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Sample records for standard clinical assessment

  1. Standardized Patients Provide a Reliable Assessment of Athletic Training Students' Clinical Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kirk J.; Jarriel, Amanda J.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Providing students reliable objective feedback regarding their clinical performance is of great value for ongoing clinical skill assessment. Since a standardized patient (SP) is trained to consistently portray the case, students can be assessed and receive immediate feedback within the same clinical encounter; however, no research, to our…

  2. Establishment of quality assessment standard for mammographic equipment: evaluation of phantom and clinical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Hoon; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Chung, Soo Young

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a quality standard for mammographic equipment Korea and to eventually improve mammographic quality in clinics and hospitals throughout Korea by educating technicians and clinic personnel. For the phantom test and on site assessment, we visited 37 sites and examined 43 sets of mammographic equipment. Items that were examined include phantom test, radiation dose measurement, developer assessment, etc. The phantom images were assessed visually and by optical density measurements. For the clinical image assessment, clinical images from 371 sites were examined following the new Korean standard for clinical image evaluation. The items examined include labeling, positioning, contrast, exposure, artifacts, collimation among others. Quality standard of mammographic equipment was satisfied in all equipment on site visits. Average mean glandular dose was 114.9 mRad. All phantom image test scores were over 10 points (average, 10.8 points). However, optical density measurements were below 1.2 in 9 sets of equipment (20.9%). Clinical image evaluation revealed appropriate image quality in 83.5%, while images from non-radiologist clinics were adequate in 74.6% (91/122), which was the lowest score of any group. Images were satisfactory in 59.0% (219/371) based on evaluation by specialists following the new Korean standard for clinical image evaluation. Satisfactory images had a mean score of 81.7 (1 S.D. =8.9) and unsatisfactory images had a mean score of 61.9 (1 S.D = 11). The correlation coefficient between the two observers was 0.93 (ρ < 0.01) in 49 consecutive cases. The results of the phantom tests suggest that optical density measurements should be performed as part of a new quality standard for mammographic equipment. The new clinical evaluation criteria that was used in this study can be implemented with some modifications for future mammography quality control by the Korean government

  3. Clinical evaluation in advanced practice nursing education: using standardized patients in Health Assessment.

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    Gibbons, Susanne W; Adamo, Graceanne; Padden, Diane; Ricciardi, Richard; Graziano, Marjorie; Levine, Eugene; Hawkins, Richard

    2002-05-01

    Clinical education is critically important because competency in practice ultimately will determine the future of advanced practice nursing. Skills taught in Health Assessment, the first in a series of clinical courses, exposed students to tools that form the basis on which other competencies are built. The availability of standardized patients, people who participate in enacting a simulated but seemingly "real life" clinical encounter in a realistic clinical setting for the benefit of student learning and/or evaluation, made this instructional development project possible. The underlying assumption of this project was that clinical advanced practice nursing student education is enhanced by using an authentic clinical environment, known as a simulation center, with standardized patients and by using one or more evaluation techniques with multiple evaluators (i.e., peer, self, faculty, standardized patient). The student clinical experience was expected to improve and overall learning to increase by this method. This improvement was reflected at the end-of-course evaluations and in the quality of the final videotaped physical examination, which was superior to previous years. Student and faculty satisfaction with this teaching-learning process exceeded all expectations.

  4. Clinically significant discrepancies between sleep problems assessed by standard clinical tools and actigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjersti Marie Blytt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sleep disturbances are widespread among nursing home (NH patients and associated with numerous negative consequences. Identifying and treating them should therefore be of high clinical priority. No prior studies have investigated the degree to which sleep disturbances as detected by actigraphy and by the sleep-related items in the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory – Nursing Home version (NPI-NH provide comparable results. Such knowledge is highly needed, since both questionnaires are used in clinical settings and studies use the NPI-NH sleep item to measure sleep disturbances. For this reason, insight into their relative (disadvantages is valuable. Method Cross-sectional study of 83 NH patients. Sleep was objectively measured with actigraphy for 7 days, and rated by NH staff with the sleep items in the CSDD and the NPI-NH, and results were compared. McNemar's tests were conducted to investigate whether there were significant differences between the pairs of relevant measures. Cohen's Kappa tests were used to investigate the degree of agreement between the pairs of relevant actigraphy, NPI-NH and CSDD measures. Sensitivity and specificity analyses were conducted for each of the pairs, and receiver operating characteristics (ROC curves were designed as a plot of the true positive rate against the false positive rate for the diagnostic test. Results Proxy-raters reported sleep disturbances in 20.5% of patients assessed with NPI-NH and 18.1% (difficulty falling asleep, 43.4% (multiple awakenings and 3.6% (early morning awakenings of patients had sleep disturbances assessed with CSDD. Our results showed significant differences (p<0.001 between actigraphy measures and proxy-rated sleep by the NPI-NH and CSDD. Sensitivity and specificity analyses supported these results. Conclusions Compared to actigraphy, proxy-raters clearly underreported NH patients' sleep disturbances as assessed

  5. Resource utilization after introduction of a standardized clinical assessment and management plan.

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    Friedman, Kevin G; Rathod, Rahul H; Farias, Michael; Graham, Dionne; Powell, Andrew J; Fulton, David R; Newburger, Jane W; Colan, Steven D; Jenkins, Kathy J; Lock, James E

    2010-01-01

    A Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plan (SCAMP) is a novel quality improvement initiative that standardizes the assessment and management of all patients who carry a predefined diagnosis. Based on periodic review of systemically collected data the SCAMP is designed to be modified to improve its own algorithm. One of the objectives of a SCAMP is to identify and reduce resource utilization and patient care costs. We retrospectively reviewed resource utilization in the first 93 arterial switch operation (ASO) SCAMP patients and 186 age-matched control ASO patients. We compared diagnostic and laboratory testing obtained at the initial SCAMP clinic visit and control patient visits. To evaluate the effect of the SCAMP over time, the number of clinic visits per patient year and echocardiograms per patient year in historical control ASO patients were compared to the projected rates for ASO SCAMP participants. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), stress echocardiogram, and lipid profile utilization were higher in the initial SCAMP clinic visit group than in age-matched control patients. Total echocardiogram and lung scan usage were similar. Chest X-ray and exercise stress testing were obtained less in SCAMP patients. ASO SCAMP patients are projected to have 0.5 clinic visits and 0.5 echocardiograms per year. Historical control patients had more clinic visits (1.2 vs. 0.5 visits/patient year, P<.01) and a higher echocardiogram rate (0.92 vs. 0.5 echocardiograms/patient year, P<.01) Implementation of a SCAMP may initially lead to increased resource utilization, but over time resource utilization is projected to decrease.

  6. Implementation of a Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plan (SCAMP) for Food Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simberloff, Tander; Parambi, Ron; Bartnikas, Lisa M; Broyles, Ana Dioun; Hamel, Victoria; Timmons, Karol G; Miller, D Marlowe; Graham, Dionne A; Schneider, Lynda C; MacGinnitie, Andrew J

    Oral food challenges (OFCs) are routinely used to confirm ongoing food allergy. Serum-specific IgE (sIgE) and skin prick testing (SPT) are imperfect predictors of which patients will pass OFCs. The objective of this study was to describe the design and implementation of a Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plan (SCAMP) to study and iteratively improve sIgE and SPT thresholds to determine when and where to conduct OFCs for patients. Allergists consulted recommended sIgE and SPT thresholds when ordering challenges although diversions were permitted. Criteria were iteratively improved after periodic analyses of challenge outcome and diversions. Over 3 years, allergists ordered 2368 food challenges for 1580 patients with histories of IgE-mediated reactions to food: 1386 in an outpatient clinic and 945 in a higher resource infusion center. Reactions to challenge were observed in 13% of clinic and 23% of infusion center challenges. Six patients challenged in clinic required treatment with epinephrine compared with 22 in the infusion center. The need for epinephrine was more common in patients with asthma-5% of asthmatic patients required epinephrine compared with 1% of nonasthmatic patients (P challenges ordered in the higher resource location. By setting and continually refining sIgE and SPT recommendations using the SCAMP method, allergists can better determine the risk of severe reaction and triage patients to the appropriate setting for an OFC. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Resource reduction in pediatric chest pain: Standardized clinical assessment and management plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleeb, Susan F; McLaughlin, Sarah R; Graham, Dionne A; Friedman, Kevin G; Fulton, David R

    2018-01-01

    Using a Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plan (SCAMP) for pediatric patients presenting to clinic with chest pain, we evaluated the cost impact associated with implementation of the care algorithm. Prior to introduction of the SCAMP, we analyzed charges for 406 patients with chest pain, seen in 2009, and predicted 21% reduction of overall charges had the SCAMP methodology been used. The SCAMP recommended an echocardiogram for history, examination, or ECG findings suggestive of a cardiac etiology for chest pain. Resource utilization was reviewed for 1517 patients (7-21 years) enrolled in the SCAMP from July 2010 to April 2014. Compared to the 2009 historic cohort, patients evaluated by the SCAMP had higher rates of exertional chest pain (45% vs 37%) and positive family history (5% vs 1%). The SCAMP cohort had fewer abnormal physical examination findings (1% vs 6%) and abnormal electrocardiograms (3% vs 5%). Echocardiogram use increased in the SCAMP cohort compared to the 2009 historic cohort (45% vs 41%), whereas all other ancillary testing was reduced: exercise stress testing (4% SCAMP vs 28% historic), Holter (4% vs 7%), event monitors (3% vs 10%), and MRI (1% vs 2%). Total charges were reduced by 22% ($822 625) by use of the Chest Pain SCAMP, despite a higher percentage of patients for whom echocardiogram was recommended compared to the historic cohort. The Chest Pain SCAMP effectively streamlines cardiac testing and reduces resource utilization. Further reductions can be made by algorithm refinement regarding echocardiograms for exertional symptoms. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Identification of dementia using standard clinical assessments by primary care physicians in Japan.

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    Noda, Hiroyuki; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Ikeda, Ai; Asada, Takashi; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2018-01-16

    The aim of the present study was to develop a way of identifying dementia using clinical assessments made by primary care physicians under the existing medical care system in Japan. A total of 623 people aged ≥65 years underwent standard clinical assessments by primary care physicians under the long-term-care insurance program to determine their grade of activities of daily living related to dementia. To examine the validity of the diagnosis, neuropsychiatrists carried out further diagnosis of dementia for all the participants. We regarded the dementia patients who received care for disability under the long-term care insurance program as having disabling dementia. Multivariable odds ratio (95% confidence interval) in single-grade increments of the activity was 2.1 (1.7-2.5) for dementia and 2.8 (2.2-3.4) for disabling dementia. The grades ≥I and ≥IIa were near the upper-left corner in the receiver operating characteristic curves. Setting the cut-off point at grades ≥I or ≥IIa yielded a higher integrated discrimination improvement, suggesting a major improvement in reducing misclassification by using these cut-off points. When we used grades ≥I as the cut-off point, the sensitivity (95% confidence limits) was 65% (58-72%) and the specificity was 93% (91-96%) for dementia, and the corresponding values in grades ≥IIa were 54% (47-62%) and 96% (94-97%). The corresponding values for disabling dementia were 83% (76-90%), 92% (90-95%), 73% (65-80%) and 96% (94-97%). Our findings suggest that selection of grades ≥I or ≥IIa as the cut-off point would reduce instances of misclassification in the identification of dementia and disabling dementia. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; ••: ••-••. © 2018 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  9. Incidence of unanticipated difficult airway using an objective airway score versus a standard clinical airway assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Anders Kehlet; Rosenstock, Charlotte Valentin; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    -specific assessment. Data from patients' pre-operative airway assessment are registered in the Danish Anaesthesia Database. Objective scores for intubation and mask ventilation grade the severity of airway managements. The accuracy of predicting difficult intubation and mask ventilation is measured for each group...... the examination and registration of predictors for difficult mask ventilation with a non-specified clinical airway assessment on prediction of difficult mask ventilation.Method/Design: We cluster-randomized 28 Danish departments of anaesthesia to airway assessment either by the SARI or by usual non...... that registration of the SARI and predictors for difficult mask ventilation are mandatory for the intervention group but invisible to controls....

  10. Regional Implementation of a Pediatric Cardiology Syncope Algorithm Using Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPS) Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Paris, Yvonne; Toro?Salazar, Olga H.; Gauthier, Naomi S.; Rotondo, Kathleen M.; Arnold, Lucy; Hamershock, Rose; Saudek, David E.; Fulton, David R.; Renaud, Ashley; Alexander, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pediatric syncope is common. Cardiac causes are rarely found. We describe and assess a pragmatic approach to these patients first seen by a pediatric cardiologist in the New England region, using Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPs). Methods and Results: Ambulatory patients aged 7 to 21 years initially seen for syncope at participating New England Congenital Cardiology Association practices over a 2.5‐year period were evaluated using a SCAMP. Findings wer...

  11. Standardizing data exchange for clinical research protocols and case report forms: An assessment of the suitability of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Vojtech; Sastry, Chandan; Breymaier, Matthew; Idriss, Asma; Cimino, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient communication of a clinical study protocol and case report forms during all stages of a human clinical study is important for many stakeholders. An electronic and structured study representation format that can be used throughout the whole study life-span can improve such communication and potentially lower total study costs. The most relevant standard for representing clinical study data, applicable to unregulated as well as regulated studies, is the Operational Data Model (ODM) in development since 1999 by the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC). ODM's initial objective was exchange of case report forms data but it is increasingly utilized in other contexts. An ODM extension called Study Design Model, introduced in 2011, provides additional protocol representation elements. Using a case study approach, we evaluated ODM's ability to capture all necessary protocol elements during a complete clinical study lifecycle in the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health. ODM offers the advantage of a single format for institutions that deal with hundreds or thousands of concurrent clinical studies and maintain a data warehouse for these studies. For each study stage, we present a list of gaps in the ODM standard and identify necessary vendor or institutional extensions that can compensate for such gaps. The current version of ODM (1.3.2) has only partial support for study protocol and study registration data mainly because it is outside the original development goal. ODM provides comprehensive support for representation of case report forms (in both the design stage and with patient level data). Inclusion of requirements of observational, non-regulated or investigator-initiated studies (outside Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation) can further improve future revisions of the standard. PMID:26188274

  12. Standardizing data exchange for clinical research protocols and case report forms: An assessment of the suitability of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Vojtech; Sastry, Chandan; Breymaier, Matthew; Idriss, Asma; Cimino, James J

    2015-10-01

    Efficient communication of a clinical study protocol and case report forms during all stages of a human clinical study is important for many stakeholders. An electronic and structured study representation format that can be used throughout the whole study life-span can improve such communication and potentially lower total study costs. The most relevant standard for representing clinical study data, applicable to unregulated as well as regulated studies, is the Operational Data Model (ODM) in development since 1999 by the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC). ODM's initial objective was exchange of case report forms data but it is increasingly utilized in other contexts. An ODM extension called Study Design Model, introduced in 2011, provides additional protocol representation elements. Using a case study approach, we evaluated ODM's ability to capture all necessary protocol elements during a complete clinical study lifecycle in the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health. ODM offers the advantage of a single format for institutions that deal with hundreds or thousands of concurrent clinical studies and maintain a data warehouse for these studies. For each study stage, we present a list of gaps in the ODM standard and identify necessary vendor or institutional extensions that can compensate for such gaps. The current version of ODM (1.3.2) has only partial support for study protocol and study registration data mainly because it is outside the original development goal. ODM provides comprehensive support for representation of case report forms (in both the design stage and with patient level data). Inclusion of requirements of observational, non-regulated or investigator-initiated studies (outside Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation) can further improve future revisions of the standard. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Assessment of Measurement Tools of Observation Rate of Nursing Handover Standards in Clinical Wards of Hospital

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    Saadi Amini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives : In health centers, clinical information of patient is transferred among care staffs regularly. One of the common cases in information transferring is during the time of nurses’ handover in hospital which performing it correctly will help schedule patient care, providing safety and facilitating exact transferring of information. The aim of this study is investigating validity and reliability of assessment of observance rate of shift handover in clinical wards checklist. Material and Methods : In order to determine the reliability of checklist, two experts panel meetings were held with the presence of 10 experts in clinical field that in those meetings the reliability was investigated with discussion and consensus of participants. Checklist validity was investigated through pilot study in 4 wards of 4 hospitals and calculated by Kronbach- alpha method with 28 cases of shifts handover in morning, noon, and night shift. Results : In studying reliability, the primary checklist was divided into two checklists: patient handover, equipments and ward handover that included 27 and 72 items, respectively. The reliability of patient handover checklist was verified with 0.9155 Kronbach-alpha and that of equipments and ward handover was verified with 0.8779 Kronbach-alpha. Conclusion : Verifying checklists by mentioned scientific and statistical methods showed that these are very powerful instruments that can be used as one of the assessment tools of shift handover in clinical wards to be used towards promoting received services by customers of healthcare system.

  14. Assessing the reliability of the borderline regression method as a standard setting procedure for objective structured clinical examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Mortaz Hejri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the methods used for standard setting is the borderline regression method (BRM. This study aims to assess the reliability of BRM when the pass-fail standard in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE was calculated by averaging the BRM standards obtained for each station separately. Materials and Methods: In nine stations of the OSCE with direct observation the examiners gave each student a checklist score and a global score. Using a linear regression model for each station, we calculated the checklist score cut-off on the regression equation for the global scale cut-off set at 2. The OSCE pass-fail standard was defined as the average of all station′s standard. To determine the reliability, the root mean square error (RMSE was calculated. The R2 coefficient and the inter-grade discrimination were calculated to assess the quality of OSCE. Results: The mean total test score was 60.78. The OSCE pass-fail standard and its RMSE were 47.37 and 0.55, respectively. The R2 coefficients ranged from 0.44 to 0.79. The inter-grade discrimination score varied greatly among stations. Conclusion: The RMSE of the standard was very small indicating that BRM is a reliable method of setting standard for OSCE, which has the advantage of providing data for quality assurance.

  15. A comparison of two standard-setting approaches in high-stakes clinical performance assessment using generalizability theory.

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    Richter Lagha, Regina A; Boscardin, Christy K; May, Win; Fung, Cha-Chi

    2012-08-01

    Scoring clinical assessments in a reliable and valid manner using criterion-referenced standards remains an important issue and directly affects decisions made regarding examinee proficiency. This generalizability study of students' clinical performance examination (CPX) scores examines the reliability of those scores and of their interpretation, particularly according to a newly introduced, "critical actions" criterion-referenced standard and scoring approach. The authors applied a generalizability framework to the performance scores of 477 third-year students attending three different medical schools in 2008. The norm-referenced standard included all station checklist items. The criterion-referenced standard included only those items deemed critical to patient care by a faculty panel. The authors calculated and compared variance components and generalizability coefficients for each standard across six common stations. Norm-referenced scores had moderate generalizability (ρ = 0.51), whereas criterion-referenced scores showed low dependability (φ = 0.20). The estimated 63% of measurement error associated with the person-by-station interaction suggests case specificity. Increasing the number of stations on the CPX from 6 to 24, an impractical solution both for cost and time, would still yield only moderate dependability (φ = 0.50). Though the performance assessment of complex skills, like clinical competence, seems intrinsically valid, careful consideration of the scoring standard and approach is needed to avoid misinterpretation of proficiency. Further study is needed to determine how best to improve the reliability of criterion-referenced scores, by implementing changes to the examination structure, the process of standard-setting, or both.

  16. Clinical balance assessment: perceptions of commonly-used standardized measures and current practices among physiotherapists in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Kathryn M; Straus, Sharon E; Inness, Elizabeth L; Salbach, Nancy M; Jaglal, Susan B

    2013-03-20

    Balance impairment is common in multiple clinical populations, and comprehensive assessment is important for identifying impairments, planning individualized treatment programs, and evaluating change over time. However, little information is available regarding whether clinicians who treat balance are satisfied with existing assessment tools. In 2010 we conducted a cross-sectional survey of balance assessment practices among physiotherapists in Ontario, Canada, and reported on the use of standardized balance measures (Sibley et al. 2011 Physical Therapy; 91: 1583-91). The purpose of this study was to analyse additional survey data and i) evaluate satisfaction with current balance assessment practices and standardized measures among physiotherapists who treat adult or geriatric populations with balance impairment, and ii) identify factors associated with satisfaction. The questionnaire was distributed to 1000 practicing physiotherapists. This analysis focuses on questions in which respondents were asked to rate their general perceptions about balance assessment, the perceived utility of individual standardized balance measures, whether they wanted to improve balance assessment practices, and why. Data were summarized with descriptive statistics and utility of individual measures was compared across clinical practice areas (orthopaedic, neurological, geriatric or general rehabilitation). The questionnaire was completed by 369 respondents, of which 43.4% of respondents agreed that existing standardized measures of balance meet their needs. In ratings of individual measures, the Single Leg Stance test and Berg Balance Scale were perceived as useful for clinical decision-making and evaluating change over time by over 70% of respondents, and the Timed Up-and-Go test was perceived as useful for decision-making by 56.9% of respondents and useful for evaluating change over time by 62.9% of respondents, but there were significant differences across practice groups. Seventy

  17. Impact of standardized clinical assessment and management plans on resource utilization and costs in children after the arterial switch operation.

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    Rathod, Rahul H; Jurgen, Brittney; Hamershock, Rose A; Friedman, Kevin G; Marshall, Audrey C; Samnaliev, Mihail; Graham, Dionne A; Jenkins, Kathy; Lock, James E; Powell, Andrew J

    2017-12-01

    Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPs) are a quality improvement initiative designed to reduce unnecessary utilization, decrease practice variation, and improve patient outcomes. We created a novel methodology, the SCAMP managed episode of care (SMEOC), which encompasses multiple encounters to assess the impact of the arterial switch operation (ASO) SCAMP on total costs. All ASO SCAMP patients (dates March 2009 to July 2015) were compared to a control group of ASO patients (January 2001 to February 2009). Patients were divided into "younger" (stress tests (P = .01), and a 14% total reduction in costs. The total cost savings of the ASO SCAMP was $216 649 in the first 6 years of the SCAMP. There was no difference in clinical outcomes between the historical and SCAMP cohorts. SCAMPs can improve resource utilization and reduce costs after the ASO operation while maintaining quality of care. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Value of standard personality assessments in informing clinical decision - making in a medium secure unit.

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    Duggan, Conor; Mason, Lauren; Banerjee, Penny; Milton, John

    2007-05-01

    Assessing those with personality disorder for treatment in secure settings is known to be unsatisfactory. To examine the utility of a standardised assessment of offenders with personality disorder referred for treatment in secure care in a naturalistic study. A consecutive series of 89 men were assessed with a battery of four recommended instruments measuring personality and risk. Decisions on whether or not to admit were based on a multidisciplinary discussion informed by these assessments. Of the 89 comprehensively assessed referrals, 60 (67%) were offered admission. High scores on the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (especially on Factor 1) was the only measure that was associated with rejection. Of 44 patients discharged, 29 (66%) failed to complete treatment; none of the pre-admission assessments distinguished ;completers' from ;non-completers'. Although skills were acquired on the unit, follow-up of 24 men in the community showed that this had only a marginal effect on re-offending rate (58%). Current recommended assessment methods appear unsatisfactory in identifying those who either (a) complete treatment or (b) benefit from treatment. Our results throw doubt on their value.

  19. Routine administration of standardized questionnaires that assess aspects of patients quality of life in medical oncology clinics: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsaleh, Kh.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Increasing interest in the Quality of Life outcomes in cancer patients led to increase implementation of their use in routine clinical practice. The aim of this systemic review is to review the scientific evidence behind recommending the use of quality of life (QoL) scales routinely in outpatient evaluation. Methods: Systematic review for all published randomized controlled trials in English language between January 1, 1990 till December 31, 2012. Out of 487 articles (476 identified by electronic search + 11 articles identified by manual search), six trials satisfied the eligibility criteria: (1) the study was a randomized controlled trial (RCT) with randomization of patients or health care providers; (2) the findings of the administered questionnaire or scale (the intervention) were given to health care provider, and compared to standard care with no questionnaire administered (the control); (3) study was conducted in outpatient oncology clinics; and (4) an outcome was measured that related to (i) QoL improvement, (ii) reduction in morbidity, (iii) reduction in stress for the patients, (iv) improvement in communication between patients and health care provider, or (v) improved patient satisfaction. Assessment for the quality of the study was done using the GRADE methodology. Results: Serious methodological issues were affecting most of the trials. Overall the evaluation of the quality of the evidence from these identified trials suggests that there is a weak recommendation to use QoL scales in routine oncology practice to improve communication between physicians and patients. Conclusion: The routine use of such tools in the outpatient settings at improving the patient outcome or satisfaction cannot be recommended based on the available evidence. The potential harm with the excess use of resources needed to implement, collect, store, analyse, and present such data to health care providers should be also considered. Further research and better designed

  20. Regional Implementation of a Pediatric Cardiology Syncope Algorithm Using Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPS) Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Yvonne; Toro-Salazar, Olga H; Gauthier, Naomi S; Rotondo, Kathleen M; Arnold, Lucy; Hamershock, Rose; Saudek, David E; Fulton, David R; Renaud, Ashley; Alexander, Mark E

    2016-02-19

    Pediatric syncope is common. Cardiac causes are rarely found. We describe and assess a pragmatic approach to these patients first seen by a pediatric cardiologist in the New England region, using Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPs). Ambulatory patients aged 7 to 21 years initially seen for syncope at participating New England Congenital Cardiology Association practices over a 2.5-year period were evaluated using a SCAMP. Findings were iteratively analyzed and the care pathway was revised. The vast majority (85%) of the 1254 patients had typical syncope. A minority had exercise-related or more problematic symptoms. Guideline-defined testing identified one patient with cardiac syncope. Syncope Severity Scores correlated well between physician and patient perceived symptoms. Orthostatic vital signs were of limited use. Largely incidental findings were seen in 10% of ECGs and 11% of echocardiograms. The 10% returning for follow-up, by design, reported more significant symptoms, but did not have newly recognized cardiac disease. Iterative analysis helped refine the approach. SCAMP methodology confirmed that the vast majority of children referred to the outpatient pediatric cardiology setting had typical low-severity neurally mediated syncope that could be effectively evaluated in a single visit using minimal resources. A simple scoring system can help triage patients into treatment categories. Prespecified criteria permitted the effective diagnosis of the single patient with a clear cardiac etiology. Patients with higher syncope scores still have a very low risk of cardiac disease, but may warrant attention. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  1. QUEST-RA: quantitative clinical assessment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis seen in standard rheumatology care in 15 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Kautiainen, Hannu; Toloza, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a cross-sectional review of non-selected consecutive outpatients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as part of standard clinical care in 15 countries for an overview of the characteristics of patients with RA. METHODS: The review included current disease activity using data from...

  2. Clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The technological progress that is currently being witnessed in the areas of diagnostic imaging, treatment planning systems and therapeutic equipment has caused radiotherapy to become a high-tech and interdisciplinary domain involving staff of various backgrounds. This allows steady improvement in therapy results, but at the same time makes the diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic processes more complex and complicated, requiring every stage of those processes to be planned, organized, controlled and improved so as to assure high quality of services provided. The aim of this paper is to present clinical quality standards for radiotherapy as developed by the author. Material and methods In order to develop the quality standards, a comparative analysis was performed between European and Polish legal acts adopted in the period of 1980-2006 and the universal industrial ISO 9001:2008 standard, defining requirements for quality management systems, and relevant articles published in 1984-2009 were reviewed, including applicable guidelines and recommendations of American, international, European and Polish bodies, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) on quality assurance and management in radiotherapy. Results As a result, 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: 1 – organizational standards; 2 – physico-technical standards and 3 – clinical standards. Conclusion Proposed clinical quality standards for radiotherapy can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical purposes. However, standards are of value only if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved, and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:23788854

  3. Can standardized diagnostic assessment be a useful adjunct to clinical assessment in child mental health services? A randomized controlled trial of disclosure of the Development and Well-Being Assessment to practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Tamsin; Last, Anna; Henley, William; Norman, Shelley; Guglani, Sacha; Kelesidi, Katerina; Martin, Anne-Marie; Moran, Pippa; Latham-Cork, Harriett; Goodman, Robert

    2013-04-01

    While research demands standardized diagnostic assessments as an indication of sufficient methodological rigour, there is debate about their application to clinical practice. The Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) provides a structured assessment of psychiatric disorder. Since it can be completed on-line, it could be used by Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services with few additional demands on staff. Access to the standardized diagnostic information as an adjunct to clinical assessment could reduce the number of appointments spent on assessment, free up practitioner time to work on engagement and improve clinical outcomes by increasing the accuracy of assessment and thus access to the appropriate evidence-based treatment. Randomized controlled trial of the disclosure of the DAWBA to the assessing practitioner (n = 117) versus assessment at normal (n = 118) and analysed by "intention to disclose". Exposure to the DAWBA may increase agreement between the DAWBA and practitioners about some anxiety disorders, but detected no other statistically significant increased agreement for other disorders, nor a reduced need for further assessment, the number of difficulties recognised or influence on outcomes. The results may be explained by the inadequacy of the DAWBA, lack of statistical power to detect any effects that were present or a reluctance of some practitioners to use the DAWBA in their assessment. Future research might benefit from exploring the use of the DAWBA or similar assessments as a referral rather than an assessment tool, and exploring how practitioners and parents experience and use the DAWBA and what training might optimise the utility of the DAWBA to clinical practice.

  4. MR imaging of the articular cartilage of the knee with arthroscopy as gold standard: assessment of methodological quality of clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, Florence; Berg, Bruno C. vande

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the methodological quality of articles addressing the value of MR imaging of the knee cartilage with arthroscopy as a standard. Relevant papers were selected after Medline review (MEDLINE database search including the terms ''cartilage'' ''knee'', ''MR'' and ''arthroscopy''). Two observers reviewed independently 29 selected articles to determine how each study had met 15 individual standards that had been previously developed to assess the methodological quality of clinical investigations. The following criteria were met in variable percentage of articles including adequate definition of purpose (100%), statistical analysis (90%), avoidance of verification bias (86%), patient population description (83%), reference standard (79%), review bias (79%), study design (66%), inclusion criteria (41%) and method of analysis (41.5%), avoidance of diagnostic-review bias (24%), exclusion criteria (21%), indeterminate examination results (17%), analysis criteria (14%), interobserver reliability (14%) and intraobserver reliability (7%). The assessment of the methodological quality of clinical investigations addressing the value of MR imaging in the evaluation of the articular cartilage of the knee with arthroscopy as the standard of reference demonstrated that several standards were rarely met in the literature. Efforts should be made to rely on clearly defined lesion criteria and to determine reliability of the observations. (orig.)

  5. The development of an ICF-based clinical guideline and screening tool for the standardized assessment and evaluation of functioning after head and neck cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisser, Ulrich; Adderson-Kisser, Christine; Coenen, Michaela; Stier-Jarmer, Marita; Becker, Sven; Sabariego, Carla; Harréus, Ulrich

    2017-02-01

    The assessment and evaluation of functioning and quality of life after tumor treatment in head and neck cancer (HNC) are considered as essential aspects of clinical routine and studies. A huge number of instruments are available that have been designed to evaluate functioning and quality of life after HNC treatment. The diversity of these instruments in terms of content, response options and administration hinders the comparability of available studies and the performance of meta-analyses. The objective of this paper is to inform about the development of a screening tool for the standardized assessment and evaluation of functioning based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Set for HNC. We followed a multi-step approach including (1) preparatory studies to identify and preselect suitable instruments for the assessment of functioning, (2) a decision-making process to agree on an ICF-based clinical guideline including instruments assessing functioning and (3) the development of a computer-based standardized screening tool to assess and evaluate functioning based on this guideline in clinical routine. Twenty-one experts participated in a consensus meeting and decided on instruments to be included in an ICF-based clinical guideline and screening tool for the assessment and evaluation of functioning in HNC patients in cancer treatment. The chosen instruments cover all aspects of the ICF Core Set for HNC addressing therapy control, pain, food intake/swallowing, voice/speech/breathing, other somatic complaints and psychosocial aspects. The screening tool contains patient-reported outcome measures and a clinician's checklist. It has to be further tested in clinical practice.

  6. Verbal communication of students with high patient-physician interaction scores in a clinical performance examination assessed by standardized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, HyeRin; Park, Kyung Hye; Park, Song Yi

    2017-12-01

    Standardized patients (SPs) tend to rate medical students' communication skills subjectively and comprehensively, in contrast to such objective skill set defined in the clinical performance examination (CPX). Meanwhile, medical school instructors have a different approach in their evaluation of students' communication skills. We aim to analyze medical students' verbal communication skills using objective methods, and to determine the contributing factors of a patient-physician interaction (PPI) score. Students with high- and low-ranking scores for PPI in CPX were selected. The Roter interaction analysis system was used to compare verbal communication behaviors of the students and SPs. Patient-centeredness scores (PCSs), physician's verbal dominance, and number of utterances were compared between the two groups. PCSs and physician's verbal dominance had no difference between the groups. The number of utterances during the limited time of 5 minutes of CPX was higher for the high-ranking students. They tended to employ more paraphrase/check for understanding, and closed questions for psychosocial state and open questions for medical condition. The SPs interviewed by high-ranking students gave more medical information and requested for more services. In the case of the routine checkup, smooth conversations with more frequent utterances were detected in the high-ranking students. More medical information exchange and requests for services by SPs were higher for the high-ranking students. Medical communication instructors should keep in mind that our results could be indicators of a high PPI score.

  7. DOE limited standard: Operations assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    Purpose of this standard is to provide DOE Field Element assessors with a guide for conducting operations assessments, and provide DOE Field Element managers with the criteria of the EM Operations Assessment Program. Sections 6.1 to 6.21 provide examples of how to assess specific areas; the general techniques of operations assessments (Section 5) may be applied to other areas of health and safety (e.g. fire protection, criticality safety, quality assurance, occupational safety, etc.).

  8. Inconsistent trial assessments by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence and IQWiG: standards for the performance and interpretation of subgroup analyses are needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasford, J; Bramlage, P; Koch, G; Lehmacher, W; Einhäupl, K; Rothwell, P M

    2010-12-01

    The methodology for the critical assessment of medical interventions is well established. Regulatory agencies and institutions adhere, in principle, to the same standards. This consistency, however, is not always the case in practice. Using the evaluation of the CAPRIE (Clopidogrel versus Aspirin in Patients at risk of Ischemic Events) trial by the British National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) and the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG), we illustrate that there was no consensus for the interpretation of possible heterogeneity in treatment comparisons across subgroups. The NICE concluded that CAPRIE demonstrated clinical benefit for the overall intention-to-treat (ITT) population with sufficient robustness to possible sources of heterogeneity. The IQWiG interpreted the alleged heterogeneity as implying that the clinical benefit only applied to the subgroup of patients with a statistically significant result irrespective of the results of the ITT analysis. International standards for the performance and interpretation of subgroup analyses as well as for the assessment of heterogeneity between strata are needed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Classification and clinical assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cantini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There are at least nine classification criteria for psoriatic arthritis (PsA that have been proposed and used in clinical studies. With the exception of the ESSG and Bennett rules, all of the other criteria sets have a good performance in identifying PsA patients. As the CASPAR criteria are based on a robust study methodology, they are considered the current reference standard. However, if there seems to be no doubt that they are very good to classify PsA patients (very high specificity, they might be not sensitive enough to diagnose patients with unknown early PsA. The vast clinical heterogeneity of PsA makes its assessment very challenging. Peripheral joint involvement is measured by 78/76 joint counts, spine involvement by the instruments used for ankylosing spondylitis (AS, dactylitis by involved digit count or by the Leeds dactylitis index, enthesitis by the number of affected entheses (several indices available and psoriasis by the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI. Peripheral joint damage can be assessed by a modified van der Heijde-Sharp scoring system and axial damage by the methods used for AS or by the Psoriatic Arthritis Spondylitis Radiology Index (PASRI. As in other arthritides, global evaluation of disease activity and severity by patient and physician and assessment of disability and quality of life are widely used. Finally, composite indices that capture several clinical manifestations of PsA have been proposed and a new instrument, the Psoriatic ARthritis Disease Activity Score (PASDAS, is currently being developed.

  10. QUEST-RA: quantitative clinical assessment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis seen in standard rheumatology care in 15 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Kautiainen, Hannu; Toloza, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    ) within and between countries was graphically analysed. A median regression model was applied to analyse differences in disease activity between countries. RESULTS: Between January 2005 and October 2006, the QUEST-RA (Quantitative Patient Questionnaires in Standard Monitoring of Patients with Rheumatoid...

  11. Impact assessment of commodity standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruben, Ruerd

    2017-01-01

    Voluntary commodity standards are widely used to enhance the performance of tropical agro-food chains and to support the welfare and sustainability of smallholder farmers. Different methods and approaches are used to assess the effectiveness and impact of these certification schemes at

  12. Raising standards in clinical research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohmann, C.; Canham, S.; Demotes, J.

    2017-01-01

    The nature and the purpose of the ECRIN Data Centre Certification Programme are summarised, and a very brief description is given of the underlying standards (129 in total, divided into 19 separate lists). The certification activity performed so far is described. In a pilot phase 2 centres were c...

  13. Standards and measurements for assessing bone health-workshop report co-sponsored by the International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Herbert S; Dienstfrey, Andrew; Hudson, Lawrence T; Oreskovic, Tammy; Fuerst, Thomas; Shepherd, John

    2006-01-01

    This article reports and discusses the results of the recent ISCD-NIST Workshop on Standards and Measurements for Assessing Bone Health. The purpose of the workshop was to assess the status of efforts to standardize and compare results from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans, and then to identify and prioritize ongoing measurement and standards needs.

  14. Contribution of diagnostic tests for the etiological assessment of uveitis, data from the ULISSE study (Uveitis: Clinical and medicoeconomic evaluation of a standardized strategy of the etiological diagnosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grumet, Pierre; Kodjikian, Laurent; de Parisot, Audrey; Errera, Marie-Hélène; Sedira, Neila; Heron, Emmanuel; Pérard, Laurent; Cornut, Pierre-Loïc; Schneider, Christelle; Rivière, Sophie; Ollé, Priscille; Pugnet, Grégory; Cathébras, Pascal; Manoli, Pierre; Bodaghi, Bahram; Saadoun, David; Baillif, Stéphanie; Tieulie, Nathalie; Andre, Marc; Chiambaretta, Frédéric; Bonin, Nicolas; Bielefeld, Philip; Bron, Alain; Mouriaux, Frédéric; Bienvenu, Boris; Vicente, Stéphanie; Bin, Sylvie; Labetoulle, Marc; Broussolle, Christiane; Jamilloux, Yvan; Decullier, Evelyne; Sève, Pascal

    2018-04-01

    ULISSE is the only study that prospectively assessed the efficiency of a standardized strategy, compared to an open strategy for the etiologic diagnosis of uveitis. Our aim was to evaluate the diagnostic yield of the tests prescribed in the ULISSE study to clarify their relevance. ULISSE is a non-inferiority, prospective, multicenter and cluster randomized study. The standardized strategy is a two-steps strategy: in the first step, common standard tests were performed, and in the second step, tests were guided by the clinical and anatomic type of uveitis. We reported the relevance of the diagnostic tests used in the standardized strategy, as well as the profitability of the tests that were prescribed to more than twenty patients in each group. Based on diagnostic criteria, either an ophthalmologist, or an internist, established the profitability of a test by considering whether the test lead to a diagnosis or not. Among the 676 patients included (standardized 303; open 373), a diagnosis was made for 152 (50.4%) in the standardized group and 203 (54.4%) in the open group. The most common entities were HLA-B27 associated uveitis (22%), spondyloarthritis (11%), sarcoidosis (18%), tuberculosis (10.7%) and herpes virus infections (8.5%). Among the first step's systematic tests, tuberculin skin test was the most contributive investigation (17.1%), followed by chest X-ray (8.4%), C reactive protein and ESR (6.6% and 5.1%), complete blood count (2.2%) and VDRL (2.0%). The second step's most often contributive tests were: HLA B27 (56.3%), chest-CT (30.3%) and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) (16.5%). HLA B27 and ACE were significantly more contributive in the standardized group than in the open group. Immunological tests were never contributive. Among the free investigations, or among the investigations guided by clinical or paraclinical findings, the most often contributive tests were: Quantiferon® (24%), electrophoresis of serum protein (7.8%) and sacroiliac imagery

  15. Standards for Clinical Grade Genomic Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohe, Sophia L; Carter, Alexis B; Pfeifer, John D; Crawford, James M; Cushman-Vokoun, Allison; Caughron, Samuel; Leonard, Debra G B

    2015-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing performed in a clinical environment must meet clinical standards, which requires reproducibility of all aspects of the testing. Clinical-grade genomic databases (CGGDs) are required to classify a variant and to assist in the professional interpretation of clinical next-generation sequencing. Applying quality laboratory standards to the reference databases used for sequence-variant interpretation presents a new challenge for validation and curation. To define CGGD and the categories of information contained in CGGDs and to frame recommendations for the structure and use of these databases in clinical patient care. Members of the College of American Pathologists Personalized Health Care Committee reviewed the literature and existing state of genomic databases and developed a framework for guiding CGGD development in the future. Clinical-grade genomic databases may provide different types of information. This work group defined 3 layers of information in CGGDs: clinical genomic variant repositories, genomic medical data repositories, and genomic medicine evidence databases. The layers are differentiated by the types of genomic and medical information contained and the utility in assisting with clinical interpretation of genomic variants. Clinical-grade genomic databases must meet specific standards regarding submission, curation, and retrieval of data, as well as the maintenance of privacy and security. These organizing principles for CGGDs should serve as a foundation for future development of specific standards that support the use of such databases for patient care.

  16. Setting pass scores for clinical skills assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Liu, Keh-Min

    2008-12-01

    In a clinical skills assessment, the decision to pass or fail an examinee should be based on the test content or on the examinees' performance. The process of deciding a pass score is known as setting a standard of the examination. This requires a properly selected panel of expert judges and a suitable standard setting method, which best fits the purpose of the examination. Six standard setting methods that are often used in clinical skills assessment are described to provide an overview of the standard setting process.

  17. Setting Pass Scores for Clinical Skills Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Liu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In a clinical skills assessment, the decision to pass or fail an examinee should be based on the test content or on the examinees' performance. The process of deciding a pass score is known as setting a standard of the examination. This requires a properly selected panel of expert judges and a suitable standard setting method, which best fits the purpose of the examination. Six standard setting methods that are often used in clinical skills assessment are described to provide an overview of the standard setting process.

  18. Research Notes - Openness and Evolvability - Standards Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    and Processes developed to assess system level Openness and Evolvability. The Research Notes within this report focus on Standards Assessment. 2...the standard available without an unreasonable financial burden to any vendor that wishes to access the standard ? If a cost is charged at all, the...Notes – Openness and Evolvability – Standards Assessment 3. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION (FOR UNCLASSIFIED REPORTS THAT ARE LIMITED RELEASE USE (U/L

  19. GAIA Service and Standard Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dormann, Claire; Øst, Alexander Gorm

    A delivery from the ACTS-project GAIA. The report validates the gAIA architecture and standard. It provides results concerning the deployment of distributed brokerage systems over broadband networks.......A delivery from the ACTS-project GAIA. The report validates the gAIA architecture and standard. It provides results concerning the deployment of distributed brokerage systems over broadband networks....

  20. Standardized training in nurse model travel clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofarelli, Theresa A; Ricks, Jane H; Anand, Rahul; Hale, Devon C

    2011-01-01

    International travel plays a significant role in the emergence and redistribution of major human diseases. The importance of travel medicine clinics for preventing morbidity and mortality has been increasingly appreciated, although few studies have thus far examined the management and staff training strategies that result in successful travel-clinic operations. Here, we describe an example of travel-clinic operation and management coordinated through the University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases. This program, which involves eight separate clinics distributed statewide, functions both to provide patient consult and care services, as well as medical provider training and continuing medical education (CME). Initial training, the use of standardized forms and protocols, routine chart reviews and monthly continuing education meetings are the distinguishing attributes of this program. An Infectious Disease team consisting of one medical doctor (MD) and a physician assistant (PA) act as consultants to travel nurses who comprise the majority of clinic staff. Eight clinics distributed throughout the state of Utah serve approximately 6,000 travelers a year. Pre-travel medical services are provided by 11 nurses, including 10 registered nurses (RNs) and 1 licensed practical nurse (LPN). This trained nursing staff receives continuing travel medical education and participate in the training of new providers. All nurses have completed a full training program and 7 of the 11 (64%) of clinic nursing staff serve more than 10 patients a week. Quality assurance measures show that approximately 0.5% of charts reviewed contain a vaccine or prescription error which require patient notification for correction. Using an initial training program, standardized patient intake forms, vaccine and prescription protocols, preprinted prescriptions, and regular CME, highly trained nurses at travel clinics are able to provide standardized pre-travel care to

  1. MRI assessment of myelination: an age standardization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staudt, M. (Kinderklinik Dritter Orden, Passau (Germany)); Schropp, C. (Kinderklinik Dritter Orden, Passau (Germany)); Staudt, F. (Kinderklinik Dritter Orden, Passau (Germany)); Obletter, N. (Radiologische Praxis, Klinikum Ingolstadt (Germany)); Bise, K. (Neuropathologisches Inst., Muenchen Univ. (Germany)); Breit, A. (MR Tomographie, Klinikum Passau (Germany)); Weinmann, H.M. (Kinderklinik Schwabing, Muenchen (Germany))

    1994-04-01

    777 cerebral MRI examinations of children aged 3 days to 14 years were staged for myelination to establish an age standardization. Staging was performed using a system proposed in a previous paper, separately ranking 10 different regions of the brain. Interpretation of the results led to the identification of foue clinical diagnoses that are frequently associated with delays in myelination: West syndrome, cerebral palsy, developmental retardation, and congenital anomalies. In addition, it was found that assessment of myelination in children with head injuries was not practical as alterations in MRI signal can simulate earlier stages of myelination. Age limits were therefore calculated from the case material after excluding all children with these conditions. When simplifications of the definition of the stages are applied, these age limits for the various stages of myelination of each of the 10 regions of the brain make the staging system applicable for routine assessment of myelination. (orig.)

  2. Two-Dimensional Cutting (TDC Vitrectome: In Vitro Flow Assessment and Prospective Clinical Study Evaluating Core Vitrectomy Efficiency versus Standard Vitrectome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrofanis Pavlidis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate comparative aspiration flow performance and also vitrectomy operating time efficiency using a double-cutting open port vitreous cutting system incorporated in a two-dimensional cutting (TDC, DORC International vitrectome design versus standard vitreous cutter. Methods. In vitro investigations compared aspiration flow rates in artificial vitreous humor at varying cutter speeds and vacuum levels using a TDC vitrectome and a standard vitrectome across different aspiration pump systems. A prospective single-centre clinical study evaluated duration of core vitrectomy in 80 patients with macular pucker undergoing 25-gauge or 27-gauge vitrectomy using either a TDC vitrectome at 16,000 cuts per minute (cpm or standard single-cut vitrectome, combined with a Valve Timing intelligence (VTi pump system (EVA, DORC International. Results. Aspiration flow rates remained constant independent of TDC vitrectome cut rate, while flow rates decreased linearly at higher cutter speeds using a classic single-blade vitrectome. Mean duration of core vitrectomy surgeries using a TDC vitreous cutter system was significantly (p<0.001 shorter than the mean duration of core vitrectomy procedures using a single-cut vitrectome of the same diameter (reduction range, 34%–50%. Conclusion. Vitrectomy surgery performed using a TDC vitrectome was faster than core vitrectomy utilizing a standard single-action vitrectome at similar cut speeds.

  3. Programmatic Environmental Assessment for Standard Targetry Replacement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    This Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA) evaluates potential direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts of standard targetry replacement and alternatives on environmental and land use resources...

  4. Value in Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery Health Care: the Role of Time-driven Activity-based Cost Accounting (TDABC) and Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The continuing increases in health care expenditures as well as the importance of providing safe, effective, timely, patient-centered care has brought government and commercial payer pressure on hospitals and providers to document the value of the care they deliver. This article introduces work at Boston Children's Hospital on time-driven activity-based accounting to determine cost of care delivery; combined with Systemic Clinical Assessment and Management Plans to reduce variation and improve outcomes. The focus so far has been on distal radius fracture care for children and adolescents.

  5. Clinical perceptions of radiation therapy undergraduate competency standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Mary-Ann; Bridge, Pete

    2014-12-01

    The multifactorial nature of clinical skills development makes assessment of undergraduate radiation therapist competence level by clinical mentors challenging. A recent overhaul of the clinical assessment strategy at Queensland University of Technology has moved away from the high-stakes Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) to encompass a more continuous measure of competence. This quantitative study aimed to gather stakeholder evidence to inform development of standards by which to measure student competence for a range of levels of progression. A simple anonymous questionnaire was distributed to all Queensland radiation therapists. The tool asked respondents to assign different levels of competency with a range of clinical tasks to different levels of student. All data were anonymous and was combined for analysis using Microsoft Excel. Feedback indicated good agreement with tasks that specified the amount of direction required and this has been incorporated into the new clinical achievements record that the students need to have signed off. Additional puzzling findings suggested higher expectations with planning tasks than with treatment-based tasks. The findings suggest that the amount of direction required by students is a valid indicator of their level and has been adopted into the clinical assessment scheme. Further work will build on this to further define standards of competency for undergraduates.

  6. A Novel Clinical-Simulated Suture Education for Basic Surgical Skill: Suture on the Biological Tissue Fixed on Standardized Patient Evaluated with Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (OSATS) Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhanlong; Yang, Fan; Gao, Pengji; Zeng, Li; Jiang, Guanchao; Wang, Shan; Ye, Yingjiang; Zhu, Fengxue

    2017-06-21

    Clinical-simulated training has shown benefit in the education of medical students. However, the role of clinical simulation for surgical basic skill training such as suturing techniques remains unclear. Forty-two medical students were asked to perform specific suturing tasks at three stations with the different settings within four minutes (Station 1: Synthetic suture pad fixed on the bench, Station 2: Synthetic suture pad fixed on the standardized patient, Station 3: Pig skin fixed on the standardized patient); the OSATS (Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill) tool was used to evaluate the performance of students. A questionnaire was distributed to the students following the examination. Mean performance score of Station 3 was significant lower than that of Station 1 and 2 in the general performance including tissue handling, time, and motion. The suturing techniques of students at Station 2 and 3 were not as accurate as that at Station 1. Inappropriate tension was applied to the knot at Station 2 compared with Station 1 and 3. On the questionnaire, 93% of students considered clinical-simulated training of basic surgical skills was necessary and may increase their confidence in future clinical work as surgeons; 98% of students thought the assessment was more objective when OSATS tool was used for evaluation. Clinical simulation examination assessed with OSATS might throw a novel light on the education of basic surgical skills and may be worthy of wider adoption in the surgical education of medical students.

  7. An open-label prospective clinical study to assess the efficacy of increasing levocetirizine dose up to four times in chronic spontaneous urticaria not controlled with standard dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vinod Kumar; Gupta, Vishal; Pathak, Mona; Ramam, M

    2017-09-01

    The EAACI/GA 2 LEN/EDF/WAO recommendation of increasing antihistamines' dose up to four times in urticaria not adequately controlled with the standard dose is largely based on expert opinion. The objective of this study is to test the current urticaria guidelines of up-dosing antihistamines as second-line treatment. This was an open-label study conducted prospectively on 113 patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria. All patients were treated with sequentially increasing doses of levocetrizine (5 mg, 10 mg, 15 mg and 20 mg/day) every week till the patients became completely asymptomatic or dose of 20 mg/day reached. Urticaria Activity Score (UAS)-7, urticaria-related quality-of-life (CU-Q2oL) and patients' global assessment were used to assess treatment response. Twenty-one (18.58%) patients became asymptomatic with levocetirizine 5 mg/day, while 50 required higher doses of levocetirizine for complete control: 29/92 (31.52%), 6/63 (9.52%) and 15/57 (26.31%) with 10 mg, 15 mg and 20 mg/day, respectively. The percentage of patients experiencing >75% improvement increased with increasing doses of levocetirizine: 26.54%, 53.98%, 60.17% and 69.91% with 5 mg, 10 mg, 15 mg and 20 mg/day, respectively. Sequential up-dosing of levocetirizine produced a progressive improvement in both urticaria control (UAS-7) and quality-of-life (CU-Q2oL) without significantly increasing somnolence. Our results support the current recommendations of increasing antihistamines up to four times the standard dose in patients who fail the first-line treatment.

  8. Responsive Assessment: Assessing Student Nurses' Clinical Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neary, Mary

    2001-01-01

    A study involving 300 nursing students, 155 nurse practitioners, and 80 assessors tested a model of responsive assessment that includes identification of learning needs and potential, assignment to suitable placements, continuous assessment of clinical practice and patient care, and alignment of teaching and assessment with patient needs and…

  9. Clinical performance of Siemens digital breast tomosynthesis versus standard supplementary mammography for the assessment of screen-detected soft-tissue abnormalities: a multi-reader study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelehan, P; Heywang-Köbrunner, S H; Vinnicombe, S J; Hacker, A; Jänsch, A; Hapca, A; Gray, R; Jenkin, M; Lowry, K; Oeppen, R; Reilly, M; Stahnke, M; Evans, A

    2017-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of standard screening images plus single-view digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), using Siemens DBT equipment, with standard screening images plus supplementary mammographic views in non-calcific, screen-detected mammographic abnormalities. Participants were unselected women aged 50-69 years recalled within a population-based European breast screening programme for assessment of soft-tissue mammographic abnormalities. Supplementary mammographic views (SMVs) and DBT were performed in all cases. A range of equipment was used for screening and supplementary mammography, but all DBT examinations were performed using the Siemens Mammomat Inspiration. A retrospective multi-reader study including 238 cases for whom either histology or at least 2 years' follow-up was available was performed with eight suitably accredited UK breast screening personnel reading all cases under both conditions, with temporal separation. Readers were blinded to case outcomes and findings from other examinations. Diagnostic accuracy using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was compared between screening plus SMV images and screening plus DBT images. The study was powered to detect a 3% inferiority margin in diagnostic accuracy between methods. The final sample with complete data available for analysis included 195 benign cases (1,560 reads) and 35 malignant cases (280 reads). The DBT method yielded a slightly higher area under the curve (AUC) value than the SMV method (0.870 versus 0.857), but the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.4890), indicating that the methods have equivalent accuracy. Siemens DBT demonstrates equivalent diagnostic accuracy according to ROC curve analysis when used in place of SMVs in screen-detected soft-tissue mammographic abnormalities. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. NUSS safety standards: A critical assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minogue, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    The NUSS safety standards are based on systematic review of safety criteria of many countries in a process carefully defined to assure completeness of coverage. They represent an international consensus of accepted safety principles and practices for regulation and for the design, construction, and operation of nuclear power plants. They are a codification of principles and practices already in use by some Member States. Thus, they are not standards which describe methodologies at their present state of evolution as a result of more recent experience and improvements in technological understanding. The NUSS standards assume an underlying body of national standards and a defined technological base. Detailed design and industrial practices vary between countries and the implementation of basic safety standards within countries has taken approaches that conform with national industrial practices. Thus, application of the NUSS standards requires reconciliation with the standards of the country where the reactor will be built as well as with the country from which procurement takes place. Experience in making that reconciliation will undoubtedly suggest areas of needed improvement. After the TMI accident a reassessment of the NUSS programme was made and it was concluded that, given the information at that time and the then level of technology, the basic approach was sound; the NUSS programme should be continued to completion, and the standards should be brought into use. It was also recognized, however, that in areas such as probabilistic risk assessment, human factors methodology, and consideration of detailed accident sequences, more advanced technology was emerging. As these technologies develop, and become more amenable to practical application, it is anticipated that the NUSS standards will need revision. Ideally those future revisions will also flow from experience in their use

  11. A standardized clinical evaluation of phenotypic diversity in diabetic polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Joachim; Rathmell, James P; David, William S; Chad, David A; Broderick, Alithia C; Perros, Stephen G; Shin, Naomi S; Wells, Jenna L; Davis, John B; DiMaggio, Charles J; Wang, Shuang; Tate, Simon N

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) is a major cause of neuropathic pain and a frequent target condition in analgesic treatment trials. Differences in the clinical symptoms and signs associated with DPN suggest distinct pathophysiological mechanisms underlying nerve damage and dysfunction that are likely to have therapeutic relevance. The aim of this study was to develop a tool for the bedside assessment of painful neuropathies such as DPN that captures the diversity of phenotypes. Sixty-one patients with type 2 diabetes and painful neuropathy, 19 patients with painless DPN, 25 patients with type 2 diabetes but no clinical evidence of neuropathy, and 20 healthy control subjects completed a structured interview (47 items) and a standardized physical examination (39 items). After analyzing critical features of pain and painless symptoms and examining the outcome of physical tests of sensory function, we determined principal components of the phenotypic variance among patients. Increased sensitivity to mechanical or thermal stimuli and, to a lesser extent, the sensory quality of pain or paresthesia were the most discriminating elements of DPN phenotypes. Correlation patterns of symptoms and signs indicated the involvement of functionally distinct nerve fiber populations. We combined interview questions and physical tests identifying these differences in a shortened assessment protocol that we named Standardized Evaluation of Pain and Somatosensory Function (StEPS). The protocol StEPS generates a phenotypic profile of patients with neuropathy. Separate intensity ratings for spontaneous painful symptoms and pain evoked by standard stimuli support a detailed documentation of neuropathic pain and its response to analgesic treatment.

  12. Standard concentration infusions in paediatric intensive care: the clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Joanne; Aguado-Lorenzo, Virginia; Arenas-Lopez, Sara

    2017-05-01

    The use of standard concentrations of intravenous infusions has been advocated by international organisations to increase intravenous medication safety in paediatric and neonatal critical care. However, there is no guidance on how to identify and implement these infusions leading to great interunit variability. To identify the most appropriate clinical concentrations required by our paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) population with regard to accuracy of delivery and overall fluid allowance. Firstly a matrix was used to balance the concentration, dose and infusion volume (weight range 1.5-50 kg). Results were further refined considering: patient fluid allowance based on fluid volume targets, infusion pump accuracy and challenging each infusion against clinical scenarios requiring administration of multiple drug infusions found in PICU. Consideration was given to the standard concentrations routinely used in adults, in order to assess whether alignment with paediatrics was possible for some of the concentrations proposed. Finally a risk assessment of the infusions was conducted using the NPSA 20 tool. Twenty-five drugs identified as the most commonly used intravenous infusions in the unit. For the majority of the medicines, three weight bands of standard concentrations were necessary to cover the children's weight ranges and kept within predefined fluid requirements and accuracy of delivery. This work shows a patient focused systematic approach for defining and evaluating standardised concentrations in intensive care children. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  13. Assessing the clinical probability of pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniati, M.; Pistolesi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Clinical assessment is a cornerstone of the recently validated diagnostic strategies for pulmonary embolism (PE). Although the diagnostic yield of individual symptoms, signs, and common laboratory tests is limited, the combination of these variables, either by empirical assessment or by a prediction rule, can be used to express a clinical probability of PE. The latter may serve as pretest probability to predict the probability of PE after further objective testing (posterior or post-test probability). Over the last few years, attempts have been made to develop structured prediction models for PE. In a Canadian multicenter prospective study, the clinical probability of PE was rated as low, intermediate, or high according to a model which included assessment of presenting symptoms and signs, risk factors, and presence or absence of an alternative diagnosis at least as likely as PE. Recently, a simple clinical score was developed to stratify outpatients with suspected PE into groups with low, intermediate, or high clinical probability. Logistic regression was used to predict parameters associated with PE. A score ≤ 4 identified patients with low probability of whom 10% had PE. The prevalence of PE in patients with intermediate (score 5-8) and high probability (score ≥ 9) was 38 and 81%, respectively. As opposed to the Canadian model, this clinical score is standardized. The predictor variables identified in the model, however, were derived from a database of emergency ward patients. This model may, therefore, not be valid in assessing the clinical probability of PE in inpatients. In the PISA-PED study, a clinical diagnostic algorithm was developed which rests on the identification of three relevant clinical symptoms and on their association with electrocardiographic and/or radiographic abnormalities specific for PE. Among patients who, according to the model, had been rated as having a high clinical probability, the prevalence of proven PE was 97%, while it was 3

  14. 42 CFR 493.1457 - Standard; Clinical consultant responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1457 Standard; Clinical consultant... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Clinical consultant responsibilities. 493...

  15. 42 CFR 493.1417 - Standard; Clinical consultant qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1417 Standard; Clinical consultant qualifications. The clinical consultant must be qualified to consult with and render opinions to the laboratory's... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Clinical consultant qualifications. 493...

  16. 42 CFR 493.1419 - Standard; Clinical consultant responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1419 Standard; Clinical consultant... clinical consultation to the laboratory's clients; (b) Be available to assist the laboratory's clients in... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Clinical consultant responsibilities. 493...

  17. 42 CFR 493.1455 - Standard; Clinical consultant qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1455 Standard; Clinical consultant qualifications. The clinical consultant must be qualified to consult with and render opinions to the laboratory's... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Clinical consultant qualifications. 493...

  18. Virtual glaucoma clinics: patient acceptance and quality of patient education compared to standard clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Jennifer H; Austin, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Virtual glaucoma clinics allow rapid, reliable patient assessment but the service should be acceptable to patients and concordance with treatment needs to be maintained with adequate patient education. This study compares experiences and understanding of patients reviewed via the virtual clinic versus the standard clinic by way of an extended patient satisfaction questionnaire (PSQ). One hundred PSQs were given to consecutive patients attending glaucoma clinics in October 2013. All 135 patients reviewed via the virtual clinic from April 2013 until August 2013 were sent postal PSQs in September 2013. Data were obtained for demographics, understanding of glaucoma, their condition, satisfaction with their experience, and quality of information. Responses were analyzed in conjunction with the clinical records. Eighty-five percent of clinic patients and 63% of virtual clinic patients responded to the PSQ. The mean satisfaction score was over 4.3/5 in all areas surveyed. Virtual clinic patients' understanding of their condition was very good, with 95% correctly identifying their diagnosis as glaucoma, 83% as ocular hypertension and 78% as suspects. There was no evidence to support inferior knowledge or self-perceived understanding compared to standard clinic patients. Follow-up patients knew more about glaucoma than new patients. Over 95% of patients found our information leaflet useful. Forty percent of patients sought additional information but less than 20% used the internet for this. A substantial proportion of glaucoma pathway patients may be seen by non-medical staff supervised by glaucoma specialists via virtual clinics. Patients are accepting of this format, reporting high levels of satisfaction and non-inferior knowledge to those seen in standard clinics.

  19. Virtual glaucoma clinics: patient acceptance and quality of patient education compared to standard clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Court JH

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer H Court,1 Michael W Austin1,21Department of Ophthalmology, Singleton Hospital, Swansea, Wales, UK; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Neath Port Talbot Hospital, Swansea, Wales, UKPurpose: Virtual glaucoma clinics allow rapid, reliable patient assessment but the service should be acceptable to patients and concordance with treatment needs to be maintained with adequate patient education. This study compares experiences and understanding of patients reviewed via the virtual clinic versus the standard clinic by way of an extended patient satisfaction questionnaire (PSQ.Patients and methods: One hundred PSQs were given to consecutive patients attending glaucoma clinics in October 2013. All 135 patients reviewed via the virtual clinic from April 2013 until August 2013 were sent postal PSQs in September 2013. Data were obtained for demographics, understanding of glaucoma, their condition, satisfaction with their experience, and quality of information. Responses were analyzed in conjunction with the clinical records.Results: Eighty-five percent of clinic patients and 63% of virtual clinic patients responded to the PSQ. The mean satisfaction score was over 4.3/5 in all areas surveyed. Virtual clinic patients’ understanding of their condition was very good, with 95% correctly identifying their diagnosis as glaucoma, 83% as ocular hypertension and 78% as suspects. There was no evidence to support inferior knowledge or self-perceived understanding compared to standard clinic patients. Follow-up patients knew more about glaucoma than new patients. Over 95% of patients found our information leaflet useful. Forty percent of patients sought additional information but less than 20% used the internet for this.Conclusion: A substantial proportion of glaucoma pathway patients may be seen by non-medical staff supervised by glaucoma specialists via virtual clinics. Patients are accepting of this format, reporting high levels of satisfaction and non

  20. Pediatric Chest Pain-Low-Probability Referral: A Multi-Institutional Analysis From Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPs®), the Pediatric Health Information Systems Database, and the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahsheh, Ashraf S; O'Byrne, Michael L; Pastor, Bill; Graham, Dionne A; Fulton, David R

    2017-11-01

    We conducted a study to assess test characteristics of red-flag criteria for identifying cardiac disease causing chest pain and technical charges of low-probability referrals. Accuracy of red-flag criteria was ascertained through study of chest pain Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPs®) data. Patients were divided into 2 groups: Group1 (concerning clinical elements) and Group2 (without). We compared incidence of cardiac disease causing chest pain between these 2 groups. Technical charges of Group 2 were analyzed using the Pediatric Health Information System database. Potential savings for the US population was estimated using National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data. Fifty-two percent of subjects formed Group 1. Cardiac disease causing chest pain was identified in 8/1656 (0.48%). No heart disease was identified in patients in Group 2 ( P = .03). Applying red-flags in determining need for referral identified patients with cardiac disease causing chest pain with 100% sensitivity. Median technical charges for Group 2, over a 4-year period, were US2014$775 559. Eliminating cardiac testing of low-probability referrals would save US2014$3 775 182 in technical charges annually. Red-flag criteria were an effective screen for children with chest pain. Eliminating cardiac testing in children without red-flags for referral has significant technical charge savings.

  1. Standards for psychological assessment of nuclear facility personnel. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, F.D.; Lindley, B.S.; Cohen, R.A.

    1981-07-01

    The subject of this study was the development of standards for the assessment of emotional instability in applicants for nuclear facility positions. The investigation covered all positions associated with a nuclear facility. Conclusions reached in this investigation focused on the ingredients of an integrated selection system including the use of personality tests, situational simulations, and the clinical interview; the need for professional standards to ensure quality control; the need for a uniform selection system as organizations vary considerably in terms of instruments presently used; and the need for an on-the-job behavioral observation program

  2. Standardized clinical photography: the role of flash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariello, Angelino; Viana, Giovanni André; Osaki, Midori; Pamplona, André Luis; Höfling-Lima, Ana Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Medical photographic documentation is important for professional, research, and ethical concerns. This study analyzed the possible interference that the flash could cause on evaluation of lower eyelid cosmetic results. Standardized photographs with and without flash were taken of 10 patients with dermatochalasis. The photographs were evaluated by 3 independent observers, as before (without flash) and after (with flash) an alternative esthetic treatment of the lower eyelid. The observers rated the overall cosmetic improvement of the lower eyelid photographs on a visual analog scale. The 3 surgeons believed that there was improvement in cosmetic outcome from the first (without flash) to the second (with flash) picture. The results indicate that a simple flash addition in one of 2 consecutive photographs, taken seconds apart, could influence the impression of experienced surgeons on the final outcome of oculoplastic surgeries and may constitute a bias in observer-dependent studies.

  3. Standardized patient and standardized interdisciplinary team meeting: validation of a new performance-based assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Misuzu; Nagoshi, Michael; Oshiro-Wong, Celeste; Tin, Maung; Wen, Aida; Masaki, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    The interdisciplinary team (IDT) approach is critical in the care of elderly adults. Performance-based tools to assess IDT skills have not been well validated. A novel assessment tool, the standardized patient (SP) and standardized interdisciplinary team meeting (SIDTM), consisting of two stations, was developed. First, trainees evaluate a SP hospitalized after a fall. Second, trainees play the role of the physician in a standardized IDT meeting with a standardized registered nurse (SRN) and standardized medical social worker (SMSW) for discharge planning. The SP-SIDTM was administered to 52 fourth-year medical students (MS4s) and six geriatric medicine fellows (GMFs) in 2011/12. The SP, SRN, and SMSW scored trainee performance on dichotomous checklists of clinical tasks and Likert scales of communication skills, which were compared according to level of training using t-tests. Trainees rated the SP-SIDTM experience as moderately difficult, length of time about right, and believability moderate to high. Reliability was high for both cases (Cronbach α = 0.73-0.87). Interobserver correlation between SRN and SMSW checklist scores (correlation coefficient (r) = 0.82, P < .001) and total scores (r = 0.69, P < .001) were high. The overall score on the SP-SIDTM case was significantly higher for GMF (75) than for MS4 (65, P = .002). These observations support the validity of this novel assessment tool. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  4. Standards in clinical decision support: activities in health level seven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenders, Robert A; Jenders, Robert Allen; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Sailors, R Matthew

    2008-11-06

    Health Level Seven (HL7) has evolved into an international standards development organization (SDO) with a suite of standards. Prominent among these are formalisms related to clinical decision support, including the Arden Syntax, GELLO and Decision Support Service (DSS) standards. Continuing improvement in these standards and ongoing development of future decision support standards require wide participation in order to maximize their success. Accordingly, the purpose of the workshop is twofold. First, instructors will convey the latest developments regarding existing decision support standards and related efforts to develop new standards. Second, the instructors will solicit feedback so that attendees who do not participate in HL7 can have input into the standards activities of that organization. The instructors of this workshop, who are the co-chairs and/or members of the Clinical Decision Support Technical Committee of HL7, will review progress in these areas. They will present the details of the ongoing development of the extant Arden Syntax, GELLO and DSS standards. They will discuss work on current draft and proposed future standards, including the Infobutton communication and Order Set standards that are undergoing development in anticipation of certification as standards. Finally, they will solicit discussion regarding the future direction of standards development in these areas.

  5. Assessment of paediatric clinical audit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Perrem, L M

    2012-02-01

    Consultant paediatricians in Ireland were surveyed to evaluate their perceptions of the hospital audit environment and assess their involvement in the audit process. Eighty nine (77%) replied of whom 66 (74%) had an audit department and 23 (26%) did not. Sixteen (18%) felt their hospital was well resourced for audit and 25 (28%) felt the culture was very positive but only 1 (1%) had protected time. For 61 (69%) consultants audit was very important with 38 (43%) being very actively involved in the process. The most frequent trigger for audit was non consultant hospital doctor (NCHD) career development, cited by 77 (87%). The new Professional Competence Scheme and the National Quality and Risk Management Standards will require the deficiencies identified in this survey be addressed.

  6. Relationship Between Faculty and Standardized Patient Assessment Scores of Podiatric Medical Students During a Standardized Performance Assessment Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, James M; Vardaxis, Vassilios; Anwar, Noreen; Hagenbucher, Jacob

    2016-03-01

    Direct assessment of health professional student performance of clinical skills can be accurately performed in the standardized performance assessment laboratory (SPAL), typically by health professional faculty. However, owing to time and economic considerations, nonmedical individuals have been specially trained to perform the same function (standardized patients [SPs]). This study compared the assessment scores of the history and physical examination components of a SPAL designed for second-year podiatric medical students at Des Moines University (DMU) by a podiatry medical faculty member and SPs. A total of 101 students from the classes of 2015 and 2016 were evaluated in 2013 and 2014 by 11 to 13 SPs from the DMU SPAL program. The video recordings of these 101 students were then evaluated by one faculty member from the College of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery at DMU. The Pearson correlation coefficient for each class showed a strong linear relationship between SP and faculty assessment scores. The associations between SP and faculty assessment scores in the history, physical examination, and combined history and physical examination components for the 2016 class (0.706, 0.925, and 0.911, respectively) were found to be stronger than those for the 2015 class (0.697, 0.791, and 0.791, respectively). This study indicated that there are strong associations between the assessment scores of trained SPs and faculty for the history, physical examination, and combined history and physical examination components of second-year SPAL activity for podiatric medical students.

  7. Standardizing Physiologic Assessment Data to Enable Big Data Analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matney, Susan A; Settergren, Theresa Tess; Carrington, Jane M; Richesson, Rachel L; Sheide, Amy; Westra, Bonnie L

    2016-07-18

    Disparate data must be represented in a common format to enable comparison across multiple institutions and facilitate big data science. Nursing assessments represent a rich source of information. However, a lack of agreement regarding essential concepts and standardized terminology prevent their use for big data science in the current state. The purpose of this study was to align a minimum set of physiological nursing assessment data elements with national standardized coding systems. Six institutions shared their 100 most common electronic health record nursing assessment data elements. From these, a set of distinct elements was mapped to nationally recognized Logical Observations Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC®) and Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT®) standards. We identified 137 observation names (55% new to LOINC), and 348 observation values (20% new to SNOMED CT) organized into 16 panels (72% new LOINC). This reference set can support the exchange of nursing information, facilitate multi-site research, and provide a framework for nursing data analysis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Organizational, technical, physical and clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusz-Czerniewicz, Marta; Kaźmierczak, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Background Indisputably, radiotherapy has become an entirely interdisciplinary specialty. This situation requires efficient planning, verification, monitoring, quality control and constant improvement of all aspects of service delivery, referring both to patients’ (including diagnosis, prescription and method of treatment, its justification, realization and follow up) and organizational, technical and physics matters. Aim The aim of this work was to develop technical, physics and clinical quality standards for radiotherapy. This paper presents chosen standards for each of the aforementioned category. Materials and methods For the development of quality standards the comparison analysis of EU and Polish acts of law passed between 1980 and 2010 was conducted, the universal industrial ISO norm 9001:2008 referring to quality management system was reviewed. Recommendations of this norm were completed with detailed quality standards based on the author's 11 year work experience and the review of articles on quality assurance and quality control standards for radiotherapy published between 1984 and 2009 and the review of current recommendations and guidelines of American, International, European and National bodies (associations, societies, agencies such as AAPM, ESTRO, IAEA, and OECI) for quality assurance and quality management in radiotherapy. Results As a result 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: (1) organizational standards, (2) physics and technical standards and (3) clinical standards. Conclusions Proposed quality standards for radiotherapy, can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical procedures. Nevertheless standards are only of value if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:24377023

  9. Assessment of Marginal Peri-implant Bone-Level Short-Length Implants Compared with Standard Implants Supporting Single Crowns in a Controlled Clinical Trial: 12-Month Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Azpur, Gerardo; Lau, Miguel; Valdivia, Erick; Rojas, Jorge; Muñoz, Henry; Nevins, Myron

    In oral rehabilitation, crown-to-root ratio is accepted as an indicator of bone loss, and this concept was transferred to implants. Recent studies have indicated that there is no significant difference between short and standard implants. The aim of this study was to compare marginal bone-level alteration through radiographic evaluation and clinical parameters between short and standard implants supporting single crowns. This prospective clinical trial study included 82 systemically healthy, nonsmoking subjects. Patients were divided into two groups: one group for short dental implants measuring 5.5 or 7 mm, and one group for standard dental implants measuring 10 or 12 mm, in accordance with the individual needs of the patient. A clinical dental history was taken for each subject, including model casts, dental radiography, and cone beam computed tomography. A periapical analysis was also performed using ImageJ computer software to establish the initial bone measurement and periapical bone loss. A statistically significant difference was found in favor of the standard-length implants after 12 months, with greater gingival recession around the implant; however, bone loss in the short implants did not exceed 0.53 mm. The treatment with 5.5- to 7-mm-length implants is as reliable as treatment with 10- or 12-mm implants. Peri-implant bone loss is minimal, and therefore use of short implants can be recommended as treatment for the restoration of partially edentulous patients without the need for splinted crowns.

  10. Upper limb risk assessment according to ISO/CEN standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delleman, N.J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the current status, general content, and application of the standards EN 1005, ISO 11226, and ISO 11228-3 concerning upper limb risk assessment. The upper limb risk assessment according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO)/CEN standards is discussed. Risk

  11. Students' Assessment and Self-assessment of Nursing Clinical Faculty Competencies: Important Feedback in Clinical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrić, Robert; Prlić, Nada; Zec, Davor; Pušeljić, Silvija; Žvanut, Boštjan

    2015-01-01

    The students' assessment of clinical faculty competencies and the faculty members' self-assessment can provide important information about nursing clinical education. The aim of this study was to identify the differences between the students' assessment of the clinical faculty member's competencies and the faculty member's self-assessment. These differences can reveal interesting insights relevant for improving clinical practice.

  12. Assessment of Safety Standards for Automotive Electronic Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study that assessed and compared six industry and government safety standards relevant to the safety and reliability of automotive electronic control systems. These standards include ISO 26262 (Road Vehicles - ...

  13. Effects of tailored neck-shoulder pain treatment based on a decision model guided by clinical assessments and standardized functional tests. A study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björklund Martin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major problem with rehabilitation interventions for neck pain is that the condition may have multiple causes, thus a single treatment approach is seldom efficient. The present study protocol outlines a single blinded randomised controlled trial evaluating the effect of tailored treatment for neck-shoulder pain. The treatment is based on a decision model guided by standardized clinical assessment and functional tests with cut-off values. Our main hypothesis is that the tailored treatment has better short, intermediate and long-term effects than either non-tailored treatment or treatment-as-usual (TAU on pain and function. We sub-sequentially hypothesize that tailored and non-tailored treatment both have better effect than TAU. Methods/Design 120 working women with minimum six weeks of nonspecific neck-shoulder pain aged 20–65, are allocated by minimisation with the factors age, duration of pain, pain intensity and disability in to the groups tailored treatment (T, non-tailored treatment (NT or treatment-as-usual (TAU. Treatment is given to the groups T and NT for 11 weeks (27 sessions evenly distributed. An extensive presentation of the tests and treatment decision model is provided. The main treatment components are manual therapy, cranio-cervical flexion exercise and strength training, EMG-biofeedback training, treatment for cervicogenic headache, neck motor control training. A decision algorithm based on the baseline assessment determines the treatment components given to each participant of T- and NT-groups. Primary outcome measures are physical functioning (Neck Disability Index and average pain intensity last week (Numeric Rating Scale. Secondary outcomes are general improvement (Patient Global Impression of Change scale, symptoms (Profile Fitness Mapping neck questionnaire, capacity to work in the last 6 weeks (quality and quantity and pressure pain threshold of m. trapezius. Primary and secondary outcomes will

  14. Quality assessment of clinical computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Dorothea; Luckow, Marlen; Lambrecht, J. Thomas; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2008-08-01

    Three-dimensional images are vital for the diagnosis in dentistry and cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Artifacts caused by highly absorbing components such as metallic implants, however, limit the value of the tomograms. The dominant artifacts observed are blowout and streaks. Investigating the artifacts generated by metallic implants in a pig jaw, the data acquisition for the patients in dentistry should be optimized in a quantitative manner. A freshly explanted pig jaw including related soft-tissues served as a model system. Images were recorded varying the accelerating voltage and the beam current. The comparison with multi-slice and micro computed tomography (CT) helps to validate the approach with the dental CT system (3D-Accuitomo, Morita, Japan). The data are rigidly registered to comparatively quantify their quality. The micro CT data provide a reasonable standard for quantitative data assessment of clinical CT.

  15. Assessing student clinical learning experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehyba, Katrine; Miller, Susan; Connaughton, Joanne; Singer, Barbara

    2017-08-01

    This article describes the use of an activity worksheet and questionnaire to investigate the learning experience of students on clinical placement. The worksheet measures the amount of time students spend in different learning activities, and the questionnaire explores student satisfaction and preferred learning activities. An activity worksheet and questionnaire … investigate[d] the learning experiences of students on clinical placement METHODS: The activity worksheet and questionnaire were used in a cohort pilot study of physiotherapy students on clinical placement. The activity worksheet provides details of the amount of time students engage in a range of clinical and non-clinical tasks while on placement, such as time spent treating patients, working individually, working with their peers and engaging in reflective practice. In combination with the questionnaire results, it allows clinicians to gain an understanding of the clinical learning environment experienced by their students. The data collected using these tools provide a description of the students' activities while undertaking the clinical placement. This information may guide the refinement of the clinical experience, and offers an opportunity to individualise learning activities to match students' needs and preferences. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  16. Automated Clinical Assessment from Smart home-based Behavior Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawadi, Prafulla Nath; Cook, Diane Joyce; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Smart home technologies offer potential benefits for assisting clinicians by automating health monitoring and well-being assessment. In this paper, we examine the actual benefits of smart home-based analysis by monitoring daily behaviour in the home and predicting standard clinical assessment scores of the residents. To accomplish this goal, we propose a Clinical Assessment using Activity Behavior (CAAB) approach to model a smart home resident’s daily behavior and predict the corresponding standard clinical assessment scores. CAAB uses statistical features that describe characteristics of a resident’s daily activity performance to train machine learning algorithms that predict the clinical assessment scores. We evaluate the performance of CAAB utilizing smart home sensor data collected from 18 smart homes over two years using prediction and classification-based experiments. In the prediction-based experiments, we obtain a statistically significant correlation (r = 0.72) between CAAB-predicted and clinician-provided cognitive assessment scores and a statistically significant correlation (r = 0.45) between CAAB-predicted and clinician-provided mobility scores. Similarly, for the classification-based experiments, we find CAAB has a classification accuracy of 72% while classifying cognitive assessment scores and 76% while classifying mobility scores. These prediction and classification results suggest that it is feasible to predict standard clinical scores using smart home sensor data and learning-based data analysis. PMID:26292348

  17. Sunscreen compliance with regional clinical practice guidelines and product labeling standards in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporer, Matthias E; Mathy, Joanna E; Kenealy, John; Mathy, Jon A

    2016-03-01

    INTRODUCTION For general practitioners, practice nurses and community pharmacists in New Zealand, a core duty is to educate patients about sun protection. We aimed to evaluate compliance of locally available sunscreens with regional clinical practice guidelines and sunscreen labelling standards, to assist clinicians in advising consumers on sunscreen selection. METHODS We audited all sunscreens available at two Auckland stores for three New Zealand sunscreen retailers. We then assessed compliance with accepted regional clinical practice guidelines for sun protection from the New Zealand Guidelines Group. We further assessed compliance with regional Australia/New Zealand consumer standards for sunscreen labelling. RESULTS All sunscreens satisfied clinical guidelines for broad-spectrum protection, and 99% of sunscreens met or exceeded clinical guidelines for minimal Sun Protection Factor. Compliance with regional standardized labelling guidelines is voluntary in New Zealand and 27% of audited sunscreens were not fully compliant with SPF labelling standards. DISCUSSION Sunscreens were generally compliant with clinical guidelines for minimal sun protection. However there was substantial noncompliance with regional recommendations for standardized sunscreen labelling. Primary health care clinicians should be aware that this labelling noncompliance may mislead patients into thinking some sunscreens offer more sun protection than they do. Mandatory compliance with the latest regional labelling standards would simplify sunscreen selection by New Zealand consumers. KEYWORDS Sunscreen; Sun Protection Factor; SPF; Skin Neoplasms; Melanoma; Skin Cancer Prevention.

  18. 76 FR 16250 - Planning Resource Adequacy Assessment Reliability Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... planning, horizon. The Commission agrees with Borlick's comment, and emphasizes that any type of demand...; Order No. 747] Planning Resource Adequacy Assessment Reliability Standard AGENCY: Federal Energy... (Planning Resource Adequacy Analysis, Assessment and [[Page 16251

  19. International Standardization of the Clinical Dosimetry of Beta Radiation Brachytherapy Sources: Progress of an ISO Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Christopher

    2006-03-01

    In 2004 a new work item proposal (NWIP) was accepted by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Technical Committee 85 (TC85 -- Nuclear Energy), Subcommittee 2 (Radiation Protection) for the development of a standard for the clinical dosimetry of beta radiation sources used for brachytherapy. To develop this standard, a new Working Group (WG 22 - Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry and Protocols in Medical Applications) was formed. The standard is based on the work of an ad-hoc working group initiated by the Dosimetry task group of the Deutsches Insitiut für Normung (DIN). Initially the work was geared mainly towards the needs of intravascular brachytherapy, but with the decline of this application, more focus has been placed on the challenges of accurate dosimetry for the concave eye plaques used to treat ocular melanoma. Guidance is given for dosimetry formalisms, reference data to be used, calibrations, measurement methods, modeling, uncertainty determinations, treatment planning and reporting, and clinical quality control. The document is currently undergoing review by the ISO member bodies for acceptance as a Committee Draft (CD) with publication of the final standard expected by 2007. There are opportunities for other ISO standards for medical dosimetry within the framework of WG22.

  20. E-health stakeholders experiences with clinical modelling and standardizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gøeg, Kirstine Rosenbeck; Elberg, Pia Britt; Højen, Anne Randorff

    2015-01-01

    Stakeholders in e-health such as governance officials, health IT-implementers and vendors have to co-operate to achieve the goal of a future-proof interoperable e-health infrastructure. Co-operation requires knowledge on the responsibility and competences of stakeholder groups. To increase awareness on clinical modeling and standardization we conducted a workshop for Danish and a few Norwegian e-health stakeholders' and made them discuss their views on different aspects of clinical modeling using a theoretical model as a point of departure. Based on the model, we traced stakeholders' experiences. Our results showed there was a tendency that stakeholders were more familiar with e-health requirements than with design methods, clinical information models and clinical terminology as they are described in the scientific literature. The workshop made it possible for stakeholders to discuss their roles and expectations to each other.

  1. Physical Activity Stories: Assessing the "Meaning Standard" in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tyler G.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of the "meaning standard" in both national and state content standards suggests that professionals consider it an important outcome of a quality physical education program. However, only 10 percent of states require an assessment to examine whether students achieve this standard. The purpose of this article is to introduce…

  2. Standardized testing: a case of annual national assessments in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Standardized assessments are becoming a norm internationally. Governments have turned to standardized assessments due to mounting pressure by citizens for accountability, quality education, transparency, and increased public confidence in education. In South Africa, the observed learning deficiencies and prolonged ...

  3. Assessing core clinical competencies required of medical graduates in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Huang, Yu-Sheng; Liu, Keh-Min

    2006-10-01

    Medical students are assumed to be competent to provide basic patient care independently on graduation. However, there is a gap between what students are expected to learn and what they have actually learned. This may be due to the lack of clearly defined learning objectives, well-organized curriculum, and properly administered assessment. In an attempt to tackle this problem, we conducted a three-step study. Firstly, we identified the core clinical competencies required of medical graduates in Taiwan. Secondly, we incorporated these clinical competencies into a new medical curriculum. Finally, we identified the most appropriate assessment methods for each clinical competency. In 2004, a set of minimally required clinical competencies for medical undergraduates in Taiwan was developed, which included 92 clinical skills, four communication skills, and seven kinds of attitudes. In order to prepare 3rd and 4th year medical students at Kaohsiung Medical University (KMU) for later clinical work, the medical curriculum committee integrated the teaching and assessment of the core clinical skills identified previously into relevant organ-system blocks of the new curriculum. To identify appropriate assessment methods for each clinical skill, a structured questionnaire of assessment methods based on the Toolbox of Assessment Methods (Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education) and The Scottish Doctor (Scottish Deans' Medical Curriculum Group) was developed and distributed to 40 senior clinical faculty members at KMU. Simulations and Models, Standardized Patient Examination (SP), and Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) were suggested to be most suitable to assess two-thirds of the core clinical skills. These assessment methods are commonly used in American and European medical schools. We believe that the implementation of the new curriculum at KMU accompanied by the use of Simulations and Models, SP, OSCE, and other teaching and assessment methods will

  4. Assessing Core Clinical Competencies Required of Medical Graduates in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Liu

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Medical students are assumed to be competent to provide basic patient care independently on graduation. However, there is a gap between what students are expected to learn and what they have actually learned. This may be due to the lack of clearly defined learning objectives, well- organized curriculum, and properly administered assessment. In an attempt to tackle this problem, we conducted a three-step study. Firstly, we identified the core clinical competencies required of medical graduates in Taiwan. Secondly, we incorporated these clinical competencies into a new medical curriculum. Finally, we identified the most appropriate assessment methods for each clinical competency. In 2004, a set of minimally required clinical competencies for medical undergraduates in Taiwan was developed, which included 92 clinical skills, four communication skills, and seven kinds of attitudes. In order to prepare 3rd and 4th year medical students at Kaohsiung Medical University (KMU for later clinical work, the medical curriculum committee integrated the teaching and assessment of the core clinical skills identified previously into relevant organ-system blocks of the new curriculum. To identify appropriate assessment methods for each clinical skill, a structured questionnaire of assessment methods based on the Toolbox of Assessment Methods (Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and The Scottish Doctor (Scottish Deans' Medical Curriculum Group was developed and distributed to 40 senior clinical faculty members at KMU. Simulations and Models, Standardized Patient Examination (SP, and Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE were suggested to be most suitable to assess two-thirds of the core clinical skills. These assessment methods are commonly used in American and European medical schools. We believe that the implementation of the new curriculum at KMU accompanied by the use of Simulations and Models, SP, OSCE, and other teaching and

  5. PASSING STANDARDIZED ASSESSMENTS WITH FADING PROMPTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Marie GREENE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 mandates that all students perform at a level of proficient on state assessments. This includes students with learning and intellectual disabilities who are inherently performing below grade level. Given that schools are held accountable for meeting these goals and some states are not allowing students to graduate if they do not pass the assessments, this is a large concern for students, parents, teachers, and administration Method: Forty-five students with a disability in writing or an intellectual disability participated in this quasi-experimental, single-group, pretest-posttest design that evaluated the effectiveness of the Fading Prompts through Graphic Organizers method for students with learning and intellectual disabilities in written expression as measured according to the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment. Results: Data analyses were conducted through the use of four dichotomies for percent differences, which compared teacher administered pretests and posttests, pretests and the state administered PSSA, teacher administered posttests and the PSSA, and the participants’ PSSA and the average state PSSA score. All forty-five students performed at a below basic level during baseline and a proficient level on the posttest. The learned skills generalized to the PSSA with forty-three students earning a passing score of proficient, while two students advanced to basic. Conclusion: Based on the outcomes of this study, it is highly recommended that this program be utilized at least for students with learning and intellectual disabilities until further research can be done.

  6. Standardized Representation of Clinical Study Data Dictionaries with CIMI Archetypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak K; Solbrig, Harold R; Prud'hommeaux, Eric; Pathak, Jyotishman; Jiang, Guoqian

    2016-01-01

    Researchers commonly use a tabular format to describe and represent clinical study data. The lack of standardization of data dictionary's metadata elements presents challenges for their harmonization for similar studies and impedes interoperability outside the local context. We propose that representing data dictionaries in the form of standardized archetypes can help to overcome this problem. The Archetype Modeling Language (AML) as developed by the Clinical Information Modeling Initiative (CIMI) can serve as a common format for the representation of data dictionary models. We mapped three different data dictionaries (identified from dbGAP, PheKB and TCGA) onto AML archetypes by aligning dictionary variable definitions with the AML archetype elements. The near complete alignment of data dictionaries helped map them into valid AML models that captured all data dictionary model metadata. The outcome of the work would help subject matter experts harmonize data models for quality, semantic interoperability and better downstream data integration.

  7. Assessing the Genetics Content in the Next Generation Science Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Lontok, Katherine S.; Zhang, Hubert; Dougherty, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Science standards have a long history in the United States and currently form the backbone of efforts to improve primary and secondary education in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Although there has been much political controversy over the influence of standards on teacher autonomy and student performance, little light has been shed on how well standards cover science content. We assessed the coverage of genetics content in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) using...

  8. CDISC standard-based electronic archiving of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Aerts, J; Semler, S C; Ohmann, C

    2009-01-01

    Our objectives were to develop, based on the analysis of archived clinical trial documents and data and on the requirements of GCP-compliant electronic archiving, a concept for legally secure and technically feasible archiving of the entire clinical trial, including the essential documents of the trial master file and the study database. Based on own experiences with CDISC, existing implementations and future developments, CDISC standards were evaluated concerning requirements for archiving clinical studies. Trial master files of a small, medium and large clinical study were analyzed to collect specifications for electronic archiving of records. Two different ways of long-term storage exist for the clinical trial archive: document-oriented archival and data archiving of the study database. The trial master file has a highly complex structure; its different parts can vary greatly in size, depending of the working style of investigators, number of patients recruited, the number of adverse event reports and the number of queries. The CDISC standard ODM is especially suited for archiving clinical trials, because among other features it contains the entire clinical trial data and full audit trail information. On the other hand SDTM is a content standard suited for data warehouses. Two recent developments in CDISC will affect the archival of studies: the further development of ODM in the area of "eCRF submission" and the use of "Electronic Source Data". The complexity and size of the trial master file requires new solutions. Though ODM provides effective means to archive the study database, it shows still deficiencies, especially for the joint archiving of data and the complex documentation of the trial master file. A concept was developed in which the ODM standard is part of an integrated archiving of the trial data and documents. ODM archiving of the study database enables long-term storage which is GCP-compliant. Archiving of documents of the trial master file in PDF

  9. Assessing the Genetics Content in the Next Generation Science Standards.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Lontok

    Full Text Available Science standards have a long history in the United States and currently form the backbone of efforts to improve primary and secondary education in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM. Although there has been much political controversy over the influence of standards on teacher autonomy and student performance, little light has been shed on how well standards cover science content. We assessed the coverage of genetics content in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS using a consensus list of American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG core concepts. We also compared the NGSS against state science standards. Our goals were to assess the potential of the new standards to support genetic literacy and to determine if they improve the coverage of genetics concepts relative to state standards. We found that expert reviewers cannot identify ASHG core concepts within the new standards with high reliability, suggesting that the scope of content addressed by the standards may be inconsistently interpreted. Given results that indicate that the disciplinary core ideas (DCIs included in the NGSS documents produced by Achieve, Inc. clarify the content covered by the standards statements themselves, we recommend that the NGSS standards statements always be viewed alongside their supporting disciplinary core ideas. In addition, gaps exist in the coverage of essential genetics concepts, most worryingly concepts dealing with patterns of inheritance, both Mendelian and complex. Finally, state standards vary widely in their coverage of genetics concepts when compared with the NGSS. On average, however, the NGSS support genetic literacy better than extant state standards.

  10. Assessing the Genetics Content in the Next Generation Science Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lontok, Katherine S; Zhang, Hubert; Dougherty, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Science standards have a long history in the United States and currently form the backbone of efforts to improve primary and secondary education in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Although there has been much political controversy over the influence of standards on teacher autonomy and student performance, little light has been shed on how well standards cover science content. We assessed the coverage of genetics content in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) using a consensus list of American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) core concepts. We also compared the NGSS against state science standards. Our goals were to assess the potential of the new standards to support genetic literacy and to determine if they improve the coverage of genetics concepts relative to state standards. We found that expert reviewers cannot identify ASHG core concepts within the new standards with high reliability, suggesting that the scope of content addressed by the standards may be inconsistently interpreted. Given results that indicate that the disciplinary core ideas (DCIs) included in the NGSS documents produced by Achieve, Inc. clarify the content covered by the standards statements themselves, we recommend that the NGSS standards statements always be viewed alongside their supporting disciplinary core ideas. In addition, gaps exist in the coverage of essential genetics concepts, most worryingly concepts dealing with patterns of inheritance, both Mendelian and complex. Finally, state standards vary widely in their coverage of genetics concepts when compared with the NGSS. On average, however, the NGSS support genetic literacy better than extant state standards.

  11. SPIRIT 2013 Statement: defining standard protocol items for clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Wen Chan

    Full Text Available The protocol of a clinical trial serves as the foundation for study planning, conduct, reporting, and appraisal. However, trial protocols and existing protocol guidelines vary greatly in content and quality. This article describes the systematic development and scope of SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials 2013, a guideline for the minimum content of a clinical trial protocol. The 33-item SPIRIT checklist applies to protocols for all clinical trials and focuses on content rather than format. The checklist recommends a full description of what is planned; it does not prescribe how to design or conduct a trial. By providing guidance for key content, the SPIRIT recommendations aim to facilitate the drafting of high-quality protocols. Adherence to SPIRIT would also enhance the transparency and completeness of trial protocols for the benefit of investigators, trial participants, patients, sponsors, funders, research ethics committees or institutional review boards, peer reviewers, journals, trial registries, policymakers, regulators, and other key stakeholders.

  12. Performance Standards': Utility for Different Uses of Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Linn

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Performance standards are arguably one of the most controversial topics in educational measurement. There are uses of assessments such as licensure and certification where performance standards are essential. There are many other uses, however, where performance standards have been mandated or become the preferred method of reporting assessment results where the standards are not essential to the use. Distinctions between essential and nonessential uses of performance standards are discussed. It is argued that the insistence on reporting in terms of performance standards in situations where they are not essential has been more harmful than helpful. Variability in the definitions of proficient academic achievement by states for purposes of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 is discussed and it is argued that the variability is so great that characterizing achievement is meaningless. Illustrations of the great uncertainty in standards are provided.

  13. Assessing NHS trusts' compliance with child health policy standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Leslie; Glasper, Alan; Battrick, Cath; Brown, Sara

    An audit tool to undertake a baseline assessment of NHS trust compliance with contemporary healthcare polices was designed collaboratively by senior children's nurses across one English strategic health authority (SHA). Children's units in hospitals across the SHA were benchmarked against the audit tool standards throughout 2009. The aim was to identify good and less optimum compliance with best practice policy-driven benchmarks of care, using a 1-5 scale. Each NHS trust within the SHA was contacted to make arrangements with members of the interprofessional team to complete the baseline benchmarking exercise. The audit was conducted over 1 or 2 days. The majority of the evidence sourced comprised documented evidence and verbal affirmation of the individual perceptions of key informants with regard to how the range of clinical areas scored against the best practice benchmarks. Scores of policy compliance in some trusts audited ranged from 1 (non-compliant) to 5 (full compliance). The results demonstrate that many trusts are making good efforts to ensure full compliance to policy guidelines and mandates. However, there are some aspects of policy standards that trusts have yet to fully embrace. This initial benchmarking exercise on behalf of an English SHA has revealed many areas of outstanding and good practice which have the potential to be shared.

  14. The Clinical Assessment and Remote Administration Tablet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Turner

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Electronic data capture of case report forms (CRFs, demographic, neuropsychiatric, or clinical assessments, can vary from scanning hand-written forms into databases to fully electronic systems. Web-based forms can be extremely useful for self-assessment; however, in the case of neuropsychiatric assessments, self-assessment is often not an option. The clinician often must be the person either summarizing or making their best judgment about the subject’s response in order to complete an assessment, and having the clinician turn away to type into a web browser may be disruptive to the flow of the interview. The Mind Research Network (MRN has developed a prototype for a software tool for the real-time acquisition and validation of clinical assessments in remote environments. We have developed the Clinical Assessment and Remote Administration Tablet (CARAT on a Microsoft Windows PC tablet system, which has been adapted to interact with various data models already in use in several large-scale databases of neuroimaging studies in clinical populations. The tablet has been used successfully to collect and administer clinical assessments in several large-scale studies, so that the correct clinical measures are integrated with the correct imaging and other data. It has proven to be incredibly valuable in confirming that data collection across multiple research groups is performed similarly, quickly, and with accountability for incomplete datasets. We present the overall architecture and an evaluation of its use.

  15. The clinical assessment and remote administration tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jessica A; Lane, Susan R; Bockholt, H Jeremy; Calhoun, Vince D

    2011-01-01

    Electronic data capture of case report forms, demographic, neuropsychiatric, or clinical assessments, can vary from scanning hand-written forms into databases to fully electronic systems. Web-based forms can be extremely useful for self-assessment; however, in the case of neuropsychiatric assessments, self-assessment is often not an option. The clinician often must be the person either summarizing or making their best judgment about the subject's response in order to complete an assessment, and having the clinician turn away to type into a web browser may be disruptive to the flow of the interview. The Mind Research Network has developed a prototype for a software tool for the real-time acquisition and validation of clinical assessments in remote environments. We have developed the clinical assessment and remote administration tablet on a Microsoft Windows PC tablet system, which has been adapted to interact with various data models already in use in several large-scale databases of neuroimaging studies in clinical populations. The tablet has been used successfully to collect and administer clinical assessments in several large-scale studies, so that the correct clinical measures are integrated with the correct imaging and other data. It has proven to be incredibly valuable in confirming that data collection across multiple research groups is performed similarly, quickly, and with accountability for incomplete datasets. We present the overall architecture and an evaluation of its use.

  16. Minimum reporting standards for clinical research on groin pain in athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Thorborg, Kristian; Khan, Karim M

    2015-01-01

    are provided in relation to: (1) study methodology, (2) study participants and injury history, (3) clinical examination, (4) clinical assessment and (5) radiology. Adherence to these minimum reporting standards will strengthen the quality and transparency of research conducted on groin pain in athletes......Groin pain in athletes is a priority area for sports physiotherapy and sports medicine research. Heterogeneous studies with low methodological quality dominate research related to groin pain in athletes. Low-quality studies undermine the external validity of research findings and limit the ability...... to generalise findings to the target patient population. Minimum reporting standards for research on groin pain in athletes are overdue. We propose a set of minimum reporting standards based on best available evidence to be utilised in future research on groin pain in athletes. Minimum reporting standards...

  17. Supporting Student Teachers' Professional Learning with Standards-Referenced Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sylvia Yee Fan; Cheng, May May Hung; So, Winnie Wing Mui

    2006-01-01

    Professional standards in teaching are developed in many education systems, with professional learning and quality assurance being the central purposes of these standards. This paper presents an initiative in developing a professional development progress map (hereafter, progress map) within a learning-oriented field experience assessment (LOFEA) …

  18. Principles of assessment from a clinical perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landewé, Robert B. M.; van der Heijde, Désirée M. F. M.

    2003-01-01

    Physicians apply assessments every day in clinical practice. Common clinical practice is impossible without measurements and tests. Testing looks rather straightforward: a test result is either positive or negative. Unfortunately, this simplicity is not in keeping with truth. At the base of

  19. Assessment of hospital pharmacists' clinical knowledge and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Course learning design also focused on drug use evaluation, monitoring plans, and reaching clinical evidence- ... Conclusion: The findings indicate that pharmacist's self-confidence to perform clinical assessment activities is low. Lack of ... reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. Tropical ...

  20. Standard setting and quality of assessment: A conceptual approach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality performance standards and the effect of assessment outcomes are important in the educational milieu, as assessment remains the representative ... not be seen as a methodological process of setting pass/fail cut-off points only, but as a powerful catalyst for quality improvements in HPE by promoting excellence in ...

  1. 24 CFR 115.206 - Performance assessments; Performance standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Performance assessments; Performance standards. 115.206 Section 115.206 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... AGENCIES Certification of Substantially Equivalent Agencies § 115.206 Performance assessments; Performance...

  2. Higher Education Quality Assessment Model: Towards Achieving Educational Quality Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noaman, Amin Y.; Ragab, Abdul Hamid M.; Madbouly, Ayman I.; Khedra, Ahmed M.; Fayoumi, Ayman G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a developed higher education quality assessment model (HEQAM) that can be applied for enhancement of university services. This is because there is no universal unified quality standard model that can be used to assess the quality criteria of higher education institutes. The analytical hierarchy process is used to identify the…

  3. Assessing emergency nurses' clinical competency: An exploratory factor analysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Ghanbari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nursing as a clinical discipline is developing in the emergency wards. Health care systems should continuously assess and prioritize indicators of clinical competency in these wards. The lack of clear standards of clinical competency indicators challenges evaluation. The purpose of this study was to determine clinical competency indicators and its priority based on nurses' views in educational and therapeutic centers in Guilan. Materials and Methods: The Q methodology was conducted in three phases, that is, phase I (determining the clinical competency indicators, phase II (classifying clinical competency indicators by an expert panel, and phase III (prioritizing clinical competency indicators. The subjects were selected by convenience sampling among nurses working in the emergency wards of teaching hospitals affiliated to Guilan in 2013. Finally, clinical competency indicators were prioritized using exploratory factor analysis. Results: In the prioritizing phase, data were collected from 710 nurses over two months. Five factors with 30 general competencies were found in three domains: communication, professional maturity, and personality characteristics. Six factors with 37 specific competencies were also found in two domains: scientific and technical capabilities and basic clinical skills that can provide a structured instrument for assessing clinical competence in emergency nurses. Conclusions: Achieved competencies can be used as a reference for nursing education and practice in emergency. Further research on health care system is needed in order to achieve a reliable and valid instrument.

  4. Applicability Evaluation of Job Standards for Diabetes Nutritional Management by Clinical Dietitian

    OpenAIRE

    Baek, Young Jin; Oh, Na Gyeong; Sohn, Cheong-Min; Woo, Mi-Hye; Lee, Seung Min; Ju, Dal Lae; Seo, Jung-Sook

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate applicability of job standards for diabetes nutrition management by hospital clinical dietitians. In order to promote the clinical nutrition services, it is necessary to present job standards of clinical dietitian and to actively apply these standardized tasks to the medical institution sites. The job standard of clinical dietitians for diabetic nutrition management was distributed to hospitals over 300 beds. Questionnaire was collected from 96 clinical di...

  5. Multiparametric prostate MRI: technical conduct, standardized report and clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Matteo; Mele, Fabrizio; Garrou, Diletta; Walz, Jochen; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Russo, Filippo; Vassallo, Lorenzo; Villers, Arnauld; Emberton, Mark; Valerio, Massimo

    2018-02-01

    Multiparametric prostate MRI (mp-MRI) is an emerging imaging modality for diagnosis, characterization, staging, and treatment planning of prostate cancer (PCa). The technique, results reporting, and its role in clinical practice have been the subject of significant development over the last decade. Although mp-MRI is not yet routinely used in the diagnostic pathway, almost all urological guidelines have emphasized the potential role of mp-MRI in several aspects of PCa management. Moreover, new MRI sequences and scanning techniques are currently under evaluation to improve the diagnostic accuracy of mp-MRI. This review presents an overview of mp-MRI, summarizing the technical applications, the standardized reporting systems used, and their current roles in various stages of PCa management. Finally, this critical review also reports the main limitations and future perspectives of the technique.

  6. The clinical viva: an assessment of clinical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Debbie

    2013-04-01

    In order to enable Masters level pre-registration students to demonstrate sophisticated cognitive abilities, integration of knowledge, complex problem solving, critical opinion, lateral thinking and innovative action; an innovative assessment tool is required (Sadler, 2009). A clinical viva was devised to enable third year students in their final transitional placement prior to qualifying demonstrate both the art and science of nursing practice. The assessment combines some of the viva element of an Australian assessment model described by Levett-Jones et al. (2011), together with the think aloud approach suggested by Banning (2008); whereby the think aloud model acts as a catalyst for eliciting students' understandings and knowledge and the SOAP model is a mechanism for the assessment of students' understandings and knowledge. Rust (2002) calls for students to be afforded opportunities for regular formative feedback; therefore, the assessment includes a replica formative assessment, one week prior to the summative assessment. This formative test prevents assessment being seen as a snapshot of the student's development and encourages assessment for learning and is an approach which is suggested to discourage surface learning (Rust, 2002). A holistic rubric was developed in an attempt to capture the students' abilities against the six cognitive operators or heuristics suggested by Banning (2008). Open-ended questions were devised to be asked of the students as advocated by Levett-Jones et al. (2011), to uncover the student's cognitive abilities, integration of knowledge, complex problem solving, critical opinion, lateral thinking and innovative action. Roberts (2011) calls for new and innovative ways of assessing student learning which bridges the artificial divide between theory and practice and enables students to demonstrate both the art and science of nursing practice (p610). The clinical viva has the potential to be one such mechanism. Copyright © 2013

  7. A scheme for the audit of scientific and technological standards in clinical nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, A.C.; Jarritt, P.H.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Audit is the process whereby the quality of a service is monitored and optimised. It forms an essential component of the quality assurance process, whether by self-assessment or by external peer review. In the UK the British Nuclear Medicine Society (BNMS) has undertaken external organisational audit of departments providing clinical nuclear medicine services. This work aimed to develop a more thorough and service specific process for the audit of scientific and technological standards in nuclear medicine. Materials and Methods: The audit process has been implemented using written audit documents to facilitate the audit procedure. A questionnaire forms part of the formal documentation for audit of the scientific and technical standards of a clinical service. Scientific and technical standards were derived from a number of sources including legal requirements, regulatory obligations, notes for guidance, peer reviewed publications and accepted good clinical practice (GCP). Results: The audit process graded the standards of an individual department according to legal or safety requirements (Grade A), good practice (Grade B) and desirable aspects of service delivery (Grade C). The standards have been allocated into eight main categories. These are: Instrumentation; Software and data protection; Electrical Safety; Mechanical Safety; Workstation Safety; The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH); Radiation Protection; Scientific and Technical staffing levels. During the audit visit a detailed inspection of clinical and laboratory areas and department written documentation is also necessary to validate the data obtained. Conclusion: The printed scheme now provides a means for external audit or self-assessment. There should be evidence of a well-organised and safe environment for both patients and staff. Health and Safety legislation requires written local rules and these records should be available to demonstrate the standard of service provision. Other

  8. Randomised clinical trial of early specialist palliative care plus standard care versus standard care alone in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønvold, Mogens; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Damkier, Anette

    2017-01-01

    Palliative Care Trial (DanPaCT) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01348048) is a multicentre randomised clinical trial comparing early referral to a specialist palliative care team plus standard care versus standard care alone. The planned sample size was 300. At five oncology departments, consecutive patients...

  9. Environmental assessment. Energy efficiency standards for consumer products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McSwain, Berah

    1980-06-01

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 requires DOE to prescribe energy efficiency standards for 13 consumer products. The Consumer Products Efficiency Standards (CPES) program covers: refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers, freezers, clothes dryers, water heaters, room air conditioners, home heating equipment, kitchen ranges and ovens, central air conditioners (cooling and heat pumps), furnaces, dishwashers, television sets, clothes washers, and humidifiers and dehumidifiers. This Environmental Assessment evaluates the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts expected as a result of setting efficiency standards for all of the consumer products covered by the CPES program. DOE has proposed standards for eight of the products covered by the Program in a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR). DOE expects to propose standards for home heating equipment, central air conditioners (heat pumps only), dishwashers, television sets, clothes washers, and humidifiers and dehumidifiers in 1981. No significant adverse environmental or socioeconomic impacts have been found to result from instituting the CPES.

  10. The role of the standard EEG in clinical psychiatry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S S

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The EEG is a commonly requested test on patients attending psychiatric services, predominantly to investigate for a possible organic brain syndrome causing behavioural changes. AIMS: To assess referrals for EEG from psychiatric services in comparison with those from other sources. We determine which clinical factors were associated with an abnormal EEG in patients referred from psychiatric sources. METHODS: A retrospective review of EEG requests in a 1-year period was performed. Analysis of referral reasons for psychiatric patients was undertaken, and outcome of patients referred from psychiatric services post-EEG was reviewed. RESULTS: One thousand four hundred and seventy EEGs were reviewed, of which 91 (6.2%) were referred from psychiatry. Neurology service referrals had detection rates of abnormal EEGs of 27%, with psychiatric referrals having the lowest abnormality detection rate of 17.6% (p < 0.1). In psychiatric-referred patients the only significant predictors found of an abnormal EEG were a known history of epilepsy (p < 0.001), being on clozapine (p < 0.05), and a possible convulsive seizure (RR = 6.51). Follow-up data of 53 patients did not reveal a significant clinical impact of EEG results on patient management. CONCLUSIONS: Many patients are referred for EEG from psychiatric sources despite a relatively low index of suspicion of an organic brain disorders, based on reasons for referral documented, with an unsurprising low clinical yield.

  11. Using systematically observed clinical encounters (SOCEs to assess medical students’ skills in clinical settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George R Bergus

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available George R Bergus1–3, Jerold C Woodhead4, Clarence D Kreiter2,51Performance Based Assessment Program, Office of Student Affairs and Curriculum, 2Department of Family Medicine, 3Department of Psychiatry, 4Department of Pediatrics, 5Office of Consultation and Research in Medical Education, Roy J and Lucille A Carver College of Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAIntroduction: The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE is widely used to assess the clinical performance of medical students. However, concerns related to cost, availability, and validity, have led educators to investigate alternatives to the OSCE. Some alternatives involve assessing students while they provide care to patients – the mini-CEX (mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise and the Long Case are examples. We investigated the psychometrics of systematically observed clinical encounters (SOCEs, in which physicians are supplemented by lay trained observers, as a means of assessing the clinical performances of medical students.Methods: During the pediatrics clerkship at the University of Iowa, trained lay observers assessed the communication skills of third-year medical students using a communication checklist while the students interviewed and examined pediatric patients. Students then verbally presented their findings to faculty, who assessed students’ clinical skills using a standardized form. The reliability of the combined communication and clinical skills scores was calculated using generalizability theory.Results: Fifty-one medical students completed 199 observed patient encounters. The mean combined clinical and communication skills score (out of a maximum 45 points was 40.8 (standard deviation 3.3. The calculated reliability of the SOCE scores, using generalizability theory, from 10 observed patient encounters was 0.81. Students reported receiving helpful feedback from faculty after 97% of their observed clinical encounters.Conclusion: The SOCE can

  12. [New medical device hospital assessment: what kind of clinical data?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaussier, H; Junot, H; Lancrenon, S; Faure, P

    2012-01-01

    Since 2003, the AP-HP medical devices committee (CODIMS) assess the therapeutic relevance of innovated medical device (MD) for the French AP-HP hospitals' group. To accomplish this task, the CODIMS asks manufacturers to bring out clinical arguments to justify the use of their MD in hospital. This work analyses retrospectively after 8years, all assessed MD until March 2011 and the scientific quality of the clinical data submitted by manufacturers to the CODIMS to purchase their MD. All MD were classed according to their certification's level (I, IIa, IIb, III, DMIA). The quality of available clinical studies (CS) provided by manufacturers for each case was assessed and classed according to five clinical relevance levels based on the evidence-based medecine standards (1-2: high methodology; 3-5: low methodology). One hundred and three MD files (80 % of class IIb and III MD) were analysed by the CODIMS (630CS). Our results highlight the lack of relevance of files that are provided to assess innovated MD: 29 files without any CS; concerning class IIb (32DMS, 221CS) and III (50, 342CS) MD, only 6 % of CS presented a correct clinical relevance level. And the situation did not get better during this assessment period. The CODIMS deplore the poor clinical relevance of files provided to assess MD (wrong comparator, inappropriate ends-points, insufficient follow-up to assess long-term security, small population studied). Future legislative developments for MD assessment are expected to improve this situation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessing Medical Students' Awareness of and Sensitivity to Diverse Health Beliefs Using a Standardized Patient Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Lynne S.; White, Casey B.; Alexander, Gwen L.; Gruppen, Larry D.; Grum, Cyril M.

    2001-01-01

    Assessed students' competence in addressing the health beliefs and cultural concerns of a standardized patient, an African American woman with diabetes, during a clinical interview. Found that minority students displayed greater competence in addressing the patient's concerns about altering culturally-based dietary behaviors; white students…

  14. Personality Assessment Use by Clinical Neuropsychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven R.; Gorske, Tad T.; Wiggins, Chauntel; Little, Jessica A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study is an exploration of the personality assessment practices of clinical neuropsychologists. Professional members of the National Academy of Neuropsychology and the International Neuropsychological Society (N = 404) were surveyed to examine use of several forms of personality, behavior, and emotional function measures. Results…

  15. Clinical Assessment of Family Caregivers in Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Eric D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Evaluated development of integrated family assessment inventory based on Double ABCX and Circumplex models of family functioning and its clinical utility with 121 primary family caregivers from cognitive disorders program. Proposed model predicted significant proportion of variance associated with caregiver stress and strain. Several aspects of…

  16. Formative assessment promotes learning in undergraduate clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Clinical clerkships, typically situated in environments lacking educational structure, form the backbone of undergraduate medical training. The imperative to develop strategies that enhance learning in this context is apparent. This study explored the impact of longitudinal bedside formative assessment on ...

  17. Patient flow in the preoperative assessment clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edward, G. M.; Razzaq, S.; de Roodj, A.; Boer, Fred; Hollmann, M. W.; Dzoljic, M.; Lemalre, L. C.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objective: Previous research has shown that a preoperative assessment clinic enhances hospital cost-efficiency. However, the differences in organization of the patient flow have not been analysed. In this descriptive study, we evaluated the consequences of the organization of the

  18. A Deep Learning Solution for Automatic Fetal Neurosonographic Diagnostic Plane Verification Using Clinical Standard Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqub, Mohammad; Kelly, Brenda; Papageorghiou, Aris T; Noble, J Alison

    2017-12-01

    During routine ultrasound assessment of the fetal brain for biometry estimation and detection of fetal abnormalities, accurate imaging planes must be found by sonologists following a well-defined imaging protocol or clinical standard, which can be difficult for non-experts to do well. This assessment helps provide accurate biometry estimation and the detection of possible brain abnormalities. We describe a machine-learning method to assess automatically that transventricular ultrasound images of the fetal brain have been correctly acquired and meet the required clinical standard. We propose a deep learning solution, which breaks the problem down into three stages: (i) accurate localization of the fetal brain, (ii) detection of regions that contain structures of interest and (iii) learning the acoustic patterns in the regions that enable plane verification. We evaluate the developed methodology on a large real-world clinical data set of 2-D mid-gestation fetal images. We show that the automatic verification method approaches human expert assessment. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Standards of Ombudsman Assessment: A New Normative Concept?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Remac

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Today, an ombudsman is a traditional component of democratic legal systems. Generally, reports of the ombudsman are not legally binding. Due to this fact, the ombudsman can rely only on his own persuasiveness, on his acceptance by individuals and state institutions, on the understanding of the administration and on the accessibility and transparency of rules that underpin his reports. During investigations, ombudsmen assess whether the administration has acted in accordance with certain legal or extra-legal standards. Depending on the legal system, ombudsmen can investigate whether there is an instance of maladministration in the activities of administrative bodies, whether the administration has acted ‘properly’, whether it has acted in accordance with the law, whether administrative actions have breached the human rights of complainants or whether the actions of the administration were in accordance with anti-corruption rules etc. Regardless of the legislative standard of an ombudsman’s control, the ombudsman should consider and assess the situation described in complaints against certain criteria or against certain normative standards. A distinct set of standards which ombudsmen use during their investigation, or at least a clear statement of their assessment criteria, can increase the transparency of their procedures and the persuasiveness of their reports. Are the normative standards used by different ombudsmen the same? Do they possibly create a new normative concept? And can it possibly lead to a higher acceptance of their reports by the administration?

  20. STANDARDIZING QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF FUSED REMOTELY SENSED IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pohl

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The multitude of available operational remote sensing satellites led to the development of many image fusion techniques to provide high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution images. The comparison of different techniques is necessary to obtain an optimized image for the different applications of remote sensing. There are two approaches in assessing image quality: 1. Quantitatively by visual interpretation and 2. Quantitatively using image quality indices. However an objective comparison is difficult due to the fact that a visual assessment is always subject and a quantitative assessment is done by different criteria. Depending on the criteria and indices the result varies. Therefore it is necessary to standardize both processes (qualitative and quantitative assessment in order to allow an objective image fusion quality evaluation. Various studies have been conducted at the University of Osnabrueck (UOS to establish a standardized process to objectively compare fused image quality. First established image fusion quality assessment protocols, i.e. Quality with No Reference (QNR and Khan's protocol, were compared on varies fusion experiments. Second the process of visual quality assessment was structured and standardized with the aim to provide an evaluation protocol. This manuscript reports on the results of the comparison and provides recommendations for future research.

  1. Standardizing Quality Assessment of Fused Remotely Sensed Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, C.; Moellmann, J.; Fries, K.

    2017-09-01

    The multitude of available operational remote sensing satellites led to the development of many image fusion techniques to provide high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution images. The comparison of different techniques is necessary to obtain an optimized image for the different applications of remote sensing. There are two approaches in assessing image quality: 1. Quantitatively by visual interpretation and 2. Quantitatively using image quality indices. However an objective comparison is difficult due to the fact that a visual assessment is always subject and a quantitative assessment is done by different criteria. Depending on the criteria and indices the result varies. Therefore it is necessary to standardize both processes (qualitative and quantitative assessment) in order to allow an objective image fusion quality evaluation. Various studies have been conducted at the University of Osnabrueck (UOS) to establish a standardized process to objectively compare fused image quality. First established image fusion quality assessment protocols, i.e. Quality with No Reference (QNR) and Khan's protocol, were compared on varies fusion experiments. Second the process of visual quality assessment was structured and standardized with the aim to provide an evaluation protocol. This manuscript reports on the results of the comparison and provides recommendations for future research.

  2. Xpand chest drain: assessing equivalence to current standard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    leakage from 'open to air' system or breakage of glass bottle (with associated risk to ... and an air-leak detection system. It is connected to a ... need to add water. Xpand chest drain: assessing equivalence to current standard therapy – a randomised controlled trial. CHARL COOPER, M.B. CH.B. TIMOTHY HARDCASTLE ...

  3. Assessment of Ethical and Other Professional Standards in Private ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compliance of 21 private medical laboratories in Osun State with ethical and other professional was assessed by the authors' pre and post inspection by the Medical Laboratory Science Council of Nigeria (MLSCN). Laboratory environment, personnel, equipment and adherence to Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) ...

  4. Evaluation of the efficiency of standard assessment for Category C ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article evaluates the application and efficiency of the Ethiopian standard tax assessment, as enshrined in the Income Tax Regulation No. 78/2002, against the tax liability of Category C Taxpayers, commonly known as small business taxpayers, referring to the practice in Eastern Zone Administration of the Tigray ...

  5. Motivational Effects of Standardized Language Assessment on Chinese Young Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chuqiao

    2016-01-01

    This review paper examines how standardized language assessment affects Chinese young learners' motivation for second-language learning. By presenting the historical and contemporary contexts of the testing system in China, this paper seeks to demonstrate the interrelationship among cultural, social, familial, and individual factors, which…

  6. Psychosocial Assessment as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazak, Anne E.; Abrams, Annah N.; Banks, Jaime; Christofferson, Jennifer; DiDonato, Stephen; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Kabour, Marianne; Madan-Swain, Avi; Patel, Sunita K.; Zadeh, Sima; Kupst, Mary Jo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the evidence for a standard of care for psychosocial assessment in pediatric cancer. An interdisciplinary group of investigators utilized EBSCO, PubMed, PsycINFO, Ovid, and Google Scholar search databases, focusing on five areas: youth/family psychosocial adjustment, family

  7. 75 FR 66038 - Planning Resource Adequacy Assessment Reliability Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... adequacy of specific loads (customer demand and energy requirements) within a Planning Authority Area... risks regarding the capability to balance resources and demand in a planning timeframe. Acknowledging...] Planning Resource Adequacy Assessment Reliability Standard Issued October 21, 2010. AGENCY: Federal Energy...

  8. Assessment of non-standard HIV antiretroviral therapy regimens at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-06

    Mar 6, 2016 ... guidelines for children and not adults. Discussion. Less than 1% of the 17,000 patients receiving ART for treatment of HIV at Lighthouse Trust in 2012 were being treated with NS-ART, signifying a strong adherence to standardized regimens by clinicians. Assessing the reasons for use of NS-ART is essential ...

  9. Clinical standard of neurosurgical disorder. (9) Disturbance of consciousness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Tomio

    2009-01-01

    Functional diagnosis of consciousness disturbance (CD) in acute and chronic stages is becoming more important along with the progress of morphological diagnosis by CT and MRI at the stroke and brain lesion. Here described and discussed are the definition of consciousness and unconsciousness, cause and scoring of CD by various scaling and clinical significance of the scale for therapy. The author's definition for consciousness is based on patients' self identity and orientation. The above CD is essentially caused by the increased intracranial pressure, which is evaluable by imaging as the increase is derived from the herniation by tumor or edema mainly through transtentorial (uncal, hippocampal) and/or foraminal (cerebellar tonsillar) pathways. Scaling of CD stands on three factors of validity, reliability and feasibility, of which standards of JCS (Japan coma scale) and GCS (Glasgow coma scale) have been widely employed. In discussion of merit/demerit of JCS and GCS, the author et al. have proposed a new scale ECS (emergency coma scale) with 3 levels of digit code for patient's response and behavior under CD. Therapeutic outcome is greatly affected by acute CD levels evaluable by scaling, in which awakening/alertness relates with mortality, and local symptom/consciousness, with morbidity. ECS is now globally getting around. (K.T.)

  10. A Student Assessment Tool for Standardized Patient Simulations (SAT-SPS): Psychometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Yuste, Cristina; García-Cabanillas, María José; Rodríguez-Cornejo, María Jesús; Carnicer-Fuentes, Concepción; Paloma-Castro, Olga; Moreno-Corral, Luis Javier

    2018-05-01

    The evaluation of the level of clinical competence acquired by the student is a complex process that must meet various requirements to ensure its quality. The psychometric analysis of the data collected by the assessment tools used is a fundamental aspect to guarantee the student's competence level. To conduct a psychometric analysis of an instrument which assesses clinical competence in nursing students at simulation stations with standardized patients in OSCE-format tests. The construct of clinical competence was operationalized as a set of observable and measurable behaviors, measured by the newly-created Student Assessment Tool for Standardized Patient Simulations (SAT-SPS), which was comprised of 27 items. The categories assigned to the items were 'incorrect or not performed' (0), 'acceptable' (1), and 'correct' (2). 499 nursing students. Data were collected by two independent observers during the assessment of the students' performance at a four-station OSCE with standardized patients. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the variables. The difficulty levels and floor and ceiling effects were determined for each item. Reliability was analyzed using internal consistency and inter-observer reliability. The validity analysis was performed considering face validity, content and construct validity (through exploratory factor analysis), and criterion validity. Internal reliability and inter-observer reliability were higher than 0.80. The construct validity analysis suggested a three-factor model accounting for 37.1% of the variance. These three factors were named 'Nursing process', 'Communication skills', and 'Safe practice'. A significant correlation was found between the scores obtained and the students' grades in general, as well as with the grades obtained in subjects with clinical content. The assessment tool has proven to be sufficiently reliable and valid for the assessment of the clinical competence of nursing students using standardized patients

  11. Risk assessment instruments in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Gilles; Crocker, Anne G; Nicholls, Tonia L; Seto, Michael C

    2012-04-01

    To determine whether the items in one of the most widely validated instruments of violence risk assessment, the Historical-Clinical-Risk Management-20 (HCR-20), are used in review board hearings to assess the risk of violence by people found Not Criminally Responsible on account of Mental Disorder (NCRMD). This study was conducted from October 2004 to August 2006 in Quebec's sole forensic psychiatric hospital and 2 large civil psychiatric hospitals designated for the care of people declared NCRMD in the Montreal metropolitan area. The risk assessments presented by clinicians at annual review board hearings and the boards' rationale for the release or detention of people found NCRMD were contrasted with the risk assessments conducted by the research team using the HCR-20. The final sample was comprised of 96 men. Very few of the risk factors identified by prior research (HCR-20 items) were mentioned in the hearing process, whether in clinical reports, discussions during the hearing, or in the disposition justification. The findings confirm that there remains a significant gap between research evidence and risk assessment practice.

  12. The clinical assessment of aggressive periodontitis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Chan-Myung; You, Hyung-Keun; Jeong, Seong-Nyum

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Few epidemiologic studies have investigated aggressive periodontitis in Koreans, but such studies of disease prevalence and other clinical characteristics would be invaluable in providing proper treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of aggressive periodontitis and to measure the extent of associated periodontal breakdown. Methods The study population consisted of 1,692 patients who visited the Department of Periodontology, Wonkwang Daejeon Dental Hospital from ...

  13. The Role of Self- and Peer Assessment in Dental Students' Reflective Practice Using Standardized Patient Encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Karin K

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into the nature of the role played by self- and peer assessment in the development of dental students' reflective practice skills and the value gained through structured encounters with standardized patients. Four standardized patient encounters in an objective structured clinical exam (OSCE) format served as a learning experience for students to demonstrate decision making and communication skills in complex scenarios regarding issues of ethics. Self- and peer assessment and peer-to-peer discourse were used to enhance student reflection. A sample of 16 peer pairs was randomly selected from the population of 108 fourth-year students who participated in the 2014 Clinical Dental Ethics OSCE. Data were collected from self- and peer assessment forms. Five overall performance themes (personal affect, verbal communication, professional demeanor, relationship-building, and patient management) and three student learning themes (application and knowledge, ways to change, and impressed with peer/increased confidence in self) were identified. The results showed that peer assessment ratings were consistently higher than those in the self-assessments, but overall the students deemed both their peers' and their own decision making and communication skills to be quite good. These students rated their experience with the OSCE and self- and peer assessments as positive, appreciating the importance of reflection and learning from their peers. These results provide support for the continued formative use of standardized patient OSCEs and self- and peer assessment to help students develop skills in decision making, communication, professionalism, and reflection.

  14. Savannah River Site peer evaluator standards: Operator assessment for restart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Savannah River Site has implemented a Peer Evaluator program for the assessment of certified Central Control Room Operators, Central Control Room Supervisors and Shift Technical Engineers prior to restart. This program is modeled after the nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Examiner Standard, ES-601, for the requalification of licensed operators in the commercial utility industry. It has been tailored to reflect the unique differences between Savannah River production reactors and commercial power reactors

  15. Savannah River Site peer evaluator standards: Operator assessment for restart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    Savannah River Site has implemented a Peer Evaluator program for the assessment of certified Central Control Room Operators, Central Control Room Supervisors and Shift Technical Engineers prior to restart. This program is modeled after the nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) Examiner Standard, ES-601, for the requalification of licensed operators in the commercial utility industry. It has been tailored to reflect the unique differences between Savannah River production reactors and commercial power reactors.

  16. Savannah River Site peer evaluator standards: Operator assessment for restart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    Savannah River Site has implemented a Peer Evaluator program for the assessment of certified Central Control Room Operators, Central Control Room Supervisors and Shift Technical Engineers prior to restart. This program is modeled after the nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Examiner Standard, ES-601, for the requalification of licensed operators in the commercial utility industry. It has been tailored to reflect the unique differences between Savannah River production reactors and commercial power reactors.

  17. Improving clinical assessment: evaluating students' ability to identify and apply clinical criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwood, C; Winning, T; Lekkas, D; Townsend, G

    2010-08-01

    There is ongoing concern by health educators over the inability of professionals to accurately self-assess their clinical behaviour and standards, resulting in doubts over a key expectation of effective self-regulation in the health professions. Participation by students in the assessment process has been shown to increase the understanding of assessment criteria in written assessment tasks. How this might transfer to the clinical setting is the focus of this study. This paper is part of an ongoing investigation of the impact on learning of a series of activities that provides students with opportunities to discuss and apply criteria and standards associated with self-assessment in clinical dentistry. Our aim was to evaluate whether participation in these assessment activities improved the ability of first-year dental students to recognise behaviours demonstrated by 'peers' in videos of clinical scenarios and to relate these to the assessment criteria. A series of three workshops in conjunction with weekly clinical assessment activities in Semesters 1 and 2 were use to support first-year students' learning of clinical assessment criteria. The design of the workshops was based on the principles of social constructivist theories of learning and the concept of tacit knowledge. Accordingly workshop activities were planned around videos that were specifically constructed to illustrate procedures and behaviours typical of those observed by staff and tutors in the first year of the dental course at The University of Adelaide, Australia. First-year students viewed the videos prior to and after the workshops and recorded observed behaviours that related to the assessment criteria that were used in their clinical practice course. Student learning outcomes were assessed 10-14 weeks after the initial workshop and again up to 42 weeks later. To check whether learning resulted from repeated viewing of the videos without formal discussion, a reference group of third-year students

  18. Standards for Clinical Trials in Male and Female Sexual Dysfunction: I. Phase I to Phase IV Clinical Trial Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William A; Gruenwald, Ilan; Jannini, Emmanuele A; Lev-Sagie, Ahinoam; Lowenstein, Lior; Pyke, Robert E; Reisman, Yakov; Revicki, Dennis A; Rubio-Aurioles, Eusebio

    2016-12-01

    This series of articles outlines standards for clinical trials of treatments for male and female sexual dysfunctions, with a focus on research design and patient-reported outcome assessment. These articles consist of revision, updating, and integration of articles on standards for clinical trials in male and female sexual dysfunction from the 2010 International Consultation on Sexual Medicine developed by the authors as part of the 2015 International Consultation on Sexual Medicine. We are guided in this effort by several principles. In contrast to previous versions of these guidelines, we merge discussion of standards for clinical trials in male and female sexual dysfunction in an integrated approach that emphasizes the common foundational practices that underlie clinical trials in the two settings. We present a common expected standard for clinical trial design in male and female sexual dysfunction, a common rationale for the design of phase I to IV clinical trials, and common considerations for selection of study population and study duration in male and female sexual dysfunction. We present a focused discussion of fundamental principles in patient- (and partner-) reported outcome assessment and complete this series of articles with specific discussions of selected aspects of clinical trials that are unique to male and to female sexual dysfunction. Our consideration of standards for clinical trials in male and female sexual dysfunction attempts to embody sensitivity to existing and new regulatory guidance and to address implications of the evolution of the diagnosis of sexual dysfunction that have been brought forward in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. The first article in this series focuses on phase I to phase IV clinical trial design considerations. Subsequent articles in this series focus on the measurement of patient-reported outcomes, unique aspects of clinical trial design for men, and unique aspects of clinical

  19. Assessing undergraduate nursing students in clinical practice: do preceptors use assessment strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Bridie; Murphy, Siobhan

    2008-04-01

    Health care organisations such as the World Health Organisation (WHO) and An Bord Altranais (ABA, The Irish Nursing Registration Board) demand higher standards of new graduate nurses than heretofore. This is in conjunction with the implementation of degree programmes for undergraduate nurse education. These organisations stipulate that graduates must be well-educated, accountable, and can demonstrate the skills of a safe, caring and competent decision-making practitioner. The Bachelor of Science (BSc) four-year degree programme for undergraduate nurse education was introduced in Ireland in 2002, and is provided in universities and colleges of higher education throughout The Republic of Ireland. During the implementation process, each university and college of higher education developed a range of assessment strategies to clinically assess students. Preceptor nurses were subsequently assigned the responsibility of clinically assessing students, a remit previously undertaken by Clinical Ward/Unit Nurse Managers. Preceptors are qualified nurses, working in clinical units who are specially prepared to support BSc students during clinical placements. The purpose of this study was to explore to what extent preceptor nurses use the devised assessment strategies to clinically assess BSc students in one university in The Republic of Ireland. Data were collected by using a questionnaire distributed to all known preceptors in General, Psychiatric and Intellectual Disability nursing, during year four of the first cycle of the BSc programme. Findings from this descriptive study revealed that many preceptors were inexperienced, did not fully comprehend the assessment process and were not applying all of the recommended assessment strategies when assessing students in clinical practice. In light of these findings suggestions are made in the context of further research, management and education.

  20. Examiner alignment and assessment in clinical periodontal research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefti, Arthur F; Preshaw, Philip M

    2012-06-01

    Periodontal research typically relies on clinical examiners to assess variables such as gingival inflammation, plaque scores or probing depths as a means of determining treatment outcomes or for performing group comparisons. The quality of the gathered information is dependent, to a large extent, on the skills of the examiner(s) and on the validity of the assessment methods that are used. Attempts have been made to increase the objectivity of periodontal assessments, for example by introducing scoring systems for gingival inflammation, but within these systems there is often considerable scope for variation when interpreting the scoring criteria, leading to subjectivity when assigning scores to individual periodontal sites. This has led to an awareness of the importance of examiner alignment and assessment to improve the data quality by standardizing techniques and improving examiner reliability. Examiner alignment and assessment is used in preference to the term 'examiner calibration' because calibration implies comparison with an accurate or 'gold' standard, which is not available in periodontal research. In this review, we consider the historical perspective that led to the development of clinical scoring systems for periodontal research using gingival inflammation as an example. A clinical protocol for undertaking examiner alignment and assessment is presented, and we review the common sources of error and bias that can lead to difficulties in aligning examiners, and consider how they can be eliminated. It is particularly important that subjects who are recruited to the examiner alignment and assessment study present with a comparable level of disease to the subjects who will ultimately be recruited to the planned clinical trial. Another challenge in examiner alignment and assessment is applying appropriate statistical tests to assess the outcome of the alignment exercise. In the periodontal literature, the statistic kappa is frequently used to confirm an

  1. A standardized methodology for the surveillance of antimicrobial prescribing linked to clinical indications in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sue; Hawker, Jeremy I; Smith, Gillian E; Morbey, Roger; Johnson, Alan P; Fleming, Douglas M; Shallcross, Laura; Hayward, Andrew C

    2017-09-11

    A key component of strategies to reduce antimicrobial resistance is better antimicrobial prescribing. The majority of antibiotics are prescribed in primary care. While many existing surveillance systems can monitor trends in the quantities of antibiotics prescribed in this setting, it can be difficult to monitor the quality of prescribing as data on the condition for which prescriptions are issued are often not available. We devised a standardized methodology to facilitate the monitoring of condition-specific antibiotic prescribing in primary care. We used a large computerized general practitioner database to develop a standardized methodology for routine monitoring of antimicrobial prescribing linked to clinical indications in primary care in the UK. Outputs included prescribing rate by syndrome and percentages of consultations with antibiotic prescription, for recommended antibiotic, and of recommended treatment length. The standardized methodology can monitor trends in proportions of common infections for which antibiotics were prescribed, the specific drugs prescribed and duration of treatment. These data can be used to help assess the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing and to assess the impact of prescribing guidelines. We present a standardized methodology that could be applied to any suitable national or local database and adapted for use in other countries. © Crown copyright 2017.

  2. WE-F-BRB-01: The Power of Ontologies and Standardized Terminologies for Capturing Clinical Knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, P.

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in informatics in radiotherapy are opening up opportunities to improve our ability to assess treatment plans. Models on individualizing patient dose constraints from prior patient data and shape relationships have been extensively researched and are now making their way into commercial products. New developments in knowledge based treatment planning involve understanding the impact of the radiation dosimetry on the patient. Akin to radiobiology models that have driven intensity modulated radiotherapy optimization, toxicity and outcome predictions based on treatment plans and prior patient experiences may be the next step in knowledge based planning. In order to realize these predictions, it is necessary to understand how the clinical information can be captured, structured and organized with ontologies and databases designed for recall. Large databases containing radiation dosimetry and outcomes present the opportunity to evaluate treatment plans against predictions of toxicity and disease response. Such evaluations can be based on dose volume histogram or even the full 3-dimensional dose distribution and its relation to the critical anatomy. This session will provide an understanding of ontologies and standard terminologies used to capture clinical knowledge into structured databases; How data can be organized and accessed to utilize the knowledge in planning; and examples of research and clinical efforts to incorporate that clinical knowledge into planning for improved care for our patients. Learning Objectives: Understand the role of standard terminologies, ontologies and data organization in oncology Understand methods to capture clinical toxicity and outcomes in a clinical setting Understand opportunities to learn from clinical data and its application to treatment planning Todd McNutt receives funding from Philips, Elekta and Toshiba for some of the work presented

  3. Standardized assessment of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tramm, Trine; Di Caterino, Tina; Jylling, Anne Marie B.

    2018-01-01

    by the International TILs Working Group 2014, applied to a cohort of breast cancers reflecting an average breast cancer population. Material and methods: Stromal TILs were assessed using full slide sections from 124 breast cancers with varying histology, malignancy grade and ER- and HER2 status. TILs were estimated......Introduction: In breast cancer, there is a growing body of evidence that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) may have clinical utility and may be able to direct clinical decisions for subgroups of patients. Clinical utility is, however, not sufficient for warranting the implementation of a new...... by nine dedicated breast pathologists using scanned hematoxylin–eosin stainings. TILs results were categorized using various cutoffs, and the inter-observer agreement was evaluated using the intraclass coefficient (ICC), Kappa statistics as well as individual overall agreements with the median value...

  4. Guidelines for Standard Photography in Gross and Clinical Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Cagatay; Ertilav, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    Photography has a widespread usage in medicine and anatomy. In this review, authors focused on the usage of photography in gross and clinical anatomy. Photography in gross and clinical anatomy is not only essential for accurate documentation of morphological findings but also important in sharing knowledge and experience. Photographs of cadavers…

  5. Effectiveness of Standardized Patient Simulations in Teaching Clinical Communication Skills to Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Carly T; Tilashalski, Ken R; Peterson, Dawn Taylor; White, Marjorie Lee

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate dental students' long-term retention of clinical communication skills learned in a second-year standardized patient simulation at one U.S. dental school. Retention was measured by students' performance with an actual patient during their fourth year. The high-fidelity simulation exercise focused on clinical communication skills took place during the spring term of the students' second year. The effect of the simulation was measured by comparing the fourth-year clinical performance of two groups: those who had participated in the simulation (intervention group; Class of 2016) and those who had not (no intervention/control group; Class of 2015). In the no intervention group, all 47 students participated; in the intervention group, 58 of 59 students participated. Both instructor assessments and students' self-assessments were used to evaluate the effectiveness of key patient interaction principles as well as comprehensive presentation of multiple treatment options. The results showed that students in the intervention group more frequently included cost during their treatment option presentation than did students in the no intervention group. The instructor ratings showed that the intervention group included all key treatment option components except duration more frequently than did the no intervention group. However, the simulation experience did not result in significantly more effective student-patient clinical communication on any of the items measured. This study presents limited evidence of the effectiveness of a standardized patient simulation to improve dental students' long-term clinical communication skills with respect to thorough presentation of treatment options to a patient.

  6. Clinical Assessment of Cardiovascular and Autonomic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Benitez

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a non-invasive virtual medical instrument for the clinical assessment of cardiovascular and autonomic function. The virtual instrument was developed with the aim of analysing and understanding the physiological changes that occurs in the heart and circulation during vasovagal blackout attacks. The automated virtual instrument allows impedance cardiography analysis, time and frequency heart rate and blood pressure variability analysis, invasive and non-invasive baroreflex sensitivity assessment and forearm blood flow measurements. Using this virtual instrument five control subjects (3 male, mean age 30.6 ± 5.4 and five vasovagal syncope suffers (2 male, mean age 38.6 ± 6.3 were used in a study to try to identify the differences between the two groups to tilt induced syncope. The results obtained suggest that there are fundamental differences in the physiological responses to orthostatic stress between vasovagal patients and controls, which are evident before the onset of major haemodynamic changes.

  7. Assessing Binocular Interaction in Amblyopia and Its Clinical Feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, MiYoung; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Miller, Alexandra; Kazlas, Melanie; Hunter, David G.; Bex, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To measure binocular interaction in amblyopes using a rapid and patient-friendly computer-based method, and to test the feasibility of the assessment in the clinic. Methods Binocular interaction was assessed in subjects with strabismic amblyopia (n = 7), anisometropic amblyopia (n = 6), strabismus without amblyopia (n = 15) and normal vision (n = 40). Binocular interaction was measured with a dichoptic phase matching task in which subjects matched the position of a binocular probe to the cyclopean perceived phase of a dichoptic pair of gratings whose contrast ratios were systematically varied. The resulting effective contrast ratio of the weak eye was taken as an indicator of interocular imbalance. Testing was performed in an ophthalmology clinic under 8 mins. We examined the relationships between our binocular interaction measure and standard clinical measures indicating abnormal binocularity such as interocular acuity difference and stereoacuity. The test-retest reliability of the testing method was also evaluated. Results Compared to normally-sighted controls, amblyopes exhibited significantly reduced effective contrast (∼20%) of the weak eye, suggesting a higher contrast requirement for the amblyopic eye compared to the fellow eye. We found that the effective contrast ratio of the weak eye covaried with standard clincal measures of binocular vision. Our results showed that there was a high correlation between the 1st and 2nd measurements (r = 0.94, pamblyopia. PMID:24959842

  8. Evaluating Objective Structured Clinical Assessment (OSCA) in undergraduate nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Leah; Peters, Kathleen; Halcomb, Elizabeth; Raymond, Debra; Salamonson, Yenna

    2014-09-01

    The aims of this mixed methods study were to gain insight into how individual assessors determine an Objective Structured Clinical Assessment (OSCA) result for undergraduate nursing students and identify whether individual assessor perceptions and professional characteristics have an impact on students' results. Results from 25 participants showed that although less than half (44%) of the participants were teaching in the course that they were assessing, the participants were highly experienced clinicians and nearly three-quarters (72%) had completed formal teaching qualifications. There were wide variations in pass rates (16.7-90%) between assessors. The widest disparity was observed between assessors with and those without critical care experience (66% versus 39%), as well as assessors who were teaching the course and those who were not (68% versus 49%). Qualitative analysis revealed three dominant themes within participants' transcripts. The themes focused on determining student safety, and the use of personal perceptions and clinical experience to determine competency. Findings indicate that assessors' individual perceptions and clinical experience have the potential to influence and determine undergraduate nursing students OSCA results. Development of criteria standards and objective assessment may be enhanced by greater involvement of assessors and thorough education and training within the context of student assessments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessing Nursing Students' Clinical Competencies Using a Problem-Focused Objective Structured Clinical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuemei; Yang, Li; Lin, Ping; Lu, Guizhi; Xiao, Ningning; Yang, Shufen; Sui, Shujie

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop, implement, and evaluate an innovative modified Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) model, and to compare students' performance of different clinical skills as assessed by standardized patients and OSCE examiners. Data were obtained from final year undergraduate students undergoing the modified OSCE as a graduation examination. Seventy-seven students rotated through four stations (nine substations). Standardized patients scored students higher than examiners in history taking (9.14 ± 0.92 vs. 8.42 ± 0.85), response to emergency event (8.88 ± 1.12 vs. 7.62 ± 1.54), executive medical orders (8.77 ± 0.96 vs. 8.25 ± 1.43), technical operation (18.21 ± 1.26 vs. 16.91 ± 1.35), nursing evaluation (4.53 ± 0.28 vs. 4.29 ± 0.52), and health education stations (13.79 ± 1.31 vs. 11.93 ± 2.25; p physical examination skills was nonsignificant (8.70 ± 1.18 vs. 8.80 ± 1.27; p > .05). The modified, problem-focused, and nursing process-driven OSCE model effectively assessed nursing students' clinical competencies, and clinical and critical thinking. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Reef Fish Survey Techniques: Assessing the Potential for Standardizing Methodologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary R Caldwell

    Full Text Available Dramatic changes in populations of fishes living on coral reefs have been documented globally and, in response, the research community has initiated efforts to assess and monitor reef fish assemblages. A variety of visual census techniques are employed, however results are often incomparable due to differential methodological performance. Although comparability of data may promote improved assessment of fish populations, and thus management of often critically important nearshore fisheries, to date no standardized and agreed-upon survey method has emerged. This study describes the use of methods across the research community and identifies potential drivers of method selection. An online survey was distributed to researchers from academic, governmental, and non-governmental organizations internationally. Although many methods were identified, 89% of survey-based projects employed one of three methods-belt transect, stationary point count, and some variation of the timed swim method. The selection of survey method was independent of the research design (i.e., assessment goal and region of study, but was related to the researcher's home institution. While some researchers expressed willingness to modify their current survey protocols to more standardized protocols (76%, their willingness decreased when methodologies were tied to long-term datasets spanning five or more years. Willingness to modify current methodologies was also less common among academic researchers than resource managers. By understanding both the current application of methods and the reported motivations for method selection, we hope to focus discussions towards increasing the comparability of quantitative reef fish survey data.

  11. [Clinical gastroenterology--luxury or standard of service in gastroenterology?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkner, B

    2005-12-01

    Gastroenterology is one of the important specialities in internal medicine. The reform of the training curriculum for internal medicine and the reimbursement for inpatient and outpatient services in gastroenterology threatens the existence of internal medicine and gastroenterology in Germany, too. The capacity for training in internal medicine and gastroenterology is reduced by a decrease in the number of hospital beds in academic and community training centres. The concentration on gastrointestinal endoscopy in outpatient gastroenterology will be a result of an increasing demand for gastrointestinal endoscopy services and the decreasing number of gastroenterology clinics, respectively. Therefore, clinical gastroenterology as a core service in gastroenterology will be steadily eliminated. This development will diminish clinical gastroenterology to gastrointestinal endoscopy by eliminating the clinical services for chronic gastroenterological conditions such as, e.g., IBD, chronic hepatitis, reflux disease, IBS and functional dyspepsia. In this way gastroenterology looses its central role in health care services in specialised internal medicine. In 2003 the American Gastroenterological Association position paper: "Training the Gastroenterologist of the Future: the Gastroenterology Core Curriculum" was published. It has emphasised the role of clinical gastroenterology in medical training and medical services, too. Clinical gastroenterology consists of an array of several disciplines, e.g., GI physiology, GI research, infectious diseases, hepatology, oncology and gastrointestinal endoscopy, which all contribute to the effectiveness and efficiency in health care service. Financial incentives and better prospects of leading positions for young gastroenterologists in clinical gastroenterology have to be accomplished in order to nourish clinical gastroenterology in Germany. The German Association of Gastroenterology should negotiate with the responsible authorities for

  12. Clinical assessment of bone mass in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L A Sheplyagina

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To give clinical assessment of bone mass main indices in healthy children living in Moscow and Moscow region. Material and methods. 357 healthy children aged 5-16 years (194 male, 163 female were included. Physical development, bone mineral density (BMD by 2-power radiological absorptiometry, bone mineral content (BMC were evaluated. Results. Significant variability of height in children age groups was revealed. 40,2% had disharmonious physical development. BMC and BMD were closely associated with height (r=0,8, p=0,0001 and body mass (r=0,7, p=0,0001. Bone mass indices were proved to be significantly less in children with height and body mass less then 10% percentile. BMD growth rate was less than mineral accumulation rate. Method of body mass clinical assessment in children was elaborated. Conclusion. Application of elaborated tables of conjugated values of anthropometric and densitometric indices allows to decrease of osteopenia overdiagnosis in children and determine causes of insufficient bone mineral content.

  13. Positive animal welfare states and reference standards for welfare assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, D J

    2015-01-01

    Developments in affective neuroscience and behavioural science during the last 10-15 years have together made it increasingly apparent that sentient animals are potentially much more sensitive to their environmental and social circumstances than was previously thought to be the case. It therefore seems likely that both the range and magnitude of welfare trade-offs that occur when animals are managed for human purposes have been underestimated even when minimalistic but arguably well-intentioned attempts have been made to maintain high levels of welfare. In light of these neuroscience-supported behaviour-based insights, the present review considers the extent to which the use of currently available reference standards might draw attention to these previously neglected areas of concern. It is concluded that the natural living orientation cannot provide an all-embracing or definitive welfare benchmark because of its primary focus on behavioural freedom. However assessments of this type, supported by neuroscience insights into behavioural motivation, may now carry greater weight when used to identify management practices that should be avoided, discontinued or substantially modified. Using currently accepted baseline standards as welfare reference points may result in small changes being accorded greater significance than would be the case if they were compared with higher standards, and this could slow the progress towards better levels of welfare. On the other hand, using "what animals want" as a reference standard has the appeal of focusing on the specific resources or conditions the animals would choose themselves and can potentially improve their welfare more quickly than the approach of making small increments above baseline standards. It is concluded that the cautious use of these approaches in different combinations could lead to recommendations that would more effectively promote positive welfare states in hitherto neglected areas of concern.

  14. The clinical assessment of aggressive periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chan-Myung; You, Hyung-Keun; Jeong, Seong-Nyum

    2011-06-01

    Few epidemiologic studies have investigated aggressive periodontitis in Koreans, but such studies of disease prevalence and other clinical characteristics would be invaluable in providing proper treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of aggressive periodontitis and to measure the extent of associated periodontal breakdown. The study population consisted of 1,692 patients who visited the Department of Periodontology, Wonkwang Daejeon Dental Hospital from January to December, 2010. Clinical parameters (probing depth, gingival recession, periodontal attachment loss) were measured by a single examiner, and radiographic examination was performed at the baseline. Twenty-eight (1.65%) patients showed clinical features of aggressive periodontitis, of which 27 patients exhibited the generalized form, and 1 exhibited the localized form. There was no significant difference between the percentage of male and female patients. The probing pocket depth of the maxillary first molar was deeper than that of the other teeth and gingival recession was also the most serious at the maxillary first molar. The periodontal attachment loss was the highest at the maxillary first molar. The average number of missing teeth was 1.29 per subject. Loss of the second molar was prominent. Within the limitations of this study, the periodontal breakdown evaluated by attachment loss was found to be most severe at the first molars of aggressive periodontitis patients. However, further large scale multicenter studies are necessary to access more precise data, including prevalence.

  15. Clinical outcomes assessment in clinical trials to assess treatment of femoroacetabular impingement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris-Hayes, Marcie; McDonough, Christine M; Leunig, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures are an important component of outcomes assessment in clinical trials to assess the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). This review of disease-specific measures and instruments used to assess the generic quality of life and physical activity levels...... developed recently and have not been established in the literature. Although currently used generic and activity-level measures have limitations, as well, they should be considered, depending on the specific goals of the study. Additional research is needed to assess the properties of these measures fully...

  16. Assessment of a Motivational Interviewing Curriculum for Year 3 Medical Students Using a Standardized Patient Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeseler, Frederick; Fortin, Auguste H.; Pfeiffer, Carol; Walters, Cheryl; Martino, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Objective We sought to evaluate a year 3 motivational interviewing (MI) curriculum using a standardized patient case. Methods The 2-hour small group MI curriculum included a didactic presentation followed by interactive role plays. During a clinical skills assessment at the end of year 3 the MI skills of 80 students who had participated in the curriculum were compared with those of 19 students who had not participated. Results The standardized patient reliably rated the students on their performance of 8 items. Students who had participated in the MI curriculum were significantly more proficient than nonparticipating students in the performance of 2 strategic MI skills, importance and confidence rulers (ps motivations for change. Practice Implications Medical schools should consider providing students with MI training and MI skill assessments using standardized patient cases to help students prepare to counsel patients for behavior change. PMID:21123019

  17. Microbial air quality and standard precaution practice in a hospital dental clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Panya, Navapan; Sujirarat, Dusit; Thaweboon, Sroisiri

    2009-12-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to assess standard precaution practices among dental personnel and to investigate microbial counts in indoor air samples collected from a hospital dental clinic before and during dental works. Thirty dental personnel who voluntarily participated were interviewed using a questionnaire towards demographic information and standard precaution practices between May and August 2007. Additionally, 138 indoor air samples (72 from dental treatment units, 48 from dental supporting units and offices and 18 from patient waiting area) were collected before and during dental works for 6 days (Monday to Saturday) to investigate bacterial and fungal counts. Data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics. Paired t-test was used for analyzing the difference of mean + standard deviation between microbial counts before and during dental procedures. The statistical significance was expressed in term of p-value and the critical level was set at alpha = 0.05. The results revealed that standard precaution practices towards wearing personal protective equipments regularly during dental procedures ranged from 50% to 100%, whereas, cleaning and disinfecting dental unit after each patient treatment and cleaning dental unit water lines with antiseptics every week were done regularly only 36.7%. The mean score of standard precaution was 8.4 +/- 2.5 (moderate level, total score of 13). The means of bacterial and fungal counts in air samples collected from dental treatment units significantly increased during dental procedures when compared with those collected before dental works (p 0.05. This study demonstrated the moderate level of standard precaution practice score among studied dental personnel and significantly higher microbial counts (bacterial and fungal counts) in air samples collected from dental treatment units during dental procedures were demonstrated. To reduce the occupational risk among this group, standard precaution practices should be

  18. Assessment of the Japanese Energy Efficiency Standards Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Arakawa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Japanese energy efficiency standards program for appliances is a unique program which sets and revises mandatory standards based on the products of the highest energy efficiency on the markets. This study assessed the cost-effectiveness of the standard settings for air conditioner as a major residential appliance or typical example in the program. Based on analyses of empirical data, the net costs and effects from 1999 to 2040 were estimated. When applying a discount rate of 3%, the cost of abating CO2 emissions realized through the considered standards was estimated to be -13700 JPY/t-CO2. The sensitivity analysis, however, showed the cost turns into positive at a discount rate of 26% or higher. The authors also revealed that the standards’ “excellent” cost-effectiveness largely depends on that of the 1st standard setting, and the CO2 abatement cost through the 2nd standard was estimated to be as high as 26800 JPY/t-CO2. The results imply that the government is required to be careful about the possible economic burden imposed when considering introducing new, additional standards.

  19. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography of patients using a standard clinical scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Tomas; Wikstroem, Johan; Eriksson, Mats-Ola; Lundberg, Anders; Ahlstroem, Haakan [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Johansson, Lars [Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden); Ljungman, Christer [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery, Uppsala (Sweden); Hoogeven, Romhild [Philips Medical Systems, MR Clinical Science, Best (Netherlands)

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technique of whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of patients with a standard clinical scanner. Thirty-three patients referred for stenoses, occlusions, aneurysms, assessment of patency of vascular grafts, vasculitis and vascular aplasia were examined in a 1.5-T scanner using its standard body coil. Three-dimensional sequences were acquired in four stations after administration of one intravenous injection of 40 ml conventional gadolinium contrast agent. Different vessel segments were evaluated as either diagnostic or nondiagnostic and regarding the presence of stenoses with more than 50% diameter reduction, occlusions or aneurysms. Of 923 vessel segments, 67 were not evaluable because of poor contrast filling (n=31), motion artefacts (n=20), venous overlap (n=12) and other reasons (n=4). Stenoses of more than 50%, occlusions or aneurysms were observed in 26 patients (129 segments). In nine patients additional unsuspected pathology was found. In 10 out of 14 patients (71/79 segments) there was conformity between MRA and digital subtraction angiography regarding the grade of stenosis. This study shows that whole-body MRA with a standard clinical scanner is feasible. Motion artefacts and the timing of the contrast agent through the different segments are still problems to be solved. (orig.)

  20. Audit, guidelines and standards: clinical governance for hip fracture care in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Colin T; Hutchison, James D

    To report on experience of national-level audit, guidelines and standards for hip fracture care in Scotland. Scottish Hip Fracture Audit (from 1993) documents case-mix, process and outcomes of hip fracture care in Scotland. Evidence-based national guidelines on hip fracture care are available (1997, updated 2002). Hip fracture serves as a tracer condition by the health quality assurance authority for its work on older people, which reported in 2004. Audit data are used locally to document care and support and monitor service developments. Synergy between the guidelines and the audit provides a means of improving care locally and monitoring care nationally. External review by the quality assurance body shows to what extent guideline-based standards relating to A&E care, pre-operative delay, multidisciplinary care and audit participation are met. Three national-level initiatives on hip fracture care have delivered: Reliable and large-scale comparative information on case-mix, care and outcomes; evidence-based recommendations on care; and nationally accountable standards inspected and reported by the national health quality assurance authority. These developments are linked and synergistic, and enjoy both clinical and managerial support. They provide an evolving framework for clinical governance, with casemix-adjusted outcome assessment for hip fracture care as a next step.

  1. A collaborative comparison of objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) standard setting methods at Australian medical schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malau-Aduli, B.S.; Teague, P.A.; D'Souza, K.; Heal, C.; Turner, R.; Garne, D.L.; Vleuten, C. van der

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A key issue underpinning the usefulness of the OSCE assessment to medical education is standard setting, but the majority of standard-setting methods remain challenging for performance assessment because they produce varying passing marks. Several studies have compared standard-setting

  2. The Cardiology Audit and Registration Data Standards (CARDS), European data standards for clinical cardiology practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.R. Flynn (Rachel); C. Barrett (Conor); F.G. Cosio (Francisco); A.K. Gitt (Anselm); L.C. Wallentin (Lars); P. Kearney (Peter); M. Lonergan (Moira); E. Shelley (Emer); M.L. Simoons (Maarten)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: Systematic registration of data from clinical practice is important for clinical care, local, national and international registries, and audit. Data to be collected for these different purposes should be harmonized. Therefore, during Ireland's Presidency of the European Union (EU)

  3. Self-assessment: Strategy for higher standards, consistency, and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    In late 1994, Palo Verde operations underwent a transformation from a unitized structure to a single functional unit. It was necessary to build consistency in watchstanding practices and create a shared mission. Because there was a lack of focus on actual plant operations and because personnel were deeply involved with administrative tasks, command and control of evolutions were weak. Improvement was needed. Consistent performance standards have been set for all three operating units. These expectation focus on nuclear, radiological, and industrial safety. Straightforward descriptions of watchstanding and monitoring practices have been provided to all department personnel. The desired professional and leadership qualities for employee conduct have been defined and communicated thoroughly. A healthy and competitive atmosphere developed with the successful implementation of these standards. Overall performance improved. The auxiliary operators demonstrated increased pride and ownership in the performance of their work activities. In addition, their morale improved. Crew teamwork improved as well as the quality of shift briefs. There was a decrease in the noise level and the administrative functions in the control room. The use of self-assessment helped to anchor and define higher and more consistent standards. The proof of Palo Verde's success was evident when an Institute of Nuclear Power Operations finding was turned into a strength within 1 yr

  4. Radiation protection standards: A practical exercise in risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, Roger H.

    1992-01-01

    Within 12 months of the discovery of x-rays in 1895, it was reported that large doses of radiation were harmful to living human tissues. The first radiation protection standards were set to avoid the early effects of acute irradiation. By the 1950s, evidence was mounting for late somatic effects - mainly a small excess of cancers - in irradiated populations. In the late 1980's, sufficient human epidemiological data had been accumulated to allow a comprehensive assessment of carcinogenic radiation risks following the delivery of moderately high doses. Workers and the public are exposed to lower doses and dose-rates than the groups from whom good data are available so that risks have had to be estimated for protection purposes. However, in the 1990s, some confirmation of these risk factors has been derived occupationally exposed populations. If an estimate is made of the risk per unit dose, then in order to set dose limits, an unacceptable level of risk must be established for both workers and the public. There has been and continues to be a debate about the definitions of 'acceptable' and 'tolerable' and the attributing of numerical values to these definitions. This paper discusses the issues involved in the quantification of these terms and their application to setting dose limits on risk grounds. Conclusions are drawn about the present protection standards and the application of the methods to other fields of risk assessment. (author)

  5. Clinical assessment of social cognitive function in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Julie D; von Hippel, William; Molenberghs, Pascal; Lee, Teresa; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2016-01-01

    Social cognition broadly refers to the processing of social information in the brain that underlies abilities such as the detection of others' emotions and responding appropriately to these emotions. Social cognitive skills are critical for successful communication and, consequently, mental health and wellbeing. Disturbances of social cognition are early and salient features of many neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders, and often occur after acute brain injury. Its assessment in the clinic is, therefore, of paramount importance. Indeed, the most recent edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5) introduced social cognition as one of six core components of neurocognitive function, alongside memory and executive control. Failures of social cognition most often present as poor theory of mind, reduced affective empathy, impaired social perception or abnormal social behaviour. Standard neuropsychological assessments lack the precision and sensitivity needed to adequately inform treatment of these failures. In this Review, we present appropriate methods of assessment for each of the four domains, using an example disorder to illustrate the value of these approaches. We discuss the clinical applications of testing for social cognitive function, and finally suggest a five-step algorithm for the evaluation and treatment of impairments, providing quantitative evidence to guide the selection of social cognitive measures in clinical practice.

  6. Psoriatic arthritis: An assessment of clinical, biochemical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , epidemiological, clinical and radiological studies of South African (SA) patients are scarce. Objectives. To assess clinical, biochemical and radiological features in a single-centre SA cohort. Methods. We conducted a prospective assessment ...

  7. Radiotherapy for pediatric brain tumors: Standard of care, current clinical trials, and new directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, Larry E.

    1996-01-01

    Objectives: To review the clinical characteristics of childhood brain tumors, including neurologic signs, neuroimaging and neuropathology. To critically assess indications for therapy relevant to presenting characteristics, age, and disease status. To discuss current management strategies including neurosurgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. To analyze current clinical trials and future directions of clinical research. Brain tumors account for 20% of neoplastic diseases in children. The most common tumors include astrocytoma and malignant gliomas, medulloblastoma and supratentorial PNET's, ependymoma, craniopharyngioma, and intracranial germ cell tumors. Tumor type and clinical course are often correlated with age at presentation and anatomic site. The clinical characteristics and disease extent largely determine the relative merits of available 'standard' and investigational therapeutic approaches. Treatment outcome, including disease control and functional integrity, is dependent upon age at presentation, tumor type, and disease extent. An understanding of the clinical, neuroimaging, and histologic characteristics as they relate to decisions regarding therapy is critical to the radiation oncologist. Appropriate radiation therapy is central to curative therapy for a majority of pediatric brain tumor presentations. Technical advances in neurosurgery provide greater safety for 'gross total resection' in a majority of hemispheric astrocytomas and medulloblastomas. The relative roles of 'standard' radiation therapy and evolving chemotherapy for centrally located astrocytomas (e.g., diencephalic, optic pathway) need to be analyzed in the context of initial and overall disease control, neurotoxicities, and potential modifications in the risk:benefit ratio apparent in the introduction of precision radiation techniques. Modifications in radiation delivery are fundamental to current investigations in medulloblastoma; the rationale for contemporary and projected

  8. Development of the Test Of Astronomy STandards (TOAST) Assessment Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Timothy F.; Slater, S. J.

    2008-05-01

    Considerable effort in the astronomy education research (AER) community over the past several years has focused on developing assessment tools in the form of multiple-choice conceptual diagnostics and content knowledge surveys. This has been critically important in advancing the AER discipline so that researchers could establish the initial knowledge state of students as well as to attempt measure some of the impacts of innovative instructional interventions. Unfortunately, few of the existing instruments were constructed upon a solid list of clearly articulated and widely agreed upon learning objectives. This was not done in oversight, but rather as a result of the relative youth of AER as a discipline. Now that several important science education reform documents exist and are generally accepted by the AER community, we are in a position to develop, validate, and disseminate a new assessment instrument which is tightly aligned to the consensus learning goals stated by the American Astronomical Society - Chair's Conference on ASTRO 101, the American Association of the Advancement of Science's Project 2061 Benchmarks, and the National Research Council's National Science Education Standards. In response, researchers from the Cognition in Astronomy, Physics and Earth sciences Research (CAPER) Team at the University of Wyoming's Science & Math Teaching Center (UWYO SMTC) have designed a criterion-referenced assessment tool, called the Test Of Astronomy STandards (TOAST). Through iterative development, this instrument has a high degree of reliability and validity for instructors and researchers needing information on students’ initial knowledge state at the beginning of a course and can be used, in aggregate, to help measure the impact of course-length duration instructional strategies for courses with learning goals tightly aligned to the consensus goals of our community.

  9. Achieving low anastomotic leak rates utilizing clinical perfusion assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kream, Jacob; Ludwig, Kirk A; Ridolfi, Timothy J; Peterson, Carrie Y

    2016-10-01

    Anastomotic leak after colorectal resection increases morbidity, mortality, and in the setting of cancer, increases recurrences rates and reduces survival odds. Recent reports suggest that fluorescence evaluation of perfusion after colorectal anastomosis creation is associated with low anastomotic leak rates (1.4%). The purpose of this work was to evaluate whether a similar low anastomotic leak rate after left-sided colorectal resections could be achieved using standard assessment of blood flow to the bowel ends. We performed a retrospective chart review at an academic tertiary referral center, evaluating 317 consecutive patients who underwent a pelvic anastomosis after sigmoid colectomy, left colectomy, or low anterior resection. All operations were performed by a single surgeon from March 2008 to January 2015 with only standard clinical measures used to assess perfusion to the bowel ends. The primary outcome measure was the anastomotic leak rate as diagnosed by clinical symptoms, exam, or routine imaging. The average patient age was 59.7 years with an average body mass index of 28.8 kg/m(2). Rectal cancer (128, 40.4%) was the most common indication for operation while hypertension (134, 42.3%) was the most common comorbidity. In total, 177 operations were laparoscopic (55.8%), 13 were reoperative resections (4.1%), and 108 were protected with a loop ileostomy (34.1%). Preoperative chemotherapy was administered to 25 patients (7.9%) while preoperative chemo/radiation was administered to 64 patients (20.2%). The anastomotic leak rate was 1.6% (5/317). Our data suggests that standard, careful evaluation of adequate blood flow via inspection and confirmation of pulsatile blood flow to the bowel ends and meticulous construction of the colorectal or coloanal anastomoses can result in very low leak rates, similar to the rate reported when intraoperative imaging is used to assess perfusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacologic and clinical assessment of kratom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C Michael

    2018-03-01

    This article reviews the pharmacology, clinical utility, adverse effects, and abuse potential of kratom. The leaves of Mitragyna speciosa contain the biologically active alkaloids of kratom. Kratom exerts opioid and α-2 receptor agonistic effects as well as antiinflammatory and parasympathetic-impeding effects. There are no published human pharmacologic, pharmacokinetic, or drug interaction studies on kratom or mitragynine, making it virtually impossible to fully understand kratom's therapeutic potential and risks and the populations most likely to benefit or experience harm from its use. Kratom has been used to ameliorate opioid withdrawal symptoms but also induces withdrawal. Human pharmacologic, pharmacokinetic, and clinical data are of low quality, precluding any firm conclusions regarding safety and efficacy. Respiratory depression has not been commonly reported, but kratom does cause a host of adverse effects without clear guidance for how they should be treated. There are numerous assessments where people have been unable to stop using kratom therapy, and withdrawal signs and symptoms are problematic. Kratom does not appear in normal drug screens and, when taken with other substances of abuse, may not be recognized. Thirty-six deaths have been attributed to kratom, and the Food and Drug Administration issued a public health warning about the substance in November 2017. Kratom exerts opioid and α-2 receptor agonistic effects as well as antiinflammatory and parasympathetic-impeding effects. Human pharmacologic, pharmacokinetic, and clinical data are of low quality, precluding any firm conclusions regarding safety and efficacy. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Standardization of I-123-meta-iodobenzylguanidine myocardial sympathetic activity imaging: phantom calibration and clinical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Verschure, Derk O.; Okuda, Koichi; Verberne, Hein J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Myocardial sympathetic imaging with I-123-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (I-123-mIBG) has gained clinical momentum. Although the need for standardization of I-123-mIBG myocardial uptake has been recognized, the availability of practical clinical standardization approaches is limited. The need for

  12. [Discussion on the standard of clinical genetic testing report and the consensus of gene testing industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Shen, Yiping; Gu, Weihong; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yiming; Qi, Ming; Shen, Jun; Qiu, Zhengqing; Yu, Shihui; Zhou, Zaiwei; Chen, Baixue; Chen, Lei; Chen, Yundi; Cui, Huanhuan; Du, Juan; Gao, Yong; Guo, Yiran; Hu, Chanjuan; Hu, Liang; Huang, Yi; Li, Peipei; Li, Xiaorong; Li, Xiurong; Liu, Yaping; Lu, Jie; Ma, Duan; Ma, Yongyi; Peng, Mei; Song, Fang; Sun, Hongye; Wang, Liang; Wang, Dawei; Wang, Jingmin; Wang, Ling; Wang, Zhengyuan; Wang, Zhinong; Wu, Jihong; Wu, Jing; Wu, Jian; Xu, Yimin; Yao, Hong; Yang, Dongsheng; Yang, Xu; Yang, Yanling; Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Yulin; Zhu, Baosheng; Zeng, Sicong; Peng, Zhiyu; Huang, Shangzhi

    2018-02-10

    The widespread application of next generation sequencing (NGS) in clinical settings has enabled testing, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of genetic diseases. However, many issues have arisen in the meanwhile. One of the most pressing issues is the lack of standards for reporting genetic test results across different service providers. The First Forum on Standards and Specifications for Clinical Genetic Testing was held to address the issue in Shenzhen, China, on October 28, 2017. Participants, including geneticists, clinicians, and representatives of genetic testing service providers, discussed problems of clinical genetic testing services across in China and shared opinions on principles, challenges, and standards for reporting clinical genetic test results. Here we summarize expert opinions presented at the seminar and report the consensus, which will serve as a basis for the development of standards and guidelines for reporting of clinical genetic testing results, in order to promote the standardization and regulation of genetic testing services in China.

  13. Assessment of Clinical Criteria for Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Christopher W.; Liu, Vincent X.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.; Brunkhorst, Frank M.; Rea, Thomas D.; Scherag, André; Rubenfeld, Gordon; Kahn, Jeremy M.; Shankar-Hari, Manu; Singer, Mervyn; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Escobar, Gabriel J.; Angus, Derek C.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The Third International Consensus Definitions Task Force defined sepsis as “life-threatening organ dysfunction due to a dysregulated host response to infection.” The performance of clinical criteria for this sepsis definition is unknown. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the validity of clinical criteria to identify patients with suspected infection who are at risk of sepsis. DESIGN, SETTINGS, AND POPULATION Among 1.3 million electronic health record encounters from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2012, at 12 hospitals in southwestern Pennsylvania, we identified those with suspected infection in whom to compare criteria. Confirmatory analyses were performed in 4 data sets of 706 399 out-of-hospital and hospital encounters at 165 US and non-US hospitals ranging from January 1, 2008, until December 31, 2013. EXPOSURES Sequential [Sepsis-related] Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, Logistic Organ Dysfunction System (LODS) score, and a new model derived using multivariable logistic regression in a split sample, the quick Sequential [Sepsis-related] Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) score (range, 0–3 points, with 1 point each for systolic hypotension [≤100 mm Hg], tachypnea [≥22/min], or altered mentation). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES For construct validity, pairwise agreement was assessed. For predictive validity, the discrimination for outcomes (primary: in-hospital mortality; secondary: in-hospital mortality or intensive care unit [ICU] length of stay ≥3 days) more common in sepsis than uncomplicated infection was determined. Results were expressed as the fold change in outcome over deciles of baseline risk of death and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). RESULTS In the primary cohort, 148 907 encounters had suspected infection (n = 74 453 derivation; n = 74 454 validation), of whom 6347 (4%) died. Among ICU encounters in the validation cohort (n = 7932 with suspected

  14. "Heidelberg standard examination" and "Heidelberg standard procedures" - Development of faculty-wide standards for physical examination techniques and clinical procedures in undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikendei, C; Ganschow, P; Groener, J B; Huwendiek, S; Köchel, A; Köhl-Hackert, N; Pjontek, R; Rodrian, J; Scheibe, F; Stadler, A-K; Steiner, T; Stiepak, J; Tabatabai, J; Utz, A; Kadmon, M

    2016-01-01

    The competent physical examination of patients and the safe and professional implementation of clinical procedures constitute essential components of medical practice in nearly all areas of medicine. The central objective of the projects "Heidelberg standard examination" and "Heidelberg standard procedures", which were initiated by students, was to establish uniform interdisciplinary standards for physical examination and clinical procedures, and to distribute them in coordination with all clinical disciplines at the Heidelberg University Hospital. The presented project report illuminates the background of the initiative and its methodological implementation. Moreover, it describes the multimedia documentation in the form of pocketbooks and a multimedia internet-based platform, as well as the integration into the curriculum. The project presentation aims to provide orientation and action guidelines to facilitate similar processes in other faculties.

  15. Milestones: a rapid assessment method for the Clinical Competency Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Christopher; Forman, Leanne; Peterson, Stephen J.; Gennarelli, Melissa; Aronow, Wilbert S.; DeLorenzo, Lawrence; Chandy, Dipak; Ahn, Chul; Sule, Sachin; Stallings, Gary W.; Khera, Sahil; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Frishman, William H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Educational milestones are now used to assess the developmental progress of all U.S. graduate medical residents during training. Twice annually, each program’s Clinical Competency Committee (CCC) makes these determinations and reports its findings to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). The ideal way to conduct the CCC is not known. After finding that deliberations reliant upon the new milestones were time intensive, our internal medicine residency program tested an approach designed to produce rapid but accurate assessments. Material and methods For this study, we modified our usual CCC process to include pre-meeting faculty ratings of resident milestones progress with in-meeting reconciliation of their ratings. Data were considered largely via standard report and presented in a pre-arranged pattern. Participants were surveyed regarding their perceptions of data management strategies and use of milestones. Reliability of competence assessments was estimated by comparing pre-/post-intervention class rank lists produced by individual committee members with a master class rank list produced by the collective CCC after full deliberation. Results Use of the study CCC approach reduced committee deliberation time from 25 min to 9 min per resident (p < 0.001). Committee members believed milestones improved their ability to identify and assess expected elements of competency development (p = 0.026). Individual committee member assessments of trainee progress agreed well with collective CCC assessments. Conclusions Modification of the clinical competency process to include pre-meeting competence ratings with in-meeting reconciliation of these ratings led to shorter deliberation times, improved evaluator satisfaction and resulted in reliable milestone assessments. PMID:28144272

  16. Brain imaging with synthetic MR in children: clinical quality assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betts, Aaron M.; Serai, Suraj [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Leach, James L.; Jones, Blaise V. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Zhang, Bin [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Synthetic magnetic resonance imaging is a quantitative imaging technique that measures inherent T1-relaxation, T2-relaxation, and proton density. These inherent tissue properties allow synthesis of various imaging sequences from a single acquisition. Clinical use of synthetic MR imaging has been described in adult populations. However, use of synthetic MR imaging has not been previously reported in children. The purpose of this study is to report our assessment of diagnostic image quality using synthetic MR imaging in children. Synthetic MR acquisition was obtained in a sample of children undergoing brain MR imaging. Image quality assessments were performed on conventional and synthetic T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and FLAIR images. Standardized linear measurements were performed on conventional and synthetic T2 images. Estimates of patient age based upon myelination patterns were also performed. Conventional and synthetic MR images were evaluated on 30 children. Using a 4-point assessment scale, conventional imaging performed better than synthetic imaging for T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and FLAIR images. When the assessment was simplified to a dichotomized scale, the conventional and synthetic T1-weighted and T2-weighted images performed similarly. However, the superiority of conventional FLAIR images persisted in the dichotomized assessment. There were no statistically significant differences between linear measurements made on T2-weighted images. Estimates of patient age based upon pattern of myelination were also similar between conventional and synthetic techniques. Synthetic MR imaging may be acceptable for clinical use in children. However, users should be aware of current limitations that could impact clinical utility in the software version used in this study. (orig.)

  17. Standards for Clinical Trials in Male and Female Sexual Dysfunction: II. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William A; Gruenwald, Ilan; Jannini, Emmanuele A; Lev-Sagie, Ahinoam; Lowenstein, Lior; Pyke, Robert E; Reisman, Yakov; Revicki, Dennis A; Rubio-Aurioles, Eusebio

    2016-12-01

    The second article in this series, Standards for Clinical Trials in Male and Female Sexual Dysfunction, focuses on measurement of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Together with the design of appropriate phase I to phase IV clinical trials, the development, validation, choice, and implementation of valid PRO measurements-the focus of the present article-form the foundation of research on treatments for male and female sexual dysfunctions. PRO measurements are assessments of any aspect of a patient's health status that come directly from the patient (ie, without the interpretation of the patient's responses by a physician or anyone else). PROs are essential for assessing male and female sexual dysfunction and treatment response, including symptom frequency and severity, personal distress, satisfaction, and other measurements of sexual and general health-related quality of life. Although there are some relatively objective measurements of sexual dysfunction (ie, intravaginal ejaculatory latency time, frequency of sexual activity, etc), these measurements do not comprehensively assess the occurrence and extent of sexual dysfunction or treatment on the patient's symptoms, functioning, and well-being. Data generated by a PRO instrument can provide evidence of a treatment benefit from the patient's perspective. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical Case Vignettes: A Promising Tool to Assess Competence in the Management of Agitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowden, Gillian L; Vestal, Heather S; Stoklosa, Joseph B; Valcourt, Stephanie C; Peabody, John W; Keary, Christopher J; Nejad, Shamim H; Caminis, Argyro; Huffman, Jeff C

    2017-06-01

    While standardized patients (SPs) remain the gold standard for assessing clinical competence in a standardized setting, clinical case vignettes that allow free-text, open-ended written responses are more resource- and time-efficient assessment tools. It remains unknown, however, whether this is a valid method for assessing competence in the management of agitation. Twenty-six psychiatry residents partook in a randomized controlled study evaluating a simulation-based teaching intervention on the management of agitated patients. Competence in the management of agitation was assessed using three separate modalities: simulation with SPs, open-ended clinical vignettes, and self-report questionnaires. Performance on clinical vignettes correlated significantly with SP-based assessments (r = 0.59, p = 0.002); self-report questionnaires that assessed one's own ability to manage agitation did not correlate with SP-based assessments (r = -0.06, p = 0.77). Standardized clinical vignettes may be a simple, time-efficient, and valid tool for assessing residents' competence in the management of agitation.

  19. Phasic Electrodermal Activity During the Standardized Assessment of Concussion (SAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikes, Adam C; Schaefer, Sydney Y

    2016-07-01

    The long-term effects of concussion on brain function during cognitive tasks are not fully understood and neuroimaging findings are equivocal. Some images show hyperactivation of prefrontal brain regions in previously concussed individuals relative to controls, suggesting increased cognitive resource allocation. Others show prefrontal hypoactivation and hyperactivation in other regions as a presumed compensatory mechanism. Given the relationship between sympathetic arousal and neural activation, physiologic measures of arousal, such as electrodermal activity, may provide additional insight into the brain's functional changes in those with a history of concussion. To quantify differences in electrodermal activity during a commonly used standardized neurocognitive assessment between individuals with or without a history of concussion. Descriptive laboratory study. Research laboratory. Seven asymptomatic individuals with a self-reported history of physician-diagnosed, sport-related concussion (number of previous concussions = 1.43 ± 0.53; time since most recent concussion = 0.75 to 6 years, median = 3 years) and 10 individuals without a history of concussion participated in this study. All participants wore bilateral wrist electrodermal activity sensors during the Standardized Assessment of Concussion. We measured normalized phasic (reactive) electrodermal activity during each test element (orientation, immediate recall, concentration, delayed recall). A significant group-by-test element interaction was present (P = .003). Individuals with a history of concussion had greater phasic activity during delayed recall (P concussed individuals relative to healthy control participants, supporting previous neuroimaging findings of increased prefrontal cortex activity during memory tasks after concussion. Given similar task performance and arousal patterns across the test, our results suggest that previously concussed individuals incur additional cognitive demands in a short

  20. A taxonomy of multinational ethical and methodological standards for clinical trials of therapeutic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Carol M; Wray, Nelda P; Jarman, Anna F; Kolman, Jacob M; Wenner, Danielle M; Brody, Baruch A

    2011-06-01

    If trials of therapeutic interventions are to serve society's interests, they must be of high methodological quality and must satisfy moral commitments to human subjects. The authors set out to develop a clinical-trials compendium in which standards for the ethical treatment of human subjects are integrated with standards for research methods. The authors rank-ordered the world's nations and chose the 31 with >700 active trials as of 24 July 2008. Governmental and other authoritative entities of the 31 countries were searched, and 1004 English-language documents containing ethical and/or methodological standards for clinical trials were identified. The authors extracted standards from 144 of those: 50 designated as 'core', 39 addressing trials of invasive procedures and a 5% sample (N=55) of the remainder. As the integrating framework for the standards we developed a coherent taxonomy encompassing all elements of a trial's stages. Review of the 144 documents yielded nearly 15 000 discrete standards. After duplicates were removed, 5903 substantive standards remained, distributed in the taxonomy as follows: initiation, 1401 standards, 8 divisions; design, 1869 standards, 16 divisions; conduct, 1473 standards, 8 divisions; analysing and reporting results, 997 standards, four divisions; and post-trial standards, 168 standards, 5 divisions. The overwhelming number of source documents and standards uncovered in this study was not anticipated beforehand and confirms the extraordinary complexity of the clinical trials enterprise. This taxonomy of multinational ethical and methodological standards may help trialists and overseers improve the quality of clinical trials, particularly given the globalisation of clinical research.

  1. A taxonomy of multinational ethical and methodological standards for clinical trials of therapeutic interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Carol M; Wray, Nelda P; Jarman, Anna F; Kolman, Jacob M; Wenner, Danielle M; Brody, Baruch A

    2013-01-01

    Background If trials of therapeutic interventions are to serve society’s interests, they must be of high methodological quality and must satisfy moral commitments to human subjects. The authors set out to develop a clinical-trials compendium in which standards for the ethical treatment of human subjects are integrated with standards for research methods. Methods The authors rank-ordered the world’s nations and chose the 31 with >700 active trials as of 24 July 2008. Governmental and other authoritative entities of the 31 countries were searched, and 1004 English-language documents containing ethical and/or methodological standards for clinical trials were identified. The authors extracted standards from 144 of those: 50 designated as ‘core’, 39 addressing trials of invasive procedures and a 5% sample (N=55) of the remainder. As the integrating framework for the standards we developed a coherent taxonomy encompassing all elements of a trial’s stages. Findings Review of the 144 documents yielded nearly 15 000 discrete standards. After duplicates were removed, 5903 substantive standards remained, distributed in the taxonomy as follows: initiation, 1401 standards, 8 divisions; design, 1869 standards, 16 divisions; conduct, 1473 standards, 8 divisions; analysing and reporting results, 997 standards, four divisions; and post-trial standards, 168 standards, 5 divisions. Conclusions The overwhelming number of source documents and standards uncovered in this study was not anticipated beforehand and confirms the extraordinary complexity of the clinical trials enterprise. This taxonomy of multinational ethical and methodological standards may help trialists and overseers improve the quality of clinical trials, particularly given the globalisation of clinical research. PMID:21429960

  2. Introduction of a new standardized assessment score of spine morphology in osteogenesis imperfecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerber, F.; Schulze Uphoff, U.; Koerber, S.; Maintz, D. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Schoenau, E.; Semler, O. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Children' s Hospital

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare hereditary disease leading to multiple bone deformities and fractures. In the absence of causal therapy, a symptomatic approach is based on treatment with bisphosphonates and physiotherapy. The clinical and radiological manifestations vary. Therefore, standardization and quantification for an objective comparison, especially during therapy, are required. In this paper, radiological changes of the spine are quantified according to their clinical relevance to define a scoring system that transfers the morphological changes into a single value representing the severity of the disease. Materials and Methods: 268 lateral spine X-rays of 95 patients with OI (median age 5.6 years) were assessed. The findings were classified based on their clinical relevance. Results: The three criteria, vertebral compression, thoracolumbar kyphosis and deformity type, were quantified in a new grading system. Based on this, a 'severity classification' (1 to 5) was defined with implications for diagnostics and treatment. A mathematical formula that takes into account the three criteria and their correlations to clinical relevance, resulting in a 'severity score', was developed. Conclusion: 'Severity classification' and 'severity score' introduce a new concept for a standardized evaluation of spine X-rays in patients with OI. For both scientific and routine purposes, it provides the user with a simple and easy-to-handle tool for assessing and comparing different stages of severity prior to and during therapy with detailed accuracy. (orig.)

  3. Introduction of a new standardized assessment score of spine morphology in osteogenesis imperfecta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerber, F.; Schulze Uphoff, U.; Koerber, S.; Maintz, D.; Schoenau, E.; Semler, O.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare hereditary disease leading to multiple bone deformities and fractures. In the absence of causal therapy, a symptomatic approach is based on treatment with bisphosphonates and physiotherapy. The clinical and radiological manifestations vary. Therefore, standardization and quantification for an objective comparison, especially during therapy, are required. In this paper, radiological changes of the spine are quantified according to their clinical relevance to define a scoring system that transfers the morphological changes into a single value representing the severity of the disease. Materials and Methods: 268 lateral spine X-rays of 95 patients with OI (median age 5.6 years) were assessed. The findings were classified based on their clinical relevance. Results: The three criteria, vertebral compression, thoracolumbar kyphosis and deformity type, were quantified in a new grading system. Based on this, a 'severity classification' (1 to 5) was defined with implications for diagnostics and treatment. A mathematical formula that takes into account the three criteria and their correlations to clinical relevance, resulting in a 'severity score', was developed. Conclusion: 'Severity classification' and 'severity score' introduce a new concept for a standardized evaluation of spine X-rays in patients with OI. For both scientific and routine purposes, it provides the user with a simple and easy-to-handle tool for assessing and comparing different stages of severity prior to and during therapy with detailed accuracy. (orig.)

  4. Standards for the assessment of salivary glands – an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Zajkowski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is an update of 2011 Standards for Ultrasound Assessment of Salivary Glands, which were developed by the Polish Ultrasound Society. We have described current ultrasound technical requirements, assessment and measurement techniques as well as guidelines for ultrasound description. We have also discussed an ultrasound image of normal salivary glands as well as the most important pathologies, such as inflammation, sialosis, collagenosis, injuries and proliferative processes, with particular emphasis on lesions indicating high risk of malignancy. In acute bacterial inflammation, the salivary glands appear as hypoechoic, enlarged or normal-sized, with increased parenchymal flow. The echogenicity is significantly increased in viral infections. Degenerative lesions may be seen in chronic inflammations. Hyperechoic deposits with acoustic shadowing can be visualized in lithiasis. Parenchymal fibrosis is a dominant feature of sialosis. Sjögren syndrome produces different pictures of salivary gland parenchymal lesions at different stages of the disease. Pleomorphic adenomas are usually hypoechoic, well-defined and polycyclic in most cases. Warthin tumor usually presents as a hypoechoic, oval-shaped lesion with anechoic cystic spaces. Malignancies are characterized by blurred outlines, irregular shape, usually heterogeneous echogenicity and pathological neovascularization. The accompanying metastatic lesions are another indicator of malignancy, however, final diagnosis should be based on biopsy findings.

  5. Standardization of figures and assessment procedures for DTM verticalaccuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Casella

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Digital Terrain Models (DTMs are widely used in many sectors. They play a key role in hydrological risk prevention, risk mitigation and numeric simulations. This paper deals with two questions: (i when it is stated that a DTM has a given vertical accuracy, is this assertion univocal? (ii when DTM vertical accuracy is assessed by means of checkpoints, does their location influence results? First, the paper illustrates that two vertical accuracy definitions are conceivable: Vertical Accuracy at the Nodes (VAN, the average vertical distance between the model and the terrain, evaluated at the DTM's nodes and Vertical Accuracy at the interpolated Points (VAP, in which the vertical distance is evaluated at the generic points. These two quantities are not coincident and, when they are calculated for the same DTM, different numeric values are reached. Unfortunately, the two quantities are often interchanged, but this is misleading. Second, the paper shows a simulated example of a DTM vertical accuracy assessment, highlighting that the checkpoints’ location plays a key role: when checkpoints coincide with the DTM nodes, VAN is estimated; when checkpoints are randomly located, VAP is estimated, instead. Third, an in-depth, theoretical characterization of the two considered quantities is performed, based on symbolic computation, and suitable standardization coefficients are proposed. Finally, our discussion has a well-defined frame: it doesn't deal with all the items of the DTM vertical accuracy budget, which would require a much longer essay, but only with one, usually called fundamental vertical accuracy.

  6. Assessing clinical skills – standard setting in the objective structured ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Standardisation of the OSCE is required to define the pass mark above which a candidate performs at the level expected of a family physician. A number of standardisation processes have been described that either judge the test items prior to the exam or judge the individual during the exam. In this paper we report on an ...

  7. Alignment between South African mathematics assessment standards and the TIMSS assessment frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mdutshekelwa Ndlovu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available South Africa’s performance in international benchmark tests is a major cause for concern amongst educators and policymakers, raising questions about the effectiveness of the curriculum reform efforts of the democratic era. The purpose of the study reported in this article was to investigate the degree of alignment between the TIMSS 2003 Grade 8 Mathematics assessment frameworks and the Revised National Curriculum Statements (RNCS assessment standards for Grade 8 Mathematics, later revised to become the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statements (CAPS. Such an investigation could help to partly shed light on why South African learners do not perform well and point out discrepancies that need to be attended to. The methodology of document analysis was adopted for the study, with the RNCS and the TIMSS 2003 Grade 8 Mathematics frameworks forming the principal documents. Porter’s moderately complex index of alignment was adopted for its simplicity. The computed index of 0.751 for the alignment between the RNCS assessment standards and the TIMSS assessment objectives was found to be significantly statistically low, at the alpha level of 0.05, according to Fulmer’s critical values for 20 cells and 90 or 120 standard points. The study suggests that inadequate attention has been paid to the alignment of the South African mathematics curriculum to the successive TIMSS assessment frameworks in terms of the cognitive level descriptions. The study recommends that participation in TIMSS should rigorously and critically inform ongoing curriculum reform efforts.

  8. Alignment between South African mathematics assessment standards and the TIMSS assessment frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mdutshekelwa Ndlovu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available South Africa’s performance in international benchmark tests is a major cause for concern amongst educators and policymakers, raising questions about the effectiveness of the curriculum reform efforts of the democratic era. The purpose of the study reported in this article was to investigate the degree of alignment between the TIMSS 2003 Grade 8 Mathematics assessment frameworks and the Revised National Curriculum Statements (RNCS assessment standards for Grade 8 Mathematics, later revised to become the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statements (CAPS. Such an investigation could help to partly shed light on why South African learners do not perform well and point out discrepancies that need to be attended to. The methodology of document analysis was adopted for the study, with the RNCS and the TIMSS 2003 Grade 8 Mathematics frameworks forming the principal documents. Porter’s moderately complex index of alignment was adopted for its simplicity. The computed index of 0.751 for the alignment between the RNCS assessment standards and the TIMSS assessment objectives was found to be significantly statistically low, at the alpha level of 0.05, according to Fulmer’s critical values for 20 cells and 90 or 120 standard points. The study suggests that inadequate attention has been paid to the alignment of the South African mathematics curriculum to the successive TIMSS assessment frameworks in terms of the cognitive level descriptions. The study recommends that participation in TIMSS should rigorously and critically inform ongoing curriculum reform efforts.

  9. The Standardized Professional Encounter: A New Model to Assess Professionalism and Communication Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifchez, Scott D; Cooney, Carisa M; Redett, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    Physician-patient communication is vital to patient care, and physician-nurse interactions are equally critical. Conflict between nurses and physicians can greatly impair communication, increasing the risk of treatment errors, yet physicians receive little education during training on recognizing and resolving professional conflicts. We created and implemented the Standardized Professional (S-Pro) Encounter to improve training and provide opportunities to evaluate resident professionalism and communication with health care team colleagues. The standardized patient model is well established for teaching and assessing clinical and communication skills. Using the standardized patient concept, we created a nurse-resident encounter with 2 professionally trained medical portrayers (1 "nurse," 1 "patient"), in which the nurse disagrees with the resident's treatment plan. Residents were surveyed for prior experience with nurse-physician conflict management, and we assessed postencounter for collaborative skills and conflict resolution. All residents (n=18) observed at least 1 physician-nurse conflict in front of patients. Eleven (61%) reported being involved in at least 1 conflict. Twelve residents (67%) had 2 or fewer prior education experiences in interprofessional conflict management. Faculty assessment and S-Pro scores demonstrated high agreement, while resident self-assessment scores demonstrated low agreement with faculty and S-Pro scores. Participants and evaluators found the encounter to be reasonably authentic. There was strong agreement between the faculty and S-Pro assessment of resident performance when using the Boggs scale. The S-Pro Encounter is easily adapted for other clinical situations or training programs, and facilitates the assessment of professionalism and communication skills between residents and other health care professionals.

  10. Exploring standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index for drought assessment in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Md Giashuddin; Abdullah, Hasan Muhammad; Jeong, Changyoon

    2017-10-09

    Drought is a critical issue, and it has a pressing, negative impact on agriculture, ecosystems, livelihoods, food security, and sustainability. The problem has been studied globally, but its regional or even local dimension is sometimes overlooked. Local-level drought assessment is necessary for developing adaptation and mitigation strategies for that particular region. Keeping this in understanding, an attempt was made to create a detailed assessment of drought characteristics at the local scale in Bangladesh. Standardized precipitation evapotranspiration (SPEI) is a new drought index that mainly considers the rainfall and evapotranspiration data set. Globally, SPEI has become a useful drought index, but its local scale application is not common. SPEI base (0.5° grid data) for 110 years (1901-2011) was utilized to overcome the lack of long-term climate data in Bangladesh. Available weather data (1955-2011) from Bangladesh Meteorology Department (BMD) were analyzed to calculate SPEI weather station using the SPEI calculator. The drivers for climate change-induced droughts were characterized by residual temperature and residual rainfall data from different BMD stations. Grid data (SPEI base ) of 26 stations of BMD were used for drought mapping. The findings revealed that the frequency and intensity of drought are higher in the northwestern part of the country which makes it vulnerable to both extreme and severe droughts. Based on the results, the SPEI-based drought intensity and frequency analyses were carried out, emphasizing Rangpur (northwest region) as a hot spot, to get an insight of drought assessment in Bangladesh. The findings of this study revealed that SPEI could be a valuable tool to understand the evolution and evaluation of the drought induced by climate change in the country. The study also justified the immediate need for drought risk reduction strategies that should lead to relevant policy formulations and agricultural innovations for developing

  11. Psychobiology of dissociation and its clinical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptacek, Radek; Bob, Petr; Paclt, Ivo; Pavlat, Josef; Jasova, Denisa; Zvolsky, Petr; Raboch, Jiri

    2007-04-01

    Dissociation is often defined as partial or total disconnection between memories of the past, awareness of identity and of immediate sensations, and control of bodily movements, often resulting from traumatic experiences, intolerable problems, or disturbed relationships. This type of reaction to a psychological and/or physical trauma has often various neurobiological consequences and its clinical assessment has received enormous interest in recent psychological and neuroscience research. Psychometric parameters of the Czech version of the Dissociative Experiences Scale were tested from the viewpoints of internal consistency, validity and factor structure, using data from a sample of n=783 adults, divided into three groups (epilepsy n=243, depression n=357, norm n=183), average age 39 years, SD=13.5. Findings of this study demonstrated that reliability, validity and factor structure of the Czech version of the Dissociative Experiences Scale correspond to those of the original English version. The Czech version of the questionnaire may be considered a suitable tool for estimating subjectively experienced dissociative symptoms.

  12. Standardized outcome assessment in brain injury rehabilitation for younger adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Stokes, L

    2002-05-10

    To explore possible candidates for a common outcome measure for brain injury rehabilitation in younger adults. Patients recovering from brain injury pass through several different stages of rehabilitation, illustrated by the 'Slinky model'. Outcome measures used to assess progress must not only meet scientific criteria for validity and reliability--they must be practical to use in a clinical setting and relevant to the rehabilitation goals at each stage. Within most major rehabilitation settings, the commonest goals focus on reducing disability or dependency. Among the most widely used measures in the UK are the Barthel Index, the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and the extended Functional Assessment Measure (FIM + FAM). The relationship between these instruments is discussed. No single outcome measure is suitable for all brain injury rehabilitation, but by taking these most widely used measures and understanding the relationship between them, we already have a potential common language in disability measurement between the majority of rehabilitation centres in the UK and beyond. These instruments, however, have clear floor and ceiling effects and further work is needed to agree common measures for rehabilitation intervention that falls outside the sensitivity range of these three scales.

  13. Adapting Objective Structured Clinical Examinations to Assess Social Work Students' Performance and Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogo, Marion; Regehr, Cheryl; Logie, Carmen; Katz, Ellen; Mylopoulos, Maria; Regehr, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    The development of standardized, valid, and reliable methods for assessment of students' practice competence continues to be a challenge for social work educators. In this study, the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), originally used in medicine to assess performance through simulated interviews, was adapted for social work to…

  14. Comparative analysis of photograph-based clinical goniometry to standard techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crasto, Jared A; Sayari, Arash J; Gray, Robert R-L; Askari, Morad

    2015-06-01

    Assessment of joint range of motion (ROM) is an accepted evaluation of disability as well as an indicator of recovery from musculoskeletal injuries. Many goniometric techniques have been described to measure ROM, with variable validity due to inter-rater reliability. In this report, we assessed the validity of photograph-based goniometry in measurement of ROM and its inter-rater reliability and compared it to two other commonly used techniques. We examined three methods for measuring ROM in the upper extremity: manual goniometry (MG), visual estimations (VE), and photograph-based goniometry (PBG). Eight motions of the upper extremity were measured in 69 participants at an academic medical center. We found visual estimations and photograph-based goniometry to be clinically valid when tested against manual goniometry (r avg. 0.58, range 0.28 to 0.87). Photograph-based measurements afforded a satisfactory degree of inter-rater reliability (ICC avg. 0.77, range 0.28 to 0.96). Our study supports photograph-based goniometry as the new standard goniometric technique, as it has been clinically validated, is performed with greater consistency and better inter-rater reliability when compared with manual goniometry. It also allows for better documentation of measurements and potential incorporation into medical records in direct contrast to visual estimation.

  15. Clinical Image Evaluation of Film Mammograms in Korea: Comparison with the ACR Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwak, Yeon Joo; Kim, Hye Jung; Kwak, Jin Young; Son, Eun Ju; Ko, Kyung Hee; Lee, Jin Hwa; Lim, Hyo Soon; Lee, You Jin; Park, Ji Won; Shin, Kyung Min; Jang, Yun-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study is to compare the overall quality of film mammograms taken according to the Korean standards with the American College of Radiology (ACR) standard for clinical image evaluation and to identify means of improving mammography quality in Korea. Four hundred and sixty eight sets of film mammograms were evaluated with respect to the Korean and ACR standards for clinical image evaluation. The pass and failure rates of mammograms were compared by medical facility types. Average scores in each category of the two standards were evaluated. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to identify an optimal Korean standard pass mark by taking the ACR standard as the reference standard. 93.6% (438/468) of mammograms passed the Korean standard, whereas only 80.1% (375/468) passed the ACR standard (p < 0.001). Non-radiologic private clinics had the lowest pass rate (88.1%: Korean standard, 71.8%: ACR standard) and the lowest total score (76.0) by the Korean standard. Average scores of positioning were lowest (19.3/29 by the Korean standard and 3.7/5 by the ACR standard). A cutoff score of 77.0 for the Korean standard was found to correspond to a pass level when the ACR standard was applied. We suggest that tighter regulations, such as, raising the Korean pass mark, subtracting more for severe deficiencies, or considering a very low scores in even a single category as failure, are needed to improve the quality of mammography in Korea

  16. Experimental and clinical standards, and evolution of lasers in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaux, B C; Roux, F X

    1996-01-01

    From initial experiments of ruby, argon and CO2 lasers on the nervous system so far, dramatic progress was made in delivery systems technology as well as in knowledge of laser-tissue interaction effects and hazards through various animal experiments and clinical experience. Most surgical effects of laser light on neural tissue and the central nervous system (CNS) are thermal lesions. Haemostasis, cutting and vaporization depend on laser emission parameters--wavelength, fluence and mode--and on the exposed tissues optical and thermal properties--water and haemoglobin content, thermal conductivity and specific heat. CO2 and Nd-YAG lasers have today a large place in the neurosurgical armamentarium, while new laser sources such as high power diode lasers will have one in the near future. Current applications of these lasers derive from their respective characteristics, and include CNS tumour and vascular malformation surgery, and stereotactic neurosurgery. Intracranial, spinal cord and intra-orbital meningiomas are the best lesions for laser use for haemostasis, dissection and tissue vaporization. Resection of acoustic neuromas, pituitary tumours, spinal cord neuromas, intracerebral gliomas and metastases may also benefit from lasers as accurate, haemostatic, non-contact instruments which reduce surgical trauma to the brain and eloquent structures such as brain stem and cranial nerves. Coagulative lasers (1.06 microns and 1.32 microns Nd-YAG, argon, or diode laser) will find an application for arteriovenous malformations and cavernomas. Any fiberoptic-guided laser will find a use during stereotactic neurosurgical procedures, including image-guided resection of tumours and vascular malformations and endoscopic tumour resection and cysts or entry into a ventricle. Besides these routine applications of lasers, laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) of brain tumours are still in the experimental stage. The choice of a laser in a

  17. Assessment and Next Generation Standards: An Interview with Olivia Gude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeny, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a transcript of an interview with Olivia Gude, member of the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards Writing Team. In the interview, Gude provides an overview of the process for writing the new visual arts standards.

  18. Developing standards for malaria microscopy: external competency assessment for malaria microscopists in the Asia-Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Sania

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria diagnosis has received renewed interest in recent years, associated with the increasing accessibility of accurate diagnosis through the introduction of rapid diagnostic tests and new World Health Organization guidelines recommending parasite-based diagnosis prior to anti-malarial therapy. However, light microscopy, established over 100 years ago and frequently considered the reference standard for clinical diagnosis, has been neglected in control programmes and in the malaria literature and evidence suggests field standards are commonly poor. Microscopy remains the most accessible method for parasite quantitation, for drug efficacy monitoring, and as a reference of assessing other diagnostic tools. This mismatch between quality and need highlights the importance of the establishment of reliable standards and procedures for assessing and assuring quality. This paper describes the development, function and impact of a multi-country microscopy external quality assurance network set up for this purpose in Asia. Methods Surveys were used for key informants and past participants for feedback on the quality assurance programme. Competency scores for each country from 14 participating countries were compiled for analyses using paired sample t-tests. In-depth interviews were conducted with key informants including the programme facilitators and national level microscopists. Results External assessments and limited retraining through a formalized programme based on a reference slide bank has demonstrated an increase in standards of competence of senior microscopists over a relatively short period of time, at a potentially sustainable cost. The network involved in the programme now exceeds 14 countries in the Asia-Pacific, and the methods are extended to other regions. Conclusions While the impact on national programmes varies, it has translated in some instances into a strengthening of national microscopy standards and offers a

  19. Potential facilitators and barriers to adopting standard treatment guidelines in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sangeeta; Pandit, Ajay; Tabassum, Fauzia

    2017-04-18

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess medicines information sources accessed by clinicians, if sources differed in theory and practice and to find out the barriers and facilitators to effective guideline adoption. Design/methodology/approach In all, 183 doctors were surveyed. Barriers and facilitators were classified as: communication; potential adopters; innovation; organization characteristics and environmental/social/economic context. Findings Most of the clinicians accessed multiple information sources including standard treatment guidelines, but also consulted seniors/colleagues in practice. The top three factors influencing clinical practice guideline adoption were innovation characteristics, environmental context and individual characteristics. The respondents differed in the following areas: concerns about flexibility offered by the guideline; denying patients' individuality; professional autonomy; insights into gaps in current practice and evidence-based practice; changing practices with little or no benefit. Barriers included negative staff attitudes/beliefs, guideline integration into organizational structures/processes, time/resource constraints. Fearing third parties (government and insurance companies) restricting medicines reimbursement and poor liability protection offered by the guidelines emerged as the barriers. Facilitators include aligning organizational structures/processes with the innovation; providing leadership support to guide diffusion; increasing awareness and enabling early innovation during pre/in-service training, with regular feedback on outcomes and use. Practical implications Guideline adoption in clinical practice is partly within doctors' control. There are other key prevailing factors in the local context such as environmental, social context, professional and organizational culture affecting its adoption. Organizational policy and accreditation standards necessitating adherence can serve as a driver. Originality

  20. Assessment of Clinical Competence of Medical Students Using the Objective Structured Clinical Examination: First 2 Years' Experience in Taipei Veterans General Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Chou Huang

    2010-11-01

    Conclusion: The OSCE is an effective method for assessing the clinical competence of medical students. The OSCE could be improved further by modifying the examination questions and promoting effective training for standardized patients and examiners.

  1. Standardizing clinical trials workflow representation in UML for international site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Elias Cesar Araujo; Jayanti, Madhav Kishore; Batilana, Adelia Portero; Kozan, Andreia M O; Rodrigues, Maria J; Shah, Jatin; Loures, Marco R; Patil, Sunita; Payne, Philip; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2010-11-09

    With the globalization of clinical trials, a growing emphasis has been placed on the standardization of the workflow in order to ensure the reproducibility and reliability of the overall trial. Despite the importance of workflow evaluation, to our knowledge no previous studies have attempted to adapt existing modeling languages to standardize the representation of clinical trials. Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a computational language that can be used to model operational workflow, and a UML profile can be developed to standardize UML models within a given domain. This paper's objective is to develop a UML profile to extend the UML Activity Diagram schema into the clinical trials domain, defining a standard representation for clinical trial workflow diagrams in UML. Two Brazilian clinical trial sites in rheumatology and oncology were examined to model their workflow and collect time-motion data. UML modeling was conducted in Eclipse, and a UML profile was developed to incorporate information used in discrete event simulation software. Ethnographic observation revealed bottlenecks in workflow: these included tasks requiring full commitment of CRCs, transferring notes from paper to computers, deviations from standard operating procedures, and conflicts between different IT systems. Time-motion analysis revealed that nurses' activities took up the most time in the workflow and contained a high frequency of shorter duration activities. Administrative assistants performed more activities near the beginning and end of the workflow. Overall, clinical trial tasks had a greater frequency than clinic routines or other general activities. This paper describes a method for modeling clinical trial workflow in UML and standardizing these workflow diagrams through a UML profile. In the increasingly global environment of clinical trials, the standardization of workflow modeling is a necessary precursor to conducting a comparative analysis of international clinical trials

  2. Towards Automating Clinical Assessments: A Survey of the Timed Up and Go (TUG)

    OpenAIRE

    Sprint, Gina; Cook, Diane; Weeks, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Older adults often suffer from functional impairments that affect their ability to perform everyday tasks. To detect the onset and changes in abilities, healthcare professionals administer standardized assessments. Recently, technology has been utilized to complement these clinical assessments to gain a more objective and detailed view of functionality. In the clinic and at home, technology is able to provide more information about patient performance and reduce subjectivity in outcome measur...

  3. Assessing the standard Molybdenum projector augmented wave VASP potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Ann E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Multi-Scale Science

    2014-07-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) based Equation of State (EOS) construction is a prominent part of Sandia’s capabilities to support engineering sciences. This capability is based on augmenting experimental data with information gained from computational investigations, especially in those parts of the phase space where experimental data is hard, dangerous, or expensive to obtain. A key part of the success of the Sandia approach is the fundamental science work supporting the computational capability. Not only does this work enhance the capability to perform highly accurate calculations but it also provides crucial insight into the limitations of the computational tools, providing high confidence in the results even where results cannot be, or have not yet been, validated by experimental data. This report concerns the key ingredient of projector augmented-wave (PAW) potentials for use in pseudo-potential computational codes. Using the tools discussed in SAND2012-7389 we assess the standard Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP) PAWs for Molybdenum.

  4. Assessing the costs and benefits of US renewable portfolio standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiser, Ryan; Mai, Trieu T.; Millstein, Dev; Barbose, Galen; Bird, Lori A.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, renewable portfolio standards (RPS) exist in 29 US states and the District of Columbia. This article summarizes the first national-level, integrated assessment of the future costs and benefits of existing RPS policies; the same metrics are evaluated under a second scenario in which widespread expansion of these policies is assumed to occur. Depending on assumptions about renewable energy technology advancement and natural gas prices, existing RPS policies increase electric system costs by as much as 31 billion dollars, on a present-value basis over 2015-2050. The expanded renewable deployment scenario yields incremental costs that range from 23 billion to 194 billion dollars, depending on the assumptions employed. The monetized value of improved air quality and reduced climate damages exceed these costs. Using central assumptions, existing RPS policies yield 97 billion dollars in air-pollution health benefits and 161 billion dollars in climate damage reductions. Under the expanded RPS case, health benefits total 558 billion dollars and climate benefits equal 599 billion dollars. These scenarios also yield benefits in the form of reduced water use. RPS programs are not likely to represent the most cost effective path towards achieving air quality and climate benefits. Nonetheless, the findings suggest that US RPS programs are, on a national basis, cost effective when considering externalities.

  5. Assessing the costs and benefits of US renewable portfolio standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiser, Ryan; Mai, Trieu; Millstein, Dev; Barbose, Galen; Bird, Lori; Heeter, Jenny; Keyser, David; Krishnan, Venkat; Macknick, Jordan

    2017-09-01

    Renewable portfolio standards (RPS) exist in 29 US states and the District of Columbia. This article summarizes the first national-level, integrated assessment of the future costs and benefits of existing RPS policies; the same metrics are evaluated under a second scenario in which widespread expansion of these policies is assumed to occur. Depending on assumptions about renewable energy technology advancement and natural gas prices, existing RPS policies increase electric system costs by as much as 31 billion, on a present-value basis over 2015-2050. The expanded renewable deployment scenario yields incremental costs that range from 23 billion to 194 billion, depending on the assumptions employed. The monetized value of improved air quality and reduced climate damages exceed these costs. Using central assumptions, existing RPS policies yield 97 billion in air-pollution health benefits and 161 billion in climate damage reductions. Under the expanded RPS case, health benefits total 558 billion and climate benefits equal 599 billion. These scenarios also yield benefits in the form of reduced water use. RPS programs are not likely to represent the most cost effective path towards achieving air quality and climate benefits. Nonetheless, the findings suggest that US RPS programs are, on a national basis, cost effective when considering externalities.

  6. Using plant clinic registers to assess the quality of diagnoses and advice given to farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Solveig; Boa, Eric; Mafabi, Moses

    2012-01-01

    recognition, pest management and record keeping as well as better technical backstopping to solve unknown problems. Common standards and procedures for clinic data collection and analysis should be established, and roles and responsibilities clearly defined. Originality/value: This is the first time plant...... clinic registers have been used to systematically assess quality of plant clinic services. Apart from being a valuable tool for quality assessment of extension, the plant clinic registers constitute a novel source of regular information about pests, diseases and farmer demand that can help improve...

  7. Objective Structured Clinical Examination as an Assessment Tool for Clinical Skills in Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saceda-Corralo, D; Fonda-Pascual, P; Moreno-Arrones, Ó M; Alegre-Sánchez, A; Hermosa-Gelbard, Á; Jiménez-Gómez, N; Vañó-Galván, S; Jaén-Olasolo, P

    2017-04-01

    Objective Structured Clinical Evaluation (OSCE) is an excellent method to evaluate student's abilities, but there are no previous reports implementing it in dermatology. To determine the feasibility of implementation of a dermatology OSCE in the medical school. Five stations with standardized patients and image-based assessment were designed. A specific checklist was elaborated in each station with different items which evaluated one competency and were classified into five groups (medical history, physical examination, technical skills, case management and prevention). A total of 28 students were tested. Twenty-five of them (83.3%) passed the exam globally. Concerning each group of items tested: medical interrogation had a mean score of 71.0; physical examination had a mean score of 63.0; management had a mean score of 58.0; and prevention had a mean score of 58.0 points. The highest results were obtained in interpersonal skills items with 91.8 points. Testing a small sample of voluntary students may hinder generalization of our study. OSCE is an useful tool for assessing clinical skills in dermatology and it is possible to carry it out. Our experience enhances that medical school curriculum needs to establish OSCE as an assessment tool in dermatology. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of hospital pharmacists' clinical knowledge and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate hospital pharmacists' clinical knowledge and practical skill levels for pharmaceutical care. Methods: A quasi-experimental prospective longitudinal study design was used to evaluate the level of clinical skills with problem-based learning (PBL) sessions. Pharmacists' in three different government ...

  9. Assessing postoperative reduction following acetabular fracture surgery: A standardized digital CT-based method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Diederik O; van der List, Jelle P; Moloney, Gele B; Wellman, David S; Helfet, David L

    2018-02-23

    Quality of reduction following acetabular fracture surgery is an important predictor for clinical outcome. Computed tomography likely superior to plain pelvic radiography for assessment of postoperative reduction but interobserver reliability may be limited in the absence of a widely adopted technique. We describe a standardized digital CT-based method for measuring residual (gap and step) displacement on CT following acetabular fracture surgery. In a selection of patients, we determined the interobserver reliability for measuring displacement and grading quality of reduction on postoperative pelvic radiography and CT with and without the use of this novel technique.

  10. Standardizing Clinical Document Names Using the HL7/LOINC Document Ontology and LOINC Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Elizabeth S; Melton, Genevieve B; Engelstad, Mark E; Sarkar, Indra Neil

    2010-11-13

    The standardization of clinical document names is an essential first step towards the optimal use, management, and exchange of documents within and across institutions. The HL7/LOINC Document Ontology (DO) is an existing and evolving document standard developed to provide consistent naming of clinical documents and to guide the creation of LOINC codes for clinical notes. The goal of this study was to explore the feasibility and challenges of mapping local clinical document names from two institutions into the five axes of the DO and then to leverage this mapping for identifying specific LOINC codes. The results indicate that the DO is either adequate or too broad for representing a majority of the document names and that there are LOINC codes available for one- to two-thirds of the names. Through this mapping process, granularity and other issues were revealed that will be valuable for guiding next steps towards effective standardization of clinical document names.

  11. [Assessing the clinical competence of dental students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonheim-Klein, M E; van Selms, M K A; Volgenant, C M C; Wiegman, H P; Vervoorn, J M

    2012-06-01

    Nowadays, the competences of dental students are tested more on the basis of quality of their achievements than the quantity. 'Objective Structured Clinical Examinations' (OSCEs) can be used in a pre-clinical phase to test these clinical competences. For the clinical phase, the general examination and the digital portfolio have been developed. Tests are used to stimulate the learning process and to determine whether students are ready for the next step; in addition, the quality of the programme is protected by the set of examinations. The results of the last 5 general examinations reveal the pattern that the number of correct answers increases as the study progresses. The Amsterdam Academic Centre for Dentistry (ACTA) introduced a digital portfolio which was evaluated 1 year later with the help ofan anonymous questionnaire. Students judged the use of the digital portfolio in the clinic to be useful but also costly in time.

  12. The Performance of Standardized Patients in Portraying Clinical Scenarios in Speech-Language Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anne E.; Davidson, Bronwyn J.; Theodoros, Deborah G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Standardized patients (SPs) are frequently included in the clinical preparation of students in the health sciences. An acknowledged benefit of using SPs is the opportunity to provide a standardized method by which students can demonstrate and develop their competency. Relatively little is known, however, about the capacity of SPs to…

  13. The Electronic Patient Record and Second Generation Clinical Databases: Problems of Standards and Nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteith, Brian D.

    1991-01-01

    Three principles of classification are stressed in the development of electronic dental patient records and clinical databases: (1) the classification must have a suitable organizing principle; (2) use must be made of standard terminology; and (3) there must be standard operational criteria. (DB)

  14. The National Clinical Assessment Tool for Medical Students in the Emergency Department (NCAT-EM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julianna; Franzen, Douglas; Lawson, Luan; Manthey, David; Tews, Matthew; Dubosh, Nicole; Fisher, Jonathan; Haughey, Marianne; House, Joseph B; Trainor, Arleigh; Wald, David A; Hiller, Katherine

    2018-01-01

    Clinical assessment of medical students in emergency medicine (EM) clerkships is a highly variable process that presents unique challenges and opportunities. Currently, clerkship directors use institution-specific tools with unproven validity and reliability that may or may not address competencies valued most highly in the EM setting. Standardization of assessment practices and development of a common, valid, specialty-specific tool would benefit EM educators and students. A two-day national consensus conference was held in March 2016 in the Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine (CDEM) track at the Council of Residency Directors in Emergency Medicine (CORD) Academic Assembly in Nashville, TN. The goal of this conference was to standardize assessment practices and to create a national clinical assessment tool for use in EM clerkships across the country. Conference leaders synthesized the literature, articulated major themes and questions pertinent to clinical assessment of students in EM, clarified the issues, and outlined the consensus-building process prior to consensus-building activities. The first day of the conference was dedicated to developing consensus on these key themes in clinical assessment. The second day of the conference was dedicated to discussing and voting on proposed domains to be included in the national clinical assessment tool. A modified Delphi process was initiated after the conference to reconcile questions and items that did not reach an a priori level of consensus. The final tool, the National Clinical Assessment Tool for Medical Students in Emergency Medicine (NCAT-EM) is presented here.

  15. Tying Together the Common Core of Standards, Instruction, and Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Vicki; Wong, Carina

    2010-01-01

    Clear, high standards will enable us to develop an education system that ensures that high school graduates are ready for college. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has been working with other organizations to develop a Common Core of Standards. The partners working with the foundation are developing tools that will show teachers what is…

  16. Assessment of non-standard HIV antiretroviral therapy regimens at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-06

    Mar 6, 2016 ... Aim. Lighthouse Trust in Lilongwe, Malawi serves approximately 25,000 patients with HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens standardized according to national treatment guidelines. However, as a referral centre for complex cases, Lighthouse Trust occasionally treats patients with non-standard ART.

  17. Social Moderation, Assessment and Assuring Standards for Accounting Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watty, Kim; Freeman, Mark; Howieson, Bryan; Hancock, Phil; O'Connell, Brendan; de Lange, Paul; Abraham, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Evidencing student achievement of standards is a growing imperative worldwide. Key stakeholders (including current and prospective students, government, regulators and employers) want confidence that threshold learning standards in an accounting degree have been assured. Australia's new higher education regulatory environment requires that student…

  18. SEDIMENT TOXICITY ASSESSMENT: COMPARISON OF STANDARD AND NEW TESTING DESIGNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standard methods of sediment toxicity testing are fairly well accepted; however, as with all else, evolution of these methods is inevitable. We compared a standard ASTM 10-day amphipod toxicity testing method with smaller, 48- and 96-h test methods using very toxic and reference ...

  19. Balance Assessment Practices and Use of Standardized Balance Measures Among Ontario Physical Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Kathryn M.; Straus, Sharon E.; Inness, Elizabeth L.; Salbach, Nancy M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Balance impairment is a significant problem for older adults, as it can influence daily functioning. Treating balance impairment in this population is a major focus of physical therapist practice. Objective The purpose of this study was to document current practices in clinical balance assessment and compare components of balance assessed and measures used across practice areas among physical therapists. Design This was a cross-sectional study. Methods A survey questionnaire was mailed to 1,000 practicing physical therapists in Ontario, Canada. Results Three hundred sixty-nine individuals completed the survey questionnaire. More than 80% of respondents reported that they regularly (more than 60% of the time) assessed postural alignment, static and dynamic stability, functional balance, and underlying motor systems. Underlying sensory systems, cognitive contributions to balance, and reactive control were regularly assessed by 59.6%, 55.0%, and 41.2% of the respondents, respectively. The standardized measures regularly used by the most respondents were the single-leg stance test (79.1%), the Berg Balance Scale (45.0%), and the Timed “Up & Go” Test (27.6%). There was considerable variation in the components of balance assessed and measures used by respondents treating individuals in the orthopedic, neurologic, geriatric, and general rehabilitation populations. Limitations The survey provides quantitative data about what is done to assess balance, but does not explain the factors influencing current practice. Conclusions Many important components of balance and standardized measures are regularly used by physical therapists to assess balance. Further research, however, is needed to understand the factors contributing to the relatively lower rates of assessing reactive control, the component of balance most directly responsible for avoiding a fall. PMID:21868613

  20. Inconsistent detection of changes in cerebral blood volume by near infrared spectroscopy in standard clinical tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canova, D; Roatta, S; Bosone, D; Micieli, G

    2011-06-01

    The attractive possibility of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to noninvasively assess cerebral blood volume and oxygenation is challenged by the possible interference from extracranial tissues. However, to what extent this may affect cerebral NIRS monitoring during standard clinical tests is ignored. To address this issue, 29 healthy subjects underwent a randomized sequence of three maneuvers that differently affect intra- and extracranial circulation: Valsalva maneuver (VM), hyperventilation (HV), and head-up tilt (HUT). Putative intracranial ("i") and extracranial ("e") NIRS signals were collected from the forehead and from the cheek, respectively, and acquired together with cutaneous plethysmography at the forehead (PPG), cerebral blood velocity from the middle cerebral artery, and arterial blood pressure. Extracranial contribution to cerebral NIRS monitoring was investigated by comparing Beer-Lambert (BL) and spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS) blood volume indicators [the total hemoglobin concentration (tHb) and the total hemoglobin index, (THI)] and by correlating their changes with changes in extracranial circulation. While THIe and tHbe generally provided concordant indications, tHbi and THIi exhibited opposite-sign changes in a high percentage of cases (VM: 46%; HV: 31%; HUT: 40%). Moreover, tHbi was correlated with THIi only during HV (P < 0.05), not during VM and HUT, while it correlated with PPG in all three maneuvers (P < 0.01). These results evidence that extracranial circulation may markedly affect BL parameters in a high percentage of cases, even during standard clinical tests. Surface plethysmography at the forehead is suggested as complementary monitoring helpful in the interpretation of cerebral NIRS parameters.

  1. A comparative analysis of quality management standards for contract research organisations in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Elizabeth; McAdam, Rodney

    2007-01-01

    This article compares and contrasts the main quality standards in the highly regulated pharmaceutical industry with specific focus on Good Clinical Practice (GCP), the standard for designing, conducting, recording and reporting clinical trials involving human participants. Comparison is made to ISO quality standards, which can be applied to all industries and types of organisation. The study is then narrowed to that of contract research organisations (CROs) involved in the conduct of clinical trials. The paper concludes that the ISO 9000 series of quality standards can act as a company-wide framework for quality management within such organisations by helping to direct quality efforts on a long-term basis without any loss of compliance. This study is valuable because comparative analysis in this domain is uncommon.

  2. Standard requirements for GCP-compliant data management in multinational clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohmann, Christian; Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Canham, Steve

    2011-01-01

    A recent survey has shown that data management in clinical trials performed by academic trial units still faces many difficulties (e.g. heterogeneity of software products, deficits in quality management, limited human and financial resources and the complexity of running a local computer centre......). Unfortunately, no specific, practical and open standard for both GCP-compliant data management and the underlying IT-infrastructure is available to improve the situation. For that reason the "Working Group on Data Centres" of the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) has developed...... a standard specifying the requirements for high quality GCP-compliant data management in multinational clinical trials....

  3. Summative clinical competency assessment: A survey of ultrasound practitioners' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Gill

    2015-02-01

    Clinical competency and the assessment of core skills is a crucial element of any programme leading to an award with a clinical skills component. This has become a more prominent feature of current reports on quality health care provision. This project aimed to determine ultrasound practitioners' opinions about how best to assess clinical competency. An on-line questionnaire was sent to contacts from the Consortium for the Accreditation of Sonographic Education and details distributed at the British Medical Ultrasound Society conference in 2011. One hundred and sixteen responses were received from a range of clinical staff with an interest in ultrasound assessment. The majority of respondents suggested that competency assessments should take place in the clinical departments with or without an element of assessment at the education centre. Moderation was an important area highlighted by respondents, with 84% of respondents suggesting that two assessors were required and 66% of those stating some element of external moderation should be included. The findings suggest that respondents' preference is for some clinical competency assessments to take place on routine lists within the clinical department, assessed by two people one of which would be an external assessor. In view of recent reports relating to training and assessment of health care professionals, the ultrasound profession needs to begin the debate about how best to assess clinical competence and ensure appropriate first post-competency of anyone undertaking ultrasound examinations.

  4. Comparison study of judged clinical skills competence from standard setting ratings generated under different administration conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, William L; Boulet, John; Sandella, Jeanne

    2017-12-01

    When the safety of the public is at stake, it is particularly relevant for licensing and credentialing exam agencies to use defensible standard setting methods to categorize candidates into competence categories (e.g., pass/fail). The aim of this study was to gather evidence to support change to the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing-USA Level 2-Performance Evaluation standard setting design and administrative process. Twenty-two video recordings of candidates assessed for clinical competence were randomly selected from the 2014-2015 Humanistic domain test score distribution ranging from the highest to lowest quintile of performance. Nineteen panelists convened at the same site to receive training and practice prior to generating judgments of qualified or not qualified performance to each of the twenty videos. At the end of training, one panel remained onsite to complete their judgments and the second panel was released and given 1 week to observe the same twenty videos and complete their judgments offsite. The two one-sided test procedure established equivalence between panel group means at the 0.05 confidence level, controlling for rater errors within each panel group. From a practical cost-effective and administrative resource perspective, results from this study suggest it is possible to diverge from typical panel groups, who are sequestered the entire time onsite, to larger numbers of panelists who can make their judgments offsite with little impact on judged samples of qualified performance. Standard setting designs having panelists train together and then allowing those to provide judgments yields equivalent ratings and, ultimately, similar cut scores.

  5. Assessment of rosacea severity: A review of evaluation methods used in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkinson, Dennis; Moradi Tuchayi, Sara; Alinia, Hossein; Feldman, Steven R

    2015-07-01

    Novel rosacea treatments are needed. Assessment methodologies for clinical trials of rosacea treatments are not standardized and are relatively inadequate. To determine the efficacy of new treatments, a valid and reliable assessment methodology is needed. We sought to determine the assessment methodologies used in clinical trials for rosacea treatments, to demonstrate the need for a valid and reliable assessment tool, and to describe the relevant properties of such a tool. PubMed and MEDLINE were searched for clinical trials of rosacea treatments since January 1, 1985. In all, 32 clinical trials met inclusion criteria. Assessment methodologies were highly variable, and standardized assessment methodologies were used in only 3 studies. The various manifestations of rosacea were assessed inconsistently. Eighteen articles could not be included as a result of lack of access to the full text. The diverse methodologies make the assessment of novel treatments and comparison of treatments difficult. A valid and reliable assessment tool is needed to properly assess novel treatments to improve the management of rosacea. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Predicting failing performance on a standardized patient clinical performance examination: the importance of communication and professionalism skills deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anna; Boscardin, Christy; Chou, Calvin L; Loeser, Helen; Hauer, Karen E

    2009-10-01

    The purpose is to determine which assessment measures identify medical students at risk of failing a clinical performance examination (CPX). Retrospective case-control, multiyear design, contingency table analysis, n = 149. We identified two predictors of CPX failure in patient-physician interaction skills: low clerkship ratings (odds ratio 1.79, P = .008) and student progress review for communication or professionalism concerns (odds ratio 2.64, P = .002). No assessments predicted CPX failure in clinical skills. Performance concerns in communication and professionalism identify students at risk of failing the patient-physician interaction portion of a CPX. This correlation suggests that both faculty and standardized patients can detect noncognitive traits predictive of failing performance. Early identification of these students may allow for development of a structured supplemental curriculum with increased opportunities for practice and feedback. The lack of predictors in the clinical skills portion suggests limited faculty observation or feedback.

  7. Radiotherapy for pediatric brain tumors: Standard of care, current clinical trials and new directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, Larry E.

    1997-01-01

    Objectives: To review the clinical characteristics of childhood brain tumors, including neurologic signs, neuroimaging and neuropathology. To critically assess indications for therapy relevant to presenting characteristics, age, and disease status. To discuss current management strategies including neurosurgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. To analyze current clinical trials and future directions of clinical research. Brain tumors account for 20% of neoplastic diseases in children. The most common tumors include astrocytoma and malignant gliomas, medulloblastoma and supratentorial PNET's, ependymoma, craniopharyngioma, and intracranial germ cell tumors. The clinical characteristics and disease extent largely determine the relative merits of available 'standard' and investigational therapeutic approaches. Treatment outcome, including disease control and functional integrity, is dependent upon tumor type and site, age at presentation, and disease extent. An understanding of the clinical, neuroimaging, and histologic characteristics as they relate to decisions regarding therapy is critical to the radiation oncologist. Appropriate radiation therapy is central to curative therapy for a majority of pediatric brain tumor presentations. Technical advances in neurosurgery provide greater safety for 'gross total resection' in a majority of hemispheric astrocytomas and medulloblastomas. The relative roles of radiation therapy and chemotherapy for centrally located astrocytomas (e.g., diencephalic, optic pathway) need to be analyzed in the context of initial and overall disease control, neurotoxicities, and potential modifications in the risk:benefit ratio apparent in the introduction of 3-dimensional radiation techniques. Modifications in radiation delivery are important components of current investigations in medulloblastoma; the rationale for contemporary cooperative group trials will be presented as well as the background data re surgical, radiotherapeutic, and

  8. A Standardized Narrative Profile Approach to Self-Reflection and Assessment of Cross-Cultural Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle J Wilby

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: 1 to explore clinical assessor’s values regarding behaviours related to cultural aspects of care, 2 to generate standardized narrative profiles regarding cultural behavioural outcomes within clinical teaching settings, and 3 to rank order standardized narrative profiles according to performance expectations. Methods: Ten interviews were completed with clinicians to determine values and performance expectations for culturally competent behaviours. Transcripts were produced and coded. Six narrative profiles were developed based on data obtained. Twenty clinicians categorized profiles according to performance expectations and rank ordered. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs determined inter-rater reliability. Clinicians rated usability of profiles in clinical training settings. Results: Eighteen categories were coded with communication, awareness and ability most frequently reported with each ranging from 9.6-11.5% of the utterances. Consensus for categorization of all profiles was achieved at a level of 70% (ICC = 0.837, 95% CI 0.654-0.969. High inter-rater reliability was achieved for rank ordering (ICC = 0.815, 95% CI 0.561 to 0.984. Seventeen (85% clinicians agreed that the profiles would be usable in clinical training settings. Conclusions: Standardized narrative profiles may aid assessment and self-reflection for student performance within culturally diverse interactions. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties.   Type: Original Research

  9. Use of Computer-based Clinical Examination for Assessment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Video-projected Structured Clinical Examination (ViPSCE) replaced the oral (viva) examination as a student assessment tool in clinical surgery in our department since its invention in 2001 (1, 2). It has been useful for assessing higher knowledge domain including problem-solving abilities. Objectives: To ...

  10. Environmental assessment for the Consumer Products Efficiency Standards program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-23

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 as amended by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978, requires the DOE to prescribe energy efficiency standards for thirteen consumer products. The Consumer Products Efficiency Standards (CPES) program covers the following products: refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers; freezers;clothes dryers;water heaters; room air conditioners; home heating equipment (not including furnaces); kitchen ranges and ovens; central air conditioners (cooling and heat pumps); furnaces; dishwashers; television sets; clothes washers; and humidifiers and dehumidifiers. DOE is proposing two sets of standards for all thirteen consumer products: intermediate standards to become effective in 1981 for the first nine products and in 1982 for the second four products, and final standards to become effective in 1986 and 1987, respectively. The final standards are more restrictive than the intermediate standards and will provide manufacturers with the maximum time permitted under the Act to plan and develop extensive new lines of efficient consumer products. The final standards proposed by DOE require the maximum improvements in efficiency which are technologically feasible and economically justified, as required by Section 325(c) of EPCA. The thirteen consumer products account for approximately 90% of all the energy consumed in the nation's residences, or more than 20% of the nation's energy needs. Increases in the energy efficiency of these consumer products can help to narrow the gap between the nation's increasing demand for energy and decreasing supplies of domestic oil and natural gas. Improvements in the efficiency of consumer products can thus help to solve the nation's energy crisis.

  11. Validation of the Australian Midwifery Standards Assessment Tool (AMSAT): A tool to assess midwifery competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Linda; Bazargan, Maryam; McKellar, Lois; Gray, Joanne; Henderson, Amanda

    2018-02-01

    There is no current validated clinical assessment tool to measure the attainment of midwifery student competence in the midwifery practice setting. The lack of a valid assessment tool has led to a proliferation of tools and inconsistency in assessment of, and feedback on student learning. This research aimed to develop and validate a tool to assess competence of midwifery students in practice-based settings. A mixed-methods approach was used and the study implemented in two phases. Phase one involved the development of the AMSAT tool with qualitative feedback from midwifery academics, midwife assessors of students, and midwifery students. In phase two the newly developed AMSAT tool was piloted across a range of midwifery practice settings and ANOVA was used to compare scores across year levels, with feedback being obtained from assessors. Analysis of 150 AMSAT forms indicate the AMSAT as: reliable (Cronbach alpha greater than 0.9); valid-data extraction loaded predominantly onto one factor; and sensitivity scores indicating level of proficiency increased across the three years. Feedback evaluation forms (n=83) suggest acceptance of this tool for the purpose of both assessing and providing feedback on midwifery student's practice performance and competence. The AMSAT is a valid, reliable and acceptable midwifery assessment tool enables consistent assessment of midwifery student competence. This assists benchmarking across midwifery education programs. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Assess of the Status of the Karaj Operating Rooms in Comparison with International Standards in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Naseri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Because of making money, the operating room (OR is known as the beating heart of any clinical & health center. The effective and regular activity of the operating room guarantees a sustainable income for the hospital. So, in order to provide high quality treatment and care services, and to save the health and safety of OR staff, exploiting standard equipments and spaces as well as employing professional and skilled personnel is necessary. This study was aimed to assess the status of the Karaj operating rooms from physical, safety, sterilization, staffing and equipment aspects in comparison to the International Standards. Methods: This sectional descriptive study was conducted in Alborz University of Medical Sciences in 2011. Samples were 10 operating room wards from 10 surgical hospitals. Data were collected by a 70 items check-list at 5 fields of physical, safety, sterilization, staffing and equipment conditions and then compared to the international standards. The data were recorded in SPSS software and analyzed by statistical methods. Results: The results showed that compared to the international standards, the physical aspect was 60.5%, safety aspect 66%, sterilization aspect 68%, staffing aspect 63%, and equipment aspect was 80% close to the standard criteria. On the whole, in 10 assessed hospitals, equipment aspect with 80% had the best and the physical aspect with 60.5% had the worst conditions respectively. Conclusion: Due to admission in different medical and paramedical programs in Alborz University of Medical Sciences, renovation of the ORs is essential for training skilled students. Considering the results of this study could help the University authorities to improve the current condition.

  13. Summative clinical competency assessment: A survey of ultrasound practitioners’ views

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Clinical competency and the assessment of core skills is a crucial element of any programme leading to an award with a clinical skills component. This has become a more prominent feature of current reports on quality health care provision. This project aimed to determine ultrasound practitioners’ opinions about how best to assess clinical competency. An on-line questionnaire was sent to contacts from the Consortium for the Accreditation of Sonographic Education and details distributed at the ...

  14. Variation in Students' Conceptions of Self-Assessment and Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Kiat Kelvin Tan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a phenomenographic study on the different ways that secondary students understood and utilized student self-assessment and how various ego types could affect the accuracy of self-assessment. The study sought to contribute to the growing literature which recognizes the critical role that students play in assessment processes, and in particular the different roles that they assume in student self-assessment. The results of the study provide insights into how different students experience self-assessment by articulating the variation in the perception and purposes of assessing one's own learning. This variation is depicted as a hierarchy of logically related students' conceptions of self-assessment.

  15. Clinical assessment of hip strength using a hand-held dynamometer is reliable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, K; Petersen, J; Magnusson, S P

    2010-01-01

    Hip strength assessment plays an important role in the clinical examination of the hip and groin region. The primary aim of this study was to examine the absolute test-retest measurement variation concerning standardized strength assessments of hip abduction (ABD), adduction (ADD), external...... tests. No systematic differences were present. Standardized strength assessment procedures of hip ABD, ER, IR, FLEX, with test-retest measurement variation below 5%, hip ADD below 6% and hip EXT below 8%, make it possible to determine even small changes in hip strength at the individual level....

  16. [Clinical tools for assessing hair loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Marmol, V; Jouanique, C

    2004-09-01

    The complaint of hair loss is quite frequent but merits close attention because it can be very stressful to the patient. A simple examination will allow in most cases to define the origin of the hair loss and reassure the patient rapidly as to its likely evolution if it is reversible. The examination must take into account the medical, chirurgical, gynaecological and dietary antecedents and the cosmetic habits. These elements must be situated in time and complemented by a clinical examination to define the loss as diffuse or localised and in the latter case, expose scar damage. The clinical examination will be associated with a trichogram and in certain cases with a biopsy or a squam prelevement. Further, the blood can be analysed for different metabolically and hormonal elements. Finally, the treatments already administered must be known in order to identify the beneficial and secondary effects, which will allow the definition of a new treatment, if required.

  17. Clinical Assessment And Diagnosis Of Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is characterized by progressive decline in an alert individual, leading to loss of independence in day-to-day functioning. It is a generic term for a condition that has various causes and hence myriad clinical presentations. It has to be distinguished from age-related cognitive decline, depression and delirium all of which are common in the elderly population. Detailed history and mental status examination are necessary to identify dementia, fit it into one of the various bedside classifications and pursue the differential diagnosis. This teaching review summarizes current information on definition, differential diagnosis and classification of dementia and presents a brief elaboration of bedside cognitive testing pertaining to dementia. A bird′s eye view of the profiles of various dementia subtypes is also provided so that after reading this article the reader will able to recognize dementia, conduct clinical examination to identify the characteristic cognitive profile and formulate the differential diagnosis with confidence.

  18. Clinical assessment of rosacea severity: oriental score vs. quantitative assessment method with imaging and biomedical tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Ahn, J W; Ha, S; Kwon, S H; Lee, O; Oh, C

    2017-05-01

    Rosacea is a common chronic inflammatory disorder affecting facial skin. Currently, no accurate and objective method is available for assessing the severity of rosacea. Most studies use the National Rosacea Society Standard (NRSS) grading method, which lacks objectivity and yields varying results. Eighteen patients with rosacea were included. Clinical severity was assessed on the basis of the NRSS grade, Investigators' Global Assessment, Patients' Global Assessment, and Dermatology Quality of Life Index. A skin color analysis system was used to measure the facial area showing erythema, and biophysical parameters of facial skin (transepidermal water loss and skin surface hydration) were examined. To find statistical significant in classification severity of the rosacea, statistical analysis was performed with all parameters. A significant correlation (P rosacea of different levels of severity (mild, moderate, severe; P rosacea, in addition to biophysical parameter assessment. The combination of these two analytical methods enabled objective and quantitative evaluation of the severity of rosacea. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Standardized exchange of clinical documents--towards a shared care paradigm in glaucoma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdsen, F; Müller, S; Jablonski, S; Prokosch, H-U

    2006-01-01

    The exchange of medical data from research and clinical routine across institutional borders is essential to establish an integrated healthcare platform. In this project we want to realize the standardized exchange of medical data between different healthcare institutions to implement an integrated and interoperable information system supporting clinical treatment and research of glaucoma. The central point of our concept is a standardized communication model based on the Clinical Document Architecture (CDA). Further, a communication concept between different health care institutions applying the developed document model has been defined. With our project we have been able to prove that standardized communication between an Electronic Medical Record (EMR), an Electronic Health Record (EHR) and the Erlanger Glaucoma Register (EGR) based on the established conceptual models, which rely on CDA rel.1 level 1 and SCIPHOX, could be implemented. The HL7-tool-based deduction of a suitable CDA rel.2 compliant schema showed significant differences when compared with the manually created schema. Finally fundamental requirements, which have to be implemented for an integrated health care platform, have been identified. An interoperable information system can enhance both clinical treatment and research projects. By automatically transferring screening findings from a glaucoma research project to the electronic medical record of our ophthalmology clinic, clinicians could benefit from the availability of a longitudinal patient record. The CDA as a standard for exchanging clinical documents has demonstrated its potential to enhance interoperability within a future shared care paradigm.

  20. Standardized reporting for rapid relative effectiveness assessments of pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijnen, Sarah; Pasternack, Iris; Van de Casteele, Marc; Rossi, Bernardette; Cangini, Agnese; Di Bidino, Rossella; Jelenc, Marjetka; Abrishami, Payam; Autti-Rämö, Ilona; Seyfried, Hans; Wildbacher, Ingrid; Goettsch, Wim G

    2014-11-01

    Many European countries perform rapid assessments of the relative effectiveness (RE) of pharmaceuticals as part of the reimbursement decision making process. Increased sharing of information on RE across countries may save costs and reduce duplication of work. The objective of this article is to describe the development of a tool for rapid assessment of RE of new pharmaceuticals that enter the market, the HTA Core Model® for Rapid Relative Effectiveness Assessment (REA) of Pharmaceuticals. Eighteen member organisations of the European Network of Health Technology Assessment (EUnetHTA) participated in the development of the model. Different versions of the model were developed and piloted in this collaboration and adjusted accordingly based on feedback on the content and feasibility of the model. The final model deviates from the traditional HTA Core Model® used for assessing other types of technologies. This is due to the limited scope (strong focus on RE), the timing of the assessment (just after market authorisation), and strict timelines (e.g. 90 days) required for performing the assessment. The number of domains and assessment elements was limited and it was decided that the primary information sources should preferably be a submission file provided by the marketing authorisation holder and the European Public Assessment Report. The HTA Core Model® for Rapid REA (version 3.0) was developed to produce standardised transparent RE information of pharmaceuticals. Further piloting can provide input for possible improvements, such as further refining the assessment elements and new methodological guidance on relevant areas.

  1. Assessment of technologies to meet a low carbon fuel standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Sonia; Lutsey, Nicholas P; Parker, Nathan C

    2009-09-15

    California's low carbon fuel standard (LCFS) was designed to incentivize a diverse array of available strategies for reducing transportation greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It provides strong incentives for fuels with lower GHG emissions, while explicitly requiring a 10% reduction in California's transportation fuel GHG intensity by 2020. This paper investigates the potential for cost-effective GHG reductions from electrification and expanded use of biofuels. The analysis indicates that fuel providers could meetthe standard using a portfolio approach that employs both biofuels and electricity, which would reduce the risks and uncertainties associated with the progress of cellulosic and battery technologies, feedstock prices, land availability, and the sustainability of the various compliance approaches. Our analysis is based on the details of California's development of an LCFS; however, this research approach could be generalizable to a national U.S. standard and to similar programs in Europe and Canada.

  2. Transformative Shifts in Art History Teaching: The Impact of Standards-Based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormond, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    This article examines pedagogical shifts in art history teaching that have developed as a response to the implementation of a standards-based assessment regime. The specific characteristics of art history standards-based assessment in the context of New Zealand secondary schools are explained to demonstrate how an exacting form of assessment has…

  3. Comparing Panelists' Understanding of Standard Setting across Multiple Levels of an Alternate Science Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Mary A.; Lyon, Steven R.; Heh, Peter; Zigmond, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale assessment programs, including alternate assessments based on alternate achievement standards (AA-AAS), must provide evidence of technical quality and validity. This study provides information about the technical quality of one AA-AAS by evaluating the standard setting for the science component. The assessment was designed to have…

  4. Clinical Assessment Applications of Ambulatory Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Stephen N.; Yoshioka, Dawn T.

    2007-01-01

    Ambulatory biosensor assessment includes a diverse set of rapidly developing and increasingly technologically sophisticated strategies to acquire minimally disruptive measures of physiological and motor variables of persons in their natural environments. Numerous studies have measured cardiovascular variables, physical activity, and biochemicals…

  5. Psychological Assessment Training in Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihura, Joni L; Roy, Manali; Graceffo, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    We surveyed American Psychological Association-accredited clinical psychology doctoral programs' (n = 83) training in psychological assessment-specifically, their coverage of various assessment topics and tests in courses and practica, and whether the training was optional or required. We report results overall and separately per training model (clinical science, scientist-practitioner, and practitioner-focused). Overall, our results suggest that psychological assessment training is as active, or even more active, than in previous years. Areas of increased emphasis include clinical interviewing and psychometrics; multimethod, outcomes, health, and collaborative or therapeutic assessment; and different types of cognitive and self-report personality tests. All or almost all practice-focused programs offered training with the Thematic Apperception Test and Rorschach compared to about half of the scientist-practitioner programs and a third of the clinical science programs. Although almost all programs reported teaching multimethod assessment, what constitutes different methods of assessing psychopathology should be clarified in future studies because many programs appear to rely on one method-self-report (especially clinical science programs). Although doctoral programs covered many assessment topics and tests in didactic courses, there appears to be a shortage of program-run opportunities for students to obtain applied assessment training. Finally, we encourage doctoral programs to be familiar with (a) internships' assessment expectations and opportunities, (b) the professional guidelines for assessment training, and (c) the American Psychological Association's requirements for preinternship assessment competencies.

  6. Standardizing measurement, sampling and reporting for public exposure assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochedo, Elaine R.R. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Salvador Allende s/No. CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: elaine@ird.gov.br

    2008-11-15

    UNSCEAR assesses worldwide public exposure from natural and man-made sources of ionizing radiation based on information submitted to UNSCEAR by United Nations Member States and from peer reviewed scientific literature. These assessments are used as a basis for radiation protection programs of international and national regulatory and research organizations. Although UNSCEAR describes its assessment methodologies, the data are based on various monitoring approaches. In order to reduce uncertainties and improve confidence in public exposure assessments, it would be necessary to harmonize the methodologies used for sampling, measuring and reporting of environmental results.

  7. Objective Structured Clinical Examinations Provide Valid Clinical Skills Assessment in Emergency Medicine Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallenstein, Joshua

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evaluation of emergency medicine (EM learners based on observed performance in the emergency department (ED is limited by factors such as reproducibility and patient safety. EM educators depend on standardized and reproducible assessments such as the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE. The validity of the OSCE as an evaluation tool in EM education has not been previously studied. The objective was to assess the validity of a novel management-focused OSCE as an evaluation instrument in EM education through demonstration of performance correlation with established assessment methods and case item analysis. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study of fourth-year medical students enrolled in a required EM clerkship. Students enrolled in the clerkship completed a five-station EM OSCE. We used Pearson’s coefficient to correlate OSCE performance with performance in the ED based on completed faculty evaluations. Indices of difficulty and discrimination were computed for each scoring item. Results: We found a moderate and statistically-significant correlation between OSCE score and ED performance score [r(239 =0.40, p<0.001]. Of the 34 OSCE testing items the mean index of difficulty was 63.0 (SD =23.0 and the mean index of discrimination was 0.52 (SD =0.21. Conclusion: Student performance on the OSCE correlated with their observed performance in the ED, and indices of difficulty and differentiation demonstrated alignment with published best-practice testing standards. This evidence, along with other attributes of the OSCE, attest to its validity. Our OSCE can be further improved by modifying testing items that performed poorly and by examining and maximizing the inter-rater reliability of our evaluation instrument. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:121–126.

  8. The inter-examiner reliability of standardized manual palpation for the identification of clinically relevant myofascial triggerpoints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Larsen, Anders Holsgaard

    -observer agreement of TP examination among four examiners and whether reproducibility is influenced by examiner clinical experience. Two experienced and two inexperienced clinicians each performed a standardized palpation of the upper Trapezius musculature. Each observer was asked to judge the presents....../absence of clinically relevant TP(s) using clinician global assessment (GA). A random case mix of 81 female participants was examined, 14 being asymptomatic and the remainder suffering from neck/shoulder pain. Examiners received psychomotor training and video analysis feedback provided prior to and during the study...... in order to improve protocol standardization. Kappa co-efficients were calculated for all possible examiner pairings. Good agreement was noted between the experienced pairing (κ= 0.63). Moderate levels of agreement were observed among the two mixed pairings (κ=0.35 and 0.47 respectively). However, poor...

  9. Xpand chest drain: assessing equivalence to current standard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This device incorporates a one-way valve with a fluid reservoir and permits the detection of an air leak, as well as intrapleural pressure differences. Aim. To prove equivalence of the Xpand chest drain compared with standard underwater bottle drainage. Methods. In a non-blinded randomised control trial 67 patients with ...

  10. Assessing Learning Environment for Achieving Standard in Primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper is a descriptive survey which sought to identify how the provision of adequate learning environment would affect standard in primary education and subsequently empower both staff and students for capacity development through counselling. Fifteen (15) public primary schools out of 96 identified in Oru-East, ...

  11. Development and Application of Assessment Standards to Advanced Written Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miihkinen, Antti; Virtanen, Tuija

    2018-01-01

    This study describes the results of a project that focused on developing an assessment rubric to be used as the assessment criteria for the written thesis of accounting majors and the quality of the coursework during the seminar. We used descriptive analysis and the survey method to collect information for the development work and to examine the…

  12. Electromagnetic tracking for US-guided interventions: standardized assessment of a new compact field generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, A M; März, K; Hummel, J; Birkfellner, W; Bendl, R; Delorme, S; Schlemmer, H-P; Meinzer, H-P; Maier-Hein, L

    2012-11-01

    One of the main challenges related to electromagnetic tracking in the clinical setting is a placement of the field generator (FG) that optimizes the reliability and accuracy of sensor localization. Recently, a new mobile FG for the NDI Aurora(®) tracking system has been presented. This Compact FG is the first FG that can be attached directly to an ultrasound (US) probe. The purpose of this study was to assess the precision and accuracy of the Compact FG in the presence of nearby mounted US probes. Six different US probes were mounted onto the Compact FG by means of a custom-designed mounting adapter. To assess precision and accuracy of the Compact FG, we employed a standardized assessment protocol. Utilizing a specifically manufactured plate, we measured positional data on three levels of distances from the FG as well as rotational data. While some probes had negligible influence on tracking accuracy two probes increased the mean distance error up to 1.5 mm compared with a reference measurement of 0.5 mm. The jitter error consistently stayed below 0.2 mm in all cases. The mean relative error in orientation was found to be smaller than 3°. Attachment of an US probe to the Compact FG does not have a critical influence on tracking accuracy in most cases. Clinical benefit of this promising mobile FG must be shown in future studies.

  13. Methodological aspects of clinical trials in tinnitus: A proposal for an international standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgrebe, Michael; Azevedo, Andréia; Baguley, David; Bauer, Carol; Cacace, Anthony; Coelho, Claudia; Dornhoffer, John; Figueiredo, Ricardo; Flor, Herta; Hajak, Goeran; van de Heyning, Paul; Hiller, Wolfgang; Khedr, Eman; Kleinjung, Tobias; Koller, Michael; Lainez, Jose Miguel; Londero, Alain; Martin, William H.; Mennemeier, Mark; Piccirillo, Jay; De Ridder, Dirk; Rupprecht, Rainer; Searchfield, Grant; Vanneste, Sven; Zeman, Florian; Langguth, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus is a common condition with a high burden of disease. While many different treatments are used in clinical practice, the evidence for the efficacy of these treatments is low and the variance of treatment response between individuals is high. This is most likely due to the great heterogeneity of tinnitus with respect to clinical features as well as underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. There is a clear need to find effective treatment options in tinnitus, however, clinical trials differ substantially with respect to methodological quality and design. Consequently, the conclusions that can be derived from these studies are limited and jeopardize comparison between studies. Here, we discuss our view of the most important aspects of trial design in clinical studies in tinnitus and make suggestions for an international methodological standard in tinnitus trials. We hope that the proposed methodological standard will stimulate scientific discussion and will help to improve the quality of trials in tinnitus. PMID:22789414

  14. Providing support to nursing students in the clinical environment: a nursing standard requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carina; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

    2016-10-01

    This discussion paper poses the question 'What enables or deters Registered Nurses to take up their professional responsibility to support undergraduate nursing students through the provision of clinical education?'. Embedded within many nursing standards are expectations that Registered Nurses provide support and professional development to undergraduate nursing students undertaking clinical placements. Expectations within nursing standards that Registered Nurses provide support and professional development to nursing students are important because nursing students depend on Registered Nurses to help them to become competent practitioners. Contributing factors that enable and deter Registered Nurses from fulfilling this expectation to support nursing students in their clinical learning include; workloads, preparedness for the teaching role, confidence in teaching and awareness of the competency requirement to support students. Factors exist which can enable or deter Registered Nurses from carrying out the licence requirement to provide clinical education and support to nursing students.

  15. Features of assessment learners use to make informed self-assessments of clinical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeant, Joan; Eva, Kevin W; Armson, Heather; Chesluk, Ben; Dornan, Tim; Holmboe, Eric; Lockyer, Jocelyn M; Loney, Elaine; Mann, Karen V; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2011-06-01

    Conceptualisations of self-assessment are changing as its role in professional development comes to be viewed more broadly as needing to be both externally and internally informed through activities that enable access to and the interpretation and integration of data from external sources. Education programmes use various activities to promote learners' reflection and self-direction, yet we know little about how effective these activities are in 'informing' learners' self-assessments. This study aimed to increase understanding of the specific ways in which undergraduate and postgraduate learners used learning and assessment activities to inform self-assessments of their clinical performance. We conducted an international qualitative study using focus groups and drawing on principles of grounded theory. We recruited volunteer participants from three undergraduate and two postgraduate programmes using structured self-assessment activities (e.g. portfolios). We asked learners to describe their perceptions of and experiences with formal and informal activities intended to inform self-assessment. We conducted analysis as a team using a constant comparative process. Eighty-five learners (53 undergraduate, 32 postgraduate) participated in 10 focus groups. Two main findings emerged. Firstly, the perceived effectiveness of formal and informal assessment activities in informing self-assessment appeared to be both person- and context-specific. No curricular activities were considered to be generally effective or ineffective. However, the availability of high-quality performance data and standards was thought to increase the effectiveness of an activity in informing self-assessment. Secondly, the fostering and informing of self-assessment was believed to require credible and engaged supervisors. Several contextual and personal conditions consistently influenced learners' perceptions of the extent to which assessment activities were useful in informing self-assessments of

  16. [The challenges of standardization in clinical diagnostic laboratories of medical organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men'shikov, V V

    2013-04-01

    The generalized data concerning the conditions of application of regulations of national standards in clinical diagnostic laboratories of medical organizations is presented. The primary information was provided by 14 regions of 6 federal administrative okrugs of Russia. The causes of challenges of application of requirements of standards are presented. They are mostly related with insufficient financial support, lacking of manpower, difficulties with reagents supply, inadequate technical maintenance of devices and absence of support of administration of medical organizations. The recommendations are formulated concerning the necessity of publishing the document of Minzdrav of Russia to determine the need in application of standards in laboratory practice.

  17. 49 CFR 1572.5 - Standards for security threat assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... assessment includes biometric identification and a biometric credential. (2) To apply for a comparability... process and provide biometric information to obtain a TWIC, if the applicant seeks unescorted access to a...

  18. Is a wound swab for microbiological analysis supportive in the clinical assessment of infection of a chronic wound?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondas, Armand A L M; Halfens, Ruud J G; Schols, Jos M G A; Thiesen, Kelly P T; Trienekens, Thera A M; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether bacteriological analysis of a wound swab is supportive in the clinical assessment of infection of a chronic wound. Patients attending an outpatient wound clinic who had endured a chronic wound for more than 3 weeks were clinically assessed for infection. In addition, standardized wound swabs were taken according to the Levine technique and the microbiological findings of the swabs compared with the clinical assessment of the wounds. There was no significant relationship between the clinical assessments of the chronic wounds and the qualitative or quantitative bacteriological results of the swabs. Microbiological analysis of wound swabs taken from chronic wounds to support clinical assessment of the wounds is waste of time and money. It may be preferable to assess chronic wounds clinically, however, validation studies of these signs and symptoms are needed.

  19. Assessing the performance and satisfaction of medical residents utilizing standardized patient versus mannequin-simulated training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsaad AA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ali A Alsaad,1 Swetha Davuluri,2 Vandana Y Bhide,3 Amy M Lannen,4 Michael J Maniaci3 1Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 2University of Miami, Coral Gables, 3Division of Hospital Internal Medicine, 4J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Simulation Center, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA Background: Conducting simulations of rapidly decompensating patients are a key part of internal medicine (IM residency training. Traditionally, mannequins have been the simulation tool used in these scenarios. Objective: To compare IM residents’ performance and assess realism in specific-simulated decompensating patient scenarios using standardized patients (SPs as compared to mannequin. Methods: Nineteen IM residents were randomized to undergo simulations using either a mannequin or an SP. Each resident in the two groups underwent four different simulation scenarios (calcium channel blocker overdose, severe sepsis, severe asthma exacerbation, and acute bacterial meningitis. Residents completed pretest and post-test evaluations as well as a questionnaire to assess the reality perception (realism score. Results: Nine residents completed mannequin-based scenarios, whereas 10 completed SP-based scenarios. Improvement in the post-test scores was seen in both groups. However, there were significantly higher post-test scores achieved with SP simulations in three out of the four scenarios (P=0.01. When compared with the mannequin group, the SP simulation group showed a significantly higher average realism score (P=0.002. Conclusions: Applying SP-based specific-simulation scenarios in IM residency training may result in better performance and a higher sense of a realistic experience by medical residents. Keywords: simulation, standardized patient, satisfaction, mannequin, assessment, resident education

  20. Assessing cultural validity in standardized tests in stem education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassant, Lunes

    This quantitative ex post facto study examined how race and gender, as elements of culture, influence the development of common misconceptions among STEM students. Primary data came from a standardized test: the Digital Logic Concept Inventory (DLCI) developed by Drs. Geoffrey L. Herman, Michael C. Louis, and Craig Zilles from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The sample consisted of a cohort of 82 STEM students recruited from three universities in Northern Louisiana. Microsoft Excel and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) were used for data computation. Two key concepts, several sub concepts, and 19 misconceptions were tested through 11 items in the DLCI. Statistical analyses based on both the Classical Test Theory (Spearman, 1904) and the Item Response Theory (Lord, 1952) yielded similar results: some misconceptions in the DLCI can reliably be predicted by the Race or the Gender of the test taker. The research is significant because it has shown that some misconceptions in a STEM discipline attracted students with similar ethnic backgrounds differently; thus, leading to the existence of some cultural bias in the standardized test. Therefore the study encourages further research in cultural validity in standardized tests. With culturally valid tests, it will be possible to increase the effectiveness of targeted teaching and learning strategies for STEM students from diverse ethnic backgrounds. To some extent, this dissertation has contributed to understanding, better, the gap between high enrollment rates and low graduation rates among African American students and also among other minority students in STEM disciplines.

  1. Clinical Approach to the Standardization of Oriental Medical Diagnostic Pattern Identification in Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Jung Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In Korea, many stroke patients receive oriental medical care, in which pattern-identification plays a major role. Pattern-identification is Oriental Medicine's unique diagnostic system. This study attempted to standardize oriental medical pattern-identification for stroke patients. This was a community-based multicenter study that enrolled stroke patients within 30 days after their ictus. We assessed the patients' general characteristics and symptoms related to pattern-identification. Each patient's pattern was determined when two doctors had the same opinion. To determine which variables affect the pattern-identification, binary logistic regression analysis was used with the backward method. A total of 806 stroke patients were enrolled. Among 480 patients who were identified as having a certain pattern, 100 patients exhibited the Fire Heat Pattern, 210 patients the Phlegm Dampness Pattern, nine patients the Blood Stasis Pattern, 110 patients the Qi Deficiency Pattern, and 51 patients the Yin Deficiency Pattern. After the regression analysis, the predictive logistic equations for the Fire Heat, Phlegm Dampness, Qi Deficiency, and Yin Deficiency patterns were determined. The Blood Stasis Pattern was omitted because the sample size was too small. Predictive logistic equations were suggested for four of the patterns. These criteria would be useful in determining each stroke patient's pattern in clinics. However, further studies with large samples are necessary to validate and confirm these criteria.

  2. On the creation of a clinical gold standard corpus in Spanish: Mining adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oronoz, Maite; Gojenola, Koldo; Pérez, Alicia; de Ilarraza, Arantza Díaz; Casillas, Arantza

    2015-08-01

    The advances achieved in Natural Language Processing make it possible to automatically mine information from electronically created documents. Many Natural Language Processing methods that extract information from texts make use of annotated corpora, but these are scarce in the clinical domain due to legal and ethical issues. In this paper we present the creation of the IxaMed-GS gold standard composed of real electronic health records written in Spanish and manually annotated by experts in pharmacology and pharmacovigilance. The experts mainly annotated entities related to diseases and drugs, but also relationships between entities indicating adverse drug reaction events. To help the experts in the annotation task, we adapted a general corpus linguistic analyzer to the medical domain. The quality of the annotation process in the IxaMed-GS corpus has been assessed by measuring the inter-annotator agreement, which was 90.53% for entities and 82.86% for events. In addition, the corpus has been used for the automatic extraction of adverse drug reaction events using machine learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. External quality assessment schemes raise standards: evidence from the UKNEQAS parasitology subschemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettelhut, M M; Chiodini, P L; Edwards, H; Moody, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: The burden of parasitic disease imported into the temperate zone is increasing, and in the tropics remains very high. Thus, high quality diagnostic parasitology services are needed, but to implement clinical governance a measure of quality of service is required. Aim: To examine performance in the United Kingdom National External Quality Assessment Scheme for Parasitology for evidence of improved standards in parasite diagnosis in clinical specimens. Methods: Analysis of performance was made for the period 1986 to 2001, to look for trends in performance scores. Results: An overall rise in performance in faecal and blood parasitology schemes was found from 1986 to 2001. This was seen particularly in the identification of ova, cysts, and larvae in the faecal scheme, the detection of Plasmodium ovale and Plasmodium vivax in the blood scheme, and also in the correct identification of non-malarial blood parasites. Despite this improvement, there are still problems. In the faecal scheme, participants still experience difficulty in recognising small protozoan cysts, differentiating vegetable matter from cysts, and detecting ova and cysts when more than one species is present. In the blood scheme, participants have problems in identifying mixed malarial infections, distinguishing between P ovale and P vivax, and estimating the percentage parasitaemia. The reasons underlying these problems have been identified via the educational part of the scheme, and have been dealt with by distributing teaching sheets and undertaking practical sessions. Conclusions: UK NEQAS for Parasitology has helped to raise the standard of diagnostic parasitology in the UK. PMID:14645352

  4. Call for standardized definitions of osteoarthritis and risk stratification for clinical trials and clinical use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, V B; Blanco, F J; Englund, M

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a heterogeneous disorder. The goals of this review are (1) To stimulate use of standardized nomenclature for OA that could serve as building blocks for describing OA and defining OA phenotypes, in short to provide unifying disease concepts for a heterogeneous disorder; and (2......) To stimulate establishment of ROAD (Risk of OA Development) and ROAP (Risk of OA Progression) tools analogous to the FRAX™ instrument for predicting risk of fracture in osteoporosis; and (3) To stimulate formulation of tools for identifying disease in its early preradiographic and/or molecular stages - REDI...... (Reliable Early Disease Identification). Consensus around more sensitive and specific diagnostic criteria for OA could spur development of disease modifying therapies for this entity that has proved so recalcitrant to date. We fully acknowledge that as we move forward, we expect to develop more...

  5. Call for standardized definitions of osteoarthritis and risk stratification for clinical trials and clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, V B; Blanco, F J; Englund, M; Karsdal, M A; Lohmander, L S

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a heterogeneous disorder. The goals of this review are (1) To stimulate use of standardized nomenclature for OA that could serve as building blocks for describing OA and defining OA phenotypes, in short to provide unifying disease concepts for a heterogeneous disorder; and (2) To stimulate establishment of ROAD (Risk of OA Development) and ROAP (Risk of OA Progression) tools analogous to the FRAX™ instrument for predicting risk of fracture in osteoporosis; and (3) To stimulate formulation of tools for identifying disease in its early preradiographic and/or molecular stages - REDI (Reliable Early Disease Identification). Consensus around more sensitive and specific diagnostic criteria for OA could spur development of disease modifying therapies for this entity that has proved so recalcitrant to date. We fully acknowledge that as we move forward, we expect to develop more sophisticated definitions, terminology and tools. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Caliper measurement to improve clinical assessment of palpable neck lumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, J; Amonoo-Kuofi, K; Scrivens, J; Pfleiderer, A

    2012-05-01

    One-stop neck lump clinics with ultrasonography and cytopathology support are an expensive and finite resource. Consequently, many neck lump patients are assessed in general ear, nose and throat or head and neck clinics. Optimal clinical assessment of neck lump size is important to guide investigation, monitor change and provisionally stage nodal disease. The aims of this study were to investigate whether caliper measurement is more accurate than clinical palpation in assessing neck lump size and whether caliper measurement of neck lump size correlates closely with accurate ultrasonography measurement. A prospective study was carried out involving 50 patients with clinically palpable neck lumps presenting to the one-stop neck lump clinic. Long and short axis neck lump dimensions were estimated first by clinical palpation and second by caliper measurement. Estimations were compared with accurate ultrasonography measurement. The mean combined long and short axis measurement deviation from accurate ultrasonography measurement was smaller for caliper measurement (7.80 mm) than for clinical palpation (12.38 mm) (p caliper measurement of neck lumps (p = 0.462). Caliper measurement is more accurate than clinical palpation in estimating the size of clinically palpable neck lumps. The use of calipers to measure the skin surface dimensions of palpable neck lumps is statistically comparable to accurate ultrasonography measurement.

  7. Assessment of Usability Benchmarks: Combining Standardized Scales with Specific Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Bettina Linek

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The usability of Web sites and online services is of rising importance. When creating a completely new Web site, qualitative data are adequate for identifying the most usability problems. However, changes of an existing Web site should be evaluated by a quantitative benchmarking process. The proposed paper describes the creation of a questionnaire that allows a quantitative usability benchmarking, i.e. a direct comparison of the different versions of a Web site and an orientation on general standards of usability. The questionnaire is also open for qualitative data. The methodology will be explained by the digital library services of the ZBW.

  8. Assessment of Offshore Wind System Design, Safety, and Operation Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirnivas, Senu [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Musial, Walt [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bailey, Bruce [AWS Trupower LLC, Albany, NY (United States); Filippelli, Matthew [AWS Trupower LLC, Albany, NY (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This report is a deliverable for a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) entitled National Offshore Wind Energy Resource and Design Data Campaign -- Analysis and Collaboration (contract number DE-EE0005372; prime contractor -- AWS Truepower). The project objective is to supplement, facilitate, and enhance ongoing multiagency efforts to develop an integrated national offshore wind energy data network. The results of this initiative are intended to 1) produce a comprehensive definition of relevant met-ocean resource assets and needs and design standards, and 2) provide a basis for recommendations for meeting offshore wind energy industry data and design certification requirements.

  9. Standardization of 8-color flow cytometry across different flow cytometer instruments: A feasibility study in clinical laboratories in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glier, Hana; Heijnen, Ingmar; Hauwel, Mathieu; Dirks, Jan; Quarroz, Stéphane; Lehmann, Thomas; Rovo, Alicia; Arn, Kornelius; Matthes, Thomas; Hogan, Cassandra; Keller, Peter; Dudkiewicz, Ewa; Stüssi, Georg; Fernandez, Paula

    2017-07-29

    The EuroFlow Consortium developed a fully standardized flow cytometric approach from instrument settings, through antibody panel, reagents and sample preparation protocols, to data acquisition and analysis. The Swiss Cytometry Society (SCS) promoted a study to evaluate the feasibility of using such standardized measurements of 8-color data across two different flow cytometry platforms - Becton Dickinson (BD) FACSCanto II and Beckman Coulter (BC) Navios, aiming at increasing reproducibility and inter-laboratory comparability of immunophenotypic data in clinical laboratories in Switzerland. The study was performed in two phases, i.e. a learning phase (round 1) and an analytical phase (rounds 2 and 3) consisting of a total of three rounds. Overall, 10 laboratories using BD FACSCanto II (n=6) or BC Navios (n=4) flow cytometers participated. Each laboratory measured peripheral blood samples from healthy donors stained with a uniform antibody panel of reagents - EuroFlow Lymphoid Screening Tube (LST) - applying the EuroFlow standardized protocols for instrument setup and sample preparation (www.EuroFlow.org). All data files were analyzed centrally and median fluorescence intensity (MedFI) values for individual markers on defined lymphocyte subsets were recorded; variability from reference MedFI values was assessed using performance scores. Data troubleshooting and discussion of the results with the participants followed after each round at SCS meetings. The results of the learning phase demonstrated that standardized instrument setup and data acquisition are feasible in routine clinical laboratories without previous experience with EuroFlow. During the analytical phase, highly comparable data were obtained at the different laboratories using either BD FACSCanto II or BC Navios. The coefficient of variation of MedFI for 7 of 11 markers performed repeatedly below 30%. In the last study round, 89% of participants scored over 90% MedFI values within the acceptance criteria

  10. Quality standards for DNA sequence variation databases to improve clinical management under development in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bennetts

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the routine nature of comparing sequence variations identified during clinical testing to database records, few databases meet quality requirements for clinical diagnostics. To address this issue, The Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA in collaboration with the Human Genetics Society of Australasia (HGSA, and the Human Variome Project (HVP is developing standards for DNA sequence variation databases intended for use in the Australian clinical environment. The outputs of this project will be promoted to other health systems and accreditation bodies by the Human Variome Project to support the development of similar frameworks in other jurisdictions.

  11. Assessing FDG-PET diagnostic accuracy studies to develop recommendations for clinical use in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardi, Marina; Festari, Cristina; Altomare, Daniele; Gandolfo, Federica; Orini, Stefania; Nobili, Flavio; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2018-04-30

    FDG-PET is frequently used as a marker of synaptic damage to diagnose dementing neurodegenerative disorders. We aimed to adapt the items of evidence quality to FDG-PET diagnostic studies, and assess the evidence available in current literature to assist Delphi decisions for European recommendations for clinical use. Based on acknowledged methodological guidance, we defined the domains, specific to FDG-PET, required to assess the quality of evidence in 21 literature searches addressing as many Population Intervention Comparison Outcome (PICO) questions. We ranked findings for each PICO and fed experts making Delphi decisions for recommending clinical use. Among the 1435 retrieved studies, most lacked validated measures of test performance, an adequate gold standard, and head-to-head comparison of FDG-PET and clinical diagnosis, and only 58 entered detailed assessment. Only two studies assessed the accuracy of the comparator (clinical diagnosis) versus any kind of gold-/reference-standard. As to the index-test (FDG-PET-based diagnosis), an independent gold-standard was available in 24% of the examined papers; 38% used an acceptable reference-standard (clinical follow-up); and 38% compared FDG-PET-based diagnosis only to baseline clinical diagnosis. These methodological limitations did not allow for deriving recommendations from evidence. An incremental diagnostic value of FDG-PET versus clinical diagnosis or lack thereof cannot be derived from the current literature. Many of the observed limitations may easily be overcome, and we outlined them as research priorities to improve the quality of current evidence. Such improvement is necessary to outline evidence-based guidelines. The available data were anyway provided to expert clinicians who defined interim recommendations.

  12. An automated standardized system for managing adverse events in clinical research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richesson, Rachel L; Malloy, Jamie F; Paulus, Kathleen; Cuthbertson, David; Krischer, Jeffrey P

    2008-01-01

    Multi-site clinical protocols and clinical research networks require tools to manage and monitor adverse events (AEs). To be successful, these tools must be designed to comply with applicable regulatory requirements, reflect current data standards, international directives and advances in pharmacovigilance, and be convenient and adaptable to multiple needs. We describe an Adverse Event Data Management System (AEDAMS) that is used across multiple study designs in the various clinical research networks and multi-site studies for which we provide data and technological support. Investigators enter AE data using a standardized and structured web-based data collection form. The automated AEDAMS forwards the AE information to individuals in designated roles (investigators, sponsors, Data Safety and Monitoring Boards) and manages subsequent communications in real time, as the entire reporting, review and notification is done by automatically generated emails. The system was designed to adhere to timelines and data requirements in compliance with Good Clinical Practice (International Conference on Harmonisation E6) reporting standards and US federal regulations, and can be configured to support AE management for many types of study designs and adhere to various domestic or international reporting requirements. This tool allows AEs to be collected in a standard way by multiple distributed users, facilitates accurate and timely AE reporting and reviews, and allows the centralized management of AEs. Our design justification and experience with the system are described.

  13. European AIDS Clinical Society Standard of Care meeting on HIV and related coinfections: The Rome Statements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mussini, C.; Antinori, A.; Bhagani, S.; Branco, T.; Brostrom, M.; Dedes, N.; Bereczky, T.; Girardi, E.; Gökengin, D.; Horban, A.; Lacombe, K.; Lundgren, J. D.; Mendao, L.; Mocroft, A.; Oprea, C.; Porter, K.; Podlekareva, D.; Battegay, M.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Mulcahy, Fiona; Geretti, Anna Maria; Clumeck, Nathan; Reiss, Peter; Arribas, Jose; Gatell, Jose; Katlama, Christine; Pozniak, Anton; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Youle, Mike; Friis-Møller, Nina; Rusconi, Stefano; Behrens, Georg; de Wit, Stéphane; Furrer, Hansjakob; Wensing, Annemarie; John Gill, M.; Letendre, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the 1st European AIDS Clinical Society meeting on Standard of Care in Europe was to raise awareness of the European scenario and come to an agreement on actions that could be taken in the future. Data-driven presentations were given on specific topics followed by interactive panel

  14. European AIDS Clinical Society Standard of Care meeting on HIV and related coinfections : The Rome Statements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mussini, C.; Antinori, A.; Bhagani, S.; Branco, T.; Brostrom, M.; Dedes, N.; Bereczky, T.; Girardi, E.; Gökengin, D.; Horban, A.; Lacombe, K.; Lundgren, J. D.; Mendao, L.; Mocroft, A.; Oprea, C.; Porter, K.; Podlekareva, D.; Battegay, M.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Mulcahy, Fiona; Geretti, Anna Maria; Clumeck, Nathan; Reiss, Peter; Arribas, Jose; Gatell, Jose; Katlama, Christine; Pozniak, Anton; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Youle, Mike; Friis-Møller, Nina; Rusconi, Stefano; Behrens, Georg; De Wit, Stéphane; Furrer, Hansjakob; Wensing, Annemarie|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30817724X; John Gill, M.; Letendre, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of the 1st European AIDS Clinical Society meeting on Standard of Care in Europe was to raise awareness of the European scenario and come to an agreement on actions that could be taken in the future. Methods: Data-driven presentations were given on specific topics followed

  15. Standardized Patient Encounters Improved Athletic Training Students' Confidence in Clinical Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kirk J.; Jarriel, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Researchers have reported that interacting with standardized patients (SPs) is a worthwhile and realistic experience for athletic training (AT) students. These encounters enhance students' interviewing skills, confidence as a clinician, clinical skill development, and interpersonal communication. Objective: To determine how SP encounters…

  16. European AIDS Clinical Society Second Standard of Care Meeting, Brussels 16-17 November 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Wit, S; Battegay, M; D'Arminio Monforte, A

    2018-01-01

    The European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) organized a second meeting on Standard of Care in Europe on November 16-17 th, 2016. The aims of the meeting were to discuss and propose actions on three topics, namely: Adherence to guidelines for treatment initiation, treatment monitoring and outcomes, ...

  17. Comparative assessment of the clinical performance of chloroquine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative assessment of the clinical performance of chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine in the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum infection in Plateau State: an open randomised study of 109 children with acute uncomplicated malaria.

  18. Family Medicine needs assessment: Studying the clinical work of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Family Medicine needs assessment: Studying the clinical work of general practitioners in Ethiopia. J Philpott, S Shiferaw, K Rouleau, D Cole, E Nicolle, K Bezanson, N Pimlott, C Meaney, G Nasmith, M Abbyad, M Derbew, A Mekasha ...

  19. Clinical assessment of suspected child physical abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrer, T.

    2009-01-01

    Violence against children has many faces. Child physical abuse, neglect, sexual abuse and interparental violence can cause acute and permanent damage and affect children's development and their life plans in the long term. In industrialized nations almost 1 child in 10 is affected. Up to 10% of child physical abuse cases involve the central nervous system with 80% of these cases occurring during the first year of life. Worldwide more than 50,000 children die as a result of violence, abuse and neglect every year, according to the United Nations Children's Fund UNICEF. In Germany, there are about 120 cases of non-accidental head injury per year. In addition to the officially known cases there is a large grey area for all forms of violence. Recognition of these cases and the provision of help for the victims require an appropriate suspicion and understanding of the pertinent pathophysiology. Suspicion must be based on a well-documented medical history and multidisciplinary diagnostic assessment. Medical confidentiality prevents the disclosure of such information making early detection networks and guidelines for collaboration absolutely indispensable. (orig.) [de

  20. Data interchange standards in healthcare: semantic interoperability in preoperative assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadian, L.

    2011-01-01

    Om risico’s van een operatie in te schatten wordt vooraf een assessment gedaan, maar een standaard ontbreekt. Leila Ahmadian ontwikkelde op basis van expertconsensus en literatuur een gestandaardiseerde kerndataset. Het gebruik van gestandaardiseerde data moet miscommunicatie verminderen en dubbele

  1. A Comprehensive Evaluation of Standardized Assessment Tools in the Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia and in the Assessment of Fibromyalgia Severity

    OpenAIRE

    Boomershine, Chad S.

    2012-01-01

    Standard assessments for fibromyalgia (FM) diagnosis and core FM symptom domains are needed for biomarker development and treatment trials. Diagnostic and symptom assessments are reviewed and recommendations are made for standards. Recommendations for existing assessments include the American College of Rheumatology FM classification criteria using the manual tender point Survey for diagnosis, the brief pain inventory average pain visual analogue scale for pain intensity, the function subscal...

  2. The Role of Standardized Patient and Trainer Training in Quality Assurance for a High-Stakes Clinical Skills Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail E. Furman

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available For over 30 years, medical educators have used standardized patients (SPs, laypersons trained to portray a patient case in a realistic manner, to teach and to assess clinical skills. All medical schools in the US have SP programs in place, and the US and Canada require national examinations using SPs to assess the competency of those wishing to obtain licensure to practice medicine in these countries. To ensure a valid and reliable examination, unwanted variance that can be introduced by SP performance must be addressed. The goal of SP training is to imbue the SP with the characteristics, mannerisms and history of a real patient so that the portrayal is consistent and accurate. The challenge is to ensure consistent portrayal of each case with sufficient realism to elicit the expected clinical performance and to ensure standardized SP performance across multiple examinees. This paper considers the quality assurance methods applied to training the SP trainers and the protocols used to train the SPs, to ensure that the SP performances are sufficiently accurate and standardized, and that the evaluators completing the checklists and scales used for scoring do so correctly and consistently.

  3. College of American Pathologists' laboratory standards for next-generation sequencing clinical tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Nazneen; Zhao, Qin; Bry, Lynn; Driscoll, Denise K; Funke, Birgit; Gibson, Jane S; Grody, Wayne W; Hegde, Madhuri R; Hoeltge, Gerald A; Leonard, Debra G B; Merker, Jason D; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Palicki, Linda A; Robetorye, Ryan S; Schrijver, Iris; Weck, Karen E; Voelkerding, Karl V

    2015-04-01

    The higher throughput and lower per-base cost of next-generation sequencing (NGS) as compared to Sanger sequencing has led to its rapid adoption in clinical testing. The number of laboratories offering NGS-based tests has also grown considerably in the past few years, despite the fact that specific Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988/College of American Pathologists (CAP) laboratory standards had not yet been developed to regulate this technology. To develop a checklist for clinical testing using NGS technology that sets standards for the analytic wet bench process and for bioinformatics or "dry bench" analyses. As NGS-based clinical tests are new to diagnostic testing and are of much greater complexity than traditional Sanger sequencing-based tests, there is an urgent need to develop new regulatory standards for laboratories offering these tests. To develop the necessary regulatory framework for NGS and to facilitate appropriate adoption of this technology for clinical testing, CAP formed a committee in 2011, the NGS Work Group, to deliberate upon the contents to be included in the checklist. Results . -A total of 18 laboratory accreditation checklist requirements for the analytic wet bench process and bioinformatics analysis processes have been included within CAP's molecular pathology checklist (MOL). This report describes the important issues considered by the CAP committee during the development of the new checklist requirements, which address documentation, validation, quality assurance, confirmatory testing, exception logs, monitoring of upgrades, variant interpretation and reporting, incidental findings, data storage, version traceability, and data transfer confidentiality.

  4. Certifying a university ENT clinic using the ISO 9001:2000 international standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbig, Matthias; Helbig, Silke; Kahla-Witzsch, Heike A; Kroll, Tobias; May, Angelika

    2010-01-01

    Against statutory duties to introduce quality management systems, the increased importance of this subject has led to numerous activities in various public health institutions. Following the International Standardization Organization (ISO 9001:2000) prerequisites, Frankfurt Goethe University Hospital ENT clinic staff introduced a quality management system. This paper aims to investigate this process. Designing, planning and implementing the quality management system is described. Under the supervision of an executive quality management board, clinic quality goals were defined. Thereafter, several quality management teams performed an actual state analysis as well as developing and realising improvement proposals. Finally a quality management manual containing binding standards and working instructions concerning all patient care, research and teaching aspects was written. Successful certification by a neutral body ascertained that the clinic's quality management system conformed to current national and international standards while restructuring and reform improved procedural efficiency. The paper shows that mplementing the quality management system requires considerable effort but patients as well as staff profit considerably from the innovation. On the whole, the positive impact on structure and workflow in a specialist clinic predominates. Therefore, implementing a quality management system in all the clinic's wards and departments is recommended.

  5. Assessment challenges in the clinical environment | du Plessis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The assessment of students' performance in the clinical legal education course presents a challenge for a variety of reasons. Factors to be considered are large student numbers, language barriers, a large and diverse client pool, students working in pairs, specialised units within the clinic, education and experience ...

  6. Alternative methods for clinical nursing assessment and evaluation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The recommendations made in the article on nurse educators' perceptions of OSCE as a clinical evaluation method (Chabeli, 2001:84-91) are addressed in this article. The research question: What alternative methods of assessment and evaluation can be used to measure the comprehensive and holistic clinical nursing ...

  7. Nigerian Dental Students' Assessment of their Clinical Learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical learning in medical and dental education provides students with knowledge, skills and proper etiquette for their professional life. Students' assessment of clinical education is therefore important to help to promote excellence in medical and dental education in Nigeria. A cross-sectional study using a ...

  8. Clinical utility of dual-energy vertebral assessment (DVA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vokes, Tamara J; Dixon, Larry B; Favus, Murray J

    2003-11-01

    The current study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical utility of DVA, a system for imaging the lateral spine on the Lunar Prodigy densitometer. DVA images were obtained and bone density of the lumbar spine and proximal femur measured in 297 subjects (272 women), aged 64+/-13 years. The images were classified as: normal (N) if no fractures were detected and all vertebrae between T6 and L4 were visualized, fracture (F) if any vertebra had a fracture (defined as 25% or more reduction in the vertebral height) even if some of the other vertebrae could not be visualized, and un-interpretable (U) if at least one of the vertebra between T6 and L4 could not be classified and no fractures were detected in the visualized vertebrae. A subset of 66 patients also had standard radiographs of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Compared to radiographs, DVA had a 95% sensitivity to detect fractures and 82% specificity (to exclude them). Among all 297 subjects studied, DVAs were interpretable in 87%. They were classified as N in 204 (68%), F in 55 (19%) and U in 38 (13%). The reasons for un-interpretability were: scoliosis, scapular or rib shadow, severe arthritic changes and multiple vertebral compression fracture with severe spinal deformities. Only 11% of F subjects gave a history of a vertebral fracture, and only 56% of F subjects met the BMD criteria for osteoporosis (T score DVA, a low radiation and relatively low cost "point of service" procedure, to BMD measurement provides the clinician with a more comprehensive fracture risk assessment than that afforded by clinical evaluation and BMD measurement alone.

  9. Current practices and challenges in the standardization and harmonization of clinical laboratory tests123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesper, Hubert W; Myers, Gary L; Miller, W Greg

    2016-01-01

    Effective patient care, clinical research, and public health efforts require comparability of laboratory results independent of time, place, and measurement procedure. Comparability is achieved by establishing metrological traceability, which ensures that measurement procedures measure the same quantity and that the calibration of measurement procedures is traceable to a common reference system consisting of reference methods and materials. Whereas standardization ensures traceability to the International System of Units, harmonization ensures traceability to a reference system agreed on by convention. This article provides an overview of standardization and harmonization with an emphasis on commutability as an important variable that affects testing accuracy. Commutability of reference materials is required to ensure that traceability is established appropriately and that laboratory results are comparable. The use of noncommutable reference materials leads to inaccurate results. Whereas procedures and protocols for standardizing measurements are established and have been successfully applied in efforts such as the Hormones Standardization Program of the CDC, harmonization activities require new, more complex procedures and approaches. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry, together with its domestic and international partners, formed the International Consortium for Harmonization of Clinical Laboratory Results to coordinate harmonization efforts. Reference systems, as well as procedures and protocols to establish traceability of clinical laboratory tests, have been established and continue to be developed by national and international groups and organizations. Serum tests of thyroid function, including those for the thyroid hormones thyroxine and triiodothyronine, are among the clinical procedures for which standardization efforts are well under way. Approaches to the harmonization of measurement procedures for serum concentrations of thyroid

  10. The need for international standardization in clinical beta dosimetry for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quast, U.; Boehm, J.; Kaulich, T.W.

    2002-01-01

    Beta radiation has found increasing interest in radiotherapy. Besides the curative treatment of small and medium-sized intraocular tumors by means of ophthalmic beta radiation plaques, intravascular brachytherapy has proven to successfully overcome the severe problem of restenosis after interventional treatment of arterial stenosis in coronaries and peripheral vessels in many clinical trials with a large number of patients. Prior to initiating procedures applying beta radiation in radiotherapy, however, there is a common need to specify methods for the determination and specification of the absorbed dose to water or tissue and their spatial distributions. The IAEA-TECDOC-1274 Calibration of photon and beta ray sources used in brachytherapy (2002) is a help for photon brachytherapy calibration. But, for beta seed and line sources, IAEA recommends well type ionization chambers as working standards which are far from measuring absorbed dose to water of the radiation clinically used. Although the application of such working standards seems to be more precise, large errors can occur when the medical physicist has to convert the calibration data to absorbed dose to water of the beta radiation emitted. The user must believe that the source is equally activated and that the manufacturer did not change the design and construction of the source encapsulation. With the DGMP Report 16 (2001) Guidelines for medical physical aspects of intravascular brachytherapy a very detailed code of practice is given, especially for the calibration and clinical dosimetry of intravascular beta radiation sources. As there is a global need for standardization in clinical dosimetry for intravascular brachytherapy utilizing beta radiation, the DIN-NAR, the German committee on standardization in radiology, task group dosimetry, has initiated an international adhoc working group for a new ISO work item proposal on the standardization of procedures in clinical dosimetry to guarantee reliable

  11. [Thinking on the assessment of clinical therapeutic effectiveness of TCM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sui-yu; Jin, Yi-qiang

    2005-01-01

    How to assess the therapeutic effectiveness of TCM is the focus of this paper, the trend of study on standard for therapeutic effectiveness assessment and application of standard for disease combined with symptom diagnosis and treatment were described. Taking the study on standard for TCM syndrome of Gan as an example, the basic principle and existing problem in standard formulation were pointed out. The possibility in establishing the therapeutic effectiveness assessment system of TCM by using the quantified scale for therapeutic effectiveness assessment as a tool, i.e., the theoretical design of the scale formation should be in accord with the theories of TCM, and followed with scientific measuring principle, based on the sample investigation to establish the database of quantified scale, to make sure the scale that having corresponding checking process and scoring criteria so as to make the scale meeting the need of reliability and validity. It was also pointed owt that the scale should be used in combination with the standard for syndrome differentiation, thus, the scientific, practical therapeutic effectiveness assessment system of TCM could be built up.

  12. The Auditing of General Practitioner Offices in Tabriz City to Assess Their Compliance with National Licensure Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Tabrizi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The licensure is an evaluation mechanism, which allows health centers or individuals to assess health services delivery based on minimum requirements. Objectives The present study aimed to audit the general practitioner (GP offices in Tabriz city to assess their compliance with national licensure standards in 2015. Methods This was across-sectional study, which audited 228 general practitioner offices randomly. The data from offices was collected based on researcher-made checklist, the validity of which was approved. Firstly, descriptively analysis of data was done and then, the relationship between clinics characteristics and compliance with standards was assessed using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and Tukey’s test. To perform the analysis, the SPSS19 software was used, and P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results Based on the study results, the mean standards compliance in GP offices was 78.9%, with highest compliance dedicated to medical documents and informatics dimension with 99.1% compliance level and lowest compliance related to hygiene dimension with 56.2% compliance level. In the analysis of the statistical relationship between the offices characteristics and licensure standards, there was significant relationships, between daily admittance of patients in offices and standards compliance in human resources dimension; GPs’ job experience and standards compliance in medical and non-medical devices dimension; and urban district of office and standards compliance in physical environment dimension and medical and non-medical devices dimension. In addition, there was a significant difference between total score of standards compliance and offices of urban districts (P < 0.05. Conclusions Generally, the status of Tabriz general health clinics was relatively acceptable. Thus, evaluation authorities should pay attention especially to the hygiene dimension.

  13. 25 CFR 36.50 - Standard XVII-School program evaluation and needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... assessment. Each school shall complete a formal, formative evaluation at least once every seven (7) years... each school, Agency or Area, as appropriate, a standardized needs assessment and evaluation instrument... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standard XVII-School program evaluation and needs...

  14. Framework for Assessing the ICT Competency in Teachers up to the Requirements of "Teacher" Occupational Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdeeva, Svetlana; Zaichkina, Olga; Nikulicheva, Nataliya; Khapaeva, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with problems of working out a test framework for the assessment of teachers' ICT competency in line with the requirements of "Teacher" occupational standard. The authors have analyzed the known approaches to assessing teachers' ICT competency--ISTE Standards and UNESCO ICT CFT and have suggested their own approach to…

  15. Assessing the Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility Standards in Global Value Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Thomsen, Peter

    This paper considers the issue of corporate social responsibility (CSR) standard impact assessment in global value chains. CSR standards have proliferated in recent years, and several studies have attempted to assess their effects on local producers, workers, and the environment in developing...... good to the intended beneficiaries - developing country firms, farmers, workers, and communities - unless these ethical and political dilemmas are given serious consideration....

  16. 7 CFR 319.40-11 - Plant pest risk assessment standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... analysis to determine the plant pest risks associated with each requested importation in order to determine... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Plant pest risk assessment standards. 319.40-11... Unmanufactured Wood Articles § 319.40-11 Plant pest risk assessment standards. When evaluating a request to...

  17. EMBEDding the CEFR in Academic Writing Assessment : A case study in training and standardization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haines, Kevin; Lowie, Wander; Jansma, Petra; Schmidt, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The CEFR is increasingly being used as the framework of choice for the assessment of language proficiency at universities across Europe. However, to attain consistent assessment, familiarization and standardization are essential. In this paper we report a case study of embedding a standardization

  18. Validated assessment tool paves the way for standardized evaluation of trainees on anastomotic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Cassidy A; Shames, Murray; Bismuth, Jean; Lee, Jason T

    2014-01-01

    Simulation modules allow for the safe practice of certain techniques and are becoming increasingly important in the shift toward education for integrated vascular residents. There is an unquestionable need to standardize the evaluation of trainees on these simulation models to assure their impact and effectiveness. We sought to validate such an assessment tool for a basic open vascular technique. Vascular fellows, integrated vascular residents, and general surgery residents attending Society for Clinical Vascular Surgery, Introduction to Academic Vascular Surgery, and Methodist Boot Camp in 2012 were asked to participate in an assessment model using multiple anastomotic models and given 20 minutes to complete an end-to-side anastomosis. Trained vascular faculty evaluated subjects using an assessment tool that included a 25-point checklist and a graded overall global rating scale (GRS) on a 5-point Likert scale with 8 parameters. Self-assessment using the GRS was performed by 20 trainees. Reliability and construct validity were evaluated. Ninety-two trainees were assessed. There was excellent agreement between assessors on 21 of the 25 items, with 2 items found not to be relevant for the bench-top model. Graders agreed that the checklist was prohibitively cumbersome to use. Scores on the global assessments correlated with experience and were higher for the senior trainees, with median global summary scores increasing by postgraduate year. Reliability was confirmed through interrater correlation and internal consistency. Internal consistency was 0.92 for the GRS. There was poor correlation between grades given by the expert observers and the self-assessment from the trainee, but good correlation between scores assigned by faculty. Assessment of appropriate hemostasis was poor, which likely reflects the difficulty of evaluating this parameter in the current inanimate model. Performance on an open simulation model evaluated by a standardized global rating scale

  19. An overview of failure assessment methods in codes and standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerbst, U.; Ainsworth, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    This volume provides comprehensive up-to-date information on the assessment of the integrity of engineering structures containing crack-like flaws, in the absence of effects of creep at elevated temperatures (see volume 5) and of environment (see volume 6). Key methods are extensively reviewed and background information as well as validation is given. However, it should be kept in mind that for actual detailed assessments the relevant documents have to be consulted. In classical engineering design, an applied stress is compared with the appropriate material resistance expressed in terms of a limit stress, such as the yield strength or fatigue endurance limit. As long as the material resistance exceeds the applied stress, integrity of the component is assured. It is implicitly assumed that the component is defect-free but design margins provide some protection against defects. Modern design and operation philosophies, however, take explicit account of the possible presence of defects in engineering components. Such defects may arise from fabrication, e.g., during casting, welding, or forming processes, or may develop during operation. They may extend during operation and eventually lead to failure, which in the ideal case occurs beyond the design life of the component. Failure assessment methods are based upon the behavior of sharp cracks in structures, and for this reason all flaws or defects found in structures have to be treated as if they are sharp planar cracks. Hence the terms flaw or defect should be regarded as being interchangeable with the term crack throughout this volume. (orig.)

  20. Standard guide for three methods of assessing buried steel tanks

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1998-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers procedures to be implemented prior to the application of cathodic protection for evaluating the suitability of a tank for upgrading by cathodic protection alone. 1.2 Three procedures are described and identified as Methods A, B, and C. 1.2.1 Method A—Noninvasive with primary emphasis on statistical and electrochemical analysis of external site environment corrosion data. 1.2.2 Method B—Invasive ultrasonic thickness testing with external corrosion evaluation. 1.2.3 Method C—Invasive permanently recorded visual inspection and evaluation including external corrosion assessment. 1.3 This guide presents the methodology and the procedures utilizing site and tank specific data for determining a tank's condition and the suitability for such tanks to be upgraded with cathodic protection. 1.4 The tank's condition shall be assessed using Method A, B, or C. Prior to assessing the tank, a preliminary site survey shall be performed pursuant to Section 8 and the tank shall be tightness test...

  1. Hand-held echocardiography: added value in clinical cardiological assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballo Piercarlo

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ultrasonic industry has recently produced echocardiographic Hand Held Devices (miniaturized, compact and battery-equipped echocardiographic systems. Their potential usefulness has been successfully assessed in a wide range of clinical conditions. The aim of the study was to verify if the routine use of a basic model of echocardiographic Hand Held Device (HHD could be an important diagnostic tool during outpatient cardiologic consulting or in non-cardiologic hospital sections. Methods 87 consecutive patients were included in this study; they underwent routine physical examination, resting ECG and echocardiographic evaluation using a basic model of HHD performed by trained echocardiographists; the cardiologist, whenever possible, formulated a diagnosis. The percentage of subjects in whom the findings were judged reasonably adequate for final diagnostic and therapeutic conclusions was used to quantify the "conclusiveness" of HHD evaluation. Successively, all patients underwent a second echocardiographic evaluation, by an examiner with similar echocardiographic experience, performed using a Standard Echo Device (SED. The agreement between the first and the second echocardiographic exam was also assessed. Results Mean examination time was 6.7 ± 1.5 min. using HHD vs. 13.6 ± 2.4 min. using SED. The echocardiographic examination performed using HHD was considered satisfactory in 74/87 patients (85.1% conclusiveness. Among the 74 patients for whom the examination was conclusive, the diagnosis was concordant with that obtained with the SED examination in 62 cases (83.8% agreement. Conclusion HHD may generally allow a reliable cardiologic basic evaluation of outpatient or subjects admitted to non-cardiologic sections, more specifically in particular subgroups of patients, with a gain in terms of time, shortening patient waiting lists and reducing healthy costs.

  2. Hand-held echocardiography: added value in clinical cardiological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, Giovanna; Mondillo, Sergio; Galderisi, Maurizio; Barbati, Riccardo; Zacà, Valerio; Ballo, Piercarlo; Agricola, Eustachio; Guerrini, Francesco

    2005-03-24

    The ultrasonic industry has recently produced echocardiographic Hand Held Devices (miniaturized, compact and battery-equipped echocardiographic systems). Their potential usefulness has been successfully assessed in a wide range of clinical conditions. The aim of the study was to verify if the routine use of a basic model of echocardiographic Hand Held Device (HHD) could be an important diagnostic tool during outpatient cardiologic consulting or in non-cardiologic hospital sections. 87 consecutive patients were included in this study; they underwent routine physical examination, resting ECG and echocardiographic evaluation using a basic model of HHD performed by trained echocardiographists; the cardiologist, whenever possible, formulated a diagnosis. The percentage of subjects in whom the findings were judged reasonably adequate for final diagnostic and therapeutic conclusions was used to quantify the "conclusiveness" of HHD evaluation. Successively, all patients underwent a second echocardiographic evaluation, by an examiner with similar echocardiographic experience, performed using a Standard Echo Device (SED). The agreement between the first and the second echocardiographic exam was also assessed. Mean examination time was 6.7 +/- 1.5 min. using HHD vs. 13.6 +/- 2.4 min. using SED. The echocardiographic examination performed using HHD was considered satisfactory in 74/87 patients (85.1% conclusiveness). Among the 74 patients for whom the examination was conclusive, the diagnosis was concordant with that obtained with the SED examination in 62 cases (83.8% agreement). HHD may generally allow a reliable cardiologic basic evaluation of outpatient or subjects admitted to non-cardiologic sections, more specifically in particular subgroups of patients, with a gain in terms of time, shortening patient waiting lists and reducing healthy costs.

  3. Validation of a clinical assessment tool for spinal anaesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Breen, D

    2011-07-01

    There is a need for a procedure-specific means of assessment of clinical performance in anaesthesia. The aim of this study was to devise a tool for assessing the performance of spinal anaesthesia, which has both content and construct validity.

  4. The Fertility Assessment and Counselling Clinic - does the concept work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kathrine Birch; Maltesen, Thomas; Forman, Julie L.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Fertility Assessment and Counselling (FAC) Clinic was initiated to provide women information about their current fertility status to prevent infertility and smaller families than desired. The aim was to study the predictive value of a risk assessment score based on known fertility...

  5. Validation of the Standard Method for Assessing Flicker From Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barahona Garzon, Braulio; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Christensen, L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the validity of the standard method in IEC 61400-21 for assessing the flicker emission from multiple wind turbines. The standard method is based on testing a single wind turbine and then using the results of this test to assess the flicker emission from a number of wind turbines...... the flicker emission at the collection line; this assessment is then compared to the actual measurements in order to study the accuracy of the estimation. It was observed in both wind farms, that the assessment based on the standard method is statistically conservative compared to the measurements. The reason...... for this is the statistical characteristics of flicker emission....

  6. Standard Format for Chromatographic-polarimetric System small samples assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naranjo, S.; Fajer, V.; Fonfria, C.; Patinno, R.

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of samples containing optically active substances to be evaluated as part of quality control of raw material entering industrial process, and also during the modifications exerted on it to obtain the desired final composition is still and unsolved problem for many industries. That is the case of sugarcane industry. Sometimes the troubles implied are enlarged because samples to be evaluated are not bigger than one milliliter. Reduction of gel beds in G-10 and G-50 chromatographic columns having an inner diameter of 16 mm, instead of 25, and bed heights adjustable to requirements by means of sliding stoppers to increase analytical power were evaluated with glucose and sucrose standards in concentrations from 1 to 10 g/dL, using aliquots of 1 ml without undesirable dilutions that could affect either detection or chromatographic profile. Assays with seaweed extracts gave good results that are shown. It is established the advantage to know concentration of a separated substance by the height of its peak and the savings in time and reagents resulting . Sample expanded uncertainty in both systems is compared. It is also presented several programs for data acquisition, storing and processing. (Author)

  7. Broadening Perspectives on Clinical Performance Assessment: Rethinking the Nature of In-Training Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govaerts, Marjan J. B.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; Schuwirth, Lambert W. T.; Muijtjens, Arno M. M.

    2007-01-01

    Context: In-training assessment (ITA), defined as multiple assessments of performance in the setting of day-to-day practice, is an invaluable tool in assessment programmes which aim to assess professional competence in a comprehensive and valid way. Research on clinical performance ratings, however, consistently shows weaknesses concerning…

  8. Teaching communication skills in clinical settings: comparing two applications of a comprehensive program with standardized and real patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Communication is important for the quality of clinical practice, and programs have been implemented to improve healthcare providers’ communication skills. However, the consistency of programs teaching communication skills has received little attention, and debate exists about the application of acquired skills to real patients. This study inspects whether (1) results from a communication program are replicated with different samples, and (2) results with standardized patients apply to interviews with real patients. Methods A structured, nine-month communication program was applied in two consecutive years to two different samples of healthcare professionals (25 in the first year, 20 in the second year). Results were assessed at four different points in time, each year, regarding participants’ confidence levels (self-rated), basic communication skills in interviews with standardized patients, and basic communication skills in interviews with real patients. Data were analyzed using GLM Repeated-Measures procedures. Results Improvements were statistically significant in both years in all measures except in simulated patients’ assessment of the 2008 group. Differences between the two samples were non-significant. Differences between interviews with standardized and with real patients were also non-significant. Conclusions The program’s positive outcomes were replicated in different samples, and acquired skills were successfully applied to real-patient interviews. This reinforces this type of program structure as a valuable training tool, with results translating into real situations. It also adds to the reliability of the assessment instruments employed, though these may need adaptation in the case of real patients. PMID:24886341

  9. Teaching communication skills in clinical settings: comparing two applications of a comprehensive program with standardized and real patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Irene P; Pais, Vanessa G; Silva, Filipa R; Martins, Raquel; Figueiredo-Braga, Margarida; Pedrosa, Raquel; Almeida, Susana S; Correia, Luís; Ribeiro-Silva, Raquel; Castro-Vale, Ivone; Teles, Ana; Mota-Cardoso, Rui

    2014-05-09

    Communication is important for the quality of clinical practice, and programs have been implemented to improve healthcare providers' communication skills. However, the consistency of programs teaching communication skills has received little attention, and debate exists about the application of acquired skills to real patients. This study inspects whether (1) results from a communication program are replicated with different samples, and (2) results with standardized patients apply to interviews with real patients. A structured, nine-month communication program was applied in two consecutive years to two different samples of healthcare professionals (25 in the first year, 20 in the second year). Results were assessed at four different points in time, each year, regarding participants' confidence levels (self-rated), basic communication skills in interviews with standardized patients, and basic communication skills in interviews with real patients. Data were analyzed using GLM Repeated-Measures procedures. Improvements were statistically significant in both years in all measures except in simulated patients' assessment of the 2008 group. Differences between the two samples were non-significant. Differences between interviews with standardized and with real patients were also non-significant. The program's positive outcomes were replicated in different samples, and acquired skills were successfully applied to real-patient interviews. This reinforces this type of program structure as a valuable training tool, with results translating into real situations. It also adds to the reliability of the assessment instruments employed, though these may need adaptation in the case of real patients.

  10. 466 Bee venom Immunotherapy with Standardized Extract, Two Case Comunication and Clinical Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Aristoteles Alvarez; Nieto, Leticia Hernandez; Melendez, Alvaro Pedroza

    2012-01-01

    Background Bee venom immunotherapy is a safe and effective treatment, indicated in patients with previous history of severe systemic reactions to bee venom, demonstrating succesful desensitization in more than 90% of cases with standardized extract. Currently in Mexico there is no standardized extract commercially available for treatment, despite of having high activity of beekeeping and occupational exposure with at least 17,478 registered stings per year and an annually honey production of nearly 70 tons. Methods We present the clinical progress of 2 patients with history of severe systemic reactions to bee venom and occupational exposure, both with demonstrated sensitization by specific IgE and who underwent specific immunotherapy with standardized extract (Alk-US) reaching a maintenance weekly dose of 100 mcg (PLA2) for the last 4 years. Results Both patients sufered of accidental stings after reached the maintenance dose presenting mild local reactions to stings. Both patients had very different clinical course presenting a wide variety of adverse reactions during desensitization protocol; from mild local to generalized reactions all generally well tolerated allowed to reach the maintenance dose with succesful desensitization proved by accidental exposure without severe systemic reactions. Conclusions Bee venom specific immunotherapy with standardized extract is a well tolerated and efective treatment preventing the development of life threathening reactions in sensitized patients. It is important to promote the use and availability of standardized extract in developing countries with poor safety measures and high occupational exposure.

  11. A standardized SOA for clinical data interchange in a cardiac telemonitoring environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzarata, Roberta; Vergari, Fabio; Cinotti, Tullio Salmon; Giacomini, Mauro

    2014-11-01

    Care of chronic cardiac patients requires information interchange between patients' homes, clinical environments, and the electronic health record. Standards are emerging to support clinical information collection, exchange and management and to overcome information fragmentation and actors delocalization. Heterogeneity of information sources at patients' homes calls for open solutions to collect and accommodate multidomain information, including environmental data. Based on the experience gained in a European Research Program, this paper presents an integrated and open approach for clinical data interchange in cardiac telemonitoring applications. This interchange is supported by the use of standards following the indications provided by the national authorities of the countries involved. Taking into account the requirements provided by the medical staff involved in the project, the authors designed and implemented a prototypal middleware, based on a service-oriented architecture approach, to give a structured and robust tool to congestive heart failure patients for their personalized telemonitoring. The middleware is represented by a health record management service, whose interface is compliant to the healthcare services specification project Retrieve, Locate and Update Service standard (Level 0), which allows communication between the agents involved through the exchange of Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 documents. Three performance tests were carried out and showed that the prototype completely fulfilled all requirements indicated by the medical staff; however, certain aspects, such as authentication, security and scalability, should be deeply analyzed within a future engineering phase.

  12. Low-dose versus standard-dose CT protocol in patients with clinically suspected renal colic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Schmidlin, Franz R; Iselin, Christophe E; Becker, Christoph D

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare a low-dose abdominal CT protocol, delivering a dose of radiation close to the dose delivered by abdominal radiography, with standard-dose unenhanced CT in patients with suspected renal colic. One hundred twenty-five patients (87 men, 38 women; mean age, 45 years) who were admitted with suspected renal colic underwent both abdominal low-dose CT (30 mAs) and standard-dose CT (180 mAs). Low-dose CT and standard-dose CT were independently reviewed, in a delayed fashion, by two radiologists for the characterization of renal and ureteral calculi (location, size) and for indirect signs of renal colic (renal enlargement, pyeloureteral dilatation, periureteral or renal stranding). Results reported for low-dose CT, with regard to the patients' body mass indexes (BMIs), were compared with those obtained with standard-dose CT (reference standard). The presence of non-urinary tract-related disorders was also assessed. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. In patients with a BMI 3 mm. Low-dose CT was 100% sensitive and specific for depicting non-urinary tract-related disorders (n = 6). Low-dose CT achieves sensitivities and specificities close to those of standard-dose CT in assessing the diagnosis of renal colic, depicting ureteral calculi > 3 mm in patients with a BMI < 30, and correctly identifying alternative diagnoses.

  13. Large observer variation of clinical assessment of dyspnoeic wheezing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekhof, Jolita; Reimink, Roelien; Bartels, Ine-Marije; Eggink, Hendriekje; Brand, Paul L P

    2015-07-01

    In children with acute dyspnoea, the assessment of severity of dyspnoea and response to treatment is often performed by different professionals, implying that knowledge of the interobserver variation of this clinical assessment is important. To determine intraobserver and interobserver variation in clinical assessment of children with dyspnoea. From September 2009 to September 2010, we recorded a convenience sample of 27 acutely wheezing children (aged 3 months-7 years) in the emergency department of a general teaching hospital in the Netherlands, on video before and after treatment with inhaled bronchodilators. These video recordings were independently assessed by nine observers scoring wheeze, prolonged expiratory phase, retractions, nasal flaring and a general assessment of dyspnoea on a Likert scale (0-10). Assessment was repeated after 2 weeks to evaluate intraobserver variation. We analysed 972 observations. Intraobserver reliability was the highest for supraclavicular retractions (κ 0.84) and moderate-to-substantial for other items (κ 0.49-0.65). Interobserver reliability was considerably worse, with κ3 points) was larger than the minimal important change (meaning that in 69% of observations a clinically important change after treatment cannot be distinguished from measurement error. Intraobserver variation is modest, and interobserver variation is large for most clinical findings in children with dyspnoea. The measurement error induced by this variation is too large to distinguish potentially clinically relevant changes in dyspnoea after treatment in two-thirds of observations. The poor interobserver reliability of clinical dyspnoea assessment in children limits its usefulness in clinical practice and research, and highlights the need to use more objective measurements in these patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Postimplant Dosimetry Using a Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Engine: A New Clinical Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrier, Jean-Francois; D'Amours, Michel; Verhaegen, Frank; Reniers, Brigitte; Martin, Andre-Guy; Vigneault, Eric; Beaulieu, Luc

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To use the Monte Carlo (MC) method as a dose calculation engine for postimplant dosimetry. To compare the results with clinically approved data for a sample of 28 patients. Two effects not taken into account by the clinical calculation, interseed attenuation and tissue composition, are being specifically investigated. Methods and Materials: An automated MC program was developed. The dose distributions were calculated for the target volume and organs at risk (OAR) for 28 patients. Additional MC techniques were developed to focus specifically on the interseed attenuation and tissue effects. Results: For the clinical target volume (CTV) D 90 parameter, the mean difference between the clinical technique and the complete MC method is 10.7 Gy, with cases reaching up to 17 Gy. For all cases, the clinical technique overestimates the deposited dose in the CTV. This overestimation is mainly from a combination of two effects: the interseed attenuation (average, 6.8 Gy) and tissue composition (average, 4.1 Gy). The deposited dose in the OARs is also overestimated in the clinical calculation. Conclusions: The clinical technique systematically overestimates the deposited dose in the prostate and in the OARs. To reduce this systematic inaccuracy, the MC method should be considered in establishing a new standard for clinical postimplant dosimetry and dose-outcome studies in a near future

  15. Independent donor ethical assessment: aiming to standardize donor advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Devasmita; Jotterand, Fabrice; Casenave, Gerald; Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    Living organ donation has become more common across the world. To ensure an informed consent process, given the complex issues involved with organ donation, independent donor advocacy is required. The choice of how donor advocacy is administered is left up to each transplant center. This article presents the experience and process of donor advocacy at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center administered by a multidisciplinary team consisting of physicians, surgeons, psychologists, medical ethicists and anthropologists, lawyers, a chaplain, a living kidney donor, and a kidney transplant recipient. To ensure that advocacy remains fair and consistent for all donors being considered, the donor advocacy team at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center developed the Independent Donor Ethical Assessment, a tool that may be useful to others in rendering donor advocacy. In addition, the tool may be modified as circumstances arise to improve donor advocacy and maintain uniformity in decision making.

  16. Standard requirements for GCP-compliant data management in multinational clinical trials

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ohmann, Christian

    2011-03-22

    Abstract Background A recent survey has shown that data management in clinical trials performed by academic trial units still faces many difficulties (e.g. heterogeneity of software products, deficits in quality management, limited human and financial resources and the complexity of running a local computer centre). Unfortunately, no specific, practical and open standard for both GCP-compliant data management and the underlying IT-infrastructure is available to improve the situation. For that reason the "Working Group on Data Centres" of the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) has developed a standard specifying the requirements for high quality GCP-compliant data management in multinational clinical trials. Methods International, European and national regulations and guidelines relevant to GCP, data security and IT infrastructures, as well as ECRIN documents produced previously, were evaluated to provide a starting point for the development of standard requirements. The requirements were produced by expert consensus of the ECRIN Working group on Data Centres, using a structured and standardised process. The requirements were divided into two main parts: an IT part covering standards for the underlying IT infrastructure and computer systems in general, and a Data Management (DM) part covering requirements for data management applications in clinical trials. Results The standard developed includes 115 IT requirements, split into 15 separate sections, 107 DM requirements (in 12 sections) and 13 other requirements (2 sections). Sections IT01 to IT05 deal with the basic IT infrastructure while IT06 and IT07 cover validation and local software development. IT08 to IT015 concern the aspects of IT systems that directly support clinical trial management. Sections DM01 to DM03 cover the implementation of a specific clinical data management application, i.e. for a specific trial, whilst DM04 to DM12 address the data management of trials across the unit

  17. Functional assessment of the elderly with the use of EASY-Care Standard 2010 and Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarska, Dorota; Pacholska, Renata; Strugała, Magdalena; Wieczorowska-Tobis, Katarzyna

    2016-06-01

    The wide variation in performance among the elderly leads to the search for a suitable instrument to identify the necessary support. The aim of this study was to examine the scope of independent functioning of the elderly and to indicate the necessary support using basic instruments, Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) and EASY-Care Standard 2010. For statistical analysis were qualified 101 questionnaires of patients from oncological surgery clinic. The study group was dominated by women (79.2%). The average age for the entire group was 74.7 ± 7.5 years. In terms of basic life activities (Barthel Index), 75.2% of the elderly performed most of their activities independently. The Lawton IADL (Instrumental Activity of Daily Living Scale) median was 25 points. Moderate depression (Geriatric Depression Scale) reported 37.6% of the group. The influence of age, education, mode of movement and efficiency in basic and instrumental life activities and depression (Geriatric Depression Scale) was demonstrated in the results in three scales of the EASY-Care Standard 2010 questionnaire: Independence score, Risk of break down in care and Risk of falls. There was no difference in terms of gender and the nature of the residence. The study group of the elderly was characterised by a good level of efficiency in basic and instrumental activities of daily living. Questionnaire EASY-Care Standard 2010 enables to identify functional limitations of the elderly that may form the basis for planning individual support. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  18. Comparative life cycle assessment of standard and green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz, Susana; Kennedy, Christopher; Bass, Brad; Pressnail, Kim

    2006-07-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) is used to evaluate the benefits, primarily from reduced energy consumption, resulting from the addition of a green roof to an eight story residential building in Madrid. Building energy use is simulated and a bottom-up LCA is conducted assuming a 50 year building life. The key property of a green roof is its low solar absorptance, which causes lower surface temperature, thereby reducing the heat flux through the roof. Savings in annual energy use are just over 1%, but summer cooling load is reduced by over 6% and reductions in peak hour cooling load in the upper floors reach 25%. By replacing the common flat roof with a green roof, environmental impacts are reduced by between 1.0 and 5.3%. Similar reductions might be achieved by using a white roof with additional insulation for winter, but more substantial reductions are achieved if common use of green roofs leads to reductions in the urban heat island.

  19. Methods and dimensions of electronic health record data quality assessment: enabling reuse for clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskopf, Nicole Gray; Weng, Chunhua

    2013-01-01

    To review the methods and dimensions of data quality assessment in the context of electronic health record (EHR) data reuse for research. A review of the clinical research literature discussing data quality assessment methodology for EHR data was performed. Using an iterative process, the aspects of data quality being measured were abstracted and categorized, as well as the methods of assessment used. Five dimensions of data quality were identified, which are completeness, correctness, concordance, plausibility, and currency, and seven broad categories of data quality assessment methods: comparison with gold standards, data element agreement, data source agreement, distribution comparison, validity checks, log review, and element presence. Examination of the methods by which clinical researchers have investigated the quality and suitability of EHR data for research shows that there are fundamental features of data quality, which may be difficult to measure, as well as proxy dimensions. Researchers interested in the reuse of EHR data for clinical research are recommended to consider the adoption of a consistent taxonomy of EHR data quality, to remain aware of the task-dependence of data quality, to integrate work on data quality assessment from other fields, and to adopt systematic, empirically driven, statistically based methods of data quality assessment. There is currently little consistency or potential generalizability in the methods used to assess EHR data quality. If the reuse of EHR data for clinical research is to become accepted, researchers should adopt validated, systematic methods of EHR data quality assessment.

  20. [Standardized management of acupuncture-moxibustion clinic in Singapore General Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shu-Li; Tan, Kian Hian; Ong, Biauw Chi; Lim, Shih hui; Yong, Yang; Seah, Cheng Ngee; Huang, Youyi; Han, Seong Ng

    2014-02-01

    The standardized management of acupuncture-moxibustion in Singapore General Hospital is introduced. With gradual improvement of outpatient infrastructure, re-training of medical staff, strict disinfection of manipulation, periodical inspection of medical instruments, unified management of writing, saving and processing in medical records and public education of TCM knowledge, a standardized management system in accordance with modernized hospital is gradually established. As a result, efficiency and quality of clinical treatment is continuously increasing. From April of 1998 to December of 2012, a total of 74 654 times of treatment were performed, and treatment amount per day is gradually increased. The unusual condition of acupuncture is avoided. Periodical strict inspection of joint committee authenticated by domestic and overseas medical health organization is repeatedly passed and accepted. Additionally, three clinical researches funded by Singapore Health-care Company are still in progress in acupuncture-moxibustion department.

  1. [Effect of standardized PICC training and management on the clinical effect and complication of catheterization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinghui; Tang, Siyuan; He, Lianxiang; Chen, Wenfeng; Jiang, Pinglan; Hu, Yuanping; Chen, Hua

    2014-06-01

    To determine the clinical effect of standardized training and management of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) and catheter-related complications. A total of 610 patients were divided into a control group and an observation group, the control group (n=300) were catheterized by trainees who received "short-term intensive training", the observation group (n=310) by "system standardized training and management". The clinical efficacy of catheterization and the rate of catheter-related complications were compared. There was significant difference in the one-time puncture success rate, one-time cannulation success rate, the time for operation and the pain score between the 2 groups (all PPICC training and management can improve the effect of catheterization and reduce the incidence of PICC-related complication.

  2. The effect of standard pain assessment on pain and analgesic consumption amount in patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erden, Sevilay; Demir, Sevil Güler; Kanatlı, Ulunay; Danacı, Fatma; Carboğa, Banu

    2017-02-01

    Pain assessment has a key role in relief of the postoperative pain. In this study, we aimed to examine the effect of the Standard Pain Assessment Protocol (SPAP), which we developed based on acute pain guidelines, on pain level, and analgesic consumption. The study population consisted of a total of 101 patients who had arthroscopic shoulder surgery. The routine pain assessment was administered to the control group, while the SPAP was administered to the study group. The routine pain therapy of the clinic was administered to the subjects from both groups based on the pain assessment. Throughout the study, pain was assessed nearly two times more in the study group (ppain levels were lower at 8th-11th hours in the study group (pPain assessment was not performed after 12th hour despite the severe pain in the control group, and, therefore, analgesia was administered at irregular intervals or was not administered at all. However, the hours of analgesic administration were found to be more regular according to the pain levels of the patients in the study group. In conclusion, the SPAP reduced the pain level by providing regular analgesia when used in combination with regular pain assessment. This article highlights the appropriate assessment for patients with surgical pain. In majority of literature on the subject, the authors emphasize the importance of Standard Pain Assessment Protocol to provide adequate pain relief. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of electronic data capture (EDC with the standard data capture method for clinical trial data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Walther

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Traditionally, clinical research studies rely on collecting data with case report forms, which are subsequently entered into a database to create electronic records. Although well established, this method is time-consuming and error-prone. This study compares four electronic data capture (EDC methods with the conventional approach with respect to duration of data capture and accuracy. It was performed in a West African setting, where clinical trials involve data collection from urban, rural and often remote locations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three types of commonly available EDC tools were assessed in face-to-face interviews; netbook, PDA, and tablet PC. EDC performance during telephone interviews via mobile phone was evaluated as a fourth method. The Graeco Latin square study design allowed comparison of all four methods to standard paper-based recording followed by data double entry while controlling simultaneously for possible confounding factors such as interview order, interviewer and interviewee. Over a study period of three weeks the error rates decreased considerably for all EDC methods. In the last week of the study the data accuracy for the netbook (5.1%, CI95%: 3.5-7.2% and the tablet PC (5.2%, CI95%: 3.7-7.4% was not significantly different from the accuracy of the conventional paper-based method (3.6%, CI95%: 2.2-5.5%, but error rates for the PDA (7.9%, CI95%: 6.0-10.5% and telephone (6.3%, CI95% 4.6-8.6% remained significantly higher. While EDC-interviews take slightly longer, data become readily available after download, making EDC more time effective. Free text and date fields were associated with higher error rates than numerical, single select and skip fields. CONCLUSIONS: EDC solutions have the potential to produce similar data accuracy compared to paper-based methods. Given the considerable reduction in the time from data collection to database lock, EDC holds the promise to reduce research

  4. Clinical trial or standard treatment? Shared decision making at the department of oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Trine Ammentorp; Birkelund, Regner; Ammentorp, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Title: Clinical trial or standard treatment? Shared decision making at the department of oncology. Authors: Ph.d. student, Trine A. Gregersen. Trine.gregersen@rsyd.dk. Department of Oncology. Health Services Research Unit Lillebaelt Hospital / IRS University of Southern Denmark. Professor, Regner...... Analyzing field notes: • How to write useful field notes? • How to analyze field notes systematically? • Using Nvivo when analyzing field notes and interviews?...

  5. Cognitive Assessment of Elderly Inpatients: A Clinical Audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Shermon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Comprehensive geriatric assessment including cognitive assessment results in better outcomes and quality of life through facilitating access to support and further care. The National Audit of Dementia Care revealed too few patients were being assessed for cognition and therefore failing to receive adequate care. Methods: This was a retrospective clinical audit in a district general hospital with systematic sampling of the clinical records of 50 inpatients on an elderly care ward. A descriptive analysis of the results was performed. Results: Despite guidance that cognitive assessment should be performed on admission, this was only documented in 22% of the medical notes. However, this rate improved to 56% by discharge. The most commonly used tool was the Abbreviated Mental Test (AMT 10. Assessment completion was independent of gender or social support, but only patients aged over 75 years were assessed. Of those, 75% had some level of cognitive impairment and 36.8% received a new or suspected diagnosis of dementia. Discussion: Cognitive assessment rates continue to be low. Our findings support the need for increased education regarding the importance and benefits of assessment as well as how to complete and document the assessment correctly. Conclusion: Cognitive assessment rates need to be further improved to promote better outcomes for patients with dementia.

  6. Standardization of Data for Clinical Use and Research in Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Noonan, Vanessa K

    2016-01-01

    for use in SCI clinical practice and research. Reporting of SCI data is likewise standardized. Data elements are continuously updated and developed using an open and transparent process. There are ongoing internal, as well as external review processes, where all interested parties are encouraged...... to participate. The purpose of this review paper is to provide an overview of the initiatives to standardize data including the International Spinal Cord Society's International SCI Data Sets and the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Common Data Elements......Increased survival after spinal cord injury (SCI) worldwide has enhanced the need for quality data that can be compared and shared between centers, countries, as well as across research studies, to better understand how best to prevent and treat SCI. Such data should be standardized and be able...

  7. A collaborative comparison of objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) standard setting methods at Australian medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malau-Aduli, Bunmi Sherifat; Teague, Peta-Ann; D'Souza, Karen; Heal, Clare; Turner, Richard; Garne, David L; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2017-12-01

    A key issue underpinning the usefulness of the OSCE assessment to medical education is standard setting, but the majority of standard-setting methods remain challenging for performance assessment because they produce varying passing marks. Several studies have compared standard-setting methods; however, most of these studies are limited by their experimental scope, or use data on examinee performance at a single OSCE station or from a single medical school. This collaborative study between 10 Australian medical schools investigated the effect of standard-setting methods on OSCE cut scores and failure rates. This research used 5256 examinee scores from seven shared OSCE stations to calculate cut scores and failure rates using two different compromise standard-setting methods, namely the Borderline Regression and Cohen's methods. The results of this study indicate that Cohen's method yields similar outcomes to the Borderline Regression method, particularly for large examinee cohort sizes. However, with lower examinee numbers on a station, the Borderline Regression method resulted in higher cut scores and larger difference margins in the failure rates. Cohen's method yields similar outcomes as the Borderline Regression method and its application for benchmarking purposes and in resource-limited settings is justifiable, particularly with large examinee numbers.

  8. Innovating cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs in an era of successful standard of care therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDevanter, Donald R; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole

    2017-11-01

    Evolving cystic fibrosis 'standards of care' have influenced recent cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs for new therapies; care additions/improvements will require innovative trial designs to maximize feasibility and efficacy detection. Three cystic fibrosis therapeutic areas (pulmonary exacerbations, Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infections, and reduced cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator [CFTR] protein function) differ with respect to the duration for which recognized 'standards of care' have been available. However, developers of new therapies in all the three areas are affected by similar challenges: standards of care have become so strongly entrenched that traditional placebo-controlled studies in cystic fibrosis populations likely to benefit from newer therapies have become less and less feasible. Today, patients/clinicians are more likely to entertain participation in active-comparator trial designs, that have substantial challenges of their own. Foremost among these are the selection of 'valid' active comparator(s), estimation of a comparator's current clinical efficacy (required for testing noninferiority hypotheses), and effective blinding of commercially available comparators. Recent and future cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs will have to creatively address this collateral result of successful past development of effective cystic fibrosis therapies: patients and clinicians are much less likely to accept simple, placebo-controlled studies to evaluate future therapies.

  9. Reliable and Valid Assessment of Clinical Bronchoscopy Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Larsen, Klaus Richter; Clementsen, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Background: There have been several attempts to systematically assess performance in bronchoscopy. Earlier validation studies have used bronchoscopy simulators, not real-life performance in patients. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the reliability and validity of an assessment tool...... aspects of the assessment, but post hoc tests showed different discriminative abilities. Conclusions: This new tool for assessing clinical bronchoscopy performance has a high interrater reliability. One rater assessing performance of 3 bronchoscopies ensures sufficient reliability. The assessment tool......: The interrater reliability was high, with Cronbach's a = 0.86. Assessment of 3 bronchoscopies by a single rater had a generalizability coefficient of 0.84. The correlation between experience and performance was good (Pearson correlation = 0.76). There were significant differences between the groups for all...

  10. A study of clinical and information management processes in the surgical pre-assessment clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; Mair, Frances S

    2014-03-25

    Establishing day-case surgery as the preferred hospital admission route for all eligible patients requires adequate preoperative assessment of patients in order to quickly distinguish those who will require minimum assessment and are suitable for day-case admission from those who will require more extensive management and will need to be admitted as inpatients. As part of a study to elucidate clinical and information management processes within the patient surgical pathway in NHS Scotland, we conducted a total of 10 in-depth semi-structured interviews during 4 visits to the Dumfries & Galloway Royal Infirmary surgical pre-assessment clinic. We modelled clinical processes using process-mapping techniques and analysed interview data using qualitative methods. We used Normalisation Process Theory as a conceptual framework to interpret the factors which were identified as facilitating or hindering information elucidation tasks and communication within the multi-disciplinary team. The pre-assessment clinic of Dumfries & Galloway Royal Infirmary was opened in 2008 in response to clinical and workflow issues which had been identified with former patient management practices in the surgical pathway. The preoperative clinic now operates under well established processes and protocols. The use of a computerised system for managing preoperative documentation substantially transformed clinical practices and facilitates communication and information-sharing among the multi-disciplinary team. Successful deployment and normalisation of innovative clinical and information management processes was possible because both local and national strategic priorities were synergistic and the system was developed collaboratively by the POA staff and the health-board IT team, resulting in a highly contextualised operationalisation of clinical and information management processes. Further concerted efforts from a range of stakeholders are required to fully integrate preoperative assessment

  11. Determination of Tedizolid susceptibility interpretive criteria for gram-positive pathogens according to clinical and laboratory standards institute guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaci, Mekki; Flanagan, Shawn; Sandison, Taylor

    2018-03-01

    For effective antibacterial therapy, physicians require qualitative test results using susceptibility breakpoints provided by clinical microbiology laboratories. This article summarizes the key components used to establish the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoints for tedizolid. First, in vitro studies using recent surveillance and clinical trial isolates ascertained minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions against pertinent organisms, including staphylococci, streptococci, and enterococci. Studies in animal models of infection determined rates of antibacterial efficacy and survival following administration of tedizolid phosphate at doses equivalent to those in humans. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses examined the relationship between plasma concentrations and MICs against the target organism. Finally, clinical trials assessed clinical and microbiologic outcomes by MIC. All these data were evaluated and combined to obtain the ratified CLSI susceptibility criteria for tedizolid of ≤0.5μg/mL for Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Enterococcus faecalis and ≤0.25μg/mL for Streptococcus anginosus group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Safety assessment of a standardized polyphenolic extract of clove buds: Subchronic toxicity and mutagenicity studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liju Vijayasteltar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the various reports on the toxicity of clove oil and its major component eugenol, systematic evaluations on the safety of polyphenolic extracts of clove buds have not been reported. Considering the health beneficial pharmacological effects and recent use of clove polyphenols as dietary supplements, the present study investigated the safety of a standardized polyphenolic extract of clove buds (Clovinol, as assessed by oral acute (5 g/kg b.wt. for 14 days and subchronic (0.25, 0.5 and 1 g/kg b.wt. for 90 days toxicity studies on Wistar rats and mutagenicity studies employing Salmonella typhimurium strains. Administration of Clovinol did not result in any toxicologically significant changes in clinical/behavioural observations, ophthalmic examinations, body weights, organ weights, feed consumption, urinalysis, hematology and clinical biochemistry parameters when compared to the untreated control group of animals, indicating the no observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL as 1000 mg/kg b.wt./day; the highest dose tested. Terminal necropsy did not reveal any treatment-related histopathology changes. Clovinol did not show genotoxicity when tested on TA-98, TA-100 and TA-102 with or without metabolic activation; rather exhibited significant antimutagenic potential against the known mutagens, sodium azide, NPD and tobacco as well as against 2-acetamidoflourene, which needed metabolic activation for mutagenicity.

  13. Assessing electronic health record phenotypes against gold-standard diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Susan E; Pereira, Katherine; Granger, Bradi B; Batch, Bryan C; Phelan, Matthew; Pencina, Michael; Miranda, Marie Lynn; Boulware, Ebony; Lucas, Joseph E; Nelson, Charlotte L; Neely, Benjamin; Goldstein, Benjamin A; Barth, Pamela; Richesson, Rachel L; Riley, Isaretta L; Corsino, Leonor; McPeek Hinz, Eugenia R; Rusincovitch, Shelley; Green, Jennifer; Barton, Anna Beth; Kelley, Carly; Hyland, Kristen; Tang, Monica; Elliott, Amanda; Ruel, Ewa; Clark, Alexander; Mabrey, Melanie; Morrissey, Kay Lyn; Rao, Jyothi; Hong, Beatrice; Pierre-Louis, Marjorie; Kelly, Katherine; Jelesoff, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of 8 electronic health record (EHR)-based phenotypes for diabetes mellitus against gold-standard American Diabetes Association (ADA) diagnostic criteria via chart review by clinical experts. We identified EHR-based diabetes phenotype definitions that were developed for various purposes by a variety of users, including academic medical centers, Medicare, the New York City Health Department, and pharmacy benefit managers. We applied these definitions to a sample of 173 503 patients with records in the Duke Health System Enterprise Data Warehouse and at least 1 visit over a 5-year period (2007-2011). Of these patients, 22 679 (13%) met the criteria of 1 or more of the selected diabetes phenotype definitions. A statistically balanced sample of these patients was selected for chart review by clinical experts to determine the presence or absence of type 2 diabetes in the sample. The sensitivity (62-94%) and specificity (95-99%) of EHR-based type 2 diabetes phenotypes (compared with the gold standard ADA criteria via chart review) varied depending on the component criteria and timing of observations and measurements. Researchers using EHR-based phenotype definitions should clearly specify the characteristics that comprise the definition, variations of ADA criteria, and how different phenotype definitions and components impact the patient populations retrieved and the intended application. Careful attention to phenotype definitions is critical if the promise of leveraging EHR data to improve individual and population health is to be fulfilled. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. Forensic neuropsychological assessment: clinical case of depression and working incapacity

    OpenAIRE

    Monti, Camila; Saffi, Fabiana; Barros, Daniel Martins de; Dias, Alvaro Machado; Akiba, Henrique Teruo; Serafim, Antonio de Pádua

    2015-01-01

    Issues related to mental health in relation to court matters have increasingly required the participation of the psychologist. We present the use of forensic neuropsychological assessment in a case of retirement reversal. Incapacity was attested due to disability resulting from depression of a 35-year-old attorney, and the case was forwarded from the courts to the Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology Unit at the USP Clinical Hospital. A clinical interview and application of cognitive tests was ...

  15. 2016 Updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards, Including Standards for Pediatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuss, Michael N; Gilmore, Terry R; Belderson, Kristin M; Billett, Amy L; Conti-Kalchik, Tara; Harvey, Brittany E; Hendricks, Carolyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Mangu, Pamela B; McNiff, Kristen; Olsen, MiKaela; Schulmeister, Lisa; Von Gehr, Ann; Polovich, Martha

    2016-12-01

    Purpose To update the ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards and to highlight standards for pediatric oncology. Methods The ASCO/ONS Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards were first published in 2009 and updated in 2011 to include inpatient settings. A subsequent 2013 revision expanded the standards to include the safe administration and management of oral chemotherapy. A joint ASCO/ONS workshop with stakeholder participation, including that of the Association of Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nurses and American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, was held on May 12, 2015, to review the 2013 standards. An extensive literature search was subsequently conducted, and public comments on the revised draft standards were solicited. Results The updated 2016 standards presented here include clarification and expansion of existing standards to include pediatric oncology and to introduce new standards: most notably, two-person verification of chemotherapy preparation processes, administration of vinca alkaloids via minibags in facilities in which intrathecal medications are administered, and labeling of medications dispensed from the health care setting to be taken by the patient at home. The standards were reordered and renumbered to align with the sequential processes of chemotherapy prescription, preparation, and administration. Several standards were separated into their respective components for clarity and to facilitate measurement of adherence to a standard. Conclusion As oncology practice has changed, so have chemotherapy administration safety standards. Advances in technology, cancer treatment, and education and training have prompted the need for periodic review and revision of the standards. Additional information is available at http://www.asco.org/chemo-standards .

  16. Do coursework summative assessments predict clinical performance? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Rebecca; Hing, Wayne; Orr, Robin; Milne, Nikki

    2017-02-16

    Two goals of summative assessment in health profession education programs are to ensure the robustness of high stakes decisions such as progression and licensing, and predict future performance. This systematic and critical review aims to investigate the ability of specific modes of summative assessment to predict the clinical performance of health profession education students. PubMed, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, ERIC and EMBASE databases were searched using key terms with articles collected subjected to dedicated inclusion criteria. Rigorous exclusion criteria were applied to ensure a consistent interpretation of 'summative assessment' and 'clinical performance'. Data were extracted using a pre-determined format and papers were critically appraised by two independent reviewers using a modified Downs and Black checklist with level of agreement between reviewers determined through a Kappa analysis. Of the 4783 studies retrieved from the search strategy, 18 studies were included in the final review. Twelve were from the medical profession and there was one from each of physiotherapy, pharmacy, dietetics, speech pathology, dentistry and dental hygiene. Objective Structured Clinical Examinations featured in 15 papers, written assessments in four and problem based learning evaluations, case based learning evaluations and student portfolios each featured in one paper. Sixteen different measures of clinical performance were used. Two papers were identified as 'poor' quality and the remainder categorised as 'fair' with an almost perfect (k = 0.852) level of agreement between raters. Objective Structured Clinical Examination scores accounted for 1.4-39.7% of the variance in student performance; multiple choice/extended matching questions and short answer written examinations accounted for 3.2-29.2%; problem based or case based learning evaluations accounted for 4.4-16.6%; and student portfolios accounted for 12.1%. Objective structured clinical examinations and written

  17. Clinically assessed mediolateral knee motion: impact on gait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Creaby, Mark W; Simic, Milena

    2011-01-01

    Mediolateral knee movement can be assessed visually with clinical tests. A knee-medial-to-foot position is associated with an increased risk of knee injuries and pathologies. However, the implications of such findings on daily tasks are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigat...... if a knee-medial-to-foot position assessed during a clinical test was associated with altered hip and knee joint kinematics and knee joint kinetics during gait compared with those with a knee-over-foot position....

  18. A Pilot Curriculum to Integrate Standardized Patient Simulation into Clinical Pastoral Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rami A; Damore, Deborah R; Viti, Joseph F; Hughes, Patrick G; Miesle, Rebecca; Ataya, Ramsey; Atkinson, S Scott; Gable, Brad

    2016-06-01

    We describe a novel means of experiential learning for clinical pastoral care residents using standardized patient (SP) simulations. A prospective cohort study involving 7 clinical pastoral care residents was performed. All residents underwent 2 verbatim SP sessions and 2 simulation sessions. After all sessions, residents completed a self-evaluation. Faculty completed an evaluation and then provided a debriefing session to all residents. Performance ratings were globally higher on simulated scenarios when compared to the verbatim sessions. More research in the field of pastoral care is needed to validate the learned professional skills that enhance a comprehensive training program through the use of medical simulation, verbatim reports, and clinical pastoral education (CPE) competencies. Medical simulation provides a promising teaching methodology for the training of CPE residents. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Natural language processing systems for capturing and standardizing unstructured clinical information: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreimeyer, Kory; Foster, Matthew; Pandey, Abhishek; Arya, Nina; Halford, Gwendolyn; Jones, Sandra F; Forshee, Richard; Walderhaug, Mark; Botsis, Taxiarchis

    2017-09-01

    We followed a systematic approach based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses to identify existing clinical natural language processing (NLP) systems that generate structured information from unstructured free text. Seven literature databases were searched with a query combining the concepts of natural language processing and structured data capture. Two reviewers screened all records for relevance during two screening phases, and information about clinical NLP systems was collected from the final set of papers. A total of 7149 records (after removing duplicates) were retrieved and screened, and 86 were determined to fit the review criteria. These papers contained information about 71 different clinical NLP systems, which were then analyzed. The NLP systems address a wide variety of important clinical and research tasks. Certain tasks are well addressed by the existing systems, while others remain as open challenges that only a small number of systems attempt, such as extraction of temporal information or normalization of concepts to standard terminologies. This review has identified many NLP systems capable of processing clinical free text and generating structured output, and the information collected and evaluated here will be important for prioritizing development of new approaches for clinical NLP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Standardized handwriting to assess bradykinesia, micrographia and tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther J Smits

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess whether standardized handwriting can provide quantitative measures to distinguish patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease from age- and gender-matched healthy control participants. DESIGN: Exploratory study. Pen tip trajectories were recorded during circle, spiral and line drawing and repeated character 'elelelel' and sentence writing, performed by Parkinson patients and healthy control participants. Parkinson patients were tested after overnight withdrawal of anti-Parkinsonian medication. SETTING: University Medical Center Groningen, tertiary care, the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 10; mean age 69.0 years; 6 male and healthy controls (n = 10; mean age 68.1 years; 6 male. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Movement time and velocity to detect bradykinesia and the size of writing to detect micrographia. A rest recording to investigate the presence of a rest-tremor, by frequency analysis. RESULTS: Mean disease duration in the Parkinson group was 4.4 years and the patients were in modified Hoehn-Yahr stages 1-2.5. In general, Parkinson patients were slower than healthy control participants. Median time per repetition, median velocity and median acceleration of the sentence task and median velocity of the elel task differed significantly between Parkinson patients and healthy control participants (all p<0.0014. Parkinson patients also wrote smaller than healthy control participants and the width of the 'e' in the elel task was significantly smaller in Parkinson patients compared to healthy control participants (p<0.0014. A rest-tremor was detected in the three patients who were clinically assessed as having rest-tremor. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that standardized handwriting can provide objective measures for bradykinesia, tremor and micrographia to distinguish Parkinson patients from healthy control participants.

  1. Current standards of neuropsychological assessment in epilepsy surgery centers across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Viola Lara; Äikiä, Marja; Del Barrio, Antonio; Boon, Paul; Borbély, Csaba; Bran, Ema; Braun, Kees; Carette, Evelien; Clark, Maria; Cross, Judith Helen; Dimova, Petia; Fabo, Daniel; Foroglou, Nikolaos; Francione, Stefano; Gersamia, Anna; Gil-Nagel, Antonio; Guekht, Alla; Harrison, Sue; Hecimovic, Hrvoje; Heminghyt, Einar; Hirsch, Edouard; Javurkova, Alena; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Kavan, Nicole; Kelemen, Anna; Kimiskidis, Vasilios K; Kirschner, Margarita; Kleitz, Catherine; Kobulashvili, Teia; Kosmidis, Mary H; Kurtish, Selin Yagci; Lesourd, Mathieu; Ljunggren, Sofia; Lossius, Morten Ingvar; Malmgren, Kristina; Mameniskiené, Ruta; Martin-Sanfilippo, Patricia; Marusic, Petr; Miatton, Marijke; Özkara, Çiğdem; Pelle, Federica; Rubboli, Guido; Rudebeck, Sarah; Ryvlin, Philippe; van Schooneveld, Monique; Schmid, Elisabeth; Schmidt, Pia-Magdalena; Seeck, Margitta; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Shavel-Jessop, Sara; Tarta-Arsene, Oana; Trinka, Eugen; Viggedal, Gerd; Wendling, Anne-Sophie; Witt, Juri-Alexander; Helmstaedter, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    We explored the current practice with respect to the neuropsychological assessment of surgical epilepsy patients in European epilepsy centers, with the aim of harmonizing and establishing common standards. Twenty-six epilepsy centers and members of "E-PILEPSY" (a European pilot network of reference centers in refractory epilepsy and epilepsy surgery), were asked to report the status of neuropsychological assessment in adults and children via two different surveys. There was a consensus among these centers regarding the role of neuropsychology in the presurgical workup. Strong agreement was found on indications (localization, epileptic dysfunctions, adverse drugs effects, and postoperative monitoring) and the domains to be evaluated (memory, attention, executive functions, language, visuospatial skills, intelligence, depression, anxiety, and quality of life). Although 186 different tests are in use throughout these European centers, a core group of tests reflecting a moderate level of agreement could be discerned. Variability exists with regard to indications, protocols, and paradigms for the assessment of hemispheric language dominance. For the tests in use, little published evidence of clinical validity in epilepsy was provided. Participants in the survey reported a need for improvement concerning the validity of the tests, tools for the assessment of everyday functioning and accelerated forgetting, national norms, and test co-normalization. Based on the present survey, we documented a consensus regarding the indications and principles of neuropsychological testing. Despite the variety of tests in use, the survey indicated that there may be a core set of tests chosen based on experience, as well as on published evidence. By combining these findings with the results of an ongoing systematic literature review, we aim for a battery that can be recommended for the use across epilepsy surgical centers in Europe. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League

  2. Environmental assessment in support of proposed voluntary energy conservation standard for new residential buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, D.L.; Parker, G.B.; Callaway, J.W.; Marsh, S.J.; Roop, J.M.; Taylor, Z.T.

    1989-06-01

    The objective of this environmental assessment (EA) is to identify the potential environmental impacts that could result from the proposed voluntary residential standard (VOLRES) on private sector construction of new residential buildings. 49 refs., 15 tabs.

  3. Future Directions in Assessment: Influences of Standards and Implications for Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Troy L.; Malone, Margaret E.; Winke, Paula

    2018-01-01

    As "Foreign Language Annals" concludes its 50th anniversary, it is fitting to review the past and peer into the future of standards-based education and assessment. Standards are a common yardstick used by educators and researchers as a powerful framework for conceptualizing teaching and measuring learner success. The impact of standards…

  4. External Peer Review of Assessment: An Effective Approach to Verifying Standards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Sue; Hudson, Jane; den Outer, Birgit; Price, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    There is growing international concern to regulate and assure standards in higher education. External peer review of assessment, often called external examining, is a well-established approach to assuring standards. Australian higher education is one of several systems without a history of external examining for undergraduate programmes that is…

  5. The Impact of Early Exposure of Eighth Grade Math Standards on End of Grade Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Tonjai E.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the Cumberland County Schools district-wide issue surrounding the disproportional performance of eighth grade Math I students' proficiency scores on standardized end-of-grade and end-of-course assessments. The study focused on the impact of the school district incorporating eighth grade math standards in…

  6. INEE Minimum Standards: A Tool for Education Quality Assessment in Afghan Refugee Schools in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qahir, Katayon

    2007-01-01

    This article details a pilot Minimum Standards assessment in Afghan refugee schools supported by the International Rescue Committee's Female Education Program in the North West Frontier Province of Pakistan. A set of specifically selected, contextualized indicators, based on the global INEE Minimum Standards, served as a tool for teachers and…

  7. Adherence of Pain Assessment to the German National Standard for Pain Management in 12 Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Osterbrink

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pain is very common among nursing home residents. The assessment of pain is a prerequisite for effective multiprofessional pain management. Within the framework of the German health services research project, ‘Action Alliance Pain-Free City Muenster’, the authors investigated pain assessment adherence according to the German national Expert Standard for Pain Management in Nursing, which is a general standard applicable to all chronic/acute pain-affected persons and highly recommended for practice.

  8. Clinical evaluation of further-developed MRCP sequences in comparison with standard MRCP sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundt, W.; Scheidler, J.; Reiser, M.; Petsch, R.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the comparison of technically improved single-shot magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) sequences with standard single-shot rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) and half-Fourier acquired single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences in evaluating the normal and abnormal biliary duct system. The bile duct system of 45 patients was prospectively investigated on a 1.5-T MRI system. The investigation was performed with RARE and HASTE MR cholangiography sequences with standard and high spatial resolutions, and with a delayed-echo half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) sequence. Findings of the improved MRCP sequences were compared with the standard MRCP sequences. The level of confidence in assessing the diagnosis was divided into five groups. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test at a level of p<0.05 was applied. In 15 patients no pathology was found. The MRCP showed stenoses of the bile duct system in 10 patients and choledocholithiasis and cholecystolithiasis in 16 patients. In 12 patients a dilatation of the bile duct system was found. Comparison of the low- and high spatial resolution sequences and the short and long TE times of the half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) sequence revealed no statistically significant differences regarding accuracy of the examination. The diagnostic confidence level in assessing normal or pathological findings for the high-resolution RARE and half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) was significantly better than for the standard sequences. For the delayed-echo half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) sequence no statistically significant difference was seen. The high-resolution RARE and half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) sequences had a higher confidence level, but there was no significant difference in diagnosis in terms of detection and assessment of pathological changes in the biliary duct system compared with standard sequences. (orig.)

  9. Clinical evaluation of further-developed MRCP sequences in comparison with standard MRCP sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hundt, W.; Scheidler, J.; Reiser, M. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich (Germany); Petsch, R. [Department of MRI, Siemens Medizintechnik, Erlangen (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this study was the comparison of technically improved single-shot magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) sequences with standard single-shot rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) and half-Fourier acquired single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences in evaluating the normal and abnormal biliary duct system. The bile duct system of 45 patients was prospectively investigated on a 1.5-T MRI system. The investigation was performed with RARE and HASTE MR cholangiography sequences with standard and high spatial resolutions, and with a delayed-echo half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) sequence. Findings of the improved MRCP sequences were compared with the standard MRCP sequences. The level of confidence in assessing the diagnosis was divided into five groups. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test at a level of p<0.05 was applied. In 15 patients no pathology was found. The MRCP showed stenoses of the bile duct system in 10 patients and choledocholithiasis and cholecystolithiasis in 16 patients. In 12 patients a dilatation of the bile duct system was found. Comparison of the low- and high spatial resolution sequences and the short and long TE times of the half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) sequence revealed no statistically significant differences regarding accuracy of the examination. The diagnostic confidence level in assessing normal or pathological findings for the high-resolution RARE and half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) was significantly better than for the standard sequences. For the delayed-echo half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) sequence no statistically significant difference was seen. The high-resolution RARE and half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) sequences had a higher confidence level, but there was no significant difference in diagnosis in terms of detection and assessment of pathological changes in the biliary duct system compared with standard sequences. (orig.)

  10. Design and validation of standardized clinical and functional remission criteria in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosolov SN

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sergey N Mosolov,1 Andrey V Potapov,1 Uriy V Ushakov,2 Aleksey A Shafarenko,1 Anastasiya B Kostyukova11Department of Mental Disorders Therapy, Moscow Research Institute of Psychiatry, Moscow, Russia; 2Moscow Psychiatric Outpatient Services #21, Moscow, RussiaBackground: International Remission Criteria (IRC for schizophrenia were developed recently by a group of internationally known experts. The IRC detect only 10%–30% of cases and do not cover the diversity of forms and social functioning. Our aim was to design a more applicable tool and validate its use – the Standardized Clinical and Functional Remission Criteria (SCFRC.Methods: We used a 6-month follow-up study of 203 outpatients from two Moscow centers and another further sample of stable patients from a 1-year controlled trial of atypical versus typical medication. Diagnosis was confirmed by International Classification of Diseases Version 10 (ICD10 criteria and the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI. Patients were assessed by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, including intensity threshold, and further classified using the Russian domestic remission criteria and the level of social and personal functioning, according to the Personal and Social Performance Scale (PSP. The SCFRC were formulated and were validated by a data reanalysis on the first population sample and on a second independent sample (104 patients and in an open-label prospective randomized 12-month comparative study of risperidone long-acting injectable (RLAI versus olanzapine.Results: Only 64 of the 203 outpatients (31.5% initially met the IRC, and 53 patients (26.1% met the IRC after 6 months, without a change in treatment. Patients who were in remission had episodic and progressive deficit (39.6%, or remittent (15% paranoid schizophrenia, or schizoaffective disorder (17%. In addition, 105 patients of 139 (51.7%, who did not meet symptomatic IRC, remained stable within the period. Reanalysis of

  11. Clinical pastoral education as professional training: some entrance, curriculum and assessment implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, N Keith

    2010-01-01

    Clinical Pastoral Education is professional training for pastoral care. This paper compares CPE against the professional training model. While limiting the discussion to Christian pastoral care, the professional education model suggests a clarification of the trainee's theological and other entry requirements for a basic unit, a more thoughtful provision of information during CPE training, a careful attention to group membership and an appropriate integration with the theological curriculum. It also suggests more specific competency standards and more reliable, valid and objective assessment methods.

  12. Assessment of postgraduate dental students using mini-clinical examination tool in periodontology and implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha Ramrao Rathod

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mini-clinical examination (mini-CEX is a new assessment tool that observes the student using a standard rating form. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of the mini-CEX as an assessment and feedback tool in the postgraduate setting in periodontology. Materials and Methods: Eight postgraduate students and two evaluators were included in this study carried out for 4 months during which the students were made to appear for four encounters evaluated on a standardized nine-point Likert scale. Feedback was obtained from the students about this assessment after the fourth encounter. Results: Sixty-three percent of the students felt that mini-CEX is better than the conventional assessment tools. Seventy-five percent of the students felt that this type of mini-CEX assessment helped improve the student–teacher relationship and student–patient relationship. Sixty-three percent of the students were satisfied with this assessment pattern and were willing to face more encounters as it helped them improve their competencies. Seventy-five percent of the students agreed that they felt anxious on being observed while taking cases. Conclusion: The training and assessment of a wide range of procedures make dentistry unique. Good communication skills and counseling can allay patient's fear and anxiety. This structured way of assessment of clinical skills and feedback provides good clinical care and helps improve the quality of the resulting information which would induce confidence, improve clinical competencies, and alleviate the fear of examination among the students.

  13. Measurement properties of clinical assessment methods for classifying generalized joint hypermobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Schmedling, Karoline; Rombaut, Lies

    2017-01-01

    The purpose was to perform a systematic review of clinical assessment methods for classifying Generalized Joint Hypermobility (GJH), evaluate their clinimetric properties, and perform the best evidence synthesis of these methods. Four test assessment methods (Beighton Score [BS], Carter...... and Wilkinson, Hospital del Mar, Rotes-Querol) and two questionnaire assessment methods (Five-part questionnaire [5PQ], Beighton Score-self reported [BS-self]) were identified on children or adults. Using the Consensus-based Standards for selection of health Measurement Instrument (COSMIN) checklist...... test assessment methods lack satisfactory information on both reliability and validity. For the questionnaire assessment methods, 5PQ was the most frequently used, and reliability showed conflicting evidence, while the validity had limited positive to conflicting evidence compared with test assessment...

  14. A standards-based clinical information system for HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitt, F W

    1995-01-01

    To create a clinical data repository to interface the Veteran's Administration (VA) Decentralized Hospital Computer Program (DHCP) and a departmental clinical information system for the management of HIV patients. This system supports record-keeping, decision-making, reporting, and analysis. The database development was designed to overcome two impediments to successful implementations of clinical databases: (i) lack of a standard reference data model, and; (ii) lack of a universal standard for medical concept representation. Health Level Seven (HL7) is a standard protocol that specifies the implementation of interfaces between two computer applications (sender and receiver) from different vendors or sources of electronic data exchange in the health care environment. This eliminates or substantially reduces the custom interface programming and program maintenance that would otherwise be required. HL7 defines the data to be exchanged, the timing of the interchange, and the communication of errors to the application. The formats are generic in nature and must be configured to meet the needs of the two applications involved. The standard conceptually operates at the seventh level of the ISO model for Open Systems Interconnection (OSI). The OSI simply defines the data elements that are exchanged as abstract messages, and does not prescribe the exact bit stream of the messages that flow over the network. Lower level network software developed according to the OSI model may be used to encode and decode the actual bit stream. The OSI protocols are not universally implemented and, therefore, a set of encoding rules for defining the exact representation of a message must be specified. The VA has created an HL7 module to assist DHCP applications in exchanging health care information with other applications using the HL7 protocol. The DHCP HL7 module consists of a set of utility routines and files that provide a generic interface to the HL7 protocol for all DHCP applications

  15. Standard donor lung procurement with normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion: A prospective randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slama, Alexis; Schillab, Lukas; Barta, Maximilian; Benedek, Aris; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Hoetzenecker, Konrad; Taghavi, Shahrokh; Lang, Gyoergy; Matilla, Jose; Ankersmit, Hendrik; Hager, Helmut; Roth, Georg; Klepetko, Walter; Aigner, Clemens

    2017-07-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) was primarily developed for evaluation of impaired donor lungs. The good clinical results raise the question for its possible impact on lungs meeting standard criteria. Before application of EVLP on such lungs enters routine clinical practice, it must be demonstrated whether EVLP would affect or improve outcome when used in standard donor lungs. We performed a prospective randomized trial to investigate the role of EVLP in standard lung transplantation (Tx). This prospective randomized clinical trial compared patients who underwent Tx with ex vivo evaluated donor lungs with an equivalent patient population without previous EVLP. From October 2013 to May 2015, 193 lung Tx were performed at the Medical University of Vienna. During this period, 80 recipient/donor pairs that met the inclusion criteria were included in this trial, 41 pairs in the control group, and 39 in the EVLP group. In the EVLP group, 4 lungs (10.2%) ultimately did not qualify for Tx and were rejected for lung Tx owing to technical reasons (n = 2) and quality criteria (n = 2). Donor and recipient characteristics were comparable in both groups. Total cold ischemic time in the EVLP group was significantly longer for both implanted lungs (first side, 372 minutes vs 291 minutes, p 1 was lower in the EVLP group at all time points compared with the control group (24 hours, 5.7% vs 19.5%, p = 0.10), and need for post-operative prolonged extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was lower in the EVLP group (5.7% vs 12.2%, p = 0.44). Short-term clinical outcomes did not differ between recipients in the 2 groups. Patients remained intubated (1.6 days vs 1.6 days, p = 0.67), in the intensive care unit (6 days vs 6 days, p = 0.76), and in the hospital (23 days vs 19 days, p = 0.42) for a comparable period of time. The 30-day survival was 97.1% vs 100% (p = 0.46). This study provides evidence that EVLP can safely be used in standard donor lungs. Functional results and perioperative

  16. True communication skills assessment in interdepartmental OSCE stations: Standard setting using the MAAS-Global and EduG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyonugroho, Winny; Kropmans, Thomas; Murphy, Ruth; Hayes, Peter; van Dalen, Jan; Kennedy, Kieran M

    2018-01-01

    Comparing outcome of clinical skills assessment is challenging. This study proposes reliable and valid comparison of communication skills (1) assessment as practiced in Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (2). The aim of the present study is to compare CS assessment, as standardized according to the MAAS Global, between stations in a single undergraduate medical year. An OSCE delivered in an Irish undergraduate curriculum was studied. We chose the MAAS-Global as an internationally recognized and validated instrument to calibrate the OSCE station items. The MAAS-Global proportion is the percentage of station checklist items that can be considered as 'true' CS. The reliability of the OSCE was calculated with G-Theory analysis and nested ANOVA was used to compare mean scores of all years. MAAS-Global scores in psychiatry stations were significantly higher than those in other disciplines (pMAAS-Global proportions when compared to the general practice stations. Comparison of outcome measurements, using the MAAS Global as a standardization instrument, between interdisciplinary station checklists was valid and reliable. The MAAS-Global was used as a single validated instrument and is suggested as gold standard. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Standard setting in student assessment: is a defensible method yet to come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, A

    2008-11-01

    Setting, maintaining and re-evaluation of assessment standard periodically are important issues in medical education. The cut-off scores are often "pulled from the air" or set to an arbitrary percentage. A large number of methods/procedures used to set standard or cut score are described in literature. There is a high degree of uncertainty in performance standard set by using these methods. Standards set using the existing methods reflect the subjective judgment of the standard setters. This review is not to describe the existing standard setting methods/procedures but to narrate the validity, reliability, feasibility and legal issues relating to standard setting. This review is on some of the issues in standard setting based on the published articles of educational assessment researchers. Standard or cut-off score should be to determine whether the examinee attained the requirement to be certified competent. There is no perfect method to determine cut score on a test and none is agreed upon as the best method. Setting standard is not an exact science. Legitimacy of the standard is supported when performance standard is linked to the requirement of practice. Test-curriculum alignment and content validity are important for most educational test validity arguments. Representative percentage of must-know learning objectives in the curriculum may be the basis of test items and pass/fail marks. Practice analysis may help in identifying the must-know areas of curriculum. Cut score set by this procedure may give the credibility, validity, defensibility and comparability of the standard. Constructing the test items by subject experts and vetted by multi-disciplinary faculty members may ensure the reliability of the test as well as the standard.

  18. The role of Health Impact Assessment in the setting of air quality standards: An Australian perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spickett, Jeffery, E-mail: J.Spickett@curtin.edu.au [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Katscherian, Dianne [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Harris, Patrick [CHETRE — UNSW Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, University of New South Wales (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    The approaches used for setting or reviewing air quality standards vary from country to country. The purpose of this research was to consider the potential to improve decision-making through integration of HIA into the processes to review and set air quality standards used in Australia. To assess the value of HIA in this policy process, its strengths and weaknesses were evaluated aligned with review of international processes for setting air quality standards. Air quality standard setting programmes elsewhere have either used HIA or have amalgamated and incorporated factors normally found within HIA frameworks. They clearly demonstrate the value of a formalised HIA process for setting air quality standards in Australia. The following elements should be taken into consideration when using HIA in standard setting. (a) The adequacy of a mainly technical approach in current standard setting procedures to consider social determinants of health. (b) The importance of risk assessment criteria and information within the HIA process. The assessment of risk should consider equity, the distribution of variations in air quality in different locations and the potential impacts on health. (c) The uncertainties in extrapolating evidence from one population to another or to subpopulations, especially the more vulnerable, due to differing environmental factors and population variables. (d) The significance of communication with all potential stakeholders on issues associated with the management of air quality. In Australia there is also an opportunity for HIA to be used in conjunction with the NEPM to develop local air quality standard measures. The outcomes of this research indicated that the use of HIA for air quality standard setting at the national and local levels would prove advantageous. -- Highlights: • Health Impact Assessment framework has been applied to a policy development process. • HIA process was evaluated for application in air quality standard setting.

  19. Upper Limb Assessment in Tetraplegia: Clinical, Functional and Kinematic Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; de Oliveira, Roberta; Ortolan, Rodrigo L.; Varoto, Renato; Cliquet, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate clinical and functional evaluations with kinematic variables of upper limp reach-to-grasp movement in patients with tetraplegia. Twenty chronic patients were selected to perform reach-to-grasp kinematic assessment using a target placed at a distance equal to the arm's length. Kinematic variables (hand peak…

  20. Clinical laboratory assessment of congenital and acquired disorders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... various methods of assessing platelet function in the clinical laboratory have been derived; however with the advent of automation, more research is still on to further unveil specific defects in the structure and functions of platelets. Methods are however being specific for investigating certain stages of haemostasis process.

  1. An approach to the clinical assessment and management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Syncope, defined as a brief loss of consciousness due to an abrupt fall in cerebral perfusion, remains a frequent reason for medical presentation. The goals of the clinical assessment of a patient with syncope are twofold: (i) to identify the precise cause in order to implement a mechanism-specific and effective therapeutic ...

  2. Research Methods for Assessing and Evaluating School-Based Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Douglas

    This monograph describes three types of evaluation that are potentially useful to school-based clinics: needs assessments, process evaluations, and impact evaluations. Two important methodological principles are involved: (1) collecting multiple kinds of data with multiple methods; and (2) collecting comparison data. Student needs can be…

  3. Evidence-Based Clinical Voice Assessment: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nelson; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie; Eadie, Tanya; Sivasankar, M. Preeti; Mehta, Daryush; Paul, Diane; Hillman, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what research evidence exists to support the use of voice measures in the clinical assessment of patients with voice disorders. Method: The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) National Center for Evidence-Based Practice in Communication Disorders staff searched 29 databases for peer-reviewed English-language…

  4. Testing keywords internationally to define and apply undergraduate assessment standards in art and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Harland

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available What language should be featured in assessment standards for international students? Have universities adjusted their assessment methods sufficiently to match the increased demand for studying abroad? How might art and design benefit from a more stable definition of standards? These are some questions this paper seeks to address by reporting the results of recent pedagogic research at the School of the Arts, Loughborough University, in the United Kingdom. Language use is at the heart of this issue, yet it is generally overlooked as an essential tool that links assessment, feedback and action planning for international students. The paper reveals existing and new data that builds on research since 2009, aimed at improving students’ assessment literacy. Recommendations are offered to stimulate local and global discussion about keyword use for defining undergraduate assessment standards in art and design.

  5. Clinical Trial Design for HIV Prevention Research: Determining Standards of Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Liza; Zwerski, Sheryl

    2015-06-01

    This article seeks to advance ethical dialogue on choosing standards of prevention in clinical trials testing improved biomedical prevention methods for HIV. The stakes in this area of research are high, given the continued high rates of infection in many countries and the budget limitations that have constrained efforts to expand treatment for all who are currently HIV-infected. New prevention methods are still needed; at the same time, some existing prevention and treatment interventions have been proven effective but are not yet widely available in the countries where they most urgently needed. The ethical tensions in this field of clinical research are well known and have been the subject of extensive debate. There is no single clinical trial design that can optimize all the ethically important goals and commitments involved in research. Several recent articles have described the current ethical difficulties in designing HIV prevention trials, especially in resource limited settings; however, there is no consensus on how to handle clinical trial design decisions, and existing international ethical guidelines offer conflicting advice. This article acknowledges these deep ethical dilemmas and moves beyond a simple descriptive approach to advance an organized method for considering what clinical trial designs will be ethically acceptable for HIV prevention trials, balancing the relevant criteria and providing justification for specific design decisions. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  6. Quality assessment of randomized clinical trial in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Giulliano Peixoto; Barbosa, Fabiano Timbó; Barbosa, Luciano Timbó; Duarte, José Lira

    2009-03-01

    A randomized clinical trial is a prospective study that compares the effect and value of interventions in human beings, of one or more groups vs. a control group. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of published randomized clinical trials in Intensive care in Brazil. All randomized clinical trials in intensive care found by manual search in Revista Brasileira de Terapia Intensiva from January 2001 to March 2008 were assessed to evaluate their description by the quality scale. Descriptive statistics and a 95 % confidence interval were used for the primary outcome. Our primary outcome was the randomized clinical trial quality. Our search found 185 original articles, of which 14 were randomized clinical trials. Only one original article (7.1%) showed good quality. There was no statistical significance between the collected data and the data shown in the hypothesis of this search. It can be concluded that in the sample of assessed articles 7% of the randomized clinical trials in intensive care published in a single intensive care journal in Brazil, present good methodological quality.

  7. Simulation with standardized patients to prepare undergraduate nursing students for mental health clinical practice: An integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øgård-Repål, Anita; De Presno, Åsne Knutson; Fossum, Mariann

    2018-04-22

    To evaluate the available evidence supporting the efficacy of using simulation with standardized patients to prepare nursing students for mental health clinical practice. Integrative literature review. A systematic search of the electronic databases CINAHL (EBSCOhost), Embase, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and SveMed+ was conducted to identify empirical studies published until November 2016. Multiple search terms were used. Original empirical studies published in English and exploring undergraduate nursing students' experiences of simulation with standardized patients as preparation for mental health nursing practice were included. A search of reference lists and gray literature was also conducted. In total, 1677 studies were retrieved; the full texts of 78 were screened by 2 of the authors, and 6 studies reminded in the review. The authors independently reviewed the studies in three stages by screening the titles, abstracts, and full texts, and the quality of the included studies was assessed in the final stage. Design-specific checklists were used for quality appraisal. The thematic synthesizing method was used to summarize the findings of the included studies. The studies used four different research designs, both qualitative and quantitative. All studies scored fairly low in the quality appraisal. The five themes identified were enhanced confidence, clinical skills, anxiety regarding the unknown, demystification, and self-awareness. The findings of this study indicate that simulation with standardized patients could decrease students' anxiety level, shatter pre-assumptions, and increase self-confidence and self-awareness before entering clinical practice in mental health. More high-quality studies with larger sample sizes are required because of the limited evidence provided by the six studies in the present review. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Efficacy of Standardized Patient Feedback in Clinical Teaching: A Mixed Methods Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Doyle Howley, PhD

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of oral feedback from standardized patients on medical students’ overall perceptions of an educational exercise. We chose a mixed-methods approach to better understand the following research questions: Does satisfaction with the standardized patient exercise differ among those students who receive oral feedback and those who do not? What is the quality of oral feedback provided by standardized patients? Procedures. In order to address the first question, a basic randomized design comparing treatment (or those receiving SP feedback to control (those not receiving SP feedback was conducted. To address the second question, students in the treatment group were surveyed about their impressions of the quality of the feedback provided to them by their SP. One hundred and thirty six first year medical students were divided into treatment and control groups and interviewed one standardized patient during a single 20-minute encounter. Standardized patients were trained to simulate one of two outpatient cases and provide feedback using standard training materials. Both treatment and control groups completed a rating scale and questionnaire regarding their satisfaction with the encounter and students in the treatment group responded to additional questions regarding the quality of the SP feedback. Results. A one-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA revealed significant differences among control and treatment groups on the seven combined dependent variables, Wilks’ =.890, F(7, 127=2.25, p<.034, ?2=.110. Students reported that the quality of SP feedback was very strong and additional qualitative analysis revealed further evidence to support the efficacy of providing oral SP feedback in a formative pre-clinical educational activity.

  9. Home pregnancy test compared to standard-of-care ultrasound dating in the assessment of pregnancy duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S; Shaw, R; Parkinson, P; Ellis, J; Buchanan, P; Zinaman, M

    2011-02-01

    To determine the level of agreement between the Clearblue Digital Pregnancy Test with Conception Indicator home pregnancy test and standard-of-care ultrasound in assessing pregnancy duration in a real-life, observational setting encompassing routine, clinical care. This was a prospective observational study of non-pregnant women seeking conception. Women collected daily urine samples from day 1 of their next menstrual cycle. If any volunteer became pregnant, daily urine samples continued to be collected for 43 days after the LH surge. Samples from day -7 to day +28 relative to the expected period (LH surge + 15 days) were tested using the home pregnancy test. This categorised any resulting pregnancies into one of three groups: 1-2 weeks, 2-3 weeks, and 3+ weeks since conception. Information from the standard UK ultrasound dating scan was also recorded by the midwife, including the expected delivery date according to ultrasound and the expected delivery date according to LMP. Full data were available from 52 pregnant women who had conceived naturally. During the study analysis, 4786 urine samples were cross-compared with 52 routine 12-week NHS ultrasound assessments and the level of agreement between home pregnancy testing and standard-of-care ultrasound in determining pregnancy duration was calculated. The agreement between the gestational age as calculated by the home pregnancy test result and the exact midwife-recorded gestational age using ultrasound was 82.3%. However, when a ± 5-day range was applied to the ultrasound reading (as per routine UK clinical practice), the level of agreement was 98%. The home pregnancy test provides a significantly high (98%) level of agreement with standard-of-care ultrasound when assessing pregnancy duration in a real-life, observational setting which closely mirrors daily clinical practice.

  10. Clinical Outcome Assessments: Conceptual Foundation-Report of the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment - Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Marc K; Powers, John H; Hobart, Jeremy; Patrick, Donald; Marquis, Patrick; Vamvakas, Spiros; Isaac, Maria; Molsen, Elizabeth; Cano, Stefan; Burke, Laurie B

    2015-09-01

    An outcome assessment, the patient assessment used in an endpoint, is the measuring instrument that provides a rating or score (categorical or continuous) that is intended to represent some aspect of the patient's health status. Outcome assessments are used to define efficacy endpoints when developing a therapy for a disease or condition. Most efficacy endpoints are based on specified clinical assessments of patients. When clinical assessments are used as clinical trial outcomes, they are called clinical outcome assessments (COAs). COAs include any assessment that may be influenced by human choices, judgment, or motivation. COAs must be well-defined and possess adequate measurement properties to demonstrate (directly or indirectly) the benefits of a treatment. In contrast, a biomarker assessment is one that is subject to little, if any, patient motivational or rater judgmental influence. This is the first of two reports by the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment - Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force. This report provides foundational definitions important for an understanding of COA measurement principles. The foundation provided in this report includes what it means to demonstrate a beneficial effect, how assessments of patients relate to the objective of showing a treatment's benefit, and how these assessments are used in clinical trial endpoints. In addition, this report describes intrinsic attributes of patient assessments and clinical trial factors that can affect the properties of the measurements. These factors should be considered when developing or refining assessments. These considerations will aid investigators designing trials in their choice of using an existing assessment or developing a new outcome assessment. Although the focus of this report is on the development of a new COA to define endpoints in a clinical trial, these principles may be applied more generally. A critical element in appraising or developing a COA is to

  11. Caries assessment: establishing mathematical link of clinical and benchtop method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaechi, Bennett T.

    2009-02-01

    It is well established that the development of new technologies for early detection and quantitative monitoring of dental caries at its early stage could provide health and economic benefits ranging from timely preventive interventions to reduction of the time required for clinical trials of anti-caries agents. However, the new technologies currently used in clinical setting cannot assess and monitor caries using the actual mineral concentration within the lesion, while a laboratory-based microcomputed tomography (MCT) has been shown to possess this capability. Thus we envision the establishment of mathematical equations relating the measurements of each of the clinical technologies to that of MCT will enable the mineral concentration of lesions detected and assessed in clinical practice to be extrapolated from the equation, and this will facilitate preventitive care in dentistry to lower treatment cost. We utilize MCT and the two prominent clinical caries assessment devices (Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence [QLF] and Diagnodent) to longitudinally monitor the development of caries in a continuous flow mixed-organisms biofilm model (artificial mouth), and then used the collected data to establish mathematical equation relating the measurements of each of the clinical technologies to that of MCT. A linear correlation was observed between the measurements of MicroCT and that of QLF and Diagnodent. Thus mineral density in a carious lesion detected and measured using QLF or Diagnodent can be extrapolated using the developed equation. This highlights the usefulness of MCT for monitoring the progress of an early caries being treated with therapeutic agents in clinical practice or trials.

  12. Standardization of Data for Clinical Use and Research in Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Noonan, Vanessa K.

    2016-01-01

    Increased survival after spinal cord injury (SCI) worldwide has enhanced the need for quality data that can be compared and shared between centers, countries, as well as across research studies, to better understand how best to prevent and treat SCI. Such data should be standardized and be able to be uniformly collected at any SCI center or within any SCI study. Standardization will make it possible to collect information from larger SCI populations for multi-center research studies. With this aim, the international SCI community has obtained consensus regarding the best available data and measures for use in SCI clinical practice and research. Reporting of SCI data is likewise standardized. Data elements are continuously updated and developed using an open and transparent process. There are ongoing internal, as well as external review processes, where all interested parties are encouraged to participate. The purpose of this review paper is to provide an overview of the initiatives to standardize data including the International Spinal Cord Society’s International SCI Data Sets and the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Common Data Elements Project within SCI and discuss future opportunities. PMID:27529284

  13. Setting a Minimum Standard of Care in Clinical Trials: Human Rights and Bioethics as Complementary Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouf, Fatma E; Esplin, Bryn S

    2015-06-11

    For the past few decades, there has been intense debate in bioethics about the standard of care that should be provided in clinical trials conducted in developing countries. Some interpret the Declaration of Helsinki to mean that control groups should receive the best intervention available worldwide, while others interpret this and other international guidelines to mean the best local standard of care. Questions of justice are particularly relevant where limited resources mean that the local standard of care is no care at all. Introducing human rights law into this complex and longstanding debate adds a new and important perspective. Through non-derogable rights, including the core obligations of the right to health, human rights law can help set a minimum standard of care. Copyright 2015 Marouf and Esplin. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  14. Clinical application of Assessment of Parenting Competencies (APC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl

    This paper is part of a symposium on music therapy with families with Kirsi Tuomi as Chair. It revolves around the clinical application of a new music therapy assessment model on parent-child interaction and parenting competencies. APC was developed for emotional neglected children...... and their parents at a family care center that was considered an alternative to removal of child custody. However, as this is a very diverse population with many different both psychiatric and developmental difficulties, the APC might be applicable to other population such as families at child psychiatry units......, child somatic hospitals, centers for refuges and other populations where it would be clinical relevant to assess the parent-child interaction. APC is an observational and improvisational based assessment model evaluating dyads of parent and child (child age range is 5-12). It produces information...

  15. Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs, psychiatry and the Clinical assessment of Skills and Competencies (CASCSame Evidence, Different Judgement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwaha Steven

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE, originally developed in the 1970's, has been hailed as the "gold standard" of clinical assessments for medical students and is used within medical schools throughout the world. The Clinical assessment of Skills and Competencies (CASC is an OSCE used as a clinical examination gateway, granting access to becoming a senior Psychiatrist in the UK. Discussion Van der Vleuten's utility model is used to examine the CASC from the viewpoint of a senior psychiatrist. Reliability may be equivalent to more traditional examinations. Whilst the CASC is likely to have content validity, other forms of validity are untested and authenticity is poor. Educational impact has the potential to change facets of psychiatric professionalism and influence future patient care. There are doubts about acceptability from candidates and more senior psychiatrists. Summary Whilst OSCEs may be the best choice for medical student examinations, their use in post graduate psychiatric examination in the UK is subject to challenge on the grounds of validity, authenticity and educational impact.

  16. Evaluation of dental restorations: a comparative study between clinical and digital photographic assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, G; Silva, F; Angel, P; Oliveira, O B; Fresno, M C; Cisternas, P; Fernandez, E; Estay, J; Martin, J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a direct clinical evaluation method with an indirect digital photographic method in assessing the quality of dental restorations. Seven parameters (color, occlusal marginal adaptation, anatomy form, roughness, occlusal marginal stain, luster, and secondary caries) were assessed in 89 Class I and Class II restorations from 36 adults using the modified US Public Health Service/Ryge criteria. Standardized photographs of the same restorations were digitally processed by Adobe Photoshop software, separated into the following four groups and assessed by two calibrated examiners: Group A: The original photograph displayed at 100%, without modifications (IMG100); Group B: Formed by images enlarged at 150% (IMG150); Group C: Formed by digital photographs displayed at 100% (mIMG100), with digital modifications (levels adjustment, shadow and highlight correction, color balance, unsharp Mask); and Group D: Formed by enlarged photographs displayed at 150% with modifications (mIMG150), with the same adjustments made to Group C. Photographs were assessed on a calibrated screen (Macbook) by two calibrated clinicians, and the results were statistically analyzed using Wilcoxon tests (SSPS 11.5) at 95% CI. The photographic method produced higher reliability levels than the direct clinical method in all parameters. The evaluation of digital images is more consistent with clinical assessment when restorations present some moderate defect (Bravo) and less consistent when restorations are clinically classified as either satisfactory (Alpha) or in cases of severe defects (Charlie). The digital photographic method is a useful tool for assessing the quality of dental restorations, providing information that goes unnoticed with the visual-tactile clinical examination method. Additionally, when analyzing restorations using the Ryge modified criteria, the digital photographic method reveals a significant increase of defects compared to those

  17. Comparative effects of photodynamic therapy mediated by curcumin on standard and clinical isolate of Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonon, Caroline C; Paschoal, Marco Aurélio; Correia, Marilia; Spolidório, Denise M P; Bagnato, Vanderlei S; Giusti, Juçaíra S M; Santos-Pinto, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was investigate the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using curcumin (C) as a photosensitizing agent irradiated with an LED (L) in the blue wavelength as a light source on a standard and clinical isolate of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) in a planktonic suspension model. Suspensions of both strains were divided into 4 groups as follows: absence of C and L (control group: C-L-), with C and without L (C group: C+L-), absence of C with L (L group: C-L+) and presence of C and L (PDT group: C+L+). Three different concentrations of curcumin (0.75 mg/ml, 1.5 mg/ml and 3 mg/ml) and three light fluences of studied light source (24, 48 and 72 J cm(-2)) were tested. Aliquots of each studied group was plated in BHI agar and submitted to colony forming units counting (CFU/ml) and the data transformed into logarithmical scale. A high photoinactivation rate of more than 70% was verified to standard S. mutans strain submitted to PDT whereas the clinical isolate showed a lower sensitivity to all the associations of curcumin and LED. A slight bacterial reduction was verified to C+L- and C-L+, demonstrating no toxic effects to the isolated application of light and photosensitizer to both S. mutans strains tested. Photodynamic therapy using a combination of curcumin and blue LED presented a substantial antimicrobial effect on S. mutans standard strain in a planktonic suspension model with a less pronounced effect on its clinical isolate counterparts due to resistance to this alternative approach. Alternative antimicrobial approaches, as photodynamic therapy, should be encouraged due to optimal results against cariogenic bacteria aiming to prevent or treat dental caries.

  18. Standardization and classification of In vitro biofilm formation by clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Kumar Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus is Gram-positive bacterium commonly associated with nosocomial infections. The development of biofilm exhibiting drug resistance especially in foreign body associated infections has enabled the bacterium to draw considerable attention. However, till date, consensus guidelines for in vitro biofilm quantitation and categorization criterion for the bacterial isolates based on biofilm-forming capacity are lacking. Therefore, it was intended to standardize in vitro biofilm formation by clinical isolates of S. aureus and then to classify them on the basis of their biofilm-forming capacity. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted for biofilm quantitation by tissue culture plate (TCP assay employing 61 strains of S. aureus isolated from clinical samples during May 2015– December 2015 wherein several factors influencing the biofilm formation were optimized. Therefore, it was intended to propose a biofilm classification criteria based on the standard deviation multiples of the control differentiating them into non, low, medium, and high biofilm formers. Results: Brain-heart infusion broth was found to be more effective in biofilm formation compared to trypticase soy broth. Heat fixation was more effective than chemical fixation. Although, individually, glucose, sucrose, and sodium chloride (NaCl had no significant effect on biofilm formation, a statistically significant increase in absorbance was observed after using the supplement mix consisting of 222.2 mM glucose, 116.9 mM sucrose, and 1000 mM NaCl (P = 0.037. Conclusions: The present study puts forth a standardized in vitro TCP assay for biofilm biomass quantitation and categorization criteria for clinical isolates of S. aureus based on their biofilm-forming capacity. The proposed in vitro technique may be further evaluated for its usefulness in the management of persistent infections caused by the bacterium.

  19. Basic Laparoscopic Skills Assessment Study: Validation and Standard Setting among Canadian Urology Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason Y; Andonian, Sero; Pace, Kenneth T; Grober, Ethan

    2017-06-01

    As urology training programs move to a competency based medical education model, iterative assessments with objective standards will be required. To develop a valid set of technical skills standards we initiated a national skills assessment study focusing initially on laparoscopic skills. Between February 2014 and March 2016 the basic laparoscopic skill of Canadian urology trainees and attending urologists was assessed using 4 standardized tasks from the AUA (American Urological Association) BLUS (Basic Laparoscopic Urological Surgery) curriculum, including peg transfer, pattern cutting, suturing and knot tying, and vascular clip applying. All performances were video recorded and assessed using 3 methods, including time and error based scoring, expert global rating scores and C-SATS (Crowd-Sourced Assessments of Technical Skill Global Rating Scale), a novel, crowd sourced assessment platform. Different methods of standard setting were used to develop pass-fail cut points. Six attending urologists and 99 trainees completed testing. Reported laparoscopic experience and training level correlated with performance (p standard setting methods to define pass-fail cut points for all 4 AUA BLUS tasks. The 4 AUA BLUS tasks demonstrated good construct validity evidence for use in assessing basic laparoscopic skill. Performance scores using the novel C-SATS platform correlated well with traditional time-consuming methods of assessment. Various standard setting methods were used to develop pass-fail cut points for educators to use when making formative and summative assessments of basic laparoscopic skill. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Emission standards versus immission standards for assessing the impact of urban drainage on ephemeral receiving water bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freni, Gabriele; Mannina, Giorgio; Viviani, Gaspare

    2010-01-01

    In the past, emission standard indicators have been adopted by environmental regulation authorities in order to preserve the quality of a receiving water body. Such indicators are based on the frequency or magnitude of a polluted discharge that may be continuous or intermittent. In order to properly maintain the quality of receiving waters, the Water Framework Directive, following the basic ideas of British Urban Pollution Manual, has been established. The Directive has overtaken the emission-standard concept, substituting it with the stream-standard concept that fixes discharge limits for each polluting substance depending on the self-depurative characteristics of receiving waters. Stream-standard assessment requires the deployment of measurement campaigns that can be very expensive; furthermore, the measurement campaigns are usually not able to provide a link between the receiving water quality and the polluting sources. Therefore, it would be very useful to find a correlation between the quality status of the natural waters and the emission-based indicators. Thus, this study is aimed to finding a possible connection between the receiving water quality indicators drawn by environmental regulation authorities and emission-based indicators while considering both continuous (i.e. from the wastewater treatment plants) and intermittent pollution discharges (mainly from combined sewer overflows). Such research has been carried out by means of long-term analysis adopting a holistic modelling approach. The different parts of the integrated urban drainage system were modelled by a parsimonious integrated model. The analysis was applied to an ephemeral river bounding Bologna (Italy). The study concluded that the correlation between receiving water quality and polluting emissions cannot be generally stated. Nevertheless, specific analyses on polluting emissions were pointed out in the study highlighting cause-effect link between polluting sources and receiving water quality.

  1. [Nomenclature and classification of complications. Standard procedure at the Heidelberg University Orthopedic Clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, K L; Clauss, M

    1999-03-01

    In order to get a better data management of complications in orthopedic surgery and in order to get comparable statistics a standardisation of nomenclature and classification of complications is demanded since 1.1.1997. The Orthopedic University Clinic of Heidelberg started with a register of all early complications of all inpatients. According to a standardized nomenclature all occurred complications the doctors put in the data of complications in a database. These data were controlled, complemented and classified by members of the quality management group. This guideline consists of five parts: catalogue of diagnoses, general and special definitions, classification and an allocation table of diagnoses to grades of severity.

  2. Evaluation of an eportfolio for the assessment of clinical competence in a baccalaureate nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Bernard M; MacPhee, Maura; Jackson, Cathryn

    2013-10-01

    This paper reports a study undertaken to evaluate the implementation of an electronic portfolio (eportfolio) tool for the assessment of clinical competence in a Bachelor of Science in Nursing program. Baccalaureate nursing programs increasingly use information and communications technologies to support student learning, assess and record progress. Portfolio based practice assessment and electronic portfolios represent growing trends to enhance learning via student reflection and self-identification of further learning needs. Using an action-research process, a mixed-methods evaluation strategy explored the efficacy of the eportfolio in its second year of use. Website tracking analytics and descriptive statistics were used to explore trends in eportfolio usage. Instructor and student surveys and focus groups were carried out at the end of the second year. Instructors valued the eportfolios convenience, improved transparency, an improved ability to track student progress, enhanced theory-practice links, and the competency based assessment framework. Students valued accessibility and convenience, but expressed concerns over assessment data openness and processes for standardization. Both groups felt that the eportfolio navigation required simplification. Electronic portfolios represent a technological evolution from paper-based clinical assessment systems. Although there appear to be many student and instructor advantages in using eportfolios, to maximize successful implementation, clinical teachers require additional training in this new pedagogic approach. Strategies to assist an institutional culture shift towards more transparent assessment processes may also need consideration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of the gold standard of hemoglobin measurement with the clinical standard (BGA) and noninvasive hemoglobin measurement (SpHb) in small children: a prospective diagnostic observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenmeier, Eva; Bellosevich, Sophia; Mauff, Susanne; Schmidtmann, Irene; Eli, Michael; Pestel, Gunther; Noppens, Ruediger R

    2015-10-01

    Collecting a blood sample is usually necessary to measure hemoglobin levels in children. Especially in small children, noninvasively measuring the hemoglobin level could be extraordinarily helpful, but its precision and accuracy in the clinical environment remain unclear. In this study, noninvasive hemoglobin measurement and blood gas analysis were compared to hemoglobin measurement in a clinical laboratory. In 60 healthy preoperative children (0.2-7.6 years old), hemoglobin was measured using a noninvasive method (SpHb; Radical-7 Pulse Co-Oximeter), a blood gas analyzer (clinical standard, BGAHb; ABL 800 Flex), and a laboratory hematology analyzer (reference method, labHb; Siemens Advia). Agreement between the results was assessed by Bland-Altman analysis and by determining the percentage of outliers. Sixty SpHb measurements, 60 labHb measurements, and 59 BGAHb measurements were evaluated. In 38% of the children, the location of the SpHb sensor had to be changed more than twice for the signal quality to be sufficient. The bias/limits of agreement between SpHb and labHb were -0.65/-3.4 to 2.1 g·dl(-1) . Forty-four percent of the SpHb values differed from the reference value by more than 1 g·dl(-1) . Age, difficulty of measurement, and the perfusion index (PI) had no influence on the accuracy of SpHb. The bias/limits of agreement between BGAHb and labHb were 1.14/-1.6 to 3.9 g·dl(-1) . Furthermore, 66% of the BGAHb values differed from the reference values by more than 1 g·dl(-1) . The absolute mean difference between SpHb and labHb (1.1 g·dl(-1) ) was smaller than the absolute mean difference between BGAHb and labHb (1.5 g·dl(-1) /P = 0.024). Noninvasive measurement of hemoglobin agrees more with the reference method than the measurement of hemoglobin using a blood gas analyzer. However, both methods can show clinically relevant differences from the reference method (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01693016). © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Standardization in clinical enzymology: a challenge for the theory of metrological traceability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infusino, Ilenia; Schumann, Gerhard; Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Panteghini, Mauro

    2010-03-01

    The goal of standardization for measurement of the catalytic concentration of enzymes is to achieve comparable results in human samples, independent of the reagent kits, instruments, and laboratory where the assay is performed. To pursue this objective, the IFCC has established reference systems for the most important clinical enzymes. These systems are based on the following requirements: a) reference methods, well described and evaluated extensively; b) suitable reference materials; and c) reference laboratories operating in a highly controlled manner. When these reference systems are used appropriately, the diagnostic industry can assign traceable values to commercial calibrators. Clinical laboratories that use procedures with validated calibrators to measure human specimens can now obtain values that are traceable to higher-order reference procedures. These reference systems constitute the structure of the traceability chain to which the routine methods can be linked via an appropriate calibration process, provided that they have a comparable specificity (i.e., they are measuring the same catalytic quantity).

  5. Integrated monitoring: Setting new standards for the next decade of clinical trial practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Rai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The new age clinical research professional is now geared toward an "integrated monitoring" approach. A number of critical activities at the site level and at the sponsor′s organization need convergence to harness rich dividends in early study start and quick close of the study. The field monitor needs full integration to ensure standard of care, train the site in protocol, select the right site, ensure regulatory support, ensure excellent project management skills, coach, support the logistics team, manage the vendor, ensure good documentation practices, develop patient recruitment and retention, lean the applicable process, as well as ensure effective site management amongst the myriad activities assigned toward developing the drug in the clinic.

  6. Representation of Functional Status Concepts from Clinical Documents and Social Media Sources by Standard Terminologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Jinqiu; Mohanty, April F; Rashmi, V H; Weir, Charlene R; Bray, Bruce E; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Patient-reported functional status is widely recognized as an important patient-centered outcome that adds value to medical care, research, and quality improvement. Functional status outcomes are, however, not routinely or uniformly collected in the medical record, except in certain small patient populations (e.g. geriatrics, nursing home residents). To utilize patient reported functional status for clinical research and practice, we manually collected 2,763 terms from clinical records and social media sites and modeled them on the widely used Short Form-36 Health Survey. We then examined the coverage of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) for these functional status terms through automated mapping. Most terms (85.9%) did not have exact matches in the UMLS. The partial matches were prevalent, however, they typically did not capture the terms' exact semantics. Our study suggests that there is a need to extend existing standard terminologies to incorporate functional status terms used by patients and clinicians.

  7. A Serious Game for Clinical Assessment of Cognitive Status: Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Tiffany; Chignell, Mark; Tierney, Mary C; Lee, Jacques

    2016-05-27

    We propose the use of serious games to screen for abnormal cognitive status in situations where it may be too costly or impractical to use standard cognitive assessments (eg, emergency departments). If validated, serious games in health care could enable broader availability of efficient and engaging cognitive screening. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of a game-based cognitive assessment delivered on tablet technology to a clinical sample and to conduct preliminary validation against standard mental status tools commonly used in elderly populations. We carried out a feasibility study in a hospital emergency department to evaluate the use of a serious game by elderly adults (N=146; age: mean 80.59, SD 6.00, range 70-94 years). We correlated game performance against a number of standard assessments, including the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), and the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM). After a series of modifications, the game could be used by a wide range of elderly patients in the emergency department demonstrating its feasibility for use with these users. Of 146 patients, 141 (96.6%) consented to participate and played our serious game. Refusals to play the game were typically due to concerns of family members rather than unwillingness of the patient to play the game. Performance on the serious game correlated significantly with the MoCA (r=-.339, P games in a clinical setting. Further research is required to demonstrate the validity and reliability of game-based assessments for clinical decision making.

  8. A Serious Game for Clinical Assessment of Cognitive Status: Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chignell, Mark; Tierney, Mary C.; Lee, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Background We propose the use of serious games to screen for abnormal cognitive status in situations where it may be too costly or impractical to use standard cognitive assessments (eg, emergency departments). If validated, serious games in health care could enable broader availability of efficient and engaging cognitive screening. Objective The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of a game-based cognitive assessment delivered on tablet technology to a clinical sample and to conduct preliminary validation against standard mental status tools commonly used in elderly populations. Methods We carried out a feasibility study in a hospital emergency department to evaluate the use of a serious game by elderly adults (N=146; age: mean 80.59, SD 6.00, range 70-94 years). We correlated game performance against a number of standard assessments, including the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), and the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM). Results After a series of modifications, the game could be used by a wide range of elderly patients in the emergency department demonstrating its feasibility for use with these users. Of 146 patients, 141 (96.6%) consented to participate and played our serious game. Refusals to play the game were typically due to concerns of family members rather than unwillingness of the patient to play the game. Performance on the serious game correlated significantly with the MoCA (r=–.339, P games in a clinical setting. Further research is required to demonstrate the validity and reliability of game-based assessments for clinical decision making. PMID:27234145

  9. Health Literacy Assessment in an Otolaryngology Clinic Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megwalu, Uchechukwu C; Lee, Jennifer Y

    2016-12-01

    To assess health literacy in an adult tertiary care otolaryngology clinic population and to explore potential determinants of inadequate health literacy. Cross-sectional study. Tertiary care otolaryngology clinic. The study population included all adult patients treated at 3 of Stanford University's adult otolaryngology clinic sites between March 1 and 11, 2016. Data were collected via an anonymous questionnaire. Health literacy was assessed with the Brief Health Literacy Screen. Ten percent of patients had inadequate health literacy. White race (odds ratio [OR], 0.23) and having English as the primary language (OR, 0.12) were associated with adequate health literacy, while high school or lower level of education (OR, 3.2) was associated with inadequate health literacy. Age, sex, and Hispanic ethnicity were not associated with health literacy. Our study highlights the need for health literacy screening in the otolaryngology clinic setting and identifies sociodemographic risk factors for inadequate health literacy. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of health literacy on patient outcomes and to test specific interventions to address health literacy and health outcomes. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  10. Photographing Injuries in the Acute Care Setting: Development and Evaluation of a Standardized Protocol for Research, Forensics, and Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemen, Elizabeth M; Rosen, Tony; Cline Schiroo, Justina A; Clark, Sunday; Mulcare, Mary R; Stern, Michael E; Mysliwiec, Regina; Flomenbaum, Neal E; Lachs, Mark S; Hargarten, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Photographing injuries in the acute setting allows for improved documentation as well as assessment by clinicians and others who have not personally examined a patient. This tool is important, particularly for telemedicine, tracking of wound healing, the evaluation of potential abuse, and injury research. Despite this, protocols to ensure standardization of photography in clinical practice, forensics, or research have not been published. In preparation for a study of injury patterns in elder abuse and geriatric falls, our goal was to develop and evaluate a protocol for standardized photography of injuries that may be broadly applied. We conducted a literature review for techniques and standards in medical, forensic, and legal photography. We developed a novel protocol describing types of photographs and body positioning for eight body regions, including instructional diagrams. We revised it iteratively in consultation with experts in medical photography; forensics; and elder, child, and domestic abuse. The resulting protocol requires a minimum of four photos of each injury at multiple distances with and without a ruler/color guide. To evaluate the protocol's efficacy, multiple research assistants without previous photography experience photographed injuries from a convenience sample of elderly patients presenting to a single large, urban, academic emergency department. A selection of these patients' images were then evaluated in a blinded fashion by four nontreating emergency medicine physicians and the inter-rater reliability between these physicians was calculated. Among the 131 injuries, from 53 patients, photographed by 18 photographers using this protocol, photographs of 25 injuries (10 bruises, seven lacerations, and eight abrasions) were used to assess characterization of the injury. Physicians' characterizations of the injuries were reliable for the size of the injury (κ = 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.77 to 1.00), side of the body (κ = 0.97, 95

  11. Clinical assessment of transthoracic echocardiography skills: a generalizability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldbrand Nielsen, Dorte; Jensen, Signe Lichtenstein; O'Neill, Lotte

    2015-02-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is a widely used cardiac imaging technique that all cardiologists should be able to perform competently. Traditionally, TTE competence has been assessed by unstructured observation or in test situations separated from daily clinical practice. An instrument for assessment of clinical TTE technical proficiency including a global rating score and a checklist score has previously shown reliability and validity in a standardised setting. As clinical test situations typically have several sources of error giving rise to variance in scores, a more thorough examination of the generalizability of the assessment instrument is needed. Nine physicians performed a TTE scan on the same three patients. Then, two raters rated all 27 TTE scans using the TTE technical assessment instrument in a fully crossed, all random generalizability study. Estimated variance components were calculated for both the global rating and checklist scores. Finally, dependability (phi) coefficients were also calculated for both outcomes in a decision study. For global rating scores, 66.6% of score variance can be ascribed to true differences in performance. For checklist scores this was 88.8%. The difference was primarily due to physician-rater interaction. Four random cases rated by one random rater resulted in a phi value of 0.81 for global ratings and two random cases rated by one random rater showed a phi value of 0.92 for checklist scores. Using the TTE checklist as opposed to the TTE global rating score had the effect of minimising the largest source of error variance in test scores. Two cases rated by one rater using the TTE checklist are sufficiently reliable for high stakes examinations. As global rating is less time consuming it could be considered performing four global rating assessments in addition to the checklist assessments to account for both reliability and content validity of the assessment.

  12. Assessing Professionalism: A Theoretical Framework for Defining Clinical Rotation Assessment Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage-Chan, Elizabeth

    Although widely accepted as an important graduate competence, professionalism is a challenging outcome to define and assess. Clinical rotations provide an excellent opportunity to develop student professionalism through the use of experiential learning and effective feedback, but without appropriate theoretical frameworks, clinical teachers may find it difficult to identify appropriate learning outcomes. The adage "I know it when I see it" is unhelpful in providing feedback and guidance for student improvement, and criteria that are more specifically defined would help students direct their own development. This study sought first to identify how clinical faculty in one institution currently assess professionalism, using retrospective analysis of material obtained in undergraduate teaching and faculty development sessions. Subsequently, a faculty workshop was held in which a round-table type discussion sought to develop these ideas and identify how professionalism assessment could be improved. The output of this session was a theoretical framework for teaching and assessing professionalism, providing example assessment criteria and ideas for clinical teaching. This includes categories such as client and colleague interaction, respect and trust, recognition of limitations, and understanding of different professional identities. Each category includes detailed descriptions of the knowledge, skills, and behaviors expected of students in these areas. The criteria were determined by engaging faculty in the development of the framework, and therefore they should represent a focused development of criteria already used to assess professionalism, and not a novel and unfamiliar set of assessment guidelines. The faculty-led nature of this framework is expected to facilitate implementation in clinical teaching.

  13. Assessing the Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility Standards in Global Value Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Thomsen, Peter

    This paper considers the issue of corporate social responsibility (CSR) standard impact assessment in global value chains. CSR standards have proliferated in recent years, and several studies have attempted to assess their effects on local producers, workers, and the environment in developing...... countries. However, much less attention has been paid to the “dark side” of impact assessment – the ethical and political dilemmas that arise in the process of carrying out impact studies. This paper addresses this gap in literature, arguing that impact assessments of CSR standards may do more harm than...... good to the intended beneficiaries - developing country firms, farmers, workers, and communities - unless these ethical and political dilemmas are given serious consideration....

  14. Background variability in standard clinical pathology biomarkers in beagle dogs instrumented with chronic indwelling telemetry devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Theodore J; Aulbach, Adam; O'Donohue, Kyle P; Yoder, Joshua D; Dalton, Jill A; Gauvin, David V

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary best practice recommendations in preclinical cardiovascular safety assessment promote 3Rs principles. This includes the employment of within-subjects experimental designs to evaluate discrete, acute doses of investigational new drugs, as well as the maintenance of stock colonies of appropriate large animal test systems. Such colony species are often tested repeatedly on independent studies with provision of appropriate recovery periods and requisite health status evaluations (e.g., physical examinations, electrocardiographic assessments, clinical pathology evaluations). To investigate the utility of the often reiterative process of pre- or inter-study clinical pathology testing to help ascertain health status of non-naïve, telemetered canines (beagle dogs), the present study collated the results of a randomly selected set of animals approximately every three months for a period of three years. Although occasionally a few routine hematology or clinical chemistry endpoints did demonstrate evidence of systematic trending over time, none of the observed fluctuations fell outside the range of expected biological variability, nor would have prevented assignment of any given animal to study. The present findings illustrate a high degree of consistency in routinely assessed clinical pathology parameters during the course of chronic telemetry instrumentation in the canine, including relative to historical control data in healthy, experimentally naïve animals of the same species and source, maintained under analogous laboratory conditions. The data suggest that routine assessment of such parameters for the purposes of facilitating judgments concerning suitability for study may represent a pursuit of little overall value, and which may be reasonably accomplished based on alternative, observation-based screening procedures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of a standardized training program on midwives’ ability to assess fetal heart anatomy by ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, Eric; Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine; Sved, Catarina; Gottvall, Tomas; Blomberg, Marie; Janerot-Sjoberg, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Studies of prenatal detection of congenital heart disease (CHD) in the UK, Italy, and Norway indicate that it should be possible to improve the prenatal detection rate of CHD in Sweden. These studies have shown that training programs, visualization of the outflow tracts and color-Doppler all can help to speed up and improve the detection rate and accuracy. We aimed to introduce a more accurate standardized fetal cardiac ultrasound screening protocol in Sweden. A novel pedagogical model for training midwives in standardized cardiac imaging was developed, a model using a think-aloud analysis during a pre- and post-course test and a subsequent group reflection. The self-estimated difficulties and knowledge gaps of two experienced and two beginner midwives were identified. A two-day course with mixed lectures, demonstrations and hands-on sessions was followed by a feedback session three months later consisting of an interview and check-up. The long-term effects were tested two years later. At the post-course test the self-assessed uncertainty was lower than at the pre-course test. The qualitative evaluation showed that the color Doppler images were difficult to interpret, but the training seems to have improved their ability to use the new technique. The ability to perform the method remained at the new level at follow-up both three months and two years later. Our results indicate that by implementing new imaging modalities and providing hands-on training, uncertainty can be reduced and examination time decreased, but they also show that continuous on-site training with clinical and technical back-up is important

  16. Assessment of alcoholic standard drinks using the Munich composite international diagnostic interview (M-CIDI): An evaluation and subsequent revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuitunen-Paul, Sören; Rehm, Jürgen; Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Kadrić, Firdeus; Kuitunen, Paula T; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Manthey, Jakob

    2017-09-01

    The quantity and frequency of alcohol consumption are crucial both in risk assessment as well as epidemiological and clinical research. Using the Munich Composite International Diagnostic Interview (M-CIDI), drinking amounts have been assessed in numerous large-scale studies. However, the accuracy of this assessment has rarely been evaluated. This study evaluates the relevance of drink categories and pouring sizes, and the factors used to convert actual drinks into standard drinks. We compare the M-CIDI to alternative drink assessment instruments and empirically validate drink categories using a general population sample (n = 3165 from Germany), primary care samples (n = 322 from Italy, n = 1189 from Germany), and a non-representative set of k = 22503 alcoholic beverages sold in Germany in 2010-2016. The M-CIDI supplement sheet displays more categories than other instruments (AUDIT, TLFB, WHO-CIDI). Beer, wine, and spirits represent the most prevalent categories in the samples. The suggested standard drink conversion factors were inconsistent for different pouring sizes of the same drink and, to a smaller extent, across drink categories. For the use in Germany and Italy, we propose the limiting of drink categories and pouring sizes, and a revision of the proposed standard drinks. We further suggest corresponding examinations and revisions in other cultures. © 2017 The Authors International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Treatment in a specialised out-patient mood disorder clinic v. standard out-patient treatment in the early course of bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Hansen, Hanne Vibe; Hvenegaard, Anne

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about whether treatment in a specialised out-patient mood disorder clinic improves long-term prognosis for patients discharged from initial psychiatric hospital admissions for bipolar disorder. AIMS: To assess the effect of treatment in a specialised out-patient mood...... disorder clinic v. standard decentralised psychiatric treatment among patients discharged from one of their first three psychiatric hospital admissions for bipolar disorder. METHOD: Patients discharged from their first, second or third hospital admission with a single manic episode or bipolar disorder were...... randomised to treatment in a specialised out-patient mood disorder clinic or standard care (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00253071). The primary outcome measure was readmission to hospital, which was obtained from the Danish Psychiatric Central Register. RESULTS: A total of 158 patients with mania/bipolar disorder...

  18. Assessing the challenges of multi-scope clinical research sites: an example from NIH HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Scott R; Cope, Marie T; Villa, Christie; Motevalli, Mahnaz; Utech, Jill; Schouten, Jeffrey T

    2014-04-01

    Large-scale, multi-network clinical trials are seen as a means for efficient and effective utilization of resources with greater responsiveness to new discoveries. Formal structures instituted within the National Institutes of Health (NIH) HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials facilitate collaboration and coordination across networks and emphasize an integrated approach to HIV/AIDS vaccine, prevention and therapeutics clinical trials. This study examines the joint usage of clinical research sites as means of gaining efficiency, extending capacity, and adding scientific value to the networks. A semi-structured questionnaire covering eight clinical management domains was administered to 74 (62% of sites) clinical site coordinators at single- and multi-network sites to identify challenges and efficiencies related to clinical trials management activities and coordination with multi-network units. Overall, respondents at multi-network sites did not report more challenges than single-network sites, but did report unique challenges to overcome including in the areas of study prioritization, community engagement, staff education and training, and policies and procedures. The majority of multi-network sites reported that such affiliations do allow for the consolidation and cost-sharing of research functions. Suggestions for increasing the efficiency or performance of multi-network sites included streamlining standards and requirements, consolidating protocol activation methods, using a single cross-network coordinating centre, and creating common budget and payment mechanisms. The results of this assessment provide important information to consider in the design and management of multi-network configurations for the NIH HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Networks, as well as others contemplating and promoting the concept of multi-network settings. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Assessing the population representativeness of colorectal cancer treatment clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhe He; Zhiwei Chen; George, Thomas J; Lipori, Gloria; Bian

    2016-08-01

    The generalizability (external validity) of clinical trials has long been a concern for both clinical research community as well as the general public. Results of trials that do not represent the target population may not be applicable to the broader patient population. In this study, we used a previously published metric Generalizability Index for Study Traits (GIST) to assess the population representativeness of colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment trials. Our analysis showed that the quantitative eligibility criteria of CRC trials are in general not restrictive. However, the qualitative eligibility criteria in these trials are with moderate or strict restrictions, which may impact their population representativeness of the real-world patient population.

  20. Inter-observer reliability assessments in time motion studies: the foundation for meaningful clinical workflow analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopetegui, Marcelo A; Bai, Shasha; Yen, Po-Yin; Lai, Albert; Embi, Peter; Payne, Philip R O

    2013-01-01

    Understanding clinical workflow is critical for researchers and healthcare decision makers. Current workflow studies tend to oversimplify and underrepresent the complexity of clinical workflow. Continuous observation time motion studies (TMS) could enhance clinical workflow studies by providing rich quantitative data required for in-depth workflow analyses. However, methodological inconsistencies have been reported in continuous observation TMS, potentially reducing the validity of TMS' data and limiting their contribution to the general state of knowledge. We believe that a cornerstone in standardizing TMS is to ensure the reliability of the human observers. In this manuscript we review the approaches for inter-observer reliability assessment (IORA) in a representative sample of TMS focusing on clinical workflow. We found that IORA is an uncommon practice, inconsistently reported, and often uses methods that provide partial and overestimated measures of agreement. Since a comprehensive approach to IORA is yet to be proposed and validated, we provide initial recommendations for IORA reporting in continuous observation TMS.

  1. Technical quality assessment of breast ultrasound according to American College of Radiology (ACR) Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Kyung Hee; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Young Ah; Son, Eun Ju; Oh, Ki Keun; Chung, Sun Yang

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the technical quality of breast ultrasound based on American College of Radiology(ACR) standards. Between March 2002 and July 2002, ninety three breast sonograms obtained from 73 institutions were evaluated based on ACR standards for the hardware, technical settings, labeling of the images and identification. Of 93 breast sonograms, a satisfactory compliance with all ACR standards in the performance of breast US examinations was documented in 31% while the remaining 69% did not fully meet all ACR standards. 4.3% of breast US examinations were performed with a convex transducers, and the focal zone was inappropriately positioned in 14.2%. Gray-scale gain was subjectively characterized as inappropriate in 26.9%, and the size of lesion was not measured in 7.5%. Anatomic location of lesions was inappropriately described in 9.3%. The orientation of an US transducer was not properly labeled on any images in 33.3%. Inadequate recording of patient's information was noted in 43.3%. 50% of sonograms at University medical centers and larger general hospitals fully met all ACR standards while 36.8% at radiologic clinics and 12.1% at other private clinics met all ACR standards. Overall, 69% of breast sonograms failed to meet the quality criteria of the ACR standards. Therefore, it is essential to educate the basic technical details in performing breast US for the quality control.

  2. Clinical value of single versus composite provocative clinical tests in the assessment of painful shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaffi, Fausto; Ciapetti, Alessandro; Carotti, Marina; Gasparini, Stefania; Filippucci, Emilio; Grassi, Walter

    2010-04-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate the clinical value of the provocative clinical tests and propose a composite index for the assessment of painful shoulder, using ultrasonography (US) as reference method. Two hundred three patients with painful shoulder underwent both clinical and US evaluations. The physical examination was carried out performing the Hawkins, Jobe, Patte, Gerber, and Speed tests. Each test was included in a composite index namely, SNAPSHOT (Simple Numeric Assessment of Pain by SHOulder Tests). The US examination was performed by a rheumatologist experienced in US and blinded to clinical findings. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, positive and negative likelihood ratio of each clinical test were calculated. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to assess the performance of the composite SNAPSHOT index. Sensitivity was low for the clinical diagnosis of all shoulder abnormalities. The highest sensitivity and smallest negative likelihood ratio were found for the Hawkins (63.88% and 0.50%) and Patte (62.21% and 0.52%) tests. Specificity was good for Speed (76.33%), Gerber (75.42%), and Patte (74.20%) tests. Patte and Speed tests were the most accurate (71.12% and 66.41%, respectively). The calculated area under the ROC curve related to the SNAPSHOT composite index was 0.881 +/- 0.026. With an optimal cut-off point of 3, the sensitivity and specificity were 75.8% and 87.5%, respectively. The results of the present study showed that SNAPSHOT is a feasible, informative and quantitative composite index for the assessment of painful shoulder in the clinical setting.

  3. An Objective Structured Clinical Exam to Assess Semiology Skills of Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Vitor Hugo; Morgado, Pedro; Gonçalves, Mónica; Costa, Liliana; Sousa, Nuno; Cerqueira, João José

    2016-12-30

    Mastery of history taking and physical exam skills is a key competence of medical students. Objective Structured Clinical Examinations are the gold standard to assess these competencies, but their implementation in Portugal is poorly documented. We describe the implementation and our seven years experience with a high-stakes Objective Structured Clinical Examination to assess these skills in the School of Medicine, University of Minho. Our Objective Structured Clinical Examination is in place since 2010 and has been subject to continuous improvements, including the adoption of a standard setting procedure and an increase in the number of stations. Grades in our exam are well distributed and discriminate among students. History taking grades are lower and have remained stable throughout the years while physical examination scores have risen. The exam is reliable, with internal consistency above 0.45 and a G-coefficient of 0.74. It is also feasible, with a total testing time of approximately 20 hours for 140 students, and the involvement of 18 standardized patients and 18 faculty assessors. More importantly, it was able to engage the students, who recognize its importance. The most important validity criterion of our, and any Objective Structured Clinical Examination, would be predictive validity,the ability to predict the performance of students in the clinical context. Our approach to a high-stakes Objective Structured Clinical Examination shows that it is feasible, reliable, valid and fair and can be implemented with success in the Portuguese setting.

  4. Developing an Evaluation Tool for Assessing Clinical Ethics Consultation Skills in Simulation Based Education: The ACES Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, Katherine; Parsi, Kayhan; McCarthy, Michael; Siddall, Viva Jo; Kuczewski, Mark

    2016-06-01

    The American Society for Bioethics and Humanities has created a quality attestation (QA) process for clinical ethics consultants; the pilot phase of reviewing portfolios has begun. One aspect of the QA process which is particularly challenging is assessing the interpersonal skills of individual clinical ethics consultants. We propose that using case simulation to evaluate clinical ethics consultants is an approach that can meet this need provided clear standards for assessment are identified. To this end, we developed the Assessing Clinical Ethics Skills (ACES) tool, which identifies and specifies specific behaviors that a clinical ethics consultant should demonstrate in an ethics case simulation. The aim is for the clinical ethics consultant or student to use a videotaped case simulation, along with the ACES tool scored by a trained rater, to demonstrate their competence as part of their QA portfolio. The development and piloting of the tool is described.

  5. Newly graduated doctors' competence in managing cardiopulmonary arrests assessed using a standardized Advanced Life Support (ALS) assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marianne Lidang; Hesselfeldt, R.; Rasmussen, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    AIM OF THE STUDY: Several studies using a variety of assessment approaches have demonstrated that young doctors possess insufficient resuscitation competence. The aims of this study were to assess newly graduated doctors' resuscitation competence against an internationally recognised standard...... and to study whether teaching site affects their resuscitation competence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The entire cohort of medical students from Copenhagen University expected to graduate in June 2006 was invited to participate in the study. Participants' ALS-competence was assessed using the Advanced Life Support...... Provider (ALS) examination standards as issued by the European Resuscitation Council (ERC). The emergency medicine course is conducted at three different university hospital teaching sites and teaching and assessment might vary across sites, despite the common end objectives regarding resuscitation...

  6. A Comprehensive Evaluation of Standardized Assessment Tools in the Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia and in the Assessment of Fibromyalgia Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad S. Boomershine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard assessments for fibromyalgia (FM diagnosis and core FM symptom domains are needed for biomarker development and treatment trials. Diagnostic and symptom assessments are reviewed and recommendations are made for standards. Recommendations for existing assessments include the American College of Rheumatology FM classification criteria using the manual tender point Survey for diagnosis, the brief pain inventory average pain visual analogue scale for pain intensity, the function subscale of the revised fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQR for physical function, the patient global impression of change and FIQR for overall/global improvement, the hospital anxiety and depression scale depression subscale for depression, the multiple ability self-report questionnaire for cognitive dysfunction, the fatigue severity scale for fatigue, the FIQR for multidimensional function/health-related quality of life, the jenkins sleep scale for sleep disturbance, and the fibromyalgia intensity score for tenderness. Forthcoming assessments including the FIQR for diagnosis, NIH PROMIS, and FIBRO Change scales are discussed.

  7. Extracting and standardizing medication information in clinical text - the MedEx-UIMA system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Min; Wu, Yonghui; Shah, Anushi; Priyanka, Priyanka; Denny, Joshua C; Xu, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Extraction of medication information embedded in clinical text is important for research using electronic health records (EHRs). However, most of current medication information extraction systems identify drug and signature entities without mapping them to standard representation. In this study, we introduced the open source Java implementation of MedEx, an existing high-performance medication information extraction system, based on the Unstructured Information Management Architecture (UIMA) framework. In addition, we developed new encoding modules in the MedEx-UIMA system, which mapped an extracted drug name/dose/form to both generalized and specific RxNorm concepts and translated drug frequency information to ISO standard. We processed 826 documents by both systems and verified that MedEx-UIMA and MedEx (the Python version) performed similarly by comparing both results. Using two manually annotated test sets that contained 300 drug entries from medication list and 300 drug entries from narrative reports, the MedEx-UIMA system achieved F-measures of 98.5% and 97.5% respectively for encoding drug names to corresponding RxNorm generic drug ingredients, and F-measures of 85.4% and 88.1% respectively for mapping drug names/dose/form to the most specific RxNorm concepts. It also achieved an F-measure of 90.4% for normalizing frequency information to ISO standard. The open source MedEx-UIMA system is freely available online at http://code.google.com/p/medex-uima/.

  8. New pricing approaches for bundled payments: Leveraging clinical standards and regional variations to target avoidable utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellsten, Erik; Chu, Scally; Crump, R Trafford; Yu, Kevin; Sutherland, Jason M

    2016-03-01

    Develop pricing models for bundled payments that draw inputs from clinician-defined best practice standards and benchmarks set from regional variations in utilization. Health care utilization and claims data for a cohort of incident Ontario ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke episodes. Episodes of care are created by linking incident stroke hospitalizations with subsequent health service utilization across multiple datasets. Costs are estimated for episodes of care and constituent service components using setting-specific case mix methodologies and provincial fee schedules. Costs are estimated for five areas of potentially avoidable utilization, derived from best practice standards set by an expert panel of stroke clinicians. Alternative approaches for setting normative prices for stroke episodes are developed using measures of potentially avoidable utilization and benchmarks established by the best performing regions. There are wide regional variations in the utilization of different health services within episodes of stroke care. Reconciling the best practice standards with regional utilization identifies significant amounts of potentially avoidable utilization. Normative pricing models for stroke episodes result in increasingly aggressive redistributions of funding. Bundled payment pilots to date have been based on the costs of historical service patterns, which effectively 'bake in' unwarranted and inefficient variations in utilization. This study demonstrates the feasibility of novel clinically informed episode pricing approaches that leverage these variations to target reductions in potentially avoidable utilization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. New semiquantitative assessment of 123I-FP-CIT by an anatomical standardization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Seiko; Yoshimura, Mana; Shindo, Hiroaki; Saito, Kazuhiro; Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Utsumi, Hiroya; Abe, Kimihiko

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated a new semiquantitative procedure to more easily and objectively estimate the striatal uptake of 123 I-FP-CIT in patients with Parkinsonian syndrome (PS) and essential tremor (ET), using an anatomical standardization method, the Neurostat. Eleven patients with PS and 8 with ET were examined by clinical assessment and 123 I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging. The modified Hoehn and Yahr Staging Scale and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) were used to assess the stage and severity of the disease. The co-registered MR and SPECT images were created with fusion software included in Neurostat. On the cross section, which shows the largest area of striate, irregular shaped regions of interest corresponding to the striate and occipital cortex were drawn. Then the ratio of specific striatal uptake to non-specific occipital cortex, V3''(F), was calculated. Another calculation was done by VOIClassic, which is a software included in Neurostat to estimate the counts per voxel of anatomically defined regions such as caudate nucleus, putamen, occipital cortex, and total cortex. Using these count data, the ratio of specific striatal uptake to non-specific occipital cortex, V3''(OC), and total cortex, V3''(TC), was calculated. A fair linear correlation was observed between V3''(OC) and V3''(F) (y=1.53x+1.40; r=0.756; p s =-0.816). However, V3''(OC) and V3''(TC) correlated less with UPDRS (r s =-0.667 and -0.645, respectively). Semiquantitative parameters, V3''(OC) and V3''(TC), calculated by VOIClassic including the Neurostat system are useful and easily calculable parameters as well as V3''(F) for the differential diagnosis of PS from ET. (author)

  10. New clinical validation method for automated sphygmomanometer: a proposal by Japan ISO-WG for sphygmomanometer standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasaki, Osamu; Asou, Yosuke; Takahashi, Yukio

    2007-12-01

    Owing to fast or stepwise cuff deflation, or measuring at places other than the upper arm, the clinical accuracy of most recent automated sphygmomanometers (auto-BPMs) cannot be validated by one-arm simultaneous comparison, which would be the only accurate validation method based on auscultation. Two main alternative methods are provided by current standards, that is, two-arm simultaneous comparison (method 1) and one-arm sequential comparison (method 2); however, the accuracy of these validation methods might not be sufficient to compensate for the suspicious accuracy in lateral blood pressure (BP) differences (LD) and/or BP variations (BPV) between the device and reference readings. Thus, the Japan ISO-WG for sphygmomanometer standards has been studying a new method that might improve validation accuracy (method 3). The purpose of this study is to determine the appropriateness of method 3 by comparing immunity to LD and BPV with those of the current validation methods (methods 1 and 2). The validation accuracy of the above three methods was assessed in human participants [N=120, 45+/-15.3 years (mean+/-SD)]. An oscillometric automated monitor, Omron HEM-762, was used as the tested device. When compared with the others, methods 1 and 3 showed a smaller intra-individual standard deviation of device error (SD1), suggesting their higher reproducibility of validation. The SD1 by method 2 (P=0.004) significantly correlated with the participant's BP, supporting our hypothesis that the increased SD of device error by method 2 is at least partially caused by essential BPV. Method 3 showed a significantly (P=0.0044) smaller interparticipant SD of device error (SD2), suggesting its higher interparticipant consistency of validation. Among the methods of validation of the clinical accuracy of auto-BPMs, method 3, which showed the highest reproducibility and highest interparticipant consistency, can be proposed as being the most appropriate.

  11. Milestones: a rapid assessment method for the Clinical Competency Committee

    OpenAIRE

    Nabors, Christopher; Forman, Leanne; Peterson, Stephen J.; Gennarelli, Melissa; Aronow, Wilbert S.; DeLorenzo, Lawrence; Chandy, Dipak; Ahn, Chul; Sule, Sachin; Stallings, Gary W.; Khera, Sahil; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Frishman, William H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Educational milestones are now used to assess the developmental progress of all U.S. graduate medical residents during training. Twice annually, each program?s Clinical Competency Committee (CCC) makes these determinations and reports its findings to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). The ideal way to conduct the CCC is not known. After finding that deliberations reliant upon the new milestones were time intensive, our internal medicine residency pr...

  12. Clinical significance of computed tomography assessment for third molar surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamori, Kenji; Tomihara, Kei; Noguchi, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Surgical extraction of the third molar is the most commonly performed surgical procedure in the clinical practice of oral surgery. Third molar surgery is warranted when there is inadequate space for eruption, malpositioning, or risk for cyst or odontogenic tumor formation. Preoperative assessment should include a detailed morphologic analysis of the third molar and its relationship to adjacent structures and surrounding tissues. Due to developments in medical engineering technology, computed ...

  13. Assessment of Thyroid Function: Towards an Integrated Laboratory - Clinical Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Stockigt, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory assessment of thyroid function is now often initiated with a low pre-test probability, by clinicians who may not have a detailed knowledge of current methodology or testing strategies. Skilled laboratory staff can significantly enhance the choice of appropriate tests and the accuracy of clinical response; such involvement requires both appropriate training and relevant information from the clinician. Measurement of the serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration with an a...

  14. Assessing biocomputational modelling in transforming clinical guidelines for osteoporosis management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Rainer; Viceconti, Marco; Stroetmann, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Biocomputational modelling as developed by the European Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) Initiative is the area of ICT most likely to revolutionise in the longer term the practice of medicine. Using the example of osteoporosis management, a socio-economic assessment framework is presented that captures how the transformation of clinical guidelines through VPH models can be evaluated. Applied to the Osteoporotic Virtual Physiological Human Project, a consequent benefit-cost analysis delivers promising results, both methodologically and substantially.

  15. Hand-held echocardiography: added value in clinical cardiological assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Ballo Piercarlo; Zacà Valerio; Barbati Riccardo; Galderisi Maurizio; Mondillo Sergio; Giannotti Giovanna; Agricola Eustachio; Guerrini Francesco

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The ultrasonic industry has recently produced echocardiographic Hand Held Devices (miniaturized, compact and battery-equipped echocardiographic systems). Their potential usefulness has been successfully assessed in a wide range of clinical conditions. The aim of the study was to verify if the routine use of a basic model of echocardiographic Hand Held Device (HHD) could be an important diagnostic tool during outpatient cardiologic consulting or in non-cardiologic hospital ...

  16. Use of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards Guidelines for Disk Diffusion Susceptibility Testing in New York State Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiehlbauch, Julia A.; Hannett, George E.; Salfinger, Max; Archinal, Wendy; Monserrat, Catherine; Carlyn, Cynthia

    2000-01-01

    Accurate antimicrobial susceptibility testing is vital for patient care and surveillance of emerging antimicrobial resistance. The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) outlines generally agreed upon guidelines for reliable and reproducible results. In January 1997 we surveyed 320 laboratories participating in the New York State Clinical Evaluation Program for General Bacteriology proficiency testing. Our survey addressed compliance with NCCLS susceptibility testing guidelines for bacterial species designated a problem (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus species) or fastidious (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae) organism. Specifically, we assessed compliance with guidelines for inoculum preparation, medium choice, number of disks per plate, and incubation conditions for disk diffusion tests. We also included length of incubation for S. aureus and Enterococcus species. We found overall compliance with the five characteristics listed above in 80 of 153 responding laboratories (50.6%) for S. aureus and 72 of 151 (47.7%) laboratories for Enterococcus species. The most common problem was an incubation time shortened to less than 24 h. Overall compliance with the first four characteristics was reported by 92 of 221 (41.6%) laboratories for S. pneumoniae, 49 of 163 (30.1%) laboratories for H. influenzae, and 11 of 77 (14.3%) laboratories for N. gonorrhoeae. Laboratories varied from NCCLS guidelines by placing an excess number of disks per plate. Laboratories also reported using alternative media for Enterococcus species, N. gonorrhoeae, and H. influenzae. This study demonstrates a need for education among clinical laboratories to increase compliance with NCCLS guidelines. PMID:10970381

  17. National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank: a standard based biospecimen and clinical data resource to enhance translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Waqas; Parwani, Anil V; Schmandt, Linda; Mohanty, Sambit K; Farhat, Ghada; Pople, Andrew K; Winters, Sharon B; Whelan, Nancy B; Schneider, Althea M; Milnes, John T; Valdivieso, Federico A; Feldman, Michael; Pass, Harvey I; Dhir, Rajiv; Melamed, Jonathan; Becich, Michael J

    2008-08-13

    Advances in translational research have led to the need for well characterized biospecimens for research. The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank is an initiative which collects annotated datasets relevant to human mesothelioma to develop an enterprising biospecimen resource to fulfill researchers' need. The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank architecture is based on three major components: (a) common data elements (based on College of American Pathologists protocol and National North American Association of Central Cancer Registries standards), (b) clinical and epidemiologic data annotation, and (c) data query tools. These tools work interoperably to standardize the entire process of annotation. The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank tool is based upon the caTISSUE Clinical Annotation Engine, developed by the University of Pittsburgh in cooperation with the Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG, see http://cabig.nci.nih.gov). This application provides a web-based system for annotating, importing and searching mesothelioma cases. The underlying information model is constructed utilizing Unified Modeling Language class diagrams, hierarchical relationships and Enterprise Architect software. The database provides researchers real-time access to richly annotated specimens and integral information related to mesothelioma. The data disclosed is tightly regulated depending upon users' authorization and depending on the participating institute that is amenable to the local Institutional Review Board and regulation committee reviews. The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank currently has over 600 annotated cases available for researchers that include paraffin embedded tissues, tissue microarrays, serum and genomic DNA. The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank is a virtual biospecimen registry with robust translational biomedical informatics support to facilitate basic science, clinical, and translational research. Furthermore, it protects patient privacy by disclosing only

  18. National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank: A standard based biospecimen and clinical data resource to enhance translational research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdivieso Federico A

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in translational research have led to the need for well characterized biospecimens for research. The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank is an initiative which collects annotated datasets relevant to human mesothelioma to develop an enterprising biospecimen resource to fulfill researchers' need. Methods The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank architecture is based on three major components: (a common data elements (based on College of American Pathologists protocol and National North American Association of Central Cancer Registries standards, (b clinical and epidemiologic data annotation, and (c data query tools. These tools work interoperably to standardize the entire process of annotation. The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank tool is based upon the caTISSUE Clinical Annotation Engine, developed by the University of Pittsburgh in cooperation with the Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid™ (caBIG™, see http://cabig.nci.nih.gov. This application provides a web-based system for annotating, importing and searching mesothelioma cases. The underlying information model is constructed utilizing Unified Modeling Language class diagrams, hierarchical relationships and Enterprise Architect software. Result The database provides researchers real-time access to richly annotated specimens and integral information related to mesothelioma. The data disclosed is tightly regulated depending upon users' authorization and depending on the participating institute that is amenable to the local Institutional Review Board and regulation committee reviews. Conclusion The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank currently has over 600 annotated cases available for researchers that include paraffin embedded tissues, tissue microarrays, serum and genomic DNA. The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank is a virtual biospecimen registry with robust translational biomedical informatics support to facilitate basic science, clinical, and translational

  19. Assessing the clinical significance of tumor markers in common neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beketic-Oreskovic, Lidija; Maric, Petra; Ozretic, Petar; Oreskovic, Darko; Ajdukovic, Mia; Levanat, Sonja

    2012-06-01

    The term tumor markers include a spectrum of molecules and substances with widely divergent characteristics whose presence in the significant amount can be related to the malignant disease. An ideal tumor marker should have high specificity and sensitivity, which would allow its use in early diagnosis and prognosis of malignant disease, as well as in prediction of therapeutic response and follow-up of the patients. Numerous biochemical entities have emerged as potentially valuable tumor markers so far, but only few markers showed to be of considerable clinical reliability and have been accepted into standard clinical practice. Recent development of genomics and proteomics has enabled the examination of many new potential tumor markers. Scientific studies on discovery, development, and application of tumor markers have been proceeding quite rapidly providing great opportunities for improving the management of cancer patients. This review is focusing on the clinical usefulness of various tumor markers already in clinical practice as well as certain potential markers, giving a brief description of their prognostic and predictive significance in most common malignancies.

  20. A Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing 3D and Standard Miniplates in Treatment of Mandibular Symphysis and Parasymphysis Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Mohit; Meena, Balram; Gupta, D K; Tiwari, Anjali Dave; Jakhar, Sunil Kumar

    2014-06-01

    To compare the efficacy of the 3D miniplates to standard miniplates in the osteosynthesis of mandibular symphysis and parasymphysis fractures on the basis of clinical parameters and radiographic evaluation. A prospective randomized clinical trial was conducted to treat consecutive mandibular symphysis and parasymphysis fractures. The patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. The patients underwent osteosynthesis in group A with 3D titanium miniplates and in group B with conventional titanium miniplates. The cause of trauma, the number of days from injury to surgery, average age and gender were all reviewed. The assessment of the patients was done at 1, 3, and 6 weeks and 3 months using the clinical parameters and radiographic evaluation. Eighty patients with isolated symphysis or parasymphysis fracture met the inclusion criteria. In our study, a statistically significant difference was not found in the clinical parameters such as pain, swelling, infection, paresthesia, hardware failure, and mobility between the fracture segments. Similarly Radiological evaluation did not show any statistically significant difference in reduction between the 2 groups. 3D plates are difficult to adapt and use sometimes, but operative time is less with them in treatment of symphysis and parasymphysis fractures. The use of 3D miniplates for symphysis and parasymphysis fracture fixation was efficacious enough to bear the masticatory load during osteosynthesis of the fracture. Although 3D miniplate system is difficult to adapt and difficult to use in cases of fractures involving the mental nerve, they provide the advantage of less operative time and less implant material in treatment of symphysis and parasymphysis fracture, with clinical results almost similar to those seen with conventional miniplate osteosynthesis.

  1. Assessment of commercial NLP engines for medication information extraction from dictated clinical notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, V; Mullett, Charles J; Arbogast, James G; Halbritter, Kevin A; Yellapragada, Deepthi; Regulapati, Sushmitha; Bandaru, Pavani

    2009-04-01

    We assessed the current state of commercial natural language processing (NLP) engines for their ability to extract medication information from textual clinical documents. Two thousand de-identified discharge summaries and family practice notes were submitted to four commercial NLP engines with the request to extract all medication information. The four sets of returned results were combined to create a comparison standard which was validated against a manual, physician-derived gold standard created from a subset of 100 reports. Once validated, the individual vendor results for medication names, strengths, route, and frequency were compared against this automated standard with precision, recall, and F measures calculated. Compared with the manual, physician-derived gold standard, the automated standard was successful at accurately capturing medication names (F measure=93.2%), but performed less well with strength (85.3%) and route (80.3%), and relatively poorly with dosing frequency (48.3%). Moderate variability was seen in the strengths of the four vendors. The vendors performed better with the structured discharge summaries than with the clinic notes in an analysis comparing the two document types. Although automated extraction may serve as the foundation for a manual review process, it is not ready to automate medication lists without human intervention.

  2. Assessment scales in stroke: clinimetric and clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison JK

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer K Harrison,1 Katherine S McArthur,2 Terence J Quinn21Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK; 2Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UKAbstract: As stroke care has developed, there has been a need to robustly assess the efficacy of interventions both at the level of the individual stroke survivor and in the context of clinical trials. To describe stroke-survivor recovery meaningfully, more sophisticated measures are required than simple dichotomous end points, such as mortality or stroke recurrence. As stroke is an exemplar disabling long-term condition, measures of function are well suited as outcome assessment. In this review, we will describe functional assessment scales in stroke, concentrating on three of the more commonly used tools: the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, the modified Rankin Scale, and the Barthel Index. We will discuss the strengths, limitations, and application of these scales and use the scales to highlight important properties that are relevant to all assessment tools. We will frame much of this discussion in the context of "clinimetric" analysis. As they are increasingly used to inform stroke-survivor assessments, we will also discuss some of the commonly used quality-of-life measures. A recurring theme when considering functional assessment is that no tool suits all situations. Clinicians and researchers should chose their assessment tool based on the question of interest and the evidence base around clinimetric properties.Keywords: Barthel Index, clinimetrics, clinical trial, disability, methodology, modified Rankin Scale, National Institutes Health Stroke Scale, scales, stroke, outcomes

  3. Health technology assessment in Australia: a role for clinical registries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Anna Mae

    2017-03-01

    Objective Health technology assessment (HTA) is a process of assessing evidence to inform policy decisions about public subsidy of new drugs and medical procedures. Where evidence is uncertain but the technology itself is promising, funders may recommend funding on an interim basis. It is unknown whether evidence from clinical registries is used to resolve uncertainties identified in interim-funded decisions made by Australian HTA bodies. Therefore, the present study evaluated the role of evidence from clinical registries in resolving evidence uncertainties identified by the Medical Services Advisory Committee (MSAC). Methods All HTAs considered by MSAC between 1998 and 2015 were reviewed and assessments that recommended interim funding were identified. The MSAC website was searched to identify reassessments of these recommendations and sources of evidence used to resolve the uncertainties were identified. Results Of 173 HTA reports considered by MSAC, 17 (10%) contained an interim funding recommendation. Eight recommendations cited uncertainty around safety, 15 cited uncertainty around clinical effectiveness and 13 cited uncertainty around economics (cost-effectiveness and/or budget impact). Of the 17 interim funding recommendations, 11 (65%) have been reassessed. Only two reassessments relied on clinical registry evidence to resolve evidence gaps identified at the time of the interim funding recommendation. Conclusions Clinical registries are underused as a source of evidence for resolving uncertainties around promising new health technologies in Australia. An open dialogue between stakeholders on the role of registries in this context is needed. What is known about the topic? HTA is a process of assessing the evidence to inform policy decisions about public subsidy of new health technologies (e.g. pharmaceuticals, diagnostic tests, medical procedures). Where evidence is uncertain but the technology under evaluation is promising, funders may recommend the funding

  4. Influenza and other respiratory viruses: standardizing disease severity in surveillance and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Barbara; Conrad, Tim; Myles, Puja; Alchikh, Maren; Ma, Xiaolin; Hoppe, Christian; Tief, Franziska; Chen, Xi; Obermeier, Patrick; Kisler, Bron; Schweiger, Brunhilde

    2017-06-01

    Influenza-Like Illness is a leading cause of hospitalization in children. Disease burden due to influenza and other respiratory viral infections is reported on a population level, but clinical scores measuring individual changes in disease severity are urgently needed. Areas covered: We present a composite clinical score allowing individual patient data analyses of disease severity based on systematic literature review and WHO-criteria for uncomplicated and complicated disease. The 22-item ViVI Disease Severity Score showed a normal distribution in a pediatric cohort of 6073 children aged 0-18 years (mean age 3.13; S.D. 3.89; range: 0 to 18.79). Expert commentary: The ViVI Score was correlated with risk of antibiotic use as well as need for hospitalization and intensive care. The ViVI Score was used to track children with influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, human metapneumovirus, human rhinovirus, and adenovirus infections and is fully compliant with regulatory data standards. The ViVI Disease Severity Score mobile application allows physicians to measure disease severity at the point-of care thereby taking clinical trials to the next level.

  5. Qualitative research within trials: developing a standard operating procedure for a clinical trials unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Qualitative research methods are increasingly used within clinical trials to address broader research questions than can be addressed by quantitative methods alone. These methods enable health professionals, service users, and other stakeholders to contribute their views and experiences to evaluation of healthcare treatments, interventions, or policies, and influence the design of trials. Qualitative data often contribute information that is better able to reform policy or influence design. Methods Health services researchers, including trialists, clinicians, and qualitative researchers, worked collaboratively to develop a comprehensive portfolio of standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the West Wales Organisation for Rigorous Trials in Health (WWORTH), a clinical trials unit (CTU) at Swansea University, which has recently achieved registration with the UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC). Although the UKCRC requires a total of 25 SOPs from registered CTUs, WWORTH chose to add an additional qualitative-methods SOP (QM-SOP). Results The qualitative methods SOP (QM-SOP) defines good practice in designing and implementing qualitative components of trials, while allowing flexibility of approach and method. Its basic principles are that: qualitative researchers should be contributors from the start of trials with qualitative potential; the qualitative component should have clear aims; and the main study publication should report on the qualitative component. Conclusions We recommend that CTUs consider developing a QM-SOP to enhance the conduct of quantitative trials by adding qualitative data and analysis. We judge that this improves the value of quantitative trials, and contributes to the future development of multi-method trials. PMID:23433341

  6. Qualitative research within trials: developing a standard operating procedure for a clinical trials unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapport, Frances; Storey, Mel; Porter, Alison; Snooks, Helen; Jones, Kerina; Peconi, Julie; Sánchez, Antonio; Siebert, Stefan; Thorne, Kym; Clement, Clare; Russell, Ian

    2013-02-21

    Qualitative research methods are increasingly used within clinical trials to address broader research questions than can be addressed by quantitative methods alone. These methods enable health professionals, service users, and other stakeholders to contribute their views and experiences to evaluation of healthcare treatments, interventions, or policies, and influence the design of trials. Qualitative data often contribute information that is better able to reform policy or influence design. Health services researchers, including trialists, clinicians, and qualitative researchers, worked collaboratively to develop a comprehensive portfolio of standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the West Wales Organisation for Rigorous Trials in Health (WWORTH), a clinical trials unit (CTU) at Swansea University, which has recently achieved registration with the UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC). Although the UKCRC requires a total of 25 SOPs from registered CTUs, WWORTH chose to add an additional qualitative-methods SOP (QM-SOP). The qualitative methods SOP (QM-SOP) defines good practice in designing and implementing qualitative components of trials, while allowing flexibility of approach and method. Its basic principles are that: qualitative researchers should be contributors from the start of trials with qualitative potential; the qualitative component should have clear aims; and the main study publication should report on the qualitative component. We recommend that CTUs consider developing a QM-SOP to enhance the conduct of quantitative trials by adding qualitative data and analysis. We judge that this improves the value of quantitative trials, and contributes to the future development of multi-method trials.

  7. Planning the Unplanned Experiment: Assessing the Efficacy of Standards for Safety Critical Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graydon, Patrick J.; Holloway, C. Michael

    2015-01-01

    We need well-founded means of determining whether software is t for use in safety-critical applications. While software in industries such as aviation has an excellent safety record, the fact that software aws have contributed to deaths illustrates the need for justi ably high con dence in software. It is often argued that software is t for safety-critical use because it conforms to a standard for software in safety-critical systems. But little is known about whether such standards `work.' Reliance upon a standard without knowing whether it works is an experiment; without collecting data to assess the standard, this experiment is unplanned. This paper reports on a workshop intended to explore how standards could practicably be assessed. Planning the Unplanned Experiment: Assessing the Ecacy of Standards for Safety Critical Software (AESSCS) was held on 13 May 2014 in conjunction with the European Dependable Computing Conference (EDCC). We summarize and elaborate on the workshop's discussion of the topic, including both the presented positions and the dialogue that ensued.

  8. Assessing Quality of Data Standards: Framework and Illustration Using XBRL GAAP Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Harris

    The primary purpose of data standards or metadata schemas is to improve the interoperability of data created by multiple standard users. Given the high cost of developing data standards, it is desirable to assess the quality of data standards. We develop a set of metrics and a framework for assessing data standard quality. The metrics include completeness and relevancy. Standard quality can also be indirectly measured by assessing interoperability of data instances. We evaluate the framework using data from the financial sector: the XBRL (eXtensible Business Reporting Language) GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles) taxonomy and US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filings produced using the taxonomy by approximately 500 companies. The results show that the framework is useful and effective. Our analysis also reveals quality issues of the GAAP taxonomy and provides useful feedback to taxonomy users. The SEC has mandated that all publicly listed companies must submit their filings using XBRL. Our findings are timely and have practical implications that will ultimately help improve the quality of financial data.

  9. [Criteria for the assessment of the noise-induced occupational hearing loss: international and national standards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmerov, N F; Denisov, É I; Adeninskaia, E E; Gorblianskiĭ, Iu Iu

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present paper was to review international and national standards for the criteria of assessment of the noise-induced occupational loss of hearing. The importance of healthy hearing for the occupational safety is emphasized which implies the necessity of the more rigorous criteria for hearing conservation in the workers engaged in the noisy technological environment compared with those for the general population. A rationale for the development of the standard program of hearing conservation in the workers engaged in the noisy technological environment is proposed including hygienic norms and rules or national state standards.

  10. Assessing barriers to adherence in routine clinical care for pediatric kidney transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnell, Charles D; Rich, Kristin L; Nichols, Melissa; Dahale, Devesh; Goebel, Jens W; Pai, Ahna L H; Hooper, David K; Modi, Avani C

    2017-11-01

    Patient-identified barriers to immunosuppressive medications are associated with poor adherence and negative clinical outcomes in transplant patients. Assessment of adherence barriers is not part of routine post-transplant care, and studies regarding implementing such a process in a reliable way are lacking. Using the Model for Improvement and PDSA cycles, we implemented a system to identify adherence barriers, including patient-centered design of a barriers assessment tool, identification of eligible patients, clear roles for clinic staff, and creating a culture of non-judgmental discussion around adherence. We performed time-series analysis of our process measure. Secondary analyses examined the endorsement and concordance of adherence barriers between patient-caregiver dyads. After three methods of testing, the most reliable delivery system was an EHR-integrated tablet that alerted staff of patient eligibility for assessment. Barriers were endorsed by 35% of caregivers (n=85) and 43% of patients (n=60). The most frequently patient-endorsed barriers were forgetting, poor taste, and side effects. Caregivers endorsed forgetting and side effects. Concordance between patient-caregiver dyads was fair (k=0.299). Standardized adherence barriers assessment is feasible in the clinical care of pediatric kidney transplant patients. Features necessary for success included automation, redundant systems with designated staff to identify and mitigate failures, aligned reporting structures, and reliable measurement approaches. Future studies will examine whether barriers predict clinical outcomes (eg, organ rejection, graft loss). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Clinical significance of computed tomography assessment for third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamori, Kenji; Tomihara, Kei; Noguchi, Makoto

    2014-07-28

    Surgical extraction of the third molar is the most commonly performed surgical procedure in the clinical practice of oral surgery. Third molar surgery is warranted when there is inadequate space for eruption, malpositioning, or risk for cyst or odontogenic tumor formation. Preoperative assessment should include a detailed morphologic analysis of the third molar and its relationship to adjacent structures and surrounding tissues. Due to developments in medical engineering technology, computed tomography (CT) now plays a critical role in providing the clear images required for adequate assessment prior to third molar surgery. Removal of the maxillary third molar is associated with a risk for maxillary sinus perforation, whereas removal of the mandibular third molar can put patients at risk for a neurosensory deficit from damage to the lingual nerve or inferior alveolar nerve. Multiple factors, including demographic, anatomic, and treatment-related factors, influence the incidence of nerve injury during or following removal of the third molar. CT assessment of the third molar prior to surgery can identify some of these risk factors, such as the absence of cortication between the mandibular third molar and the inferior alveolar canal, prior to surgery to reduce the risk for nerve damage. This topic highlight presents an overview of the clinical significance of CT assessment in third molar surgery.

  12. Proprioception in musculoskeletal rehabilitation. Part 2: Clinical assessment and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Nicholas C; Röijezon, Ulrik; Treleaven, Julia

    2015-06-01

    Proprioception can be impaired in gradual-onset musculoskeletal pain disorders and following trauma. Understanding of the role of proprioception in sensorimotor dysfunction and methods for assessment and interventions is of vital importance in musculoskeletal rehabilitation. In Part 1 of this two-part Masterclass we presented a theory-based overview of the role of proprioception in sensorimotor control, causes and findings of altered proprioception in musculoskeletal conditions, and general principles of assessment and interventions. The aim of this second part is to present specific methods for clinical assessment and interventions to improve proprioception in the spine and extremities. Clinical assessment of proprioception can be performed using goniometers, inclinometers, laser-pointers, and pressure sensors. Manual therapy, taping, and bracing can immediately enhance proprioception and should be used to prepare for exercise interventions. Various types of exercise (active joint repositioning, force sense, co-ordination, muscle performance, balance/unstable surface, plyometric, and vibration training) should be employed for long-term enhancement of proprioception. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Performance of physician-certified verbal autopsies: multisite validation study using clinical diagnostic gold standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaxman Abraham D

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physician review of a verbal autopsy (VA and completion of a death certificate remains the most widely used approach for VA analysis. This study provides new evidence about the performance of physician-certified verbal autopsy (PCVA using defined clinical diagnostic criteria as a gold standard for a multisite sample of 12,542 VAs. The study was also designed to analyze issues related to PCVA, such as the impact of a second physician reader on the cause of death assigned, the variation in performance with and without household recall of health care experience (HCE, and the importance of local information for physicians reading VAs. Methods The certification was performed by 24 physicians. The assignment of VA was random and blinded. Each VA was certified by one physician. Half of the VAs were reviewed by a different physician with household recall of health care experience included. The completed death certificate was processed for automated ICD-10 coding of the underlying cause of death. PCVA was compared to gold standard cause of death assignment based on strictly defined clinical diagnostic criteria that are part of the Population Health Metrics Research Consortium (PHMRC gold standard verbal autopsy study. Results For individual cause assignment, the overall chance-corrected concordance for PCVA against the gold standard cause of death is less than 50%, with substantial variability by cause and physician. Physicians assign the correct cause around 30% of the time without HCE, and addition of HCE improves performance in adults to 45% and slightly higher in children to 48%. Physicians estimate cause-specific mortality fractions (CSMFs with considerable error for adults, children, and neonates. Only for neonates for a cause list of six causes with HCE is accuracy above 0.7. In all three age groups, CSMF accuracy improves when household recall of health care experience is available. Conclusions Results show that physician

  14. Clinical assessment of hip strength using a hand-held dynamometer is reliable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, K; Petersen, J; Magnusson, S P

    2010-01-01

    Hip strength assessment plays an important role in the clinical examination of the hip and groin region. The primary aim of this study was to examine the absolute test-retest measurement variation concerning standardized strength assessments of hip abduction (ABD), adduction (ADD), external...... rotation (ER), internal rotation (IR), flexion (FLEX) and extension (EXT) using a hand-held dynamometer. Nine subjects (five males, four females), physically active for at least 2.5 h a week, were included. Twelve standardized isometric strength tests were performed twice with a 1-week interval in between...... by the same examiner. The test order was randomized to avoid systematic bias. Measurement variation between sessions was 3-12%. When the maximum value of four measurements was used, test-retest measurement variation was below 10% in 11 of the 12 individual hip strength tests and below 5% in five of the 12...

  15. Assessment of Sexual Desire for Clinical Trials of Women With Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder: Measures, Desire-Related Behavior, and Assessment of Clinical Significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyke, Robert E; Clayton, Anita H

    2018-01-19

    The Female Sexual Function Index-desire subscale is the standard measure for clinical trials of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD), but lacks items assessing sexually related behaviors and attitudes toward partner. Counting satisfying sexual events is criticized, but sexual behavior remains important. Mean treatment differences cannot define clinical significance; responder and remitter analyses help. We reviewed measures on sexual desire and sexual behavior relevant to HSDD, and how to assess clinical significance. We conducted a literature review of measures of sexual desire comparing expert-proposed criteria for dysfunctional desire, expert-developed scales, and scales from patient input. Commonly recognized symptoms of HSDD were identified. Results of HSDD trials and scale validation studies were evaluated to extract responder and remitter values. The utility of distribution-based measures of responders and remitters was assessed. Symptom relevance was evaluated as the proportion of symptom sets that included the item; responder and remitter cut points were determined by distribution-based methods. 12 Validated rating scales, 5 scales primarily derived from expert recommendations and 7 scales initially from patient input, and 5 sets of diagnostic criteria for conditions like HSDD were compared. Content varied highly between scales despite compliance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommendations for patient-reported outcomes. This disunity favors an expert-recommended scale such as the Elements of Desire Questionnaire with each of the common items, plus a measure of frequency of sexual activity, eg, item in the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System. Registrational drug trials, but not psychological treatment trials, usually give responder/remitter analyses, using dichotomized global impressions or anchor-based definitions. Distribution-based methods are more uniformly applicable to define responder and remitter status. The

  16. Cross-cultural validity of standardized motor development screening and assessment tools: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Bianca; Sargent, Barbara; Fetters, Linda

    2016-12-01

    To investigate whether standardized motor development screening and assessment tools that are used to evaluate motor abilities of children aged 0 to 2 years are valid in cultures other than those in which the normative sample was established. This was a systematic review in which six databases were searched. Studies were selected based on inclusion/exclusion criteria and appraised for evidence level and quality. Study variables were extracted. Twenty-three studies representing six motor development screening and assessment tools in 16 cultural contexts met the inclusion criteria: Alberta Infant Motor Scale (n=7), Ages and Stages Questionnaire, 3rd edition (n=2), Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, 3rd edition (n=8), Denver Developmental Screening Test, 2nd edition (n=4), Harris Infant Neuromotor Test (n=1), and Peabody Developmental Motor Scales, 2nd edition (n=1). Thirteen studies found significant differences between the cultural context and normative sample. Two studies established reliability and/or validity of standardized motor development assessments in high-risk infants from different cultural contexts. Five studies established new population norms. Eight studies described the cross-cultural adaptation of a standardized motor development assessment. Standardized motor development assessments have limited validity in cultures other than that in which the normative sample was established. Their use can result in under- or over-referral for services. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  17. Novel femoral artery terminology: integrating anatomy and clinical procedures leading to standardized intuitive nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, Brion

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the terminology of the femoral artery and recommended alternative terminology that satisfies both anatomy and clinical arenas.The femoral artery (FA) is often defined as the continuation of the external iliac artery. Specifically, when the external iliac artery reaches directly beneath the inguinal ligament, it becomes the FA. Currently, Terminologia Anatomica (TA) records the profunda femoris or deep femoral as a terminal branch. Clinicians often use superficial femoral artery (SFA) rather than FA and profunda or deep FA. SFA is actually very deep and well protected for most of its journey. On observation, the terminology in current use is not intuitive. The objective of this study was to investigate the terminology associated with the anatomical and clinical anatomical interpretations of the FA and its terminal branches and to suggest a more appropriate terminology that addresses the points of view of the macro anatomist, as well as that of the clinician. Literature search was conducted regarding the nomenclature of the FA and its terminal branches. Dissection of 89 embalmed cadavers (49F, 40M, ages 47-89) was conducted to analyze the morphology of the FA and its branches. Perusal of the literature revealed a difference in terminology between anatomical and clinical textbooks/atlases/journals regarding the FA and its terminal branch. Our dissections suggested that the FA may be better defined vis-à-vis its relationship to the anterior and posterior compartments of the thigh. A difference in terminology exists between the anatomical and clinical arenas. A need for a standardized terminology is necessary because clinicians and their publishers have not adopted TA. This study suggests that the current FA be considered the common FA and the continuation of the FA, the SFA be renamed the anterior FA and the current profunda (the deep FA) be renamed the posterior FA, respectively. The proposed terminology mirrors the lower

  18. Elevated mortality amongst weekend hospital admissions is not associated with adoption of seven-day clinical standards

    OpenAIRE

    Meacock, Rachel; Sutton, Matt

    2017-01-01

    IntroductionPatients admitted to hospital in an emergency at weekends have been found to experience higher mortality rates than those admitted during the week. The NHS in England has introduced four priority clinical standards for emergency hospital care with the objective of reducing the deaths associated with this ‘weekend effect’. This study aimed to determine whether adoption of these clinical standards is associated with the extent to which weekend mortality is elevated. MethodsWe utilis...

  19. Assessing clinical reasoning abilities of medical students using clinical performance examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunju Im

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the reliability and validity of new clinical performance examination (CPX for assessing clinical reasoning skills and evaluating clinical reasoning ability of the students. Methods: Third-year medical school students (n=313 in Busan-Gyeongnam consortium in 2014 were included in the study. One of 12 stations was developed to assess clinical reasoning abilities. The scenario and checklists of the station were revised by six experts. Chief complaint of the case was rhinorrhea, accompanied by fever, headache, and vomiting. Checklists focused on identifying of the main problem and systematic approach to the problem. Students interviewed the patient and recorded subjective and objective findings, assessments, plans (SOAP note for 15 minutes. Two professors assessed students simultaneously. We performed statistical analysis on their scores and survey. Results: The Cronbach α of subject station was 0.878 and Cohen κ coefficient between graders was 0.785. Students agreed on CPX as an adequate tool to evaluate students’ performance, but some graders argued that the CPX failed to secure its validity due to their lack of understanding the case. One hundred eight students (34.5% identified essential problem early and only 58 (18.5% performed systematic history taking and physical examination. One hundred seventy-three of them (55.3% communicated correct diagnosis with the patient. Most of them had trouble in writing SOAP notes. Conclusion: To gain reliability and validity, interrater agreement should be secured. Students' clinical reasoning skills were not enough. Students need to be trained on problem identification, reasoning skills and accurate record-keeping.

  20. Clinical assessment tools identify functional deficits in fragility fracture patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ames TD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tyler D Ames,1 Corinne E Wee,1 Khoi M Le,1 Tiffany L Wang,1 Julie Y Bishop,2 Laura S Phieffer,2 Carmen E Quatman2 1The Ohio State University College of Medicine, 2Department of Orthopaedics, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA Purpose: To identify inexpensive, noninvasive, portable, clinical assessment tools that can be used to assess functional performance measures that may put older patients at risk for falls such as balance, handgrip strength, and lumbopelvic control.Patients and methods: Twenty fragility fracture patients and 21 healthy control subjects were evaluated using clinical assessment tools (Nintendo Wii Balance Board [WBB], a handheld dynamometer, and an application for the Apple iPod Touch, the Level Belt that measure functional performance during activity of daily living tasks. The main outcome measurements were balance (WBB, handgrip strength (handheld dynamometer, and lumbopelvic control (iPod Touch Level Belt, which were compared between fragility fracture patients and healthy controls.Results: Fragility fracture patients had lower scores on the vertical component of the WBB Torso Twist task (P=0.042 and greater medial–lateral lumbopelvic sway during a 40 m walk (P=0.026 when compared to healthy controls. Unexpectedly, the fracture patients had significantly higher scores on the left leg (P=0.020 and total components (P=0.010 of the WBB Single Leg Stand task as well as less faults during the left Single Leg Stand task (P=0.003.Conclusion: The clinical assessment tools utilized in this study are relatively inexpensive and portable tools of performance measures capable of detecting differences in postural sway between fragility fracture patients and controls. Keywords: fall risk, geriatric fracture, Nintendo Wii Balance Board, Level Belt, fragility fracture

  1. Clinically significant cardiopulmonary events and the effect of definition standardization on apnea of prematurity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, M B F; Ahlers-Schmidt, C R; Engel, M; Bloom, B T

    2017-01-01

    To define the impact of care standardization on caffeine and cardiorespiratory monitoring at neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) discharge. Electronic records were abstracted for infants aged 24-36 weeks gestation with birth weights appropriate for gestational age. Infants who died, transferred prior to discharge, had major pulmonary anomalies, required a home monitor for mechanical ventilation or had a family history of sudden infant death syndrome were excluded. Data and records were used to indicate when the new definition of clinically significant cardiopulmonary events (CSCPEs) and concurrent education was implemented. Preimplementation and postimplementation cohorts were compared. Incidence fell from 74% diagnosed with apnea of prematurity at baseline to 49% diagnosed with CSCPE postimplementation (Pdefinitions and treatments reduced the use of caffeine and cardiorespiratory monitors upon NICU dismissal.

  2. European AIDS Clinical Society Standard of Care meeting on HIV and related coinfections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mussini, C; Antinori, A; Bhagani, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the 1st European AIDS Clinical Society meeting on Standard of Care in Europe was to raise awareness of the European scenario and come to an agreement on actions that could be taken in the future. METHODS: Data-driven presentations were given on specific topics followed...... by interactive panel discussions. RESULTS: In Eastern European countries, the epidemic is largely driven by injecting drug use, in contrast with Western Europe where the infection mainly occurs through heterosexual contact. A high proportion of people living with HIV remain unaware of their infection...... diagnosed multi-drug-resistant cases. Hepatitis C is widespread in selected geographical areas and risk groups. CONCLUSIONS: The key conclusion from the meeting was that a high-priority group of actions could be identified, including: increasing HIV awareness and testing, improving training for health care...

  3. How to Implement a Geriatric Assessment in Your Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Schroder; Alibhai, Shabbir M.H.; Wildiers, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a disease that mostly affects older adults. Other health conditions, changes in functional status, and use of multiple medications change the risks and benefits of cancer treatment for older adults. Several international organizations, such as the International Society of Geriatric Oncology, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, recommend the conduct of a geriatric assessment (GA) for older adults with cancer to help select the most appropriate treatment and identify any underlying undetected medical, functional, and psychosocial issues that can interfere with treatment. The aim of this review is to describe what a GA is and how to implement it in daily clinical practice for older adults with cancer in the oncology setting. We provide an overview of commonly used tools. Key considerations in performing the GA include the resources available (staff, space, and time), patient population (who will be assessed), what GA tools to use, and clinical follow-up (who will be responsible for using the GA results for developing care plans and who will provide follow-up care). Important challenges in implementing GA in clinical practice include not having easy and timely access to geriatric expertise, patient burden of the additional hospital visits, and establishing collaboration between the GA team and oncologists regarding expectations of the population referred for GA and expected outcomes of the GA. Finally, we provide some possible interventions for problems identified during the GA. PMID:25187477

  4. Syncope risk assessment in the emergency department and clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benditt, David G

    2013-01-01

    The initial assessment of patients who present with presumed syncope is challenging. Syncope has many possible causes ranging from relatively benign to potentially life-threatening, and sorting through the possibilities may not be feasible given time limitations in an urgent care setting. Therefore, the physician almost always must determine whether the affected individual needs in-hospital evaluation or can be safely referred to an outpatient syncope evaluation clinic. In instances when the etiology of syncope has been diagnosed with confidence at the initial clinical evaluation, the hospitalization question is readily addressed and the appropriateness of hospitalization versus timely outpatient evaluation (preferably in a dedicated syncope management clinic) is clear. In those cases in which the diagnosis is uncertain, risk stratification schemes such as those summarized in this communication become more essential. However, at present no single risk assessment protocol appears to be satisfactory for universal application. The development of a consensus recommendation is an essential next step. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Comparative Study between the Conventional MCQ Scores and MCQ with the CBA Scores at the Standardized Clinical Knowledge Exam for Clinical Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Ghadermarzi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Partial knowledge is one of the main factors to be considered when dealing with the improvement of the administration of Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ in testing. Various strategies have been proposed for this factor in the traditional testing environment. Therefore, this study proposed a Confidence Based Assessment (CBA as a pertinent solution and aims at comparing the effect of the CBA Scoring system with that of the conventional scoring systems (with and without negative score estimation as penalty on the students’ scores and estimating their partial knowledge on clinical studies.Methods: This comparative study was conducted using a standardized clinical knowledge exam for 117 clinical students. After two-step training, both the conventional MCQ and CBA examination was given in a single session simultaneously. The exam included 100 questions and the volunteers were requested to complete a questionnaire regarding their attitude and satisfaction on their first experience of the CBA after exam. A new confidence based marking system was selected for the scoring, which was a hybrid of the UCL and MUK2010 systems. The MCQ-Assistant, SPSS and Microsoft office Excel software were used for scoring and data analysis.Results: The mean age of the volunteers was 27.3±5.47, of whom 43.6% were men and 69.2% were senior medical students. Exam reliability was 0.977. The fit line of the MCQ scores without penalty estimation was R2=0.9816 and Intercept=18.125 or approximately.2 deviation in the low scores. The MCQ scoring with penalty had a fit line approximately parallel to the 45-degree line but on or above it and the CBA scoring fit line was nearer to the 45-degree line, parallel to it and a little below it. These two sets of scores had a significant p value0.037. The response percentage to the CBA is higher (p value=0.0001. The discrimination power of the MCQ and the CBA for the upper and lower 1/3 of the students was not

  6. Reconsidering the risk assessment concept: Standardizing the impact description as a building block for vulnerability assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hollenstein

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Risk assessments for natural hazards are becoming more widely used and accepted. Using an extended definition of risk, it becomes obvious that performant procedures for vulnerability assessments are vital for the success of the risk concept. However, there are large gaps in knowledge about vulnerability. To alleviate the situation, a conceptual extension of the scope of existing and new models is suggested. The basis of the suggested concept is a stadardization of the output of hazard assessments. This is achieved by defining states of the target objects that depend on the impact and at the same time affect the object's performance characteristics. The possible state variables can be related to a limited set of impact descriptors termed generic impact description interface. The concept suggests that both hazard and vulnerability assessment models are developed according to the specification of this interface, thus facilitating modularized risk assessments. Potential problems related to the application of the concept include acceptance issues and the lacking accuracy of transformation of outputs of existing models. Potential applications and simple examples for adapting existing models are briefly discussed.

  7. 2013 updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society chemotherapy administration safety standards including standards for the safe administration and management of oral chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuss, Michael N; Polovich, Martha; McNiff, Kristen; Esper, Peg; Gilmore, Terry R; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Schulmeister, Lisa; Jacobson, Joseph O

    2013-05-01

    In 2009, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) published standards for the safe use of parenteral chemotherapy in the outpatient setting, including issues of practitioner orders, preparation, and administration of medication. In 2011, these were updated to include inpatient facilities. In December 2011, a multistakeholder workgroup met to address the issues associated with orally administered antineoplastics, under the leadership of ASCO and ONS. The workgroup participants developed recommended standards, which were presented for public comment. Public comments informed final edits, and the final standards were reviewed and approved by the ASCO and ONS Boards of Directors. Significant newly identified recommendations include those associated with drug prescription and the necessity of ascertaining that prescriptions are filled. In addition, the importance of patient and family education regarding administration schedules, exception procedures, disposal of unused oral medication, and aspects of continuity of care across settings were identified. This article presents the newly developed standards.

  8. Antimicrobial Potential of Momordica charantia L. against Multiresistant Standard Species and Clinical Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena Filho, José Hardman Sátiro de; Lima, Rennaly de Freitas; Medeiros, Ana Claudia Dantas de; Pereira, Jozinete Vieira; Granville-Garcia, Ana Flávia; Costa, Edja Maria Melo de Brito

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial and antifungal potential in vitro of Momordica charantia L. against the microorganisms of clinical interest (standard strains and multiresistant isolates) in order to aggregate scientific information in relation to its use as a therapeutic product. M. charantia L. plant material was acquired in municipality of Malta, Paraiba, Brazil. The extract was obtained through maceration, filtration and then concentrated under reduced pressure in a rotary evaporator, resulting in a dough, and was then dried in an oven for 72 hours at 40°C. Antimicrobial action of ethanolic extract of seed M. charantia L. was evaluated based on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) against standard strains of bacteria, isolates multiresistant bacteria and Candida species, by microdilution in broth method. All organisms were sensitive to the extract, being considered strong antimicrobial activity (MIC and MBC/MFC charantia L. showed strong antimicrobial potential, with bactericidal and fungicidal profile, there is the prospect to constitute a new therapeutic strategy for the control of infections, particularly in multiresistant strains. The use of medicinal plants in treatment of infectious processes have an important function nowadays, due to the limitations of the use of synthetic antibiotics available, related specifically to the microbial resistance emergence.

  9. Integrity, standards, and QC-related issues with big data in pre-clinical drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, John F; Ung, Matthew; Escalante-Chong, Renan; Ross, Jermaine; Zhang, Jenny; Cha, Yoonjeong; Lysaght, Andrew; Funt, Jason; Kusko, Rebecca

    2018-03-15

    The tremendous expansion of data analytics and public and private big datasets presents an important opportunity for pre-clinical drug discovery and development. In the field of life sciences, the growth of genetic, genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data is partly driven by a rapid decline in experimental costs as biotechnology improves throughput, scalability, and speed. Yet far too many researchers tend to underestimate the challenges and consequences involving data integrity and quality standards. Given the effect of data integrity on scientific interpretation, these issues have significant implications during preclinical drug development. We describe standardized approaches for maximizing the utility of publicly available or privately generated biological data and address some of the common pitfalls. We also discuss the increasing interest to integrate and interpret cross-platform data. Principles outlined here should serve as a useful broad guide for existing analytical practices and pipelines and as a tool for developing additional insights into therapeutics using big data. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessing people with dementia: the role of the aged care assessment team and memory clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozsa, M; Ford, A; Flicker, L

    2016-09-01

    A cross-sectional survey of all patients reviewed by the aged care assessment team (ACAT) service and memory clinics between 1 January and 31 December 2012. The ACAT catchment included an estimated 14 325 people over the age of 70. To determine the numbers and outcomes of assessments for cognitive problems by the ACAT and hospital memory clinics for patients within a single ACAT catchment area. Data collected included patient demographics, diagnoses, referral and pharmacological treatment. Flow of referrals to the services that diagnose and manage dementia, and the number of incident dementia cases diagnosed in 2012 were determined. The ACAT service assessed 1005 patients from the catchment, of which 241 patients already had a diagnosis of dementia. When compared with the estimated dementia prevalence in Australia, 19% of prevalent dementia cases (n = 1260) within the catchment were reviewed by the ACAT. The two memory clinics saw a combined 186 new referrals (91 and 95 respectively) from within the catchment, with a total of 82 patients (22 and 60 respectively) receiving a new diagnosis of dementia. Using Australian estimates of dementia incidence, this would suggest 29% of 286 incident cases were managed through these memory clinics. Geriatric services are responsible for the assessment and management of a large proportion of the estimated number of patients with dementia in this catchment area. Further resourcing and standardisation of the pathways to dementia assessment is required in Australia in order to diagnose and manage effectively people with dementia. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  11. Implementation of Depression Screening and Global Health Assessment in Pediatric Subspecialty Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturralde, Esti; Adams, Rebecca N; Barley, Regan C; Bensen, Rachel; Christofferson, Megan; Hanes, Sarah J; Maahs, David M; Milla, Carlos; Naranjo, Diana; Shah, Avni C; Tanenbaum, Molly L; Veeravalli, Sruthi; Park, K T; Hood, Korey K

    2017-11-01

    Adolescents with chronic illness face greater risk of psychosocial difficulties, complicating disease management. Despite increased calls to screen for patient-reported outcomes, clinical implementation has lagged. Using quality improvement methods, this study aimed to investigate the feasibility of standardized screening for depression and assessment of global health and to determine recommended behavioral health follow-up, across three pediatric subspecialty clinics. A total of 109 patients aged 12-22 years (median = 16.6) who were attending outpatient visits for treatment of diabetes (80% type 1), inflammatory bowel disease, or cystic fibrosis completed the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) depression and Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Pediatric Global Health measures on electronic tablets. Patients screening positive on the PHQ-9 received same-day behavioral health assessment and regular phone check-ins to facilitate necessary follow-up care. Overall, 89% of 122 identified patients completed screening during a 6-month window. Patients completed measures in a timely manner (within 3 minutes) without disruption to clinic flow, and they rated the process as easy, comfortable, and valuable. Depression scores varied across disease type. Patients rated lower global health relative to a previously assessed validation cohort. Depression and global health related significantly to certain medical outcomes. Fifteen percent of patients screened positive on the PHQ-9, of whom 50% confirmed attending behavioral health appointments within 6 months of screening. A standardized depression and global health assessment protocol implemented across pediatric subspecialties was feasible and effective. Universal behavioral health screening for adolescents and young adults living with chronic disease is necessary to meet programmatic needs in pediatric subspecialty clinics. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine

  12. Integrating Interactive Web-Based Technology to Assess Adherence and Clinical Outcomes in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori E. Crosby

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Research indicates that the quality of the adherence assessment is one of the best predictors for improving clinical outcomes. Newer technologies represent an opportunity for developing high quality standardized assessments to assess clinical outcomes such as patient experience of care but have not been tested systematically in pediatric sickle cell disease (SCD. The goal of the current study was to pilot an interactive web-based tool, the Take-Charge Program, to assess adherence to clinic visits and hydroxyurea (HU, barriers to adherence, solutions to overcome these barriers, and clinical outcomes in 43 patients with SCD age 6–21 years. Results indicate that the web-based tool was successfully integrated into the clinical setting while maintaining high patient satisfaction (>90%. The tool provided data consistent with the medical record, staff report, and/or clinical lab data. Participants reported that forgetting and transportation were major barriers for adherence to both clinic attendance and HU. A greater number of self-reported barriers (P<.01 and older age (P<.05 were associated with poorer clinic attendance and HU adherence. In summary, the tool represents an innovative approach to integrate newer technology to assess adherence and clinical outcomes for pediatric patients with SCD.

  13. A Mapmark method of standard setting as implemented for the National Assessment Governing Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, E Matthew; Mitzel, Howard C

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a Mapmark standard setting procedure, developed under contract with the National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB). The procedure enhances the bookmark method with spatially representative item maps, holistic feedback, and an emphasis on independent judgment. A rationale for these enhancements, and the bookmark method, is presented, followed by a detailed description of the materials and procedures used in a meeting to set standards for the 2005 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) in Grade 12 mathematics. The use of difficulty-ordered content domains to provide holistic feedback is a particularly novel feature of the method. Process evaluation results comparing Mapmark to Anghoff-based methods previously used for NAEP standard setting are also presented.

  14. Proposed standardization of assessment protocols for plant molluscicides for use in self-help control programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackenbury, T D

    1998-10-01

    Several candidate plant molluscicides have been identified for possible incorporation into self-help control programmes against schistosomiasis, but their full potential has yet to be realised. This has been, in the most part, due to the absence of standardized assessment and toxicity protocols, and subsequently the inability to register crude plant products in their country of origin or internationally. In an attempt to solve this dilemma, a series of protocols has been designed which will provide a useful standardized guideline for investigations into plant molluscicides, as well as precipitate moves towards the establishment of internationally accepted guidelines for the assessment of various categories of plant biopesticides. Ultimately, being able to register a crude plant extract will permit health organizations such as the World Health Organization to promote the use of such material, especially in self-help control programmes, thereby improving the health standards of rural communities.

  15. The Centrality of Teachers' Judgement Practice in Assessment: A Study of Standards in Moderation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt-Smith, Claire; Klenowski, Val; Gunn, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    There is a strong quest in several countries including Australia for greater national consistency in education and intensifying interest in standards for reporting. Given this, it is important to make explicit the intended and unintended consequences of assessment reform strategies and the pressures to pervert and conform. In a policy context that…

  16. Study on Design and Implementation of JAVA Programming Procedural Assessment Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingting, Xu; Hua, Ma; Xiujuan, Wang; Jing, Wang

    2015-01-01

    The traditional JAVA course examination is just a list of questions from which we cannot know students' skills of programming. According to the eight abilities in curriculum objectives, we designed an assessment standard of JAVA programming course that is based on employment orientation and apply it to practical teaching to check the teaching…

  17. Preschool and Kindergarten Teachers’ Conceptions of Standardized Norm-Referenced Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frans, Niek; Post, Wendy; Oenema-Mostert, Ineke; Minnaert, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The Dutch inspectorate of education mandates that primary schools assess their pupils on a regular basis with a standardized measure to monitor the development of children in pre-primary education. Although schools are free to decide which method they use a vast majority of schools (between 80% and

  18. Ecological Assessment Battery for Numbers (EABN) for brain-damaged patients: standardization and validity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villain, M; Tarabon-Prevost, C; Bayen, E; Robert, H; Bernard, B; Hurteaux, E; Pradat-Diehl, P

    2015-10-01

    Number-processing may be altered following brain injury and might affect the everyday life of patients. We developed the first ecological tool to assess number-processing disorders in brain-injured patients, the Ecological Assessment Battery for Numbers (EABN; in French, the BENQ). The aim of the present study was to standardize and validate this new tool. Standardization included 126 healthy controls equally distributed by age, sex and sociocultural level. First, 17 patients were evaluated by the EABN; then scores for a subgroup of 10 were compared with those from a French analytical calculation test, the Évaluation Clinique des Aptitudes Numériques (ECAN). The concordance between the EABN and the ECAN was analyzed to determine construct validity. Discrimination indexes were calculated to assess the sensitivity of the subtests. Standardization highlighted a major effect of sociocultural level. In total, 9 of 17 patients had a pathological EABN score, with difficulties in telling time, making appointments and reading numerical data. The results of both the EABN and ECAN tests were concordant (Kendall's w=0.97). Finally, the discriminatory power was good, particularly for going to the movies, cheque-writing and following a recipe: scores were>0.4. The EABN is a new tool to assess number-processing disorders in adults. This tool has been standardized and has good psychometric properties for patients with brain injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. A conceptual analysis of standard setting in large-scale assessments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Willem J.

    1994-01-01

    Elements of arbitrariness in the standard setting process are explored, and an alternative to the use of cut scores is presented. The first part of the paper analyzes the use of cut scores in large-scale assessments, discussing three different functions: (1) cut scores define the qualifications used

  20. Setting Proficiency Standards for School Leadership Assessment: An Examination of Cut Score Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravens, Xiu Chen; Goldring, Ellen B.; Porter, Andrew C.; Polikoff, Morgan S.; Murphy, Joseph; Elliott, Stephen N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Performance evaluation informs professional development and helps school personnel improve student learning. Although psychometric literature indicates that a rational, sound, and coherent standard-setting process adds to the credibility of an assessment, few studies have empirically examined the decision-making process. This article…

  1. Incorporation of biomagnification in procedures for environmental risk assessment and standard setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttik R; Traas TP; de Greef J

    1992-01-01

    Recently methods have been developed in the Netherlands to assess quality standards for the environment. Maximum permissible concentrations have been derived for direct exposure to environmental media. In 1991 two simple foodchains were analyzed at the RIVM. - Water --> Fish --> Fish-eating

  2. Assessing Resilience in Students Who Are Deaf or Blind: Supplementing Standardized Achievement Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Michelle A.; Katayama, Andrew D.; Schindling, Casey; Dials, Katherine

    2018-01-01

    Although testing accommodations for standardized assessments are available for students with disabilities, interpretation remains challenging. The authors explored resilience to see if it could contribute to the interpretation of academic success for students who are deaf or hard of hearing or blind or have low vision. High school students (30…

  3. Tests of Alignment among Assessment, Standards, and Instruction Using Generalized Linear Model Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmer, Gavin W.; Polikoff, Morgan S.

    2014-01-01

    An essential component in school accountability efforts is for assessments to be well-aligned with the standards or curriculum they are intended to measure. However, relatively little prior research has explored methods to determine statistical significance of alignment or misalignment. This study explores analyses of alignment as a special case…

  4. Validity: Applying Current Concepts and Standards to Gynecologic Surgery Performance Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeClaire, Edgar L.; Nihira, Mikio A.; Hardré, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    Validity is critical for meaningful assessment of surgical competency. According to the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, validation involves the integration of data from well-defined classifications of evidence. In the authoritative framework, data from all classifications support construct validity claims. The two aims of this…

  5. The Relationship between Students' Performance on Conventional Standardized Mathematics Assessments and Complex Mathematical Modeling Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, Ozgul; Dunya, Beyza Aksu; Diefes-Dux, Heidi A.; Zawojewski, Judith S.

    2016-01-01

    Critical to many science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) career paths is mathematical modeling--specifically, the creation and adaptation of mathematical models to solve problems in complex settings. Conventional standardized measures of mathematics achievement are not structured to directly assess this type of mathematical…

  6. Towards identifying dyslexia in Standard Indonesian: : the development of a reading assessment battery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jap, Bernard Amadeus Jaya; Borleffs, Elisabeth; Maassen, Bernardus

    2017-01-01

    With its transparent orthography, Standard Indonesian is spoken by over 160 million inhabitants and is the primary language of instruction in education and the government in Indonesia. An assessment battery of reading and reading-related skills was developed as a starting point for the diagnosis of

  7. Improving the Memory Sections of the Standardized Assessment of Concussion Using Item Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhiney, Danielle; Kang, Minsoo; Starkey, Chad; Ragan, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to improve the immediate and delayed memory sections of the Standardized Assessment of Concussion (SAC) by identifying a list of more psychometrically sound items (words). A total of 200 participants with no history of concussion in the previous six months (aged 19.60 ± 2.20 years; N?=?93 men, N?=?107 women)…

  8. Using standardized patients versus video cases for representing clinical problems in problem-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Young Yoon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The quality of problem representation is critical for developing students’ problem-solving abilities in problem-based learning (PBL. This study investigates preclinical students’ experience with standardized patients (SPs as a problem representation method compared to using video cases in PBL. Methods: A cohort of 99 second-year preclinical students from Inje University College of Medicine (IUCM responded to a Likert scale questionnaire on their learning experiences after they had experienced both video cases and SPs in PBL. The questionnaire consisted of 14 items with eight subcategories: problem identification, hypothesis generation, motivation, collaborative learning, reflective thinking, authenticity, patient-doctor communication, and attitude toward patients. Results: The results reveal that using SPs led to the preclinical students having significantly positive experiences in boosting patient-doctor communication skills; the perceived authenticity of their clinical situations; development of proper attitudes toward patients; and motivation, reflective thinking, and collaborative learning when compared to using video cases. The SPs also provided more challenges than the video cases during problem identification and hypotheses generation. Conclusion: SPs are more effective than video cases in delivering higher levels of authenticity in clinical problems for PBL. The interaction with SPs engages preclinical students in deeper thinking and discussion; growth of communication skills; development of proper attitudes toward patients; and motivation. Considering the higher cost of SPs compared with video cases, SPs could be used most advantageously during the preclinical period in the IUCM curriculum.

  9. Using standardized patients versus video cases for representing clinical problems in problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Bo Young; Choi, Ikseon; Choi, Seokjin; Kim, Tae-Hee; Roh, Hyerin; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Lee, Jong-Tae

    2016-06-01

    The quality of problem representation is critical for developing students' problem-solving abilities in problem-based learning (PBL). This study investigates preclinical students' experience with standardized patients (SPs) as a problem representation method compared to using video cases in PBL. A cohort of 99 second-year preclinical students from Inje University College of Medicine (IUCM) responded to a Likert scale questionnaire on their learning experiences after they had experienced both video cases and SPs in PBL. The questionnaire consisted of 14 items with eight subcategories: problem identification, hypothesis generation, motivation, collaborative learning, reflective thinking, authenticity, patient-doctor communication, and attitude toward patients. The results reveal that using SPs led to the preclinical students having significantly positive experiences in boosting patient-doctor communication skills; the perceived authenticity of their clinical situations; development of proper attitudes toward patients; and motivation, reflective thinking, and collaborative learning when compared to using video cases. The SPs also provided more challenges than the video cases during problem identification and hypotheses generation. SPs are more effective than video cases in delivering higher levels of authenticity in clinical problems for PBL. The interaction with SPs engages preclinical students in deeper thinking and discussion; growth of communication skills; development of proper attitudes toward patients; and motivation. Considering the higher cost of SPs compared with video cases, SPs could be used most advantageously during the preclinical period in the IUCM curriculum.

  10. MR imaging assessment of clinical problems in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narvaez, Jose A.; Roca, Yolanda; Aguilera, Carlos; Narvaez, Javier

    2002-01-01

    Although MR imaging has been increasingly recognized as a useful tool in the diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the assessment of disease activity, these applications have not yet been usually included in the routine management of this condition. Our goal is to review the current role of MRI in the everyday clinical management of patients with RA. The usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of articular and para-articular changes in specific locations, mainly the craniocervical region and the temporomandibular joint, are reviewed. Clinical problems derived from local extra-articular involvement, such as tenosynovitis, ''rice-bodies'' bursitis, and Baker's cyst rupture, are also described. Finally, we also review the value of MRI in evaluation of some complications of RA such as tendinous rupture, osteonecrosis, stress fracture, and septic arthritis/osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  11. MR imaging assessment of clinical problems in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narvaez, Jose A.; Roca, Yolanda; Aguilera, Carlos [Department of CT and MR Imaging, Hospital Duran i Reynals, Universitaria de Bellvitge, Barcelona (Spain); Narvaez, Javier [Department of Medicine, Delfos Medical Center, Barcelona (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Although MR imaging has been increasingly recognized as a useful tool in the diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the assessment of disease activity, these applications have not yet been usually included in the routine management of this condition. Our goal is to review the current role of MRI in the everyday clinical management of patients with RA. The usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of articular and para-articular changes in specific locations, mainly the craniocervical region and the temporomandibular joint, are reviewed. Clinical problems derived from local extra-articular involvement, such as tenosynovitis, ''rice-bodies'' bursitis, and Baker's cyst rupture, are also described. Finally, we also review the value of MRI in evaluation of some complications of RA such as tendinous rupture, osteonecrosis, stress fracture, and septic arthritis/osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  12. The process of clinical assessment: cognitions of the evaluator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Ibáñez Aguirre

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The cognitive paradigm of the past few decades opens several new possibilities for psychological evaluation.  The objective of this essay is to emphasize the possibilities related to the quality of self-evaluation, specifically professional self-assessment, meaning a critical analysis of one’s own evaluation process. In this essay, metacognition activities and strategies are examined, as are the ways in which these activities and strategies relate to metacognition and cognitive skills. The intent of this theoretical essay is to offer answers to the clinical evaluator’s professional experience. The results indicate that the clinical professional must consider strategies to improve metacognition and cognitive skills through reflection, self-analysis and self-criticism to improve the quality and efficiency of their work.

  13. [Assessment of clinical observation skills of last year medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steichen, O; Georgin-Lavialle, S; Grateau, G; Ranque, B

    2015-05-01

    Clinical examination skills are poorly evaluated by theoretical tests. We observed the clinical examination of real patients by 6th year medical students. Four internists involved in teaching activities defined 11 clinical examination items, with two objective performance criteria each. The students were evaluated in two internal medicine departments during the rotation preceding or following their national graduation test. Scores by item and by criterion and an overall score were calculated and correlated with their rank at the national graduation test. Thirty-two students were evaluated in one department and 18 in the other; each evaluation lasted approximately 30 minutes. The results were similar in both departments. Only 2 items got a score over 75% in this students' sample (acute respiratory failure, peripheral pulses); 4 items were satisfied at less than 50% (lymph nodes, right heart failure, liver failure, and attention). The mean overall score was 6.5/11 (standard deviation 1.5). National rankings were good (median 1605/8001, interquartile 453-3036) but uncorrelated with the global score (Spearman coefficient -0.13; P=0.39). Bedside evaluation of the students reveals substantial deficiencies, a few months or weeks before taking their position as residents. Several elementary skills are mastered by a minority of them (search for an asterixis, distended jugular veins, deep tendon reflexes), even among those successful at the national graduation test. Bedside evaluation of clinical examination skills should be more systematically performed. Copyright © 2014 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. An agenda for assessing and improving conservation impacts of sustainability standards in tropical agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milder, Jeffrey C; Arbuthnot, Margaret; Blackman, Allen; Brooks, Sharon E; Giovannucci, Daniele; Gross, Lee; Kennedy, Elizabeth T; Komives, Kristin; Lambin, Eric F; Lee, Audrey; Meyer, Daniel; Newton, Peter; Phalan, Ben; Schroth, Götz; Semroc, Bambi; Van Rikxoort, Henk; Zrust, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Sustainability standards and certification serve to differentiate and provide market recognition to goods produced in accordance with social and environmental good practices, typically including practices to protect biodiversity. Such standards have seen rapid growth, including in tropical agricultural commodities such as cocoa, coffee, palm oil, soybeans, and tea. Given the role of sustainability standards in influencing land use in hotspots of biodiversity, deforestation, and agricultural intensification, much could be gained from efforts to evaluate and increase the conservation payoff of these schemes. To this end, we devised a systematic approach for monitoring and evaluating the conservation impacts of agricultural sustainability standards and for using the resulting evidence to improve the effectiveness of such standards over time. The approach is oriented around a set of hypotheses and corresponding research questions about how sustainability standards are predicted to deliver conservation benefits. These questions are addressed through data from multiple sources, including basic common information from certification audits; field monitoring of environmental outcomes at a sample of certified sites; and rigorous impact assessment research based on experimental or quasi-experimental methods. Integration of these sources can generate time-series data that are comparable across sites and regions and provide detailed portraits of the effects of sustainability standards. To implement this approach, we propose new collaborations between the conservation research community and the sustainability standards community to develop common indicators and monitoring protocols, foster data sharing and synthesis, and link research and practice more effectively. As the role of sustainability standards in tropical land-use governance continues to evolve, robust evidence on the factors contributing to effectiveness can help to ensure that such standards are designed and

  15. Research on the technical requirements standards of high efficiency precipitator in power industries for assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huang; Ling, Lin; Jun, Guo; Jianguo, Li; Yongzhong, Wang

    2017-11-01

    Facing the increasingly severe situation of air pollution, China are now positively promoting the evaluation of high efficiency air pollution control equipments and the research of the relative national standards. This paper showed the significance and the effect of formulating the technical requirements of high efficiency precipitator equipments for assessment national standards in power industries as well as the research thoughts and principle of these standards. It introduce the qualitative and quantitative evaluation requirements of high efficiency precipitators using in power industries and the core technical content such as testing, calculating, evaluation methods and so on. The implementation of a series of national standards is in order to lead and promote the production and application of high efficiency precipitator equipments in the field of the prevention of air pollution in national power industries.

  16. Personality Assessment of Rosebud Sioux: A Comparison of Rorschach, Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory and 16PF Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, Richard H.; And Others

    Three standard assessment instruments (Rorschach, Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory and 16PF) were administered to 12 participating Rosebud Sioux Indians--6 males, 6 females. Reports were generated for each instrument. Consensual and unique concepts contained in all the reports were analyzed in order to describe the contents. Six judges, all…

  17. Assessment of quality in psychiatric nursing documentation - a clinical audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instefjord, Marit Helen; Aasekjær, Katrine; Espehaug, Birgitte; Graverholt, Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    Quality in nursing documentation facilitates continuity of care and patient safety. Lack of communication between healthcare providers is associated with errors and adverse events. Shortcomings are identified in nursing documentation in several clinical specialties, but very little is known about the quality of how nurses document in the field of psychiatry. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the quality of the written nursing documentation in a psychiatric hospital. A cross-sectional, retrospective patient record review was conducted using the N-Catch audit instrument. In 2011 the nursing documentation from 21 persons admitted to a psychiatric department from September to December 2010 was assessed. The N-Catch instrument was used to audit the record structure, admission notes, nursing care plans, progress and outcome reports, discharge notes and information about the patients' personal details. The items of N-Catch were scored for quantity and/or quality (0-3 points). The item 'quantity of progress and evaluation notes' had the lowest score: in 86% of the records progress and outcome were evaluated only sporadically. The items 'the patients' personal details' and 'quantity of record structure' had the highest scores: respectively 100% and 71% of the records achieved the highest score of these items. Deficiencies in nursing documentation identified in other clinical specialties also apply to the clinical field of psychiatry. The quality of electronic written nursing documentation in psychiatric nursing needs improvements to ensure continuity and patient safety. This study shows the importance of the existence of a validated tool, readily available to assess local levels of nursing documentation quality.

  18. Assessing the readability of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Danny T Y; Hanauer, David A; Mei, Qiaozhu; Clark, Patricia M; An, Lawrence C; Proulx, Joshua; Zeng, Qing T; Vydiswaran, V G Vinod; Collins-Thompson, Kevyn; Zheng, Kai

    2016-03-01

    ClinicalTrials.gov serves critical functions of disseminating trial information to the public and helping the trials recruit participants. This study assessed the readability of trial descriptions at ClinicalTrials.gov using multiple quantitative measures. The analysis included all 165,988 trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as of April 30, 2014. To obtain benchmarks, the authors also analyzed 2 other medical corpora: (1) all 955 Health Topics articles from MedlinePlus and (2) a random sample of 100,000 clinician notes retrieved from an electronic health records system intended for conveying internal communication among medical professionals. The authors characterized each of the corpora using 4 surface metrics, and then applied 5 different scoring algorithms to assess their readability. The authors hypothesized that clinician notes would be most difficult to read, followed by trial descriptions and MedlinePlus Health Topics articles. Trial descriptions have the longest average sentence length (26.1 words) across all corpora; 65% of their words used are not covered by a basic medical English dictionary. In comparison, average sentence length of MedlinePlus Health Topics articles is 61% shorter, vocabulary size is 95% smaller, and dictionary coverage is 46% higher. All 5 scoring algorithms consistently rated CliniclTrials.gov trial descriptions the most difficult corpus to read, even harder than clinician notes. On average, it requires 18 years of education to properly understand these trial descriptions according to the results generated by the readability assessment algorithms. Trial descriptions at CliniclTrials.gov are extremely difficult to read. Significant work is warranted to improve their readability in order to achieve CliniclTrials.gov's goal of facilitating information dissemination and subject recruitment. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association 2015. This work is written by US Government

  19. An Objective Structured Clinical Examination to Assess Pharmacy Resident Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A.B. Cauthon

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective was to utilize an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE for assessment of pharmacy residents. Innovation: Post-graduate year 1 (PGY1 and post-graduate year 2 (PGY2 pharmacy residents completing multiple, local residency programs were invited to participate in an OSCE. A total of eight PGY1 residents and one PGY2 resident completed the OSCE. American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP residency program goals were aligned for each case, which were originally developed for a fourth-year pharmacy student OSCE. Station design included outpatient and inpatient settings with patient and physician interactions. Median communication and clinical skills scores were evaluated. Critical Analysis: The OSCE allows for assessment of all residents on common scenarios. Pharmacy residents met competency requirements and demonstrated excellent communication skills. The OSCE was able to evaluate both physician-pharmacist communication and patient-pharmacist communication. Baseline performance related to the ASHP goals and objectives was not completed; however, the OSCE could highlight resident strengths and weaknesses in communication and clinical skills. The OSCE could simulate independent practice, may reduce bias, and could provide an evaluation of the resident by a patient. However, the OSCE incurs higher resource utilization, specifically monetary and time, than other assessment methods. Next Steps: The pilot study results provide a beginning for further study of OSCEs for pharmacy residents. Further study should include surveying the residency directors about use of the OSCE, a comparison of performance between the OSCE and preceptor evaluations of residents on ASHP goals and objectives, and an evaluation of OSCE implementation at different time points within the residency. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in

  20. Clinical standardized fMRI reveals altered language lateralization in patients with brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partovi, S; Jacobi, B; Rapps, N; Zipp, L; Karimi, S; Rengier, F; Lyo, J K; Stippich, C

    2012-12-01

    Brain tumors affecting language-relevant areas may influence language lateralization. The purpose of this study was to systematically investigate language lateralization in brain tumor patients using clinical language fMRI, comparing the results with a group of healthy volunteers. Fifty-seven strictly right-handed patients with left-hemispheric-space intracranial masses (mainly neoplastic) affecting either the Broca area (n = 19) or Wernicke area (n = 38) were prospectively enrolled in this study. Fourteen healthy volunteers served as a control group. Standardized clinical language fMRI, using visually triggered sentence- and word-generation paradigms, was performed on a 1.5T MR scanner. Semiautomated analyses of all functional data were conducted on an individual basis using BrainVoyager. A regional lateralization index was calculated for Broca and Wernicke areas separately versus their corresponding right-hemisphere homologs. In masses affecting the Broca area, a significant decrease in the lateralization index was found when performing word generation (P = .0017), whereas when applying sentence generation, the decrease did not reach statistical significance (P = .851). Masses affecting the Wernicke area induced a significant decrease of the lateralization index when performing sentence generation (P = .0007), whereas when applying word generation, the decrease was not statistically significant (P = .310). Clinical language fMRI was feasible for patients with brain tumors and provided relevant presurgical information by localizing essential language areas and determining language dominance. A significant effect of the brain masses on language lateralization was observed, with a shift toward the contralesional, nondominant hemisphere. This may reflect compensatory mechanisms of the brain to maintain communicative abilities.