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Sample records for standard chest radiographs

  1. Black Lung Benefits Act: standards for chest radiographs. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-17

    Physicians and adjudicators use chest radiographs (X-rays) as a tool in evaluating whether a coal miner suffers from pneumoconiosis (black lung disease). Accordingly, the Department's regulations implementing the Black Lung Benefits Act allow the submission of radiographs in connection with benefit claims and set out quality standards for administering and interpreting film-based chest radiographs. This final rule updates the Department's existing film-radiograph standards and provides parallel standards for digital radiographs. This rule also updates outdated terminology and removes certain obsolete provisions.

  2. 78 FR 53645 - Black Lung Benefits Act: Standards for Chest Radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ...-AA07 Black Lung Benefits Act: Standards for Chest Radiographs AGENCY: Office of Workers' Compensation... connection with claims filed under the Black Lung Benefits Act. The comment period closed on August 12, 2013..., 2013, OWCP published the direct final rule, Black Lung Benefits Act: Standards for Chest Radiographs...

  3. Black Lung Benefits Act: standards for chest radiographs. Direct final rule; request for comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    Physicians and adjudicators use chest radiographs (X-rays) as a tool in evaluating whether a coal miner suffers from pneumoconiosis (black lung disease). Accordingly, the Department's regulations implementing the Black Lung Benefits Act allow the submission of radiographs in connection with benefit claims and set out quality standards for their performance. These standards are currently limited to film radiographs. In recent years, many medical facilities have phased out film radiography in favor of digital radiography. This direct final rule updates the existing film-radiograph standards and provides parallel standards for digital radiographs. This rule also updates outdated terminology and removes certain obsolete provisions.

  4. 78 FR 35575 - Black Lung Benefits Act: Standards for Chest Radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    ...-AA07 Black Lung Benefits Act: Standards for Chest Radiographs AGENCY: Office of Workers' Compensation... pneumoconiosis (black lung disease). Accordingly, the Department's regulations implementing the Black Lung... used by the Department of Labor in the Black Lung Benefits Act (BLBA) context, and OWCP alerted the...

  5. Lung segmentation on standard and mobile chest radiographs using oriented Gaussian derivatives filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Ahmad, Wan Siti Halimatul Munirah; Zaki, W Mimi Diyana W; Ahmad Fauzi, Mohammad Faizal

    2015-03-04

    Unsupervised lung segmentation method is one of the mandatory processes in order to develop a Content Based Medical Image Retrieval System (CBMIRS) of CXR. The purpose of the study is to present a robust solution for lung segmentation of standard and mobile chest radiographs using fully automated unsupervised method. The novel method is based on oriented Gaussian derivatives filter with seven orientations, combined with Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) clustering and thresholding to refine the lung region. In addition, a new algorithm to automatically generate a threshold value for each Gaussian response is also proposed. The algorithms are applied to both PA and AP chest radiographs from both public JSRT dataset and our private datasets from collaborative hospital. Two pre-processing blocks are introduced to standardize the images from different machines. Comparisons with the previous works found in the literature on JSRT dataset shows that our method gives a reasonably good result. We also compare our algorithm with other unsupervised methods to provide fairly comparative measures on the performances for all datasets. Performance measures (accuracy, F-score, precision, sensitivity and specificity) for the segmentation of lung in public JSRT dataset are above 0.90 except for the overlap measure is 0.87. The standard deviations for all measures are very low, from 0.01 to 0.06. The overlap measure for the private image database is 0.81 (images from standard machine) and 0.69 (images from two mobile machines). The algorithm is fully automated and fast, with the average execution time of 12.5 s for 512 by 512 pixels resolution. Our proposed method is fully automated, unsupervised, with no training or learning stage is necessary to segment the lungs taken using both a standard machine and two different mobile machines. The proposed pre-processing blocks are significantly useful to standardize the radiographs from mobile machines. The algorithm gives good performance measures

  6. Clavicle segmentation in chest radiographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogeweg, L.E.; Sanchez, C.I.; Jong, P.A. de; Maduskar, P.; Ginneken, B. van

    2012-01-01

    Automated delineation of anatomical structures in chest radiographs is difficult due to superimposition of multiple structures. In this work an automated technique to segment the clavicles in posterior-anterior chest radiographs is presented in which three methods are combined. Pixel classification

  7. Chest radiographic findings of leptospirosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mee Hyun; Jung, Hee Tae; Lee, Young Joong; Yoon, Jong Sup

    1986-01-01

    1. A study on chest radiographic findings of 54 cases with pneumonia like symptoms was performed. Of 54 cases, 8 cases were confirmed to be leptospirosis and 7 cases were leptospirosis combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever. 2. Of 8 cases of leptospirosis, 4 cases showed abnormal chest radiographic findings: acinar nodular type 2, massive confluent consolidation type 2. Of 7 cases of leptospirosis combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever: acinar nodular type 3, massive confluent consolidation type 1, and increased interstitial markings type 1 respectively. 3. It was considered to be difficult to diagnose the leptospirosis on chest radiographic findings alone, especially the case combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever.

  8. Standardized Interpretation of Chest Radiographs in Cases of Pediatric Pneumonia From the PERCH Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancourt, Nicholas; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Barger-Kamate, Breanna; de Campo, John; de Campo, Margaret; Diallo, Mahamadou; Ebruke, Bernard E; Feikin, Daniel R; Gleeson, Fergus; Gong, Wenfeng; Hammitt, Laura L; Izadnegahdar, Rasa; Kruatrachue, Anchalee; Madhi, Shabir A; Manduku, Veronica; Matin, Fariha Bushra; Mahomed, Nasreen; Moore, David P; Mwenechanya, Musaku; Nahar, Kamrun; Oluwalana, Claire; Ominde, Micah Silaba; Prosperi, Christine; Sande, Joyce; Suntarattiwong, Piyarat; O'Brien, Katherine L

    2017-06-15

    Chest radiographs (CXRs) are a valuable diagnostic tool in epidemiologic studies of pneumonia. The World Health Organization (WHO) methodology for the interpretation of pediatric CXRs has not been evaluated beyond its intended application as an endpoint measure for bacterial vaccine trials. The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) study enrolled children aged 1-59 months hospitalized with WHO-defined severe and very severe pneumonia from 7 low- and middle-income countries. An interpretation process categorized each CXR into 1 of 5 conclusions: consolidation, other infiltrate, both consolidation and other infiltrate, normal, or uninterpretable. Two members of a 14-person reading panel, who had undertaken training and standardization in CXR interpretation, interpreted each CXR. Two members of an arbitration panel provided additional independent reviews of CXRs with discordant interpretations at the primary reading, blinded to previous reports. Further discordance was resolved with consensus discussion. A total of 4172 CXRs were obtained from 4232 cases. Observed agreement for detecting consolidation (with or without other infiltrate) between primary readers was 78% (κ = 0.50) and between arbitrators was 84% (κ = 0.61); agreement for primary readers and arbitrators across 5 conclusion categories was 43.5% (κ = 0.25) and 48.5% (κ = 0.32), respectively. Disagreement was most frequent between conclusions of other infiltrate and normal for both the reading panel and the arbitration panel (32% and 30% of discordant CXRs, respectively). Agreement was similar to that of previous evaluations using the WHO methodology for detecting consolidation, but poor for other infiltrates despite attempts at a rigorous standardization process. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  9. 78 FR 35549 - Black Lung Benefits Act: Standards for Chest Radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    ... radiographs (X-rays) as a tool in evaluating whether a coal miner suffers from pneumoconiosis (black lung disease). Accordingly, the Department's regulations implementing the Black Lung Benefits Act allow the... informed the public that the standards might also be used by the Department of Labor in the Black Lung...

  10. Gastric tumors on chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Shozo; Kawanami, Takashi; Russell, W.J.

    1978-04-01

    Gastric neoplasms of three patients protruded into their gas-containing fornices and were first visualized on plain chest radiographs. Endoscopy and/or surgery confirmed these to be a polyp, a leiomyoma, and an adenocarcinoma. The polyp, 1.3 cm in diameter, was the smallest of these three, but smaller lesions may be detectable under suitable conditions. Adequate technique and positioning, sufficiently large lesions in the upper portion of the stomach, a central beam tangential to the tumor, sufficient gas in the stomach, and careful scrutiny by the observer are required. Lesions may be more readily visualized during chest radiography when oral sodium bicarbonate is used to distend the stomach. In chest radiography, exposure limited to the lung fields has been advocated for economy and dose reduction. However, too small an exposure field may result in loss of information potentially beneficial to the patient. Using the smaller of two popular film sizes (35 x 43 cm and 35 x 35 cm), the saving in surface and bone marrow doses is negligible, and the saving in gonad dose may be nil over that when shielding is used. The interest of the observer may be absorbed by a concomitant cardiac or pulmonary lesion. Careful scrutiny of the entire radiograph is therefore essential. (author)

  11. Chest radiographic findings in Human Immunodeficiency Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients had postero-anterior (PA) chest radiographs done in full inspiration, with a Roentgen 301 radiographic machine (GEC Medical) using the following factors; KVp = 65, focus-film distance = 150cm and 12 – 15mAs. A total of 308 confirmed HIV- positive patients had chest radiographic examinations. Ninety-nine ...

  12. Chest Radiographic Findings in Newly Diagnosed Pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five hundred newly diagnosed cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis were treated with directly observed short-course treatment and 100 of them had chest radiographic examination done. The various chest radiographic patterns in the 100 subjects were studied and included: Fluffy exudative changes 80(80%), fibrosis 70(70%) ...

  13. Chest radiographic findings in acute paraquat poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Gyeong Gyun; Lee, Mi Sook; Kim, Hee Jun; Sun, In O

    2016-01-01

    To describe the chest radiographic findings of acute paraquat poisoning. 691 patients visited the emergency department of our hospital between January 2006 and October 2012 for paraquat poisoning. Of these 691, we identified 56 patients whose initial chest radiographs were normal but who developed radiographic abnormalities within one week. We evaluated their radiographic findings and the differences in imaging features based on mortality. The most common finding was diffuse consolidation (29/56, 52%), followed by consolidation with linear and nodular opacities (18/56, 32%), and combined consolidation and pneumomediastinum (7/56, 13%). Pleural effusion was noted in 17 patients (30%). The two survivors (4%) showed peripheral consolidations, while the 54 patients (96%) who died demonstrated bilateral (42/54, 78%) or unilateral (12/54, 22%) diffuse consolidations. Rapidly progressing diffuse pulmonary consolidation was observed within one week on follow-up radiographs after paraquat ingestion in the deceased, but the survivors demonstrated peripheral consolidation

  14. Chest radiographic findings in acute paraquat poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Gyeong Gyun; Lee, Mi Sook; Kim, Hee Jun; Sun, In O [Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    To describe the chest radiographic findings of acute paraquat poisoning. 691 patients visited the emergency department of our hospital between January 2006 and October 2012 for paraquat poisoning. Of these 691, we identified 56 patients whose initial chest radiographs were normal but who developed radiographic abnormalities within one week. We evaluated their radiographic findings and the differences in imaging features based on mortality. The most common finding was diffuse consolidation (29/56, 52%), followed by consolidation with linear and nodular opacities (18/56, 32%), and combined consolidation and pneumomediastinum (7/56, 13%). Pleural effusion was noted in 17 patients (30%). The two survivors (4%) showed peripheral consolidations, while the 54 patients (96%) who died demonstrated bilateral (42/54, 78%) or unilateral (12/54, 22%) diffuse consolidations. Rapidly progressing diffuse pulmonary consolidation was observed within one week on follow-up radiographs after paraquat ingestion in the deceased, but the survivors demonstrated peripheral consolidation.

  15. Quantification of pneumothorax volume on chest radiographs: comparison between the collins' and the axel's methods with three-dimensional CT as the standard of reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Keun; Kim, Hyung Jin; Lee, Kyung Hee; Kim, Joung Taek; Kim, Kwang Ho; Suh, Chang Hae; Han, Heon

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold. In a preliminary study, we evaluated the accuracy of 3-D (three-dimensional) CT for the estimation of pneumothorax volume and for providing the optimal postprocessing method for clinical study. In the clinical study, we determined which of the two methods, Collins' and Axel's, was more accurate for the estimation of pneumothorax volume, as seen on chest radiographs, using 3-D CT as the standard of reference. In the preliminary study, 3-D CT was applied to phantoms and to four patients with pneumothorax using two different postprocessing methods, manual contour delineation and thresholding. In the clinical study, 3-D CT was performed in 13 patients with pneumothorax. For the purpose of evaluating conventional radiographs, a localizer scan was used for comparing the accuracy of Collins' method with that of Axel's method, with 3-D CT as the standard of reference. The preliminary study revealed that 3-D CT estimated pneumothorax volume with great accuracy and that manual contour delineation and thresholding measured volume equally well. Because of the shorter postprocessing time required with thresholding than with manual contour delineation (5 min versus 30 min), the former was used during clinical study. The results of this indicated close correlation between the measurements obtained using Collins' method on chest radiographs and those obtained by 3-D CT(r=0.95, p 0.05). 3-D CT can estimate pneumothorax volume with great accuracy. Collins' method is superior to Axel's method for the quantification of pneumothorax volume as seen on chest radiographs

  16. Chest radiograph interpretation by medical students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, D.R.; Goddard, P.R.; Callaway, M.P.; Greenwood, R.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To assess the ability of final year medical students to interpret conventional chest radiographs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten conventional chest radiographs were selected from a teaching hospital radiology department library that were good radiological examples of common conditions. All were conditions that a medical student should be expected to recognize by the end of their training. One normal radiograph was included. The radiographs were shown to 52 final year medical students who were asked to describe their findings. RESULTS: The median score achieved was 12.5 out of 20 (range 6-18). There was no difference between the median scores of male and female students (12.5 and 12.3, respectively, p=0.82) but male students were more likely to be certain of their answers than female students (median certainty scores 23.0 and 14.0, respectively). The overall degree of certainty was low. On no radiograph were more than 25% of students definite about their answer. Students had received little formal radiology teaching (2-42 h, median 21) and few expressed an interest in radiology as a career. Only two (3.8%) students thought they were good at interpreting chest radiographs, 17 (32.7%) thought they were bad or awful. CONCLUSION: Medical students reaching the end of their training do not perform well at interpreting simple chest radiographs. They lack confidence and have received little formal radiological tuition. Perhaps as a result, few are interested in radiology as a career, which is a matter for concern in view of the current shortage of radiologists in the UK

  17. Plain chest radiographic findings of smoke inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Shin Ho; Lee, Eil Weong; Kim, Hyun Suk; Park, Ju Youn; Kim, Soo Hyun; Hong, Sung Hwan; Park, Hong Suk; Lee, Kwan Seop; Kang Ik Won

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the plain chest radiographic findings of smoke inhalation. Our study included 72 burn patients who had suffered smoke inhalation. On admission, all underwent serial portable chest AP radiography. We retrospectively reviewed the plain chest radiographs taken between admission and pootburn day five, evaluating the pattern, distribution, and time onset of direct injury to the respiratory system by smoke inhalation. The lesions were also assessed for change. In 16 of 72 patients (22%), abnormal findings of direct injury to the respiratory system by smoke inhalation were revealed by the radiographs. Abnormal findings were 15 pulmonary lesions and one subglottic tracheal narrowing. Findings of pulmonary lesions were multiple small patchy consolidations (10/15), peribronchial cuffing (8/15), and perivascular fuzziness (6/15). Patterns of pulmonary lesions were mixed alveolar and interstitial lesion (n=3D9), interstitial lesion (n=3D5), and alveolar lesion (n=3D1). No interlobular septal thickening was observed. Pulmonary edema was distributed predominantly in the upper lung zone and perihilar region, with asymmetricity. Its time of onset was within 24 hours in 13 cases, 24-48 hours in two cases, and 48-72 hours in one. Five of 16 patients progressed to ARDS. Chest radiographs showed that pulmonary lesions caused by inhalation injury were due to pulmonary edema, which the pattern of which was commonly mixed alveolar and interstitial. (author)

  18. Chest radiographic manifestations of scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KPP Abhilash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Rationale: Respiratory system involvement in scrub typhus is seen in 20–72% of patients. In endemic areas, good understanding and familiarity with the various radiologic findings of scrub typhus are essential in identifying pulmonary complications. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted to a tertiary care center with scrub typhus between October 2012 and September 2013 and had a chest X ray done were included in the analysis. Details and radiographic findings were noted and factors associated with abnormal X-rays were analyzed. Results: The study cohort contained 398 patients. Common presenting complaints included fever (100%, generalized myalgia (83%, headache (65%, dyspnea (54%, cough (24.3%, and altered sensorium (14%. Almost half of the patients (49.4% had normal chest radiographs. Common radiological pulmonary abnormalities included pleural effusion (14.6%, acute respiratory distress syndrome (14%, airspace opacity (10.5%, reticulonodular opacities (10.3%, peribronchial thickening (5.8%, and pulmonary edema (2%. Cardiomegaly was noted in 3.5% of patients. Breathlessness, presence of an eschar, platelet counts of 2 mg/dL had the highest odds of having an abnormal chest radiograph. Patients with an abnormal chest X-ray had a higher requirement of noninvasive ventilation (odds ratio [OR]: 13.98; 95% confidence interval CI: 5.89–33.16, invasive ventilation (OR: 18.07; 95% CI: 6.42–50.88, inotropes (OR: 8.76; 95% CI: 4.35–17.62, higher involvement of other organ systems, longer duration of hospital stay (3.18 ± 3 vs. 7.27 ± 5.58 days; P< 0.001, and higher mortality (OR: 4.63; 95% CI: 1.54–13.85. Conclusion: Almost half of the patients with scrub typhus have abnormal chest radiographs. Chest radiography should be included as part of basic evaluation at presentation in patients with scrub typhus, especially in those with breathlessness, eschar, jaundice, and severe thrombocytopenia.

  19. Lung involvement quantification in chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacomini, Guilherme; Alvarez, Matheus; Oliveira, Marcela de; Miranda, Jose Ricardo A.; Pina, Diana R.; Pereira, Paulo C.M.; Ribeiro, Sergio M.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is an infectious disease which remains a global health problem. The chest radiography is the commonly method employed to assess the TB's evolution. The methods for quantification of abnormalities of chest are usually performed on CT scans (CT). This quantification is important to assess the TB evolution and treatment and comparing different treatments. However, precise quantification is not feasible for the amount of CT scans required. The purpose of this work is to develop a methodology for quantification of lung damage caused by TB through chest radiographs. It was developed an algorithm for computational processing of exams in Matlab, which creates a lungs' 3D representation, with compromised dilated regions inside. The quantification of lung lesions was also made for the same patients through CT scans. The measurements from the two methods were compared and resulting in strong correlation. Applying statistical Bland and Altman, all samples were within the limits of agreement, with a confidence interval of 95%. The results showed an average variation of around 13% between the two quantification methods. The results suggest the effectiveness and applicability of the method developed, providing better risk-benefit to the patient and cost-benefit ratio for the institution. (author)

  20. Chest radiographic findings of tuberculous pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Seung Hye; Sung, Dong Wook; Yoon, Yup; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1991-01-01

    When tuberculous pneumonia appears as a segmental or loabr consolidation, its is difficult to differentiate tuberculous pneumonia from nontuberculous bacterial pneumonia radiologically. The object of this study was to define the typical radiographic findings of tuberculous pneumonia through comparative analysis of tuberculous and nontuberculous pneumonia. A review of chest radiolograph in 29 patients with tuberculous pneumonia and in 23 patients with nontuberculous bacterial pneumonia was made with regard to homogeneity, volume loss, air-fluid level within the cavities, air-bronchogram, pleural disease, and predilection sites. The characteristic findings of tuberculous pneumonia are a heterogeneous density of infiltration (66%), evidence of volume loss of infiltrative lesion (52%), and cavity formation (48%) without air - fluid level. An associated parameter of analysis is the relative absence of leukocytosis (76%)

  1. Diagnostic Yield of Recommendations for Chest CT Examination Prompted by Outpatient Chest Radiographic Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H. Benjamin; Gilman, Matthew D.; Wu, Carol C.; Cushing, Matthew S.; Halpern, Elkan F.; Zhao, Jing; Pandharipande, Pari V.; Shepard, Jo-Anne O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic yield of recommended chest computed tomography (CT) prompted by abnormalities detected on outpatient chest radiographic images. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval; informed consent was waived. Reports of all outpatient chest radiographic examinations performed at a large academic center during 2008 (n = 29 138) were queried to identify studies that included a recommendation for a chest CT imaging. The radiology information system was queried for these patients to determine if a chest CT examination was obtained within 1 year of the index radiographic examination that contained the recommendation. For chest CT examinations obtained within 1 year of the index chest radiographic examination and that met inclusion criteria, chest CT images were reviewed to determine if there was an abnormality that corresponded to the chest radiographic finding that prompted the recommendation. All corresponding abnormalities were categorized as clinically relevant or not clinically relevant, based on whether further work-up or treatment was warranted. Groups were compared by using t test and Fisher exact test with a Bonferroni correction applied for multiple comparisons. Results There were 4.5% (1316 of 29138 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 4.3%, 4.8%]) of outpatient chest radiographic examinations that contained a recommendation for chest CT examination, and increasing patient age (P history (P = .001) were associated with increased likelihood of a recommendation for chest CT examination. Of patients within this subset who met inclusion criteria, 65.4% (691 of 1057 [95% CI: 62.4%, 68.2%) underwent a chest CT examination within the year after the index chest radiographic examination. Clinically relevant corresponding abnormalities were present on chest CT images in 41.4% (286 of 691 [95% CI: 37.7%, 45.2%]) of cases, nonclinically relevant corresponding abnormalities in 20.6% (142 of 691 [95% CI: 17

  2. Skeletal changes mimicking intrathoracic disease on chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelderen, WFC van

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Various chest radiographs are illustrated to demonstrate features where bony changes may mimic intrathoracic disease. To confirm the skeletal origin and nature, further conventional radiographs often suffice, and the need for CT or scintigraphy may therefore be obviated. At the time of presentation for radiography of the chest, further pertinent clinical details can be obtained from the patient by the department staff, as required. All previous radiographs and radiological reports should be readily available. In order to add to the educational value of the 13 cases illustrated, all are presented in quiz format, with the answers and further images included in the text.

  3. Chest radiographic features of human metapneumovirus infection in pediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilmes, Melissa A.; Daniel Dunnavant, F.; Singh, Sudha P.; Ellis, Wendy D. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nashville, TN (United States); Payne, Daniel C. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States); Zhu, Yuwei [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics, Nashville, TN (United States); Griffin, Marie R. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Health Policy, Nashville, TN (United States); Edwards, Kathryn M. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Williams, John V. [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); University of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-12-15

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) was identified in 2001 and is a common cause of acute respiratory illness in young children. The radiologic characteristics of laboratory-confirmed HMPV acute respiratory illness in young children have not been systematically assessed. We systematically evaluated the radiographic characteristics of acute respiratory illness associated with HMPV in a prospective cohort of pediatric patients. We included chest radiographs from children <5 years old with acute respiratory illness who were enrolled in the prospective New Vaccine Surveillance Network (NVSN) study from 2003 to 2009 and were diagnosed with HMPV by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Of 215 HMPV-positive subjects enrolled at our tertiary care children's hospital, 68 had chest radiographs obtained by the treating clinician that were available for review. Two fellowship-trained pediatric radiologists, independently and then in consensus, retrospectively evaluated these chest radiographs for their radiographic features. Parahilar opacities were the most commonly observed abnormality, occurring in 87% of children with HMPV. Hyperinflation also occurred frequently (69%). Atelectasis (40%) and consolidation (18%) appeared less frequently. Pleural effusion and pneumothorax were not seen on any radiographs. The clinical presentations of HMPV include bronchiolitis, croup and pneumonia. Dominant chest radiographic abnormalities include parahilar opacities and hyperinflation, with occasional consolidation. Recognition of the imaging patterns seen with common viral illnesses like respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and HMPV might facilitate diagnosis and limit unnecessary antibiotic treatment. (orig.)

  4. Chest radiographic features of human metapneumovirus infection in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilmes, Melissa A.; Daniel Dunnavant, F.; Singh, Sudha P.; Ellis, Wendy D.; Payne, Daniel C.; Zhu, Yuwei; Griffin, Marie R.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Williams, John V.

    2017-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) was identified in 2001 and is a common cause of acute respiratory illness in young children. The radiologic characteristics of laboratory-confirmed HMPV acute respiratory illness in young children have not been systematically assessed. We systematically evaluated the radiographic characteristics of acute respiratory illness associated with HMPV in a prospective cohort of pediatric patients. We included chest radiographs from children <5 years old with acute respiratory illness who were enrolled in the prospective New Vaccine Surveillance Network (NVSN) study from 2003 to 2009 and were diagnosed with HMPV by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Of 215 HMPV-positive subjects enrolled at our tertiary care children's hospital, 68 had chest radiographs obtained by the treating clinician that were available for review. Two fellowship-trained pediatric radiologists, independently and then in consensus, retrospectively evaluated these chest radiographs for their radiographic features. Parahilar opacities were the most commonly observed abnormality, occurring in 87% of children with HMPV. Hyperinflation also occurred frequently (69%). Atelectasis (40%) and consolidation (18%) appeared less frequently. Pleural effusion and pneumothorax were not seen on any radiographs. The clinical presentations of HMPV include bronchiolitis, croup and pneumonia. Dominant chest radiographic abnormalities include parahilar opacities and hyperinflation, with occasional consolidation. Recognition of the imaging patterns seen with common viral illnesses like respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and HMPV might facilitate diagnosis and limit unnecessary antibiotic treatment. (orig.)

  5. Should the lateral chest radiograph be routinely performed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Fatuma; Williams, Imelda

    2014-01-01

    Background: The chest x-ray is one of the most common plain film radiographic examinations performed. Inclusion of the lateral chest radiograph varies internationally and nationally across radiology departments and states in Australia. Search strategy: A search strategy of the databases Cochrane Library, Ovid Medline/Medline, PubMed, Scopus and Science Direct was conducted. The results were restricted to those published between 1985 and 2013 and those published in English. The following search terms were used: ‘lateral chest’, ‘radiograph’, ‘digital radiography’, ‘chest x-ray’, ‘plain film radiography’, ‘ionising radiation’. The results were restricted to publications with these terms in the title, abstract and/or keywords. Main findings: There are few national or international guidelines pertaining to the inclusion of the lateral chest x-ray as routine. Primary concerns are the increased radiation dose associated with the additional chest view and reduction of medical imaging services cost. Modern digital imaging systems result in a lower radiation dose. The diagnostic yield of the lateral chest x-ray is highly dependent on the clinical indications of the patient. Further research into the routine inclusion of the lateral chest x-ray is recommended. Conclusion: Review of the literature suggests that the lateral chest radiograph should not be performed routinely unless clinically indicated

  6. Intracavitary pulmonary aspergilloma: comparison of CT with plain chest radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Chun Hwan; Im, Jung Gi; Yu, Eun Ju; Han, Man Chung

    1991-01-01

    Saprophytic intracavitary fungus ball is the most common form of pulmonary involvement of aspergillosis. Crescent-shaped air shadow surrounded by a creativity wall is known to be a characteristic of pulmonary aspergilloma on plain chest radiograph. However, in case of early lesion in which intracavitary aspergilloma is overlapped with adjacent destroyed lung or mediastinal and hilar density, the air meniscus can not be demonstrated on plain radiograph. In such a case, CT scan might provide additional information that suggests fungus ball. The aim of this study is to describe the variable CT appearances of pulmonary aspergilloma in addition to air meniscus sign and to correlate the findings on CT with those of plain radiograph and pathology. The diagnosis of intracavitary aspergilloma was suggested on both CT and plain radiograph in case that air-meniscus sign was visible. CT scans could add more diagnostic information over chest radiographs such as small peripheral air density or sponge-like air shadow

  7. Chest radiographs of near-drowned children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, P.; Rupprecht, E.; Burkhardt, J.; Trefftz, F.; Thomsen, H.

    1985-01-01

    From 1972 through 1983 there were 10 near-drowned children (7 boys and 3 girls) aged 1 to 4 years, treated as inpatients at the Children's Hospital of the Medical Academy Dresden. Three of them showed a severe aspiration pneumonia which in one case was complicated by bilateral pneumothoraces. In a further five children there were radiological signs of pulmonary oedema. Only in two children were the X-ray pictures of the chest normal. (orig.)

  8. Chest Radiographs for Pediatric TB Diagnosis: Interrater Agreement and Utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kaguthi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The chest radiograph (CXR is considered a key diagnostic tool for pediatric tuberculosis (TB in clinical management and endpoint determination in TB vaccine trials. We set out to compare interrater agreement for TB diagnosis in western Kenya. A pediatric pulmonologist and radiologist (experts, a medical officer (M.O, and four clinical officers (C.Os with basic training in pediatric CXR reading blindly assessed CXRs of infants who were TB suspects in a cohort study. C.Os had access to clinical findings for patient management. Weighted kappa scores summarized interrater agreement on lymphadenopathy and abnormalities consistent with TB. Sensitivity and specificity of raters were determined using microbiologically confirmed TB as the gold standard (n=8. A total of 691 radiographs were reviewed. Agreement on abnormalities consistent with TB was poor; k=0.14 (95% CI: 0.10–0.18 and on lymphadenopathy moderate k=0.26 (95% CI: 0.18–0.36. M.O [75% (95% CI: 34.9%–96.8%] and C.Os [63% (95% CI: 24.5%–91.5%] had high sensitivity for culture confirmed TB. TB vaccine trials utilizing expert agreement on CXR as a nonmicrobiologically confirmed endpoint will have reduced specificity and will underestimate vaccine efficacy. C.Os detected many of the bacteriologically confirmed cases; however, this must be interpreted cautiously as they were unblinded to clinical features.

  9. Chest Radiographs for Pediatric TB Diagnosis: Interrater Agreement and Utility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaguthi, G.; Nduba, V.; Nyokabi, J.; Onchiri, F.; Gie, R.; Borgdorff, M.

    2014-01-01

    The chest radiograph (CXR) is considered a key diagnostic tool for pediatric tuberculosis (TB) in clinical management and endpoint determination in TB vaccine trials. We set out to compare interrater agreement for TB diagnosis in western Kenya. A pediatric pulmonologist and radiologist (experts), a

  10. Automatic detection of pleural effusion in chest radiographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maduskar, P.; Philipsen, R.H.H.M.; Melendez Rodriguez, J.C.; Scholten, E.T.; Chanda, D.; Ayles, H.; Sanchez, C.I.; Ginneken, B. van

    2016-01-01

    Automated detection of Tuberculosis (TB) using chest radiographs (CXRs) is gaining popularity due to the lack of trained human readers in resource limited countries with a high TB burden. The majority of the computer-aided detection (CAD) systems for TB focus on detection of parenchymal

  11. Clinical and radiographic indications for aortography in blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kram, H B; Wohlmuth, D A; Appel, P L; Shoemaker, W C

    1987-08-01

    To determine which clinical and radiographic findings are valuable in selecting patients with blunt chest trauma for aortography, we analyzed the medical records and admission chest radiographs of 76 consecutive victims of blunt chest trauma with suspected thoracic aortic rupture during the past 7 years. All patients were evaluated by history, physical examination, chest radiography, and aortography; a total of 70 clinical and radiographic findings were independently assessed in each patient. The following occurred with significantly greater frequency in patients with thoracic aortic rupture than in those without: history of significant hypotension (mean arterial pressure less than 80 mm Hg) (p less than 0.04); the presence of upper extremity hypertension, bilateral lower extremity pulse pulse deficits, or an initial chest tube output greater than 750 ml of blood (p less than 0.05); and greater incidence of myocardial contusions, intra-abdominal injuries, and pelvic fractures compared with patients without thoracic aortic rupture (p less than 0.05). Mediastinal widening (equal to or greater than 8 cm) shown on anteroposterior chest radiography occurred in all patients with thoracic aortic rupture; however, its specificity was only 10.6%. Radiographic signs that were helpful in indicating the presence of thoracic aortic rupture included paratracheal stripe greater than 5 mm, rightward deviation of the nasogastric tube or central venous pressure line, blurring of the aortic knob, and an abnormal or absent paraspinous stripe. Upper rib fractures and mediastinal to thoracic cage width ratios at any level did not increase diagnostic accuracy for thoracic aortic rupture in the present series. Six patients in the series died, two of whom had thoracic aortic rupture.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Computerized detection of lung nodules in digital chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giger, M.L.; Doi, K.; MacMahon, H.

    1987-01-01

    Detection of cancerous lung nodules in chest radiographs is one of the more important tasks performed by a radiologist. In addition, the ''miss rate'' associated with the radiographic detection of lung nodules is approximately 30%. A computerized scheme that alerts the radiologist to possible locations of lung nodules should allow this number of false-negative diagnoses to be reduced. The authors are developing a computer-aided nodule detection scheme based on a difference image approach. They attempt to eliminate the camouflaging background structure of the normal lung anatomy by creating, from a single-projection chest image, two images: one in which the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the nodule is maximized and another in which that SNR is suppressed while the processed background remains essentially the same. Thus, the difference between these two processed images should consist of the nodule superimposed on a relatively uniform background in which the detection task may be simplified. This difference image approach is fundamentally different from conventional subtraction techniques (e.g., temporal or dual-energy subtraction) in that the two images which are subtracted arise from the same single-projection chest radiograph. Once the difference image is obtained, thresholding is performed along with tests for circularity, size and growth in order to extract the nodules. It should be noted that once an original chest image is input to the computer the nodule detection process is totally automated

  13. Analysis of optimization parameters in chest radiographs procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Davi A.; Oliveira, Karinne M.; Alves, Douglas R.M.; Maia, Ana F.

    2009-01-01

    The risks associated with ionizing radiation became evident soon after the discovery of the X radiation. Therefore, any medical practices that make use of any type of ionizing radiation should be subjected to the basic principles of radiological protection: justification, optimization of protection and application of dose limits. In diagnostic radiology, it means to seek the lowest dose reasonably practicable, without compromising the image quality. The purpose of this project was to evaluate optimization parameters, specifically image quality, exposure levels and radiographs rejection rates, in radiological chest examinations. The image quality evaluation was performed using two forms, one for adults and other for children, based on European standards. By the results, we can conclude that the evaluated sector is not in agreement to the principle of optimization and this reality is not different from most health institutions. The entrance surface air kerma (K a,e ) results were below the national diagnostic reference levels. However, the several image quality parameters showed insufficient ratings and the film rejection rates were high. The lack of optimization generates poor quality images, causing inaccurate diagnostic reports, and increasing operating costs. Therefore, the research warns of the urgency of implementing Quality Control Assurance Program in all radiology services in the country. (author)

  14. Semiautomatic detection of scoliotic rib borders from posteroanterior chest radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plourde, Frédéric; Cheriet, Farida; Dansereau, Jean

    2012-04-01

    3-D assessment of scoliotic deformities relies on an accurate 3-D reconstruction of bone structures from biplanar X-rays, which requires a precise detection and matching of anatomical structures in both views. In this paper, we propose a novel semiautomated technique for detecting complete scoliotic rib borders from PA-0° and PA-20° chest radiographs, by using an edge-following approach with multiple-path branching and oriented filtering. Edge-following processes are initiated from user starting points along upper and lower rib edges and the final rib border is obtained by finding the most parallel pair among detected edges. The method is based on a perceptual analysis leading to the assumption that no matter how bent a scoliotic rib is, it will always present relatively parallel upper and lower edges. The proposed method was tested on 44 chest radiographs of scoliotic patients and was validated by comparing pixels from all detected rib borders against their reference locations taken from the associated manually delineated rib borders. The overall 2-D detection accuracy was 2.64 ± 1.21 pixels. Comparing this accuracy level to reported results in the literature shows that the proposed method is very well suited for precisely detecting borders of scoliotic ribs from PA-0° and PA-20° chest radiographs.

  15. Herpes simplex virus 1 pneumonia: conventional chest radiograph pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umans, U.; Golding, R.P.; Duraku, S.; Manoliu, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the findings on plain chest radiographs in patients with herpes simplex virus pneumonia (HSVP). The study was based on 17 patients who at a retrospective search have been found to have a monoinfection with herpes simplex virus. The diagnosis was established by isolation of the virus from material obtained during fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) which also included broncho-alveolar lavage and tissue sampling. Fourteen patients had a chest radiograph performed within 24 h of the date of the FOB. Two radiographs showed no abnormalities of the lung parenchyma. The radiographs of the other 12 patients showed lung opacification, predominantly lobar or more extensive and always bilateral. Most patients presented with a mixed airspace and interstitial pattern of opacities, but 11 of 14 showed at least an airspace consolidation. Lobar, segmental, or subsegmental atelectasis was present in 7 patients, and unilateral or bilateral pleural effusion in 8 patients, but only in 1 patient was it a large amount. In contradiction to the literature which reports a high correlation between HSVP and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), 11 of 14 patients did not meet the pathophysiological criteria for ARDS. The radiologist may suggest the diagnosis of HSVP when bilateral airspace consolidation or mixed opacities appear in a susceptible group of patients who are not thought to have ARDS or pulmonary edema. The definite diagnosis of HSV pneumonia can be established only on the basis of culture of material obtained by broncho-alveolar lavage. (orig.)

  16. Chest radiographic staging in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: relationship with immunological findings.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kiely, J L

    2012-02-03

    The question of whether a chest radiographic severity staging system could be correlated with standard blood\\/serum diagnostic indices in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) was addressed in 41 patients. Asthma and positive Aspergillus fumigatus (AF) serology were considered essential diagnostic inclusion criteria. Eosinophil count, serum immunoglobulin (Ig)E and immediate skin hypersensitivity were also tested to grade patients as "definite" or "likely" ABPA. Definite cases had all five of these factors present, whereas likely cases had three or more. Chest radiographs were examined by experienced radiologists blinded to the clinical data. The six-stage radiographic score (0-5) was based on the severity and duration of changes seen: stage 0: normal; stage 1: transient hyperinflation; stage 2: transient minor changes; stage 3: transient major changes; stage 4: permanent minor changes; and stage 5: permanent major changes. Significant positive correlations (p<0.05) were observed between peak AF titres (expressed as an index), peak eosinophil count and radiographic severity stage. When considered as subgroups, these correlations approached, but did not reach, significance for the group with "likely" ABPA (n=28), but in the group with definite ABPA (n=13), there was a high correlation between radiographic score and peak AF index (r=0.59), as well as peak eosinophil count (r=0.62). This study suggests that the peak Aspergillus fumigatus index and eosinophil counts correlate best with the severity of radiographic stages in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. This chest radiographic staging system may be useful in the clinical assessment and management of patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, particularly in those patients with more severe radiographic stages.

  17. Computer-aided Detection Fidelity of Pulmonary Nodules in Chest Radiograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Dellios

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The most ubiquitous chest diagnostic method is the chest radiograph. A common radiographic finding, quite often incidental, is the nodular pulmonary lesion. The detection of small lesions out of complex parenchymal structure is a daily clinical challenge. In this study, we investigate the efficacy of the computer-aided detection (CAD software package SoftView™ 2.4A for bone suppression and OnGuard™ 5.2 (Riverain Technologies, Miamisburg, OH, USA for automated detection of pulmonary nodules in chest radiographs. Subjects and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated a dataset of 100 posteroanterior chest radiographs with pulmonary nodular lesions ranging from 5 to 85 mm. All nodules were confirmed with a consecutive computed tomography scan and histologically classified as 75% malignant. The number of detected lesions by observation in unprocessed images was compared to the number and dignity of CAD-detected lesions in bone-suppressed images (BSIs. Results: SoftView™ BSI does not affect the objective lesion-to-background contrast. OnGuard™ has a stand-alone sensitivity of 62% and specificity of 58% for nodular lesion detection in chest radiographs. The false positive rate is 0.88/image and the false negative (FN rate is 0.35/image. From the true positive lesions, 20% were proven benign and 80% were malignant. FN lesions were 47% benign and 53% malignant. Conclusion: We conclude that CAD does not qualify for a stand-alone standard of diagnosis. The use of CAD accompanied with a critical radiological assessment of the software suggested pattern appears more realistic. Accordingly, it is essential to focus on studies assessing the quality-time-cost profile of real-time (as opposed to retrospective CAD implementation in clinical diagnostics.

  18. Horizontal fissure on neonatal plain chest radiographs: clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konarzewska, J.; Zawadzka-Kepczynska, A.; Bianek-Bodzak, A.; Kawinska-Kilianczyk, A.; Domzalska-Popadiuk, I.

    2005-01-01

    Regardless of etiology, pleural fluid, even in small amounts, can be visualized on the neonatal chest x-ray picture within pulmonary fissures. It remains unclear whether a marked horizontal fissure unaccompanied by any other radiological symptoms is of diagnostic value or not. Ninety-one consecutive neonatal chest radiographs with marked horizontal fissure were retrospectively analyzed. The images were made between 1999 and 2005 on 69 newborns admitted to the Neonatology Department, Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Gdansk. Analysis of the radiographs was conducted independently by three radiologists based on the following criteria: fissure thickness (marked or thickened), bronchovascular markings (increased or normal), size and shape of the heart (normal or abnormal), presence or absence of pulmonary infiltration, atelectasis, and changes related to wet lung syndrome. Due to divergent interpretations, the ultimate interpretation was established by consensus in 25 cases. The radiological findings were compared with clinical data. The compatibility of the three independent interpreters was statistically significant (p<0.0001). Marked transverse fissure was the only radiological finding on 66 x-rays. In 63 cases (69.2%) the children were asymptomatic as well. In 3 cases (3.3%) clinical symptoms of respiratory tract infection occurred. On the other 25 images, horizontal fissure was accompanied by other radiological symptoms. Chest x-ray results corresponded with clinical symptoms in 24 cases (26.4%). One child (1.1%) with radiological evidence of wet lung syndrome did not present any typical clinical symptoms of it. Horizontal fissure noted on a neonatal chest x-ray seems to be of minor diagnostic value if not accompanied by any other radiological symptoms. (author)

  19. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): chest radiographic features in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babyn, Paul S.; Gahunia, Harpal K.; Manson, David [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chu, Winnie C.W.; Metreweli, Constantine [Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin (China); Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Chinese University of Hong Kong (China); Tsou, Ian Y.Y.; Wansaicheong, Gervais K.L.; Chee, Thomas S.G.; Kaw, Gregory J.L. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng (Singapore); Allen, Upton; Bitnun, Ari; Read, Stanley [Division of Infectious Diseases, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cheng, Frankie W.T.; Fok, Tai-Fai; Hon, Ellis K.L.; Li, Albert M.; Ng, Pak-Cheung [Department of Paediatrics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, 30-32 Ngan Shing Street, Shatin, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Chiu, Man-Chun; Leung, Chi-Wai [Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital, Lai King Hill Road, Lai Chi Kok, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Khong, Pek L. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, 102 Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Stringer, David A.

    2004-01-01

    We abstracted data (n=62) on the radiologic appearance and course of SARS in pediatric patients with suspect (n=25) or probable (n=37) SARS, diagnosed in five hospital sites located in three cities: Toronto, Singapore, and Hong Kong. Available chest radiographs and thoracic CTs were reviewed for the presence of the following radiographic findings: airspace disease, air bronchograms, airways inflammation and peribronchial thickening, interstitial disease, pleural effusion, and hilar adenopathy. A total of 62 patients (suspect=25, probable=37) were evaluated for SARS. Patient ages ranged from 5.5 months to 17 years and 11.5 months (average, 6 years and 10 months) with a female-to-male ratio of 32:30. Forty-one patients (66.1%) were in close contact with other probable, suspect, or quarantined cases; 10 patients (16.1%) had recently traveled to WHO-designated affected areas within 10 days; and 7 patients (11.2%) were transferred from other hospitals that had SARS patients. Three patients, who did not have close/hospital contact or travel history to affected areas, were classified as SARS cases based on their clinical signs and symptoms and on the fact that they were living in an endemic area. The most prominent clinical presentations were fever, with a temperature over 38 C (100%), cough (62.9%), rhinorrhea (22.6%), myalgia (17.7%), chills (14.5%), and headache (11.3%). Other findings included sore throat (9.7%), gastrointestinal symptoms (9.7%), rigor (8.1%), and lethargy (6.5%). In general, fever and cough were the most common clinical presentations amongst younger pediatric SARS cases (age<10 years), whereas, in addition to these symptoms, headache, myalgia, sore throat, chills, and/or rigor were common in older patients (age{>=}10 years). The chest radiographs of 35.5% of patients were normal. The most prominent radiological findings that were observed in the remaining patients were areas of consolidation (45.2%), often peripheral with multifocal lesions in 22

  20. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): chest radiographic features in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babyn, Paul S.; Gahunia, Harpal K.; Manson, David; Chu, Winnie C.W.; Metreweli, Constantine; Tsou, Ian Y.Y.; Wansaicheong, Gervais K.L.; Chee, Thomas S.G.; Kaw, Gregory J.L.; Allen, Upton; Bitnun, Ari; Read, Stanley; Cheng, Frankie W.T.; Fok, Tai-Fai; Hon, Ellis K.L.; Li, Albert M.; Ng, Pak-Cheung; Chiu, Man-Chun; Leung, Chi-Wai; Khong, Pek L.; Stringer, David A.

    2004-01-01

    We abstracted data (n=62) on the radiologic appearance and course of SARS in pediatric patients with suspect (n=25) or probable (n=37) SARS, diagnosed in five hospital sites located in three cities: Toronto, Singapore, and Hong Kong. Available chest radiographs and thoracic CTs were reviewed for the presence of the following radiographic findings: airspace disease, air bronchograms, airways inflammation and peribronchial thickening, interstitial disease, pleural effusion, and hilar adenopathy. A total of 62 patients (suspect=25, probable=37) were evaluated for SARS. Patient ages ranged from 5.5 months to 17 years and 11.5 months (average, 6 years and 10 months) with a female-to-male ratio of 32:30. Forty-one patients (66.1%) were in close contact with other probable, suspect, or quarantined cases; 10 patients (16.1%) had recently traveled to WHO-designated affected areas within 10 days; and 7 patients (11.2%) were transferred from other hospitals that had SARS patients. Three patients, who did not have close/hospital contact or travel history to affected areas, were classified as SARS cases based on their clinical signs and symptoms and on the fact that they were living in an endemic area. The most prominent clinical presentations were fever, with a temperature over 38 C (100%), cough (62.9%), rhinorrhea (22.6%), myalgia (17.7%), chills (14.5%), and headache (11.3%). Other findings included sore throat (9.7%), gastrointestinal symptoms (9.7%), rigor (8.1%), and lethargy (6.5%). In general, fever and cough were the most common clinical presentations amongst younger pediatric SARS cases (age<10 years), whereas, in addition to these symptoms, headache, myalgia, sore throat, chills, and/or rigor were common in older patients (age≥10 years). The chest radiographs of 35.5% of patients were normal. The most prominent radiological findings that were observed in the remaining patients were areas of consolidation (45.2%), often peripheral with multifocal lesions in 22

  1. Scientific use of the chest radiograph in intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistolesi, M.; Miniati, M.; Monti, S.; Giuntini, C.; Milne, E.N.C.; 2nd University of Rome; California Univ., Irvine, CA

    1990-01-01

    In this paper it is shown that, when properly standardized, the chest x-ray can be used to derive other important clinical information concerning the patient's status of hydration, the early detection of pulmonary edema in cardiacs, the assessment of ARDS severity and the differentiation of hydrostatic from injury lung edema. (author). 20 refs

  2. Usefulness of chest radiographs in first asthma attacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershel, J.C.; Goldman, H.S.; Stein, R.E.K.; Shelov, S.P.; Ziprkowski, M.

    1983-01-01

    To assess the value of routine chest radiography during acute first attacks of asthma, we studied 371 consecutive children over one year of age who presented with an initial episode of wheezing. Three hundred fifty children (94.3%) had radiographic findings that were compatible with uncomplicated asthma and were considered negative. Twenty-one (5.7%) had positive findings: atelectasis and pneumonia were noted in seven, segmental atelectasis in six, pneumonia in five, multiple areas of subsegmental atelectasis in two, and pneumomediastinum in one. The patients with positive films were more likely to have a respiratory rate above 60 or a pulse rate above 160 (P < 0.001), localized rales or localized decreased breath sounds before treatment (P < 0.01), and localized rales (P < 0.005) and localized wheezing (P < 0.02) after treatment; also, these patients were admitted to the hospital more often (P < 0.001). Ninety-five percent (20 of 21) of the children with positive films could be identified before treatment on the basis of a combination of tachypnea, tachycardia, fever, and localized rales or localized decreased breath sounds. Most first-time wheezers will not have positive radiographs; careful clinical evaluation should reveal which patients will have abnormal radiographs and will therefore benefit from the procedure. 20 references, 3 tables

  3. Chest radiographic pulmonary changes reflecting extrapulmonary involvement in paediatric HIV disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, Richard D.; Goddard, Elizabeth; Hendricks, Marc; Lawrenson, John

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory infections are the commonest cause of pulmonary change on chest radiographs of HIV-infected children. However, HIV-related neurological, oropharyngeal, oesophageal, cardiac and haematological abnormalities may also manifest with pulmonary changes and must be considered in the interpretation of the chest radiograph in HIV-infected children. (orig.)

  4. Specificity and sensitivity of chest radiographs in the diagnosis of paediatric pulmonary tuberculosis and the value of additional high-kilovolt radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Villiers, Richard; Van de Westhuizen, Stephan; Andronikou, Savvas

    2004-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the most common notifiable infectious disease in South Africa. The diagnosis of pulmonary TB in children is often very difficult because of the non-specific radiological signs and inter-observer variation in the interpretation of radiographs. The frontal high-kilovolt (kV) radiograph has been used to assess the effect of TB adenopathy on the tracheobronchial tree and to detect endobronchial lesions. The aims of the present study were to assess the specificity and sensitivity of chest radiographs in the diagnosis of pulmonary TB and to assess whether the addition of the high-kV radiograph affects these parameters. The study group consisted of paediatric patients suspected of having pulmonary TB over a 6-year period. These patients had clinical, bacteriological and radiographic examinations. Radiographs were examined by one experienced radiologist in two sittings separated by a 6-week interval. On the first sitting, only standard radiographs were examined and, on the second sitting, these were supplemented with high-kV radiographs. Differences in the detection of each recognized radiological feature of pulmonary TB before and after the addition of the high-kV film were analysed for statistical significance. The frequency of radiographic findings in our study compared favourably with other reports. No statistically significant differences for the detection of radiographic features consistent with pulmonary TB, or for the diagnosis of pulmonary TB, were demonstrated between the two sittings. Specificity increased from 74.4% to 86.6% with the addition of the high-kV view and sensitivity remained constant at 38.8%. The present study does not support the routine use of the frontal high-kV radiograph for the diagnosis of pulmonary TB. This paper also confirms the findings of others, that standard chest radiographs are a poor indicator of pulmonary TB in children Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  5. COMPUTER-AIDED DETECTION OF ACINAR SHADOWS IN CHEST RADIOGRAPHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Xu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the technological advances in medical diagnosis, accurate detection of infectious tuberculosis (TB still poses challenges due to complex image features and thus infectious TB continues to be a public health problem of global proportions. Currently, the detection of TB is mainly conducted visually by radiologists examining chest radiographs (CXRs. To reduce the backlog of CXR examination and provide more precise quantitative assessment, computer-aided detection (CAD systems for potential lung lesions have been increasingly adopted and commercialized for clinical practice. CADs work as supporting tools to alert radiologists on suspected features that could have easily been neglected. In this paper, an effective CAD system aimed for acinar shadow regions detection in CXRs is proposed. This system exploits textural and photometric features analysis techniques which include local binary pattern (LBP, grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM and histogram of oriented gradients (HOG to analyze target regions in CXRs. Classification of acinar shadows using Adaboost is then deployed to verify the performance of a combination of these techniques. Comparative study in different image databases shows that the proposed CAD system delivers consistent high accuracy in detecting acinar shadows.

  6. Ultrasound and supine chest radiograph in road traffic accident patients: a reliable and convenient way to diagnose pleural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumtaz, U.; Zahur, Z.; Raza, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Portable bed side ultrasound and supine chest radiograph of 80 traumatic patients excluding very clinically unstable patients who subsequently underwent CT scan chest was done for traumatic effusion showing that ultrasound had a higher sensitivity than CXR, 88.23% and 77.94%, respectively, and a similar specificity of 100% and 100%, respectively. Objective of the study is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of high resolution ultrasound and supine chest x-ray in detection of pleural effusion in road traffic accident patients keeping plain CT chest as gold standard. Methods: This study was conducted in PIMS and PAEC General Hospital, Islamabad from 1st January to 15th December 2015. The current study examined total of 80 trauma (blunt and penetrating) patients coming to emergency departments of both hospitals specifically those who had road traffic accident history. Their portable bed side ultrasound and supine chest radiograph were performed for assessing pleural effusion and subsequently CT scan chest was done for confirmation as it's a gold standard. Results: Using CT findings as gold standard the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value was assessed for both ultrasonography and chest radiography and found to be 88.23%,100%, 100%, 40% and 77.94%, 100%, 100%, 55.55% respectively with diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound 90% as compared to 81.25% for supine chest x-rays when compared with gold standard. Conclusion: Ultrasound and chest x-ray can be used as a useful and suitable adjunct to CT in road traffic accident patients as these are easily available, non-invasive, no contrast required, can be performed on bed side and carries no or little radiation risk. (author)

  7. Determining symptoms for chest radiographs in patients with swine flu (H1N1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Nakshabandi, Nizar A.

    2011-01-01

    The question arises about the chest X-ray findings and clinical symptoms in swine flu and about the most important clinical finding when correlated with the chest radiograph. Should physicians order a chest X-ray in each patient suspected of having swine flu? There were 179 patients with a high suspicion of swine flu. All 179 patients had an initial chest radiograph. As many as 65 males (representing 56% of the projected study population) had a normal chest radiograph, while 35 males (representing 55.6% of the study population) had an abnormal chest X-ray. As many as 51 females (representing 44% of the population) had a normal chest X-ray, while 20 females (representing 44% of the study population) had abnormal chest X-rays. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was not a determining factor for normal vs. abnormal chest X-ray (CXR). Rapid antigen test was not a determining factor for normal vs. abnormal CXR. Fever was not a determining factor for normal vs. abnormal CXR. Cough appears to be a determining factor for normal vs. abnormal CXR. Sore throat appears to be a determining factor for normal vs. abnormal CXR. Chest pain was not a determining factor for normal vs. abnormal CXR. Presence of cough with PCR was statistically significant. In my opinion, chest radiographs in patients with suspected H1N1 should only be obtained if there is a cough or sore throat. Other symptoms associated with H1N1 do not warrant a chest radiograph unless absolutely necessary

  8. An abnormal chest radiograph in a 6-year-old boy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaber, Tariq M.

    2004-01-01

    An unexpected finding in a chest radiograph of a child with upper respiratory symptoms is presented as a clinical quiz. The condition is discussed the relevant literature is reviewed and summarized. (author)

  9. Diagnosis of hydrostatic versus increased permeability pulmonary edema with chest radiographic criteria in critically ILL patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberle, D.R.; Wiener-Kronish, J.P.; Webb, W.R.; Matthay, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate chest radiographic criteria in distinguishing mechanisms of pulmonary edema, the authors studied 45 intubated patients with extensive edema. Edema type was clinically classified by the ratio of alveolar edema-to-plasma protein concentration in association with compatible clinical/hemodynamic parameters. Chest films were scored as hydrostatic, permeability, or mixed by three readers in blinded fashion based on cardiac size, vascular pedicle width, distribution of edema, effusions, peribronchial cuffs, septal lines, or air bronchograms. Overall radiographic score accurately identified 87% of patients with hydrostatic edema but only 60% of those with permeability edema. Edema distribution was most discriminating, with a patchy peripheral pattern relatively specific for clinical permeability edema. Hydrostatic features on chest radiograph were common with permeability edema, including effusions (36%), widened pedicle (56%), cuffs (72%), or septa (40%). The authors conclude that the chest radiograph is limited in distinguishing edema mechanism in the face of extensive pulmonary edema

  10. Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Children: Chest Radiographic and CT Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Min Jeong; Lee, Young Seok; Lee, Jee Young; Lee, Kun Song

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chest radiographic and CT findings of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in children, the population that is more vulnerable to respiratory infection than adults. The study population comprised 410 children who were diagnosed with an H1N1 infection from August 24, 2009 to November 11, 2009 and underwent chest radiography at Dankook University Hospital in Korea. Six of these patients also underwent chest CT. The initial chest radiographs were classified as normal or abnormal. The abnormal chest radiographs and high resolution CT scans were assessed for the pattern and distribution of parenchymal lesions, and the presence of complications such as atelectasis, pleural effusion, and pneumomediastinum. The initial chest radiograph was normal in 384 of 410 (94%) patients and abnormal in 26 of 410 (6%) patients. Parenchymal abnormalities seen on the initial chest radiographs included prominent peribronchial marking (25 of 26, 96%), consolidation (22 of 26, 85%), and ground-glass opacities without consolidation (2 of 26, 8%). The involvement was usually bilateral (19 of 26, 73%) with the lower lung zone predominance (22 of 26, 85%). Atelectasis was observed in 12 (46%) and pleural effusion in 11 (42%) patients. CT (n = 6) scans showed peribronchovascular interstitial thickening (n = 6), ground-glass opacities (n = 5), centrilobular nodules (n = 4), consolidation (n = 3), mediastinal lymph node enlargement (n = 5), pleural effusion (n = 3), and pneumomediastinum (n = 3). Abnormal chest radiographs were uncommon in children with a swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection. In children, H1N1 virus infection can be included in the differential diagnosis, when chest radiographs and CT scans show prominent peribronchial markings and ill-defined patchy consolidation with mediastinal lymph node enlargement, pleural effusion and pneumomediastinum

  11. Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Children: Chest Radiographic and CT Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Min Jeong; Lee, Young Seok; Lee, Jee Young; Lee, Kun Song [Dankook University College of Medicine, Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chest radiographic and CT findings of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in children, the population that is more vulnerable to respiratory infection than adults. The study population comprised 410 children who were diagnosed with an H1N1 infection from August 24, 2009 to November 11, 2009 and underwent chest radiography at Dankook University Hospital in Korea. Six of these patients also underwent chest CT. The initial chest radiographs were classified as normal or abnormal. The abnormal chest radiographs and high resolution CT scans were assessed for the pattern and distribution of parenchymal lesions, and the presence of complications such as atelectasis, pleural effusion, and pneumomediastinum. The initial chest radiograph was normal in 384 of 410 (94%) patients and abnormal in 26 of 410 (6%) patients. Parenchymal abnormalities seen on the initial chest radiographs included prominent peribronchial marking (25 of 26, 96%), consolidation (22 of 26, 85%), and ground-glass opacities without consolidation (2 of 26, 8%). The involvement was usually bilateral (19 of 26, 73%) with the lower lung zone predominance (22 of 26, 85%). Atelectasis was observed in 12 (46%) and pleural effusion in 11 (42%) patients. CT (n = 6) scans showed peribronchovascular interstitial thickening (n = 6), ground-glass opacities (n = 5), centrilobular nodules (n = 4), consolidation (n = 3), mediastinal lymph node enlargement (n = 5), pleural effusion (n = 3), and pneumomediastinum (n = 3). Abnormal chest radiographs were uncommon in children with a swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection. In children, H1N1 virus infection can be included in the differential diagnosis, when chest radiographs and CT scans show prominent peribronchial markings and ill-defined patchy consolidation with mediastinal lymph node enlargement, pleural effusion and pneumomediastinum

  12. A novel online Variance Based Instance Selection (VBIS) method for efficient atypicality detection in chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzubaidi, Mohammad; Balasubramanian, Vineeth; Patel, Ameet; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Black, John A., Jr.

    2012-02-01

    Chest radiographs are complex, heterogeneous medical images that depict many different types of tissues, and many different types of abnormalities. A radiologist develops a sense of what visual textures are typical for each anatomic region within chest radiographs by viewing a large set of "normal" radiographs over a period of years. As a result, an expert radiologist is able to readily detect atypical features. In our previous research, we modeled this type of learning by (1) collecting a large set of "normal" chest radiographs, (2) extracting local textural and contour features from anatomical regions within these radiographs, in the form of high-dimensional feature vectors, (3) using a distance-based transductive machine learning method to learn what it typical for each anatomical region, and (4) computing atypicality scores for the anatomical regions in test radiographs. That research demonstrated that the transductive One-Nearest-Neighbor (1NN) method was effective for identifying atypical regions in chest radiographs. However, the large set of training instances (and the need to compute a distance to each of these instances in a high dimensional space) made the transductive method computationally expensive. This paper discusses a novel online Variance Based Instance Selection (VBIS) method for use with the Nearest Neighbor classifier, that (1) substantially reduced the computational cost of the transductive 1NN method, while maintaining a high level of effectiveness in identifying regions of chest radiographs with atypical content, and (2) allowed the incremental incorporation of training data from new informative chest radiographs as they are encountered in day-to-day clinical work.

  13. Sensitivity of bedside ultrasound and supine anteroposterior chest radiographs for the identification of pneumothorax after blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, R Gentry; Stone, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    Supine anteroposterior (AP) chest radiographs in patients with blunt trauma have poor sensitivity for the identification of pneumothorax. Ultrasound (US) has been proposed as an alternative screening test for pneumothorax in this population. The authors conducted an evidence-based review of the medical literature to compare sensitivity of bedside US and AP chest radiographs in identifying pneumothorax after blunt trauma. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for trials from 1965 through June 2009 using a search strategy derived from the following PICO formulation of our clinical question: patients included adult (18 + years) emergency department (ED) patients in whom pneumothorax was suspected after blunt trauma. The intervention was thoracic ultrasonography for the detection of pneumothorax. The comparator was the supine AP chest radiograph during the initial evaluation of the patient. The outcome was the diagnostic performance of US in identifying the presence of pneumothorax in the study population. The criterion standard for the presence or absence of pneumothorax was computed tomography (CT) of the chest or a rush of air during thoracostomy tube placement (in unstable patients). Prospective, observational trials of emergency physician (EP)-performed thoracic US were included. Trials in which the exams were performed by radiologists or surgeons, or trials that investigated patients suffering penetrating trauma or with spontaneous or iatrogenic pneumothoraces, were excluded. The methodologic quality of the studies was assessed. Qualitative methods were used to summarize the study results. Data analysis consisted of test performance (sensitivity and specificity, with 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) of thoracic US and supine AP chest radiography. Four prospective observational studies were identified, with a total of 606 subjects who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The sensitivity and specificity of US for the detection of pneumothorax ranged from

  14. The diagnosis of pneumonia requires a chest radiograph (x-ray – yes, no or sometimes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Gower Wootton

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP remains a common condition associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Outcome is improved by early recognition and rapid institution of empirical antibiotic therapy. A number of international guidelines recommend a chest radiograph (x-ray is obtained when pneumonia is suspected; the argument forwarded is that chest radiographs are relatively inexpensive and enable pneumonia (lung consolidation to be confirmed or excluded. But, radiographs are not available in the community setting and introduce a delay in diagnosis and treatment. For these reasons, in mild CAP treated by primary care, guidelines suggest criteria for clinical diagnosis. However, there is debate as to whether clinical features alone are sufficiently reliable to support a diagnosis of CAP with some suggesting diagnostic precision is improved by chest radiographs. Conversely, several studies have demonstrated a lack of agreement in the interpretation of chest radiographs bringing their role as the ultimate arbiter of diagnosis into question. Below we debate the diagnostic role of the humble chest radiograph in the context of suspected CAP.

  15. Effective dose assessment for participants in the National Lung Screening Trial undergoing posteroanterior chest radiographic examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Randell; Flynn, Michael J; Judy, Phillip F; Cagnon, Christopher H; Seibert, J Anthony

    2013-07-01

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) is a multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing low-dose helical CT with chest radiography in the screening of older current and former heavy smokers for early detection of lung cancer. Recruitment was launched in September 2002 and ended in April 2004, when 53,454 participants had been randomized at 33 screening sites. The objective of this study was to determine the effective radiation dose associated with individual chest radiographic screening examinations. A total of 73,733 chest radiographic examinations were performed with 92 chest imaging systems. The entrance skin air kerma (ESAK) of participants' chest radiographic examinations was estimated and used in this analysis. The effective dose per ESAK for each examination was determined with a Monte Carlo-based program. The examination effective dose was calculated as the product of the examination ESAK and the Monte Carlo estimate of the ratio of effective dose per ESAK. This study showed that the mean effective dose assessed from 66,157 postero-anterior chest examinations was 0.052 mSv. Additional findings were a median effective dose of 0.038 mSv, a 95th percentile value of 0.136 mSv, and a fifth percentile value of 0.013 mSv. The effective dose for participant NLST chest radiographic examinations was determined and is of specific interest in relation to that associated with the previously published NLST low-dose CT examinations conducted during the trial.

  16. Chest radiographic abnormalities in HIV-infected African children: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Richard D; Lombard, Carl J; Cotton, Mark F; Beningfield, Stephen J; Workman, Lesley; Zar, Heather J

    2015-09-01

    There is limited knowledge of chest radiographic abnormalities over time in HIV-infected children in resource-limited settings. To investigate the natural history of chest radiographic abnormalities in HIV-infected African children, and the impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Prospective longitudinal study of the association of chest radiographic findings with clinical and immunological parameters. Chest radiographs were performed at enrolment, 6-monthly, when initiating ART and if indicated clinically. Radiographic abnormalities were classified as normal, mild or moderate severity and considered persistent if present for 6 consecutive months or longer. An ordinal multiple logistic regression model assessed the association of enrolment and time-dependent variables with temporal radiographic findings. 258 children (median (IQR) age: 28 (13-51) months; median CD4+%: 21 (15-24)) were followed for a median of 24 (18-42) months. 70 (27%) were on ART at enrolment; 130 (50%) (median age: 33 (18-56) months) commenced ART during the study. 154 (60%) had persistent severe radiographic abnormalities, with median duration 18 (6-24) months. Among children on ART, 69% of radiographic changes across all 6-month transition periods were improvements, compared with 45% in those not on ART. Radiographic severity was associated with previous radiographic severity (OR=120.80; 95% CI 68.71 to 212.38), lack of ART (OR=1.72; 95% CI 1.29 to 2.27), enrolment age ART was beneficial, reducing the risk of radiographic deterioration or increasing the likelihood of radiological improvement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Measurement of hemothorax amount in patients with non-penetrating chest trauma by supine chest AP radiograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Heon; Yang, Joo Hyun; Na, Myung Hoon; Baik, Hee Jong [Chung-Ang Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-15

    To evaluate the predictability of amount of hemothorax in the patients with blunt chest trauma, supine chest AP radiographs of 66 patients were reviewed and statistically analyzed. In 66 patients, rib fractures were present in 53 patients, hemothorax in 46 patients, pneumothorax in 25 patients, and pulmonary contusions in 18 patients. Width and length of hemothorax were measured on supine chest AP radiograph, and were correlated with known drained amount of hemothorax. The presence and number of rib fracture, pulmonary contusion, subcutaneous emphysema, fracture of scapula and clavicle, and total opacification of hemithorax were also correlated with the drained amount of hemothorax. In multiple logistic regression analysis, width of hemothorax had the highest correlation with drained amount of hemothorax(regression coeffcient 0.718, p value 0.00005). The presence and number of rib fracture, scapular fracture, subcutaneous emphysema were also correlated with drained amount of hemothorax. But length of hemothorax, pulmonary contusion, clavicular fracture, total opacification of hemithorax were not correlated with drained amount of hemothorax. Measured width of hemothorax in supine chest AP radiograph is the most reliable predictor for estimation of the amount of hemothorax, and may also be used as an indication for the application of closed thoracostomy in the treatment of hemothorax.

  18. Enhancement of chest radiographs obtained in the intensive care unit through bone suppression and consistent processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Zhong, Sikai; Yao, Liping; Shang, Yanfeng; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Portable chest radiographs (CXRs) are commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU) to detect subtle pathological changes. However, exposure settings or patient and apparatus positioning deteriorate image quality in the ICU. Chest x-rays of patients in the ICU are often hazy and show low contrast and increased noise. To aid clinicians in detecting subtle pathological changes, we proposed a consistent processing and bone structure suppression method to decrease variations in image appearance and improve the diagnostic quality of images. We applied a region of interest-based look-up table to process original ICU CXRs such that they appeared consistent with each other and the standard CXRs. Then, an artificial neural network was trained by standard CXRs and the corresponding dual-energy bone images for the generation of a bone image. Once the neural network was trained, the real dual-energy image was no longer necessary, and the trained neural network was applied to the consistent processed ICU CXR to output the bone image. Finally, a gray level-based morphological method was applied to enhance the bone image by smoothing other structures on this image. This enhanced image was subtracted from the consistent, processed ICU CXR to produce a soft tissue image. This method was tested for 20 patients with a total of 87 CXRs. The findings indicated that our method suppressed bone structures on ICU CXRs and standard CXRs, simultaneously maintaining subtle pathological changes.

  19. Enhancement of chest radiographs obtained in the intensive care unit through bone suppression and consistent processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Sheng; Zhong, Sikai; Yao, Liping; Shang, Yanfeng; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Portable chest radiographs (CXRs) are commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU) to detect subtle pathological changes. However, exposure settings or patient and apparatus positioning deteriorate image quality in the ICU. Chest x-rays of patients in the ICU are often hazy and show low contrast and increased noise. To aid clinicians in detecting subtle pathological changes, we proposed a consistent processing and bone structure suppression method to decrease variations in image appearance and improve the diagnostic quality of images. We applied a region of interest-based look-up table to process original ICU CXRs such that they appeared consistent with each other and the standard CXRs. Then, an artificial neural network was trained by standard CXRs and the corresponding dual-energy bone images for the generation of a bone image. Once the neural network was trained, the real dual-energy image was no longer necessary, and the trained neural network was applied to the consistent processed ICU CXR to output the bone image. Finally, a gray level-based morphological method was applied to enhance the bone image by smoothing other structures on this image. This enhanced image was subtracted from the consistent, processed ICU CXR to produce a soft tissue image. This method was tested for 20 patients with a total of 87 CXRs. The findings indicated that our method suppressed bone structures on ICU CXRs and standard CXRs, simultaneously maintaining subtle pathological changes. (paper)

  20. An audit of 3859 preadmission chest radiographs of apparently ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -admission routine chest radiography in asymptomatic patients remains a relevant screening tool for medical fitness during admissions into institutions. However because of dangers of exposure to ionizing radiation, we advise that a detailed ...

  1. Construction of a homogeneous phantom for radiographic image standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, Diana Rodrigues de

    1996-01-01

    The principle of radiodiagnosis consists in the fact the X-ray beam is attenuated at different degrees by distinct tissues. For this reason, the anatomical structures have distinct radiological opacities, that produce the radiographic image. The progresses in radiology are related to the development if new radiographic image formation systems that enable an amplification in the quality, with low dose and/or risk to the patient. The objective of this work is the sensitometric valuation of a screen-film combination, that is still the most used, for the standardization, of radiographic images. Thinking about this, were constructed homogeneous phantoms of the chest, skull and pelvis, for the calibration of X-ray beams, with the purpose of obtaining radiographic images of good quality, basing in the routine of a radiodiagnosis service and in the scientific knowledge. Questions were approached about the choice of the suitable equipment, that allow the obtention of k Vp and m As combinations, to produce radiographic images of good quality, and the reproduction of these combinations to any conventional equipment of diagnostic X-rays. Also presented are the comparison of the doses imparted by these combinations and those used in routine of the Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirao Preto's radiodiagnosis service. (author)

  2. Development of a fully automated adaptive unsharp masking technique in digital chest radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Katsumi; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Sasaki, Yasuo

    1991-01-01

    We are developing a fully automated adaptive unsharp masking technique with various parameters depending on regional image features of a digital chest radiograph. A chest radiograph includes various regions such as lung fields, retrocardiac area and spine in which their texture patterns and optical densities are extremely different. Therefore, it is necessary to enhance image contrast of each region by each optimum parameter. First, we investigated optimum weighting factors and mask sizes of unsharp masking technique in a digital chest radiograph. Then, a chest radiograph is automatically divided into three segments, one for the lung field, one for the retrocardiac area, and one for the spine, by using histogram analysis of pixel values. Finally, high frequency components of the lung field and retrocardiac area are selectively enhanced with a small mask size and mild weighting factors which are previously determined as optimum parameters. In addition, low frequency components of the spine are enhanced with a large mask size and adequate weighting factors. This processed image shows excellent depiction of the lung field, retrocardiac area and spine simultaneously with optimum contrast. Our image processing technique may be useful for diagnosis of chest radiographs. (author)

  3. Chest Radiograph Measurement Technique Facilitates Accurate Bedside Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Placement in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthi, Aishu; Chick, Jeffrey Forris Beecham; Srinivasa, Rajiv N; Hage, Anthony N; Grove, Jason J; Gemmete, Joseph J; Johnson, Timothy D; Srinivasa, Ravi N

    2018-03-01

    To report the chest radiograph measurement technique for placing bedside peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Two hundred and thirty-two consecutive pediatric patients, mean age of 56.3 months (range: 0-203 months), underwent PICC placement from January 2015 to May 2017 (28 months) with a total of 232 PICCs placed. Measurements were taken from the cavoatrial junction to clavicle, clavicle to medial margin of mid-humeral head, and medial margin of mid-humeral head to mid-humerus. The difference between total radiographic measured length and actual PICC length was then calculated, and the percent difference (from actual cut length) was recorded. An equivalence test was performed using the two, one-sided test method. Mean ± standard deviation cavoatrial junction to clavicle length was 5.29 ± 2.20 cm (range: 2.1-12.6 cm). Mean clavicle to shoulder length was 8.20 ± 3.59 cm (range: 3.23-19.06 cm). Mean shoulder to mid-humerus length was 7.88 ± 3.87 cm (range: 2.01-16.8 cm). Mean total radiographic measured length was 21.37 ± 9.19 cm (range: 7.42-43.6 cm). Mean actual cut PICC length was 20.64 ± 8.72 cm (range: 8.5-44 cm). The mean difference between predicted, or total radiographic measured length, and actual cut PICC length was 0.73 ± 2.51 (range: - 5.42-8.60 cm). The mean percent difference was 4.07 ± 12.65% (range: - 23.84-47.80%). An equivalence test rejected the null hypothesis of the true percent difference greater/less than ± 6.67% with a p value of 0.002. The chest radiograph measurement technique is an accurate method to determine catheter length for PICC placement at bedside in the pediatric population.

  4. Digital training platform for interpreting radiographic images of the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, L; Woznitza, N; Cairns, A; McFadden, S L; Bond, R; Hughes, C M; Elsayed, A; Finlay, D; McConnell, J

    2018-05-01

    Time delays and errors exist which lead to delays in patient care and misdiagnosis. Reporting clinicians follow guidance to form their own search strategy. However, little research has tested these training guides. With the use of eye tracking technology and expert input we developed a digital training platform to be used in chest image interpretation learning. Two sections of a digital training platform were planned and developed; A) a search strategy training tool to assist reporters during their interpretation of images, and B) an educational tool to communicate the search strategies of expert viewers to trainees by using eye tracking technology. A digital training platform for use in chest image interpretation was created based on evidence within the literature, expert input and two search strategies previously used in clinical practice. Images and diagrams, aiding translation of the platform content, were incorporated where possible. The platform is structured to allow the chest image interpretation process to be clear, concise and methodical. A search strategy was incorporated within the tool to investigate its use, with the possibility that it could be recommended as an evidence based approach for use by reporting clinicians. Eye tracking, a checklist and voice recordings have been combined to form a multi-dimensional learning tool, which has never been used in chest image interpretation learning before. The training platform for use in chest image interpretation learning has been designed, created and digitised. Future work will establish the efficacy of the developed approaches. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Reader performance in detection of pneumothorax on conventional chest films versus computed radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, E.A.; Hillman, B.J.; Fajardo, L.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the suitability of digital radiography for the detection of pneumothoraces, we compared radiologist' performance in four interpretation settings: conventional film-screen (FS) chest radiographs; small-format (8 x 6.5-inch) computed radiography (CR) (Toshiba); large-format (14 x 17-inch) CR; and CR images viewed on a digital workstation. Twenty-three frontal-view chest radiographs with pneumothoraces and 22 other chest radiographs, either normal or showing miscellaneous abnormalities, were read by six board-certified radiologist in each interpretation setting. We compared the sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) performances they achieved among the interpretation settings with the use of sequential paired t tests. To date, four readers have completed their reading of both the FS and the small-format CR films

  6. H1N1 influenza infection in children: Frequency, pattern, and outcome of chest radiographic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, S.-Y. [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.H., E-mail: jhkate@skku.ed [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eo, H.; Jeon, T.Y.; Shin, K.E.; Shin, W.S.; Jung, H.N. [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.-J. [Department of Pediatrics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Aim: To describe the frequency, pattern, and outcome of chest radiographic abnormalities in children with H1N1 influenza infection. Materials and methods: Three hundred and fourteen paediatric patients with confirmed H1N1 influenza infection who underwent chest radiography at presentation at a single institution during the outbreak in 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Abnormal chest radiographic findings related to acute infection were analysed in terms of frequency, pattern, and distribution. Medical records and follow-up radiographs were also reviewed to assess clinical features and outcomes. Results: Chest lesions suggesting acute infection were identified in 49 (16%) patients (mean age 8.2 years, range approximately 1.8-18.5 years). The most common finding was prominent peribronchial marking (71%), followed by air-space opacity (51%) with or without volume decrease, generalized hyperinflation (24%), and pleural effusion (20%). Other minor findings included pneumomediastinum (n = 2) and a nodule (n = 1). Distributions were bilateral (55%) or unilateral (45%) with frequent involvement of lower (78%), and middle (59%) lung zones. Thirty-nine patients (80%) were hospitalized and six (12%) required mechanical ventilation, followed by recovery. Thirty-one out of the 33 patients that underwent follow-up radiography showed marked resolution of all radiographic abnormalities. Conclusion: The frequency of a chest radiographic abnormality was found to be low in children with H1N1 influenza infection. Although typical radiographic findings of a viral lower respiratory infection were more common, unilateral involvement and air-space opacity were common, often with pleural effusion. Furthermore, pulmonary lesions showed near complete resolution on follow-up radiographs in the majority of patients.

  7. H1N1 influenza infection in children: Frequency, pattern, and outcome of chest radiographic abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, S.-Y.; Kim, J.H.; Eo, H.; Jeon, T.Y.; Shin, K.E.; Shin, W.S.; Jung, H.N.; Kim, Y.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To describe the frequency, pattern, and outcome of chest radiographic abnormalities in children with H1N1 influenza infection. Materials and methods: Three hundred and fourteen paediatric patients with confirmed H1N1 influenza infection who underwent chest radiography at presentation at a single institution during the outbreak in 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Abnormal chest radiographic findings related to acute infection were analysed in terms of frequency, pattern, and distribution. Medical records and follow-up radiographs were also reviewed to assess clinical features and outcomes. Results: Chest lesions suggesting acute infection were identified in 49 (16%) patients (mean age 8.2 years, range approximately 1.8-18.5 years). The most common finding was prominent peribronchial marking (71%), followed by air-space opacity (51%) with or without volume decrease, generalized hyperinflation (24%), and pleural effusion (20%). Other minor findings included pneumomediastinum (n = 2) and a nodule (n = 1). Distributions were bilateral (55%) or unilateral (45%) with frequent involvement of lower (78%), and middle (59%) lung zones. Thirty-nine patients (80%) were hospitalized and six (12%) required mechanical ventilation, followed by recovery. Thirty-one out of the 33 patients that underwent follow-up radiography showed marked resolution of all radiographic abnormalities. Conclusion: The frequency of a chest radiographic abnormality was found to be low in children with H1N1 influenza infection. Although typical radiographic findings of a viral lower respiratory infection were more common, unilateral involvement and air-space opacity were common, often with pleural effusion. Furthermore, pulmonary lesions showed near complete resolution on follow-up radiographs in the majority of patients.

  8. ACR appropriateness criteria routine chest radiographs in intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorosa, Judith K; Bramwit, Mark Paul; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Reddy, Gautham P; Brown, Kathleen; Dyer, Debra Sue; Ginsburg, Mark E; Heitkamp, Darel E; Jeudy, Jean; Kirsch, Jacobo; MacMahon, Heber; Ravenel, James G; Saleh, Anthony G; Shah, Rakesh D

    2013-03-01

    Daily routine chest radiographs in the intensive care unit (ICU) have been a tradition for many years. Anecdotal reports of misplacement of life support items, acute lung processes, and extra pulmonary air collections in a small number of patients served as a justification for routine chest radiographs in the ICU. Having analyzed this practice, the ACR Appropriateness Criteria Expert Panel on Thoracic Imaging has made the following recommendations: • When monitoring a stable patient or a patient on mechanical ventilation in the ICU, a portable chest radiograph is appropriate for clinical indications only. • It is appropriate to obtain a chest radiograph after placement of an endotracheal tube, central venous line, Swan-Ganz catheter, nasogastric tube, feeding tube, or chest tube. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. The strongest data contributing to these recommendations were derived from a meta-analysis of 8 trials comprising 7,078 ICU patients by Oba and Zaza [1]. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Toward the detection of abnormal chest radiographs the way radiologists do it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzubaidi, Mohammad; Patel, Ameet; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Black, John A., Jr.

    2011-03-01

    Computer Aided Detection (CADe) and Computer Aided Diagnosis (CADx) are relatively recent areas of research that attempt to employ feature extraction, pattern recognition, and machine learning algorithms to aid radiologists in detecting and diagnosing abnormalities in medical images. However, these computational methods are based on the assumption that there are distinct classes of abnormalities, and that each class has some distinguishing features that set it apart from other classes. However, abnormalities in chest radiographs tend to be very heterogeneous. The literature suggests that thoracic (chest) radiologists develop their ability to detect abnormalities by developing a sense of what is normal, so that anything that is abnormal attracts their attention. This paper discusses an approach to CADe that is based on a technique called anomaly detection (which aims to detect outliers in data sets) for the purpose of detecting atypical regions in chest radiographs. However, in order to apply anomaly detection to chest radiographs, it is necessary to develop a basis for extracting features from corresponding anatomical locations in different chest radiographs. This paper proposes a method for doing this, and describes how it can be used to support CADe.

  10. Acute chest syndrome of sickle cell disease: radiographic and clinical analysis of 70 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L.; Buonomo, C.

    1997-01-01

    Background. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a pulmonary illness with fever, chest pain, leukocytosis and new pulmonary opacity in a patient with sickle cell disease. It is a common reason for hospitalization in sickle cell patients, and a significant cause of mortality. The etiology of ACS is unclear. Lung or bone infarction and infection, among other possible causes, have been proposed. Objective. We reviewed the chest radiographs and medical records of 41 patients with 70 episodes of ACS and correlated the clinical and radiographic courses in an attempt to better characterize and understand the syndrome. Results. In 87 % of episodes, no identifiable etiology of ACS was found. This group of patients had a median age of 14 years and showed dramatic clinical and radiographic improvement within 24 h of therapy. In the remainder of episodes (13 %), an identifiable etiology was found, usually bacterial pneumonia. These patients were younger than the group without an identifiable etiology (median age 2 years) and had a prolonged radiographic course of illness. Conclusion. The chest radiographs of children with ACS without an identifiable etiology have an extremely typical appearance and evolution. Only in cases which do not have this typical pattern should infection be suspected as the underlying cause. (orig.). With 3 figs

  11. The necessity of routine post-thoracostomy tube chest radiographs in post-operative thoracic surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, M R; Patel, A; Morgan, J A

    2009-04-01

    Chest radiographs are routinely performed post-operatively in thoracic surgery patients, in particular after the removal of thoracostomy tubes. From observation of our practice, we hypothesised that chest radiographs did not need to be performed routinely post-operatively and after removal of thoracostomy tubes. To determine whether routine chest radiographs post-operatively and post-thoracostomy tube removal directly influenced patient management. A five month prospective study was carried out to analyse our current practice at the Thoracic Surgery Unit, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol, U.K. Demographic and clinico-pathological data were collected during admission. In the cohort of 74 patients, 66 (89%) patients had post-operative chest radiographs. Only three (5%) patients who had a chest radiograph had change in their management. Twenty-five (34%) patients had a chest radiograph post-thoracostomy tube removal. Only one (4%) patient in this group who had a chest radiograph after thoracostomy tube removal had a change of management. Interestingly, the decision to change patient management was not made on the basis of the chest radiographs alone; the clinical situation was the main determinant. Patients that did not have a chest radiograph postoperatively (eight patients, 11%) and post-thoracostomy tube removal (49 patients, 66%) did not suffer any adverse sequelae. We feel our data support the hypothesis that it is not necessary to perform routine chest radiographs in thoracic surgery patients post-operatively and after post-operative thoracostomy tube removal. It would be better to monitor these patients clinically and only request chest radiographs on the basis of deterioration in recorded observations or clinical findings.

  12. Diagnostic use of lung ultrasound compared to chest radiograph for suspected pneumonia in a resource-limited setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatya, Yogendra; Rupp, Jordan; Russell, Frances M; Saunders, Jason; Bales, Brian; House, Darlene R

    2018-03-12

    Lung ultrasound is an effective tool for diagnosing pneumonia in developed countries. Diagnostic accuracy in resource-limited countries where pneumonia is the leading cause of death is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of bedside lung ultrasound compared to chest X-ray for pneumonia in adults presenting for emergency care in a low-income country. Patients presenting to the emergency department with suspected pneumonia were evaluated with bedside lung ultrasound, single posterioranterior chest radiograph, and computed tomography (CT). Using CT as the gold standard, the sensitivity of lung ultrasound was compared to chest X-ray for the diagnosis of pneumonia using McNemar's test for paired samples. Diagnostic characteristics for each test were calculated. Of 62 patients included in the study, 44 (71%) were diagnosed with pneumonia by CT. Lung ultrasound demonstrated a sensitivity of 91% compared to chest X-ray which had a sensitivity of 73% (p = 0.01). Specificity of lung ultrasound and chest X-ray were 61 and 50% respectively. Bedside lung ultrasound demonstrated better sensitivity than chest X-ray for the diagnosis of pneumonia in Nepal. ClinicalTrials.gov, registration number NCT02949141 . Registered 31 October 2016.

  13. Assessment of airway compression on chest radiographs in children with pulmonary tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter-Joubert, Lisel [Groote Schuur Hospital and University of Cape Town, Department of Radiology, Cape Town (South Africa); Andronikou, Savvas [Groote Schuur Hospital and University of Cape Town, Department of Radiology, Cape Town (South Africa); Bristol Royal Hospital for Children and the University of Bristol, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom); Workman, Lesley; Zar, Heather J. [University of Cape Town, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health and MRC Unit on Child and Adolescent Health, Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2017-09-15

    Because small, pliable paediatric airways are easily compressed by enlarged lymph nodes, detection of radiographic airway compression might be an objective criterion for diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis. To investigate the frequency and inter-observer agreement of airway compression on chest radiographs in children with pulmonary tuberculosis compared to those with a different lower respiratory tract infection. Chest radiographs of children with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis were read by two readers according to a standardised format and a third reader when there was disagreement. Radiographs of children with proven pulmonary tuberculosis were compared to those with a different lower respiratory tract infection. We evaluated frequency and location of radiographic airway compression. Findings were correlated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status and age. We assessed inter-observer agreement using kappa statistics. We reviewed radiographs of 505 children (median age 25.9 months, interquartile range [IQR] 14.3-62.2). Radiographic airway compression occurred in 54/188 (28.7%) children with proven pulmonary tuberculosis and in 24/317 (7.6%) children with other types of lower respiratory tract infection (odds ratio [OR] 4.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.9-8.3). A higher frequency of radiographic airway compression occurred in infants (22/101, or 21.8%) compared to older children (56/404, or 13.9%; OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.0-3.0). We found no association between airway compression and HIV infection. Inter-observer agreement ranged from none to fair (kappa of 0.0-0.4). There is a strong association between airway compression on chest radiographs and confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis. However this finding's clinical use as an objective criterion for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in children is limited by poor inter-observer agreement. (orig.)

  14. Assessment of airway compression on chest radiographs in children with pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter-Joubert, Lisel; Andronikou, Savvas; Workman, Lesley; Zar, Heather J.

    2017-01-01

    Because small, pliable paediatric airways are easily compressed by enlarged lymph nodes, detection of radiographic airway compression might be an objective criterion for diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis. To investigate the frequency and inter-observer agreement of airway compression on chest radiographs in children with pulmonary tuberculosis compared to those with a different lower respiratory tract infection. Chest radiographs of children with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis were read by two readers according to a standardised format and a third reader when there was disagreement. Radiographs of children with proven pulmonary tuberculosis were compared to those with a different lower respiratory tract infection. We evaluated frequency and location of radiographic airway compression. Findings were correlated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status and age. We assessed inter-observer agreement using kappa statistics. We reviewed radiographs of 505 children (median age 25.9 months, interquartile range [IQR] 14.3-62.2). Radiographic airway compression occurred in 54/188 (28.7%) children with proven pulmonary tuberculosis and in 24/317 (7.6%) children with other types of lower respiratory tract infection (odds ratio [OR] 4.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.9-8.3). A higher frequency of radiographic airway compression occurred in infants (22/101, or 21.8%) compared to older children (56/404, or 13.9%; OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.0-3.0). We found no association between airway compression and HIV infection. Inter-observer agreement ranged from none to fair (kappa of 0.0-0.4). There is a strong association between airway compression on chest radiographs and confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis. However this finding's clinical use as an objective criterion for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in children is limited by poor inter-observer agreement. (orig.)

  15. Assessment of airway compression on chest radiographs in children with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter-Joubert, Lisel; Andronikou, Savvas; Workman, Lesley; Zar, Heather J

    2017-09-01

    Because small, pliable paediatric airways are easily compressed by enlarged lymph nodes, detection of radiographic airway compression might be an objective criterion for diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis. To investigate the frequency and inter-observer agreement of airway compression on chest radiographs in children with pulmonary tuberculosis compared to those with a different lower respiratory tract infection. Chest radiographs of children with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis were read by two readers according to a standardised format and a third reader when there was disagreement. Radiographs of children with proven pulmonary tuberculosis were compared to those with a different lower respiratory tract infection. We evaluated frequency and location of radiographic airway compression. Findings were correlated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status and age. We assessed inter-observer agreement using kappa statistics. We reviewed radiographs of 505 children (median age 25.9 months, interquartile range [IQR] 14.3-62.2). Radiographic airway compression occurred in 54/188 (28.7%) children with proven pulmonary tuberculosis and in 24/317 (7.6%) children with other types of lower respiratory tract infection (odds ratio [OR] 4.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.9-8.3). A higher frequency of radiographic airway compression occurred in infants (22/101, or 21.8%) compared to older children (56/404, or 13.9%; OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.0-3.0). We found no association between airway compression and HIV infection. Inter-observer agreement ranged from none to fair (kappa of 0.0-0.4). There is a strong association between airway compression on chest radiographs and confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis. However this finding's clinical use as an objective criterion for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in children is limited by poor inter-observer agreement.

  16. [Effects of image post-processing parameters on digital radiography chest radiograph for the diagnosis of pneumoconiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun-Qiang; Jiang, Zhao-Qiang; Zhou, Bin; Zhu, Qiang; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Xing

    2012-01-01

    To explore the effects of image post-processing parameters on DR chest radiograph for the diagnosis of pneumoconiosis. Eighty three coal miners were examined with high-kV and DR chest radiographs at the same time. Image post-processing parameters (density, contrast and so on) were designed in a Philips Essenta DR machine were designed, then differences of image quality between high-kV and DR chest radiographs were compared. After regulating image and proceeding the parameters, the OD (optical density) values of high density areas in the upper-middle lung fields, subphrenic and direct exposure areas were 1.58 +/- 0.10, 0.23 +/- 0.02 and 2.80 +/- 0.21, respectively. The quality of chest films met the requirements of diagnostic criteria of pneumoconiosis. The rate of excellent chest films for DR chest radiograph was 95.18%, which was significantly higher than that (80.72%) for high-kV chest radiograph (P image post-processing can make DR chest radiograph to meet the requirements of chest radiograph quality for the diagnosis of pneumoconiosis.

  17. Reporting instructions significantly impact false positive rates when reading chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, John W.; Brennan, Patrick C.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Lewis, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the impact of specific reporting tasks on the performance of radiologists when reading chest radiographs. Ten experienced radiologists read a set of 40 postero-anterior (PA) chest radiographs: 21 nodule free and 19 with a proven solitary nodule. There were two reporting conditions: an unframed task (UFT) to report any abnormality and a framed task (FT) reporting only lung nodule/s. Jackknife free-response operating characteristic (JAFROC) figure of merit (FOM), specificity, location sensitivity and number of true positive (TP), false positive (FP), true negative (TN) and false negative (FN) decisions were used for analysis. JAFROC FOM for tasks showed a significant reduction in performance for framed tasks (P = 0.006) and an associated decrease in specificity (P = 0.011) but no alteration to the location sensitivity score. There was a significant increase in number of FP decisions made during framed versus unframed tasks for nodule-containing (P = 0.005) and nodule-free (P = 0.011) chest radiographs. No significant differences in TP were recorded. Radiologists report more FP decisions when given specific reporting instructions to search for nodules on chest radiographs. The relevance of clinical history supplied to radiologists is called into question and may induce a negative effect. (orig.)

  18. Neonatal chest image quality addressed through training to enhance radiographer awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesta Friedrich-Nel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnostic radiographers working in the neonatal intensive care unit primarily aim to produce an image of optimal quality using optimal exposure techniques without repeating exposures, to keep neonatal radiation dose to a minimum.   Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine whether radiographers were producing optimal quality chest images and, if not, whether additional training could contribute to reaching this goal in the Free State Province of South Africa.   Methods: Neonatal chest image quality was determined in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit by using a checklist based on and compiled from published guidelines to evaluate the quality of 450 randomly-selected images. Thereafter, a training programme was designed, based on the evaluation criteria of the checklist and image quality areas identified. The training also referred to positioning techniques that should be applied to ensure optimal image quality. After presentation of the training, 450 newly-produced neonatal chest images were evaluated. These images were selected through purposive sampling as this evaluation only included images of participating radiographers who completed the training.   Results: Image quality that showed significant improvement included a reduction in electrocardiogram lines superimposed on chest anatomy, a tendency to centre closer to thoracic vertebra four, and visible four-sided collimation on images. Image quality areas with no significant enhancement were the absence of lead markers and radiation shielding.   Conclusion: The study has shown that a training programme has the potential to improve neonatal chest image quality.

  19. Standard reference radiographs for steel fusion welds

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This standard provides reference radiographs for steel fusion welds that contain typical discontinuities with varying severity levels in different thicknesses of material. The reference radiograph films are an adjunct to this standard and must be purchased separately from ASTM International if needed. 1.2 There are three volumes of reference radiographs based on seven nominal weld thicknesses as follows: Vol ISet of 16 plates (81/2 by 11 in.) covering base material up to and including ¼ in. (6.4 mm) in thickness. Vol IISet of 29 plates (8½ by 11 in.) covering base material over ¼ to and including 3 in. (6.4 to 76 mm) in thickness. Vol IIISet of 32 plates (8 ½ by 11 in.) covering base material over 3 to including 8 in. (76 to 203 mm) in thickness. 1.3 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport t...

  20. Digital subtraction radiographic evaluation of the standardize periapical intraoral radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo

    1993-01-01

    The geometrically standardized intraoral radiographs using 5 occlusal registration material were taken serially from immediate, 1 day, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks after making the bite blocks. The qualities of those subtracted images were evaluated to check the degree of reproducibility of each impression material. The results were as follows: 1. The standard deviations of the grey scales of the overall subtracted images were 4.9 for Exaflex, 7.2 for Pattern resin, 9.0 for Tooth Shade Acrylic, 12.2 for XCP only, 14.8 for Impregum. 2. The standard deviation of the grey scales of the overall subtracted images were grossly related to those of the localized horizontal line of interest. 3. Exaflex which showed the best subtracted image quality had 15 cases of straight, 14 cases of wave, 1 case of canyon shape. Impregum which showed the worst subtracted image quality had 4 cases of straight, 8 cases of wave, 18 cases of canyon shape respectively.

  1. Performance of radiologists in detection of small pulmonary nodules on chest radiographs: effect of rib suppression with a massive-training artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Seitaro; Awai, Kazuo; Suzuki, Kenji; Yanaga, Yumi; Funama, Yoshinori; MacMahon, Heber; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2009-11-01

    A massive-training artificial neural network is a nonlinear pattern recognition tool used to suppress rib opacity on chest radiographs while soft-tissue contrast is maintained. We investigated the effect of rib suppression with a massive-training artificial neural network on the performance of radiologists in the detection of pulmonary nodules on chest radiographs. We used 60 chest radiographs; 30 depicted solitary pulmonary nodules, and 30 showed no nodules. A stratified random-sampling scheme was used to select the images from the standard digital image database developed by the Japanese Society of Radiologic Technology. The mean diameter of the 30 pulmonary nodules was 14.7 +/- 4.1 (SD) mm. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to evaluate observer performance in the detection of pulmonary nodules first on the chest radiographs without and then on the radiographs with rib suppression. Seven board-certified radiologists and five radiology residents participated in this observer study. For all 12 observers, the mean values of the area under the best-fit receiver operating characteristic curve for images without and with rib suppression were 0.816 +/- 0.077 and 0.843 +/- 0.074; the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.019). The mean areas under the curve for images without and with rib suppression were 0.848 +/- 0.059 and 0.883 +/- 0.050 for the seven board-certified radiologists (p = 0.011) and 0.770 +/- 0.081 and 0.788 +/- 0.074 for the five radiology residents (p = 0.310). In the detection of pulmonary nodules, evaluation of a combination of rib-suppressed and original chest radiographs significantly improved the diagnostic performance of radiologists over the use of chest radiographs alone.

  2. Computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs based on morphometric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Satoshi; Li, Feng; Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Straus, Christopher; Vokes, Tamara; MacMahon, Heber; Doi, Kunio

    2007-03-01

    Vertebral fractures are the most common osteoporosis-related fractures. It is important to detect vertebral fractures, because they are associated with increased risk of subsequent fractures, and because pharmacologic therapy can reduce the risk of subsequent fractures. Although vertebral fractures are often not clinically recognized, they can be visualized on lateral chest radiographs taken for other purposes. However, only 15-60% of vertebral fractures found on lateral chest radiographs are mentioned in radiology reports. The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs in order to assist radiologists' image interpretation. Our computerized method is based on the automated identification of upper and lower vertebral edges. In order to develop the scheme, radiologists provided morphometric data for each identifiable vertebra, which consisted of six points for each vertebra, for 25 normals and 20 cases with severe fractures. Anatomical information was obtained from morphometric data of normal cases in terms of vertebral heights, heights of vertebral disk spaces, and vertebral centerline. Computerized detection of vertebral fractures was based on the reduction in the heights of fractured vertebrae compared to adjacent vertebrae and normal reference data. Vertebral heights from morphometric data on normal cases were used as reference. On 138 chest radiographs (20 with fractures) the sensitivity of our method for detection of fracture cases was 95% (19/20) with 0.93 (110/118) false-positives per image. In conclusion, the computerized method would be useful for detection of potentially overlooked vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs.

  3. Accuracy of chest radiographs in the emergency diagnosis of heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studler, Ueli; Kretzschmar, Martin; Steinbrich, Wolfgang; Christ, Michael; Breidthardt, Tobias; Noveanu, Markus; Perruchoud, Andre P.; Mueller, Christian; Schoetzau, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of chest radiographic findings of heart failure (HF) in current patients presenting with dyspnea in the emergency department. In a secondary analysis of the BASEL study, initial chest radiographs of 277 patients with acute dyspnea were evaluated by two radiologists blinded to the adjudicated diagnosis (56% had the final diagnosis of HF). Predefined radiographic criteria of HF were used. Statistical analysis included receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and calculation of a logistic regression model including B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. The reader's overall impression showed the highest area under the ROC curve for the diagnosis of HF in both supine and erect patient positions (0.855 and 0.857). Among individual radiographic findings, peribronchial cuffing in the supine position (0.829) showed the highest accuracies. The lowest accuracy was found for the vascular pedicle width in the supine position (0.461). Logistic regression analysis showed no significant differences between the reader's overall impression, the radiographic model, and BNP testing. In our study, the combination of radiographic features provided valuable information and was of comparable accuracy as BNP-testing for the diagnosis of HF. (orig.)

  4. The oblique interface in the right cardiophrenic angle: chest radiographic-CT correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeung Sook; Lee, Kyung Soo; Choo, Sung Wook; Choo, In Wook

    1996-01-01

    An oblique interface in the right cardiophrenic angle, extending superomedially from right retrocardiac or supradiaphragmatic region inferolaterally to peridiaphragmatic region, is occasionally observed on posteroanterior chest radiograph. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of visualization of the interface on chest radiographs and to elucidate its nature on radiographic-CT correlation. Posteroanterior chest radiographs from 300 consecutive subjects were analyzed to evaluate the frequency and demographic data about an oblique interface in the right cardiophrenic angle. Thin-section CT scans(1-mm collimation and 5-mm intervals) were obtained from the subjects with positive interface on chest radiograph for assessment of the nature of the interface. The demographic data in the subjects with and without the interface were tested statistically to note any difference between two groups. Oblique interface in the right cardiophrenic angle was present in 29 subjects(9.7%) on chest radiograph. The age of the subjects with positive interface(13 men and 16 women) ranged from 19 to 70 years(mean±SD, 47±12.7 years) whereas the age of the subjects without the interface from 16 to 82 years (mean±SD, 50±9.1 years)(p>0.1). The body weight of the subjects with the interface ranged from 41 to 72 Kg(mean±SD, 60±8.0Kg) whereas the body weight of the subjects without the interface from 41 to 85Kg(mean±SD, 63±10.1Kg)(p>0.1). On CT scan, it was formed due to contact between the epipericardial fat and the right middle lobe of the lung in 27 subjects(93%) and between the inferior vena cava and the medial basal segment of the right lower lobe of the lung in two(7%). Oblique interface in the right cardiophrenic angle is occasionally visualized on chest radiograph. It is formed due to contact between the right middle lobe of the lung and pericardial fat in most cases. The frequency of visualization of the interface has no relationship to age and body weight of the

  5. Improving computer-aided diagnosis of interstitial disease in chest radiographs by combining one-class and two-class classifiers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arzhaeva, Y.; Tax, D.; Van Ginneken, B.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we compare and combine two distinct pattern classification approaches to the automated detection of regions with interstitial abnormalities in frontal chest radiographs. Standard two-class classifiers and recently developed one-class classifiers are considered. The one-class problem is

  6. Multi-scale Morphological Image Enhancement of Chest Radiographs by a Hybrid Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavijeh, Fatemeh Shahsavari; Mahdavi-Nasab, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Chest radiography is a common diagnostic imaging test, which contains an enormous amount of information about a patient. However, its interpretation is highly challenging. The accuracy of the diagnostic process is greatly influenced by image processing algorithms; hence enhancement of the images is indispensable in order to improve visibility of the details. This paper aims at improving radiograph parameters such as contrast, sharpness, noise level, and brightness to enhance chest radiographs, making use of a triangulation method. Here, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization technique and noise suppression are simultaneously performed in wavelet domain in a new scheme, followed by morphological top-hat and bottom-hat filtering. A unique implementation of morphological filters allows for adjustment of the image brightness and significant enhancement of the contrast. The proposed method is tested on chest radiographs from Japanese Society of Radiological Technology database. The results are compared with conventional enhancement techniques such as histogram equalization, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization, Retinex, and some recently proposed methods to show its strengths. The experimental results reveal that the proposed method can remarkably improve the image contrast while keeping the sensitive chest tissue information so that radiologists might have a more precise interpretation.

  7. Chest Radiograph Findings in Childhood Pneumonia Cases From the Multisite PERCH Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancourt, Nicholas; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Feikin, Daniel R; Hammitt, Laura L; Howie, Stephen R C; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; Murdoch, David R; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Awori, Juliet O; Barger-Kamate, Breanna; Chipeta, James; DeLuca, Andrea N; Diallo, Mahamadou; Driscoll, Amanda J; Ebruke, Bernard E; Higdon, Melissa M; Jahan, Yasmin; Karron, Ruth A; Mahomed, Nasreen; Moore, David P; Nahar, Kamrun; Naorat, Sathapana; Ominde, Micah Silaba; Park, Daniel E; Prosperi, Christine; Wa Somwe, Somwe; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Zaman, Syed M A; Zeger, Scott L; O'Brien, Katherine L

    2017-06-15

    Chest radiographs (CXRs) are frequently used to assess pneumonia cases. Variations in CXR appearances between epidemiological settings and their correlation with clinical signs are not well documented. The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health project enrolled 4232 cases of hospitalized World Health Organization (WHO)-defined severe and very severe pneumonia from 9 sites in 7 countries (Bangladesh, the Gambia, Kenya, Mali, South Africa, Thailand, and Zambia). At admission, each case underwent a standardized assessment of clinical signs and pneumonia risk factors by trained health personnel, and a CXR was taken that was interpreted using the standardized WHO methodology. CXRs were categorized as abnormal (consolidation and/or other infiltrate), normal, or uninterpretable. CXRs were interpretable in 3587 (85%) cases, of which 1935 (54%) were abnormal (site range, 35%-64%). Cases with abnormal CXRs were more likely than those with normal CXRs to have hypoxemia (45% vs 26%), crackles (69% vs 62%), tachypnea (85% vs 80%), or fever (20% vs 16%) and less likely to have wheeze (30% vs 38%; all P pneumonia cases with abnormal CXRs were more likely to have signs typically associated with pneumonia. However, CXR-normal cases were common, and clinical signs considered indicative of pneumonia were present in substantial proportions of these cases. CXR-consolidation cases represent a group with an increased likelihood of death at 30 days post-discharge. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  8. Improved detection of pulmonary nodules on energy-subtracted chest radiographs with a commercial computer-aided diagnosis software: comparison with human observers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Patak, Michael A.; Yuksel-Hatz, Seyran; Ruder, Thomas; Vock, Peter

    2010-01-01

    To retrospectively analyze the performance of a commercial computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) software in the detection of pulmonary nodules in original and energy-subtracted (ES) chest radiographs. Original and ES chest radiographs of 58 patients with 105 pulmonary nodules measuring 5-30 mm and images of 25 control subjects with no nodules were randomized. Five blinded readers evaluated firstly the original postero-anterior images alone and then together with the subtracted radiographs. In a second phase, original and ES images were analyzed by a commercial CAD program. CT was used as reference standard. CAD results were compared to the readers' findings. True-positive (TP) and false-positive (FP) findings with CAD on subtracted and non-subtracted images were compared. Depending on the reader's experience, CAD detected between 11 and 21 nodules missed by readers. Human observers found three to 16 lesions missed by the CAD software. CAD used with ES images produced significantly fewer FPs than with non-subtracted images: 1.75 and 2.14 FPs per image, respectively (p=0.029). The difference for the TP nodules was not significant (40 nodules on ES images and 34 lesions in non-subtracted radiographs, p = 0.142). CAD can improve lesion detection both on energy subtracted and non-subtracted chest images, especially for less experienced readers. The CAD program marked less FPs on energy-subtracted images than on original chest radiographs. (orig.)

  9. Radiographic, CT and MRI spectrum of hydatid disease of the chest: a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinner, W.N. von [Dept. of Radiology MBC28, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1993-01-01

    Thirty patients with thoracic hydatidosis (Echinococcus granulosus) were studied. The hydatid cysts were located in the lung parenchyma (70%), mediastinum (6.7%), inside the heart (10%), the pleurae (10%) and the chest wall (3.3%). Complications of thoracic hydatid cysts, such as rupture, infection, pleural involvement, spread and calcifications are presented. Computed tomography (CT) without and/or with contrast enhancement was performed in all patients (30). Findings from conventional chest radiographs were compared with CT and confirmed by pathology (30). In 10 cases (33.3%), magnetic resonance imaging was also performed. The diagnostic spectrum of hydatid cysts, including variations and developmental stages, is presented in this pictorial essay. (orig.)

  10. Validation of the plain chest radiograph for epidemiologic studies of airflow obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musk, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    The chest radiographs of 125 industrial workers from rural New South Wales were examined for overinflated lungs, with and without attenuated midzonal vessels. Although the mean values of a comprehensive range of pulmonary function tests in the whole group were within normal limits, the nine subjects whose radiographs showed overinflated lungs and attenuated vessels had significantly impaired pulmonary function in comparison with 85 subjects with normal radiographs. The mean values for these nine subjects, expressed as a percentage of the mean value for subjects with normal radiographs, were: forced expiratory volume in 1 second, 75%; total lung capacity, 107%; residual volume, 143%; transpulmonary pressure at maximum inspiration, 60%; static deflation compliance, 158%; lung volume at transpulmonary pressure 10 cm H 2 O, 132%; transfer factor, 79%; and transfer factor/alveolar volume, 77%. Similar results were obtained by a second observer. Those subjects with overinflation but no vascular attenuation had significantly larger mean values for vital capacity and alveolar volume but no significant difference in total lung capacity or other tests of the mechanical properties of the lungs. Agreement on the presence of a positive sign between the two observers expressed as a percentage of those considered positive by either was 81% for overinflation and 62% for attenuated midzonal vessels. The results indicate that in groups of subjects with normal-average values of pulmonary function, the plain chest radiograph may provide information concerning pulmonary structure that is reflected in tests of function

  11. Evaluation of pneumonia in children: comparison of MRI with fast imaging sequences at 1.5T with chest radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yikilmaz, Ali; Koc, Ali; Coskun, Abdulhakim (Dept. of Radiology, Erciyes Medical School, Kayseri (Turkey)); Ozturk, Mustafa K (Dept. of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Erciyes Medical School, Kayseri (Turkey)); Mulkern, Robert V; Lee, Edward Y (Dept. of Radiology and Dept. of Medicine, Pulmonary Div., Children' s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States)), email: Edward.lee@childrens.harvard.edu

    2011-10-15

    Background Although there has been a study aimed at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of pneumonia in children at a low magnetic field (0.2T), there is no study which assessed the efficacy of MRI, particularly with fast imaging sequences at 1.5T, for evaluating pneumonia in children. Purpose To investigate the efficacy of chest MRI with fast imaging sequences at 1.5T for evaluating pneumonia in children by comparing MRI findings with those of chest radiographs. Material and Methods This was an Institutional Review Board-approved, HIPPA-compliant prospective study of 40 consecutive pediatric patients (24 boys, 16 girls; mean age 7.3 years +- 6.6 years) with pneumonia, who underwent PA and lateral chest radiographs followed by MRI within 24 h. All MRI studies were obtained in axial and coronal planes with two different fast imaging sequences: T1-weighted FFE (Fast Field Echo) (TR/TE: 83/4.6) and T2-weighted B-FFE M2D (Balanced Fast Field Echo Multiple 2D Dimensional) (TR/TE: 3.2/1.6). Two experienced pediatric radiologists reviewed each chest radiograph and MRI for the presence of consolidation, necrosis/abscess, bronchiectasis, and pleural effusion. Chest radiograph and MRI findings were compared with Kappa statistics. Results All consolidation, lung necrosis/abscess, bronchiectasis, and pleural effusion detected with chest radiographs were also detected with MRI. There was statistically substantial agreement between chest radiographs and MRI in detecting consolidation (k = 0.78) and bronchiectasis (k = 0.72) in children with pneumonia. The agreement between chest radiographs and MRI was moderate for detecting necrosis/abscess (k = 0.49) and fair for detecting pleural effusion (k = 0.30). Conclusion MRI with fast imaging sequences is comparable to chest radiographs for evaluating underlying pulmonary consolidation, bronchiectasis, necrosis/abscess, and pleural effusion often associated with pneumonia in children

  12. Computer-Aided Detection of Malignant Lung Nodules on Chest Radiographs: Effect on Observers' Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Hee; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Chang Min; Lee, Hyun Ju; Jin, Kwang Nam

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of computer-aided detection (CAD) system on observer performance in the detection of malignant lung nodules on chest radiograph. Two hundred chest radiographs (100 normal and 100 abnormal with malignant solitary lung nodules) were evaluated. With CT and histological confirmation serving as a reference, the mean nodule size was 15.4 mm (range, 7-20 mm). Five chest radiologists and five radiology residents independently interpreted both the original radiographs and CAD output images using the sequential testing method. The performances of the observers for the detection of malignant nodules with and without CAD were compared using the jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic analysis. Fifty-nine nodules were detected by the CAD system with a false positive rate of 1.9 nodules per case. The detection of malignant lung nodules significantly increased from 0.90 to 0.92 for a group of observers, excluding one first-year resident (p = 0.04). When lowering the confidence score was not allowed, the average figure of merit also increased from 0.90 to 0.91 (p = 0.04) for all observers after a CAD review. On average, the sensitivities with and without CAD were 87% and 84%, respectively; the false positive rates per case with and without CAD were 0.19 and 0.17, respectively. The number of additional malignancies detected following true positive CAD marks ranged from zero to seven for the various observers. The CAD system may help improve observer performance in detecting malignant lung nodules on chest radiographs and contribute to a decrease in missed lung cancer.

  13. Accuracy of an automated system for tuberculosis detection on chest radiographs in high-risk screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, J; Hogeweg, L; Sánchez, C I; Philipsen, R H H M; Aldridge, R W; Hayward, A C; Abubakar, I; van Ginneken, B; Story, A

    2018-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) screening programmes can be optimised by reducing the number of chest radiographs (CXRs) requiring interpretation by human experts. To evaluate the performance of computerised detection software in triaging CXRs in a high-throughput digital mobile TB screening programme. A retrospective evaluation of the software was performed on a database of 38 961 postero-anterior CXRs from unique individuals seen between 2005 and 2010, 87 of whom were diagnosed with TB. The software generated a TB likelihood score for each CXR. This score was compared with a reference standard for notified active pulmonary TB using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and localisation ROC (LROC) curve analyses. On ROC curve analysis, software specificity was 55.71% (95%CI 55.21-56.20) and negative predictive value was 99.98% (95%CI 99.95-99.99), at a sensitivity of 95%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.90 (95%CI 0.86-0.93). Results of the LROC curve analysis were similar. The software could identify more than half of the normal images in a TB screening setting while maintaining high sensitivity, and may therefore be used for triage.

  14. Value of Chest Radiographic Pattern in RSV Disease of the Newborn: A Multicenter Retrospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Américo Gonçalves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV lower respiratory tract infection is the most common viral respiratory infection in infants. Several authors have sought to determine which risk factors are the best predictors for severe RSV disease. Our aim was to evaluate if a specific chest radiographic pattern in RSV disease can predict the disease severity. We conducted a multicenter retrospective cohort study in term and preterm neonates with confirmed lower respiratory tract RSV infection, admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICU from 2000 to 2010. To determine which factors independently predicted the outcomes, multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. A total of 259 term and preterm neonates were enrolled. Patients with a consolidation pattern on the chest radiograph at admission (n=101 had greater need for invasive mechanical ventilation (OR: 2.5; P=.015, respiratory support (OR: 2.3; P=.005, supplemental oxygen (OR: 3.0; P=.008, and prolonged stay in the NICU (>7 days (OR: 1.8; P=.025. Newborns with a consolidation pattern on admission chest radiograph had a more severe disease course, with greater risk of invasive mechanical ventilation, respiratory support, supplemental oxygen, and prolonged hospitalization.

  15. Accuracy of the interpretation of chest radiographs for the diagnosis of paediatric pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A Elemraid

    Full Text Available World Health Organization (WHO radiological classification remains an important entry criterion in epidemiological studies of pneumonia in children. We report inter-observer variability in the interpretation of 169 chest radiographs in children suspected of having pneumonia.An 18-month prospective aetiological study of pneumonia was undertaken in Northern England. Chest radiographs were performed on eligible children aged ≤16 years with clinical features of pneumonia. The initial radiology report was compared with a subsequent assessment by a consultant cardiothoracic radiologist. Chest radiographic changes were categorised according to the WHO classification.There was significant disagreement (22% between the first and second reports (kappa = 0.70, P<0.001, notably in those aged <5 years (26%, kappa = 0.66, P<0.001. The most frequent sources of disagreement were the reporting of patchy and perihilar changes.This substantial inter-observer variability highlights the need for experts from different countries to create a consensus to review the radiological definition of pneumonia in children.

  16. Semi-automated location identification of catheters in digital chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Yankelevitz, David F.

    2007-03-01

    Localization of catheter tips is the most common task in intensive care unit imaging. In this work, catheters appearing in digital chest radiographs acquired by portable chest x-rays were tracked using a semi-automatic method. Due to the fact that catheters are synthetic objects, its profile does not vary drastically over its length. Therefore, we use forward looking registration with normalized cross-correlation in order to take advantage of a priori information of the catheter profile. The registration is accomplished with a two-dimensional template representative of the catheter to be tracked generated using two seed points given by the user. To validate catheter tracking with this method, we look at two metrics: accuracy and precision. The algorithms results are compared to a ground truth established by catheter midlines marked by expert radiologists. Using 12 objects of interest comprised of naso-gastric, endo-tracheal tubes, and chest tubes, and PICC and central venous catheters, we find that our algorithm can fully track 75% of the objects of interest, with a average tracking accuracy and precision of 85.0%, 93.6% respectively using the above metrics. Such a technique would be useful for physicians wishing to verify the positioning of catheter tips using chest radiographs.

  17. Are chest radiographs justified in pre-employment examinations. Presentation of legal position and medical evidence based on 1760 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladd, S.C.; Krause, U.; Ladd, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    The legal and medical basis for chest radiographs as part of pre-employment examinations (PEE) at a University Hospital is evaluated. The radiographs are primarily performed to exclude infectious lung disease. A total of 1760 consecutive chest radiographs performed as a routine part of PEEs were reviewed retrospectively. Pathologic findings were categorized as ''nonrelevant'' or ''relevant.'' No positive finding with respect to tuberculosis or any other infectious disease was found; 94.8% of the chest radiographs were completely normal. Only five findings were regarded as ''relevant'' for the individual. No employment-relevant diagnosis occurred. The performance of chest radiography as part of a PEE is most often not justified. The practice is expensive, can violate national and European law, and lacks medical justification. (orig.) [de

  18. Chest Radiographic Findings in Primary Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Observations from High School Outbreaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Won Jung; Kwon, O Jung; Lee, Kyung Soo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yeon Joo [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Jin; Lew, Woo Jin [Korean Institute of Tuberculosis, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, En Hi [4Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    To describe the radiographic findings of primary pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in previously healthy adolescent patients. The Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study, with a waiver of informed consent from the patients. TB outbreaks occurred in 15 senior high schools and chest radiographs from 58 students with identical strains of TB were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis by two independent observers. Lesions of nodule(s), consolidation, or cavitation in the upper lung zones were classified as typical TB. Mediastinal lymph node enlargement; lesions of nodule(s), consolidation, or cavitation in lower lung zones; or pleural effusion were classified as atypical TB. Inter-observer agreement for the presence of each radiographic finding was examined by kappa statistics. Of 58 patients, three (5%) had normal chest radiographs. Cavitary lesions were present in 25 (45%) of 55 students. Lesions with upper lung zone predominance were observed in 27 (49%) patients, whereas lower lung zone predominance was noted in 18 (33%) patients. The remaining 10 (18%) patients had lesions in both upper and lower lung zones. Pleural effusion was not observed in any patient, nor was the mediastinal lymph node enlargement. Hilar lymph node enlargement was seen in only one (2%) patient. Overall, 37 (67%) students had the typical form of TB, whereas 18 (33%) had TB lesions of the atypical form. The most common radiographic findings in primary pulmonary TB by recent infection in previously healthy adolescents are upper lung lesions, which were thought to be radiographic findings of reactivation pulmonary TB by remote infection

  19. An automatic computer-aided detection scheme for pneumoconiosis on digital chest radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peichun; Xu, Hao; Zhu, Ying; Yang, Chao; Sun, Xiwen; Zhao, Jun

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an automatic computer-aided detection scheme on digital chest radiographs to detect pneumoconiosis. Firstly, the lung fields are segmented from a digital chest X-ray image by using the active shape model method. Then, the lung fields are subdivided into six non-overlapping regions, according to Chinese diagnosis criteria of pneumoconiosis. The multi-scale difference filter bank is applied to the chest image to enhance the details of the small opacities, and the texture features are calculated from each region of the original and the processed images, respectively. After extracting the most relevant ones from the feature sets, support vector machine classifiers are utilized to separate the samples into the normal and the abnormal sets. Finally, the final classification is performed by the chest-based report-out and the classification probability values of six regions. Experiments are conducted on randomly selected images from our chest database. Both the training and the testing sets have 300 normal and 125 pneumoconiosis cases. In the training phase, training models and weighting factors for each region are derived. We evaluate the scheme using the full feature vectors or the selected feature vectors of the testing set. The results show that the classification performances are high. Compared with the previous methods, our fully automated scheme has a higher accuracy and a more convenient interaction. The scheme is very helpful to mass screening of pneumoconiosis in clinic.

  20. [Radiographic and computed tomographic manifestations of chest in patients with acute chlorine gas poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen-juan; Huang, De-jian; Wang, Zhong-qiu; Wang, Zheng-ge; Chang, Shuang-hui; Wu, Zheng-can

    2010-10-26

    To investigate the radiographic and computerized tomographic features of chest in patients with acute chlorine poisoning and its diagnostic value. Twenty-eight cases of chlorine poisoning were reviewed. And their radiographic and computerized tomographic features were compared and analyzed. Radiographic findings: among 28 patients, 9 cases were normal and 2 cases had no abnormalities on the first chest X-ray and became abnormal one or two days later. And there were abnormal findings in first chest X-ray in 17 patients:acute tracheal inflammation of peribronchitis (n = 3), acute chemical bronchopneumonia (n = 6) and diffuse interstitial and central pulmonary edema (n = 8). CT manifestations: At Days 1-3, the patients of mild poisoning had scattered patchy dense shadow; those of moderate to severe poisoning showed multiple patchy or diffuse infiltration (ground-glass opacity). And partial consolidation, air bronchogram and pleural effusion could be observed. At Days 4-10, the manifestations of mild poisoning were largely absorbed; those of moderate to severe poisoning manifested the absorption of diffuse or multiple patchy effusion and a fading of shadow. And the size of lung consolidation became smaller than before. At Day 10 after onset, 4 patients completely recovered. At Days 30-40, 6 cases showed traces of fibrous shadow and one case showed small punctiform opacities in both lungs. And at Day 42, there was slight ground-glass change. Acute chlorine gas poisoning in varying degrees may manifest acute bronchial pneumonia and acute pulmonary edema. During treatment, a series of chest X-ray examinations will help to follow the changes of disease. And CT examination can offer a more accurate evaluation of lung lesions.

  1. Does the Use of a Checklist Help Medical Students in the Detection of Abnormalities on a Chest Radiograph?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, E.M.; Abed, Abdelrazek; Robben, Simon G. F.

    2017-01-01

    The interpretation of chest radiographs is a complex task that is prone to diagnostic error, especially for medical students. The aim of this study is to investigate the extent to which medical students benefit from the use of a checklist regarding the detection of abnormalities on a chest

  2. Computed radiography versus mobile direct radiography for bedside chest radiographs: impact of dose on image quality and reader agreement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boo, D.W. De; Weber, M.; Deurloo, E.E.; Streekstra, G.J.; Freling, N.J.; Dongelmans, D.A.; Schaefer-Prokop, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To asses the image quality and potential for dose reduction of mobile direct detector (DR) chest radiography as compared with computed radiography (CR) for intensive care unit (ICU) chest radiographs (CXR). METHODS AND MATERIALS: Three groups of age-, weight- and disease-matched ICU patients

  3. Computed radiography versus mobile direct radiography for bedside chest radiographs: impact of dose on image quality and reader agreement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boo, D. W.; Weber, M.; Deurloo, E. E.; Streekstra, G. J.; Freling, N. J.; Dongelmans, D. A.; Schaefer-Prokop, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    To asses the image quality and potential for dose reduction of mobile direct detector (DR) chest radiography as compared with computed radiography (CR) for intensive care unit (ICU) chest radiographs (CXR). Three groups of age-, weight- and disease-matched ICU patients (n=114 patients; 50 CXR per

  4. Chest radiographic appearances in adult inpatients admitted with swine flu infection: local experience in Melbourne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirakalathanan, Janu; Lau, Kenneth K.; Joosten, Simon A.

    2013-01-01

    The influenza A virus (H1N1) pandemic began in Mexico in March 2009. As of July 2009, there were 5298 reported cases in Australia including 10 deaths. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the local chest radiographic findings in adult inpatients with proven H1N1, to assess the radiological disease progression and resolution, and to evaluate whether the severity of chest X-rays findings had a bearing on the length of admission and need for intensive care admission. Eleven H1N1 patients (5 males and 6 females, mean age of 36), presenting with cough (64%), fever (55%) and shortness of breath (55%), were admitted to our hospital between 13 August and 1 November 2010. Details of radiographic features, risk factors, clinical course including length of stay, doubling time of consolidation and time for 50% resolution of consolidation were recorded and analysed. Seventy-three per cent of our patients presented with bilateral mid and/or lower zone alveolar consolidation. One patient with underlying cystic fibrosis had only bilateral upper zone consolidation. No pleural effusion, lymphadenopathy or cardiomegaly was noted on any of the plain chest radiographs. The mean doubling time of consolidation was 1.5 days. The mean time for 50% resolution of consolidation after antiviral treatment was 10.5 days. The average length of stay in hospital was 22 days. Ninety-one per cent of our patients required intensive-care unit admission with 50% of those requiring intubation. Rapid progression of bilateral mid and lower zone air-space opacities in relatively young unwell patients, with lack of pleural effusion, pericardial effusion or lymphadenopathy on plain radiographs, should raise the clinical suspicion of H1N1 infection. Patients requiring hospital admission usually show slow clinical and radiological improvement, and require prolonged hospital stays.

  5. Survey of image quality and radiographic technique of pediatric chest examinations performed in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, H.; Mora, P.; Defaz, M.Y.; Blanco, S.; Leyton, F.; Benavente, T.; Ortiz Lopez, P.; Ramirez, R.

    2008-01-01

    This work presents the results of a survey of entrance surface air kerma values (K e ), image quality and radiographic exposure parameters used in pediatric chest examinations performed in Latin America. This study is part of the activities of the IAEA Regional Project RLA/9/057 whose objective is to optimize the radiological protection of patients in diagnostic and interventional radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. The survey was performed in nine hospitals in Argentina (1), Brazil (4), Chile (1), Costa Rica (1), Peru (1) and Ecuador (1). The study group consisted of 462 pediatric patients (Group I- from two days to one year, Group II- from four to six years of age) undergoing chest PA/AP examinations. At the time of the examination the exposure parameters (kVp, mAs, focal-spot-to-film distance, etc.) and patient information (gender, height, weight and age) were recorded. The radiographic image quality was evaluated by the local radiologist based on the European Guidelines on Quality Criteria for Diagnostic Radiographic Images in Pediatrics. The results showed that the exposure parameters used on newborn patients were in the majority outside the 60-65kV range recommended by the European Guidelines for a good radiographic practice. In the case of examinations of patients with age between 4 to 6 years, 80% were performed with a peak tube voltage within the 60-80 kV range, as recommended by the European Guidelines. It was found that none of countries fully comply with the European Guidelines on Quality Criteria and those criteria No. 2 and No. 3 (reproduction of the chest without rotation) received the lowest scores. Probably this occurs because there are no proper patient immobilization devices. The Ke values, for both patient groups, showed a wide dispersion, ranged from 10 μGy to 160μGy for the newborn patients and from 20μGy to 240μGy for infant patients. It is possible to conclude that, in the participating Latin American countries on this project

  6. A patient image-based technique to assess the image quality of clinical chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Samei, Ehsan; Luo, Hui; Dobbins, James T., III; McAdams, H. Page; Wang, Xiaohui; Sehnert, William J.; Barski, Lori; Foos, David H.

    2011-03-01

    Current clinical image quality assessment techniques mainly analyze image quality for the imaging system in terms of factors such as the capture system DQE and MTF, the exposure technique, and the particular image processing method and processing parameters. However, when assessing a clinical image, radiologists seldom refer to these factors, but rather examine several specific regions of the image to see whether the image is suitable for diagnosis. In this work, we developed a new strategy to learn and simulate radiologists' evaluation process on actual clinical chest images. Based on this strategy, a preliminary study was conducted on 254 digital chest radiographs (38 AP without grids, 35 AP with 6:1 ratio grids and 151 PA with 10:1 ratio grids). First, ten regional based perceptual qualities were summarized through an observer study. Each quality was characterized in terms of a physical quantity measured from the image, and as a first step, the three physical quantities in lung region were then implemented algorithmically. A pilot observer study was performed to verify the correlation between image perceptual qualities and physical quantitative qualities. The results demonstrated that our regional based metrics have promising performance for grading perceptual properties of chest radiographs.

  7. Learning and retaining normal radiographic chest anatomy: does preclinical exposure improve student performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigin, David S; Magid, Donna; Smirniotopoulos, James G; Carbognin, Susan Jennifer

    2007-09-01

    Although most would concur that preclinical exposure to radiology is a desirable goal, specific learning objectives have been more difficult to delineate. It is also important to assess what is learned and to determine how well it is retained or "retrievable." This study was developed in an attempt to document the extent to which specific measures of preclinically acquired knowledge may be retained and retrieved for later clinical application. The Anatomic Structure Identification Quiz (ASIQ, or Quiz), previously described in Feigin et al (Academic Radiology 2005) was administered to 236 medical students at the conclusion of the required second-year course, as a 10-item written Quiz based on a projected frontal and lateral chest image. The 10-item Quiz was also administered to 555 senior medical students (194 of which had been included in previous work) on the first day of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences basic radiology elective. Finally, the identical Quiz was completed by 74 of these 555 senior medical students at the conclusion of the academic portion of the elective, approximately 3 weeks after the administration of the first quiz. The second-year students scored a mean of 7.15 points of a possible 10 points with a standard deviation (SD) of 1.42. The senior students completing the quiz at the beginning of the elective scored an average of 4.42 (SD 1.34) compared to a score of 8.65 (SD 1.24) 3 weeks later. Long-term recall of specific radiologic structures learned in the second year of medical school was poor despite evidence documenting good initial (short-term) retention of tested information. However, after a brief review, consisting of the Quiz itself, followed by 3 weeks of general radiology emphasizing abnormal chest imaging, the senior students demonstrated a near doubling of their ability to correctly identify these structures, as well as an improvement compared with scores obtained during the second year. Thus the value of a

  8. Training and Validating a Deep Convolutional Neural Network for Computer-Aided Detection and Classification of Abnormalities on Frontal Chest Radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, Mark; Bilbily, Alexander; Colak, Errol; Dowdell, Tim; Gray, Bruce; Perampaladas, Kuhan; Barfett, Joseph

    2017-05-01

    Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) are a subtype of artificial neural network that have shown strong performance in computer vision tasks including image classification. To date, there has been limited application of CNNs to chest radiographs, the most frequently performed medical imaging study. We hypothesize CNNs can learn to classify frontal chest radiographs according to common findings from a sufficiently large data set. Our institution's research ethics board approved a single-center retrospective review of 35,038 adult posterior-anterior chest radiographs and final reports performed between 2005 and 2015 (56% men, average age of 56, patient type: 24% inpatient, 39% outpatient, 37% emergency department) with a waiver for informed consent. The GoogLeNet CNN was trained using 3 graphics processing units to automatically classify radiographs as normal (n = 11,702) or into 1 or more of cardiomegaly (n = 9240), consolidation (n = 6788), pleural effusion (n = 7786), pulmonary edema (n = 1286), or pneumothorax (n = 1299). The network's performance was evaluated using receiver operating curve analysis on a test set of 2443 radiographs with the criterion standard being board-certified radiologist interpretation. Using 256 × 256-pixel images as input, the network achieved an overall sensitivity and specificity of 91% with an area under the curve of 0.964 for classifying a study as normal (n = 1203). For the abnormal categories, the sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve, respectively, were 91%, 91%, and 0.962 for pleural effusion (n = 782), 82%, 82%, and 0.868 for pulmonary edema (n = 356), 74%, 75%, and 0.850 for consolidation (n = 214), 81%, 80%, and 0.875 for cardiomegaly (n = 482), and 78%, 78%, and 0.861 for pneumothorax (n = 167). Current deep CNN architectures can be trained with modest-sized medical data sets to achieve clinically useful performance at detecting and excluding common pathology on chest radiographs.

  9. Effect of local background anatomical patterns on the detection of subtle lung nodules in chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samei, Ehsan; Flynn, Michael J.; Eyler, William R.; Peterson, Edward

    1998-04-01

    Anatomical noise in chest radiography, created by the projection of anatomical features in the thorax such as ribs and pulmonary vessels, greatly influences the detection of subtle lung nodules in chest radiographs. Detection may be hindered by 1) the 'global' statistical characteristics of the background in relation to the signal associated withthe nodule, and/or 2) the interference of the 'local' background pattern with the nodule signal. This investigation aimed at assessing the influence of the latter process in the detection of subtle lung nodules. Six 8 X 8 cm images were extracted from the lung regions o six digital chest radiographs of normal patients from our clinic. Simulated nodules emulating the radiographic characteristics of subtle tissue-equivalent lesions ranging in size from 3.2 to 6.4 mm were numerically superimposed on the images. For each of the six lung images, a set of thirty-one processed images were produced, six containing no nodule, and the remaining 25 containing single nodules of five different sizes placed at five different locations within 6 mm of the center. The variation in location allowed different local background patterns to overlay the nodules. An observer detection study was then performed using 14 experienced radiologists. The observer data were analyzed to determine the variation in detectability with nodule location for all five sizes of the nodules. The preliminary results indicate that the variation in detectability of a nodule due to the influence of its local background surroundings is equivalent to that caused by changing its CD product by a factor of 4.45.

  10. Effective dose conversion coefficients for X-ray radiographs of the chest and the abdomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, F.R.A. [Centro regional de Ciencias Nucleares, CRCN/CNEN, Rua Conego Barata, 999, Tamarineira, Recife, PE (Brazil); Kramer, R.; Vieira, J.W.; Khoury, H.J. [Departamento de Energia Nuclear, DEN/UFPE, Cidade Universitaria, Recife, PE (Brazil)]. E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br

    2004-07-01

    The recently developed MAX (Male Adult voXel) and the FAXht (Female Adult voXel) head and trunk phantoms have been used to calculate organ and tissue equivalent dose conversion coefficients for X-ray radiographs of the chest and the abdomen as a function of source and field parameters, like voltage, filtration, field size, focus-to-skin distance, etc. Based on the equivalent doses to twenty three organs and tissues at risk, the effective dose has been determined and compared with corresponding data for others phantoms. The influence of different radiation transport codes, different tissue compositions and different human anatomies have been investigated separately. (Author)

  11. Aspergillus infection of the respiratory tract after lung transplantation: chest radiographic and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederich, S.; Scadeng, M.; Flower, C.D.R.; Dennis, C.; Stewart, S.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of our study was to assess radiographic and CT findings in lung transplant patients with evidence of Aspergillus colonization or infection of the airways and correlate the findings with clinical, laboratory, bronchoalveolar lavage, biopsy and autopsy findings. The records of 189 patients who had undergone lung transplantation were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of Aspergillus colonization or infection of the airways. Aspergillus was demonstrated by culture or microscopy of sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or histologically from lung biopsies or postmortem studies in 44 patients (23 %). Notes and radiographs were available for analysis in 30 patients. In 12 of the 30 patients (40 %) chest radiographs remained normal. In 11 of 18 patients with abnormal radiographs pulmonary abnormalities were attributed to invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in the absence of other causes for pulmonary abnormalities (8 patients) or because of histological demonstration of IPA (3 patients). In these 11 patients initial radiographic abnormalities were focal areas of patchy consolidation (8 patients), ill-defined pulmonary nodules (2 patients) or a combination of both (1 patient). In some of the lesions cavitation was demonstrated subsequently. At CT a ''halo'' of decreased density was demonstrated in some of the nodules and lesion morphology and location were shown more precisely. Demonstration of Aspergillus from the respiratory tract after lung transplantation does not necessarily reflect IPA but may represent colonization of the airways or semi-invasive aspergillosis. The findings in patients with IPA did not differ from those described in the literature in other immunocompromised patients, suggesting that surgical disruption of lymphatic drainage and nervous supply or effects of preservation and transport of the transplant lung do not affect the radiographic appearances. (orig.)

  12. Does the Use of a Checklist Help Medical Students in the Detection of Abnormalities on a Chest Radiograph?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Ellen M; Abed, Abdelrazek; Robben, Simon G F

    2017-12-01

    The interpretation of chest radiographs is a complex task that is prone to diagnostic error, especially for medical students. The aim of this study is to investigate the extent to which medical students benefit from the use of a checklist regarding the detection of abnormalities on a chest radiograph. We developed a checklist based on literature and interviews with experienced thorax radiologists. Forty medical students in the clinical phase assessed 18 chest radiographs during a computer test, either with (n = 20) or without (n = 20) the checklist. We measured performance and asked participants for feedback using a survey. Participants that used a checklist detected more abnormalities on images with multiple abnormalities (M = 50.1%) than participants that could not use a checklist (M = 41.9%), p = 0.04. The post-experimental survey shows that on average, participants considered the checklist helpful (M = 3.25 on a five-point scale), but also time consuming (M = 3.30 on a five-point scale). In conclusion, a checklist can help medical students to detect abnormalities in chest radiographs. Moreover, students tend to appreciate the use of a checklist as a helpful tool during the interpretation of a chest radiograph. Therefore, a checklist is a potentially important tool to improve radiology education in the medical curriculum.

  13. Paediatric Northern Score centile charts for the chest radiograph in cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, J.; Conway, S.P.; Mehta, A.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To create the first national centile charts for the chest radiograph Northern Score using the UK Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Database (UKCFD). Materials and methods: All active patients for 2002 from the UKCFD were analysed in 1-year cohorts from 0 to 18 years. Northern Score results from the annual review forms were used to construct centile lines for the 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 95th centiles. Results: There were 1806 patients with recorded Northern Score data for 2002 (927 male patients, male:female ratio 1.05). The centile chart demonstrates a quasi-linear rise throughout childhood. A Northern Score in excess of age in years equates to >95th centile in school-aged CF patients. Conclusion: This centile chart provides a disease-specific reference range for monitoring individual patients or for evaluating therapeutic change using the dominant chest radiograph scoring system in the UK. Patients, parents and clinicians may find these useful during the annual review process

  14. Chest Radiographic Findings of Novel Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, So Young; Hong, Eun Sook; Paik, Sang Hyun; Park, Seong Jin; Cha, Jang Gyu; Lee, Hae Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Yun Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    To analyze chest radiographic findings in children infected with laboratory confirmed novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus. Three hundred seventy-two out of 2,014 children with laboratory confirmed H1N1 infection and who also underwent a chest radiograph from September to November 2009 were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into in-patients, out-patients, and patients with co-infections and further subdivided into with underlying disease and without underlying disease as well as age (<2 years old, 2-5 years, 5-10 years, 10-18 years old). The initial radiographs were evaluated for radiographic findings and the anatomic distribution of abnormalities. The initial radiographs were abnormal in 154 (41.39%) patients. The predominant radiographic findings were peribronchial wall opacity found in 85 (22.84%) patients and hyperinflation observed in 69 (18.54%) patients. Further, 75 (71.42%) patients exhibited central predominance and the right lower lung zone was also commonly involved. There were statistically significant differences in the radiological findings between in-patient and out-patient groups. However, there were no significant differences in the radiographic findings between in-patients and the co-infection group with respect the presence of underlying disease and age. Initial radiographs of children with laboratory confirmed H1N1 virus were abnormal in 41.39% of cases. The common radiographic findings included peribronchial opacities, hyperinflation, lower lung zonal distribution, and central predominance

  15. Chest Radiographic Findings of Novel Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, So Young; Hong, Eun Sook; Paik, Sang Hyun; Park, Seong Jin; Cha, Jang Gyu; Lee, Hae Kyung; Jang, Yun Woo

    2011-01-01

    To analyze chest radiographic findings in children infected with laboratory confirmed novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus. Three hundred seventy-two out of 2,014 children with laboratory confirmed H1N1 infection and who also underwent a chest radiograph from September to November 2009 were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into in-patients, out-patients, and patients with co-infections and further subdivided into with underlying disease and without underlying disease as well as age (<2 years old, 2-5 years, 5-10 years, 10-18 years old). The initial radiographs were evaluated for radiographic findings and the anatomic distribution of abnormalities. The initial radiographs were abnormal in 154 (41.39%) patients. The predominant radiographic findings were peribronchial wall opacity found in 85 (22.84%) patients and hyperinflation observed in 69 (18.54%) patients. Further, 75 (71.42%) patients exhibited central predominance and the right lower lung zone was also commonly involved. There were statistically significant differences in the radiological findings between in-patient and out-patient groups. However, there were no significant differences in the radiographic findings between in-patients and the co-infection group with respect the presence of underlying disease and age. Initial radiographs of children with laboratory confirmed H1N1 virus were abnormal in 41.39% of cases. The common radiographic findings included peribronchial opacities, hyperinflation, lower lung zonal distribution, and central predominance

  16. Lung involvement quantification in chest radiographs; Quantificacao de comprometimento pulmonar em radiografias de torax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giacomini, Guilherme; Alvarez, Matheus; Oliveira, Marcela de; Miranda, Jose Ricardo A. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Biociencias. Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica; Pina, Diana R.; Pereira, Paulo C.M.; Ribeiro, Sergio M., E-mail: giacomini@ibb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2014-12-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is an infectious disease which remains a global health problem. The chest radiography is the commonly method employed to assess the TB's evolution. The methods for quantification of abnormalities of chest are usually performed on CT scans (CT). This quantification is important to assess the TB evolution and treatment and comparing different treatments. However, precise quantification is not feasible for the amount of CT scans required. The purpose of this work is to develop a methodology for quantification of lung damage caused by TB through chest radiographs. It was developed an algorithm for computational processing of exams in Matlab, which creates a lungs' 3D representation, with compromised dilated regions inside. The quantification of lung lesions was also made for the same patients through CT scans. The measurements from the two methods were compared and resulting in strong correlation. Applying statistical Bland and Altman, all samples were within the limits of agreement, with a confidence interval of 95%. The results showed an average variation of around 13% between the two quantification methods. The results suggest the effectiveness and applicability of the method developed, providing better risk-benefit to the patient and cost-benefit ratio for the institution. (author)

  17. What is the value of the lateral chest radiograph in the follow-up thoracic lymphoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobson, M.J.; Carrington, B.M.; Parsons, V.J.; Lo, F.; Coffey, J.; Ryder, W.D.J.; Collins, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    Lateral chest radiography in the investigation of thoracic lymphoma remains a feature of the current literature. This study assessed what information the lateral chest radiograph (CXR) adds in the follow-up of such patients. Eighty-eight patients with known lymphoma who had a CXR and thoracic CT within the same 4-week period were assessed. Five radiologists scored eight mediastinal and hilar nodal groups and eight extramediastinal regions on the frontal CXR as normal, equivocal or definitely abnormal (denoted 0, 1 and 2, respectively). This was repeated 1 week later with a combination of frontal and lateral films. Results were compared with the findings on CT which were scored similarly using accepted criteria for the presence of lymphadenopathy. Where the lateral CXR caused a change in score at any site, this change was compared with CT to determine the effect on diagnostic accuracy. For four of the five observers, the lateral film made no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy in the assessment of mediastinal lymph nodes. A fifth observer derived a small benefit from the addition of the lateral film, although almost 30 % of this was accounted for by changing from a wrong to an equivocal diagnosis. The lateral film did cause a small increase in the detection of pleuro-parenchymal lung lesions, although none of these were clinically significant. We conclude that routine lateral chest radiography is unhelpful in the follow-up of patients with lymphoma. (orig.). With 4 tabs

  18. Guidelines for the use of chest radiographs in community-acquired pneumonia in children and adolescents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronikou, Savvas; Lambert, Elena; Hilder, Lucy [University of Bristol, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Bristol (United Kingdom); CRICBristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Halton, Jarred; Crumley, Iona; Kosack, Cara [Medecins Sans Frontieres, Diagnostic Network, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lyttle, Mark D. [Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Emergency Department, Bristol (United Kingdom); University of the West of England, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-15

    National guidance from the United Kingdom and the United States on community-acquired pneumonia in children states that chest radiographs are not recommended routinely in uncomplicated cases. The main reason in the ambulatory setting is that there is no evidence of a substantial impact on clinical outcomes. However clinical practice and adherence to guidance is multifactorial and includes the clinical context (developed vs. developing world), the confidence of the attending physician, the changing incidence of complications (according to the success of immunisation programs), the availability of alternative imaging (and its relationship to perceived risks of radiation) and the reliability of the interpretation of imaging. In practice, chest radiographs are performed frequently for suspected pneumonia in children. Time pressures facing clinicians at the front line, difficulties in distinguishing which children require admission, restricted bed numbers for admissions, imaging-resource limitations, perceptions regarding risk from procedures, novel imaging modalities and the probability of other causes for the child's presentation all need to be factored into a guideline. Other drivers that often weigh in, depending on the setting, include cost-effectiveness and the fear of litigation. Not all guidelines designed for the developed world can therefore be applied to the developing world, and practice guidelines require regular review in the context of new information. In addition, radiologists must improve radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia, reach consensus on the interpretive terminology that clarifies their confidence regarding the presence of pneumonia and act to replace one imaging technique with another whenever there is proof of improved accuracy or reliability. (orig.)

  19. Guidelines for the use of chest radiographs in community-acquired pneumonia in children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikou, Savvas; Lambert, Elena; Hilder, Lucy; Halton, Jarred; Crumley, Iona; Kosack, Cara; Lyttle, Mark D.

    2017-01-01

    National guidance from the United Kingdom and the United States on community-acquired pneumonia in children states that chest radiographs are not recommended routinely in uncomplicated cases. The main reason in the ambulatory setting is that there is no evidence of a substantial impact on clinical outcomes. However clinical practice and adherence to guidance is multifactorial and includes the clinical context (developed vs. developing world), the confidence of the attending physician, the changing incidence of complications (according to the success of immunisation programs), the availability of alternative imaging (and its relationship to perceived risks of radiation) and the reliability of the interpretation of imaging. In practice, chest radiographs are performed frequently for suspected pneumonia in children. Time pressures facing clinicians at the front line, difficulties in distinguishing which children require admission, restricted bed numbers for admissions, imaging-resource limitations, perceptions regarding risk from procedures, novel imaging modalities and the probability of other causes for the child's presentation all need to be factored into a guideline. Other drivers that often weigh in, depending on the setting, include cost-effectiveness and the fear of litigation. Not all guidelines designed for the developed world can therefore be applied to the developing world, and practice guidelines require regular review in the context of new information. In addition, radiologists must improve radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia, reach consensus on the interpretive terminology that clarifies their confidence regarding the presence of pneumonia and act to replace one imaging technique with another whenever there is proof of improved accuracy or reliability. (orig.)

  20. Incidental finding of unilateral isolated aplasia of serratus anterior muscle and winged scapula on chest radiograph: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Joon Sung; Park, Hyun Jin; Ko, Jeong Min [Dept. of Radiology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The isolated aplasia of the serratus anterior muscle with winging of scapula is very rare, and only a few cases are reported. Here, we present a case of a 30-year-old Korean male who initially presented with a left flank pain. His physical exam did not show any significant finding in his right shoulder. However, his chest radiograph showed absence of right serratus anterior muscle and slightly elevated and medially rotated right scapula. Subsequent CT scan showed the right serratus anterior muscle aplasia and medial winging of the right scapula. This case is unique in two aspects. First, the combination of abnormalities is different from the typical congenital abnormalities involving shoulder girdle, such as Sprengel deformity or Poland syndrome. Secondly, this was incidentally diagnosed with chest radiograph, without clinical impression. Careful reading of chest radiograph can help the radiologists to detect such clinically silent abnormalities.

  1. Are supine chest and abdominal radiographs the best way to confirm PICC placement in neonates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneath, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are commonly used in NICUs. Although they have many benefits, they also have many potential complications. Confirming catheter tip position is essential to decreasing complications, but the best method to achieve confirmation is unclear. Literature review for studies that address line position confirmation to assist health care providers in evaluating the available research and to identify gaps in the literature. A literature search of four major databases followed by an ancestry approach was performed. Articles reviewed specifically discuss PICC lines and PICC line placement confirmation. Data on confirming PICC placement were lacking. Fluoroscopic placement is ideal, but cannot be done at the bedside and is costly. Supine chest radiograph is the most widely used method and is convenient, but when line tip position is unclear, contrast or ultrasound confirmation can be used. When PICC lines are placed in the saphenous vein, infants may benefit from supine and lateral abdominal radiographs to ensure placement in the inferior vena cava. More studies are needed to generalize findings. PICC line tips should be located in the superior vena cava or inferior vena cava close to the junction with the right atrium (0.5-1 cm outside of the cardiac chambers in premature infants and 1-2 cm outside of the cardiac chambers in larger infants). Arm position is very important when performing radiographs for placement because movement of the arm can cause migration of the catheter. There is also significant inter-observer variability when identifying line tip position.

  2. Interpretation of chest radiographs in both cancer and other critical care patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema Yilmaz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a clinical, pathophysiological and radiographic pattern that has signs of pulmonary edema occur without elevated pulmonary venous pressures. Clinical presentation and progression of acute respiratory distress syndrome are followed by frequently ordered portable chest X-ray in critically ill patients. We evaluated chest radiographs of ten cancer and other six critical care pediatric patients. The parenchymal imaging of lung in patients with cancer was reported the same as that of other critically ill children despite underlying pathophysiological variations in our investigation. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 270-273

  3. H1N1 influenza in an Irish population: patterns of chest radiograph abnormality in patients testing positive.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, K

    2012-02-29

    The winter of 2010\\/2011 saw a second peak in the number of H1N1 cases detected in Ireland. The purpose of this study was to investigate the radiological characteristics of patients diagnosed during this period. A retrospective analysis of these cases was performed. Chest radiographs were classified as normal or abnormal. A total of 37 patients were included. Of these, 22 (59%) of chest radiographs were abnormal and 15 (41%) were normal. In the 7 paediatric patients, 4 (57%) had a perihilar distribution of disease, 2 (28%) had peripherally based disease with 1 (14%) having a mixed distribution. A series of radiographs was available for 9 patients, 6 of these showed a radiographic deterioration from the initial study. The majority of chest radiographs of patients with confirmed H1N1 infection will be abnormal. In children, disease is more likely to be perihilar in distribution. Chest radiography is an important initial investigation in patients with H1N1 infection and is useful to track progression of disease in the subset of patients requiring hospitalization for severe disease.

  4. Comparison of chest radiograph scoring to lung weight as a quantitative index of pulmonary edema in organ donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Lorraine B; Neyrinck, Arne; O'Neal, Hollis R; Lee, Jae Woo; Landeck, Megan; Johnson, Elizabeth; Calfee, Carolyn S; Matthay, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of the degree of pulmonary edema in organ donors is useful for assessing the clinical severity of pulmonary edema, determining response to therapy, and as an endpoint for therapeutic trials. Currently, there is no accurate non-invasive method for assessing the degree of pulmonary edema. We tested the performance of a four-quadrant chest radiographic scoring system compared to quantification of pulmonary edema by excised lung weight in 84 donors whose lungs were not used for transplantation. Chest radiographs were taken 3.6 ± 3.0 h prior to organ procurement and were scored by two of the authors. Lungs were excised without perfusion and individually weighed. The chest radiographic scoring system had good performance: correlation between total radiographic score and total lung weight of 0.61, p pulmonary edema (total lung weight >1000 g) was 0.80. This chest radiographic scoring system may potentially be used to assess the clinical severity of pulmonary edema and may be useful as part of the evaluation of donors for suitability for lung transplantation. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. The transverse diameter of the chest on routine radiographs reliably estimates gestational age and weight in premature infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, Kelly R. [University of Minnesota, Department of Radiology, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Zhang, Lei [University of Minnesota, Biostatistical Design and Analysis Center, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Seidel, Frank G. [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Prior to digital radiography it was possible for a radiologist to easily estimate the size of a patient on an analog film. Because variable magnification may be applied at the time of processing an image, it is now more difficult to visually estimate an infant's size on the monitor. Since gestational age and weight significantly impact the differential diagnosis of neonatal diseases and determine the expected size of kidneys or appearance of the brain by MRI or US, this information is useful to a pediatric radiologist. Although this information may be present in the electronic medical record, it is frequently not readily available to the pediatric radiologist at the time of image interpretation. To determine if there was a correlation between gestational age and weight of a premature infant with their transverse chest diameter (rib to rib) on admission chest radiographs. This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board, which waived informed consent. The maximum transverse chest diameter outer rib to outer rib was measured on admission portable chest radiographs of 464 patients admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) during the 2010 calendar year. Regression analysis was used to investigate the association between chest diameter and gestational age/birth weight. Quadratic term of chest diameter was used in the regression model. Chest diameter was statistically significantly associated with both gestational age (P < 0.0001) and birth weight (P < 0.0001). An infant's gestational age and birth weight can be reliably estimated by comparing a simple measurement of the transverse chest diameter on digital chest radiograph with the tables and graphs in our study. (orig.)

  6. The additional value of the lateral chest radiograph for the detection of small pulmonary nodules-a ROC analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluthke, Robin Alexander; Kickuth, Ralph; Bansmann, Paul Martin; Tüshaus, Carolin; Adams, Stephan; Liermann, Dieter; Kirchner, Johannes

    2016-11-01

    For the past 30 years, many authors have described different advantages of the use of the additional lateral chest radiograph. However, some radiologic departments gave up performing the lateral view recently. A potential reason for this might be a lack of evidence for any diagnostic benefit of the additional lateral view of the thorax in recent studies. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic benefit of the additional lateral view for the detection of small pulmonary nodules compared with CT examinations as a gold standard. The patient population consisted of 45 patients with SPN and 45 patients without SPN. Four radiologists with varying experience in the assessment of thoracic imaging first examined the sole posteroanterior (PA) projection. After a few days, they were instructed to examine the PA and the additional lateral view. A receiver-operating characteristic analysis was accomplished to compare the documented results. The mean Az value of the sole PA view was 0.75 and 0.77 by the combination of PA and additional lateral view. So, there was no significant difference between the detectable Az values (Δ = 0.02; p = 0.384). With a cut-off value of >3, the additional view even reduced the sensitivity by averaging to 5.6%. The decrease of sensitivity by using the additional view was most detectable within the group of more experienced radiologists. The additional lateral view of the chest provides no diagnostic benefit in the detection of small pulmonary nodules in comparison with the sole PA projection. Nevertheless, the results of the present study must not be understood as a general evaluation of the benefits of the lateral radiograph per se, because we did not examine other relevant issues (i.e. cardiac failure, lung parenchyma diseases or abnormalities in hilar anatomy). Advances in knowledge: Our study demonstrates a lack of evidence for any diagnostic benefit of the additional lateral view of the thorax in detecting SPN.

  7. Quality assurance: using the exposure index and the deviation index to monitor radiation exposure for portable chest radiographs in neonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Mervyn D. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Riley Children' s Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Riley Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Cooper, Matt L.; Piersall, Kelly [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Riley Children' s Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Apgar, Bruce K. [Agfa HealthCare Corporation, Greenville, SC (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Many methods are used to track patient exposure during acquisition of plain film radiographs. A uniform international standard would aid this process. To evaluate and describe a new, simple quality-assurance method for monitoring patient exposure. This method uses the ''exposure index'' and the ''deviation index,'' recently developed by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The deviation index measures variation from an ideal target exposure index value. Our objective was to determine whether the exposure index and the deviation index can be used to monitor and control exposure drift over time. Our Agfa workstation automatically keeps a record of the exposure index for every patient. The exposure index and deviation index were calculated on 1,884 consecutive neonatal chest images. Exposure of a neonatal chest phantom was performed as a control. Acquisition of the exposure index and calculation of the deviation index was easily achieved. The weekly mean exposure index of the phantom and the patients was stable and showed <10% change during the study, indicating no exposure drift during the study period. The exposure index is an excellent tool to monitor the consistency of patient exposures. It does not indicate the exposure value used, but is an index to track compliance with a pre-determined target exposure. (orig.)

  8. Chest radiographs in acquired antibody deficiency syndrome with chronic granulomatous inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qaiyumi, S.A.A.; Peest, D.; Galanski, M.; Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

    1990-01-01

    Ten cases of acquired antibody deficiency syndrome with chronic granulomatous infection were diagnosed in our hospital during the past 10 years. We were able to perform a retrospective analysis of the initial and follow-up chest radiographs in 8 of these patients. The following pathological findings could be demonstrated: 1. increased bronchovascular markings in the basal lung fields, 2. reticular densities in the middle and basal lung fields, 3. confluent nodular densities of varying size in the periphery of the basal and middle fields, 4. pulmonary infiltrates in the middle and lower lobes, 5. hilar node enlargement of moderate extent. Findings 2, 3 and 5 completely disappeared under steroid therapy whereas 1 showed only partial recovery. If both the radiologic and serologic findings are considered, it is possible to differentiate this disease from sarcoidosis. (orig.) [de

  9. Cavity contour segmentation in chest radiographs using supervised learning and dynamic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maduskar, Pragnya; Hogeweg, Laurens; de Jong, Pim A; Peters-Bax, Liesbeth; Dawson, Rodney; Ayles, Helen; Sánchez, Clara I; van Ginneken, Bram

    2014-07-01

    Efficacy of tuberculosis (TB) treatment is often monitored using chest radiography. Monitoring size of cavities in pulmonary tuberculosis is important as the size predicts severity of the disease and its persistence under therapy predicts relapse. The authors present a method for automatic cavity segmentation in chest radiographs. A two stage method is proposed to segment the cavity borders, given a user defined seed point close to the center of the cavity. First, a supervised learning approach is employed to train a pixel classifier using texture and radial features to identify the border pixels of the cavity. A likelihood value of belonging to the cavity border is assigned to each pixel by the classifier. The authors experimented with four different classifiers:k-nearest neighbor (kNN), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), GentleBoost (GB), and random forest (RF). Next, the constructed likelihood map was used as an input cost image in the polar transformed image space for dynamic programming to trace the optimal maximum cost path. This constructed path corresponds to the segmented cavity contour in image space. The method was evaluated on 100 chest radiographs (CXRs) containing 126 cavities. The reference segmentation was manually delineated by an experienced chest radiologist. An independent observer (a chest radiologist) also delineated all cavities to estimate interobserver variability. Jaccard overlap measure Ω was computed between the reference segmentation and the automatic segmentation; and between the reference segmentation and the independent observer's segmentation for all cavities. A median overlap Ω of 0.81 (0.76 ± 0.16), and 0.85 (0.82 ± 0.11) was achieved between the reference segmentation and the automatic segmentation, and between the segmentations by the two radiologists, respectively. The best reported mean contour distance and Hausdorff distance between the reference and the automatic segmentation were, respectively, 2.48 ± 2.19 and 8.32

  10. Cavity contour segmentation in chest radiographs using supervised learning and dynamic programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maduskar, Pragnya; Hogeweg, Laurens; Sánchez, Clara I.; Ginneken, Bram van; Jong, Pim A. de; Peters-Bax, Liesbeth; Dawson, Rodney; Ayles, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Efficacy of tuberculosis (TB) treatment is often monitored using chest radiography. Monitoring size of cavities in pulmonary tuberculosis is important as the size predicts severity of the disease and its persistence under therapy predicts relapse. The authors present a method for automatic cavity segmentation in chest radiographs. Methods: A two stage method is proposed to segment the cavity borders, given a user defined seed point close to the center of the cavity. First, a supervised learning approach is employed to train a pixel classifier using texture and radial features to identify the border pixels of the cavity. A likelihood value of belonging to the cavity border is assigned to each pixel by the classifier. The authors experimented with four different classifiers:k-nearest neighbor (kNN), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), GentleBoost (GB), and random forest (RF). Next, the constructed likelihood map was used as an input cost image in the polar transformed image space for dynamic programming to trace the optimal maximum cost path. This constructed path corresponds to the segmented cavity contour in image space. Results: The method was evaluated on 100 chest radiographs (CXRs) containing 126 cavities. The reference segmentation was manually delineated by an experienced chest radiologist. An independent observer (a chest radiologist) also delineated all cavities to estimate interobserver variability. Jaccard overlap measure Ω was computed between the reference segmentation and the automatic segmentation; and between the reference segmentation and the independent observer's segmentation for all cavities. A median overlap Ω of 0.81 (0.76 ± 0.16), and 0.85 (0.82 ± 0.11) was achieved between the reference segmentation and the automatic segmentation, and between the segmentations by the two radiologists, respectively. The best reported mean contour distance and Hausdorff distance between the reference and the automatic segmentation were

  11. Accurate segmentation of lung fields on chest radiographs using deep convolutional networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabshirani, Mohammad R.; Dallal, Ahmed H.; Agarwal, Chirag; Patel, Aalpan; Moore, Gregory

    2017-02-01

    Accurate segmentation of lung fields on chest radiographs is the primary step for computer-aided detection of various conditions such as lung cancer and tuberculosis. The size, shape and texture of lung fields are key parameters for chest X-ray (CXR) based lung disease diagnosis in which the lung field segmentation is a significant primary step. Although many methods have been proposed for this problem, lung field segmentation remains as a challenge. In recent years, deep learning has shown state of the art performance in many visual tasks such as object detection, image classification and semantic image segmentation. In this study, we propose a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) framework for segmentation of lung fields. The algorithm was developed and tested on 167 clinical posterior-anterior (PA) CXR images collected retrospectively from picture archiving and communication system (PACS) of Geisinger Health System. The proposed multi-scale network is composed of five convolutional and two fully connected layers. The framework achieved IOU (intersection over union) of 0.96 on the testing dataset as compared to manual segmentation. The suggested framework outperforms state of the art registration-based segmentation by a significant margin. To our knowledge, this is the first deep learning based study of lung field segmentation on CXR images developed on a heterogeneous clinical dataset. The results suggest that convolutional neural networks could be employed reliably for lung field segmentation.

  12. Chest Wall Constriction after the Nuss Procedure Identified from Chest Radiograph and Multislice Computed Tomography Shortly after Removal of the Bar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pei-Yeh; Zeng, Qi; Wong, Kin-Sun; Wang, Chao-Jan; Chang, Chee-Jen

    2016-01-01

    This study radiographically examined the changes in the chest walls of patients with pectus excavatum (PE) after Nuss bar removal, to define the deformation caused by the bar and stabilizer. In the first part of the study, we compared the changes in chest radiographs of patients with PE to a preoperation PE control group. In the second part, we used multislice computed tomography (CT) scans to provide three-dimensional reconstructions with which to evaluate the changes to the thoracic wall. Part 1 From June 2006 to August 2011, 1,125 patients with PE who had posteroanterior chest radiographs taken before undergoing the Nuss procedure at four hospitals were enrolled as a preoperative control group. At the same time, 203 patients who had the bar removed were enrolled as the study group. The maximum dimensions of the outer boundary of the first to ninth rib pairs (R1-R9, rib pair width), chest height, and chest width were measured. Part 2 Thirty-one consecutive patients with PE (20 males and 11 females) who underwent Nuss bar removal were evaluated 7 to 30 days after operation. During this period, a further 34 patients with PE who had undergone CT imaging before bar insertion were evaluated and compared with the postoperative group. Part 1 The width of the lower ribs (R4-R9) after bar removal was significantly less than in the age-matched controls. The ribs adjacent to the bar (R5-R7) showed the greatest restriction. The width of the upper ribs (R1-R3) 2 to 3 years after bar placement did not differ significantly from the controls. Patients who were operated on after 10 years of age had less of a restrictive effect. Three years of bar placement resulted in more restriction than a 2-year period, particularly in patients younger than 10 years old. Part 2: A significant constriction of the chest wall was observed in 13 patients after removal of the Nuss bar. Constriction at ribs 5 to 8 was found to be present adjacent to the site of bar insertion. However

  13. Three-dimensional hindfoot alignment measurements based on biplanar radiographs: comparison with standard radiographic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutter, Reto; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Buck, Florian M. [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Espinosa, Norman [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-04-15

    To establish a hindfoot alignment measurement technique based on low-dose biplanar radiographs and compare with hindfoot alignment measurements on long axial view radiographs, which is the current reference standard. Long axial view radiographs and low-dose biplanar radiographs of a phantom consisting of a human foot skeleton embedded in acrylic glass (phantom A) and a plastic model of a human foot in three different hindfoot positions (phantoms B1-B3) were imaged in different foot positions (20 internal to 20 external rotation). Two independent readers measured hindfoot alignment on long axial view radiographs and performed 3D hindfoot alignment measurements based on biplanar radiographs on two different occasions. Time for three-dimensional (3D) measurements was determined. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated. Hindfoot alignment measurements on long axial view radiographs were characterized by a large positional variation, with a range of 14 /13 valgus to 22 /27 varus (reader 1/2 for phantom A), whereas the range of 3D hindfoot alignment measurements was 7.3 /6.0 to 9.0 /10.5 varus (reader 1/2 for phantom A), with a mean and standard deviation of 8.1 {+-} 0.6/8.7 {+-} 1.4 respectively. Interobserver agreement was high (ICC = 0.926 for phantom A, and ICC = 0.886 for phantoms B1-B3), and agreement between different readouts was high (ICC = 0.895-0.995 for reader 1, and ICC = 0.987-0.994 for reader 2) for 3D measurements. Mean duration of 3D measurements was 84 {+-} 15/113 {+-} 15 s for reader 1/2. Three-dimensional hindfoot alignment measurements based on biplanar radiographs were independent of foot positioning during image acquisition and reader independent. In this phantom study, the 3D measurements were substantially more precise than the standard radiographic measurements. (orig.)

  14. The clinical value of daily routine chest radiographs in a mixed medical-surgical intensive care unit is low

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graat, Marleen E.; Choi, Goda; Wolthuis, Esther K.; Korevaar, Johanna C.; Spronk, Peter E.; Stoker, Jaap; Vroom, Margreeth B.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The clinical value of daily routine chest radiographs (CXRs) in critically ill patients is unknown. We conducted this study to evaluate how frequently unexpected predefined major abnormalities are identified with daily routine CXRs, and how often these findings lead to a change in care

  15. HIV-positive patients in Pusan servitude : clinical and chest radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Young Keun; Kim, Kun Il

    2001-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and chest radiolographic findings of HIV-positive in Pusan survitude. We reviewed the medical records of 74 admission cases of 41 HIV-positive patients (38 mem and 3 women), confirmed in NIH and admitted to our hospital between May 1990 and September 1997. We evaluated the clinical findings including the pulmonary disease diagnosed at each admission, and using the pattern approach assessed the radiographic findings in 63 cases available among 74 admission cases. For statistical analysis the Pearson Chi-Square test was used, and the chest CT findings available in 19 cases among 17 patients were also evaluated. In all cases the mode of transmission was sexual contact, and they were more frequently contacted with foreigners (73%) than koreans (27%). During the follow-up period, pulmonary diseases were diagnosed in 52 (70%) of 74 admission cases. The diagnoses were pneumocystis cabrini pneumonia (PCP, n=15), pneumonia(n=15), pulmonary tuberculosis(n=15), combined infection with PCP and pulmonary tuberculosis(n=5), and combined infection with PCP and bacterial pneumonia(n=1). The count of CD4+ lymphocyte in 33 of 55 available admissions cases was less than 50 cells/mm?. In 28 patients(68%) who died, the time between confirmation of HIV-positive status to death ranged from 2 to 81 (mean, 39) months. Chest radiographs of 46 available admission cases (73%) showed the followingabnormal findings: interstitial opacities(n=26), consolidation(n=17), single or multiple nodules (n=9), hilar or mediastinal lymph node enlargement(n=10), pleural effusion(n=8), cyst(n=2), mass(n=1), and pericardial effusion(n=1). Diffuse ground glass opacity was observed in eight (89%) of nine PCP cases (p<0.05), and in cases of pulmonary tubercolosis, hilar or mediastinal lymph node enlargement was frequent (p<0.05). Pulmonary diseases in HIV-positive patients in Pusan servitude were diagnosed during follow-up in 70% of cases. The majority of these diseases were infectious

  16. HIV-positive patients in Pusan servitude : clinical and chest radiographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Young Keun; Kim, Kun Il [Pusan National Univ. College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-04-01

    To analyze the clinical and chest radiolographic findings of HIV-positive in Pusan survitude. We reviewed the medical records of 74 admission cases of 41 HIV-positive patients (38 mem and 3 women), confirmed in NIH and admitted to our hospital between May 1990 and September 1997. We evaluated the clinical findings including the pulmonary disease diagnosed at each admission, and using the pattern approach assessed the radiographic findings in 63 cases available among 74 admission cases. For statistical analysis the Pearson Chi-Square test was used, and the chest CT findings available in 19 cases among 17 patients were also evaluated. In all cases the mode of transmission was sexual contact, and they were more frequently contacted with foreigners (73%) than koreans (27%). During the follow-up period, pulmonary diseases were diagnosed in 52 (70%) of 74 admission cases. The diagnoses were pneumocystis cabrini pneumonia (PCP, n=15), pneumonia(n=15), pulmonary tuberculosis(n=15), combined infection with PCP and pulmonary tuberculosis(n=5), and combined infection with PCP and bacterial pneumonia(n=1). The count of CD4+ lymphocyte in 33 of 55 available admissions cases was less than 50 cells/mm?. In 28 patients(68%) who died, the time between confirmation of HIV-positive status to death ranged from 2 to 81 (mean, 39) months. Chest radiographs of 46 available admission cases (73%) showed the followingabnormal findings: interstitial opacities(n=26), consolidation(n=17), single or multiple nodules (n=9), hilar or mediastinal lymph node enlargement(n=10), pleural effusion(n=8), cyst(n=2), mass(n=1), and pericardial effusion(n=1). Diffuse ground glass opacity was observed in eight (89%) of nine PCP cases (p<0.05), and in cases of pulmonary tubercolosis, hilar or mediastinal lymph node enlargement was frequent (p<0.05). Pulmonary diseases in HIV-positive patients in Pusan servitude were diagnosed during follow-up in 70% of cases. The majority of these diseases were infectious

  17. Improvement in Detection of Wrong-Patient Errors When Radiologists Include Patient Photographs in Their Interpretation of Portable Chest Radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tridandapani, Srini; Olsen, Kevin; Bhatti, Pamela

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether facial photographs obtained simultaneously with radiographs improve radiologists' detection rate of wrong-patient errors, when they are explicitly asked to include the photographs in their evaluation. Radiograph-photograph combinations were obtained from 28 patients at the time of portable chest radiography imaging. From these, pairs of radiographs were generated. Each unique pair consisted of one new and one old (comparison) radiograph. Twelve pairs of mismatched radiographs (i.e., pairs containing radiographs of different patients) were also generated. In phase 1 of the study, 5 blinded radiologist observers were asked to interpret 20 pairs of radiographs without the photographs. In phase 2, each radiologist interpreted another 20 pairs of radiographs with the photographs. Radiologist observers were not instructed about the purpose of the photographs but were asked to include the photographs in their review. The detection rate of mismatched errors was recorded along with the interpretation time for each session for each observer. The two-tailed Fisher exact test was used to evaluate differences in mismatch detection rates between the two phases. A p value of error detection rates without (0/20 = 0%) and with (17/18 = 94.4%) photographs were different (p = 0.0001). The average interpretation times for the set of 20 radiographs were 26.45 (SD 8.69) and 20.55 (SD 3.40) min, for phase 1 and phase 2, respectively (two-tailed Student t test, p = 0.1911). When radiologists include simultaneously obtained photographs in their review of portable chest radiographs, there is a significant improvement in the detection of labeling errors. No statistically significant difference in interpretation time was observed. This may lead to improved patient safety without affecting radiologists' throughput.

  18. Automated characterization of perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs: Validation and calibration to observer preference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samei, Ehsan; Lin, Yuan; Choudhury, Kingshuk R.; Page McAdams, H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors previously proposed an image-based technique [Y. Lin et al. Med. Phys. 39, 7019–7031 (2012)] to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs. In this study, an observer study was designed and conducted to validate the output of the program against rankings by expert radiologists and to establish the ranges of the output values that reflect the acceptable image appearance so the program output can be used for image quality optimization and tracking. Methods: Using an IRB-approved protocol, 2500 clinical chest radiographs (PA/AP) were collected from our clinical operation. The images were processed through our perceptual quality assessment program to measure their appearance in terms of ten metrics of perceptual image quality: lung gray level, lung detail, lung noise, rib–lung contrast, rib sharpness, mediastinum detail, mediastinum noise, mediastinum alignment, subdiaphragm–lung contrast, and subdiaphragm area. From the results, for each targeted appearance attribute/metric, 18 images were selected such that the images presented a relatively constant appearance with respect to all metrics except the targeted one. The images were then incorporated into a graphical user interface, which displayed them into three panels of six in a random order. Using a DICOM calibrated diagnostic display workstation and under low ambient lighting conditions, each of five participating attending chest radiologists was tasked to spatially order the images based only on the targeted appearance attribute regardless of the other qualities. Once ordered, the observer also indicated the range of image appearances that he/she considered clinically acceptable. The observer data were analyzed in terms of the correlations between the observer and algorithmic rankings and interobserver variability. An observer-averaged acceptable image appearance was also statistically derived for each quality attribute based on the collected individual acceptable ranges

  19. Morphometric Comparison of Clavicle Outlines from 3D Bone Scans and 2D Chest Radiographs: A Short-listing Tool to Assist Radiographic Identification of Human Skeletons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan, Carl N.; Amidan, Brett G.; Trease, Harold E.; Guyomarch, Pierre; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Byrd, John E.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a computerized clavicle identification system, primarily designed to resolve the identities of unaccounted for US soldiers who fought in the Korean War. Elliptical Fourier analysis is used to quantify the clavicle outline shape from skeletons and postero-anterior antemortem chest radiographs to rank individuals in terms of metric distance. Similar to leading fingerprint identification systems, shortlists of the top matching candidates are extracted for subsequent human visual assessment. Two independent tests of the computerized system using 17 field-recovered skeletons and 409 chest radiographs demonstrate that true positive matches are captured within the top 5% of the sample 75% of the time. These results are outstanding given the eroded state of some field-recovered skeletons and the faintness of the 1950’s photoflurographs. These methods enhance the capability to resolve several hundred cold cases for which little circumstantial information exists and current DNA and dental record technologies cannot be applied.

  20. Xpand chest drain: assessing equivalence to current standard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    leakage from 'open to air' system or breakage of glass bottle (with associated risk to ... and an air-leak detection system. It is connected to a ... need to add water. Xpand chest drain: assessing equivalence to current standard therapy – a randomised controlled trial. CHARL COOPER, M.B. CH.B. TIMOTHY HARDCASTLE ...

  1. Xpand chest drain: assessing equivalence to current standard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This device incorporates a one-way valve with a fluid reservoir and permits the detection of an air leak, as well as intrapleural pressure differences. Aim. To prove equivalence of the Xpand chest drain compared with standard underwater bottle drainage. Methods. In a non-blinded randomised control trial 67 patients with ...

  2. A rig for acquisition of standardized trabecular bone radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podsiadlo, P.; Stachowiak, G.W. [Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley (Australia). Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

    2002-04-01

    To assess osteoarthritic changes in knee joints a radiography rig for acquisition of standardized radiographs of trabecular bone has been developed. The rig contains a steel frame on castors, a turntable, a cassette holder frame, calibration Plexiglas sheets, body supports and points. It is used to lock the patient in a standardized position. A film cassette holder frame was also developed to reduce scattering of X-rays, and consequently the amount of noise in the radiographs. Calibration Plexiglas sheets were mounted on ball bearing slides to obtain radiographs without a calibration pattern (suitable for the analysis of trabecular bone texture) and radiographs containing a calibration pattern (suitable for the measurement of leg alignment)

  3. Standard specification for illuminators used for viewing industrial radiographs

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 The function of the illuminator is to provide sufficient illumination and viewing capabilities for the purpose of identification and interpretation of radiographic images. This specification provides the recommended minimum requirements for Industrial Radiographic Illuminators used for viewing industrial radiographic films using transmitted light sources. 1.2 The illuminator has to ensure the same safety for personnel, or users of any electric apparatus, as specified by electrical standards applicable in the country in which the illuminator is used. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.3 Values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parenthesis are provided for information only.

  4. Standardized radiographic interpretation of thoracic tuberculosis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concepcion, Nathan David P; Laya, Bernard F; Andronikou, Savvas; Daltro, Pedro A N; Sanchez, Marion O; Uy, Jacqueline Austine U; Lim, Timothy Reynold U

    2017-09-01

    There is a lack of standardized approach and terminology to classify the diverse spectrum of manifestations in tuberculosis. It is important to recognize the different clinical and radiographic patterns to guide treatment. As a result of changing epidemiology, there is considerable overlap in the radiologic presentations of primary tuberculosis and post-primary tuberculosis. In this article we promote a standardized approach in clinical and radiographic classification for children suspected of having or diagnosed with childhood tuberculosis. We propose standardized terms to diminish confusion and miscommunication, which can affect management. In addition, we present pitfalls and limitations of imaging.

  5. Standardized radiographic interpretation of thoracic tuberculosis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concepcion, Nathan David P.; Laya, Bernard F. [St. Luke' s Medical Center, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Institute of Radiology, Taguig City (Philippines); St. Luke' s Medical Center, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Institute of Radiology, Quezon City (Philippines); Andronikou, Savvas [Bristol Royal Hospital for Children and the University of Bristol, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom); Daltro, Pedro A.N. [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Sanchez, Marion O. [St. Luke' s Medical Center, Section of Pediatric Pulmonology, Institute of Pulmonary Medicine, Quezon City (Philippines); Uy, Jacqueline Austine U. [St. Luke' s Medical Center, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Institute of Radiology, Taguig City (Philippines); Lim, Timothy Reynold U. [St. Luke' s Medical Center, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Institute of Radiology, Quezon City (Philippines)

    2017-09-15

    There is a lack of standardized approach and terminology to classify the diverse spectrum of manifestations in tuberculosis. It is important to recognize the different clinical and radiographic patterns to guide treatment. As a result of changing epidemiology, there is considerable overlap in the radiologic presentations of primary tuberculosis and post-primary tuberculosis. In this article we promote a standardized approach in clinical and radiographic classification for children suspected of having or diagnosed with childhood tuberculosis. We propose standardized terms to diminish confusion and miscommunication, which can affect management. In addition, we present pitfalls and limitations of imaging. (orig.)

  6. Standardized radiographic interpretation of thoracic tuberculosis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concepcion, Nathan David P.; Laya, Bernard F.; Andronikou, Savvas; Daltro, Pedro A.N.; Sanchez, Marion O.; Uy, Jacqueline Austine U.; Lim, Timothy Reynold U.

    2017-01-01

    There is a lack of standardized approach and terminology to classify the diverse spectrum of manifestations in tuberculosis. It is important to recognize the different clinical and radiographic patterns to guide treatment. As a result of changing epidemiology, there is considerable overlap in the radiologic presentations of primary tuberculosis and post-primary tuberculosis. In this article we promote a standardized approach in clinical and radiographic classification for children suspected of having or diagnosed with childhood tuberculosis. We propose standardized terms to diminish confusion and miscommunication, which can affect management. In addition, we present pitfalls and limitations of imaging. (orig.)

  7. Application of Phase Congruency for Discriminating Some Lung Diseases Using Chest Radiograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Mohd Rijal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel procedure using phase congruency is proposed for discriminating some lung disease using chest radiograph. Phase congruency provides information about transitions between adjacent pixels. Abrupt changes of phase congruency values between pixels may suggest a possible boundary or another feature that may be used for discrimination. This property of phase congruency may have potential for deciding between disease present and disease absent where the regions of infection on the images have no obvious shape, size, or configuration. Five texture measures calculated from phase congruency and Gabor were shown to be normally distributed. This gave good indicators of discrimination errors in the form of the probability of Type I Error (δ and the probability of Type II Error (β. However, since 1 −  δ is the true positive fraction (TPF and β is the false positive fraction (FPF, an ROC analysis was used to decide on the choice of texture measures. Given that features are normally distributed, for the discrimination between disease present and disease absent, energy, contrast, and homogeneity from phase congruency gave better results compared to those using Gabor. Similarly, for the more difficult problem of discriminating lobar pneumonia and lung cancer, entropy and homogeneity from phase congruency gave better results relative to Gabor.

  8. Are daily routine chest radiographs useful in critically ill, mechanically ventilated patients? A randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clec'h, Christophe; Simon, Paul; Hamdi, Aïcha; Hamza, Lilia; Karoubi, Philippe; Fosse, Jean-Philippe; Gonzalez, Frédéric; Vincent, François; Cohen, Yves

    2008-02-01

    Whether chest radiographs (CXRs) in mechanically ventilated patients should be routinely obtained or only when an abnormality is anticipated remains debated. We aimed to compare the diagnostic, therapeutic and outcome efficacy of a restrictive prescription of CXRs with that of a routine prescription, focusing on delayed diagnoses and treatments potentially related to the restrictive prescription. Randomized controlled trial. Intensive care unit of the Avicenne Teaching Hospital, Bobigny, France. All consecutive patients mechanically ventilated for > or = 48h between January and June 2006. Patients were randomly assigned to have daily routine CXRs (routine prescription group) or clinically indicated CXRs (restrictive prescription group). For each CXR, a questionnaire was completed addressing the reason for the CXR, the new findings, and any subsequent therapeutic intervention. The endpoints were the rates of new findings, the rates of new findings that prompted therapeutic intervention, the rate of delayed diagnoses, and mortality. Eighty-four patients were included in the routine prescription group and 81 in the restrictive prescription group. The rates of new findings and the rates of new findings that prompted therapeutic intervention in the restrictive prescription group and in the routine prescription group were 66% vs. 7.2% (p < 0.0001), and 56.4% vs. 5.5% (p < 0.0001) respectively. The rate of delayed diagnoses in the restrictive prescription group was 0.7%. Mortality was similar. Restrictive use of CXRs in mechanically ventilated patients was associated with better diagnostic and therapeutic efficacies without impairing outcome.

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of oblique chest radiograph for occult pneumothorax: comparison with ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shokei; Sekine, Kazuhiko; Funabiki, Tomohiro; Orita, Tomohiko; Shimizu, Masayuki; Hayashida, Kei; Kazamaki, Taku; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Kishikawa, Masanobu; Yamazaki, Motoyasu; Kitano, Mitsuhide

    2016-01-01

    An occult pneumothorax is a pneumothorax that is not seen on a supine chest X-ray but is detected by computed tomography scanning. However, critical patients are difficult to transport to the computed tomography suite. We previously reported a method to detect occult pneumothorax using oblique chest radiography (OXR). Several authors have also reported that ultrasonography is an effective technique for detecting occult pneumothorax. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of OXR in the diagnosis of the occult pneumothorax and to compare OXR with ultrasonography. All consecutive blunt chest trauma patients with clinically suspected pneumothorax on arrival at the emergency department were prospectively included at our tertiary-care center. The patients underwent OXR and ultrasonography, and underwent computed tomography scans as the gold standard. Occult pneumothorax size on computed tomography was classified as minuscule, anterior, or anterolateral. One hundred and fifty-nine patients were enrolled. Of the 70 occult pneumothoraces found in the 318 thoraces, 19 were minuscule, 32 were anterior, and 19 were anterolateral. The sensitivity and specificity of OXR for detecting occult pneumothorax was 61.4 % and 99.2 %, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of lung ultrasonography was 62.9 % and 98.8 %, respectively. Among 27 occult pneumothoraces that could not be detected by OXR, 16 were minuscule and 21 could be conservatively managed without thoracostomy. OXR appears to be as good method as lung ultrasonography in the detection of large occult pneumothorax. In trauma patients who are difficult to transfer to computed tomography scan, OXR may be effective at detecting occult pneumothorax with a risk of progression.

  10. Radiation risk assessment in neonatal radiographic examinations of the chest and abdomen: a clinical and Monte Carlo dosimetry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makri, T; Yakoumakis, E; Papadopoulou, D; Gialousis, G; Theodoropoulos, V; Sandilos, P; Georgiou, E

    2006-01-01

    Seeking to assess the radiation risk associated with radiological examinations in neonatal intensive care units, thermo-luminescence dosimetry was used for the measurement of entrance surface dose (ESD) in 44 AP chest and 28 AP combined chest-abdominal exposures of a sample of 60 neonates. The mean values of ESD were found to be equal to 44 ± 16 μGy and 43 ± 19 μGy, respectively. The MCNP-4C2 code with a mathematical phantom simulating a neonate and appropriate x-ray energy spectra were employed for the simulation of the AP chest and AP combined chest-abdominal exposures. Equivalent organ dose per unit ESD and energy imparted per unit ESD calculations are presented in tabular form. Combined with ESD measurements, these calculations yield an effective dose of 10.2 ± 3.7 μSv, regardless of sex, and an imparted energy of 18.5 ± 6.7 μJ for the chest radiograph. The corresponding results for the combined chest-abdominal examination are 14.7 ± 7.6 μSv (males)/17.2 ± 7.6 μSv (females) and 29.7 ± 13.2 μJ. The calculated total risk per radiograph was low, ranging between 1.7 and 2.9 per million neonates, per film, and being slightly higher for females. Results of this study are in good agreement with previous studies, especially in view of the diversity met in the calculation methods

  11. Development of CAD based on ANN analysis of power spectra for pneumoconiosis in chest radiographs: effect of three new enhancement methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Eiichiro; Kawashita, Ikuo; Ishida, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    We have been developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme for pneumoconiosis based on a rule-based plus artificial neural network (ANN) analysis of power spectra. In this study, we have developed three enhancement methods for the abnormal patterns to reduce false-positive and false-negative values. The image database consisted of 2 normal and 15 abnormal chest radiographs. The International Labour Organization standard chest radiographs with pneumoconiosis were categorized as subcategory, size, and shape of pneumoconiosis. Regions of interest (ROIs) with a matrix size of 32 × 32 were selected from normal and abnormal lungs. Three new enhanced methods were obtained by window function, top-hat transformation, and gray-level co-occurrence matrix analysis. We calculated the power spectrum (PS) of all ROIs by Fourier transform. For the classification between normal and abnormal ROIs, we applied a combined analysis using the ruled-based plus the ANN method. To evaluate the overall performance of this CAD scheme, we employed ROC analysis for distinguishing between normal and abnormal ROIs. On the chest radiographs of the highest categories (severe pneumoconiosis) and the lowest categories (early pneumoconiosis), this CAD scheme achieved area under the curve (AUC) values of 0.93 ± 0.02 and 0.72 ± 0.03. The combined rule-based plus ANN method with the three new enhanced methods obtained the highest classification performance for distinguishing between abnormal and normal ROIs. Our CAD system based on the three new enhanced methods would be useful in assisting radiologists in the classification of pneumoconiosis.

  12. Computerized classification of suspicious regions in chest radiographs using subregion Hotelling observers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baydush, Alan H.; Catarious, David M. Jr.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Abbey, Craig K.; Floyd, Carey E. Jr.

    2001-01-01

    We propose to investigate the use of subregion Hotelling observers (SRHOs) in conjunction with perceptrons for the computerized classification of suspicious regions in chest radiographs for being nodules requiring follow up. Previously, 239 regions of interest (ROIs), each containing a suspicious lesion with proven classification, were collected. We chose to investigate the use of SRHOs as part of a multilayer classifier to determine the presence of a nodule. Each SRHO incorporates information about signal, background, and noise correlation for classification. For this study, 225 separate Hotelling observers were set up in a grid across each ROI. Each separate observer discriminates an 8 by 8 pixel area. A round robin sampling scheme was used to generate the 225 features, where each feature is the output of the individual observers. These features were then rank ordered by the magnitude of the weights of a perceptron. Once rank ordered, subsets of increasing number of features were selected to be used in another perceptron. This perceptron was trained to minimize mean squared error and the output was a continuous variable representing the likelihood of the region being a nodule. Performance was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and reported as the area under the curve (A Z ). The classifier was optimized by adding additional features until the A Z declined. The optimized subset of observers then were combined using a third perceptron. A subset of 80 features was selected which gave an A Z of 0.972. Additionally, at 98.6% sensitivity, the classifier had a specificity of 71.3% and increased the positive predictive value from 60.7% to 84.1%. Preliminary results suggest that using SRHOs in combination with perceptrons can provide a successful classification scheme for pulmonary nodules. This approach could be incorporated into a larger computer aided detection system for decreasing false positives

  13. Subtraction radiography and computer assisted densitometric analyses of standardized radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortmann, L.F.; Dunford, R.; McHenry, K.; Hausmann, E.

    1985-01-01

    A standardized radiographic series of incrementally increasing alveolar crestal defects in skulls were subjected to analyses by subtraction radiography and computer assisted quantitative densitometric analysis. Subjects were able to detect change using subtraction radiography in alveolar bone defects with bone loss in the range of 1-5 percent as measured by 125 I absorptiometry. Quantitative densitometric analyses utilizing radiographic pairs adjusted for differences in contrast (gamma corrected) can be used to follow longitudinal changes at a particular alveolar bone site. Such measurements correlate with change observed by 125 I absorptiometry (r=0.82-0.94). (author)

  14. Prevalence of thoracic scoliosis in adults 25 to 64 years of age detected during routine chest radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, James B; Kim, Abraham D; Allan-Blitz, Lao; Shamie, Arya Nick

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the prevalence of thoracic scoliosis and determine the effect of both age and gender on coronal curve magnitude among asymptomatic adults aged 25-64 years old, using standing posterior-anterior chest radiographs. This was a retrospective, cross-sectional study evaluating 500 randomly selected digital posterior-anterior chest radiographs taken at a single institution on an outpatient basis between January 2010 and December 2011. Males (n = 184) and females (n = 316) ranged in age from 25 to 64 years. Patients with symptoms of back pain; including a history of back pain, spinal instrumentation, or known pre-existing spinal disease were excluded. Radiographs were evaluated using Centricity PACS Web Diagnostic 2.1 system (General Electric Co. Fairfield, CT). Coronal Cobb angle measurements of the thoracic spine were quantified by the authors, with scoliosis defined as coronal curves greater than 10°. Curvatures were subdivided into groups: a control group with coronal curves less than 10°, curves measuring 10° to 19°, 20° to 29°, and greater than 30°. The effect of age and gender on curve magnitude was examined using Pearson correlation analysis and linear regression analysis. There was a 13.4 % (67 patients) prevalence of thoracic scoliosis. The prevalence among asymptomatic males was 10.9 %, while the prevalence among asymptomatic females was 14.9 %. 11.6 % demonstrated a coronal curvature between 10° and 19° (58 patients), 1.6 % between 20° and 29° (8 patients), and 0.2 % greater than 30° (1 patient). Age and gender were not found to be significant independent predictors of curve severity. We found a 13.4 % prevalence of thoracic scoliosis among asymptomatic adults aged 25-64 years on routine outpatient chest radiographs. 11.6 % of patients demonstrated a coronal curvature between 10° and 19°. Unlike prior studies evaluating asymptomatic thoracic curves in elderly patients, age and gender did not significantly affect curve

  15. Inter-observer variation in the interpretation of chest radiographs for pneumonia in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopstaken, R.M.; Witbraad, T.; Engelshoven, J.M.A. van; Dinant, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To assess inter-observer variation in the interpretation of chest radiographs of individuals with pneumonia versus those without pneumonia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Chest radiographs of out-patients with a lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) were assessed for the presence of infiltrates by radiologists from three local hospitals and were reassessed by one university hospital radiologist. Various measures of inter-observer agreement were calculated. RESULTS: The observed proportional agreement was 218 in 243 patients (89.7%). Kappa was 0.53 (moderate agreement) with a 95% confidence interval of 0.37 to 0.69. The observed positive agreement (59%) was much lower than for negative agreement (94%). Kappa was considerably lower, if chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was present (κ=0.20) or Streptococcus pneumoniae (κ=-0.29) was the infective agent. CONCLUSION: The overall inter-observer agreement adjusted for chance was moderate. Inter-observer agreement in cases with pneumonia was much worse than the agreement in negative (i.e. non-pneumonia) cases. A general practitioner's selection of patients with a higher chance of having pneumonia for chest radiography would thus not improve the observer agreement

  16. The role of hip and chest radiographs in osteoporotic evaluation among south Indian women population: a comparative scenario with DXA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D Ashok; Anburajan, M

    2014-05-01

    Osteoporosis is recognized as a worldwide skeletal disorder problem. In India, the older as well as postmenopausal women population suffering from osteoporotic fractures has been a common issue. Bone mineral density measurements gauged by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) are used in the diagnosis of osteoporosis. (1) To evaluate osteoporosis in south Indian women by radiogrammetric method in a comparative perspective with DXA. (2) To assess the capability of KJH; Anburajan's Empirical formula in the prediction of total hip bone mineral density (T.BMD) with estimated Hologic T.BMD. In this cross-sectional design, 56 south Indian women were evaluated. These women were randomly selected from a health camp. The patients with secondary bone diseases were excluded. The standard protocol was followed in acquiring BMD of the right proximal femur by DPX Prodigy (DXA Scanner, GE-Lunar Corp., USA). The measured Lunar Total hip BMD was converted into estimated Hologic Total hip BMD. In addition, the studied population underwent chest and hip radiographic measurements. Combined cortical thickness of clavicle has been used in KJH; Anburajan's Empirical formula to predict T.BMD and compared with estimated Hologic T.BMD by DXA. The correlation coefficients exhibited high significance. The combined cortical thickness of clavicle and femur shaft of total studied population was strongly correlated with DXA femur T.BMD measurements (r = 0.87, P Hologic T.BMD (r = 0.88, P < 0.01) in total studied population. The empirical formula was identified as better tool for predicting osteoporosis in total population and old-aged population with a sensitivity (88.8 and 95.6 %), specificity (89.6 and 90.9 %), positive predictive value (88.8 and 95.6 %) and negative predictive value (89.6 and 90.9 %), respectively. The results suggest that combined cortical thickness of clavicle and femur shaft using radiogrammetric method is significantly correlated with DXA. Moreover, KJH; Anburajan

  17. Temporal subtraction technique for detection of subtle anomalies on temporally sequential bone-subtracted chest radiographs by energy subtraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanada, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Yoshida, Megumi; Takashima, Tsutomu; Matsui, Takeshi

    2000-01-01

    We developed a temporal subtraction technique for the detection of subtle anomalies on temporally sequential bone-subtracted chest radiographs (soft tissue images) by energy subtraction. To recognize the temporal changes in a current soft tissue image in comparison with those in a previous soft tissue image, we attempted to enhance the changes by a difference image processing technique. The lung markings were enhanced by the first derivative filter. The image registration for the lung markings on both images by the sequential similarity detection algorithm (SSDA) method was then employed. The soft tissue image provided by the energy subtraction technique was excellent in its detection of subtle abnormalities in the lung, and this method was able to detect subtle abnormalities such as infiltrates and nodules missed in screening. It was suggested that this temporal subtraction technique improves accuracy when radiologists diagnose soft tissue chest images by x-ray energy subtraction. (author)

  18. Development of a computerized method for identifying the posteroanterior and lateral views of chest radiographs by use of a template matching technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Li Qiang; Ishida, Takayuki; Doi, Kunio

    2002-01-01

    In picture archiving and communications systems (PACS) or digital archiving systems, the information on the posteroanterior (PA) and lateral views for chest radiographs is often not recorded or is recorded incorrectly. However, it is necessary to identify the PA or lateral view correctly and automatically for quantitative analysis of chest images for computer-aided diagnosis. Our purpose in this study was to develop a computerized method for correctly identifying either PA or lateral views of chest radiographs. Our approach is to examine the similarity of a chest image with templates that represent the average chest images of the PA or lateral view for various types of patients. By use of a template matching technique with nine template images for patients of different size in two steps, correlation values were obtained for determining whether a chest image is either a PA or a lateral view. The templates for PA and lateral views were prepared from 447 PA and 200 lateral chest images. For a validation test, this scheme was applied to 1,000 test images consisting of 500 PA and 500 lateral chest radiographs, which are different from training cases. In the first step, 924 (92.4%) of the cases were correctly identified by comparison of the correlation values obtained with the three templates for medium-size patients. In the second step, the correlation values with the six templates for small and large patients were compared, and all of the remaining unidentifiable cases were identified correctly

  19. Super-resolution convolutional neural network for the improvement of the image quality of magnified images in chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Kensuke; Ota, Junko; Ishimaru, Naoki; Ohno, Shunsuke; Okamoto, Kentaro; Suzuki, Takanori; Shirai, Naoki; Ishida, Takayuki

    2017-02-01

    Single image super-resolution (SR) method can generate a high-resolution (HR) image from a low-resolution (LR) image by enhancing image resolution. In medical imaging, HR images are expected to have a potential to provide a more accurate diagnosis with the practical application of HR displays. In recent years, the super-resolution convolutional neural network (SRCNN), which is one of the state-of-the-art deep learning based SR methods, has proposed in computer vision. In this study, we applied and evaluated the SRCNN scheme to improve the image quality of magnified images in chest radiographs. For evaluation, a total of 247 chest X-rays were sampled from the JSRT database. The 247 chest X-rays were divided into 93 training cases with non-nodules and 152 test cases with lung nodules. The SRCNN was trained using the training dataset. With the trained SRCNN, the HR image was reconstructed from the LR one. We compared the image quality of the SRCNN and conventional image interpolation methods, nearest neighbor, bilinear and bicubic interpolations. For quantitative evaluation, we measured two image quality metrics, peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM). In the SRCNN scheme, PSNR and SSIM were significantly higher than those of three interpolation methods (pmethods without any obvious artifacts. These preliminary results indicate that the SRCNN scheme significantly outperforms conventional interpolation algorithms for enhancing image resolution and that the use of the SRCNN can yield substantial improvement of the image quality of magnified images in chest radiographs.

  20. Complications related to osteopenia in the thoracic spine on admission chest radiographs of substance abuse detoxification patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haramati, L.B.; Alterman, D.D.; Israel, G.M.; Haramati, N.; Mallavurapu, R.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence of complications related to osteopenia in the thoracic spine (anterior wedging and fish vertebrae) of patients admitted for substance abuse detoxification. Design and patients. We retrospectively identified 150 sequential patients admitted to our drug and alcohol detoxification ward in whom posteroanterior and lateral admission chest radiographs and clinical charts were available for review. There were 116 men and 34 women with a mean age of 37 years (range 19-67 years). Thirty-eight patients were admitted for drug detoxification, 37 for alcohol detoxification, and 75 for drug and alcohol detoxification. These patients were compared with 66 age- and sex-matched controls from our hospital's employee health service. Two radiologists reviewed all chest radiographs for the presence of anterior wedging and fish vertebrae in the thoracic spine and other nonspinal fractures. Serum calcium and inorganic phosphorus levels were recorded for the substance abuse detoxification patients. Results. Forty-nine percent (n=73) of detoxification patients had complications of osteopenia in the thoracic spine including: anterior wedging (n=47), fish vertebrae (n=21), or both (n=5). Twenty-four percent (n=36) of patients had an elevated serum inorganic phosphorus level and one patient had an elevated serum calcium level. Patients with anterior wedging or fish vertebrae included: 45% (n=45) of patients below age 40 years, 35% (n=12) of women, 41% (n=15) of drug detoxification patients, 58% (n=22) of alcohol detoxification patients, 48% (n=36) of drug and alcohol detoxification patients, and 47% (n=17) of patients with elevated serum inorganic phosphorus (P=NS). Six percent (n=9) of our study population had nonspinal fractures on their chest radiographs. Twenty-one percent (n=14) of controls had complications of osteopenia in the thoracic spine (all anterior wedging). This prevalence differed significantly (P<0.05, chi-squared) from the study population

  1. Cardiothoracic ratio on chest radiograph in pediatric heart disease: How does it correlate with heart volumes at magnetic resonance imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotenhuis, Heynric B. [The University of Toronto, Division of Cardiology, Department of Paediatrics, The Labatt Family Heart Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Zhou, Cheng; Isaac, Kathryn V. [The University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Tomlinson, George [University of Toronto, Department of Medicine, Toronto General Hospital and Mt. Sinai Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Seed, Mike; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars; Yoo, Shi-Joon [The University of Toronto, Division of Cardiology, Department of Paediatrics, The Labatt Family Heart Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); The University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    The cardiothoracic ratio by chest radiograph is widely used as a marker of cardiac size. The purpose of this study is to correlate cardiothoracic ratio and cardiac volumes as measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (MR) in common structural and myopathic heart disease with increased cardiac size due to volume overload or hypertrophy. A retrospective single center study was performed in all patients between 2007 and 2013 with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), aortic regurgitation, isolated left-to-right shunt and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) who underwent cardiovascular MR and chest radiograph within 6 months of each other. Cardiothoracic ratios by chest radiograph (frontal and lateral) were compared to cardiac volumes (indexed for body surface area) by cardiovascular MR. One hundred twenty-seven patients (mean age: 11.2 ± 5.5 years) were included in this study (76 with TOF, 23 with isolated left-to-right shunt, 16 with aortic regurgitation and 12 with HCM). Frontal cardiothoracic ratio of all groups correlated with indexed right ventricular (RV) end-diastolic volume (EDVI) (r = 0.40, P < 0.01) and indexed total heart volume (THVI) (r = 0.27, P < 0.01). In TOF patients, frontal cardiothoracic ratio correlated with RVEDVI (r = 0.34, P < 0.01; coefficient of variation = 27.6%), indexed RV end-systolic volume (ESVI) (r = 0.44, P < 0.01; coefficient of variation = 33.3%) and THVI (r = 0.35, P < 0.01; coefficient of variation = 19.6%), although RV volumes and THVI showed widespread variation given the high coefficients of variation. In patients with aortic regurgitation, frontal cardiothoracic ratio correlated with left ventricular (LV) EDVI (r = 0.50, P = 0.047), but not with THVI and aortic regurgitant fraction, and widespread variation for LV EDVI (coefficient of variation = 19.2%), LV ESVI (coefficient of variation = 32.5%) and THVI (coefficient of variation = 13.6%) was also observed. Frontal cardiothoracic ratio was not correlated with cardiac volumes

  2. Complications related to osteopenia in the thoracic spine on admission chest radiographs of substance abuse detoxification patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haramati, L.B.; Alterman, D.D.; Israel, G.M.; Haramati, N. [Department of Radiology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Mallavurapu, R. [Department of Psychiatry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    1998-10-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence of complications related to osteopenia in the thoracic spine (anterior wedging and fish vertebrae) of patients admitted for substance abuse detoxification. Design and patients. We retrospectively identified 150 sequential patients admitted to our drug and alcohol detoxification ward in whom posteroanterior and lateral admission chest radiographs and clinical charts were available for review. There were 116 men and 34 women with a mean age of 37 years (range 19-67 years). Thirty-eight patients were admitted for drug detoxification, 37 for alcohol detoxification, and 75 for drug and alcohol detoxification. These patients were compared with 66 age- and sex-matched controls from our hospital`s employee health service. Two radiologists reviewed all chest radiographs for the presence of anterior wedging and fish vertebrae in the thoracic spine and other nonspinal fractures. Serum calcium and inorganic phosphorus levels were recorded for the substance abuse detoxification patients. Results. Forty-nine percent (n=73) of detoxification patients had complications of osteopenia in the thoracic spine including: anterior wedging (n=47), fish vertebrae (n=21), or both (n=5). Twenty-four percent (n=36) of patients had an elevated serum inorganic phosphorus level and one patient had an elevated serum calcium level. Patients with anterior wedging or fish vertebrae included: 45% (n=45) of patients below age 40 years, 35% (n=12) of women, 41% (n=15) of drug detoxification patients, 58% (n=22) of alcohol detoxification patients, 48% (n=36) of drug and alcohol detoxification patients, and 47% (n=17) of patients with elevated serum inorganic phosphorus (P=NS). Six percent (n=9) of our study population had nonspinal fractures on their chest radiographs. Twenty-one percent (n=14) of controls had complications of osteopenia in the thoracic spine (all anterior wedging). This prevalence differed significantly (P<0.05, chi-squared) from the study population

  3. Risk and significance of chest radiograph and pulmonary function abnormalities in an elderly cohort of former nuclear weapons workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulski, Marek A; Hartley, Patrick G; Sprince, Nancy L; Sanderson, Wayne T; Lourens, Spencer; Worden, Nicole E; Wang, Kai; Fuortes, Laurence J

    2011-09-01

    To estimate prevalence and risk factors for International Labour Organization radiographic abnormalities, and assess relationship of these abnormalities with spirometry results in former Department of Energy nuclear weapons workers. Participants were offered chest x-ray (CXR) and lung function testing. Three occupational medicine physicians read CXRs. Forty-five (5.9%) of 757 screened workers were found to have isolated parenchymal abnormalities on CXR and this rate is higher than that in many Department of Energy studies. Parenchymal and pleural and isolated pleural abnormalities were found in 19 (2.5%) and 37 (4.9%) workers, respectively, and these rates are lower than those in other Department of Energy studies to date. Lung function impairment was associated with radiographic abnormalities. This study found an elevated rate of parenchymal abnormalities compared to other DoE populations but the effect of age or other causes could not be ruled out. (C)2011The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of computer-aided detection of pulmonary tuberculosis in chest radiographs: a validation study from sub-Saharan Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Breuninger

    Full Text Available Chest radiography to diagnose and screen for pulmonary tuberculosis has limitations, especially due to inter-reader variability. Automating the interpretation has the potential to overcome this drawback and to deliver objective and reproducible results. The CAD4TB software is a computer-aided detection system that has shown promising preliminary findings. Evaluation studies in different settings are needed to assess diagnostic accuracy and practicability of use.CAD4TB was evaluated on chest radiographs of patients with symptoms suggestive of pulmonary tuberculosis enrolled in two cohort studies in Tanzania. All patients were characterized by sputum smear microscopy and culture including subsequent antigen or molecular confirmation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb to determine the reference standard. Chest radiographs were read by the software and two human readers, one expert reader and one clinical officer. The sensitivity and specificity of CAD4TB was depicted using receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves, the area under the curve calculated and the performance of the software compared to the results of human readers.Of 861 study participants, 194 (23% were culture-positive for M.tb. The area under the ROC curve of CAD4TB for the detection of culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis was 0.84 (95% CI 0.80-0.88. CAD4TB was significantly more accurate for the discrimination of smear-positive cases against non TB patients than for smear-negative cases (p-value<0.01. It differentiated better between TB cases and non TB patients among HIV-negative compared to HIV-positive individuals (p<0.01. CAD4TB significantly outperformed the clinical officer, but did not reach the accuracy of the expert reader (p = 0.02, for a tuberculosis specific reading threshold.CAD4TB accurately distinguished between the chest radiographs of culture-positive TB cases and controls. Further studies on cost-effectiveness, operational and ethical aspects should

  5. Semi-automatic detection of scoliotic rib borders using chest radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plourde, F; Cheriet, F; Dansereau, J

    2006-01-01

    Stereoradiography is a well known technique to obtain 3D reconstructions of the rib cage. However, clinical applications are limited by the associated 2D rib detection method. Either this detection is widely supervised and time-consuming for the user, or it is fully automatic and not accurate enough for proper 3D reconstruction or clinical indices extraction. To address these issues, we propose a novel, semi-automated technique for detecting scoliotic rib borders in PA-0 degrees and PA-20 degrees chest X-ray images, using a modified edge-following approach. The novelty consists in following multiple promising edges simultaneously. Detections are initiated from starting points (input by the user) along the upper and lower rib edges and the final rib border is obtained by finding the most parallel pair among the detected edges. Promising results show the superiority of this approach over classical rib detection in terms of accuracy. Moreover, the proposed method is of great relevancy in the scoliotic context since scoliotic ribs present very few shape priors, due to their irregularities, and hence, standard rib detection techniques become unsuitable.

  6. Comparison of chest compression quality between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method during CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Sub

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to grasp difference in quality of chest compression accuracy between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method. Participants were progressed 64 people except 6 absentees among 70 people who agreed to participation with completing the CPR curriculum. In the classification of group in participants, the modified chest compression method was called as smartphone group (33 people). The standardized chest compression method was called as traditional group (31 people). The common equipments in both groups were used Manikin for practice and Manikin for evaluation. In the meantime, the smartphone group for application was utilized Android and iOS Operating System (OS) of 2 smartphone products (G, i). The measurement period was conducted from September 25th to 26th, 2012. Data analysis was used SPSS WIN 12.0 program. As a result of research, the proper compression depth (mm) was shown the proper compression depth (p< 0.01) in traditional group (53.77 mm) compared to smartphone group (48.35 mm). Even the proper chest compression (%) was formed suitably (p< 0.05) in traditional group (73.96%) more than smartphone group (60.51%). As for the awareness of chest compression accuracy, the traditional group (3.83 points) had the higher awareness of chest compression accuracy (p< 0.001) than the smartphone group (2.32 points). In the questionnaire that was additionally carried out 1 question only in smartphone group, the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone had the high negative reason in rescuer for occurrence of hand back pain (48.5%) and unstable posture (21.2%).

  7. Chest radiographic features of lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis in HIV-infected children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, R.D.; Beningfield, S.J.; Zar, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To review the radiological features of biopsy-proven lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis (LIP) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and establish whether these are based on systematic radiological analysis, and to investigate whether more specific radiological diagnostic criteria can be developed. Materials and methods: A Medline search of English-language articles on the radiological features of biopsy-proven LIP in HIV-infected children was conducted for the period 1982 to 2007 inclusive. Radiological findings were compared with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria for a presumptive diagnosis of LIP. Results: Pulmonary pathology was recorded as 'diffuse' and 'bilateral' in 125 (97.6%) of 128 reported cases of LIP. Twenty-five different terms were used to describe the pulmonary parenchyma. In 96 (75%), the terminology was consistent with CDC diagnostic criteria. Radiological evolution was documented in 43 (33.5%). Persistent focal opacification superimposed on diffuse pulmonary nodularity was demonstrated in 10 (7.8%). The method of radiological evaluation was described in six (4.6%). In no instance was the terminology defined. Conclusion: The radiological features of LIP have not been systematically analysed. However, CDC criteria remain reliable, allowing diagnosis of at least 75% of cases. The sensitivity of these criteria may be increased by including cases with persistent focal pulmonary opacification superimposed on diffuse nodularity. Longitudinal studies utilizing standardized radiographic analysis are needed to elucidate the natural history of LIP.

  8. CT saber-sheath trachea. Correlation with clinical, chest radiographic and functional findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trigaux, J.P.; Hermes, G.; Dubois, P.; Beers, B. van; Delaunois, L.; Jamart, J.

    1994-01-01

    The diagnosis of saber-sheath trachea is easy at CT due to its cross-sectional imaging, but the significance of this CT sign has not been evaluated in the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Various signs of COPD were compared between a series of 20 patients with a saber-sheath trachea at CT (tracheal index ≤66%) and a group of 20 pneumologic control patients without saber-sheath trachea (tracheal index ≥70%). These signs include clinical and standard radiographic indices of COPD, sternum-spine distance and 3 functional tests of COPD: forced expiratory volume in one second, carbon monoxide diffusing lung capacity, and funtional residual capacity (FRC). A significant difference was found between the 2 groups, concerning the values of FRC and of sternum-spine distance (p -2 ). The tracheal index was significantly correlated with the FRC values and with the sternum-spine distance. No other significant difference was observed. It is concluded that saber-sheath trachea is basically a sign of hyperinflation. (orig./MG)

  9. A chest radiograph scoring system in patients with severe acute respiratory infection: a validation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Emma; Haven, Kathryn; Reed, Peter; Bissielo, Ange; Harvey, Dave; McArthur, Colin; Bringans, Cameron; Freundlich, Simone; Ingram, R. Joan H.; Perry, David; Wilson, Francessa; Milne, David; Modahl, Lucy; Huang, Q. Sue; Gross, Diane; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Grant, Cameron C.

    2015-01-01

    The term severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) encompasses a heterogeneous group of respiratory illnesses. Grading the severity of SARI is currently reliant on indirect disease severity measures such as respiratory and heart rate, and the need for oxygen or intensive care. With the lungs being the primary organ system involved in SARI, chest radiographs (CXRs) are potentially useful for describing disease severity. Our objective was to develop and validate a SARI CXR severity scoring system. We completed validation within an active SARI surveillance project, with SARI defined using the World Health Organization case definition of an acute respiratory infection with a history of fever, or measured fever of ≥ 38 °C; and cough; and with onset within the last 10 days; and requiring hospital admission. We randomly selected 250 SARI cases. Admission CXR findings were categorized as: 1 = normal; 2 = patchy atelectasis and/or hyperinflation and/or bronchial wall thickening; 3 = focal consolidation; 4 = multifocal consolidation; and 5 = diffuse alveolar changes. Initially, four radiologists scored CXRs independently. Subsequently, a pediatrician, physician, two residents, two medical students, and a research nurse independently scored CXR reports. Inter-observer reliability was determined using a weighted Kappa (κ) for comparisons between radiologists; radiologists and clinicians; and clinicians. Agreement was defined as moderate (κ > 0.4–0.6), good (κ > 0.6–0.8) and very good (κ > 0.8–1.0). Agreement between the two pediatric radiologists was very good (κ = 0.83, 95 % CI 0.65–1.00) and between the two adult radiologists was good (κ = 0.75, 95 % CI 0.57–0. 93). Agreement of the clinicians with the radiologists was moderate-to-good (pediatrician:κ = 0.65; pediatric resident:κ = 0.69; physician:κ = 0.68; resident:κ = 0.67; research nurse:κ = 0.49, medical students: κ = 0.53 and κ = 0.56). Agreement between clinicians was good-to-very good

  10. Evolution of Entrance Surface Doses and Image Quality in Pediatric Chest Radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campello, A.C.; Marques, D.T.; Medeiros, C.B.; Carvalho, P.P.; Khoury, H.J.; Azevedo, A.C.P.

    2006-01-01

    This work presents the results of a survey about image quality, radiographic techniques and patient doses in a large public hospital located in the city of Recife, Brazil. It was detected that the quality criteria are not fully reached and represent 70% of the agreement with recommendations from the European Community. Concerning the radiographic techniques the kV is in accordance with international recommendations in 90% if the examinations while the exposure time is 72%. The results also show that the dose values change in the range from 0.020 to 0.250 mGy. The variability is mainly caused by the disparity on the radiographic techniques employed in the examinations as well as by the radiographer's expertise. It could be concluded that the ALARA principle is not being applied in the hospital, which becomes a concern in terms of public health. (author)

  11. Immediate reporting of chest X-rays referred from general practice by reporting radiographers: a single centre feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woznitza, N; Piper, K; Rowe, S; Bhowmik, A

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the feasibility of radiographer-led immediate reporting of chest radiographs (CXRs) referred from general practice. This 4-month feasibility study (November 2016 to March 2017) was carried out in a single radiology department at an acute general hospital. Comparison was made between CXRs that received an immediate and routine report to determine the number of lung cancers diagnosed, time to diagnosis of lung cancer, time to computed tomography (CT), and number of urgent referrals to respiratory medicine. Forty of 186 sessions (22%) were covered by radiographer immediate reporting. Of the 1,687 CXRs referred from general practice, 558 (33.1%) received an immediate report (radiographer or radiologist). Twenty-two (of 36) CT examinations performed were following an abnormal CXR with an immediate report (mean 0.8 scans/week). Time from CXR to CT was shorter in the immediate report group (n=22 mean 0.9 days SD=2.3) compared to routine reporting (n=14; mean 6.5 SD=3.2; F=27.883, preporting group (mean 4.1 SD=2.9) compared to routine reporting (mean 10.6; SD=4.5; F=11.59, preporting service. Patients can be taken off the lung cancer pathway sooner with the introduction of radiographer immediate reporting of CXRs and this may improve outcomes for patients. A definitive study assessing outcomes is required to determine whether this will have an impact mortality and morbidity for patients. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A comparison of the Shwachman, Chrispin-Norman and Brasfield methods for scoring of chest radiographs of patients with cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meerman, G.J. te; Dankert-Roelse, J.; Rijksuniversiteit Groningen; Martijn, A.; Woerden, H.H. van

    1985-01-01

    Three systems are described for chest radiograph scoring in cystic fibrosis patients: the Shwachman-Kulczycki, the Chrispin-Norman and the Brasfield method. Sixty chest radiographs of 39 patients of different ages have been independently scored by two radiologists according to the three methods. No statistical differences between the methods could be demonstrated. The Chrispin-Norman method is recommended as the best choice because differences in scoring appeared better interpretable. A significant increase in precision could be achieved by combining the scores of the three methods. (orig.)

  13. Practical measurement of radiation dose in pediatric radiology: use of the dose-area product on digital fluoroscopy and neonatal chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chateil, J.F.; Rouby, C.; Brun, M.; Labessan, C.; Diard, F.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. Control of radiation dose in pediatric radiology requires knowledge of the reference levels for all examinations. These data are useful for daily quality assessment, but are not perfectly known for some radiographic examinations. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the dose related to voiding cysto-urethrograms (VCUG), upper GI (UGI) and intravenous urography (IVU). Neonatal chest radiographs in the intensive care unit were also evaluated. Material and methods. For examinations with contrast material (478VCUG, 220UGI, 80IVU), the children were divided in groups based on their weight, from 5 to 30 Kg. Measurements were performed using an ionization chamber and expressed with the-dose-area product (DAP). For chest radiographs, a direct measurement of the entrance-skin dose was performed, with secondary calculation of the DAP. Results. For-VCUGs, the DAP ranged between 42.89 cGy.cm 2 and 125.41 cGy.cm 2 . The range was between 76.43, and 150.62 cGy.cm 2 for UGIs and between 49.06 and 83.33 cGy.cm 2 for IVUs. For neonate chest radiographs, DAP calculations were between 0.29 and 0.99 cGy.cm 2 . Conclusion. These values represent our reference doses. They allow continuous monitoring of our radiographic technical parameters and radiographic equipment and help to correct and improve them if necessary. (author)

  14. Estimation of absorbed dose by newborn patients subjected to chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunick, Ana P.; Schelin, Hugo R.; Denyak, Valeriy

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present an estimate of the effective dose received by newborn patients hospitalized in NICU and subjected to X-ray examinations of the chest in the AP projection. Initially, were followed examinations chest X-rays performed on newborn patients and subsequently, simulated in a newborn simulator object. The ESAK values obtained by TLDs were used to calculate the effective dose obtained at each examination by Caldose X software. The estimated values for the effective dose in the simulated exams in this study range from 2,3μSv the 10,7μSv. The results achieved are, generally, inferior to those reported for similar previous studies. (author)

  15. Patient dose study in chest radiographic examinations for different exposure techniques using Monte Carlo method and voxel phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Samanda C.A.; Souza, Edmilson M.; Silva, Ademir X.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2007-01-01

    Monte Carlo code MCNPX coupled with an adult voxel female model (FAX) were used to investigate how radiation dose in chest radiographic examinations vary with antiscatter techniques (air gap and grid) and projection geometry (anterior-posterior - AP and posterior-anterior - PA) for different tube voltages. The radiation doses were evaluated in terms of organ and effective doses, for a fixed air kerma at the image detector. The results show that the effective dose for grid technique decreases with increasing tube voltage, while that for air gap great variations were not observed. Besides, the work also showed that doses are larger for AP projections and that use of the air gap is recommended in the place of the anti-scatter grids. (author)

  16. Gradual progression of intrapulmonary lymph nodes associated with usual interstitial pneumonia in progressive systemic sclerosis on chest radiographs and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Joon Young; Chung, Myung Hee; Kim, Seon Mun [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Hyun [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    A 40 year old female visited the clinic for evaluation of Raynaud's phenomenon for a period of four years. The initial chest radiograph showed a fine reticular density and ground glass opacity with lower lobe predominance. These findings are consistent interstitial fibrosis. Additionally, high resolution CT showed multiple, small, coexisting nodular opacities, ranging from 3 to 7 mm in size in both lungs. These nodules grew up to 1.5 cm and showed moderate enhancement. Because of the rareness of intrapulmonary lymph node in patient of progressive systemic sclerosis, we couldn't exclude the possibility of malignancy. These nodules are turned out to be intrapulmonary lymph nodes on video assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy.

  17. Construction of a homogeneous phantom for radiographic image standardization; Construcao de um fantoma homogeneo para padronizacao de imagens radiograficas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pina, Diana Rodrigues de

    1996-12-31

    The principle of radiodiagnosis consists in the fact the X-ray beam is attenuated at different degrees by distinct tissues. For this reason, the anatomical structures have distinct radiological opacities, that produce the radiographic image. The progresses in radiology are related to the development if new radiographic image formation systems that enable an amplification in the quality, with low dose and/or risk to the patient. The objective of this work is the sensitometric valuation of a screen-film combination, that is still the most used, for the standardization, of radiographic images. Thinking about this, were constructed homogeneous phantoms of the chest, skull and pelvis, for the calibration of X-ray beams, with the purpose of obtaining radiographic images of good quality, basing in the routine of a radiodiagnosis service and in the scientific knowledge. Questions were approached about the choice of the suitable equipment, that allow the obtention of k Vp and m As combinations, to produce radiographic images of good quality, and the reproduction of these combinations to any conventional equipment of diagnostic X-rays. Also presented are the comparison of the doses imparted by these combinations and those used in routine of the Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirao Preto`s radiodiagnosis service. (author) 24 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. A parameterized logarithmic image processing method with Laplacian of Gaussian filtering for lung nodule enhancement in chest radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Yao, Liping; Chen, Bao

    2016-11-01

    The enhancement of lung nodules in chest radiographs (CXRs) plays an important role in the manual as well as computer-aided detection (CADe) lung cancer. In this paper, we proposed a parameterized logarithmic image processing (PLIP) method combined with the Laplacian of a Gaussian (LoG) filter to enhance lung nodules in CXRs. We first applied several LoG filters with varying parameters to an original CXR to enhance the nodule-like structures as well as the edges in the image. We then applied the PLIP model, which can enhance lung nodule images with high contrast and was beneficial in extracting effective features for nodule detection in the CADe scheme. Our method combined the advantages of both the PLIP algorithm and the LoG algorithm, which can enhance lung nodules in chest radiographs with high contrast. To test our nodule enhancement method, we tested a CADe scheme, with a relatively high performance in nodule detection, using a publically available database containing 140 nodules in 140 CXRs enhanced through our nodule enhancement method. The CADe scheme attained a sensitivity of 81 and 70 % with an average of 5.0 frame rate (FP) and 2.0 FP, respectively, in a leave-one-out cross-validation test. By contrast, the CADe scheme based on the original image recorded a sensitivity of 77 and 63 % at 5.0 FP and 2.0 FP, respectively. We introduced the measurement of enhancement by entropy evaluation to objectively assess our method. Experimental results show that the proposed method obtains an effective enhancement of lung nodules in CXRs for both radiologists and CADe schemes.

  19. Can ultrasound extended emergency (EFAST) replace the chest radiograph in the initial approach to trauma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre Jimenez, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    The sensitivity diagnosed between ultrasound Extended emergency (EFAST) and portable radiography was compared. Life-threatening pathologies are detected in the initial approach to trauma, through an analysis comparative between EFAST and portable chest radiography. So, the need or not both studies or if the use of EFAST as the only diagnostic method in primary evaluation of trauma can be limited. The study has concluded that the EFAST can be used as the only tool for polytrauma patients, although in this analysis the sample has been very small [es

  20. Absorbed doses received by patients submitted to chest radiographs in hospitals of the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Marcelo Baptista de

    2000-01-01

    Medical irradiation contributes with a significant amount to the dose received by the population. Here, this contribution was evaluated in a survey of absorbed doses received by patients submitted to chest radiological examinations (postero-anterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) projections) in hospitals of the city of Sao Paulo. Due to the variety of equipment and procedures used in radiological examinations, a selection of hospitals was made (12, totalizing 27 X-ray facilities), taking into account their representativeness as medical institutions in the city, in terms of characteristics and number of radiographs carried out. An anthropomorphic phantom, provided with thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD-1 00), was irradiated simulating the patient, and the radiographic image quality was evaluated. Absorbed doses were determined to the thoracic region (entrance and exit skin and lung doses), and to some important organs from the radiation protection point of view (lens of the eye, thyroid and gonads). The great variation on the exposure parameters (kV, mA.s, beam size) leads to a large interval of entrance skin doses-ESD (coefficients of variation, CV, of 60% and 76%, for PA and LAT projections, respectively, were found) and of organ doses (CV of 60% and 46%. for thyroid and lung respectively). Mean values of ESD for LAT and PA projections were 0.22 and 0.98 mGy, respectively. The average absorbed doses per exam (PA and LAT) to thyroid and lung, 0.15 and 0.24 mGy respectively,showed that the thyroid was irradiated by the primary beam in many cases. Values of lens of the eye and gonad absorbed doses were below 30 μGy. Comparison of the lung doses obtained in this study with values in the literature, calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, showed good agreement. On the other hand, the comparison shows significant differences in the dose values to organs outside the chest region (thyroid, lens of eye and gonads). The effective dose calculated for a chest examination, PA and LAT

  1. Characterization of interstitial lung disease in chest radiographs using SOM artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo-Marques, P.M. de; Ambrosio, P.E.; Pereira, R.R. Jr.; Valini, R. de A.; Salomao, S.C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an automated approach to apply a self-organizing map (SOM) artificial neural network (ANN) as a tool for feature extraction and dimensionality reduction to recognize and characterize radiologic patterns of interstitial lung diseases in chest radiography. After feature extraction and dimensionality reduction a multilayer perceptron (MLP) ANN is applied for radiologic patterns classification in normal, linear, nodular or mixed. A leave-one-out methodology was applied for training and test over a database containing 17 samples of linear pattern, 9 samples of nodular pattern, 9 samples of mixed pattern and 18 samples of normal pattern. The MLP network provided an average result of 88.7% of right classification, with 100% of right classification for linear pattern, 55.5% for nodular pattern, 77.7% for mixed pattern and 100% for normal pattern. (orig.)

  2. Design, function, and performance evaluation of a system that prescreens chest radiographs for tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampeter, W.

    1983-01-01

    A system for the automated detection of the pulmonary nodule has been designed, tuned, and tested. The goal of this system is to aid the radiologist in locating a pulmonary nodule by indicating a few sites in the radiograph that are most likely to be nodules. Procedurally driven image experts that respond to specific types of anatomic features have been devised and are incorporated in a pattern recognizer. Candidate nodule sites that are not classified as nodules are eliminated from the list of sites that are presented to the radiologist for inspection. This work has demonstrated that pattern recognition techniques and procedurally driven image experts are capable of reducing the number of candidate nodule sites that a radiologist must inspect from 12 to 3. The radiologist must be willing to accept that 86% of films with nodules are detected (as opposed to 92%) for the convenience of having fewer points to inspect

  3. Short-term impact of pictorial posters and a crash course on radiographic errors for improving the quality of paediatric chest radiographs in an unsupervised unit - a pilot study for quality-assurance outreach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tebogo Hlabangana, Linda; Andronikou, Savvas

    2015-01-01

    Chest radiography is the most commonly performed diagnostic X-ray examination. The radiation dose to the patient for this examination is relatively low but because of its frequent use, the contribution to the collective dose is considerable. Optimized image quality not only allows for more accurate diagnosis but also supports radiation protection, which is particularly important in children. To determine whether the introduction of a poster of technical errors in paediatric radiography accompanied by a short lecture (crash course) for radiographers on common errors can sustainably decrease the number and rate of these errors in an unsupervised radiology department (without a paediatric-trained radiologist or paediatric-trained radiography personnel). We conducted a pilot study for quality-assurance outreach, with retrospective and prospective components, in the paediatric radiology department of a teaching hospital. The technical errors in frontal chest radiographs performed in the unit were assessed by quality-assurance analysis using a customized tick-sheet. The review was performed before and after an intervention that involved a half-hour crash course and poster displays in the department. We compared the rate of technical errors made before and after the intervention. There was statistically significant improvement in quality of radiographs (P 2 months after the intervention. A simple intervention of a crash course and poster placement resulted in improved quality of paediatric chest radiographs. A decline in quality after 2 months suggests the need to repeat this or another type of intervention regularly. (orig.)

  4. A survey on medical radiation dose by the radiographic conditions of chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Joon; Kim, Sung Soo; Park, Jun Chul

    1992-01-01

    It is a matter of common knowledge that medical radiation is most accounted for of radiation is doses applied to the whole of people, and of them the radiation dose by radiography diagnosis is mainly prevalent. In applying X-rays to a certain man for radiography diagnosis a radiologist will have to have an absolute sense of mission concerning the reduction and prevention of the patient's radiation dose as the radiologist obligation. Accordingly, the radiography conditions of the patient's chest employed 197 medical facilities were surveyed and skin dose was commutated by the IPH Bit system and examined. As a result, it was shown that the average skin dose was 288 μSv, its minimum value was 1600 μSv, which was over 32 times its minimum value. This shows that the appropriate radiography method has not been applied at applying X -ray to the patient. It comes from the performance of X-ray equipment, the choice of auxiliary equipment materials etc. But the most important thing is to master the appropriate radiography condition, and therefore this point will have to be kept in mind

  5. Association of calcified carotid atheromas visualized on panoramic images and aortic arch calcifications seen on chest radiographs of postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Arthur H; El-Saden, Suzie M; Aghazadehsanai, Nona; Chang, Tina I; Harada, Nancy D; Garrett, Neal R

    2014-04-01

    Occult atherosclerotic disease is the leading cause of death among older women. The authors hypothesized that women with calcified carotid artery plaque (CCAP) visualized on panoramic images were more likely to have aortic arch calcifications (AAC) that were visible on chest radiographs (CRs), a risk indicator of experiencing cardiovascular events, than would matched cohorts who did not have atheromas. The authors obtained the CRs of 36 female veterans (≥ 50 years) who had CCAP and atherogenically risk-matched them to those of 36 women without CCAP. A radiologist evaluated the CRs for AAC. Other study variables included age, ethnicity, body mass index and presence or absence of hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia. The authors computed descriptive and bivariate statistics. Women 60 years or older who had evidence of CCAP on their panoramic radiographs were significantly (P = .022; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.298-26.223) more likely to have evidence of AAC on their CRs than were similarly aged women who did not have evidence of CCAP. This association was not evident in women younger than 60 years. Among women who were both younger and older than 60 years, there was no evident association between the presence of CCAP and the severity (on a four point scale [0-3]) of AAC calcification. Prevalence of carotid plaque on panoramic images of women 60 years or older is significantly associated with presence of aortic arch calcifications on CRs. Panoramic images of women 60 years or older must be evaluated for CCAP, given their association with AAC. Patients with atheromas should be referred to their physicians for further evaluation given the systemic implications.

  6. A study on findings from simple chest radiographs without any clinical symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ham Gyum [Ansan College, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    In this study, the analysis on findings from simple chest radiography (CXR) test with total 1,669 subjects without any special clinical symptom came to the following conclusions: In terms of the general characteristics of subjects hereof, male and female group accounted for 55.2% and 44.8% respectively out of all 1,669 people. Pulmonary disease cases amounted to 249 persons (14.9%) out of all subjects. In the analysis on prevalence rate by age distribution, it was noted that the older age led to the more number of diseases, which was demonstrated by age 34 or younger (6.1%), age 35 {approx} 39 (9.7%), age 40 {approx} 49 (13.3%), and age 50 or older (30.8%). In regard of pulmonary disease alone, the region of onset was represented primarily by right upper lobe, which was followed by both upper lobe and left upper lobe, respectively. In terms of disease types, it was found that most cases were represented by pulmonary nodule (55.0%), which was followed by cardiomegaly (24.5%), CP angle blunting (4.8%), scoliosis (4.6%) tortuous aorta (2.8%), bronchial luminal dilatation(2.4%), and pleural thickening (2.0%). However, dextrocardia, cystic dilation of bronchus, cavitary lesion, and lung collapse accounted for relatively low rate (0.4% respectively). In terms of disease types by sex, it was found that male group accounted for higher percentage of having cardiomegaly, tortuous aorta and scoliosis than the former. In terms of disease types by age distribution, it was noted that age 34 or younger group accounted for higher percentage of scoliosis than any other age groups, while age 40 {approx} 49 group, age 35 {approx} 39 group, and age 50 or older group represented the case of CP angle blunting, pulmonary nodule, and cardiomegaly/tortuous aorta, respectively.

  7. A study on findings from simple chest radiographs without any clinical symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ham Gyum

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the analysis on findings from simple chest radiography (CXR) test with total 1,669 subjects without any special clinical symptom came to the following conclusions: In terms of the general characteristics of subjects hereof, male and female group accounted for 55.2% and 44.8% respectively out of all 1,669 people. Pulmonary disease cases amounted to 249 persons (14.9%) out of all subjects. In the analysis on prevalence rate by age distribution, it was noted that the older age led to the more number of diseases, which was demonstrated by age 34 or younger (6.1%), age 35 ∼ 39 (9.7%), age 40 ∼ 49 (13.3%), and age 50 or older (30.8%). In regard of pulmonary disease alone, the region of onset was represented primarily by right upper lobe, which was followed by both upper lobe and left upper lobe, respectively. In terms of disease types, it was found that most cases were represented by pulmonary nodule (55.0%), which was followed by cardiomegaly (24.5%), CP angle blunting (4.8%), scoliosis (4.6%) tortuous aorta (2.8%), bronchial luminal dilatation(2.4%), and pleural thickening (2.0%). However, dextrocardia, cystic dilation of bronchus, cavitary lesion, and lung collapse accounted for relatively low rate (0.4% respectively). In terms of disease types by sex, it was found that male group accounted for higher percentage of having cardiomegaly, tortuous aorta and scoliosis than the former. In terms of disease types by age distribution, it was noted that age 34 or younger group accounted for higher percentage of scoliosis than any other age groups, while age 40 ∼ 49 group, age 35 ∼ 39 group, and age 50 or older group represented the case of CP angle blunting, pulmonary nodule, and cardiomegaly/tortuous aorta, respectively

  8. Chest Fat Quantification via CT Based on Standardized Anatomy Space in Adult Lung Transplant Candidates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubing Tong

    Full Text Available Overweight and underweight conditions are considered relative contraindications to lung transplantation due to their association with excess mortality. Yet, recent work suggests that body mass index (BMI does not accurately reflect adipose tissue mass in adults with advanced lung diseases. Alternative and more accurate measures of adiposity are needed. Chest fat estimation by routine computed tomography (CT imaging may therefore be important for identifying high-risk lung transplant candidates. In this paper, an approach to chest fat quantification and quality assessment based on a recently formulated concept of standardized anatomic space (SAS is presented. The goal of the paper is to seek answers to several key questions related to chest fat quantity and quality assessment based on a single slice CT (whether in the chest, abdomen, or thigh versus a volumetric CT, which have not been addressed in the literature.Unenhanced chest CT image data sets from 40 adult lung transplant candidates (age 58 ± 12 yrs and BMI 26.4 ± 4.3 kg/m2, 16 with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, 16 with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, and the remainder with other conditions were analyzed together with a single slice acquired for each patient at the L5 vertebral level and mid-thigh level. The thoracic body region and the interface between subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT and visceral adipose tissue (VAT in the chest were consistently defined in all patients and delineated using Live Wire tools. The SAT and VAT components of chest were then segmented guided by this interface. The SAS approach was used to identify the corresponding anatomic slices in each chest CT study, and SAT and VAT areas in each slice as well as their whole volumes were quantified. Similarly, the SAT and VAT components were segmented in the abdomen and thigh slices. Key parameters of the attenuation (Hounsfield unit (HU distributions were determined from each chest slice and from the

  9. Routine use of chest radiographs in the post-operative management of pectus bar removal: necessity or futility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poola, Ashwini Suresh; Rentea, Rebecca M; Weaver, Katrina L; St Peter, Shawn David

    2017-05-01

    While there is literature on techniques for pectus bar removal, there are limited reports on post-operative management. This can include obtaining a postoperative chest radiograph (CXR) despite the minimal risk of associated intra-thoracic complications. This is a review of our experience with bar removal and lack of routine post-operative CXR. A single institution retrospective chart review was performed from 2000 to 2015. Patients who underwent a pectus bar removal procedure were included. We assessed operative timing of bar placement and removal, procedure length, intra-operative and post-operative complications and post-operative CXR findings, specifically the rate of pneumothoraces. 450 patients were identified in this study. Median duration of bar placement prior to removal was 35 months (interquartile range 30 and 36 months). Sixtey-four patients obtained a post-operative CXR. Of these, only one (58%) film revealed a pneumothorax; this was not drained. A CXR was not obtained in 386 (86%) patients with no immediate or delayed complications from this practice. Median follow-up time for all patients was 11 months (interquartile range 7.5-17 months). The risk for a clinically relevant pneumothorax is minimal following bar removal. This suggests that not obtaining routine imaging following bar removal may be a safe practice.

  10. Scatter radiation from chest radiographs: is there a risk to infants in a typical NICU?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinh, Angela M.; Schoenfeld, Alan H.; Levin, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the dose of scatter radiation to infants in a NICU in order to determine the minimal safe distance between isolettes. Dose secondary to scattered radiation from an acrylic phantom exposed to vertical and horizontal beam exposures at 56 kVp was measured at 93 cm and 125 cm from the center of the phantom. This corresponds to 2 and 3 ft between standard isolettes, respectively. For horizontal exposures, the dosimeter was placed directly behind a CR plate and scatter dose at 90-degrees and 135-degrees from the incident beam was also measured. Exposures were obtained at 160 mAs and the results were extrapolated to correspond to 2.5 mAs. Four measurements were taken at each point and averaged. At 125 cm and 93 cm there was minimal scatter compared to daily natural background radiation dose (8.493 μGy). Greatest scatter dose obtained from a horizontal beam exposure at 135 from the incident beam was still far below background radiation. Scatter radiation dose from a single exposure as well as cumulative scatter dose from numerous exposures is significantly below natural background radiation. Infants in neighboring isolettes are not at added risk from radiation scatter as long as the isolettes are separated by at least 2 ft. (orig.)

  11. Improved computerized detection of lung nodules in chest radiographs by means of 'virtual dual-energy' radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S.; Suzuki, K.; MacMahon, H.

    2011-03-01

    Major challenges in current computer-aided detection (CADe) of nodules in chest radiographs (CXRs) are to detect nodules that overlap with ribs and to reduce the frequent false positives (FPs) caused by ribs. Our purpose was to develop a CADe scheme with improved sensitivity and specificity by use of "virtual dual-energy" (VDE) CXRs where ribs are suppressed with a massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN). To reduce rib-induced FPs and detect nodules overlapping with ribs, we incorporated VDE technology in our CADe scheme. VDE technology suppressed ribs in CXR while maintaining soft-tissue opacity by use of an MTANN that had been trained with real DE imaging. Our scheme detected nodule candidates on VDE images by use of a morphologic filtering technique. Sixty-four morphologic and gray-level-based features were extracted from each candidate from both original and VDE CXRs. A nonlinear support vector classifier was employed for classification of the nodule candidates. A publicly available database containing 126 nodules in 126 CXRs was used for testing of our CADe scheme. Twenty nine percent (36/126) of the nodules were rated "extremely subtle" or "very subtle" by a radiologist. With the original scheme, a sensitivity of 76.2 (96/126) with 5 (630/126) FPs per image was achieved. By use of VDE images, more nodules overlapping with ribs were detected and the sensitivity was improved substantially to 84.1% (106/126) at the same FP rate in a leave-one-out cross-validation test, whereas the literature shows that other CADe schemes achieved sensitivities of 66.0% and 72.0% at the same FP rate.

  12. The sensitivity of standard radiographic foot measures to misalignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willauer, Patrick; Sangeorzan, Bruce J; Whittaker, Eric C; Shofer, Jane B; Ledoux, William R

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effects that X-ray source misalignment has on common measurements made from anterior-poster (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) view foot radiographs. A cadaveric foot model was used to obtain ML radiographs with ±25 degree transverse plane misalignment. From these images the calcaneal pitch angle (CPA) and lateral talometatarsal angle (LTMA) were measured. AP images were captured with up to 30 degree sagittal plane misalignment as well as ±15 degree misalignment in the transverse plane at each sagittal angle. From these images the talonavicular coverage angle (TNCA) and talometatarsal angle (TMA) were measured. On the ML images, the CPA was sensitive to transverse plane misalignment from -10 to -25 degrees and from 15 to 25 degrees (P plane misalignment. On the AP images, the TNCA and TMA were not sensitive to sagittal plane misalignment alone. However, at 0, 10, and 15 degrees sagittal misalignment the TNCA showed sensitivity to transverse plane misalignment (P foot radiographic parameters, especially the CPA when there is transverse plane misalignment and the TNCA when there is both sagittal and transverse plane misalignment. The LTMA and TMA can be measured reliably, even with significant misalignment present. If a researcher or clinician is interested in measuring the CPA or TNCA, the current best practices guidelines for obtaining ML and AP images should be closely followed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Resource reduction in pediatric chest pain: Standardized clinical assessment and management plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleeb, Susan F; McLaughlin, Sarah R; Graham, Dionne A; Friedman, Kevin G; Fulton, David R

    2018-01-01

    Using a Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plan (SCAMP) for pediatric patients presenting to clinic with chest pain, we evaluated the cost impact associated with implementation of the care algorithm. Prior to introduction of the SCAMP, we analyzed charges for 406 patients with chest pain, seen in 2009, and predicted 21% reduction of overall charges had the SCAMP methodology been used. The SCAMP recommended an echocardiogram for history, examination, or ECG findings suggestive of a cardiac etiology for chest pain. Resource utilization was reviewed for 1517 patients (7-21 years) enrolled in the SCAMP from July 2010 to April 2014. Compared to the 2009 historic cohort, patients evaluated by the SCAMP had higher rates of exertional chest pain (45% vs 37%) and positive family history (5% vs 1%). The SCAMP cohort had fewer abnormal physical examination findings (1% vs 6%) and abnormal electrocardiograms (3% vs 5%). Echocardiogram use increased in the SCAMP cohort compared to the 2009 historic cohort (45% vs 41%), whereas all other ancillary testing was reduced: exercise stress testing (4% SCAMP vs 28% historic), Holter (4% vs 7%), event monitors (3% vs 10%), and MRI (1% vs 2%). Total charges were reduced by 22% ($822 625) by use of the Chest Pain SCAMP, despite a higher percentage of patients for whom echocardiogram was recommended compared to the historic cohort. The Chest Pain SCAMP effectively streamlines cardiac testing and reduces resource utilization. Further reductions can be made by algorithm refinement regarding echocardiograms for exertional symptoms. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Thoracic CT-scans in ICU patients - Additional diagnostic information supplementing chest radiographs; Thorakale Computertomographie am Intensivpatienten - Zusatzinformation zum Thorax-Roentgen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchsjaeger, M.; Hoermann, M.; Lechner, G.; Herold, C. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik; Germann, P. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Universitaetsklinik fuer Anaesthesiologie und Allgemeine Intensivmedizin

    2000-07-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of thoracic CT-scans in comparison with conventional chest radiographs in ICU-patients. Methods: Chest radiographs and corresponding thoracic CT-scans of 25 consecutive surgical ICU-patients were reviewed and interpreted independently by two radiologists. We analyzed the additional information provided by CT-scans and the diagnostic and therapeutic relevance of these findings. Results: In 22 patients (88%), thoracic CT revealed 35 single additional findings, in comparison with the corresponding bedside radiographs. In 7 cases (28%), these findings (tubemalpositioning, mediastinitis, mediastinal abscess and pneumothorax) required modification of patient management. Of 7 patients with tube thoracostomy, 3 tubes were malpositioned, which was only depicted on CT-scans. In 10 of 21 cases (48%), pleural effusions could only be visualized by CT. 3 of 5 (60%) pneumothoraces were detected by CT-scans only. There were no significant complications during transport or CT-examination. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Studie war die Definition des diagnostischen Zugewinns durch die thorakale Computertomographie (CT) gegenueber der Thoraxbettaufnahme am Intensivpatienten. Methodik: In einer vergleichenden Analyse wurden retrospektiv radiologische Aufnahmen und Daten von 25 konsekutiven Patienten einer chirurgischen Intensivstation ausgewertet. Ergebnisse: In 22 Faellen (88%) wurden durch die CT 35 zusaetzliche Befunde erhoben, wobei die haeufigsten Zusatzinformationen Pleura- und Perikarderguesse, Buelaudrainagefehllagen und Pneumothoraces betrafen. In 7 Faellen (28%) waren diese zusaetzlichen Informationen von intensivmedizinischer Relevanz, d.h., sie verlangten nach einer Intervention oder Aenderung der laufenden Therapie. Es kam zu keinerlei kardiovaskulaeren Komplikationen waehrend des Transportes oder der computertomographischen Untersuchung. (orig.)

  15. Large mediastinal tumor mass as a prognostic factor in Hodgkin's lymphoma. Is the definition on the basis of a chest radiograph in the era of CT obsolete?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriz, J.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T.; Mueller, R.P.; Mueller, H.; Engert, A.; Kuhnert, G.; Kobe, C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The risk factor 'large mediastinal tumor mass' is an internationally accepted unfavorable prognostic factor in the staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The definition of this risk factor varies considerably between large cooperative study groups. The purpose of the present analysis was to determine to which degree data obtained from chest radiograph (CRX) give the same results as those from CT scans (CT). Methods: A total of 145 de novo HL patients in early unfavorable and advanced stages were included in this study. A total of 94 patients had a large mediastinal tumor mass according to the guidelines of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG), while 51 had mediastinal lymph node involvement only. The size of mediastinal involvement and the thoracic diameter were measured on CRX and CT. Agreement between CRX and CT was determined by sensitivity and specificity analysis as well as descriptive statistics and correlations. Results: The correlation of the diameters on CRX with those of CT was 0.95 for the tumor size and 0.77 for the thoracic diameter. The diagnostic decision - large mediastinal mass or not - correlated with 0.81 between CRX and CT and was identical in 90.3% of cases. The sensitivity was 0.87 and the specificity 0.96 for CRX, which is considered the current standard. Conclusion: The results show that there is a high agreement between the measurements of CRX and CT. Diagnosis of a large mediastinal mass disagreed in 10% of patients. Since the correct diagnosis of this risk factor is decisive for the adequate multimodal treatment choice, CRX should not be omitted. (orig.)

  16. Large mediastinal tumor mass as a prognostic factor in Hodgkin's lymphoma. Is the definition on the basis of a chest radiograph in the era of CT obsolete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriz, J; Mueller, R-P; Mueller, H; Kuhnert, G; Engert, A; Kobe, C; Haverkamp, U; Eich, H T

    2012-11-01

    The risk factor "large mediastinal tumor mass" is an internationally accepted unfavorable prognostic factor in the staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The definition of this risk factor varies considerably between large cooperative study groups. The purpose of the present analysis was to determine to which degree data obtained from chest radiograph (CRX) give the same results as those from CT scans (CT). A total of 145 de novo HL patients in early unfavorable and advanced stages were included in this study. A total of 94 patients had a large mediastinal tumor mass according to the guidelines of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG), while 51 had mediastinal lymph node involvement only. The size of mediastinal involvement and the thoracic diameter were measured on CRX and CT. Agreement between CRX and CT was determined by sensitivity and specificity analysis as well as descriptive statistics and correlations. The correlation of the diameters on CRX with those of CT was 0.95 for the tumor size and 0.77 for the thoracic diameter. The diagnostic decision-large mediastinal mass or not-correlated with 0.81 between CRX and CT and was identical in 90.3% of cases. The sensitivity was 0.87 and the specificity 0.96 for CRX, which is considered the current standard. The results show that there is a high agreement between the measurements of CRX and CT. Diagnosis of a large mediastinal mass disagreed in 10% of patients. Since the correct diagnosis of this risk factor is decisive for the adequate multimodal treatment choice, CRX should not be omitted.

  17. The Development of Expertise in Radiology: In Chest Radiograph Interpretation, "Expert" Search Pattern May Predate "Expert" Levels of Diagnostic Accuracy for Pneumothorax Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brendan S; Rainford, Louise A; Darcy, Sarah P; Kavanagh, Eoin C; Toomey, Rachel J

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To investigate the development of chest radiograph interpretation skill through medical training by measuring both diagnostic accuracy and eye movements during visual search. Materials and Methods An institutional exemption from full ethical review was granted for the study. Five consultant radiologists were deemed the reference expert group, and four radiology registrars, five senior house officers (SHOs), and six interns formed four clinician groups. Participants were shown 30 chest radiographs, 14 of which had a pneumothorax, and were asked to give their level of confidence as to whether a pneumothorax was present. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was carried out on diagnostic decisions. Eye movements were recorded with a Tobii TX300 (Tobii Technology, Stockholm, Sweden) eye tracker. Four eye-tracking metrics were analyzed. Variables were compared to identify any differences between groups. All data were compared by using the Friedman nonparametric method. Results The average area under the ROC curve for the groups increased with experience (0.947 for consultants, 0.792 for registrars, 0.693 for SHOs, and 0.659 for interns; P = .009). A significant difference in diagnostic accuracy was found between consultants and registrars (P = .046). All four eye-tracking metrics decreased with experience, and there were significant differences between registrars and SHOs. Total reading time decreased with experience; it was significantly lower for registrars compared with SHOs (P = .046) and for SHOs compared with interns (P = .025). Conclusion Chest radiograph interpretation skill increased with experience, both in terms of diagnostic accuracy and visual search. The observed level of experience at which there was a significant difference was higher for diagnostic accuracy than for eye-tracking metrics. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  18. Reliability of early radiographic evaluations for canine hip dysplasia obtained from the standard ventrodorsal radiographic projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corley, E.A.; Keller, G.G.; Lattimer, J.C.; Ellersieck, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    To determine reliability of preliminary evaluations for canine hip dysplasia (CHD) performed by the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals on dogs between 3 and 18 months of age. Retrospective analysis of data from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals database. 2,332 Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, German Shepherd Dogs, and Rottweilers for which preliminary evaluation had been performed between 3 and 18 months of age and for which results of a definitive evaluation performed after 24 months of age were available. Each radiograph was evaluated, and hip joint status was graded as excellent, good, fair, or borderline phenotype or mild, moderate, or severe dysplasia. Preliminary evaluations were performed by 1 radiologist; definitive evaluations were the consensus of 3 radiologists. Reliability of preliminary evaluations was calculated as the percentage of definitive evaluations (normal vs dysplastic) that were unchanged from preliminary evaluations. Reliability of a preliminary evaluation of normal hip joint phenotype decreased significantly as the preliminary evaluation changed from excellent (100%) to good (97.9%) to fair (76.9%) phenotype. Reliability of a preliminary evaluation of CHD increased significantly as the preliminary evaluation changed from mild (84.4%) to moderate (97.4%) CHD. Reliability of preliminary evaluations increased significantly as age at the time of preliminary evaluation increased, regardless of whether dogs received a preliminary evaluation of normal phenotype or CHD. Results suggest that preliminary evaluations of hip joint status in dogs are generally reliable. However, dogs that receive a preliminary evaluation of fair phenotype of mild CHD should be reevaluated after 24 months of age

  19. Survey of image quality and patient dose in simple radiographic examinations: establishing guidance levels and comparison with international standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manatrakul, N.; Bunsoong, T.; Krisanachinda, A.; Suwanpradit, P.; Rungruengthanakit, P.; Kanchart, S.; Chaiwong, Rajikorn; Tsapakig, V.A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate image quality and patient dose for commonly radiographic examinations in Thailand, to establish national reference or guidance levels (GL) and compare with international standards, as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) project on Radiation Protection of Patients and Medical Exposure Control (RAS/9/034 and RAS/9/047). Materials and Methods: Film reject rate analysis, image quality and patient dose assessment before and after Quality Control (QC) implementation were investigated in 8 X-ray machines in 4 hospitals. Air kerma (in mGy) at 1 meter focus-detector-distance for different kVp settings for each X-ray machines were measured using an ionization chamber under standardized condition. The entrance skin air kerma (ESAK) for Chest PA, Lumbar spine AP, Lumbar spine LAT, Pelvis AP, Abdomen AP, Skull AP and Skull LAT were calculated for at least 10 adult patients of average body mass (60 to 80 kg) for each projection. The obtained values were compared with international standards. Results: The highest film rejection rate reduction recorded after corrective actions from 9.15% to 6.8%. Mean ESAK values were less than international standards both before and after QC implementation in all projections but Chest PA projection. Maximum ESAK in Chest PA projection before corrective action was 0.55 mGy which was higher than the IAEA GL of 0.2 mGy. However, it was reduced to 0.25 mGy after QC tests on X- ray machine and using high kilovoltage (kV) technique. Conclusion: Proposed national GL of Thailand were obtained by estimating the 3rd quartile of the whole sample: Chest PA: 0.1 mGy, Lumbar Spine AP: 2.1 mGy, Lumbar Spine LAT: 6.3 mGy, Pelvis AP: 1.8 mGy, Abdomen: 1.5 mGy, Skull PA: 1.3 mGy and Skull LAT: 0.9 mGy. (author)

  20. 20 CFR Appendix A to Part 718 - Standards for Administration and Interpretation of Chest Roentgenograms (X-Rays)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Interpretation of Chest Roentgenograms (X-Rays) A Appendix A to Part 718 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS... 718—Standards for Administration and Interpretation of Chest Roentgenograms (X-Rays) The following... procedures are used in administering and interpreting X-rays and that the best available medical evidence...

  1. Transdiaphragmatic herniation of peritoneal dialysis fluid post Nissen's operation: an unusual cause for a mass on the chest radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, D.; Hall, C.; Shaw, D.

    1997-01-01

    A child on dialysis for chronic renal failure and who had had a Nissen's fundoplication showed transdiaphragmatic herniation of the peritoneum simulating a right lower zone chest mass. The imaging and possible causes are considered. (orig.). With 3 figs

  2. Image processing in digital chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manninen, H.; Partanen, K.; Lehtovirta, J.; Matsi, P.; Soimakallio, S.

    1992-01-01

    The usefulness of digital image processing of chest radiographs was evaluated in a clinical study. In 54 patients, chest radiographs in the posteroanterior projection were obtained by both 14 inch digital image intensifier equipment and the conventional screen-film technique. The digital radiographs (512x512 image format) viewed on a 625 line monitor were processed in 3 different ways: 1.standard display; 2.digital edge enhancement for the standard display; 3.inverse intensity display. The radiographs were interpreted independently by 3 radiologists. Diagnoses were confirmed by CT, follow-up radiographs and clinical records. Chest abnormalities of the films analyzed included 21 primary lung tumors, 44 pulmonary nodules, 16 cases with mediastinal disease, 17 with pneumonia /atelectasis. Interstitial lung disease, pleural plaques, and pulmonary emphysema were found in 30, 18 and 19 cases respectively. Sensitivity of conventional radiography when averaged overall findings was better than that of digital techniques (P<0.001). Differences in diagnostic accuracy measured by sensitivity and specificity between the 3 digital display modes were small. Standard image display showed better sensitivity for pulmonary nodules (0.74 vs 0.66; P<0.05) but poorer specificity for pulmonary emphysema (0.85 vs 0.93; P<0.05) compared with inverse intensity display. It is concluded that when using 512x512 image format, the routine use of digital edge enhancement and tone reversal at digital chest radiographs is not warranted. (author). 12 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  3. The difference in the appearance of proximal humeral epiphyseal ossification center on chest radiograph between the preterm and full-term infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Hong; Kim, Seung Cheol; Chang, Young Pyo; Park, Jin Young; Kwon, Ho Jang; Lee, Jee Young; Yoo, Dong Soo; Kim, You Me; Jeong, Chun Keun; Lee, Young Seok

    1997-01-01

    To assess the difference in the appearance of the proximal humeral epiphyseal ossification center, as seen on chest radiograph, between preterm and full-term infants at the same corrected ages. Forty two preterm infants born at 26--35 weeks of gestational age and 218 normal full-term infants born at 38-42 weeks were investigated. Because of various perinatal problems, the preterm infants were treated at a neonatal intensive care unit. Proximal humeral epiphyseal ossification centers were evaluated from chest radiographs, and in cases of preterm infants, the corrected age of 0 month was defined as postconceptional 40 weeks. In preterm infants, the numbers of chest radiographs obtained were 42 at 0 month, 40 at 1 month, 37 at 2 months and 36 at 3 months of corrected age, while in those who were full-term, the numbers were 103 cases at 0 month, 42 at 1 month, 42 at 2 months and 31 at 3 months of age In the preterm group, alkaline phosphatase, calcium, phosphorus levels and simple wrist radiographs were checked. We then evaluated the difference of appearance of the proximal humeral epiphyseal ossification center between preterm and full-term infants at the same corrected ages, as well as the difference between causative diseases, between the normal and abnormal serologic group and between the normal and abnormal wrist group in preterm infants at the same corrected ages. Using Fisher's exact test, the data were analysed. The incidences of the proximal humeral epiphyseal ossification center in preterm infants were 2.4% (1/42) at 0 month, 20.0% (8/40) at 1 month, 43.2% (16/37) at 2 months and 69.4%(25/36) at 3 months; in full-term infants, the figures were 24.3% (25/103) at 0 month, 66.7%(28/42) at 1 month, 83.3% (35/42) at 2 months and 90.3% (28/31) at 3 months. At 0, 1, and 2 months, the incidences were thus seen to be lower in preterm than in full-term infants(p 0.05). In preterm infants, there were no statistical differences between causative diseases, between the

  4. [Comparison of LCD and CRT monitors for detection of pulmonary nodules and interstitial lung diseases on digital chest radiographs by using receiver operating characteristic analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Ryuji; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Shimonobou, Toshiaki; Hiai, Yasuhiro; Hashida, Masahiro; Awai, Kazuo; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Doi, Kunio

    2006-05-20

    Soft copy reading of digital images has been practiced commonly in the PACS environment. In this study, we compared liquid-crystal display (LCD) and cathode-ray tube (CRT) monitors for detection of pulmonary nodules and interstitial lung diseases on digital chest radiographs by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Digital chest images with a 1000x1000 matrix size and a 8 bit grayscale were displayed on LCD/CRT monitor with 2M pixels in each observer test. Eight and ten radiologists participated in the observer tests for detection of nodules and interstitial diseases, respectively. In each observer test, radiologists marked their confidence levels for diagnosis of pulmonary nodules or interstitial diseases. The detection performance of radiologists was evaluated by ROC analyses. The average Az values (area under the ROC curve) in detecting pulmonary nodules with LCD and CRT monitors were 0.792 and 0.814, respectively. In addition, the average Az values in detecting interstitial diseases with LCD and CRT monitors were 0.951 and 0.953, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between LCD and CRT for both detection of pulmonary nodules (P=0.522) and interstitial lung diseases (P=0.869). Therefore, we believe that the LCD monitor instead of the CRT monitor can be used for the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules and interstitial lung diseases in digital chest images.

  5. Radiographic evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The author describes how to: perform a systematic evaluation of a chest radiograph; state the classic radiographic description of hyaline membrane disease; list the conditions that cause hyperaeration and describe the radiologic feature of hyperaeration; describe the radiograph of a patient with a congenital diaphragmatic hernia; identify optimum placement of an endotracheal tube, gastric feeding tube, and umbilical artery catheter on a radiograph; differentiate between pulmonary interstitial air and hyaline membrane disease; select radiographic features that would indicate the presence of a tension pneumothorax; describe a lateral decubitus projection and state the type of problem it is most often used to identify; explain the procedure used in obtaining a lateral neck radiograph and list two problems that may require this view; and describe the radiograph of a patient with cystic fibrosis

  6. Tibia-based referencing for standard proximal tibial radiographs during intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; Choxi, Ankeet A; Dhulipala, Sravan C; Evans, Jason M; Mir, Hassan R

    2013-11-01

    Limited information exists to define standard tibial radiographs. The purpose of this study was to define new landmarks on the proximal tibia for standard anteroposterior and lateral radiographs. In 10 cadaveric knees, fibular head bisection was considered the anteroposterior image, and femoral condyle overlap the lateral image. In another 10 knees, a "twin peaks" anteroposterior view, showing the sharpest profile of the tibial spines, was used. The "flat plateau" lateral image was obtained by aligning the femoral condyles then applying a varus adjustment with overlap of the tibial plateaus. Medial peritendinous approaches were performed, and an entry reamer used to open the medullary canal. A priori analysis showed good to excellent intra-/inter-observer reliability with the new technique (intra-class correlation coefficient ICC 0.61-0.90). The "twin peaks" anteroposterior radiograph was externally rotated 2.7±2.1° compared to the standard radiograph with fibular head bisection. Portal position and incidence of damage to intra-articular structures did not significantly differ between groups (P>.05). The "twin peaks" anteroposterior view and "flat plateau" lateral view can safely be used for nail entry portal creation in the anatomic safe zone. Tibia-based radiographic referencing is useful for intramedullary nailing cases in which knee or proximal tibiofibular joint anatomy is altered.

  7. Reliability of linear distance measurement for dental implant length with standardized periapical radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakoh, Mamoru; Harada, Takuya; Otonari, Takamichi

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of distance measurements of implant length based on periapical radiographs compared with that of other modalities. We carried out an experimental trial to compare precision in distance measurement. Dental implant fixtures were buried in the canine and first molar regions. These were then subjected to periapical (PE) radiography, panoramic (PA) radiography conventional (CV) and medical computed (CT) tomography. The length of the implant fixture on each film was measured by nine observers and degree of precision was statistically analyzed. The precision of both PE radiographs and CT tomograms was closest at the highest level. Standardized PE radiography, in particular, was superior to CT tomography in the first molar region. This suggests that standardized PE radiographs should be utilized as a reliable modality for longitudinal and linear distance measurement, depending on implant length at local implantation site. (author)

  8. Review and evaluation of technology, equipment, codes and standards for digitization of industrial radiographic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    This reports contains a review and evaluation of the technology, equipment, and codes and standards related to the digitization of industrial radiographic film. The report presents recommendations and equipment-performance specifications that will allow the digitization of radiographic film from nuclear power plant components in order to produce faithful reproductions of flaw images of interest on the films. Justification for the specifications selected are provided. Performance demonstration tests for the digitization process are required and criteria for such tests is presented. Also several comments related to implementation of the technology are presented and discussed

  9. An automated patient recognition method based on an image-matching technique using previous chest radiographs in the picture archiving and communication system environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Junji; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Kondo, Keisuke; Doi, Kunio

    2001-01-01

    An automated patient recognition method for correcting 'wrong' chest radiographs being stored in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) environment has been developed. The method is based on an image-matching technique that uses previous chest radiographs. For identification of a 'wrong' patient, the correlation value was determined for a previous image of a patient and a new, current image of the presumed corresponding patient. The current image was shifted horizontally and vertically and rotated, so that we could determine the best match between the two images. The results indicated that the correlation values between the current and previous images for the same, 'correct' patients were generally greater than those for different, 'wrong' patients. Although the two histograms for the same patient and for different patients overlapped at correlation values greater than 0.80, most parts of the histograms were separated. The correlation value was compared with a threshold value that was determined based on an analysis of the histograms of correlation values obtained for the same patient and for different patients. If the current image is considered potentially to belong to a 'wrong' patient, then a warning sign with the probability for a 'wrong' patient is provided to alert radiology personnel. Our results indicate that at least half of the 'wrong' images in our database can be identified correctly with the method described in this study. The overall performance in terms of a receiver operating characteristic curve showed a high performance of the system. The results also indicate that some readings of 'wrong' images for a given patient in the PACS environment can be prevented by use of the method we developed. Therefore an automated warning system for patient recognition would be useful in correcting 'wrong' images being stored in the PACS environment

  10. Radiographic findings in immunodeficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obregon, R.; Lynch, D.A.; Cink, T.M.; Newell, J.D.; Kirkpatrick, C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the chest radiographs and high-resolution CT (HRCT) scans in patients with immunodeficiency disorders and define the role of HRCT. Thirty-three cases were retrospectively graded according to the consensus of two radiologists. Patients with HIV seropositivity and asthma were excluded. HRCT was performed in 12 cases with standard techniques. Diagnoses included common variable hypogammaglobulinemia (n = 19), X-linked agammaglobulinemia (n = 4), chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (n = 4), and selective immunoglobulin g deficiencies (n = 2). Chest radiographs showed bronchiectasis in 11 of 33 cases with a predominant lower lobe distribution (82%). Nodules were present in six cases and mucus plugs in four cases. HRCT showed bronchiectasis in nine of 12 cases; in five of these nine cases, bronchiectasis was not apparent on chest radiographs. Other HRCT findings included segmental air trapping (four of 12), mucus plugs (three of 12), hazy consolidation (four of 12), nodules (five of 12), and bronchiolectasis (two of 12). Therapy was altered in seven of 12 cases in which HRCT was performed. Most pertinent to clinical management were the presence of a thymoma (n = 1) and severe focal of diffuse bronchiectasis

  11. Lateral chest radiographic findings in lobar collapse of the left lung : the distance between both upper lobe bronchi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, G. H.; Sung, D. W.; Yoon, Y.; Kim, H. C.

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the distance between both upper love bronchi on lateral radiographs and its change in left upper or lower lobe collapse. 144 true lateral radiographs were analyzed on which both upper lobe bronchi were clearly identified. They included 116 normal cases, 11 cases of left upper lobe collapse, 13 of left lower lobe collapse, and 4 cases of left lower lobe lobectomy. Line A was drawn parallel to the vertebral end plate through the upper margin of the lift upper lobe bronchus. Line B was drawn parallel to line A through the upper margin of the right upper love bronchus. The shortest distance between line A and line B was measured as the distance between both upper lobe bronchi. In normal cases, the mean value of the distance was 2.19 cm ± S.D. 0.37 cm on right and on right and 2.16 cm ± S.D. 0.40 cm on left lateral radiographs ; these results were not significantly different(P=0.79). In cases of collapse, the mean value of the distance was 0.43 cm ± S.D. 0.99 cm in upper lobe collapse and 3.56 cm ± S.D. 0.72 cm in lower lobe collapse, results which were significantly different from those of normal cases(p<0.01). In eight cases(73%) of left upper lobe collapse, the distance was less than 1 cm and in 10 cases(77%) of left lower lobe collapse, the distance was more than 3 cm. The distance between both upper lobe bronchi varies markedly in case of lobar collapse. A distance of less than 1 cm suggests collapse of the left upper lobe and a distance more than 3 cm suggests collapse of the left lower lobe

  12. Paired maximum inspiratory and expiratory plain chest radiographs for assessment of airflow limitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Takashi, E-mail: tkino@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Kawayama, Tomotaka, E-mail: kawayama_tomotaka@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Imamura, Youhei, E-mail: mamura_youhei@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Sakazaki, Yuki, E-mail: sakazaki@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Hirai, Ryo, E-mail: hirai_ryou@kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Ishii, Hidenobu, E-mail: shii_hidenobu@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Suetomo, Masashi, E-mail: jin_t_f_c@yahoo.co.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Matsunaga, Kazuko, E-mail: kmatsunaga@kouhoukai.or.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Azuma, Koichi, E-mail: azuma@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Fujimoto, Kiminori, E-mail: kimichan@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Hoshino, Tomoaki, E-mail: hoshino@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •It is often to use computed tomography (CT) scan for diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. •CT scan is more expensive and higher. •A plane chest radiography more simple and cheap. Moreover, it is useful as detection of pulmonary emphysema, but not airflow limitation. •Our study demonstrated that the maximum inspiratory and expiratory plane chest radiography technique could detect severe airflow limitations. •We believe that the technique is helpful to diagnose the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. -- Abstract: Background: The usefulness of paired maximum inspiratory and expiratory (I/E) plain chest radiography (pCR) for diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is still unclear. Objectives: We examined whether measurement of the I/E ratio using paired I/E pCR could be used for detection of airflow limitation in patients with COPD. Methods: Eighty patients with COPD (GOLD stage I = 23, stage II = 32, stage III = 15, stage IV = 10) and 34 control subjects were enrolled. The I/E ratios of frontal and lateral lung areas, and lung distance between the apex and base on pCR views were analyzed quantitatively. Pulmonary function parameters were measured at the same time. Results: The I/E ratios for the frontal lung area (1.25 ± 0.01), the lateral lung area (1.29 ± 0.01), and the lung distance (1.18 ± 0.01) were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in COPD patients compared with controls (1.31 ± 0.02 and 1.38 ± 0.02, and 1.22 ± 0.01, respectively). The I/E ratios in frontal and lateral areas, and lung distance were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in severe (GOLD stage III) and very severe (GOLD stage IV) COPD as compared to control subjects, although the I/E ratios did not differ significantly between severe and very severe COPD. Moreover, the I/E ratios were significantly correlated with pulmonary function parameters. Conclusions: Measurement of I/E ratios on paired I/E pCR is simple and

  13. Computer-aided diagnostic scheme for the detection of lung nodules on chest radiographs: Localized search method based on anatomical classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Junji; Li Qiang; Suzuki, Kenji; Engelmann, Roger; Doi, Kunio

    2006-01-01

    We developed an advanced computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme for the detection of various types of lung nodules on chest radiographs intended for implementation in clinical situations. We used 924 digitized chest images (992 noncalcified nodules) which had a 500x500 matrix size with a 1024 gray scale. The images were divided randomly into two sets which were used for training and testing of the computerized scheme. In this scheme, the lung field was first segmented by use of a ribcage detection technique, and then a large search area (448x448 matrix size) within the chest image was automatically determined by taking into account the locations of a midline and a top edge of the segmented ribcage. In order to detect lung nodule candidates based on a localized search method, we divided the entire search area into 7x7 regions of interest (ROIs: 64x64 matrix size). In the next step, each ROI was classified anatomically into apical, peripheral, hilar, and diaphragm/heart regions by use of its image features. Identification of lung nodule candidates and extraction of image features were applied for each localized region (128x128 matrix size), each having its central part (64x64 matrix size) located at a position corresponding to a ROI that was classified anatomically in the previous step. Initial candidates were identified by use of the nodule-enhanced image obtained with the average radial-gradient filtering technique, in which the filter size was varied adaptively depending on the location and the anatomical classification of the ROI. We extracted 57 image features from the original and nodule-enhanced images based on geometric, gray-level, background structure, and edge-gradient features. In addition, 14 image features were obtained from the corresponding locations in the contralateral subtraction image. A total of 71 image features were employed for three sequential artificial neural networks (ANNs) in order to reduce the number of false-positive candidates. All

  14. Reduced-dose chest CT with 3D automatic exposure control vs. standard chest CT: Quantitative assessment of emphysematous changes in smokers’ lung parenchyma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Hisanobu; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Yamazaki, Youichi; Matsumoto, Keiko; Onishi, Yumiko; Takenaka, Daisuke; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Nishio, Mizuho; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Murase, Kenya; Nishimura, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the capability of reduced-dose chest CT with three-dimensional (3D) automatic exposure control (AEC) on quantitative assessment of emphysematous change in smoker’ lung parenchyma, compared to standard chest CT. Methods: Twenty consecutive smoker patients (mean age 62.8 years) underwent CT examinations using a standard protocol (150 mAs) and a protocol with 3D-AEC. In this study, the targeted standard deviations number was set to 160. For quantitative assessment of emphysematous change in lung parenchyma in each subject using the standard protocol, a percentage of voxels less than −950 HU in the lung (%LAA −950 ) was calculated. The 3D-AEC protocol's %LAA was computed from of voxel percentages under selected threshold CT value. The differences of radiation doses between these two protocols were evaluated, and %LAAs −950 was compared with the 3D-AEC protocol %LAAs. Results: Mean dose length products were 780.2 ± 145.5 mGy cm (standard protocol), and 192.0 ± 95.9 (3D-AEC protocol). There was significant difference between them (paired Student's t test, p −950 and 3D-AEC protocol %LAAs. In adopting the feasible threshold CT values of the 3D-AEC protocol, the 3D-AEC protocol %LAAs were significantly correlated with %LAAs −950 (r = 0.98, p < 0.001) and limits of agreement from Bland–Altman analysis was 0.52 ± 4.3%. Conclusions: Changing threshold CT values demonstrated that reduced-dose chest CT with 3D-AEC can substitute for the standard protocol in assessments of emphysematous change in smoker’ lung parenchyma.

  15. Diagnosing pulmonary edema: lung ultrasound versus chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Jennifer L; Noble, Vicki E; Liteplo, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    Diagnosing the underlying cause of acute dyspnea can be challenging. Lung ultrasound may help to identify pulmonary edema as a possible cause. To evaluate the ability of residents to recognize pulmonary edema on lung ultrasound using chest radiographs as a comparison standard. This is a prospective, blinded, observational study of a convenience sample of resident physicians in the Departments of Emergency Medicine (EM), Internal Medicine (IM), and Radiology. Residents were given a tutorial on interpreting pulmonary edema on both chest radiograph and lung ultrasound. They were then shown both ultrasounds and chest radiographs from 20 patients who had presented to the emergency department with dyspnea, 10 with a primary diagnosis of pulmonary edema, and 10 with alternative diagnoses. Cohen's κ values were calculated to describe the strength of the correlation between resident and gold standard interpretations. Participants included 20 EM, 20 IM, and 20 Radiology residents. The overall agreement with gold standard interpretation of pulmonary edema on lung ultrasound (74%, κ = 0.51, 95% confidence interval 0.46-0.55) was superior to chest radiographs (58%, κ = 0.25, 95% confidence interval 0.20-0.30) (P pulmonary edema with lung ultrasound than with chest radiograph. Physicians with minimal exposure to lung ultrasound may be able to correctly recognize pulmonary edema on lung ultrasound.

  16. Comparison of conventional and standardized bone densitometry around implants in periapical radiographs during a three months period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asieh Zamani Naser

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The average density obtained at different stages in the standard densitometry showed a gradual increase in the bone density in the entire process. Standardising the patient′s consecutive radiographic images is essential for quantitative measurements over the time.

  17. A Bayesian framework for automated cardiovascular risk scoring on standard lumbar radiographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Peter Kersten; Ganz, Melanie; Mysling, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present a fully automated framework for scoring a patients risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality from a standard lateral radiograph of the lumbar aorta. The framework segments abdominal aortic calcifications for computing a CVD risk score and performs a survival analysis to validate...... the score. Since the aorta is invisible on X-ray images, its position is reasoned from (1) the shape and location of the lumbar vertebrae and (2) the location, shape, and orientation of potential calcifications. The proposed framework follows the principle of Bayesian inference, which has several advantages...

  18. Detection of proximal caries with high-resolution and standard resolution digital radiographic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkhout, W E R; Verheij, J G C; Syriopoulos, K; Li, G; Sanderink, G C H; van der Stelt, P F

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to: (1) compare the diagnostic accuracy of the high-resolution and standard resolution settings of four digital imaging systems for caries diagnosis and (2) compare the effect on the diagnostic accuracy of reducing the high-resolution image sizes to the standard resolution dimensions, and vice versa. 90 extracted human premolars were mounted in groups of 5 in plaster blocks, containing 4 test teeth and 1 non-test tooth. Two blocks at a time were placed in a jig to simulate a bitewing radiograph. Radiographs were taken using four digital systems (Planmeca Dixi 2; Gendex Visualix HDI; Dürr Vistascan; Digora Optime), each at two resolution settings. Next, the teeth were sectioned and a total of 65 surfaces were incorporated in the study. Additionally, the bicubic interpolation method was applied to reduce the high-resolution original images and to enlarge the standard resolution images. The original, reduced and enlarged images were randomly shown to five observers in two random sessions. The observers were asked to assess caries depth on a 4-point scale. The observers' scores were compared with the results from a histological examination. Data were analysed using the statistical theory for multivariate discrete data. Cohen's kappa was used to determine the agreement with the gold standard. None of the comparisons between the spatial resolution settings, or the comparisons between increased or reduced image size and the original image sizes, showed significant differences in the probability of caries detection (chi2=26.59, df=26, P approximately 0.50). The four digital systems used in this study differ significantly in the probability of caries detection (chi2=41.55, df=24, PCaries diagnosis does not improve when using high-resolution settings compared with the standard settings. The use of bicubic convolution interpolation for zooming has no detectable effect on caries diagnosis and therefore is recommended to use when enlarging or reducing

  19. Classification of radiological errors in chest radiographs, using support vector machine on the spatial frequency features of false- negative and false-positive regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Donovan, Tim; Brennan, Patrick C.; Dix, Alan; Manning, David J.

    2011-03-01

    Aim: To optimize automated classification of radiological errors during lung nodule detection from chest radiographs (CxR) using a support vector machine (SVM) run on the spatial frequency features extracted from the local background of selected regions. Background: The majority of the unreported pulmonary nodules are visually detected but not recognized; shown by the prolonged dwell time values at false-negative regions. Similarly, overestimated nodule locations are capturing substantial amounts of foveal attention. Spatial frequency properties of selected local backgrounds are correlated with human observer responses either in terms of accuracy in indicating abnormality position or in the precision of visual sampling the medical images. Methods: Seven radiologists participated in the eye tracking experiments conducted under conditions of pulmonary nodule detection from a set of 20 postero-anterior CxR. The most dwelled locations have been identified and subjected to spatial frequency (SF) analysis. The image-based features of selected ROI were extracted with un-decimated Wavelet Packet Transform. An analysis of variance was run to select SF features and a SVM schema was implemented to classify False-Negative and False-Positive from all ROI. Results: A relative high overall accuracy was obtained for each individually developed Wavelet-SVM algorithm, with over 90% average correct ratio for errors recognition from all prolonged dwell locations. Conclusion: The preliminary results show that combined eye-tracking and image-based features can be used for automated detection of radiological error with SVM. The work is still in progress and not all analytical procedures have been completed, which might have an effect on the specificity of the algorithm.

  20. Separation of bones from chest radiographs by means of anatomically specific multiple massive-training ANNs combined with total variation minimization smoothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng Chen; Suzuki, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Most lung nodules that are missed by radiologists as well as computer-aided detection (CADe) schemes overlap with ribs or clavicles in chest radiographs (CXRs). The purpose of this study was to separate bony structures such as ribs and clavicles from soft tissue in CXRs. To achieve this, we developed anatomically specific multiple massive-training artificial neural networks (MTANNs) combined with total variation (TV) minimization smoothing and a histogram-matching-based consistency improvement method. The anatomically specific multiple MTANNs were designed to separate bones from soft tissue in different anatomic segments of the lungs. Each of the MTANNs was trained with the corresponding anatomic segment in the teaching bone images. The output segmental images from the multiple MTANNs were merged to produce an entire bone image. TV minimization smoothing was applied to the bone image for reduction of noise while preserving edges. This bone image was then subtracted from the original CXR to produce a soft-tissue image where bones were separated out. This new method was compared with conventional MTANNs with a database of 110 CXRs with nodules. Our new anatomically specific MTANNs separated rib edges, ribs close to the lung wall, and the clavicles from soft tissue in CXRs to a substantially higher level than did the conventional MTANNs, while the conspicuity of lung nodules and vessels was maintained. Thus, our technique for bone-soft-tissue separation by means of our new MTANNs would be potentially useful for radiologists as well as CADe schemes in detection of lung nodules on CXRs.

  1. Computer-aided diagnosis in chest radiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginneken, B. van

    2001-01-01

    Chest radiographs account for more than half of all radiological examinations; the chest is the “mirror of health and disease”. This thesis is about techniques for computer analysis of chest radiographs. It describes methods for texture analysis and segmenting the lung fields and rib cage in a

  2. Preliminary report from the World Health Organisation Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Nasreen; Fancourt, Nicholas; de Campo, John; de Campo, Margaret; Akano, Aliu; Cherian, Thomas; Cohen, Olivia G; Greenberg, David; Lacey, Stephen; Kohli, Neera; Lederman, Henrique M; Madhi, Shabir A; Manduku, Veronica; McCollum, Eric D; Park, Kate; Ribo-Aristizabal, Jose Luis; Bar-Zeev, Naor; O'Brien, Katherine L; Mulholland, Kim

    2017-10-01

    Childhood pneumonia is among the leading infectious causes of mortality in children younger than 5 years of age globally. Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is the leading infectious cause of childhood bacterial pneumonia. The diagnosis of childhood pneumonia remains a critical epidemiological task for monitoring vaccine and treatment program effectiveness. The chest radiograph remains the most readily available and common imaging modality to assess childhood pneumonia. In 1997, the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group was established to provide a consensus method for the standardized definition for the interpretation of pediatric frontal chest radiographs, for use in bacterial vaccine efficacy trials in children. The definition was not designed for use in individual patient clinical management because of its emphasis on specificity at the expense of sensitivity. These definitions and endpoint conclusions were published in 2001 and an analysis of observer variation for these conclusions using a reference library of chest radiographs was published in 2005. In response to the technical needs identified through subsequent meetings, the World Health Organization Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies (CRES) project was initiated and is designed to be a continuation of the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group. The aims of the World Health Organization CRES project are to clarify the definitions used in the World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of pediatric chest radiographs in bacterial vaccine impact and pneumonia epidemiological studies, reinforce the focus on reproducible chest radiograph readings, provide training and support with World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of chest radiographs and develop guidelines and tools for investigators and site staff to assist in obtaining high-quality chest radiographs.

  3. Preliminary report from the World Health Organisation Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahomed, Nasreen; Fancourt, Nicholas; De Campo, John; De Campo, Margaret; Akano, Aliu; Cherian, Thomas; Cohen, Olivia G.; Greenberg, David; Lacey, Stephen; Kohli, Neera; Lederman, Henrique M.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Manduku, Veronica; McCollum, Eric D.; Park, Kate; Ribo-Aristizabal, Jose Luis; Bar-Zeev, Naor; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Mulholland, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Childhood pneumonia is among the leading infectious causes of mortality in children younger than 5 years of age globally. Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is the leading infectious cause of childhood bacterial pneumonia. The diagnosis of childhood pneumonia remains a critical epidemiological task for monitoring vaccine and treatment program effectiveness. The chest radiograph remains the most readily available and common imaging modality to assess childhood pneumonia. In 1997, the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group was established to provide a consensus method for the standardized definition for the interpretation of pediatric frontal chest radiographs, for use in bacterial vaccine efficacy trials in children. The definition was not designed for use in individual patient clinical management because of its emphasis on specificity at the expense of sensitivity. These definitions and endpoint conclusions were published in 2001 and an analysis of observer variation for these conclusions using a reference library of chest radiographs was published in 2005. In response to the technical needs identified through subsequent meetings, the World Health Organization Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies (CRES) project was initiated and is designed to be a continuation of the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group. The aims of the World Health Organization CRES project are to clarify the definitions used in the World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of pediatric chest radiographs in bacterial vaccine impact and pneumonia epidemiological studies, reinforce the focus on reproducible chest radiograph readings, provide training and support with World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of chest radiographs and develop guidelines and tools for investigators and site staff to assist in obtaining high-quality chest radiographs. (orig.)

  4. Preliminary report from the World Health Organisation Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahomed, Nasreen [University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Radiology, Johannesburg (South Africa); University of the Witwatersrand, Medical Research Council: Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit, Johannesburg (South Africa); Fancourt, Nicholas [Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore (United States); Murdoch Children' s Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); De Campo, John; De Campo, Margaret [Murdoch Children' s Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Melbourne University, Melbourne (Australia); Akano, Aliu [Department of Radiology National Hospital, Abuja (Nigeria); Medical Research Council, Gambia (South Africa); Cherian, Thomas [World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland); Cohen, Olivia G. [Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore (United States); World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland); Greenberg, David [Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Lacey, Stephen [Murdoch Children' s Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Kohli, Neera [King George Medical University, Lucknow (India); Lederman, Henrique M. [Paulista School of Medicine, Hospital Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Madhi, Shabir A. [University of the Witwatersrand, Medical Research Council: Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit, Johannesburg (South Africa); University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Science and Technology/National Research Foundation: Vaccine Preventable Diseases, Johannesburg (South Africa); Manduku, Veronica [Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), Nairobi (Kenya); McCollum, Eric D. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Eudowood Division of Pediatric Respiratory Sciences, Baltimore (United States); Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore (United States); Park, Kate [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford (United Kingdom); Ribo-Aristizabal, Jose Luis [Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona (Spain); Bar-Zeev, Naor [University of Malawi, Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, College of Medicine, Blantyre (Malawi); University of Liverpool, Centre for Global Vaccine Research, Liverpool (United Kingdom); O' Brien, Katherine L. [Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore (United States); Mulholland, Kim [Murdoch Children' s Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-15

    Childhood pneumonia is among the leading infectious causes of mortality in children younger than 5 years of age globally. Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is the leading infectious cause of childhood bacterial pneumonia. The diagnosis of childhood pneumonia remains a critical epidemiological task for monitoring vaccine and treatment program effectiveness. The chest radiograph remains the most readily available and common imaging modality to assess childhood pneumonia. In 1997, the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group was established to provide a consensus method for the standardized definition for the interpretation of pediatric frontal chest radiographs, for use in bacterial vaccine efficacy trials in children. The definition was not designed for use in individual patient clinical management because of its emphasis on specificity at the expense of sensitivity. These definitions and endpoint conclusions were published in 2001 and an analysis of observer variation for these conclusions using a reference library of chest radiographs was published in 2005. In response to the technical needs identified through subsequent meetings, the World Health Organization Chest Radiography in Epidemiological Studies (CRES) project was initiated and is designed to be a continuation of the World Health Organization Radiology Working Group. The aims of the World Health Organization CRES project are to clarify the definitions used in the World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of pediatric chest radiographs in bacterial vaccine impact and pneumonia epidemiological studies, reinforce the focus on reproducible chest radiograph readings, provide training and support with World Health Organization defined standardized interpretation of chest radiographs and develop guidelines and tools for investigators and site staff to assist in obtaining high-quality chest radiographs. (orig.)

  5. Carotid artery calcification in ischemic stroke patients detected in standard dental panoramic radiographs - a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christou, P.; Kiliaridis, S.; Leemann, B.; Schimmel, M.; Muller, F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Examine the prevalence of carotid artery calcifications in standard dental panoramic radiographs (OPT), their association to gender, medical history and oral status. Assess the predictive value of a dental OPT in early diagnosis of carotid artery calcifications. Material and Methods: Fourteen patients admitted to Geneva University Hospital for recent ischemic stroke and stenosis of the carotid artery confirmed by Duplex sonography. All OPTs were digitised and subsequently assessed independently by two operators. Results: From 21 carotid artery calcifications detected with Doppler sonography 15 were visible on the corresponding OPT, most of them on the right side (n=11). No correlation was found between the side of calcification and cerebral lesion. Hypertension and periodontal disease were the most prevalent cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusions: Dentists who either detect carotid artery calcifications in OPTs or see patients with severe periodontitis should consider a prophylactic specialist examination. (authors)

  6. Large mediastinal tumor mass as a prognostic factor in Hodgkin's lymphoma. Is the definition on the basis of a chest radiograph in the era of CT obsolete?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, J.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Mueller, R.P. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Mueller, H.; Engert, A. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Medical Oncology; Kuhnert, G.; Kobe, C. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The risk factor 'large mediastinal tumor mass' is an internationally accepted unfavorable prognostic factor in the staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The definition of this risk factor varies considerably between large cooperative study groups. The purpose of the present analysis was to determine to which degree data obtained from chest radiograph (CRX) give the same results as those from CT scans (CT). Methods: A total of 145 de novo HL patients in early unfavorable and advanced stages were included in this study. A total of 94 patients had a large mediastinal tumor mass according to the guidelines of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG), while 51 had mediastinal lymph node involvement only. The size of mediastinal involvement and the thoracic diameter were measured on CRX and CT. Agreement between CRX and CT was determined by sensitivity and specificity analysis as well as descriptive statistics and correlations. Results: The correlation of the diameters on CRX with those of CT was 0.95 for the tumor size and 0.77 for the thoracic diameter. The diagnostic decision - large mediastinal mass or not - correlated with 0.81 between CRX and CT and was identical in 90.3% of cases. The sensitivity was 0.87 and the specificity 0.96 for CRX, which is considered the current standard. Conclusion: The results show that there is a high agreement between the measurements of CRX and CT. Diagnosis of a large mediastinal mass disagreed in 10% of patients. Since the correct diagnosis of this risk factor is decisive for the adequate multimodal treatment choice, CRX should not be omitted. (orig.)

  7. Algorithm for optimisation of paediatric chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostova-Lefterova, D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to assess the current practice and patient doses in paediatric chest radiography in a large university hospital. The X-ray unit is used in the paediatric department for respiratory diseases. Another purpose was to recommend and apply optimized protocols to reduce patient dose while maintaining diagnostic image quality for the x-ray images. The practice of two different radiographers was studied. The results were compared with the existing practice in paediatric chest radiography and the opportunities for optimization were identified in order to reduce patient doses. A methodology was developed for optimization of the x-ray examinations by grouping children in age groups or according to other appropriate indication and creating an algorithm for proper selection of the exposure parameters for each group. The algorithm for the optimisation of paediatric chest radiography reduced patient doses (PKA, organ dose, effective dose) between 1.5 and 6 times for the different age groups, the average glandular dose up to 10 times and the dose for the lung between 2 and 5 times. The resulting X-ray images were of good diagnostic quality. The subjectivity in the choice of exposure parameters was reduced and standardization has been achieved in the work of the radiographers. The role of the radiologist, the medical physicist and radiographer in the process of optimization was shown. It was proven the effect of teamwork in reducing patient doses at keeping adequate image quality. Key words: Chest Radiography. Paediatric Radiography. Optimization. Radiation Exposure. Radiation Protection

  8. Estimation of entrance dose on chest radiographs according to the exposure index on Computerized Radiology System: preliminary results; Estimativa de dose de entrada a partir do indice de exposicao em sistema CR: resultados preliminares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donomai, Luana Kaoru; Jornada, Tiago da Silva; Daros, Kellen Adriana Curci, E-mail: luana.donomai@gmail.com, E-mail: tiagosjornada@gmail.com, E-mail: daros.kellen@unifesp.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Digital radiology has improved image quality in radiographs in comparison to screen/film systems though the visual control of the quantity of radiation involved on these exams became more demanding due to the low perception of over and underexposed images. Therefore, this study aims to analyze the exposure index (EI) from chest examinations and relate them to the entrance skin dose. Indices from 29 patients and kerma entrance dose were correlated. A correlation coefficient equal to 0,6881 was calculated. EI and entrance dose are correlated positive and moderately, indicating the relevance to deepen the subject. (author)

  9. Digital platform for improving non-radiologists' and radiologists' interpretation of chest radiographs for suspected tuberculosis - a method for supporting task-shifting in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semakula-Katende, Namakula S.; Lucas, Susan [University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Witwatersrand (South Africa); Andronikou, Savvas [University of Bristol, Department of Radiology/CRIC Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    Shifting X-ray interpretation to non-radiologists can help to address radiologist shortages in developing countries. To determine the change in accuracy of non-radiologists and radiologists for the radiographic diagnosis of paediatric tuberculosis after a short skill-development course. Participants interpreted 15 paediatric chest radiographs before and after a 30-minute course using three possible responses: (1) diagnostic for tuberculosis, (2) abnormal but inconclusive for diagnosis of tuberculosis and (3) normal. We compared proportions of correct diagnoses, sensitivity, and specificity, before and after the course. We included 256 participants comprising 229 non-radiologists (134 radiographers, 32 paediatricians, 39 Medecins Sans Frontieres clinicians and 24 physicians including paediatricians) and 27 radiologists. Mean change proportions of correct diagnosis ranged from -27% to 53% for individuals and 9% to 20% for groups. All groups showed a statistically significant improvement. Mean change in diagnostic sensitivity ranged from -38% to 100% for individuals and from 16% to 41% for groups. All groups showed a statistically significant improvement. Mean change in specificity ranged from -57% to 57% for individuals and from -15% to -4% for groups. The decrease was statistically significant for physicians, paediatricians and radiographers. The course resulted in increased correct diagnoses and improved sensitivity at the expense of specificity. (orig.)

  10. Digital platform for improving non-radiologists' and radiologists' interpretation of chest radiographs for suspected tuberculosis - a method for supporting task-shifting in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semakula-Katende, Namakula S.; Lucas, Susan; Andronikou, Savvas

    2016-01-01

    Shifting X-ray interpretation to non-radiologists can help to address radiologist shortages in developing countries. To determine the change in accuracy of non-radiologists and radiologists for the radiographic diagnosis of paediatric tuberculosis after a short skill-development course. Participants interpreted 15 paediatric chest radiographs before and after a 30-minute course using three possible responses: (1) diagnostic for tuberculosis, (2) abnormal but inconclusive for diagnosis of tuberculosis and (3) normal. We compared proportions of correct diagnoses, sensitivity, and specificity, before and after the course. We included 256 participants comprising 229 non-radiologists (134 radiographers, 32 paediatricians, 39 Medecins Sans Frontieres clinicians and 24 physicians including paediatricians) and 27 radiologists. Mean change proportions of correct diagnosis ranged from -27% to 53% for individuals and 9% to 20% for groups. All groups showed a statistically significant improvement. Mean change in diagnostic sensitivity ranged from -38% to 100% for individuals and from 16% to 41% for groups. All groups showed a statistically significant improvement. Mean change in specificity ranged from -57% to 57% for individuals and from -15% to -4% for groups. The decrease was statistically significant for physicians, paediatricians and radiographers. The course resulted in increased correct diagnoses and improved sensitivity at the expense of specificity. (orig.)

  11. Standard practice for determining relative image quality response of industrial radiographic imaging systems

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This standard provides a practice whereby industrial radiographic imaging systems may be comparatively assessed using the concept of relative image quality response (RIQR). The RIQR method presented within this practice is based upon the use of equivalent penetrameter sensitivity (EPS) described within Practice E 1025 and subsection 5.2 of this practice. Figure 1 illustrates a relative image quality indicator (RIQI) that has four different steel plaque thicknesses (.015, .010, .008, and .005 in.) sequentially positioned (from top to bottom) on a ¾-in. thick steel plate. The four plaques contain a total of 14 different arrays of penetrameter-type hole sizes designed to render varied conditions of threshold visibility ranging from 1.92 % EPS (at the top) to .94 % EPS (at the bottom) when exposed to nominal 200 keV X-ray radiation. Each “EPS” array consists of 30 identical holes; thus, providing the user with a quantity of threshold sensitivity levels suitable for relative image qualitative response com...

  12. X radiations dosimetry in pulmonary radiographs: study of a non standard room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bied, J.C.; Philippon, B.

    1998-01-01

    A radiograph room can present a default of radiation protection. But it is possible that the radiation protection is here only to mask a protection of an other type. For the case of a lungs type radiograph room, the monitoring does not reveal any problem of radiation protection. These results do not bring to the fore any high radiations doses. But they are an illustration of operators positions, and these ones should be better protected at the extremity of the room, that should allow a correct vision of lungs radiographs and a more important limitation of irradiation. (N.C.)

  13. Improved detection of focal pneumonia by chest radiography with bone suppression imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Feng; Engelmann, Roger; Pesce, Lorenzo; Armato, Samuel G.; MacMahon, Heber

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate radiologists' ability to detect focal pneumonia by use of standard chest radiographs alone compared with standard plus bone-suppressed chest radiographs. Standard chest radiographs in 36 patients with 46 focal airspace opacities due to pneumonia (10 patients had bilateral opacities) and 20 patients without focal opacities were included in an observer study. A bone suppression image processing system was applied to the 56 radiographs to create corresponding bone suppression images. In the observer study, eight observers, including six attending radiologists and two radiology residents, indicated their confidence level regarding the presence of a focal opacity compatible with pneumonia for each lung, first by use of standard images, then with the addition of bone suppression images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the observers' performance. The mean value of the area under the ROC curve (AUC) for eight observers was significantly improved from 0.844 with use of standard images alone to 0.880 with standard plus bone suppression images (P < 0.001) based on 46 positive lungs and 66 negative lungs. Use of bone suppression images improved radiologists' performance for detection of focal pneumonia on chest radiographs. (orig.)

  14. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Educational Programs for Radiographers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... for Accreditation of Educational Programs for Radiographers A. Description of the Profession The... classroom teaching and supervised clinical education; appoints faculty to the program; receives and... education shall be provided. 2. Laboratory. Energized laboratories utilized for teaching purposes shall be...

  15. CT of the chest in suspected child abuse using submillisievert radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Thomas R.; Seibert, J.A.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Lee, Justin S.; Coulter, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    The cornerstone of child abuse imaging is the skeletal survey, but initial imaging with radiographs may not demonstrate acute and non-displaced fractures, especially those involving the ribs. Given the high mortality of undiagnosed non-accidental trauma, timely diagnosis is crucial. CT is more sensitive in assessing rib fractures; however the effective radiation dose of a standard chest CT is high. We retrospectively identified four children (three boys, one girl; age range 1-4 months) admitted between January 2013 and February 2014 with high suspicion for non-accidental trauma from unexplained fractures of the long bones; these children all had CT of the chest when no rib fractures were evident on the skeletal survey. The absorbed radiation dose estimates for organs and tissue from the four-view chest radiographs and subsequent CT were determined using Monte Carlo photon transport software, and the effective dose was calculated using published tissue-weighting factors. In two children, CT showed multiple fractures of the ribs, scapula and vertebral body that were not evident on the initial skeletal survey. The average effective dose for a four-view chest radiograph across the four children was 0.29 mSv and the average effective dose for the chest CT was 0.56 mSv. Therefore the effective dose of a chest CT is on average less than twice that of a four-view chest radiograph. Our protocol thus shows that a reduced-dose chest CT may be useful in the evaluation of high specificity fractures of non-accidental trauma when the four-view chest radiographs are negative. (orig.)

  16. CT of the chest in suspected child abuse using submillisievert radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Thomas R.; Seibert, J.A.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca [Medical Center Children' s Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lee, Justin S. [University of California-Davis, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Coulter, Kevin P. [Medical Center Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The cornerstone of child abuse imaging is the skeletal survey, but initial imaging with radiographs may not demonstrate acute and non-displaced fractures, especially those involving the ribs. Given the high mortality of undiagnosed non-accidental trauma, timely diagnosis is crucial. CT is more sensitive in assessing rib fractures; however the effective radiation dose of a standard chest CT is high. We retrospectively identified four children (three boys, one girl; age range 1-4 months) admitted between January 2013 and February 2014 with high suspicion for non-accidental trauma from unexplained fractures of the long bones; these children all had CT of the chest when no rib fractures were evident on the skeletal survey. The absorbed radiation dose estimates for organs and tissue from the four-view chest radiographs and subsequent CT were determined using Monte Carlo photon transport software, and the effective dose was calculated using published tissue-weighting factors. In two children, CT showed multiple fractures of the ribs, scapula and vertebral body that were not evident on the initial skeletal survey. The average effective dose for a four-view chest radiograph across the four children was 0.29 mSv and the average effective dose for the chest CT was 0.56 mSv. Therefore the effective dose of a chest CT is on average less than twice that of a four-view chest radiograph. Our protocol thus shows that a reduced-dose chest CT may be useful in the evaluation of high specificity fractures of non-accidental trauma when the four-view chest radiographs are negative. (orig.)

  17. Transdiaphragmatic herniation of peritoneal dialysis fluid post Nissen`s operation: an unusual cause for a mass on the chest radiograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, D.; Hall, C.; Shaw, D. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Great Ormond Street, London, WC1N 3JH (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    A child on dialysis for chronic renal failure and who had had a Nissen`s fundoplication showed transdiaphragmatic herniation of the peritoneum simulating a right lower zone chest mass. The imaging and possible causes are considered. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  18. Advanced Imaging Reduces Cost Compared to Standard of Care in Emergency Department of Triage of Acute Chest Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Pamela S; Moore, Jhanna A; Poon, Michael

    2017-11-13

    To evaluate medical costs of novel therapies in complex medical settings using registry data. Primary data, from 2008 to 2010. We used patient registry data to evaluate cost and quality performance of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in triaging chest pain patients in our tertiary care emergency department and to model financial performance under Medicare's two midnight rule. Using generalized linear modeling, we retrospectively compared estimated expenditures for evaluation of low-to-intermediate-risk chest pain for demographic and medically risk matched samples of 894 patients each, triaged with CCTA or local standard of care (SOC) using Medicare reimbursement as a proxy. Predefined data elements were downloaded from the hospital mainframe into the CCTA registry, where they were validated and maintained electronically. We found that predicted standard of care costs were 2.5 times higher on the initial visit and 1.98 times higher over 30 days (p < .001) than those using CCTA. Predicted cost was 1.6 times higher when we applied our two midnight rule model (p < .001). Rapid assessment of treatment using registry data is a promising means of analyzing cost performance in complex health care environments. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  19. Use of newly developed standardized form for interpretation of high-resolution CT in screening for pneumoconiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julien, P.J.; Sider, L.; Silverman, J.M.; Dahlgren, J.; Harber, P.; Bunn, W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that although the International Labour Office (ILO) standard for interpretation of the posteroanterior chest radiograph has been available for 10 years, there has been no attempt to standardize the high-resolution CT (HRTC) readings for screening of pneumoconiosis. An integrated respirator surveillance program for 87 workers exposed to inorganic dust was conducted. This program consisted of a detailed occupational exposure history, physical symptoms and signs, spirometry, chest radiography, and HRCT. Two groups of workers with known exposure were studied with HRCT. Group 1 had normal spirometry results and chest radiographs, and group 2 had abnormalities at spirometry or on chest radiographs. The HRCT scans were read independently of the clinical findings and chest radiographs. The HRCT scans were interpreted by using an ILO-based standard form developed by the authors for this project. With the newly developed HRCT form, individual descriptive abnormality localized severity, and overall rating systems have been developed and compared for inter- and intraobserver consistency

  20. Estimation of absorbed dose by newborn patients subjected to chest radiographs; Estimativa de dose efetiva para radiografias do torax em pediatria neonatal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunick, Ana P. [Faculdades Pequeno Principe, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Schelin, Hugo R. [Instituto de Pesquisa Pele Pequeno Principe, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Denyak, Valeriy [Hospital Infantil Pequeno Principe, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is to present an estimate of the effective dose received by newborn patients hospitalized in NICU and subjected to X-ray examinations of the chest in the AP projection. Initially, were followed examinations chest X-rays performed on newborn patients and subsequently, simulated in a newborn simulator object. The ESAK values obtained by TLDs were used to calculate the effective dose obtained at each examination by Caldose{sub X} software. The estimated values for the effective dose in the simulated exams in this study range from 2,3μSv the 10,7μSv. The results achieved are, generally, inferior to those reported for similar previous studies. (author)

  1. CNEN-NN 6.04 standard adaptation in Brazil for industrial radiographic work in occupied areas or public roads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, P.B.; Aquino, J.O. de; Souza, L.A. de

    1996-01-01

    The industrial radiographic work that uses mobile equipment in Brazil must be in compliance with the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) Regulation CNEN-NN 6.04. It states that every works that employs radiographic equipment in occupied areas or public roads requires a specific radiation protection procedure. This procedure must be approved by the CNEN at least fifteen days before starting the job. It is not always possible to the users to get their licensing work at time, because the industrial radiography jobs need immediate actions. Furthermore, the CNEN-NN 6.04 Regulation does not specify what type of information the procedures should involve, so that some important information had been often missed, causing a delaying in the licensing procedures. The corrective and preventive actions taken by the CNEN to optimize this kind of jobs and to overcome bureaucratic difficulties are described. A standard radiation protection procedure is also presented. (authors). 2 refs., 2 tabs

  2. Design and testing of artifact-suppressed adaptive histogram equalization: a contrast-enhancement technique for display of digital chest radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, K; Seeley, G W; Dallas, W J; Ovitt, T W; Seeger, J F

    1990-01-01

    One of the goals of our research in the field of digital radiography has been to develop contrast-enhancement algorithms for eventual use in the display of chest images on video devices with the aim of preserving the diagnostic information presently available with film, some of which would normally be lost because of the smaller dynamic range of video monitors. The ASAHE algorithm discussed in this article has been tested by investigating observer performance in a difficult detection task involving phantoms and simulated lung nodules, using film as the output medium. The results of the experiment showed that the algorithm is successful in providing contrast-enhanced, natural-looking chest images while maintaining diagnostic information. The algorithm did not effect an increase in nodule detectability, but this was not unexpected because film is a medium capable of displaying a wide range of gray levels. It is sufficient at this stage to show that there is no degradation in observer performance. Future tests will evaluate the performance of the ASAHE algorithm in preparing chest images for video display.

  3. OFF-SITE SMARTPHONE VS. STANDARD WORKSTATION IN THE RADIOGRAPHIC DIAGNOSIS OF SMALL INTESTINAL MECHANICAL OBSTRUCTION IN DOGS AND CATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Peter G; Fischetti, Anthony J; Moore, George E; Le Roux, Alexandre B

    2016-09-01

    Off-site consultations by board-certified veterinary radiologists benefit residents and emergency clinicians by providing immediate feedback and potentially improving patient outcome. Smartphone devices and compressed images transmitted by email or text greatly facilitate availability of these off-site consultations. Criticism of a smartphone interface for off-site consultation is mostly directed at image degradation relative to the standard radiographic viewing room and monitors. The purpose of this retrospective, cross-sectional, methods comparison study was to compare the accuracy of abdominal radiographs in two imaging interfaces (Joint Photographic Experts Group, off-site, smartphone vs. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine, on-site, standard workstation) for the diagnosis of small intestinal mechanical obstruction in vomiting dogs and cats. Two board-certified radiologists graded randomized abdominal radiographs using a five-point Likert scale for the presence of mechanical obstruction in 100 dogs or cats presenting for vomiting. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curves for both imaging interfaces was high. The accuracy of the smartphone and traditional workstation was not statistically significantly different for either reviewer (P = 0.384 and P = 0.536). Correlation coefficients were 0.821 and 0.705 for each reviewer when the same radiographic study was viewed in different formats. Accuracy differences between radiologists were potentially related to years of experience. We conclude that off-site expert consultation with a smartphone provides an acceptable interface for accurate diagnosis of small intestinal mechanical obstruction in dogs and cat. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  4. Interpretation of neonatal chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Plain radiographs for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit are obtained using the portable X-ray equipment in order to evaluate the neonatal lungs and also to check the position of the tubes and catheters used for monitoring critically-ill neonates. Neonatal respiratory distress is caused by a variety of medical or surgical disease conditions. Clinical information about the gestational week, respiratory symptoms, and any events during delivery is essential for interpretation of the neonatal chest radiographs. Awareness of common chest abnormality in the prematurely born or term babies is also very important for chest evaluation in the newborn. Furthermore, knowledge about complications such as air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia following treatment are required to accurately inform the clinicians. The purpose of this article was to briefly review radiographic findings of chest diseases in newborns that are relatively common in daily practice.

  5. Interpretation of neonatal chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Plain radiographs for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit are obtained using the portable X-ray equipment in order to evaluate the neonatal lungs and also to check the position of the tubes and catheters used for monitoring critically-ill neonates. Neonatal respiratory distress is caused by a variety of medical or surgical disease conditions. Clinical information about the gestational week, respiratory symptoms, and any events during delivery is essential for interpretation of the neonatal chest radiographs. Awareness of common chest abnormality in the prematurely born or term babies is also very important for chest evaluation in the newborn. Furthermore, knowledge about complications such as air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia following treatment are required to accurately inform the clinicians. The purpose of this article was to briefly review radiographic findings of chest diseases in newborns that are relatively common in daily practice

  6. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Thomsen, Henrik

    on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years......Background: Chest radiography is one of the most common examinations in radiology departments. In 2013 approximately 80,000 chest x-rays were performed on women in the fertile age. Even low dose for the examinationCorrect collimation Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing...... of age are included in the study. The clinical research is performed between September and November 2014 where 3rd year Radiography students collect data on four Danish x-ray departments using identical procedures under guidance of clinical supervisors. Optimal collimation is determined by European...

  7. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian; Thomsen, Henrik

    Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials:A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from...... one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years of age are included in the study. The clinical research is performed between September and November 2014 where 3rd year Radiography students collect data on four Danish x-ray departments using identical procedures under guidance...... at the conference. Conclusion: Collimation improvement in basic chest radiography can reduce the radiation to female patients at chest x-ray examinations....

  8. Absorbed doses received by patients submitted to chest radiographs in hospitals of the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil; Doses absorvidas pelos pacientes submetidos a radiografias toracicas em hospitais do municipio de Sao Paulo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Marcelo Baptista de

    2000-07-01

    Medical irradiation contributes with a significant amount to the dose received by the population. Here, this contribution was evaluated in a survey of absorbed doses received by patients submitted to chest radiological examinations (postero-anterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) projections) in hospitals of the city of Sao Paulo. Due to the variety of equipment and procedures used in radiological examinations, a selection of hospitals was made (12, totalizing 27 X-ray facilities), taking into account their representativeness as medical institutions in the city, in terms of characteristics and number of radiographs carried out. An anthropomorphic phantom, provided with thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD-1 00), was irradiated simulating the patient, and the radiographic image quality was evaluated. Absorbed doses were determined to the thoracic region (entrance and exit skin and lung doses), and to some important organs from the radiation protection point of view (lens of the eye, thyroid and gonads). The great variation on the exposure parameters (kV, mA.s, beam size) leads to a large interval of entrance skin doses-ESD (coefficients of variation, CV, of 60% and 76%, for PA and LAT projections, respectively, were found) and of organ doses (CV of 60% and 46%. for thyroid and lung respectively). Mean values of ESD for LAT and PA projections were 0.22 and 0.98 mGy, respectively. The average absorbed doses per exam (PA and LAT) to thyroid and lung, 0.15 and 0.24 mGy respectively,showed that the thyroid was irradiated by the primary beam in many cases. Values of lens of the eye and gonad absorbed doses were below 30 {mu}Gy. Comparison of the lung doses obtained in this study with values in the literature, calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, showed good agreement. On the other hand, the comparison shows significant differences in the dose values to organs outside the chest region (thyroid, lens of eye and gonads). The effective dose calculated for a chest examination, PA and

  9. Pocket atlas of radiographic anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, T.B.; Reif, E.; Stark, P.

    1993-01-01

    The 'Pocket Atlas of Radiographic Anatomy' presents 170 radiographs of the various body regions of adults, showing only the normal radiographic anatomy. Each radiograph is supplemented on the opposite page by a drawing of the particular body region. There is no commenting text, but the drawings are provided with captions in English. The atlas is a useful guide for interpreting radiographs. The pictures are arranged in chapters entitled as follows: Skeletal Imaging (skull, spine, upper extremity), lower extremity; Miscellaneous Plain Films (chest, mammogram, trachea, lung tomograms); Contrast Examinations (gastrointestinal tract, intravenous contrast examinations, arthrography, angiography); Special Examinations (myelograms, lymphangiograms, bronchograms, sialograms). (UWA). 348 figs [de

  10. Detectability of T1a lung cancer on digital chest radiographs: an observer-performance comparison among 2-megapixel general-purpose, 2-megapixel medical-purpose, and 3-megapixel medical-purpose liquid-crystal display (LCD) monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Matsuo, Yoshio; Kamitani, Takeshi; Jinnnouchi, Mikako; Yonezawa, Masato; Yamasaki, Yuzo; Nagao, Michinobu; Kawanami, Satoshi; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Sasaki, Masayuki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    There has been no comparison of detectability of small lung cancer between general and medical LCD monitors or no comparison of detectability of small lung cancer between solid and part-solid nodules. To compare the detectabilities of T1a lung cancer on chest radiographs on three LCD monitor types: 2-megapixel (MP) for general purpose (General), 2-MP for medical purpose (Medical), and 3-MP-Medical. Radiographs from forty patients with T1aN0M0 primary lung cancer (27 solid nodules, 13 part-solid nodules) and 60 patients with no abnormalities on both chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT) were consecutively collected. Five readers assessed 100 cases for each monitor. The observations were analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. A jackknife method was used for statistical analysis. A P value of General, 2-MP-Medical, and 3-MP-Medical LCD monitors were 0.86, 0.89, and 0.89, respectively; there were no significant differences among them. The average AUC for part-solid nodule detection using a 2-MP-General, 2-MP-Medical, and 3-MP-Medical LCD monitors were 0.77, 0.86, and 0.89, respectively. There were significant differences between the 2-MP-General and 2-MP-Medical LCD monitors (P = 0.043) and between the 2-MP-General and 3-MP-Medical LCD monitors (P = 0.027). There was no significant difference between the 2-MP-Medical and 3-MP-Medical LCD monitors. The average AUC for solid nodule detection using a 2-MP-General, 2-MP-Medical, and 3-MP-Medical LCD monitors were 0.90, 0.90, and 0.88, respectively; there were no significant differences among them. The mean AUC values for all and part-solid nodules of the low-experienced readers were significantly lower than those of the high-experienced readers with the 2 M-GP color LCD monitor (P general-purpose LCD monitor was significantly lower than those using medical-purpose LCD monitors. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014.

  11. Comparison of the image quality of digital radiography system and film screen system - Radiologist' rating of the visibility of normal anatomic - Structures in chest PA, Skull radiograph and K. U. B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kounn Sik; Kim, Young Goo; Lee, Jong Beum; Kim, Kun Sang

    1987-01-01

    Digital image acquisition and display is widely used in computed tomography, ultrasonography, digital subtraction angiography, nuclear medicine and magnetic resonance image. But most of the radiological examinations performed in radiology department are made by using conventional system. The development of the digital radiography system is essential if totally digitized radiology department is desired. The advantages of digitizing the radiographic information are usually discussed in terms of PACS (picture archiving and communication system), furthermore there are many other advantages such as contrast modification, spatial filtering subtraction and superimposition of the images through the image processing by computer. Currently several approaches are under development or in clinical use, the most promising approach is the use of imaging plate composed of photostimulate phosphors such as barium fluorohalide crystal read with a He-Ne laser to produce digital radiographic images. Another promising approach is scan projection radiography. The authors performed the clinical study of comparing the image qualities of digital radiography system using scanning laser luminescence (FCR) and conventional film-screen system in chest PA, skull radiography and K. U. B. in terms of the visibility of the normal anatomic structure rating those (qualities) on a scale of 0 to 3 and obtained the following results. Normal contrast digital images are comparable to conventional film-screen images, but the images of high frequency enhancement is far superior to conventional film-screen especially in peripherally located structures such as skin, subcutaneous fat, musculoskeletal systems, nasal bone, inner and outer table of the skull including the diploic space, paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and larynx, trachea and main bronchi, mediastinal structures, retrocardiac and subphrenic vascular markings. Another promising aspects of digital radiography system is its wide exposure latitude and

  12. Sandstorm in the chest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talluri MR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A 32 year old female presented with dry cough and progressive breathlessness of one year duration. There was no history suggestive of collagen vascular disease, lung parenchymal infection or allergic airway disease. Clinical evaluation showed basal fine inspiratory crepitations. Radiographic examination of the chest revealed a black pleura line and lung parenchymal calcification. CT scan of the chest demonstrated nodular calcification of lung parenchyma with a “crazy pavement” pattern, which is suggestive of alveolar calcification. Pulmonary function test showed a severe restrictive defect. On transbronchial lung biopsy calcific spherules suggestive of the alveolar microlithiasis were seen. Diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis was made and symptomatic treatment was given, as there is no specific therapy available. The case illustrates an unusual cause of shortness of breath in a young female with striking radiographic features.

  13. Detection of proximal caries with high-resolution and standard resolution digital radiographic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, W.E.R.; Verheij, H.G.C.; Syriopoulos, K.; Li, G.; Sanderink, G.C.H.; van der Stelt, P.F.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to: (1) compare the diagnostic accuracy of the high-resolution and standard resolution settings of four digital imaging systems for caries diagnosis and (2) compare the effect on the diagnostic accuracy of reducing the high-resolution image sizes to the standard

  14. [A comparison of chest radiographs between patients with pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection and those with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in the initial stage of disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Eri; Senoo, Mami; Nagayama, Naohiro; Masuda, Kimihiko; Matsui, Hirotoshi; Tamura, Atsuhisa; Nagai, Hideaki; Akagawa, Shinobu; Toyoda, Emiko; Oota, Ken

    2013-08-01

    To elucidate the differences in affected lung segments between patients with pulmonary M. kansasii infection and those with M. tuberculosis infection in the initial stage of disease, we examined chest radiography images and CT scans. The initial stage of disease was defined as the period when less than one-sixth of the total lung area was affected by the infection, as visualized on chest radiography and CT. One hundred eighty-four patients were diagnosed with M.kansasii infection between 1996 and 2010 and 835 patients, with M.tuberculosis infection between 2008 and 2009 at our hospital. The diagnosis was made on the basis of the results of sputum culture and/or bronchial washing. After excluding the patients with underlying lung diseases such as chronic pulmonary emphysema, interstitial pneumonia, and old pulmonary tuberculosis as well as those in advanced stages, 24 patients with M. kansasii infection and 62 patients with M. tuberculosis infection were included in this study. The affected segments of the lungs and the rates of cavity development were determined by using CT scans. In patients with M.kansasii, 17 had an infected right lung, while 7 had an infected left lung. Additionally, in patients with M.tuberculosis, 58 had an infected right lung, 3 had an infected left lung, and 1 had a bilateral infection. In patients infected with M. kansasii, the upper lobes were affected in 22 cases and the lower lobes in 3 cases. In patients infected with M. tuberculosis, the upper, middle, and lower lobes and the lingular segment were affected in 41, 8, 24, and 1 cases, respectively. Upper lobe lesions were seen more frequently in patients with M. kansasii infection than in those with M. tuberculosis infection (p formation was identified more frequently in patients infected with M. kansasii (91.7%) than in those infected with M. tuberculosis (32.3%) (p < 0.001). Cavitary lesions were more frequently localized to the apical, posterior, and apico-posterior regions (S1, S2

  15. British Standard method for determination of ISO speed and average gradient of direct-exposure medical and dental radiographic film/process combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Under the direction of the Cinematography and Photography Standards Committee, a British Standard method has been prepared for determining ISO speed and average gradient of direct-exposure medical and dental radiographic film/film-process combinations. The method determines the speed and gradient, i.e. contrast, of the X-ray films processed according to their manufacturer's recommendations. (U.K.)

  16. Quality of radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    This chapter discussed on how to get a good radiograph. There are several factors that can make good radiograph such as density of radiograph, the contrast of radiograph, definition of radiograph, the present of artifact and backscattering. All of this factor will discuss detailed on each unit of chapter with some figure, picture to make the reader understand more when read this book. And at the end, the reader will introduce with penetrameter, one of device to determine the level of quality of the radiograph. There are two type of penetrameter like wire type or holes type. This standard must be followed by all the radiographer around the world to produce the good result that is standard and more reliable.

  17. Radiographic assessment of alignment following TKA: outline of a standardized protocol and assessment of a newly devised trigonometric method of analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Vikram; De Steiger, Richard; Lowe, Adrian

    2010-05-01

    An important determinant of long-term outcomes following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is post-operative alignment as measured on radiographs. Thus far, radiographs have been measured using the goniometer method (GM) and no standard protocol has been followed. The aim of this prospective study was to: (i) outline a protocol for radiographic measurement following TKA; and (ii) compare the accuracy of the traditional GM with a new trigonometric method (TM) of radiographic analysis. A protocol for the measurement of alignment on radiographs following TKA was outlined in detail with step-by-step instructions. A new TM of angle measurement was also delineated. Alignment was measured on 51 post-operative TKA radiographs. A single angle was chosen and measured by two observers using both the GM and TM. The TM had a precision of 1.06 degrees compared with 1.5 degrees using the GM. The standard deviation of the TM was significantly smaller than the GM (P= 0.033). The intra-class correlation coefficient of the TM was 0.94 versus 0.90 for the GM. The study detailed a protocol for the measurement of axial alignment of the limbs and components following TKA, and provided evidence that a newer TM of angle measurement was superior in terms of precision and intra-rater reliability in comparison with the traditional method.

  18. Technique for fabrication of gradual standards of radiographic image blachening density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovin, I.V.; Kondina, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The technique of fabrication of gradual standards of blackening density for industrial radiography by contact printing from a negative is described. The technique is designed for possibilities of industrial laboratoriesof radiation defectoscopy possessing no special-purpose sensitometric equipment

  19. Introduction of an alternative standardized radiographic measurement method to evaluate volar angulation in subcapital fractures of the 5th metacarpal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffelner, Thomas; Resch, Herbert; Moroder, Philipp; Korn, Gundobert; Steinhauer, Felix [University of Salzburg, Department of Traumatology and Sports Injuries, Salzburg (Austria); Atzwanger, Joerg [University of Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Minnich, Bernd [University of Salzburg, Department of Organismic Biology, Salzburg (Austria); Tauber, Mark [Shoulder and Elbow Surgery ATOS Clinic Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the intra- and interobserver reliability of two different measurement methods for volar angulation of the 5th metacarpal (MC) in an attempt to establish a new standard measurement method to reduce interobserver discrepancies for therapeutic decisions. Twenty patients with subcapital fractures of the 5th MC were radiologically investigated. Imaging consisted of a radiographs in antero-posterior and precise lateral view in addition to a CT scan of the 5th MC. Measurement of volar angulation was accomplished using the conventional and the shaft articular surface (SAS) method. The measurements of five investigators were exported to a spreadsheet for statistical analysis to evaluate the intra-and interobserver reliability. The conventional technique showed large differences among the investigators and poor interobserver reliability (W = 0.328 and 0.307) both at injury (p = 0.001) and at follow-up (p = 0.189). The intraobserver concordance of all investigators showed better results with the SAS than with the conventional technique. With the SAS technique, no statistically significant difference among the investigators could be detected at either the time of injury (p = 0.418) or at follow-up (p = 0.526) with excellent interobserver reliability (W = 0.051 and W = 0.041). Evaluation of volar angulation at follow-up using CT scans did not show any statistically significant difference between the techniques with better correlation among the observers with the SAS technique (p = 0.838). The interobserver correlation of volar angulation with lateral radiographs using the conventional technique was insufficient. Therefore, we recommend the use of the novel SAS technique as standardized measurement method which showed higher accuracy and interobserver reliability in order to facilitate the choice of adequate treatment option. (orig.)

  20. The chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdon, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    Radiographic interpretation of chest films of newborns in respiratory distress remains one of the most difficult aspects of pediatric radiology. Complex pulmonary and cardiac adjustments to extrauterine life are rapidly taking place. The small, fluid-filled fetal lung must rid itself of fluid and fill with air. The high vascular resistance of the fetal pulmonary bed and the open ductus arteriosus allow shunting of blood in both directions. Films taken in this period of time may show lungs that resemble those seen in congestive heart failure or fluid overload. When these findings are observed in infants who may appear dusky or even cyanotic, the result may be the diagnosis of disease in normal infants passing through a stormy transition period. To make things worse, the films are taken as portable surpine films, usually in an isolette in the intensive care unit (ICU). The phase of respiration is difficult, if not impossible, to control, and lateral films are usually not obtained. Many of the infants are on assisted ventilation either by tube or nasal prongs-nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-and lungs can appear over-inflated or whited out, depending on the pressures used and the phase of the respiratory cycle. Prolonged crying itself can make lungs appear semiopaque; the next breath may show such a dramatic reinflation that it is hard to believe the two films are of the same infant, made only seconds apart. Is the heart large? Or is it the thymus? Are the lungs ''wet''? Is there infection? Is there pulmonary vascular engorgement? Why are these films so hard to interpret? They have no easy answers. The radiologist must realize that the neonatal intensive care personnel, armed though they may be with blood gas values, are no better at interpreting films. If anything, they read into them what they wish to see

  1. A multicenter study analyzing the relationship of a standardized radiographic scoring system of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and the Scoliosis Research Society outcomes instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Philip L; Newton, Peter O; Wenger, Dennis R; Haher, Thomas; Merola, Andrew; Lenke, Larry; Lowe, Thomas; Clements, David; Betz, Randy

    2002-09-15

    A multicenter study examining the association between radiographic and outcomes measures in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. To evaluate the association between an objective radiographic scoring system and patient quality of life measures as determined by the Scoliosis Research Society outcomes instrument. Although surgical correction of scoliosis has been reported to be positively correlated with patient outcomes, studies to date have been unable to demonstrate an association between radiographic measures of deformity and outcomes measures in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. A standardized radiographic deformity scoring system and the Scoliosis Research Society outcome tool were used prospectively in seven scoliosis centers to collect data on patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. A total of 354 data points for 265 patients consisting of those with nonoperative or preoperative curves >or=10 degrees, as well as those with surgically treated curves, were analyzed. Correlation analysis was performed to identify significant relationships between any of the radiographic measures, the Harms Study Group radiographic deformity scores (total, sagittal, coronal), and the seven Scoliosis Research Society outcome domains (Total Pain, General Self-Image, General Function, Activity, Postoperative Self-Image, Postoperative Function, and Satisfaction) as well as Scoliosis Research Society outcomes instrument total scores. Radiographic measures that were identified as significantly correlated with Scoliosis Research Society outcome scores were then entered into a stepwise regression analysis. The coronal measures of thoracic curve and lumbar curve magnitude were found to be significantly correlated with the Total Pain, General Self-Image, and total Scoliosis Research Society scores (P Society domain and total scores. No radiographic measures taken after surgery were significantly correlated with the postoperative domains of the Scoliosis Research Society

  2. Visualization of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction bone tunnels: Reliability of standard radiographs, CT scans, and 3D virtual reality images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Meuffels (Duncan); J.W. Potters (Jan Willem); A.H.J. Koning (Anton); C.H. Brown Jr Jr. (Charles); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); M. Reijman (Max)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground and purpose: Non-anatomic bone tunnel placement is the most common cause of a failed ACL reconstruction. Accurate and reproducible methods to visualize and document bone tunnel placement are therefore important. We evaluated the reliability of standard radiographs, CT scans,

  3. Bicuspid aortic valves: Diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, David J., E-mail: david.murphy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); McEvoy, Sinead H., E-mail: s.mcevoy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Iyengar, Sri, E-mail: sri.iyengar@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Feuchtner, Gudrun, E-mail: Gudrun.Feuchtner@i-med.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Cury, Ricardo C., E-mail: r.cury@baptisthealth.net [Department of Radiology, Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute, 8900 North Kendall Drive, Miami, FL 33176 (United States); Roobottom, Carl, E-mail: carl.roobottom@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry (United Kingdom); Baumueller, Stephan, E-mail: Hatem.Alkadhi@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem, E-mail: stephan.baumueller@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Dodd, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonniedodd@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT for bicuspid aortic valves. Materials and methods: The standard axial chest CT scans of 20 patients with known bicuspid aortic valves were blindly, randomly analyzed for (i) the appearance of the valve cusps, (ii) the largest aortic sinus area, (iii) the longest aortic cusp length, (iv) the thickest aortic valve cusp and (v) valve calcification. A second blinded reader independently analyzed the appearance of the valve cusps. Forty-two age- and sex-matched patients with known tricuspid aortic valves were used as controls. Retrospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT multiphase reconstructions of the aortic valve were used as the gold-standard. Results: Fourteen (21%) scans were scored as unevaluable (7 bicuspid, 7 tricuspid). Of the remainder, there were 13 evaluable bicuspid valves, ten of which showed an aortic valve line sign, while the remaining three showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance owing to fused valve cusps. The 35 evaluable tricuspid aortic valves all showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance (P = 0.001). Kappa analysis = 0.62 indicating good interobserver agreement for the aortic valve cusp appearance. Aortic sinus areas, aortic cusp lengths and aortic cusp thicknesses of ≥3.8 cm{sup 2}, 3.2 cm and 1.6 mm respectively on standard axial chest CT best distinguished bicuspid from tricuspid aortic valves (P < 0.0001 for all). Of evaluable scans, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of standard axial chest CT in diagnosing bicuspid aortic valves was 77% (CI 0.54–1.0), 100%, 100% and 70% respectively. Conclusion: The aortic valve is evaluable in approximately 80% of standard chest 64-slice CT scans. Bicuspid aortic valves may be diagnosed on evaluable scans with good diagnostic accuracy. An aortic valve line sign, enlarged aortic sinuses and elongated, thickened valve cusps are specific CT

  4. Indications for chest CT. Retrospective study of cases with normal chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, Shiro

    1995-01-01

    The usefulness of computed tomography (CT) in thoracic radiology is now well appreciated, and the number of chest CTs has greatly increased. There are, however, many chest CT cases that are completely or almost completely normal. Indications for chest CT should be re-evaluated considering the cost and radiation exposure associated with the examination. Reviewing the reports of 4930 chest CT examinations performed in three hospitals during the period of two years, the author found 620 (12.6%) negative CT examinations. In 312 of the 620, the CT was requested because of 'abnormal shadow' on chest radiograph. When the same chest radiographs were re-evaluated by two radiologists, no abnormality was noted in 257 cases (82.4%). CT examinations were considered justified in only 55 cases (17.6%). There was a significant difference in the frequency of normal chest CT examinations between the university hospital and two other hospitals. The causes of false positive interpretation of chest radiographs were analyzed, and it was felt that fundamental knowledge necessary to interpret chest radiographs was lacking. The importance of close cooperation between clinicians and radiologists should be emphasized. (author)

  5. Chest Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or tightness in your chest Crushing or searing pain that radiates to your back, neck, jaw, shoulders, and one or both arms Pain that lasts ... com. Accessed Sept. 6, 2017. Yelland MJ. Outpatient evaluation of the adult with chest pain. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed Sept. ...

  6. FLAIL CHEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Crnjac

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Major thoracic trauma is consistent with high mortality rate because of associated injuries of vital thoracic organs and dangerous complications. The flail chest occurs after disruption of the skeletal continuity of chest wall and demands because of its pathophysiological complexity rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment.Conclusions. Basic pathophysiological mechanism of the flail chest is respiratory distress, which is provoked by pulmonary contusions and paradoxical chest wall motion. The treatment should be pointed to improvement and support of respiratory functions and include aggressive pain control, pulmonary physiotherapy and selective mechanical ventilation. Views about operative fixation of the flail chest are still controversial. Neither mortality rate neither long-term disability are improved after operative fixation.

  7. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2. Licenses... radiography, nuclear medicine technology, or radiation therapy technology. 2. Special eligibility to take the...-referenced examination in radiography, nuclear medicine technology, or radiation therapy technology shall be...

  8. Optimizing radiation exposure for CT localizer radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohrer, Evelyn; Maeder, Ulf; Fiebich, Martin [Univ. of Applied Sciences, Giessen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection-IMPS; Schaefer, Stefan; Krombach, Gabriele A. [Univ. Hospital Giessen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Noel, Peter B. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2017-08-01

    The trend towards submillisievert CT scans leads to a higher dose fraction of localizer radiographs in CT examinations. The already existing technical capabilities make dose optimization of localizer radiographs worthwhile. Modern CT scanners apply automatic exposure control (AEC) based on attenuation data in such a localizer. Therefore not only this aspect but also the detectability of anatomical landmarks in the localizer for the desired CT scan range adjustment needs to be considered. The effective dose of a head, chest, and abdomen-pelvis localizer radiograph with standard factory settings and user-optimized settings was determined using Monte Carlo simulations. CT examinations of an anthropomorphic phantom were performed using multiple sets of acquisition parameters for the localizer radiograph and the AEC for the subsequent helical CT scan. Anatomical landmarks were defined to assess the image quality of the localizer. CTDI{sub vol} and effective mAs per slice of the helical CT scan were recorded to examine the impact of localizer settings on a helical CT scan. The dose of the localizer radiograph could be decreased by more than 90% while the image quality remained sufficient when selecting the lowest available settings (80 kVp, 20 mA, pa tube position). The tube position during localizer acquisition had a greater impact on the AEC than the reduction of tube voltage and tube current. Except for the use of a pa tube position, all changes of acquisition parameters for the localizer resulted in a decreased total radiation exposure. A dose reduction of CT localizer radiograph is necessary and possible. In the examined CT system there was no negative impact on the modulated helical CT scan when the lowest tube voltage and tube current were used for the localizer.

  9. Chest X-ray quality in the diagnosis of pneumonia in children: from prescription to optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estevan, M.; Cotelo, E.; Hortal, M.; Iraola, I.

    2008-01-01

    Acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI), primarily pneumonia, is the leading cause of childhood death in developing countries. The increasing incidence of antimicrobial resistance and the high cost of vaccines lead to considering the first strategy to reduce pneumonia deaths the early detection of the disease. Case management begins with the clinical examination and may continue with the prescription of a chest x-ray. Consequently, the radiograph should meet quality standards, and radiologists and paediatricians must know how to interpret the images. Special attention should be paid on patient dose due to children radiosensitivity, high frequency and chest x rays rejection rate. This paper is a retrospective study of chest radiographs performed in 5731 children with clinical diagnosis of ALRI assisted in three Uruguayan hospitals during the three year investigation supported by the Division of Vaccines and Immunization of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) that had the aim of estimating the burden of pneumonia (from 2001 to 2004). It is analyzed the prescription of radiographs during the diagnosis and in later controls (2220 children assisted in two of the three hospitals). Patient doses are estimated from technical parameters and equipment specifications. The investigation also analyzes patient doses that could have been avoided if paediatricians had managed the disease according to the established protocols. Results show that 82.4 % of chest X-rays diagnosed pneumonia and that some children underwent up to ten radiographs. Significant differences were found in patient dose in the three hospitals, concluding that education on image quality on chest radiographs of radiologists, paediatricians and radiological technologists is the first and best tool for the earlier diagnosis of pneumonia in children and for the application of Radiation Protection (RP) principles in medical exposures. (author)

  10. Applying Evolution Strategies for Chest Radiographs Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliviu Matei

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available WSegmentation is one of the key areas in computer vision. Advanced techniques, such as active contour models and active shape models suffer from many drawbacks. An improvement of the two approaches, based in evolution strategies, is presented. Some of its advantages lie in less computational resources and less a priori knowledge required. At the end of the paper, the results of the experiments carried out with the new approach are presented.

  11. Psychogenic Dyspnea and Therapeutic Chest Radiograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Kenneth R.; Endres, Jennifer K.; Kaufman, Nathaniel D.

    2007-01-01

    Conversion disorders, the physical expression of unresolved psychological pain, can be associated with mourning. This case report is third in a series of articles by the authors on childhood mourning reflecting the effects of multiple losses (K. R. Kaufman & N. D. Kaufman, 2005; K. R. Kaufman & N. D. Kaufman, 2006). In this case report, perception…

  12. UTILITY OF ROUTINE CHEST RADIOGRAPHS IN KENYA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-07-07

    Jul 7, 2014 ... following exposure to ionising radiation. Several epidemiological studies have confirmed this relationship especially in areas that have experienced nuclear disasters. Tronko et alhas described radiation induced thyroid cancer in Ukraine following the. Chernobyl nuclear accident (7). One author has vividly ...

  13. Using Radon transform of standard radiographs of the hip to differentiate between post-menopausal women with and without fracture of the proximal femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, H F; Lutz, J; Körner, M; Mutschler, W; Reiser, M; Pfeifer, K-J

    2009-02-01

    Texture features based on the Radon transform were extracted from clinical radiographs of the hip in post-menopausal women. The novel algorithm allowed us to identify patients with fracture of the proximal femur and may provide an alternative to measuring bone mineral density in predicting the fracture-risk in osteoporosis, especially where densitometry is regionally unavailable. The aim of this study is to introduce an algorithm for differentiation between patients with and without fracture of the hip using parameters based on the Radon transform (RT) and applied to standard radiographs of the proximal femur and to compare the results with bone mineral density (BMD). The study comprised 50 post-menopausal women (78.6 +/- 11.5 years of age), including 25 patients with hip fracture and 25 age-matched controls. We obtained lumbar and femoral BMD and standard femoral radiographs. In the radiographs we analysed trabecular patterns of the hip in a region-of-interest of 57 x 29 mm using the RT. From the histogram-representation of the RT, we extracted several characteristic parameters. By ROC and discriminant-analysis, we assessed the statistical power of both methods. For correct differentiation between fracture and non-fracture cases by femoral BMD, area-under-the-curve (AUC) was 0.78; AUC for the RT-based parameters ranged from 0.73 to 0.8. By combination of densitometric and textural information in a multivariate model the fracture status of 84% of subjects was predicted correctly, identification of fracture cases rose to 88%. Identification of fracture patients by RT applied to femoral radiographs was feasible and seemed to have a discriminative potential comparable to that of standard densitometry. In the future, the new method may provide an alternative to DXA or in conjunction with conventional densitometry may enhance the detection of patients with elevated risk of hip fracture.

  14. ACR appropriateness criteria blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jonathan H; Cox, Christian W; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Kirsch, Jacobo; Brown, Kathleen; Dyer, Debra Sue; Ginsburg, Mark E; Heitkamp, Darel E; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Kazerooni, Ella A; Ketai, Loren H; Ravenel, James G; Saleh, Anthony G; Shah, Rakesh D; Steiner, Robert M; Suh, Robert D

    2014-04-01

    Imaging is paramount in the setting of blunt trauma and is now the standard of care at any trauma center. Although anteroposterior radiography has inherent limitations, the ability to acquire a radiograph in the trauma bay with little interruption in clinical survey, monitoring, and treatment, as well as radiography's accepted role in screening for traumatic aortic injury, supports the routine use of chest radiography. Chest CT or CT angiography is the gold-standard routine imaging modality for detecting thoracic injuries caused by blunt trauma. There is disagreement on whether routine chest CT is necessary in all patients with histories of blunt trauma. Ultimately, the frequency and timing of CT chest imaging should be site specific and should depend on the local resources of the trauma center as well as patient status. Ultrasound may be beneficial in the detection of pneumothorax, hemothorax, and pericardial hemorrhage; transesophageal echocardiography is a first-line imaging tool in the setting of suspected cardiac injury. In the blunt trauma setting, MRI and nuclear medicine likely play no role in the acute setting, although these modalities may be helpful as problem-solving tools after initial assessment. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Chest Chest x-ray uses a very ... limitations of Chest Radiography? What is a Chest X-ray (Chest Radiography)? The chest x-ray is the ...

  16. Chest radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case

  17. Emphysema quantification and lung volumetry in chest X-ray equivalent ultralow dose CT - Intra-individual comparison with standard dose CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli, Michael; Ottilinger, Thorsten; Warschkow, René; Leschka, Sebastian; Alkadhi, Hatem; Wildermuth, Simon; Bauer, Ralf W

    2017-06-01

    To determine whether ultralow dose chest CT with tin filtration can be used for emphysema quantification and lung volumetry and to assess differences in emphysema measurements and lung volume between standard dose and ultralow dose CT scans using advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE). 84 consecutive patients from a prospective, IRB-approved single-center study were included and underwent clinically indicated standard dose chest CT (1.7±0.6mSv) and additional single-energy ultralow dose CT (0.14±0.01mSv) at 100kV and fixed tube current at 70mAs with tin filtration in the same session. Forty of the 84 patients (48%) had no emphysema, 44 (52%) had emphysema. One radiologist performed fully automated software-based pulmonary emphysema quantification and lung volumetry of standard and ultralow dose CT with different levels of ADMIRE. Friedman test and Wilcoxon rank sum test were used for multiple comparison of emphysema and lung volume. Lung volumes were compared using the concordance correlation coefficient. The median low-attenuation areas (LAA) using filtered back projection (FBP) in standard dose was 4.4% and decreased to 2.6%, 2.1% and 1.8% using ADMIRE 3, 4, and 5, respectively. The median values of LAA in ultralow dose CT were 5.7%, 4.1% and 2.4% for ADMIRE 3, 4, and 5, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between LAA in standard dose CT using FBP and ultralow dose using ADMIRE 4 (p=0.358) as well as in standard dose CT using ADMIRE 3 and ultralow dose using ADMIRE 5 (p=0.966). In comparison with standard dose FBP the concordance correlation coefficients of lung volumetry were 1.000, 0.999, and 0.999 for ADMIRE 3, 4, and 5 in standard dose, and 0.972 for ADMIRE 3, 4 and 5 in ultralow dose CT. Ultralow dose CT at chest X-ray equivalent dose levels allows for lung volumetry as well as detection and quantification of emphysema. However, longitudinal emphysema analyses should be performed with the same scan protocol and

  18. Endobronchial Tuberculosis and Chest Radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Sasani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Endobronchial tuberculosis and chest radiography I read, with interest, the article entitled “Clinical and Para-clinical Presentations of Endobronchial Tuberculosis” by Ahmadi Hoseini H. S. et al. (1 published in this journal. I would like to focus on some details about the chest X-ray of patients as elaborated by the authors in the results section. Accordingly, the findings of chest radiography in the available patients were as follows: pulmonary consolidation (75%, reduced pulmonary volume (20%, and hilar adenopathy (10%. This is an incomplete statement because the authors did not explain whether there was any normal chest radiography in the study population. In addition, it is not clear whether the X-ray examinations of the patients were normal, how many abnormal plain films yielded the presented data. On the other hand, the fact that the studied patients had no normal chest radiography is  controversial since in the literature, 10-20% of the patients with endobronchial tuberculosis are reported to have normal chest X-ray (2, 3. In fact, this is one of the problems in the diagnosis of the disease, as well as a potential cause of delayed diagnosis and treatment of the patients. Therefore, the absence of normal chest radiographs is in contrast to the available literature, and if not an error, it could be a subject of further investigation.

  19. Interruptions in Chest Compressions by Surf Lifeguards: A Comparison of Face-mask Ventilation in Over-the-head CPR vs Standard CPR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørkjær, Louise; Bomholt, Katrine Bjørnshave; Krogh, Kristian

    in OH-CPR and standard CPR with face-mask ventilation and randomized to a crossover comparison on a manikin. CPR quality data were obtained from the manikin and video recordings. Interruptions in chest compressions were used as a primary measure of CPR quality. A sample size of 14 participants......Introduction: Ventilation is a priority in drowning resuscitation. Over-the-head CPR (OH-CPR), i.e. with the rescuer located at the top of the victim’s head instead of alongside the victim’s torso, has been demonstrated to be superior when doing bag-valve-mask ventilation compared to standard CPR....... The International Life Saving Federation recommends CPR using face-mask ventilation. It is currently unknown if OH-CPR using face-mask ventilation improves CPR quality. We hypothesized that OH-CPR is superior to standard CPR with face-mask ventilation among surf lifeguards. Methods: Surf lifeguards were trained...

  20. Computed tomography of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkel, E.; Uhl, H.; Reinbold, W.D.; Wimmer, B.; Wenz, W.

    1987-01-01

    Chest CT scans were obtained in 86 patients suffering from serious blunt or penetrating chest trauma. The finding of mediastinal widening was by far the most common CT indication. CT proved to be a more sensitive method for detection of parenchymal lung lesions and occult pneumothorax than bedside radiographs. CT contributed substantially in differentiation of lung abscess and empyema, exclusion of mediastinal pathology and spinal injuries. Aortography is still indicated, even when CT findings are normal, if aortic laceration is clinically suspected. Despite all technical problems combined with CT examinations in the critically ill patient, we consider CT a valuable diagnostic tool for selected problems in the traumatized patient. (orig.) [de

  1. Guidelines for the use of the International Classification of Radiographs of Pneumoconioses of the International Labour Office (ILO: Substantial changes in the currrent edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Muszyńska-Graca

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The International Classification of Radiographs of Pneumoconioses is the scheme worked out by the International Labour Office in Geneva (ILO, to register radiographic chest abnormalities in a well-ordered, reproducible and comparable way. It is used for diagnosing abnormalities caused by dust exposure. Guidelines for the use of the ILO International Classification of Radiographs of Pneumoconioses contain detailed information and recommendations on how to use the classification, as well as how the chest X-ray examination should be performed and recorded. To facilitate the diagnosis of observed abnormalities the classification is completed by the set of standard radiograms illustrating typical irregularities referring to lungs and pleura, included in the classification. The article presents the key information on classification and the most important amendments adopted in the 2000 and 2011 ILO guidelines revisions. These changes refer to radiographs quality assessment, the way of presenting abnormalities registered in standard radiographs (QUAD set, digital images and registration of failures not related to dust exposure. Particularly important complements result from the development of radiological imaging techniques. They are concerned about the classification of radiographic images of the chest recorded digitally. Med Pr 2016;67(6:833–837

  2. Use of the iTClamp versus standard suturing techniques for securing chest tubes: A randomized controlled cadaver study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Mckee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Tube thoracostomy (TT is a common yet potentially life-saving trauma procedure. After successful placement however, securing a TT through suturing is a skillset that requires practice, risking that the TT may become dislodged during prehospital transport. The purpose of this study was to examine if the iTClamp was a simpler technique with equivalent effectiveness for securing TTs. Materials and methods: In a cadaver model, a 1.5 inch incision was utilized along the upper border of the rib below the 5th intercostal space at the anterior axillary line. TTs (sizes 28Fr, 32Fr, 36Fr and 40Fr were inserted and secured with both suturing and iTClamp techniques according to the preset randomization. TT were then functionally tested for positive and negative pressure as well as the force required to remove the TT (pull test-up to 5 lbs. Time to secure the TT was also recorded. Results: When sutured is placed by a trained surgeon, the sutures and iTClamp were functionally equivalent for holding a positive and negative pressure. Mean pull force for both sutures and iTClamp exceeded the 5 lb threshold; there was no significant difference between the groups. Securing the TT with the iTClamp was significantly faster (p < 0.0001 with the iTClamp having a mean application time of 37.0 ± 22.8 s and using a suture had a man application time of 96.3 ± 29.0 s. Conclusion: The iTClamp was effective in securing TTs. The main benefit to the iTClamp is that minimal skill is required to adequately secure a TT to ensure that it does not become dislodged during transport to a trauma center. Keywords: Chest tube, Tube thoracostomy, Securing chest tubes

  3. Chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez A, Juan Carlos; Saenz M, Oscar; Martinez M, Camilo; Gonzales A Francisco; Nicolas R, Jose; Vergara V, Erika P; Pereira G, Alberto M

    2010-01-01

    In emergency departments, chest pain is one of the leading motives of consultation. We thus consider it important to review aspects such as its classification, causes, and clinical profiles. Initial assessment should include a full clinical history comprising thorough anamnesis and physical examination. Adequate interpretation of auxiliary tests, ordered in accordance with suspected clinical conditions, should lead to accurate diagnosis. We highlight certain symptoms and clinical signs, ECG and X-ray findings, cardiac bio markers, arterial blood gases, and CT-scanning. Scores of severity and prognosis such as TIMI are assessed. Optimal treatment of the clinical conditions leading to chest pain depends on adequate initial approach and assessment.

  4. A Peer-Reviewed Instructional Video is as Effective as a Standard Recorded Didactic Lecture in Medical Trainees Performing Chest Tube Insertion: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saun, Tomas J; Odorizzi, Scott; Yeung, Celine; Johnson, Marjorie; Bandiera, Glen; Dev, Shelly P

    Online medical education resources are becoming an increasingly used modality and many studies have demonstrated their efficacy in procedural instruction. This study sought to determine whether a standardized online procedural video is as effective as a standard recorded didactic teaching session for chest tube insertion. A randomized control trial was conducted. Participants were taught how to insert a chest tube with either a recorded didactic teaching session, or a New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) video. Participants filled out a questionnaire before and after performing the procedure on a cadaver, which was filmed and assessed by 2 blinded evaluators using a standardized tool. Western University, London, Ontario. Level of clinical care: institutional. A total of 30 fourth-year medical students from 2 graduating classes at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry were screened for eligibility. Two students did not complete the study and were excluded. There were 13 students in the NEJM group, and 15 students in the didactic group. The NEJM group׳s average score was 45.2% (±9.56) on the prequestionnaire, 67.7% (±12.9) for the procedure, and 60.1% (±7.65) on the postquestionnaire. The didactic group׳s average score was 42.8% (±10.9) on the prequestionnaire, 73.7% (±9.90) for the procedure, and 46.5% (±7.46) on the postquestionnaire. There was no difference between the groups on the prequestionnaire (Δ + 2.4%; 95% CI: -5.16 to 9.99), or the procedure (Δ -6.0%; 95% CI: -14.6 to 2.65). The NEJM group had better scores on the postquestionnaire (Δ + 11.15%; 95% CI: 3.74-18.6). The NEJM video was as effective as video-recorded didactic training for teaching the knowledge and technical skills essential for chest tube insertion. Participants expressed high satisfaction with this modality. It may prove to be a helpful adjunct to standard instruction on the topic. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc

  5. A prospective comparison of supine chest radiography and bedside ultrasound for the diagnosis of traumatic pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaivas, Michael; Lyon, Matthew; Duggal, Sandeep

    2005-09-01

    Supine anteroposterior (AP) chest radiography may not detect the presence of a small or medium pneumothorax (PTX) in trauma patients. To compare the sensitivity and specificity of bedside ultrasound (US) in the emergency department (ED) with supine portable AP chest radiography for the detection of PTX in trauma patients, and to determine whether US can grade the size of the PTX. This was a prospective, single-blinded study with convenience sampling, based on researcher availability, of blunt trauma patients at a Level 1 trauma center with an annual census of 75,000 patients. Enrollment criteria were adult trauma patients receiving computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis (which includes lung windows at the authors' institution). Patients in whom the examination could not be completed were excluded. During the initial evaluation, attending emergency physicians performed bedside trauma US examinations to determine the presence of a sliding lung sign to rule out PTX. Portable, supine AP chest radiographs were evaluated by an attending trauma physician, blinded to the results of the thoracic US. The CT results (used as the criterion standard), or air release on chest tube placement, were compared with US and chest radiograph findings. Sensitivities and specificities with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for US and AP chest radiography for the detection of PTX, and Spearman's rank correlation was used to evaluate for the ability of US to predict the size of the PTX on CT. A total of 176 patients were enrolled in the study over an eight-month period. Twelve patients had a chest tube placed prior to CT. Pneumothorax was detected in 53 (30%) patients by US, and 40 (23%) by chest radiography. There were 53 (30%) true positives by CT or on chest tube placement. The sensitivity for chest radiography was 75.5% (95% CI = 61.7% to 86.2%) and the specificity was 100% (95% CI = 97.1% to 100%). The sensitivity for US was 98.1% (95% CI = 89.9% to 99

  6. Radiographic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuster, J.

    1978-01-01

    In view of great differencies in X-ray transmission it is more difficult to get optimum radiographs of plastics and especially of reinforced plastics than for example of metals. A procedure will be reported how to get with little effort optimum radiographs especially also in the range of long wave-length radiation corresponding 10 to 25 kV.P. (orig.) [de

  7. Chest pain related to crack cocaine smoking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eurman, D.W.; Potash, H.I.; Eyler, W.R.; Beute, G.H.; Paganussi, P.

    1988-01-01

    The chest radiographs of 80 patients coming to emergency room because of chest pain and/or shortness of breath following the smoking of highly potent crack cocaine were retrospectively reviewed. Four showed intrathoracic free air (pneumomediastinum in two, hemopneumothorax in one, and pneumothorax in one). Four other patients showed subsegmental atelectasis or parenchymal infiltrate. Radiographic detection of these abnormalities was of importance in the clinical management of the patients. This spectrum of findings is presented with a discussion of the pathophysiologic mechanisms and other potential complications of this form of drug abuse

  8. Computed tomography of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norsworthy, R.

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography of the chest can be useful in gaining detailed information of lung and mediastinal pathology, and in following up lesions during and after treatment. Considerations for dynamic and standard techniques are presented

  9. Lung cancer screening with computer aided detection chest radiography: design and results of a randomized, controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Mazzone

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of CT based lung cancer screening for the detection of early lung cancer is balanced by the high number of benign lung nodules identified, the unknown consequences of radiation from the test, and the potential costs of a CT based screening program. CAD chest radiography may improve the sensitivity of standard chest radiography while minimizing the risks of CT based screening.Study subjects were age 40-75 years with 10+ pack-years of smoking and/or an additional risk for developing lung cancer. Subjects were randomized to receive a PA view chest radiograph or placebo control (went through the process of being imaged but were not imaged. Images were reviewed first without then with the assistance of CAD. Actionable nodules were reported and additional evaluation was tracked. The primary outcome was the rate of developing symptomatic advanced stage lung cancer.1,424 subjects were enrolled. 710 received a CAD chest radiograph, 29 of whom were found to have an actionable lung nodule on prevalence screening. Of the 15 subjects who had a chest CT performed for additional evaluation, a lung nodule was confirmed in 4, 2 of which represented lung cancer. Both of the cancers were seen by the radiologist unaided and were identified by the CAD chest radiograph. The cumulative incidence of symptomatic advanced lung cancer was 0.42 cases per 100 person-years in the control arm; there were no events in the screening arm.Further evaluation is necessary to determine if CAD chest radiography has a role as a lung cancer screening tool. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01663155.

  10. Intrathoracic tuberculous lymphadenopathy in children: a guide to chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Anthony; Andronikou, Savvas [Bristol Royal Hospital for Children and the University of Bristol, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom); Pillay, Tanyia; Zar, Heather J. [University of Cape Town and Medical Research Council Unit on Child and Adolescent Health, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Goussard, Pierre [Tygerberg Hospital and the University of Stellenbosch, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2017-09-15

    Making the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in children can be difficult because microbiological confirmation is not often achieved. Diagnosis is therefore often based on clinical features in combination with chest radiograph findings. Chest radiographs can demonstrate lymphadenopathy of the hilar and para-tracheal regions on the anteroposterior view, and subcarinal lymphadenopathy on the lateral view. However poor interobserver agreement has been reported for radiologist and clinician assessment of lymphadenopathy. This might reflect the lack of standardised imaging criteria for diagnosis as well as radiologists' objectives for achieving sensitivity rather than specificity. In this paper the authors provide a pictorial aid of chest radiographs in children with culture-confirmed tuberculosis to help clinicians identify lymph node enlargement in primary pulmonary tuberculosis. This collection of images comprises chest radiographs accompanied by schematics and either CT or MRI scan confirmation of pathological lymph node enlargement at the positions commonly affected in tuberculosis. (orig.)

  11. Intrathoracic tuberculous lymphadenopathy in children: a guide to chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, Anthony; Andronikou, Savvas; Pillay, Tanyia; Zar, Heather J.; Goussard, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Making the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in children can be difficult because microbiological confirmation is not often achieved. Diagnosis is therefore often based on clinical features in combination with chest radiograph findings. Chest radiographs can demonstrate lymphadenopathy of the hilar and para-tracheal regions on the anteroposterior view, and subcarinal lymphadenopathy on the lateral view. However poor interobserver agreement has been reported for radiologist and clinician assessment of lymphadenopathy. This might reflect the lack of standardised imaging criteria for diagnosis as well as radiologists' objectives for achieving sensitivity rather than specificity. In this paper the authors provide a pictorial aid of chest radiographs in children with culture-confirmed tuberculosis to help clinicians identify lymph node enlargement in primary pulmonary tuberculosis. This collection of images comprises chest radiographs accompanied by schematics and either CT or MRI scan confirmation of pathological lymph node enlargement at the positions commonly affected in tuberculosis. (orig.)

  12. Pediatric Chest Pain-Low-Probability Referral: A Multi-Institutional Analysis From Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPs®), the Pediatric Health Information Systems Database, and the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahsheh, Ashraf S; O'Byrne, Michael L; Pastor, Bill; Graham, Dionne A; Fulton, David R

    2017-11-01

    We conducted a study to assess test characteristics of red-flag criteria for identifying cardiac disease causing chest pain and technical charges of low-probability referrals. Accuracy of red-flag criteria was ascertained through study of chest pain Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPs®) data. Patients were divided into 2 groups: Group1 (concerning clinical elements) and Group2 (without). We compared incidence of cardiac disease causing chest pain between these 2 groups. Technical charges of Group 2 were analyzed using the Pediatric Health Information System database. Potential savings for the US population was estimated using National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data. Fifty-two percent of subjects formed Group 1. Cardiac disease causing chest pain was identified in 8/1656 (0.48%). No heart disease was identified in patients in Group 2 ( P = .03). Applying red-flags in determining need for referral identified patients with cardiac disease causing chest pain with 100% sensitivity. Median technical charges for Group 2, over a 4-year period, were US2014$775 559. Eliminating cardiac testing of low-probability referrals would save US2014$3 775 182 in technical charges annually. Red-flag criteria were an effective screen for children with chest pain. Eliminating cardiac testing in children without red-flags for referral has significant technical charge savings.

  13. Regionally adaptive histogram equalization of the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrier, R H; Johnson, G A

    1987-01-01

    Advances in the area of digital chest radiography have resulted in the acquisition of high-quality images of the human chest. With these advances, there arises a genuine need for image processing algorithms specific to the chest, in order to fully exploit this digital technology. We have implemented the well-known technique of histogram equalization, noting the problems encountered when it is adapted to chest images. These problems have been successfully solved with our regionally adaptive histogram equalization method. With this technique histograms are calculated locally and then modified according to both the mean pixel value of that region as well as certain characteristics of the cumulative distribution function. This process, which has allowed certain regions of the chest radiograph to be enhanced differentially, may also have broader implications for other image processing tasks.

  14. Radiographic Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H.J; Yang, S.H. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    This report contains theory, procedure technique and interpretation of radiographic examination and written for whom preparing radiographic test Level II. To determine this baseline of technical competence in the examination, the individual must demonstrate a knowledge of radiography physics, radiation safety, technique development, radiation detection and measurement, facility design, and the characteristics of radiation-producing devices and their principles of operation. (author) 98 figs., 23 tabs.

  15. Radiographic positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, R.L.; Dennis, C.A.; May, C.

    1989-01-01

    This book concentrates on the routine radiographic examinations commonly performed. It details the wide variety of examinations possible and their place in initial learning and in the radiology department as references for those occasions when an unusual examination is requested. This book provides information ranging from basic terminology to skeletal positioning to special procedures. Positions are discussed and supplemented with a picture of a patient, the resulting radiograph, and a labeled diagram. Immobilization and proper shielding of the patient are also shown

  16. [Detection of lung nodules. New opportunities in chest radiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pötter-Lang, S.; Schalekamp, S.; Schaefer-Prokop, C.M.; Uffmann, M.

    2014-01-01

    Chest radiography still represents the most commonly performed X-ray examination because it is readily available, requires low radiation doses and is relatively inexpensive. However, as previously published, many initially undetected lung nodules are retrospectively visible in chest radiographs.The

  17. Pseudoprominent aorta: Radiographic findings and CT correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.T.; Shepard, J.A.O.; Stewart, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of a persistent left-sided superior vena cava (LSVC) in the absence of a right-sided superior vena cava (RSVC) may be suspected on a posteroanterior (PA) chest radiograph because of a prominent-appearing ascending aorta, which results from the absence of the RSVC. In the absence of an RSVC, the right upper lobe abuts and outlines the course of the ascending aorta, allowing better demonstration of its profile. This report describes a patient with this finding on a PA chest radiograph. Computed tomographic correlation is presented

  18. Pseudoprominent aorta: Radiographic findings and CT correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.T.; Shepard, J.A.O.; Stewart, W.J.

    1985-05-01

    The presence of a persistent left-sided superior vena cava (LSVC) in the absence of a right-sided superior vena cava (RSVC) may be suspected on a posteroanterior (PA) chest radiograph because of a prominent-appearing ascending aorta, which results from the absence of the RSVC. In the absence of an RSVC, the right upper lobe abuts and outlines the course of the ascending aorta, allowing better demonstration of its profile. This report describes a patient with this finding on a PA chest radiograph. Computed tomographic correlation is presented.

  19. The Yield from Routine Chest X-Rays in Stage 3 Breast Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Cancer of the breast is a common malignancy in Nigerian women and various imaging examinations, including the chest radiograph are routinely requested in all patients with this disease. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the positive yield from routine chest radiographs in Nigerian patients ...

  20. Cash's textbook of chest, heart and vascular disorders for physiotherapists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downie, P.A.; Innocenti, D.M.; Jackson, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    A very high proportion of the patients treated by physiotherapy will have had a chest radiograph (x-ray) either because their primary disease is pulmonary or there is some long standing heart or lung illness which should be taken into account during the management of an acute problem. This chapter outlines the principles involved in reading the radiograph

  1. CHEST SONOGRAPHY IN COMMON PAEDIATRIC CHEST DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Raghavendra Kulkarni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of the study is to determine the utility of chest sonography in common paediatric diseases and to present chest sonography images with possible explanation for the same. MATERIALS AND METHODS This retrospective study was conducted in Department of Paediatric Medicine, Bharati Medical College, Sangli. The patients admitted in paediatric ward, NICU, PICU with respiratory complaints and findings were subjected to chest sonography after chest x-ray. The chest sonography images were interpreted and an attempt was made to correlate with findings of chest xray. The information given by chest sonography was analysed and possible cause of image was evaluated. RESULTS The chest sonography appearances were found to be specific and in certain instances more informative than chest x-ray. It can differentiate between collapse and consolidation easily. The limitation of chest sonography was- it can assess only peripheral lung regions with inability to assess deeper lesions, especially with aerated peripheral lung. CONCLUSION The chest sonography is superior to chest x-ray in diagnosing minimal effusion and minimal pneumothorax. Also, when there is difficulty in differentiating pulmonary from pleural pathology. Though, chest sonography cannot replace chest x-ray, it is very useful additional investigation and often times very helpful with additional diagnostic information.

  2. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed x-ray exams and use a very small dose of ... of the inside of the chest. A chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and ...

  3. Quantitative Image Quality Comparison of Reduced- and Standard-Dose Dual-Energy Multiphase Chest, Abdomen, and Pelvis CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buty, Mario; Xu, Ziyue; Wu, Aaron; Gao, Mingchen; Nelson, Chelyse; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Teomete, Uygar; Celik, Haydar; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter; Mollura, Daniel J; Bagci, Ulas; Folio, Les R

    2017-06-01

    We present a new image quality assessment method for determining whether reducing radiation dose impairs the image quality of computed tomography (CT) in qualitative and quantitative clinical analyses tasks. In this Institutional Review Board-exempt study, we conducted a review of 50 patients (male, 22; female, 28) who underwent reduced-dose CT scanning on the first follow-up after standard-dose multiphase CT scanning. Scans were for surveillance of von Hippel-Lindau disease (N = 26) and renal cell carcinoma (N = 10). We investigated density, morphometric, and structural differences between scans both at tissue (fat, bone) and organ levels (liver, heart, spleen, lung). To quantify structural variations caused by image quality differences, we propose using the following metrics: dice similarity coefficient, structural similarity index, Hausdorff distance, gradient magnitude similarity deviation, and weighted spectral distance. Pearson correlation coefficient and Welch 2-sample t test were used for quantitative comparisons of organ morphometry and to compare density distribution of tissue, respectively. For qualitative evaluation, 2-sided Kendall Tau test was used to assess agreement among readers. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluations were designed to examine significance of image differences for clinical tasks. Qualitative judgment served as an overall assessment, whereas detailed quantifications on structural consistency, intensity homogeneity, and texture similarity revealed more accurate and global difference estimations. Qualitative and quantitative results indicated no significant image quality degradation. Our study concludes that low(er)-dose CT scans can be routinely used because of no significant loss in quantitative image information compared with standard-dose CT scans.

  4. A study of reduction of patient's radiation exposure by using the new ortho screen film systems (4). A study of the possibility of higher developing temperature by observation of chest phantom radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Hirofumi; Fukui, Toshihito; Yasutomo, Motokatsu; Takashima, Koosuke; Kuroda, Tokue; Nishitani, Hiromu.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, some new ortho screen-film systems (Konica EX system, Fuji AD system and Kodak IEF system) are being developed. The granulalities of these systems have been greatly improved and gross fogs are lower than those of traditional ortho screen-film systems. Even if the radiographs with the new ortho screen-film are processed at higher temperature than with the old ortho system such as Lanex Medium/TMC-RA (Eastman Kodak), the deterioration in the image quality is negligible. Furthermore, the speed of the screen-film systems increases as the developing temperature rises. Therefore, there may be the potential to reduce patients' radiation exposure without greatly decreasing the image quality. At that time, the problem arises how to determine the appropriate developing temperature. The limit of developing temperature for the new ortho system was determined as the temperature for getting the same gross fog in old ortho-system. In this report, phantom radiographs were made at various developing temperatures and the comments about the higher limit of the developing temperature were solicited from medical doctors who evaluated them. Consequently, it has been confirmed there are sufficient image quality in the radiographs which were developed at the higher developing temperature than at the temperature used in many faculties now. (author)

  5. A pilot study evaluating erect chest imaging in children, using the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To evaluate the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of erect paediatric chest radiographs obtained with the Statscan and to compare these with conventional erect chest images obtained with a CR system. Materials and methods. Thirty-three children with suspected chest pathology were enrolled randomly over ...

  6. A large chest wall tumour in an asymptomatic 15-year-old girl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K C; Lin, W C; Lee, Y C; Chen, J S; Hsu, H H

    2009-01-01

    A 15-year-old asymptomatic girl was found to have a large left lower chest wall mass associated with chest wall invasion on an opportunistic chest radiograph. The tumour was excised and shown to be a clear cell sarcoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered and she was disease free at her 10 month follow up. PMID:21686501

  7. A Reduction in Radiographic Exposure and Image Quality in Film ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop a protocol for the optimization of diagnostic chest radiography examination, the effect of radiographic exposure reduction on image quality is investigated. Procedure: Fourty-eight adult patients presenting for posterior-anterior (PA) chest radiography in a tertiary health care centre were categorized into 3 ...

  8. Implant Mandibular Overdentures Retained by Immediately Loaded Implants: A 1-Year Randomized Trial Comparing the Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes Between Mini Dental Implants and Standard-Sized Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygogiannis, Kostas; Aartman, Irene Ha; Parsa, Azin; Tahmaseb, Ali; Wismeijer, Daniel

    The aim of this 1-year randomized trial was to evaluate and compare the clinical and radiographic performance of four immediately loaded mini dental implants (MDIs) and two immediately loaded standard-sized tissue-level (STL) implants, placed in the interforaminal region of the mandible and used to retain mandibular overdentures (IODs) in completely edentulous patients. A total of 50 completely edentulous patients wearing conventional maxillary dentures and complaining about insufficient retention of their mandibular dentures were divided into two groups; 25 patients received four MDIs and 25 patients received two STL implants. The marginal bone loss (MBL) at the mesial and distal sides of each implant was assessed by means of standardized intraoral radiographs after a period of 1 year. Implant success and survival rates were also calculated. Immediate loading was possible for all patients in the first group. In the second group, an immediate loading protocol could not be applied for 10 patients. These patients were treated with a delayed loading protocol. A mean MBL of 0.42 ± 0.56 mm for the MDIs and 0.54 ± 0.49 mm for the immediately loaded STL implants was recorded at the end of the evaluation period. There was no statistically significant difference between the MDIs and the immediately loaded STL implants. Two MDIs failed, resulting in a survival rate of 98%. The success rate was 91%. For the immediately loaded conventional implants, the survival rate was 100% and the success rate 96.7% after 1 year of function. However, in 10 patients, the immediate loading protocol could not be followed. Considering the limitations of this short-term clinical study, immediate loading of four unsplinted MDIs or two splinted STL implants to retain mandibular overdentures seems to be a feasible treatment option. The marginal bone level changes around the MDIs were well within the clinically acceptable range.

  9. Chest x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... of the chest. assess disorders of the chest bones (vertebrae, ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft ...

  11. Chest radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - chest - discharge; Cancer - chest radiation; Lymphoma - chest radiation ... When you have radiation treatment for cancer, your body goes through changes. About 2 weeks after your first treatment: It may be hard ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gives detailed pictures of structures within the chest cavity, including the mediastinum , chest wall, pleura, heart and ... helpful to assess the vessels of the chest cavity (arteries and veins). MRA can also demonstrate an ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest is performed ...

  14. Cash's textbook of chest, heart and vascular disorders for physiotherapists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downie, P.A.; Innocenti, D.M.; Jackson, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book includes a chapter on chest radiographs. A very high proportion of the patients treated by physiotherapy will have had a chest radiograph (x-ray) either because their primary disease is pulmonary or there is some long standing heart or lung illness which should be taken into account during the management of an acute problem. The chapter outlines the principles involved in reading the radiograph.

  15. Pulmonary edema: radiographic differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Dong Soo; Choi, Young Hi; Kim, Seung Cheol; An, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jee Young; Park, Hee Hong

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using chest radiography to differentiate between three different etiologies of pulmonary edema. Plain chest radiographs of 77 patients, who were clinically confirmed as having pulmonary edema, were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were classified into three groups : group 1 (cardiogenic edema : n = 35), group 2 (renal pulmonary edema : n = 16) and group 3 (permeability edema : n = 26). We analyzed the radiologic findings of air bronchogram, heart size, peribronchial cuffing, septal line, pleural effusion, vascular pedicle width, pulmonary blood flow distribution and distribution of pulmonary edema. In a search for radiologic findings which would help in the differentiation of these three etiologies, each finding was assessed. Cardiogenic and renal pulmonary edema showed overlapping radiologic findings, except for pulmonary blood flow distribution. In cardiogenic pulmonary edema (n=35), cardiomegaly (n=29), peribronchial cuffing (n=29), inverted pulmonary blood flow distribution (n=21) and basal distribution of edema (n=20) were common. In renal pulmonary edema (n=16), cardiomegaly (n=15), balanced blood flow distribution (n=12), and central (n=9) or basal distribution of edema (n=7) were common. Permeability edema (n=26) showed different findings. Air bronchogram (n=25), normal blood flow distribution (n=14) and peripheral distribution of edema (n=21) were frequent findings, while cardiomegaly (n=7), peribronchial cuffing (n=7) and septal line (n=5) were observed in only a few cases. On plain chest radiograph, permeability edema can be differentiated from cardiogenic or renal pulmonary edema. The radiographic findings which most reliably differentiated these two etiologies were air bronchogram, distribution of pulmonary edema, peribronchial cuffing and heart size. Only blood flow distribution was useful for radiographic differentiation of cardiogenic and renal edema

  16. Assessment of Radiographic Image Quality by Visual Examination of Neutron Radiographs of the Calibration Fuel Pin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Up till now no reliable radiographic image quality standards exist for neutron radiography of nuclear reactor fuel. Under the Euratoro Neutron Radiography Working Group (NRWG) Test Program neutron radiographs were produced at different neutron radiography facilities within the European Community...... of a calibration fuel pin. The radiographs were made by the direct, transfer and tracketch methods using different film recording materials. These neutron radiographs of the calibration fuel pin were used for the assessement of radiographic image quality. This was done by visual examination of the radiographs...... and assessing their radiographic image quality on an arbitrary scale....

  17. Digital chest radiography: collimation and dose reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian

    Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials:A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from...... one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years of age are included in the study. The clinical research is performed between September and November 2014 where 3rd year Radiography students collect data on four Danish x-ray departments using identical procedures under guidance...... at the conference. Conclusion: Collimation improvement in basic chest radiography can reduce the radiation to female patients at chest x-ray examinations....

  18. Correlation Of Radiographic Patterns Of Pulmonary Tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients with higher CD4+ counts often present in \\"classic\\" fashion (upper zone infiltrates cavities) whereas those with low CD4+ counts are more likely to present atypically. The chest radiographic appearances of HIV-seropositive patients presenting with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) are diverse, creating difficulty in ...

  19. Chest trauma in children: current imaging guidelines and techniques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    Given the heterogeneous nature of pediatric chest trauma, the optimal imaging approach is tailored to the specific patient. Chest radiography remains the most important imaging modality for initial triage. The decision to perform a chest computed tomography scan should be based on the nature of the trauma, the child\\'s clinical condition, and the initial radiographic findings, taking the age-related pretest probabilities of serious injury into account. The principles of as low as reasonably achievable and Image Gently should be followed. The epidemiology and pathophysiology, imaging techniques, characteristic findings, and evidence-based algorithms for pediatric chest trauma are discussed.

  20. Relationship between alveolar bone measured by 125I absorptiometry with analysis of standardized radiographs: 2. Bjorn technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortman, L.F.; McHenry, K.; Hausmann, E.

    1982-01-01

    The Bjorn technique is widely used in periodontal studies as a standardized measure of alveolar bone. Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of using 125 I absorptiometry to measure bone mass. The purpose of this study was to compare 125 I absorptiometry with the Bjorn technique in detecting small sequential losses of alveolary bone. Four periodontal-like defects of incrementally increasing size were produced in alveolar bone in the posterior segment of the maxilla of a human skull. An attempt was made to sequentially reduce the amount of bone in 10% increments until no bone remained, a through and through defect. The bone remaining at each step was measured using 125 I absorptiometry. At each site the 125 I absorptiometry measurements were made at the same location by fixing the photon source to a prefabricated precision-made occlusal splint. This site was just beneath the crest and midway between the borders of two adjacent teeth. Bone loss was also determined by the Bjorn technique. Standardized intraoral films were taken using a custom-fitted acrylic clutch, and bone measurements were made from the root apex to coronal height of the lamina dura. A comparison of the data indicates that: (1) in early bone loss, less than 30%, the Bjorn technique underestimates the amount of loss, and (2) in advanced bone loss, more than 60% the Bjorn technique overestimates it

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest uses a powerful ... Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest ... limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  3. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  4. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x- ...

  5. Radiographers and trainee radiologists reporting accident radiographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buskov, L; Abild, A; Christensen, A

    2013-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy and clinical validity of reporting radiographers with that of trainee radiologists whom they have recently joined in reporting emergency room radiographs at Bispebjerg University Hospital.......To compare the diagnostic accuracy and clinical validity of reporting radiographers with that of trainee radiologists whom they have recently joined in reporting emergency room radiographs at Bispebjerg University Hospital....

  6. Quality of intensive care chest imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, G.; Wein, B.; Keulers, P.; Stargardt, A.; Guenther, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have evaluated the image quality of a stimulable phosphorous plate system in intensive care chest radiography. Four radiologists examined 308 chest radiographs (200 conventional, 108 digital) according to the following criteria: visibility of catheters, tubes (artificial objects), bronchi, central and peripheral vessels, diaphragm, trachea, and retrocardial lung parenchyma. Detectability of these structures was classified as good, poor, or impossible to see. In addition, optical density was measured in the region of liver, heart, and lung. Results were evaluated by Student and υ test

  7. The chest X-ray in antiglomerular basement membrane antibody disease (Goodpasture's syndrome)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowley, N.B.; Steiner, R.E.; Chin, W.S.

    1979-01-01

    The chest radiographs of 25 patients with proven antiglomerular basement membrane antibody disease (Goodpasture's syndrome) were analysed. All except two of the patients had pulmonary haemorrhage at some stage of their disease. Altogether there were 39 episodes of pulmonary haemorrhage, 25 being relapses. During seven episodes the chest radiograph was normal. Relapses of pulmonary haemorrhage never occurred in isolation but were usually associated with infection (not necessarily a chest infection) or occasionally fluid overload. Conversely fluid overload or infection were always associated with pulmonary haemorrhage provided there were high or rising titres of circulating antibodies at the time. Therefore in a patient with antiglomerular basement membrane antibody disease, the presence of shadowing in the lung fields on the chest radiograph almost invariably means the patient has pulmonary haemorrhage whether or not pulmonary oedema or a chest infection are present. Limitation of shadowing by a fissure, loss of major portions of the diaphragmatic or cardiac silhouette, involvement of the lung apex or costophrenic angles suggest an underlying chest infection. Septal lines suggest fluid overload. Pleural effusions are seen with chest infections and fluid overload. The carbon monoxide uptake (KCO) was invariably high in the presence of pulmonary haemorrhage even if the chest radiograph was normal. A combined use of KCO and chest radiographs is the best method of monitoring lung disease in these patients. (author)

  8. [Imaging of pleural diseases: evaluation of imaging methods based on chest radiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyraz, Necdet; Kalkan, Havva; Ödev, Kemal; Ceran, Sami

    2017-03-01

    The most commonly employed radiologic method in diagnosis of pleural diseases is conventional chest radiograph. The commonest chest- X-Ray findings are the presence of pleural effusion and thickening. Small pleural effusions are not readily identified on posteroanterior chest radiograph. However, lateral decubitus chest radiograph and chest ultrasonography may show small pleural effusions. These are more efficient methods than posteroanterior chest radiograph in the erect position for demonstrating small amounts of free pleural effusions. Chest ultrasonograph may be able to help in distinguishing the pleural pathologies from parenchymal lesions. On chest radiograph pleural effusions or pleural thickening may obscure the visibility of the underlying disease or parenchymal abnormality. Thus, computed tomography (CT) may provide additional information of determining the extent and severity of pleural disease and may help to differentiate malign pleural lesions from the benign ones. Moreover, CT may provide the differentiation of parenchmal abnormalities from pleural pathologies. CT (coronal and sagittal reformatted images) that also show invasion of chest wall, mediastinum and diaphragm, as well as enlarged hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes. Standart non-invasive imaging techniques may be supplemented with magnetic resonans imaging (MRI).

  9. Cough in Ambulatory Immunocompromised Adults: CHEST Expert Panel Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Mark J; Ireland, Belinda; Narasimhan, Mangala; French, Cynthia; Irwin, Richard S

    2017-11-01

    Cough is a common symptom prompting patients to seek medical care. Like patients in the general population, patients with compromised immune systems also seek care for cough. However, it is unclear whether the causes of cough in immunocompromised patients who are deemed unlikely to have a life-threating condition and a normal or unchanged chest radiograph are similar to those in persons with cough and normal immune systems. We conducted a systematic review to answer the question: What are the most common causes of cough in ambulatory immunodeficient adults with normal chest radiographs? Studies of patients ≥ 18 years of age with immune deficiency, cough of any duration, and normal or unchanged chest radiographs were included and assessed for relevance and quality. Based on the systematic review, suggestions were developed and voted on using the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) methodology framework. The results of the systematic review revealed no high-quality evidence to guide the clinician in determining the likely causes of cough specifically in immunocompromised ambulatory patients with normal chest radiographs. Based on a systematic review, we found no evidence to assess whether or not the proper initial evaluation of cough in immunocompromised patients is different from that in immunocompetent persons. A consensus of the panel suggested that the initial diagnostic algorithm should be similar to that for immunocompetent persons but that the context of the type and severity of the immune defect, geographic location, and social determinants be considered. The major modifications to the 2006 CHEST Cough Guidelines are the suggestions that TB should be part of the initial evaluation of patients with cough and HIV infection who reside in regions with a high prevalence of TB, regardless of the radiographic findings, and that specific causes and immune defects be considered in all patients in whom the initial evaluation is unrevealing. Copyright

  10. Radiographic element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, T.I.; Jones, C.G.

    1983-01-01

    Radiographic elements are disclosed having first and second silver halide emulsion layers comprised of a dispersing medium and radiation-sensitive silver halide grains, and a support interposed between said silver halide emulsion layers capable of transmitting radiation to which said second silver halide emulsion layer is responsive. These elements are characterized in that at least said first silver halide emulsion layer contains tabular silver halide grains and spectral sensitizing dye adsorbed to the surface of the grains. Crossover can be improved in relation to the imaging characteristics. (author)

  11. Errors in chest x-ray interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woznitza, N.; Piper, K.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Reporting of adult chest x-rays by appropriately trained radiographers is frequently used in the United Kingdom as one method to maintain a patient focused radiology service in times of increasing workload. With models of advanced practice being developed in Australia, New Zealand and Canada, the spotlight is on the evidence base which underpins radiographer reporting. It is essential that any radiographer who extends their scope of practice to incorporate definitive clinical reporting perform at a level comparable to a consultant radiologist. In any analysis of performance it is important to quantify levels of sensitivity and specificity and to evaluate areas of error and variation. A critical review of the errors made by reporting radiographers in the interpretation of adult chest x-rays will be performed, examining performance in structured clinical examinations, clinical audit and a diagnostic accuracy study from research undertaken by the authors, and including studies which have compared the performance of reporting radiographers and consultant radiologists. overall performance will be examined and common errors discussed using a case based approach. Methods of error reduction, including multidisciplinary team meetings and ongoing learning will be considered

  12. Radiographic tales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mussmann, Bo Redder

    Purpose Until now a large number of scientific studies have focused on technological aspects of radiography. This study is a step in another direction which examines the relationship between man and technology within radiography instead of considering man and technology as separate entities. Meth...... of their narrative alertness. Errors and failure to keep the time schedule can, however, lead the radiographers to a change of perspective that makes them displace man from the scene of radiography by playing on the premises of technology........ Methods The study is designed as an observational study with a narrative approach. The participant observations took place in a Danish radiological department and involved 20 examinations followed up by three semi-structured interviews. Conclusions Through emergent narratives radiographers construct...... and symptoms. The plot is organized in a relatively concrete and fairly limited space of possibilities, i.e. the number of different diagnoses that can be made. In opposition to the diagnostic plot stands the lifestory as a masterplot. In the lifestory the examination is plotted as a significant experience...

  13. A study on the difference in the accuracy between radiographs and CT in detecting pulmonary lesions of tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noumi, Fumiko; Kaneko, Takeshi; Inoue, Masako

    2010-01-01

    Classification of pulmonary tuberculosis designated by the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis is a classification of pulmonary tuberculosis on radiographs findings. We analyzed both radiographs and CT in 150 patients with lung tuberculosis at the diagnosis based on the society classification. In 52 patients, the classification by radiographs was not consistent with that by CT. Generally, radiographs missed small and faint opacities in the lung. There were cases which showed tuberculous opacities in CT, diagnosed as normal by Radiographs. It is concluded that the diagnosis of the pulmonary tuberculosis by chest radiographs may lead to underdiagnosis and underestimation of its severity. Hence, chest CT is very useful for making an accurate diagnosis. (author)

  14. Chest physiotherapy in acute bronchiolitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, M S; Martin, J A; Cartlidge, P H; Ng, Y K; Wright, N A

    1985-01-01

    Forty four children with acute bronchiolitis were given twice daily chest physiotherapy in addition to standard supportive measures and were compared with 46 controls who were not given physiotherapy. There was no clinically discernable benefit on the course of their illness.

  15. Chest physiotherapy in acute bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, M S; Martin, J A; Cartlidge, P H; Ng, Y K; Wright, N A

    1985-11-01

    Forty four children with acute bronchiolitis were given twice daily chest physiotherapy in addition to standard supportive measures and were compared with 46 controls who were not given physiotherapy. There was no clinically discernable benefit on the course of their illness.

  16. Radiographic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapidus, S.N.

    1979-01-01

    Raytheon Company, U.S.A. have patented an on-line electronic system of normalising the responses from the photomultiplier tubes used in conjunction with a scintillator in an X-ray radiographic camera. A problem with present cameras is that the individual photomultipliers have different intensity responses which also change in time with respect to each other. The individual responses of each photomultiplier tube are measured with a uniform sheet of radioactive material in front of the camera. The associated electronic equipment then calculates scaling factors which give all photomultiplier tubes an identical response and then places these factors in an addressable store. The store is then addressed in an on-line mode to produce a visual display of the transmitted X-rays. (U.K.)

  17. Making the GRADE: CHEST Updates Its Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekemper, Rebecca L; Patel, Sheena; Mette, Stephen A; Ornelas, Joseph; Ouellette, Daniel R; Casey, Kenneth R

    2018-03-01

    The American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) has been at the forefront of evidence-based clinical practice guideline development for more than 2 decades. In 2006, CHEST adopted a modified system of Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) to support their rigorous guideline development methodology. The evolution of CHEST's Living Guidelines Model, as well as their collaborative efforts with other organizations, has necessitated improvements in their guideline development methodology. CHEST has made the decision to transition to the standard GRADE method for rating the certainty of evidence and grading recommendations in their evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, a deviation from the modified approach that was adopted in 2006. The standard GRADE approach will be used to grade recommendations in all CHEST guidelines, including updates to previously published guidelines. CHEST's adoption of a standard GRADE approach will ensure that its guideline development methodology is more consistent with that used by other organizations, will better align evidence synthesis methods, and will result in more explicit and easy to understand recommendations. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. All rights reserved.

  18. Screening for traumatic aortic tear with chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raptopoulos, V.; Sheiman, R.G.; Phillips, D.A.; Davidoff, A.; Silva, W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines if chest CT can be used in the screening of traumatic aortic tear, using CT evidence of mediastinal fluid (presumably blood) as a criterion for aortography. Dynamic CT limited to the region of the aortic arch was performed in all patients undergoing abdominal CT because of blunt trauma. Over a period of 2 years, 131 such patients also had thoracic aortograms performed within 123 hours of CT. Traumatic tear of the aorta was identified in 10 patients; all had abnormal CT scans (evidence of fluid), but only eight had abnormal chest radiographs. Of the 121 patients with normal aortograms, 86 had normal and 35 had abnormal CT scans. The chest radiographs were normal in 18 and abnormal in 103. Comparing chest radiography with CT, there was no significant difference in sensitivity (80% vs 100%), but the specificity and accuracy of CT were significantly higher (71% vs 15% and 74% vs 20%, respectively)

  19. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vascular and lymphatic malformations of the chest. assess disorders of the chest bones (vertebrae, ribs and sternum) and ... for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to ...

  1. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a ... posted: How to Obtain and Share ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to assess the anatomy and function of the heart and its blood flow. Tell your doctor about ... chest cavity, including the mediastinum , chest wall, pleura, heart and vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce ...

  4. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used ... diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A ...

  5. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used to help evaluate shortness of breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and monitor ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... the chest cavity, including the mediastinum , chest wall, pleura, heart and vessels, from almost any angle. MRI ... sac around the heart) disease. characterize mediastinal or pleural lesions seen by other imaging modalities, such as ...

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of chest X-ray dose-equivalent CT for assessing calcified atherosclerotic burden of the thoracic aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli, Michael; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Leschka, Sebastian; Warschkow, René; Wildermuth, Simon; Hechelhammer, Lukas; Bauer, Ralf W

    2017-12-01

    To determine the value of ultralow-dose chest CT for estimating the calcified atherosclerotic burden of the thoracic aorta using tin-filter CT and compare its diagnostic accuracy with chest direct radiography. A total of 106 patients from a prospective, IRB-approved single-centre study were included and underwent standard dose chest CT (1.7 ± 0.7 mSv) by clinical indication followed by ultralow-dose CT with 100 kV and spectral shaping by a tin filter (0.13 ± 0.01 mSv) to achieve chest X-ray equivalent dose in the same session. Two independent radiologists reviewed the CT images, rated image quality and estimated presence and extent of calcification of aortic valve, ascending aorta and aortic arch. Conventional radiographs were also reviewed for presence of aortic calcifications. The sensitivity of ultralow-dose CT for the detection of calcifications of the aortic valve, ascending aorta and aortic arch was 93.5, 96.2 and 96.2%, respectively, compared with standard dose CT. The sensitivity for the detection of thoracic aortic calcification was significantly lower on chest X-ray (52.3%) compared with ultralow-dose CT (p < 0.001). A reliable estimation of calcified atherosclerotic burden of the thoracic aorta can be achieved with modern tin-filter CT at dose values comparable to chest direct radiography. Advances in knowledge: Our findings suggest that ultralow-dose CT is an excellent tool for assessing the calcified atherosclerotic burden of the thoracic aorta with higher diagnostic accuracy than conventional chest radiography and importantly without the additional cost of increased radiation dose.

  8. Prevalence of radiographic appearance of pneumoconiosis in an unexposed blue collar population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellan, R.M.; Sanderson, W.T.; Petersen, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    Blue collar employees currently working in environments free from exposure to respiratory hazards were examined with chest radiography and a standard occupational history questionnaire. Workers who had worked for a total of 5 yr or more in previous jobs with possible hazardous respiratory exposures were excluded. Each radiograph was read independently by 3 NIOSH-certified ''B'' readers. For small opacities, the median profusion was accepted as a summary reading. The 1,422 readable films represented a population of 50.6% males, 49.4% females, 52.5% whites, 44.2% blacks, 47.0% current smokers, and 38.5% nonsmokers. The mean age was 33.8 yr, with a range from 16 to 70 yr. Small opacities of profusion greater than or equal to 1/0 were identified in only 3 (0.21%) of the radiographs--2 with small rounded opacities and 1 with small irregular opacities. Small irregular opacities of profusion category greater than or equal to 0/1 were statistically associated with age, gender, and pack-years of smoking. The results suggest that using the median of 3 independent readings should rarely result in interpretation of chest radiographs as ''positive'' for pneumoconiosis in active workers who have not had significant dust exposure

  9. Plain radiographic diagnosis of thrombosis of left atrial appendage in mitral valve disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, S.; Watabe, T.; Kuribayashi, S.

    1983-01-01

    Conventional posteroanterior chest radiographs of 42 patients with mitral valve disease who had had surgery were analyzed, and particular attention was directed to the presence or absence of the convexity of the left lower midcardiac border (left artrial segment). The flatness or concavity of this segment, despite other evidence of left atrial enlargement, was observed in six (60%) of 10 patients who had left atrial thrombosis, and in three (9%) of 32 patients who did not have thrombosis (false positive diagnosis). Four of the 10 patients who had left atrial thrombosis did not show this finding on the radiographs (false negative diagnosis). One of these four had a thrombus only against the posterior wall of the body of the left atrium. Therefore, the accuracy in the diagnosis of thrombosis of the left atrial appendage was 66.7% (six of nine) for patients who had thrombosis of the appendage. Standard chest radiographs are important in the evaluation of the patient with thrombosis of the left atrial appendage

  10. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vessels and heart chambers. display lymph nodes and blood vessels, including vascular and lymphatic malformations of the chest. assess disorders of the chest bones (vertebrae, ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles and fat). assess for pericardial (thin sac ...

  11. Chest Tube Thoracostomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the space around the lungs (called a pleural effusion) . A chest tube may also be needed when a patient has ... or chest CT are also done to evaluate pleural fluid. If the X-ray shows a need for a chest tube to drain fluid or air, the procedure is ...

  12. High-Throughput Classification of Radiographs Using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkomar, Alvin; Lingam, Sneha; Taylor, Andrew G; Blum, Michael; Mongan, John

    2017-02-01

    The study aimed to determine if computer vision techniques rooted in deep learning can use a small set of radiographs to perform clinically relevant image classification with high fidelity. One thousand eight hundred eighty-five chest radiographs on 909 patients obtained between January 2013 and July 2015 at our institution were retrieved and anonymized. The source images were manually annotated as frontal or lateral and randomly divided into training, validation, and test sets. Training and validation sets were augmented to over 150,000 images using standard image manipulations. We then pre-trained a series of deep convolutional networks based on the open-source GoogLeNet with various transformations of the open-source ImageNet (non-radiology) images. These trained networks were then fine-tuned using the original and augmented radiology images. The model with highest validation accuracy was applied to our institutional test set and a publicly available set. Accuracy was assessed by using the Youden Index to set a binary cutoff for frontal or lateral classification. This retrospective study was IRB approved prior to initiation. A network pre-trained on 1.2 million greyscale ImageNet images and fine-tuned on augmented radiographs was chosen. The binary classification method correctly classified 100 % (95 % CI 99.73-100 %) of both our test set and the publicly available images. Classification was rapid, at 38 images per second. A deep convolutional neural network created using non-radiological images, and an augmented set of radiographs is effective in highly accurate classification of chest radiograph view type and is a feasible, rapid method for high-throughput annotation.

  13. Automated tube potential selection for standard chest and abdominal CT in follow-up patients with testicular cancer: comparison with fixed tube potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnannt, Ralph; Winklehner, Anna; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem; Eberli, Daniel; Knuth, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate prospectively, in patients with testicular cancer, the radiation dose-saving potential and image quality of contrast-enhanced chest and abdominal CT with automated tube potential selection. Forty consecutive patients with testicular cancer underwent contrast-enhanced arterio-venous chest and portal-venous abdominal CT with automated tube potential selection (protocol B; tube potential 80-140 kVp), which is based on the attenuation of the CT topogram. All had a first CT at 120 kVp (protocol A) using the same 64-section CT machine and similar settings. Image quality was assessed; dose information (CTDI vol ) was noted. Image noise and attenuation in the liver and spleen were significantly higher for protocol B (P vol was significantly lower for protocol B compared to protocol A (reduction by 12%, P < 0.01). In patients with testicular cancer, radiation dose of chest and abdominal CT can be reduced with automated tube potential selection, while image quality is preserved. (orig.)

  14. Mediastinal hemorrhage: An evaluation of radiographic manifestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodring, J.H.; Loh, F.K.; Kryscio, R.J.

    1984-04-01

    Eleven common radiographic signs of mediastinal hemorrhage were evaluated by two observers for the following three patient groups: normal subjects, patients with mediastinal hemorrhage and no arterial injury, and patients with major thoracic arterial injury. Supine chest radiographs were studied in all cases. Four major conclusions can be made based upon these finding. M/C ratio (mediastinal width to chest width), tracheal deviation, left hemothorax, paraspinal line widening, and aorto-pulmonary window opacification do not reliably separate these three groups of patients. The diagnosis of mediastinal hemorrhage may be made if the aortic contour is abnormal or if one of the following signs is positive: abnormal mediastinal width, apical cap, widening of the right paratracheal stripe, or deviation of the nasogastric tube. Due to interobserver variation, there is good agreement between observers for the following four signs only: transverse mediastinal width, tracheal deviation, nasogastric tube deviation, nasogastric tube deviation, and right paratracheal stripe widening.

  15. Chest radiography practice in critically ill patients: a postal survey in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graat, Marleen E; Hendrikse, Karin A; Spronk, Peter E; Korevaar, Johanna C; Stoker, Jaap; Schultz, Marcus J

    2006-01-01

    To ascertain current chest radiography practice in intensive care units (ICUs) in the Netherlands. Postal survey: a questionnaire was sent to all ICUs with > 5 beds suitable for mechanical ventilation; pediatric ICUs were excluded. When an ICU performed daily-routine chest radiographs in any group of patients it was considered to be a 'daily-routine chest radiography' ICU. From the number of ICUs responding, 63% practice a daily-routine strategy, in which chest radiographs are obtained on a daily basis without any specific reason. A daily-routine chest radiography strategy is practiced less frequently in university-affiliated ICUs (50%) as compared to other ICUs (68%), as well as in larger ICUs (> 20 beds, 50%) as compared to smaller ICUs (< 20 beds, 65%) (P > 0.05). Remarkably, physicians that practice a daily-routine strategy consider daily-routine radiographs helpful in guiding daily practice in less than 30% of all performed radiographs. Chest radiographs are considered essential for verification of the position of invasive devices (81%) and for diagnosing pneumothorax, pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (82%, 74% and 69%, respectively). On demand chest radiographs are obtained after introduction of thoracic drains, central venous lines and endotracheal tubes in 98%, 84% and 75% of responding ICUs, respectively. Chest films are also obtained in case of ventilatory deterioration (49% of responding ICUs), and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (59%), tracheotomy (58%) and mini-tracheotomy (23%). There is notable lack of consensus on chest radiography practice in the Netherlands. This survey suggests that a large number of intensivists may doubt the value of daily-routine chest radiography, but still practice a daily-routine strategy

  16. Radiographic findings in pulmonary hypertension from unresolved embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, W.W. III; Hoeck, B.E.; Chitwood, W.R. Jr.; Lyerly, H.K.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.; Chen, J.T.T.

    1985-04-01

    Pulmonary artery hypertension with chronic pulmonary embolism is an uncommon entity that is potentially treatable with pulmonary embolectomy. Although the classic radiographic features have been described, several recent investigators report a significant percentage of these patients with normal chest radiographs. In a series of 22 patients, no normal radiographs were seen. Findings included cardiomegaly (86.4%) with right-sided enlargement (68.4%), right descending pulmonary artery enlargement (54.5%), azygos vein enlargement (27.3%), mosaic oligemia (68.2%), chronic volume loss (27.3%), atelectasis and/or effusion (22.7%), and pleural thickening (13.6%). Good correlation with specific areas of diminished vascularity was seen on chest radiographs compared with pulmonary angiograms.

  17. Radiographic findings in pulmonary hypertension from unresolved embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, W.W. III; Hoeck, B.E.; Chitwood, W.R. Jr.; Lyerly, H.K.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.; Chen, J.T.T.

    1985-01-01

    Pulmonary artery hypertension with chronic pulmonary embolism is an uncommon entity that is potentially treatable with pulmonary embolectomy. Although the classic radiographic features have been described, several recent investigators report a significant percentage of these patients with normal chest radiographs. In a series of 22 patients, no normal radiographs were seen. Findings included cardiomegaly (86.4%) with right-sided enlargement (68.4%), right descending pulmonary artery enlargement (54.5%), azygos vein enlargement (27.3%), mosaic oligemia (68.2%), chronic volume loss (27.3%), atelectasis and/or effusion (22.7%), and pleural thickening (13.6%). Good correlation with specific areas of diminished vascularity was seen on chest radiographs compared with pulmonary angiograms

  18. Resolution of lung collapse in a preterm neonate following chest physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Yesha Subhashchandra; Shetye, Jaimala; Nanavati, Ruchi; Mehta, Amita

    2011-09-01

    Preterm neonates are prone to lung collapse because of many reasons. Chest physiotherapy can be used successfully in such cases with lung collapse in order to facilitate removal of secretions and re-expansion of the lung. With the help of a chest radiograph, improvement can be noted as in this case.

  19. Radiation doses and image quality in pediatric chest X-ray for the diagnosis of pneumonia in selected Latin American countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, P.; Fleitas, I.; Cotelo, E.; Estevan, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Pneumonia and acute lower respiratory infections in general, is the leading cause of child death in developing countries. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 4 millions of children die annually due to this disease. Despite the growing use of vaccination as an alternate approach to reduce mortality, the increasing antimicrobial resistance and the high costs of vaccines remain important obstacles in the global struggle against the disease. The usual treatment strategy begins with a clinical examination of the patient followed by the prescription of a chest X-ray. Radiography would appear as the best available method for diagnosing pneumonia only if radiologists (and other health professionals such as pediatricians) knew how to interpret the images showed in the radiographs, and these meeting the standards of quality (anatomic structures, image contrast and optical density, and patient dose among other factors). On the other hand, special attention should be paid on patient doses due to children's specific radiosensitivity, repeated and extended use of chest x-ray in all Radiology Departments, and high rejection rate due to both equipment malfunction and to human skills shortcomings. Patient doses of chest X-ray performed to children less than 5 years old in PAHO Sentinel Hospitals for surveillance of bacterial pneumonias in various Latin American countries were estimated using technical parameters and equipment specifications. Image quality was compared to WHO criteria for chest X-rays quality. Results showing differences in patient doses translates on one hand the impact of specific characteristics of the radiological equipment, including equipment limitations and performance of the radiographs and on the other various and divers levels of health professionals skills and training on image quality interpretation and dose optimization. The study concludes that professionals' training and education on chest radiographs image quality constitutes

  20. X radiations dosimetry in pulmonary radiographs: study of a non standard room; Dosimetrie des rayons X dans les radiographies pulmonaires: etude d'une salle non-standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bied, J.C.; Philippon, B. [Hopital Hotel-Dieu, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1998-07-01

    A radiograph room can present a default of radiation protection. But it is possible that the radiation protection is here only to mask a protection of an other type. For the case of a lungs type radiograph room, the monitoring does not reveal any problem of radiation protection. These results do not bring to the fore any high radiations doses. But they are an illustration of operators positions, and these ones should be better protected at the extremity of the room, that should allow a correct vision of lungs radiographs and a more important limitation of irradiation. (N.C.)

  1. European Guidelines for AP/PA chest X-rays: routinely satisfiable in a paediatric radiology division?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschauner, Sebastian; Marterer, Robert; Guebitz, Michael; Weissensteiner, Sabine; Sorantin, Erich [Medical University of Graz, Division of Paediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Graz (Austria); Kalmar, Peter I. [Medical University of Graz, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Graz (Austria); Talakic, Emina [Medical University of Graz, Division of General Radiological Diagnostics, Department of Radiology, Graz (Austria)

    2016-02-15

    Accurate collimation helps to reduce unnecessary irradiation and improves radiographic image quality, which is especially important in the radiosensitive paediatric population. For AP/PA chest radiographs in children, a minimal field size (MinFS) from ''just above the lung apices'' to ''T12/L1'' with age-dependent tolerance is suggested by the 1996 European Commission (EC) guidelines, which were examined qualitatively and quantitatively at a paediatric radiology division. Five hundred ninety-eight unprocessed chest X-rays (45 % boys, 55 % girls; mean age 3.9 years, range 0-18 years) were analysed with a self-developed tool. Qualitative standards were assessed based on the EC guidelines, as well as the overexposed field size and needlessly irradiated tissue compared to the MinFS. While qualitative guideline recommendations were satisfied, mean overexposure of +45.1 ± 18.9 % (range +10.2 % to +107.9 %) and tissue overexposure of +33.3 ± 13.3 % were found. Only 4 % (26/598) of the examined X-rays completely fulfilled the EC guidelines. This study presents a new chest radiography quality control tool which allows assessment of field sizes, distances, overexposures and quality parameters based on the EC guidelines. Utilising this tool, we detected inadequate field sizes, inspiration depths, and patient positioning. Furthermore, some debatable EC guideline aspects were revealed. (orig.)

  2. Estimation of Pleural Fluid Volumes on Chest Radiography Using Computed Tomography Volumetric Analysis: An Update of the Visual Prediction Rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammarappallil, Joseph G; Anderson, Sarah A; Danelson, Kerry A; Stitzel, Joel A; Chiles, Caroline

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the volumes of pleural fluid (PF) required to produce visible menisci in the lateral and posterior costophrenic angles (CPA) and obscure the hemidiaphragms (HD) on upright frontal and lateral chest radiographs (CXRs), using volumetric analysis of chest computed tomography (CT). A total of 98 patients with small pleural effusions on chest CT, in whom CXRs were obtained within a 24-hour interval, were selected for retrospective analysis. PF within each hemithorax was quantified using a semiautomatic method of image segmentation. A cardiothoracic radiologist scored each hemithorax on each CXR from 0 to 3 (0-normal CPA, 1--fluid meniscus below the HD, 2--fluid meniscus at the level of the HD, 3--fluid opacity obscures the HD). Each CXR category was correlated with CT-determined PF volumes. A mean of 20 mL of PF was present on CT without a visible correlate on CXR. A meniscus below the HD on CXR correlated with roughly 100 mL; a meniscus occurring at the HD correlated with roughly 250 mL; a meniscus obscuring the HD correlated with a mean of approximately 650 mL. There were large standard deviations for all PF volumes. We provide guidelines for estimating PF volumes on upright frontal and lateral CXRs. We also confirm that the lateral radiograph is more sensitive for detection of small pleural effusions, with blunting of the posterior CPA only correlating with a mean of 26 mL of PF.

  3. Computer-aided diagnosis in chest radiography: beyond nodules.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginneken, B. van; Hogeweg, L.E.; Prokop, M.

    2009-01-01

    Chest radiographs are the most common exam in radiology. They are essential for the management of various diseases associated with high mortality and morbidity and display a wide range of findings, many of them subtle. In this survey we identify a number of areas beyond pulmonary nodules that could

  4. ORIGINAL ARTICLE ORIG ORIGI A pilot study evaluating erect chest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-11-19

    Nov 19, 2009 ... X-ray machine coupled with a Fuji FCR 5000 CR system. Image quality and diagnostic ... tion attributable to diagnostic imaging.1,4 A reduction in the radiation dose of a chest radiograph would ..... were implicated in 93% of diagnostic errors encountered on the Statscan images. Evaluation of the major ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Sponsored by Please note ...

  6. Radiographic abnormalities in tricyclic acid overdose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varnell, R.M.; Richardson, M.L.; Vincent, J.M.; Godwin, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Several case reports have described adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) secondary to tricyclic acid (TCA) overdose. During a 1-year period 83 patients requiring intubation secondary to drug overdose were evaluated. Abnormalities on chest radiographs occurred in 26 (50%) of the 54 patients with TCA overdose, compared to six (21%) of the 29 patients overdosed with other drugs. In addition, five (9%) of the patients with TCA overdose subsequently had radiographic and clinical abnormalities meeting the criteria for ARDS. Only one (3%) of the patients with non-TCA overdose subsequently had change suggesting ARDS. TCAs should be added to the list of drugs associated with ARDS, and TCA overdose should be considered a major risk factor in the development of radiographically evident abnormalities

  7. How Often is Chest Radiography Ordered for Patients with Pediatric Asthma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Özmen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although many children with asthma can be diagnosed clinically, chest radiographs are routinely requested in asthma attacks. The aim of this study is to determine how often chest radiographs are requested and the factors affecting these requests in pediatric patients with asthma. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed by studying the electronic radiographic records of pediatric patients with asthma who were referred to our Pediatric Allergy and Immunology Department over a six-month period. A questionnaire was designed to obtain further information from the parents of the patients. Results: The records of 100 children with bronchial asthma, aged 21 to 192 months, were evaluated. The average number of chest radiographs was 3.9±3.8 (between 1-30. Fifty-one percent of the children underwent three or more chest radiographs. There was a positive correlation between the number of chest X-rays before asthma diagnosis and the frequency of antibiotic usage (r=0.222, p=0.026. An inverse correlation was found between the number of chest radiographs and the patients’ ages and the age at which asthma was diagnosed (r=−0.335, p=0.001; r=−0.211, p=0.035, respectively. In contrast, there was a positive correlation between the number of chest X-rays and the number of hospital admissions (r=0.205, p=0.040. A positive correlation between the frequency of antibiotic usage and the annual number of hospital admissions was determined (r=0.428, p=0.000. Furthermore, a positive correlation between the frequency of antibiotic usage and the frequency of asthma attacks was observed (r=0.292, p=0.003. Conclusion: The results of our study show that the use of chest radiographs is high in cases of childhood asthma, especially in younger children.

  8. Comparison of extravascular lung water volume with radiographic findings in dogs with experimentally increased permeability pulmonary edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, A.; Okumura, S.; Miyamoto, T.; Hagio, M.; Fujinaga, T.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between extravascular lung water volume (ELWV) and chest radiographical findings was studied in general-anesthetized beagles. The dogs were experimentally injected with oleic acid to increase pulmonary vascular permeability. When the ELWV value in the dogs increased more than approximately 37% from the control value, their chest radiographs began to show signs of pulmonary edema. At this time, the chest X-ray density increased to 10% above the control level. PaO2 decreased, and PaCO2 increased after the administration of oleic acid. This clearly showed that the pulmonary gas exchange function was reduced following increasing ELWV. This comparison showed that probably the thermal-sodium double indicator dilution measurement of ELWV can detect slight hyperpermeability pulmonary edema that does not show on chest radiographs. The chest radiograph was therefore not suitable for the detection of slight pulmonary edema, because it did not show any changes in the early stages in hyperpermeability pulmonary edema

  9. Tricuspid regurgitation after blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone Gabrijelčič

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Our data support the fact that an injury of the tricuspid valve due to blunt chest trauma is rare and easily overlooked. Therefore, ultrasound of the heart should be done in all cases of blunt chest trauma. If negative, it should be repeated. Transoesophageal approach is more reliable than the transthoracic one. The gold standard for therapy is a valve repair, which should be done early enough to prevent further morbidity and mortality.

  10. Diagnostic Accuracy of Ultrasonography and Radiography in Initial Evaluation of Chest Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaei, Ali; Hatamabadi, Hamid Reza; Heidary, Kamran; Alimohammadi, Hosein; Tarbiyat, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Application of chest radiography for all multiple trauma patients is associated with a significant increase in total costs, exposure to radiation, and overcrowding of the emergency department. Ultrasound has been introduced as an alternative diagnostic tool in this regard. The aim of the present study is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of chest ultrasonography and radiography in detection of traumatic intrathoracic injuries. In the present prospective cross-sectional study, patients with traumatic intrathoracic injuries, who were referred to the emergency department from December 2013 to December 2014, were assessed. The patients underwent bedside ultrasound, radiographic and computed tomography (CT) scan examinations based on ATLS recommendations. Screening performance characteristics of ultrasonography and radiography were compared using SPSS 21.0. Chest CT scan was considered as gold standard. 152 chest trauma patients with a mean age of 31.4 ± 13.8 years (range: 4 ‒ 67), were enrolled (77.6% male). Chest CT scan showed pulmonary contusion in 48 (31.6%) patients, hemothorax in 29 (19.1%), and pneumothorax in 55 (36.2%) cases. Area under the ROC curve of ultrasonography in detection of pneumothorax, hemothorax, and pulmonary contusion were 0.91 (95% CI: 0.86‒0.96), 0.86 (95% CI: 0.78‒0.94), and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.736‒0.88), respectively. Area under the ROC curve of radiography was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.736‒0.87) for detection of pneumothorax, 0.77 (95% CI: 0.68‒0.86) for hemothorax, and 0.58 (95% CI: 0.5‒0.67) for pulmonary contusion. Comparison of areas under the ROC curve declared the significant superiority of ultrasonography in detection of pneumothorax (p = 0.02) and pulmonary contusion (p radiography in the initial evaluation of patients with traumatic injuries to the thoracic cavity.

  11. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to change into a gown. You may have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest is performed to: assess abnormal masses, including cancer of the lungs or other tissues, which either cannot be assessed ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and ... tissues, except for lung abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging ...

  13. Chest tube insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of your chest cavity. This is called the pleural space. It is done to allow your lungs to fully expand. ... pneumothorax ) Fluid buildup in the chest (called a pleural ... in the esophagus (the tube that allows food to go from the mouth ...

  14. Investigation of the dosimetry of chest tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Zachrisson, Sara; Månsson, Lars Gunnar; Båth, Magnus

    2009-02-01

    Chest tomosynthesis has recently been introduced to healthcare as a low-dose alternative to CT or as a tool for improved diagnostics in chest radiography with only a modest increase in radiation dose to the patient. However, no detailed description of the dosimetry for this type of examination has been presented. The aim of this work was therefore to investigate the dosimetry of chest tomosynthesis. The chest tomosynthesis examination was assumed to be performed using a stationary detector and a vertically moving x-ray tube, exposing the patient from different angles. The Monte Carlo based computer software PCXMC was used to determine the effective dose delivered to a standard-sized patient from various angles using different assumptions of the distribution of the effective dose over the different projections. The obtained conversion factors between input dose measures and effective dose for chest tomosynthesis for different angular intervals were then compared with the horizontal projection. The results indicate that the error introduced by using conversion factors for the PA projection in chest radiography for estimating the effective dose of chest tomosynthesis is small for normally sized patients, especially if a conversion factor between KAP and effective dose is used.

  15. Plain Chest Radiograph in Diagnosis of cardiac diseases: review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CXR is a most important and helpful diagnostic tool in assessment of cardiopulmonary pathology. Anorganized systematic and disciplined approach will give enormous anatomic and physiologic information to make an accurate complete diagnosis. Good background knowledge on physiology and anatomy of the heart and ...

  16. Establishing the cardiothoracic ratio using chest radiographs in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cardiothoracic ratio is a simple and cheap tool in the estimation of heart size. It is a useful index of cardiac size evaluation, and a value of 50% is generally considered to indicate the upper limit of normal. Study Objective: This study is to ascertain the normal mean value in cardiothoracic ratio of Ghanaians ...

  17. Radiographic differentiation of atypical tuberculosis from mycobacterium tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarver, R.D.; Pearcy, E.A.; Conces, D.J. Jr.; Mathur, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    The chest radiographs of 95 patients with the new diagnosis of atypical turberculosis were reviewed to determine if any significant differences between atypical tuberculosis and that caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis could be discerned. Findings included upper lobe involvement in B4 of the 95 patients and cavities in 76, with nearly equal groups having no, moderate, or extensive surrounding alveolar disease. Nodules were common; in six patients a nodule was the sole manifestation of disease. Adenopathy was seen in 12 of the 95 patients, atlectasis in 45, pleural thickening in 90, and effusions in three. These radiographic findings did not allow the radiographic differentiation of atypical tuberculosis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

  18. HipMatch: an object-oriented cross-platform program for accurate determination of cup orientation using 2D-3D registration of single standard X-ray radiograph and a CT volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guoyan; Zhang, Xuan; Steppacher, Simon D; Murphy, Stephen B; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Tannast, Moritz

    2009-09-01

    The widely used procedure of evaluation of cup orientation following total hip arthroplasty using single standard anteroposterior (AP) radiograph is known inaccurate, largely due to the wide variability in individual pelvic orientation relative to X-ray plate. 2D-3D image registration methods have been introduced for an accurate determination of the post-operative cup alignment with respect to an anatomical reference extracted from the CT data. Although encouraging results have been reported, their extensive usage in clinical routine is still limited. This may be explained by their requirement of a CAD model of the prosthesis, which is often difficult to be organized from the manufacturer due to the proprietary issue, and by their requirement of either multiple radiographs or a radiograph-specific calibration, both of which are not available for most retrospective studies. To address these issues, we developed and validated an object-oriented cross-platform program called "HipMatch" where a hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme combining an iterative landmark-to-ray registration with a 2D-3D intensity-based registration was implemented to estimate a rigid transformation between a pre-operative CT volume and the post-operative X-ray radiograph for a precise estimation of cup alignment. No CAD model of the prosthesis is required. Quantitative and qualitative results evaluated on cadaveric and clinical datasets are given, which indicate the robustness and the accuracy of the program. HipMatch is written in object-oriented programming language C++ using cross-platform software Qt (TrollTech, Oslo, Norway), VTK, and Coin3D and is transportable to any platform.

  19. Radiographers and trainee radiologists reporting accident radiographs: A comparative plain film-reading performance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buskov, L.; Abild, A.; Christensen, A.; Holm, O.; Hansen, C.; Christensen, H.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To compare the diagnostic accuracy and clinical validity of reporting radiographers with that of trainee radiologists whom they have recently joined in reporting emergency room radiographs at Bispebjerg University Hospital. Materials and methods: Plain radiographs of the appendicular skeleton from 1000 consecutive emergency room patients were included in the study: 500 primarily reported by radiographers and 500 by trainee radiologists. The final reporting was subsequently undertaken by a consultant radiologist in consensus with an orthopaedic surgeon. Two observers classified reports as either true positive/negative or false positive/negative based on the final report, which was considered the reference standard. To evaluate the severity of incorrect primary reports, errors were graded into three categories concerning clinical impact and erroneous reports graded as the most severe category were subsequently analysed. Mann–Whitney and Chi-squared tests were used to compare differences and associations between radiographers versus trainee radiologists regarding film reporting. Results: The sensitivity for correct diagnosis was 99% for reporting radiographers and 94% for trainee radiologists. The specificity was found to be 97% for reporting radiographers and 99% for trainee radiologists. Radiographers missed significantly fewer fractures (n = 2) than trainee radiologists (n = 14; p = 0.006) but had a higher, but not significant, degree of overcalling. No significant difference was found between groups regarding clinical impact of incorrect reporting. Conclusion: Trained radiographers report accident radiographs of the extremities with high accuracy and constitute a qualified resource to help meet increasing workload and demands in quality standards.

  20. Sequential radiographic changes of nodules in patients with miliary pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Jae Woo; Park, Chan Sup; Bae, In Young; Kwak, Seung Min; Cho, Chul Ho; Kwon, Min Joong; Joo, Ji Soen; Chung, Won Kyun

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate sequential changes in miliary nodules, as seen on chest radiographs in patients with miliary tuberculosis. We retrospectively analyzed sequential changes in miliary nodules, as seen on the chest radiographs of 13 patients with miliary tuberculosis who recovered completely after antituberculous medication. Two were children and 11 were adults, and their ages ranged from 2 months to 73 years (mean, 38 years). In cases in which miliary tuberculosis had been diagnosed from initial chest radiographs, follow-up chest radiographs were obtained 5 to 15 (mean, 10) months later. After complete resolution of miliary nodules, as seen on chest radiographs, high-resolution CT scanning was performed in three patients. As seen on follow-up chest radiographs obtained at one week, the number and size of miliary nodules had decreased in eight to nine patients (89%), and on those obtained at one month, these decreases were seen in all 13 patients. The mean duration of complete resolution of miliary nodules was 6.3 months; in children, this was 3.5 (range, 2-5) months, and in adults, 6.8 (range, 3-10) months. In all three patients involved, high-resolution CT scans obtained after complete radiographic resolution of miliary nodules showed no recurrence. In patients with miliary tuberculosis, the size and number of nodules had decreased within one month of adequate chemotherapy and on chest radiographs, complete resolution was seen at 6.3 months, on average. (author). 17 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  1. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee; Krane, Elliot J.; Holmes, Tyson H.; Robinson, Terry E.

    2014-01-01

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  2. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Krane, Elliot J. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Holmes, Tyson H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA (United States); Robinson, Terry E. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Cystic Fibrosis Center for Excellence in Pulmonary Biology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  3. Cardiothoracic ratio and vertebral heart size (VHS to standardize the heart size of the tufted capuchin (Cebus apella Linnaeus, 1758 in computerized radiographic images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermínio J. Rocha-Neto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The VHS and CTR were assessed using computerized thoracic radiographs of ten clinically healthy tufted capuchin monkeys (five males and five females from the Wild Animal Screening Center in São Luís (Centro de Triagem de Animais Silvestres de São Luís-MA-CETAS. Radiographs were taken in laterolateral and dorsoventral projections to calculate the cardiothoracic ratio (VHS and vertebral heart size (CTR. The VHS showed mean values of 9.34±0.32v (males and 9.16±0.34v (females and there was no statistical difference between males and females (p>0.05. The CTR showed mean values of 0.55±0.04 (males and 0.52±0.03 (females and there was no statistical difference between the sexes (p>0.05. There was positive correlation between VHS and CTR (r=0.78. The thoracic and heart diameters showed mean values of 5.70±0.48cm and 2.16±0.40cm in the males, respectively. In the females they measured 5.32±0.39cm and 2.94±0.32cm. There was no statistical difference between the sexes. Our results show that the high correlation found between VHS and CTR permitted the verification with similar clinical precision between the two methods to estimate alterations in the heart silhouette by radiographic examination of tufted capuchin, making it an easy technique to apply that can be considered in the investigation of heart problems for this wild species.

  4. Revisit image control for pediatric chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohda, Ehiichi; Nagamoto, Masashi; Gomi, Tatsuya; Terada, Hitoshi; Kawawa, Yohko; Tsutsumi, Yoshiyuki; Masaki, Hidekazu; Shiraga, Nobuyuki

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the fraction defectiveness and efficacy of the patient immobilization device (PID) for pediatric chest radiography. We examined 840 plain chest radiographs in six hospitals, including four children's hospitals and two general hospitals. The mean age of the patients was 1.9 years (range 0-5 years). Two boardqualified pediatric radiologists rated (into three grades, by consensus) the degree of inspiration, rotation, lordosis, scoliosis, and cutoff or coning as well as the quality of the chest radiographs. The incidence of ''poor'' and ''very poor'' quality examinations was 2/140 and 3/140 in each of two children's hospitals using PID. The corresponding figures were 9/139 and 17/140 in the two children's hospitals that did not use PID. The general hospital using PID had 14/140 ''poor'' and ''very poor'' examinations. The general hospital that did not use PID had 28/140 ''poor'' and ''very poor'' examinations. Thus, statistically better quality chest radiography was obtained with the use of PID (P<0.001). Likewise, rotation, lordosis, and scoliosis were less frequently diagnosed as present when PID was used (P<0.001, 0.001, 0.05). Cutoff or coning had no relation to the use of PID (P=0.13). No significant difference was found between the degree of inspiration and the use of PID (P=0.56). Fraction defectiveness in the general hospital that did not use PID was as much as 14 times higher than that of the children's hospitals that used PID. The patient immobilization device is recommended for hospitals with technologists not specifically trained for pediatric examination. (author)

  5. Suspected acute pulmonary emboli: cost-effectiveness of chest helical computed tomography versus a standard diagnostic algorithm incorporating ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larcos, G.; Chi, K.K.G.; Berry, G.; Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW; Shiell, A.

    2000-01-01

    There is a controversy regarding the investigation of patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE). To compare the cost-effectiveness of alternative methods of diagnosing acute PE, chest helical computed tomography (CT) alone and in combination with venous ultrasound (US) of legs and pulmonary angiography (PA) were compared to a conventional algorithm using ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy supplemented in selected cases by US and PA. A decision-analytical model was constructed to model the costs and effects of the three diagnostic strategies in a hypothetical cohort of 1000 patients each. Transition probabilities were based on published data. Life years gained by each strategy were estimated from published mortality rates. Schedule fees were used to estimate costs. The V/Q protocol is both more expensive and more effective than CT alone resulting in 20.1 additional lives saved at a (discounted) cost of $940 per life year gained. An additional 2.5 lives can be saved if CT replaces V/Q scintigraphy in the diagnostic algorithm but at a cost of $23,905 per life year saved. It resulted that the more effective diagnostic strategies are also more expensive. In patients with suspected PE, the incremental cost-effectiveness of the V/Q based strategy over CT alone is reasonable in comparison with other health interventions. The cost-effectiveness of the supplemented CT strategy is more questionable. Copyright (2000) The Australasian College of Physicians

  6. Digital luminescence radiography using a chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyttkens, K.; Kehler, M.; Andersson, B.; Carlsen, S.; Ebbesen, A.; Hochbergs, P.; Stroembaeck, A.

    1993-01-01

    With the introduction of picture and archiving communicating systems an alternative image display for the wards might be a personal computer (PC). The intention with this study was to evaluate the diagnostic image quality of the monitor of a PC compared to that of a workstation. Eighty-five digital radiographs of a chest phantom with simulated tumors in the mediastinum and right lung were saved on optical discs. The examinations were reviewed by 4 radiologists on a monitor at a workstation and at a PC, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed. No significant difference was found between performance of the PC and the workstation. (orig.)

  7. Pediatric chest CT after trauma: impact on surgical and clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Rina P.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Hilmes, Melissa A.; Kan, J.H.; Yu, Chang; Ray, Jackie

    2010-01-01

    Chest CT after pediatric trauma is frequently performed but its clinical impact, particularly with respect to surgical intervention, has not been adequately evaluated. To assess the impact of chest CT compared with chest radiography on pediatric trauma management. Two hundred thirty-five consecutive pediatric trauma patients who had both chest CT and radiography were identified. Images were reviewed and findings were categorized and correlated with subsequent chest interventions, blinded to final outcome and management. Of the 235 children, 38.3% (90/235) had an abnormal chest radiograph and 63.8% (150/235) had an abnormal chest CT (P < 0.0001). Chest interventions followed in 4.7% (11/235); of these, the findings could be made 1 cm above the dome of the liver in 91% (10/11). Findings requiring chest intervention included pneumothorax (PTX) and vertebral fractures. PTX was found on 2.1% (5/235) of chest radiographs and 20.0% (47/235) of chest CTs (P < 0.0001); 1.7% (4/235) of the children received a chest tube for PTX, 0.85% (2/235) seen on chest CT only. Vertebral fractures were present in 3.8% of the children (9/235) and 66.7% (6/9) of those cases were treated with spinal fusion or brace. There were no instances of mediastinal vascular injury. Most intrathoracic findings requiring surgical management in our population were identified in the lower chest and would be included in routine abdominopelvic CT exams; this information needs to be taken into consideration in the diagnostic algorithm of pediatric trauma patients. (orig.)

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed ... at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest ... gadolinium contrast, it may still be possible to use it after appropriate pre-medication. Patient consent will ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... of the body being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic ... determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted ...

  13. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... Radiology and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray ... posted: How to Obtain and Share Your Medical Images Movement Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI ...

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    Full Text Available ... nearby harm. These items include: jewelry, watches, credit cards and hearing aids, all of which can be ... Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest ...

  15. Mechanical chest compressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Matthew

    2012-09-13

    The authors of this study state that there is a lack of evidence about the efficiency of mechanical devices in producing chest compressions as an adjunct to resuscitation during cardiorespiratory arrest.

  16. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight February is American Heart Month Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test ... x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used to ...

  17. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Medical Imaging Costs Radiology and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/ ... Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed ... physicians with expertise in several radiologic areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  20. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... exams and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the ... chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest ... their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary according to the type of body ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to assess the vessels of the chest cavity (arteries and veins). MRA can also demonstrate an abnormal ballooning out of the wall of an artery ( aneurysm ) or a torn inner lining of an ...

  3. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  4. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

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    Full Text Available ... body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. Unless you are told otherwise, ... doctor for a mild sedative prior to the exam. What is MRI of the Chest? What are ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking ...

  8. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to: assess abnormal masses, including cancer of the lungs or other tissues, which either cannot be assessed ... for differentiating and characterizing soft tissues, except for lung abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  11. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... evaluate shortness of breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to ... of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  13. Learning chest imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrozo Pupo, John C. (ed.) [Magdalena Univ., Santa Maria (Colombia). Respire - Inst. for Respiratory Care

    2013-03-01

    Useful learning tool for practitioners and students. Overview of the imaging techniques used in chest radiology. Aid to the correct interpretation of chest X-ray images. Radiology of the thorax forms an indispensable element of the basic diagnostic process for many conditions and is of key importance in a variety of medical disciplines. This user-friendly book provides an overview of the imaging techniques used in chest radiology and presents numerous instructive case-based images with accompanying explanatory text. A wide range of clinical conditions and circumstances are covered with the aim of enabling the reader to confidently interpret chest images by correctly identifying structures of interest and the causes of abnormalities. This book, which will be an invaluable learning tool, forms part of the Learning Imaging series for medical students, residents, less experienced radiologists, and other medical staff. Learning Imaging is a unique case-based series for those in professional education in general and for physicians in prarticular.

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... a computer to produce detailed pictures of the structures within the chest. It is primarily used to ... extent and degree of its spread to adjacent structures. It’s also used to assess the anatomy and ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... primarily used to assess abnormal masses such as cancer and determine the size, extent and degree of ... chest is performed to: assess abnormal masses, including cancer of the lungs or other tissues, which either ...

  16. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Spotlight March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures of ... metal called gadolinium . Gadolinium can be used in patients with iodine contrast allergy. It is far less ...

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary according to the type of body ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... heart) and myocardial infarct (scar in the heart muscle due to prior obstruction of blood flow). determine ... ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles and fat). assess for pericardial (thin sac around ...

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    Full Text Available ... copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed ... sedative prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete ...

  1. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Spotlight March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: How to Obtain and ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  2. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Spotlight March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: Video: The Basketball Game: ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures of structures within ...

  4. Does periodic lung screening of films meets standards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binay, Songul; Arbak, Peri; Safak, Alp Alper; Balbay, Ege Gulec; Bilgin, Cahit; Karatas, Naciye

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether the workers' periodic chest x-ray screening techniques in accordance with the quality standards is the responsibility of physicians. Evaluation of differences of interpretations by physicians in different levels of education and the importance of standardization of interpretation. Previously taken chest radiographs of 400 workers who are working in a factory producing the glass run channels were evaluated according to technical and quality standards by three observers (pulmonologist, radiologist, pulmonologist assistant). There was a perfect concordance between radiologist and pulmonologist for the underpenetrated films. Whereas there was perfect concordance between pulmonologist and pulmonologist assistant for over penetrated films. Pulmonologist (52%) has interpreted the dose of the films as regular more than other observers (radiologist; 44.3%, pulmonologist assistant; 30.4%). The frequency of interpretation of the films as taken in inspiratory phase by the pulmonologist (81.7%) was less than other observers (radiologist; 92.1%, pulmonologist assistant; 92.6%). The rate of the pulmonologist (53.5%) was higher than the other observers (radiologist; 44.6%, pulmonologist assistant; 41.8%) for the assessment of the positioning of the patients as symmetrical. Pulmonologist assistant (15.3%) was the one who most commonly reported the parenchymal findings (radiologist; 2.2%, pulmonologist; 12.9%). It is necessary to reorganize the technical standards and exposure procedures for improving the quality of the chest radiographs. The reappraisal of all interpreters and continuous training of technicians is required.

  5. Pleuritic Chest Pain: Sorting Through the Differential Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reamy, Brian V; Williams, Pamela M; Odom, Michael Ryan

    2017-09-01

    Pleuritic chest pain is characterized by sudden and intense sharp, stabbing, or burning pain in the chest when inhaling and exhaling. Pulmonary embolism is the most common serious cause, found in 5% to 21% of patients who present to an emergency department with pleuritic chest pain. A validated clinical decision rule for pulmonary embolism should be employed to guide the use of additional tests such as d-dimer assays, ventilation-perfusion scans, or computed tomography angiography. Myocardial infarction, pericarditis, aortic dissection, pneumonia, and pneumothorax are other serious causes that should be ruled out using history and physical examination, electrocardiography, troponin assays, and chest radiography before another diagnosis is made. Validated clinical decision rules are available to help exclude coronary artery disease. Viruses are common causative agents of pleuritic chest pain. Coxsackieviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza, parainfluenza, mumps, adenovirus, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus are likely pathogens. Treatment is guided by the underlying diagnosis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are appropriate for pain management in those with virally triggered or nonspecific pleuritic chest pain. In patients with persistent symptoms, persons who smoke, and those older than 50 years with pneumonia, it is important to document radiographic resolution with repeat chest radiography six weeks after initial treatment.

  6. Lung ultrasound as a diagnostic tool for radiographically-confirmed pneumonia in low resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Laura E; Gilman, Robert H; Chavez, Miguel A; Pervaiz, Farhan; Marin-Concha, Julio; Compen-Chang, Patricia; Riedel, Stefan; Rodriguez, Shalim J; Gaydos, Charlotte; Hardick, Justin; Tielsch, James M; Steinhoff, Mark; Benson, Jane; May, Evelyn A; Figueroa-Quintanilla, Dante; Checkley, William

    2017-07-01

    Pneumonia is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children worldwide; however, its diagnosis can be challenging, especially in settings where skilled clinicians or standard imaging are unavailable. We sought to determine the diagnostic accuracy of lung ultrasound when compared to radiographically-confirmed clinical pediatric pneumonia. Between January 2012 and September 2013, we consecutively enrolled children aged 2-59 months with primary respiratory complaints at the outpatient clinics, emergency department, and inpatient wards of the Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño in Lima, Peru. All participants underwent clinical evaluation by a pediatrician and lung ultrasonography by one of three general practitioners. We also consecutively enrolled children without respiratory symptoms. Children with respiratory symptoms had a chest radiograph. We obtained ancillary laboratory testing in a subset. Final clinical diagnoses included 453 children with pneumonia, 133 with asthma, 103 with bronchiolitis, and 143 with upper respiratory infections. In total, CXR confirmed the diagnosis in 191 (42%) of 453 children with clinical pneumonia. A consolidation on lung ultrasound, which is our primary endpoint for pneumonia, had a sensitivity of 88.5%, specificity of 100%, and an area under-the-curve of 0.94 (95% CI 0.92-0.97) when compared to radiographically-confirmed clinical pneumonia. When any abnormality on lung ultrasound was compared to radiographically-confirmed clinical pneumonia the sensitivity increased to 92.2% and the specificity decreased to 95.2%, with an area under-the-curve of 0.94 (95% CI 0.91-0.96). Lung ultrasound had high diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of radiographically-confirmed pneumonia. Added benefits of lung ultrasound include rapid testing and high inter-rater agreement. Lung ultrasound may serve as an alternative tool for the diagnosis of pediatric pneumonia. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights

  7. Radiographers and radiologists reporting plain radiograph requests from accident and emergency and general practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brealey, S.D.; King, D.G.; Hahn, S.; Crowe, M.; Williams, P.; Rutter, P.; Crane, S.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess selectively trained radiographers and consultant radiologists reporting plain radiographs for the Accident and Emergency Department (A and E) and general practitioners (GPs) within a typical hospital setting. METHODS: Two radiographers, a group of eight consultant radiologists, and a reference standard radiologist independently reported under controlled conditions a retrospectively selected, random, stratified sample of 400 A and E and 400 GP plain radiographs. An independent consultant radiologist judged whether the radiographer and radiologist reports agreed with the reference standard report. Clinicians then assessed whether radiographer and radiologist incorrect reports affected confidence in their diagnosis and treatment plans, and patient outcome. RESULTS: For A and E and GP plain radiographs, respectively, there was a 1% (95% confidence interval (CI) -2 to 5) and 4% (95% CI -1 to 8) difference in reporting accuracy between the two professional groups. For both A and E and GP cases there was an 8% difference in the clinicians' confidence in their diagnosis based on radiographer or radiologist incorrect reports. For A and E and GP cases, respectively, there was a 2% and 8% difference in the clinicians' confidence in their management plans based on radiographer or radiologist incorrect reports. For A and E and GP cases, respectively, there was a 1% and 11% difference in effect on patient outcome of radiographer or radiologist incorrect reports. CONCLUSION: There is the potential to extend the reporting role of selectively trained radiographers to include plain radiographs for all A and E and GP patients. Further research conducted during clinical practice at a number of sites is recommended

  8. Fast radiographic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1984-08-01

    Industrial radiography can be performed with shorter exposure times, when instead of X-ray film with lead intensifying screens the radiographic paper with fluorescent screen is used. With paper radiography one can obtain lower material, equipment, and labor costs, shorter exposure and processing times, and easier radiation protection. The speed of the radiographic inspection can also be increased by the use of fluorometallic intensifying screens together with a special brand of X-ray film. Before accepting either of the two fast radiographic systems one must be sure that they can produce radiographs of adequate image quality. Therefore an investigation was performed on that subject using ISO wire IQI's and ASTM penetrameters. The radiographic image quality was tested for aluminium and steel up to 30 mm thick using various brands of radiographic paper and X-ray film with fluorometallic screens and comparing them with fast X-ray films with lead screens. Both systems give satisfactory results. (author)

  9. Radiographic constant exposure technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1985-01-01

    The constant exposure technique has been applied to assess various industrial radiographic systems. Different X-ray films and radiographic papers of two producers were compared. Special attention was given to fast film and paper used with fluorometallic screens. Radiographic image quality was tes...... was tested by the use of ISO wire IQI's and ASTM penetrameters used on Al and Fe test plates. Relative speed and reduction of kilovoltage obtained with the constant exposure technique were calculated. The advantages of fast radiographic systems are pointed out...

  10. Radiographic constant exposure technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1985-01-01

    The constant exposure technique has been applied to assess various industrial radiographic systems. Different X-ray films and radiographic papers of two producers were compared. Special attention was given to fast film and paper used with fluorometallic screens. Radiographic image quality...... was tested by the use of ISO wire IQI's and ASTM penetrameters used on Al and Fe test plates. Relative speed and reduction of kilovoltage obtained with the constant exposure technique were calculated. The advantages of fast radiographic systems are pointed out...

  11. Visual simulation of radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laguna, G.

    1985-01-01

    A method for computer simulation of radiographs has been added to the LLNL version of the solid modeler TIPS-1 (Technical Information Processing System-1). This new tool will enable an engineer to compare an actual radiograph of a solid to its computer-generated counterpart. The appearance of discrepancies between the two can be an indication of flaws in the solid object. Simulated radiographs can also be used to preview the placement of x-ray sources to focus on areas of concern before actual radiographs are made

  12. Palpation for muscular tenderness in the anterior chest wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.W.; Vach, W.; Manniche, C.

    2003-01-01

    of the anterior chest wall with all subjects sitting. Each dimension was rated as absent or present for tenderness or pain for each location. All examinations were carried out according to a standard written procedure. RESULTS: Based on a pooled analysis of data from palpation of the anterior chest wall, we found...

  13. Standardized evaluation of lung congestion during COPD exacerbation better identifies patients at risk of dying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Høiseth AD

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Arne Didrik Høiseth,1 Torbjørn Omland,1 Bo Daniel Karlsson,2 Pål H Brekke,1 Vidar Søyseth11Cardiothoracic Research Group, Division of Medicine, Akershus University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; 2Deptartment of Radiology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, NorwayBackground: Congestive heart failure is underdiagnosed in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Pulmonary congestion on chest radiograph at admission for acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD is associated with an increased risk of mortality. A standardized evaluation of chest radiographs may enhance prognostic accuracy.Purpose: We aimed to evaluate whether a standardized, liberal assessment of pulmonary congestion is superior to the routine assessment in identifying patients at increased risk of long-term mortality, and to investigate the association of heart failure with N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP concentrations.Material and methods: This was a prospective cohort study of 99 patients admitted for AECOPD. Chest radiographs obtained on admission were routinely evaluated and then later evaluated by blinded investigators using a standardized protocol looking for Kerley B lines, enlarged vessels in the lung apex, perihilar cuffing, peribronchial haze, and interstitial or alveolar edema, defining the presence of pulmonary congestion. Adjusted associations with long-term mortality and NT-proBNP concentration were calculated.Results: The standardized assessment was positive for pulmonary congestion in 32 of the 195 radiographs (16% ruled negative in the routine assessment. The standardized assessment was superior in predicting death during a median follow up of 1.9 years (P=0.022, and in multivariable analysis, only the standardized assessment showed a significant association with mortality (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2–4.7 (P=0.016 and NT-proBNP (relative

  14. Estudo comparativo entre tomografia computadorizada de alta resolução e radiografia de tórax no diagnóstico da silicose em casos incipientes Comparative study of high resolution computer-assisted tomography with chest radiograph in the diagnosis of silicosis incipient cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA PAULA SCALIA CARNEIRO

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Introdução:A radiografia de tórax (RX ainda é, no dias atuais, o principal método de diagnóstico da silicose, seguindo-se as normas da Organização Internacional do Trabalho (OIT. A interpretação radiológica de casos iniciais é difícil, podendo ocorrer divergências mesmo entre leitores experientes. Recentemente, tem sido considerada a possibilidade de utilização da tomografia computadorizada com técnica de alta resolução (TCAR para avaliação de casos incipientes. Objetivo: Comparar os resultados da RX com a TCAR. Material e métodos: Foi avaliado um grupo inicial de 135 ex-mineiros, cujas radiografias foram examinadas por três leitores, no período de novembro de 1997 a dezembro de 1999. Indicou-se TCAR para 68 pacientes, cuja mediana de três leituras radiológicas foi menor ou igual a 1/0. As tomografias foram avaliadas por dois leitores e, em casos de divergência, houve participação de um terceiro leitor. As TCAR foram classificadas de acordo com a profusão de micronódulos em categorias de 0 a 3. Os resultados de TCAR e RX foram comparados através do teste de McNemar, coeficiente Kappa ponderado e modelos log-lineares. Resultados e conclusão: Houve boa concordância entre os métodos quanto à classificação na categoria 0, ou seja, os dois métodos mostraram-se equivalentes para excluir o diagnóstico de silicose. Porém, para o diagnóstico da doença, caracterizado por classificação na categoria 1 ou superior, não foi obtida boa concordância entre os métodos.Introduction: At present, chest radiography (CR is the main instrument used in the diagnosis of silicosis, following the International Labor Organization (ILO recommendations. In incipient cases, the interpretation of radiographs is difficult and disagreement may occur, even among experienced readers. Recently, the possibility of evaluating incipient cases by using high resolution computed tomography (HRCT has been considered. Objective: To compare CR

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis: Skeletal manifestations observed on portable chest roentgenograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, R.B.; Sullivan, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the thoracic skeletal radiographic findings of rheumatoid arthritis, observed on portable chest examinations of 21 patients. Their pathophysiology is reviewed and additional examples of a recently described finding are illustrated: erosion of the medial surface of the proximal humerus with subsequent pathologic fracture, associated with superior and medial migration of the humeral head [11]. It has been proposed that erosion of the medial aspect of the proximal humerus is due to impingement wear, and that pathologic fracture results from the fulcrum effect of the inferior lip of the glenoid on the humerus. Rheumatoid arthritis is often diagnosed by the clinician rather than the radiologist. However, in acutely ill patients receiving portable chest radiographs, complete history and laboratory findings are often unavailable. Attention to the thoracic skeleton may clarify pleural and/or parenchymal lung disease in these patients. (orig.)

  16. Detection of pulmonary nodules at multirow-detector CT: effectiveness of double reading to improve sensitivity at standard-dose and low-dose chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wormanns, Dag; Beyer, Florian; Heindel, Walter; Ludwig, Karl; Diederich, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of double reading to increase the sensitivity of lung nodule detection at standard-dose (SDCT) and low-dose multirow-detector CT (LDCT). SDCT (100 mAs effective tube current) and LDCT (20 mAs) of nine patients with pulmonary metastases were obtained within 5 min using four-row detector CT. Softcopy images reconstructed with 5-mm slice thickness were read by three radiologists independently. Images with 1.25-mm slice thickness served as the gold standard. Sensitivity was assessed for single readers and combinations. The effectiveness of double reading was expressed as the increase of sensitivity. Average sensitivity for detection of 390 nodules (size 3.9±3.2 mm) for single readers was 0.63 (SDCT) and 0.64 (LDCT). Double reading significantly increased sensitivity to 0.74 and 0.79, respectively. No significant difference between sensitivity at SDCT and LDCT was observed. The percentage of nodules detected by all three readers concordantly was 52% for SDCT and 47% for LDCT. Although double reading increased the detection rate of pulmonary nodules from 63% to 74-79%, a considerable proportion of nodules remained undetected. No difference between sensitivities at LDCT and SDCT for detection of small nodules was observed. (orig.)

  17. Legalities of the radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The radiograph itself plays a major role in medical malpractice cases. Also, many questions arise concerning the rights to and storage of x-ray films. These issues are addressed in this chapter. To keep the terminology simple, the word radiograph represents all imaging documentation on hard copy film (x-rays, nuclear medicine, computer-assisted studies, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging)

  18. Applied pathology for radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laudicina, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents a basic text for the student of radiologic sciences. It includes most of the pathology recommended by the ASRT Curriculum Guide. Radiographic technique and positioning are examined when relevant to obtaining quality radiographs of specific disease conditions. Brief overviews of these conditions include background etiology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. Many illustrations are included to enhance understanding

  19. Psychiatric syndromes associated with atypical chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Gordana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Chest pain often indicates coronary disease, but in 25% of patients there is no evidence of ischemic heart disease using standard diagnostic tests. Beside that, cardiologic examinations are repeated several times for months. If other medical causes could not be found, there is a possibility that chest pain is a symptom of psychiatric disorder. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of psychiatric syndromes, increased somatization, anxiety, stress life events exposure and characteristic of chest pain expression in persons with atypical chest pain and coronary patients, as well as to define predictive parameters for atypical chest pain. Method. We compared 30 patients with atypical chest pain (E group to 30 coronary patients (K group, after cardiological and psychiatric evaluation. We have applied: Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI, The Symptom Checklist 90-R (SCL-90 R, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Holms-Rahe Scale of stress life events (H-R, Questionnaire for pain expression Pain-O-Meter (POM. Significant differences between groups and predictive value of the parameters for atypical chest pain were determined. Results. The E group participants compared to the group K were younger (33.4 ± 5.4 : 48.3 ± 6,4 years, p < 0.001, had a moderate anxiety level (20.4 ± 11.9 : 9.6 ± 3.8, p < 0.001, panic and somatiform disorders were present in the half of the E group, as well as eleveted somatization score (SOM ≥ 63 -50% : 10%, p < 0.01 and a higher H-R score level (102.0 ± 52.2 : 46.5 ± 55.0, p < 0.001. Pain was mild, accompanied with panic. The half of the E group subjects had somatoform and panic disorders. Conclusion. Somatoform and panic disorders are associated with atypical chest pain. Pain expression is mild, accompained with panic. Predictive factors for atypical chest pain are: age under 40, anxiety level > 20, somatization ≥ 63, presence of panic and somatoform disorders, H-R score > 102

  20. Chest X ray effective doses estimation in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, Esra Abdalrhman Dfaalla

    2013-06-01

    Conventional chest radiography is technically difficult because of wide in tissue attenuations in the chest and limitations of screen-film systems. Computed radiography (CR) offers a different approach utilizing a photostimulable phosphor. photostimulable phosphors overcome some image quality limitations of chest imaging. The objective of this study was to estimate the effective dose in computed radiography at three hospitals in Khartoum. This study has been conducted in radiography departments in three centres Advanced Diagnostic Center, Nilain Diagnostic Center, Modern Diagnostic Center. The entrance surface dose (ESD) measurement was conducted for quality control of x-ray machines and survey of operators experimental techniques. The ESDs were measured by UNFORS dosimeter and mathematical equations to estimate patient doses during chest X rays. A total of 120 patients were examined in three centres, among them 62 were males and 58 were females. The overall mean and range of patient dosed was 0.073±0.037 (0.014-0.16) mGy per procedure while the effective dose was 3.4±01.7 (0.6-7.0) mSv per procedure. This study compared radiation doses to patients radiographic examinations of chest using computed radiology. The radiation dose was measured in three centres in Khartoum- Sudan. The results of the measured effective dose showed that the dose in chest radiography was lower in computed radiography compared to previous studies.(Author)

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  2. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR ... Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Sponsored ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood test to determine whether the kidneys are functioning adequately. ... abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking the side effects of conventional ( ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest is performed to: assess abnormal masses, including cancer of the lungs or other tissues, which either cannot be assessed adequately with other ...

  8. The distinctly visible right upper lobe bronchus on the lateral chest: A clue to adolescent cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinig, J.W.; Sanchez, F.W.; Thomason, D.M.; Gobien, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    Radiographic differentiation between cystic fibrosis and asthma presenting in teenagers and young adults can be difficult. Many patients with a late presentation of cystic fibrosis display minimal changes on a chest radiograph. However, a large majority (90%) of cystic fibrosis patients with an essentially normal PA chest radiograph will have a distinctly outlined orifice of right upper lobe bronchus on a lateral chest film as opposed to a small number of asthmatics (25%) or normal patients (18%). This observation correlates well with the pathologic finding that the initial pulmonary involvement in cystic fibrosis is typically in the right upper lobe in adolescents. Teenager or young adult patients presenting with a history of repeated respiratory infections, asthma-like symptoms and a distinctly visible right upper lobe bronchus on a lateral chest film should be sweat-tested to exclude cystic fibrosis. (orig.)

  9. Radiographic features of paediatric pneumocystis pneumonia - a historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, R.D.; Zar, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To determine differences between the plain radiographic features of paediatric pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) recorded before the emergence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in 1982 and those documented in the HIV era. To establish differences in the radiographic features of PCP documented in HIV-infected children in developed and developing countries. Method: A Medline search of articles was conducted from 1950 to 2006, using the terms 'pneumocystis pneumonia in children' and 'chest radiographic features' or 'bilateral opacification' or 'lobar consolidation' or 'asymmetrical opacification' or 'pneumatocoeles' or 'cavities' or 'pneumothorax' or 'pneumomediastinum' or 'pleural effusion' or 'mediastinal adenopathy' or 'nodules' or 'normal chest radiography'. Appropriate articles were retrieved, radiological data extracted, reference lists examined and hand searches of referenced articles conducted. Results: Diffuse bilateral 'ground-glass' or alveolar pulmonary opacification, which may show some asymmetry, has been consistently documented as the commonest radiographic finding in childhood PCP throughout the period under review. The less common radiological features of PCP in children are similar to those in adults. In developed countries, PCP-related pulmonary air cysts have been reported at an earlier age in HIV-infected children, compared with uninfected children. PCP-related air cysts, pneumothorax, and pneumomediastinum have been reported in children in developed but not in developing countries. Conclusion: The radiological features of paediatric PCP documented before the HIV epidemic are similar to those recorded in the HIV era. Further study of the determinants of the uncommon radiographic features in children is warranted

  10. Problematic fine bore nasogastric intubation: A radiographer led service development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Developing from the intubation and performing of small bowel enteroclysis a consultant radiographer led service expanded to include problematic gastric, enteric and colonic intubations for diagnostic, therapeutic and interventional purposes. The radiographer led service has also extended to include 'hot reporting' chest images taken to check siting of ward placed nasogastric tubes as well as resiting those tubes that were misplaced. The service has demonstrated itself to be safe and efficient. It has also proven to be both cost and clinically effective. The protracted discomfort and distress to the patient are reduced by minimizing the delay in correctly relocating misplaced tubes

  11. Additional Value of Different Radiographic Views on the Identification of Early Radiographic Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis and Its Progression: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damen, Jurgen; Runhaar, Jos; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Meijer, Rik; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Oei, Edwin H G

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the prevalence and progression of early radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee on different radiographic views, to determine whether different radiographic views have additional value in detecting early hip and knee radiographic OA cases or progression. In the Cohort Hip and Cohort Knee (CHECK) study (n = 1,002), 5 different radiographs were obtained: an anteroposterior and faux profile view of the hips, and posteroanterior, mediolateral, and skyline views of the knees. The prevalence of radiographic OA was estimated based on each view separately and in combinations. We determined whether different radiographic views have additional value in detecting and determining the progression of radiographic OA cases, compared to standard projections. In the hip, we found 22.9% more cases when we combined both views. In the knee, we detected 79.7% more radiographic OA cases when we combined information from all 3 different radiographic views than when using only the posteroanterior view. Progression was seen in 33.1% more cases when using 2 hip radiographs, and in 65.1% more cases when using 3 knee radiographs. The use of different radiographic views increased the number of participants classified as having radiographic OA in an early OA cohort, both at baseline and at followup. The progression of early radiographic OA is demonstrated more frequently when multiple different radiographic views are used. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  12. Radiographic evaluation of AIDS patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Blang, S.D.; Witheman, M.L.; Donovan Post, M.J.; Casillas, J.V. [Miami Univ., FL (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1995-09-01

    Morphological imaging, based on the use of various techniques including ultrasound, X-ray computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the characterization, diagnosis and follow-up of patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). While the presence of thoracic infections, the most frequently observed illnesses in AIDS patients, can best be performed by using conventional chest films and CT, the assessment of cerebral involvement in AIDS patients - characterized by the presence of focal masses, demyelination, meningitis, and infarction - is best achieved using MRI. The work-up of patients with gastrointestinal symptoms should include the use of ultrasound for the evaluation of visceral involvement and lymphadenopathy, completed by CT to further characterize pathologic conditions in either the bowel or visceral organs. Ultrasound is the screening exam of choice in AIDS patients with suspected renal disease, but other methods may be necessary for the assessment of the complications due to pharmacological treatment. Musculoskeletal complications may require the combined use of all the above methods, since they may be caused by infections, tumors and rheumatologic illness. The use of the radiographic methods for the detection of the numerous forms of infections and malignancies in AIDS patients is described in detail for the various body districts.

  13. Radiographic evaluation of AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Blang, S.D.; Witheman, M.L.; Donovan Post, M.J.; Casillas, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    Morphological imaging, based on the use of various techniques including ultrasound, X-ray computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the characterization, diagnosis and follow-up of patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). While the presence of thoracic infections, the most frequently observed illnesses in AIDS patients, can best be performed by using conventional chest films and CT, the assessment of cerebral involvement in AIDS patients - characterized by the presence of focal masses, demyelination, meningitis, and infarction - is best achieved using MRI. The work-up of patients with gastrointestinal symptoms should include the use of ultrasound for the evaluation of visceral involvement and lymphadenopathy, completed by CT to further characterize pathologic conditions in either the bowel or visceral organs. Ultrasound is the screening exam of choice in AIDS patients with suspected renal disease, but other methods may be necessary for the assessment of the complications due to pharmacological treatment. Musculoskeletal complications may require the combined use of all the above methods, since they may be caused by infections, tumors and rheumatologic illness. The use of the radiographic methods for the detection of the numerous forms of infections and malignancies in AIDS patients is described in detail for the various body districts

  14. Inadvertent chest tube insertion in congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation and congenital lobar emphysema-highlighting an important problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, Shailesh M; Choudhury, Subhasis Roy; Solanki, Ravi S; Shetty, Gurucharan S; Agarwala, Surenderkumar

    2013-01-01

    Chest tube insertion in congenital cystic lung lesions is an important problem in children with acute respiratory distress having a cystic lucent lesion on chest radiograph. To evaluate the imaging findings and complications in cases of congenital cystic lung lesions with chest tube insertion and suggest the role of appropriate imaging for management of these patients. Chest radiographs and CT scans of children with congenital cystic lung lesions who had inadvertent chest tube insertion preoperatively were retrospectively reviewed for imaging appearances and complications. Fifteen patients comprising 10 cases of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) and 5 cases of congenital lobar emphysema (CLE) were included. Majority of the cases were infants. CCAM was misdiagnosed as complicated pneumatocele (n = 5) and pneumothorax (n = 5), while CLE was misdiagnosed as tension pneumothorax (n = 5) on the chest radiograph findings. Final diagnosis was made on CT and operative findings with histopathology. Complications noted were pneumothorax, hydropneumothorax, and infection in cases of CCAM, and change in imaging appearance and pneumothorax in cases of CLE. Chest tube insertion in congenital cystic lesions increases the rate of associated complications. Chest CT has a definite role in early diagnosis and deciding appropriate management in these cases

  15. Automating the radiographic NDT process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aman, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    Automation, the removal of the human element in inspection, has not been generally applied to film radiographic NDT. The justication for automating is not only productivity but also reliability of results. Film remains in the automated system of the future because of its extremely high image content, approximately 8 x 10 9 bits per 14 x 17. The equivalent to 2200 computer floppy discs. Parts handling systems and robotics applied for manufacturing and some NDT modalities, should now be applied to film radiographic NDT systems. Automatic film handling can be achieved with the daylight NDT film handling system. Automatic film processing is becoming the standard in industry and can be coupled to the daylight system. Robots offer the opportunity to automate fully the exposure step. Finally, computer aided interpretation appears on the horizon. A unit which laser scans a 14 x 17 (inch) film in 6 - 8 seconds can digitize film information for further manipulation and possible automatic interrogations (computer aided interpretation). The system called FDRS (for Film Digital Radiography System) is moving toward 50 micron (*approx* 16 lines/mm) resolution. This is believed to meet the need of the majority of image content needs. We expect the automated system to appear first in parts (modules) as certain operations are automated. The future will see it all come together in an automated film radiographic NDT system (author) [pt

  16. A comparison of radiographer and radiologist reports on radiographer conducted barium enemas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, M.; Loughran, C.F.; Birchenough, H.; Savage, J.; Sutcliffe, C.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To compare radiographer and radiologist reports on radiographer conducted barium enemas. Method: Two specially trained, experienced radiographers performed barium enemas and prepared provisional reports without consulting radiologists. Later, formal radiologist reports were issued. The reports of each were compared and correlated with clinical findings derived from case note review. Results:Seven hundred and eighty eight patients had barium enemas. Males numbered 295 (37.5%) and females 493 (62.5%). Patients ages ranged from 17 to 95 years (mean 62). The radiologist reported 244 as normal, 432 as diverticular change, 70 with polyps (31 of which had co-existent diverticular disease), 31 with carcinomas and 12 with colitis (three of which had co-existent diverticular disease). Taking the radiologist reports as gold-standard radiographer reports were concordant in 753 (95.5%). There were 35 (4.5%) discordant radiographer reports of these 19 were false-positive diagnoses of polyps and six false positive diagnoses of diverticular change. There were seven false-negative diagnoses of polyps (only one of these was found to have a polyp at follow-up endoscopy). There was one false-negative diagnosis of colitis and two false-negative reports of diverticular change. On follow up there were no false negative diagnoses of carcinoma by either radiographer or radiologist. There was one concordant false-positive diagnosis of carcinoma. Conclusion:Radiographers with specialized training can report barium enemas to a high standard

  17. A comparison of radiographer and radiologist reports on radiographer conducted barium enemas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.; Loughran, C.F.; Birchenough, H.; Savage, J.; Sutcliffe, C

    2002-11-01

    Purpose: To compare radiographer and radiologist reports on radiographer conducted barium enemas. Method: Two specially trained, experienced radiographers performed barium enemas and prepared provisional reports without consulting radiologists. Later, formal radiologist reports were issued. The reports of each were compared and correlated with clinical findings derived from case note review. Results:Seven hundred and eighty eight patients had barium enemas. Males numbered 295 (37.5%) and females 493 (62.5%). Patients ages ranged from 17 to 95 years (mean 62). The radiologist reported 244 as normal, 432 as diverticular change, 70 with polyps (31 of which had co-existent diverticular disease), 31 with carcinomas and 12 with colitis (three of which had co-existent diverticular disease). Taking the radiologist reports as gold-standard radiographer reports were concordant in 753 (95.5%). There were 35 (4.5%) discordant radiographer reports of these 19 were false-positive diagnoses of polyps and six false positive diagnoses of diverticular change. There were seven false-negative diagnoses of polyps (only one of these was found to have a polyp at follow-up endoscopy). There was one false-negative diagnosis of colitis and two false-negative reports of diverticular change. On follow up there were no false negative diagnoses of carcinoma by either radiographer or radiologist. There was one concordant false-positive diagnosis of carcinoma. Conclusion:Radiographers with specialized training can report barium enemas to a high standard.

  18. Two K versus 4 K storage phosphor chest radiography: detection performance and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelblinger, Claus; Weber, Michael; Sailer, Johannes; Cartes-Zumelzu, Fabiola; Prokop, Mathias; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of matrix size (4-K versus 2-K) in digital storage phosphor chest radiographs on image quality and on the detection of CT-proven thoracic abnormalities. In 85 patients who underwent a CT of the thorax, we obtained two additional posteroanterior storage phosphor chest radiographs, one with a matrix size of 3,520 x 4,280 (=4-K) and the other with a matrix size of 1,760 x 2,140 (=2-K). Acquisition, processing and presentation parameters were identical for all radiographs. Two radiologists evaluated the presence of mediastinal, pleural, and pulmonary abnormalities on hard copies of the radiographs, applying ROC analysis. In addition, four radiologists were asked to subjectively rank differences in image quality and to assess the demarcation of anatomic landmarks comparing the images in a blinded side-by-side manner. These data were analyzed using a two-sided binomial test with a significance level of P<0.05. Both tests, the ROC analysis of the detection performance and the binomial test of the subjective quality ratings, did not reveal significant differences between the two matrix sizes. Compared to 2-K radiographs, 4-K storage phosphor chest radiographs do not provide superior detection performance or image quality when evaluated in identical hard copy formats. (orig.)

  19. Radiographic abnormalities of ribs in β-thalassemic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singcharoen, T.; Piyachon, C.; Kulapongs, P.

    1988-01-01

    Bone change is one of the most outstanding manifestations of marrow hyperplasia in thalassemia patients. In the thorax, marrow hyperplasia widens the ribs, thins the cortices, and erases most of their trabecular patterns. Thus, a variety of radiologic changes of the ribs have been described. The chest radiographs of 33 Thai children with β-thalassemia major were reviewed, and a spectrum of rib changes were observed

  20. Nosocomial Legionnaires’ Disease: Clinical and Radiographic Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Marrie

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available From 1981 to 1991, 55 patients (33 males, 22 females, mean age 58.6 years with nosocomial Legionnaires’ disease were studied. The mortality rate was 64%. One-half of the patients developed nosocomial Legionnaires’ disease within three weeks of admission. A surprising clinical feature was the low rate of findings of consolidation on physical examination, despite the fact that 52% of patients had this finding on chest radiograph. More than one-half of patients had pre-existing lung disease, rendering a radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila impossible in 16% of cases despite microbiological confirmation. Nineteen per cent of patients who had blood cultures done had a pathogen other than L pneumophila isolated, suggesting dual infection in at least some of the patients. When the clinical and radiographic findings were combined it was noted that 40% of patients had one of three patterns suggestive of nosocomial Legionnaires’ disease: rapidly progressive pneumonia, lobar opacity and multiple peripheral opacities. However, in 60% of patients there were no distinctive features.

  1. Xeroradiographic and radiographic anatomy of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.A.; Smith, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide an anatomic reference for the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) using xeroradiography† and conventional radiography. The entire body of three adult fish was radiographed using standard xeroradiographic and conventional radiographic techniques. Two xeroradiographs and their corresponding conventional radiographs were selected, and the xeroradiographs labeled to illustrate the normal skeletal and soft-tissue anatomy of the channel catfish

  2. Studies on image quality and dose exposure in chest radiography in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, R.

    1985-01-01

    Chest radiography accounts for almost 50% of all radiographies in radiological departments for children, thus clearly dominating X-ray performances. The indications for examination in children are frequent infections of the upper airways, congenital cardiac defects, and controls in oncological patients. By contrast, indications for radioscopy of the chest organs which figure greatly in adult age and are often required concurrently with every chest radiography, are rather rare in the patient group of a paediatric X-ray department with their rate of c. 0.5% related to chest radiography. Chest radiographs and phantom radiographs were produced using different techniques and were compared by means of subjective and objective image quality parameters. Concurrently, thermoluminescence dosimetry was used to perform dose measurements of the small gonadal dose occurring in patients in chest radiographies. The study aimed at finding a chest radiography technique appropriate for use in paediatric radiology while considering both image quality parameters and the radiation dose required for producing pictures. (orig./DG) [de

  3. Editor's Choice-The organization of chest pain units: Position statement of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys, Marc J; Ahrens, Ingo; Sinnaeve, Peter; Diletti, Roberto; Rossini, Roberta; Goldstein, Patrick; Czerwińska, Kasia; Bueno, Héctor; Lettino, Maddalena; Münzel, Thomas; Zeymer, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    Chest pain units are defined as organizational short stay units with specific management protocols designed to facilitate and optimize the diagnosis of patients presenting with chest pain in the emergency department. The present document is intended to standardize and facilitate the installation of chest pain units nearby to the emergency department or as an integral part of the emergency department. Recommendations on organizational structure, physical and technical requirements and on disease management are presented. More standardized installation and implementation of chest pain units will enhance the quality of chest pain units and improve the quality of care of our chest pain patients.

  4. Radiographic signs and diagnosis of dental disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellows, J.

    1993-01-01

    Dental radiographs are critical for the complete assessment and treatment of dental diseases. Dental radiography is commonly used to evaluate congenital dental defects, periodontal disease, orthodontic manipulations, oral tumors, endodontic treatments, oral trauma, and any situation where an abnormality is suspected. Although standard radiographic equipment and film can be used to produce dental radiographs, dental X-ray equipment and film provide superior quality images and greater convenience of animal patient positioning. An understanding of normal dental radiographic anatomy is important when interpreting dental radiographs. Stage III periodontitis is the earliest stage of periodontal disease at which radiographic abnormalities become apparent. Bone loss associated with periodontal disease can be classified as either horizontal or vertical. Periapical radiolucencies can represent granulomas, cysts, or abscesses, whereas periapical radiodensities may represent sclerotic bone or condensing osteitis. Lytic lesions of the bone of the jaw often represent oral neoplasms. Neoplasms also can displace or disrupt teeth in the dental arch. Resorptive lesions can be external or internal and appear as radiolucent areas involving the external surface of the root or the pulp cavity, respectively. Feline dental resorptive lesions, also known as odontoclastic resorptions, are a specific form of dental resorptive lesions unique to cats

  5. Tuberculous mediastinal Lymphadenopathy; Simulating other mediastinal tumors in chest films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Kun Sang; Kim, Chu Wan

    1973-01-01

    Radiographs of chest may hardly differentiate the tuberculous mediastinal lymphadenopathy in children or adults with other mediastinal tumors sometimes when markedly enlarged mediastinal lymph node is the main findings of tuberculosis. 6 cases of tuberculous mediastinal lymphadenopathy was collected which was confirmed histopathologically and of which findings in chest films are indistinguishable with other mediastinal tumors especially lymphomas. After analysing the findings in chest films, the followings: could be found 1) The locations of the lesions are mainly hilar and superior mediastinum but there are also many variations of them, so there are of no significance in differential diagnosis with other mediastinal tumors. 2) The contours of the lesions are unilateral in 5 cases, and scalloped or diffusely widened appearance in all cases. 3) When mediastinal lymphadenopathy is the sole evidence of tuberculosis and even when additional lesions are noted in lung parenchyme or pleura, occasional lyes chest x-ray only is insufficient to differentiate the lesion with other mediastinal tumors including lymphomas. 4) Considering the frequency of the tuberculosis in this country, whenever one suspects any mediastinal tumors in chest x-ray one should include the possibility of tuberculous mediastinal lymphadenopathy in differential diagnosis

  6. Chest radiography for predicting the cause of febrile illness among inpatients in Moshi, Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorillo, S.P.; Diefenthal, H.C.; Goodman, P.C.; Ramadhani, H.O.; Njau, B.N.; Morrissey, A.B.; Maro, V.P.; Saganda, W.; Kinabo, G.D.; Mwako, M.S.; Bartlett, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To describe chest radiographic abnormalities and assess their usefulness for predicting causes of fever in a resource-limited setting. Materials and methods: Febrile patients were enrolled in Moshi, Tanzania, and chest radiographs were evaluated by radiologists in Tanzania and the United States. Radiologists were blinded to the results of extensive laboratory evaluations to determine the cause of fever. Results: Of 870 febrile patients, 515 (59.2%) had a chest radiograph available; including 268 (66.5%) of the adolescents and adults, the remainder were infants and children. One hundred and nineteen (44.4%) adults and 51 (20.6%) children were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected. Among adults, radiographic abnormalities were present in 139 (51.9%), including 77 (28.7%) with homogeneous and heterogeneous lung opacities, 26 (9.7%) with lung nodules, 25 (9.3%) with pleural effusion, 23 (8.6%) with cardiomegaly, and 13 (4.9%) with lymphadenopathy. Among children, radiographic abnormalities were present in 87 (35.2%), including 76 (30.8%) with homogeneous and heterogeneous lung opacities and six (2.4%) with lymphadenopathy. Among adolescents and adults, the presence of opacities was predictive of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Coxiella burnetii, whereas the presence of pulmonary nodules was predictive of Histoplasma capsulatum and Cryptococcus neoformans. Conclusions: Chest radiograph abnormalities among febrile inpatients are common in northern Tanzania. Chest radiography is a useful adjunct for establishing an aetiologic diagnosis of febrile illness and may provide useful information for patient management, in particular for pneumococcal disease, Q fever, and fungal infections

  7. Is the frontal radiograph alone sufficient to evaluate for pneumonia in children?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigsby, Cynthia K.; Strife, Janet L.; Johnson, Neil D.; Atherton, Harry D.; Kotagal, Uma R.; Pommersheim, William

    2004-01-01

    In our cost- and radiation-conscious environment, the feasibility of performing only a frontal radiograph for the diagnosis of pneumonia in children needs to be reassessed. To determine the diagnostic efficacy of the frontal radiograph alone in comparison to the frontal and lateral combined radiographs for the radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia in children. Three radiologists retrospectively and independently reviewed the frontal radiographs alone and separately reviewed the frontal and lateral radiographs of 1,268 children referred from the emergency room for chest radiographs. A majority interpretation of at least two radiologists for the frontal views alone was compared with majority interpretation of the frontal and lateral combined views for the radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia. ''Pneumonia'' was defined as a focus of streaky or confluent lung opacity. For the radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia, the sensitivity and specificity of the frontal view alone were 85% and 98%, respectively. For the confluent lobar type of pneumonia, the sensitivity and specificity increased to 100%. When the frontal view alone yields a diagnosis of confluent lobar pneumonia, this is highly reliable. However, nonlobar types of infiltrates will be underdiagnosed in 15% of patients using the frontal view alone. The clinical impact of these radiographically underdiagnosed pneumonias needs to be assessed prior to implementing the practice of using only frontal radiographs for diagnosing pneumonia. (orig.)

  8. Diagnostic Accuracy of Ultrasonography and Radiography in Initial Evaluation of Chest Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Vafaei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Application of chest radiography for all multiple trauma patients is associated with a significant increase in total costs, exposure to radiation, and overcrowding of the emergency department. Ultrasound has been introduced as an alternative diagnostic tool in this regard. The aim of the present study is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of chest ultrasonography and radiography in detection of traumatic intrathoracic injuries. Methods: In the present prospective cross-sectional study, patients with traumatic intrathoracic injuries, who were referred to the emergency department from December 2013 to December 2014, were assessed. The patients underwent bedside ultrasound, radiographic and computed tomography (CT scan examinations based on ATLS recommendations. Screening performance characteristics of ultrasonography and radiography were compared using SPSS 21.0. Chest CT scan was considered as gold standard. Results: 152 chest trauma patients with a mean age of 31.4 ± 13.8 years (range: 4 ‒ 67, were enrolled (77.6% male. Chest CT scan showed pulmonary contusion in 48 (31.6% patients, hemothorax in 29 (19.1%, and pneumothorax in 55 (36.2% cases. Area under the ROC curve of ultrasonography in detection of pneumothorax, hemothorax, and pulmonary contusion were 0.91 (95% CI: 0.86‒0.96, 0.86 (95% CI: 0.78‒0.94, and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.736‒0.88, respectively. Area under the ROC curve of radiography was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.736‒0.87 for detection of pneumothorax, 0.77 (95% CI: 0.68‒0.86 for hemothorax, and 0.58 (95% CI: 0.5‒0.67 for pulmonary contusion. Comparison of areas under the ROC curve declared the significant superiority of ultrasonography in detection of pneumothorax (p = 0.02 and pulmonary contusion (p < 0.001. However, the diagnostic value of the two tests was equal in detection of hemothorax (p = 0.08. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that ultrasonography is preferable to radiography in the initial

  9. High-resolution computed tomography versus chest radiography in the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Ana Beatriz Cordeiro de; Calderaro, Debora; Moreira, Caio; Guimaraes, Silvana Mangeon Meirelles; Tavares Junior, Wilson Campos; Leao Filho, Hilton Muniz; Andrade, Diego Correa de; Ferreira, Cid Sergio; Vieira, Jose Nelson Mendes

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with chest radiography in the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Materials And Methods: HRCT scans and chest radiographs in postero-anterior and lateral views were performed in 34 patients with systemic sclerosis, according to the American College of Rheumatology preliminary criteria for the diagnosis of SSc. The prevalence of radiological findings suggestive of interstitial lung disease in SSc seen on both imaging methods was compared. Results: Interstitial disease was observed on HRCT images of 31 patients (91%) and in the chest radiographs of 16 patients (47%). The most frequent findings observed on HRCT were septal lines (74%), honeycombing (56%) and parenchymal bands (26%). Chest radiographs showed reticular areas of attenuation in 11 patients (32%) and parenchymal distortion in 12% of the patients. In 18 patients (53%) with normal chest radiographs HRCT showed septal lines in 55%, ground glass in 44%, honeycombing in 38.5% and cysts in 33%. Conclusion: HRCT is more sensitive than chest radiography in the evaluation of incipient interstitial lung involvement in patients with SSc and can provide a justification for immunosuppressive therapy in patients with early disease. (author)

  10. Review on radiographic inspection in 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Yutaka

    1983-01-01

    This is a report of the activities in the radiographic inspection department of Japanese Society for Non-destructive Inspection. The contents of activities are described about the following 15 items: standards, minimum discernible contrast and image distribution, contrast meter and penetrameter sensitivity, testing conditions, detection limit and simulation, photographing method for tube welding and corner welding, relationship between irradiation direction and flaw detectability, abnormal images, RI sources, X-ray equipment and observing device, sensitive materials, detectors, image processing and X-ray TV and automation, neutron radiography, other application and new techniques, and safety. Concerning the ''standards'', discussion was performed on revising JIS Z 3105 ''Methods of Radiographic Test and Classification of Radiographs for Aluminum Welds''. In ''Abnormal images'', the verification by the author that the abnormal shadows generated in the radiographic images of austenitic steel welded parts are the diffraction phenomenon to satisfy the Bragg's conditions is reported. In ''RI sources'', Yb-169 was found to be a good radiation source for relatively thin steel plates. In ''neutron radiography'', it was confirmed that the neutron radiography using a cyclotron as a neutron source can be used practically by its fundamental tests. ''Application and new techniques'' include a trial to utilize scattered radiation as a source, the testing method of γ shield for spent fuel transportation, the improvement of X-ray radiographic test for titanium thin plates and thin wall tubes, and others. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  11. Examination of musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunse, Mads Hostrup; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Vach, Werner

    2010-01-01

    Chest pain may be caused by joint and muscle dysfunction of the neck and thorax (termed musculoskeletal chest pain). The objectives of this study were (1) to determine inter-observer reliability of the diagnosis 'musculoskeletal chest pain' in patients with acute chest pain of non-cardiac origin......-cardiac diagnosis could not be established at the cardiology department. Four observers (two chiropractors and two chiropractic students) performed general health and manual examination of the spine and chest wall. Percentage agreement, Cohen's Kappa and ICC were calculated for observer pairs (chiropractors...... and students) and all. Musculoskeletal chest pain was diagnosed in 45 percent of patients. Inter-observer kappa values were substantial for the chiropractors and overall (0.73 and 0.62, respectively), and moderate for the students (0.47). For single items of the protocol, the overall kappa ranged from 0...

  12. The neonatal chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, Luisa [Servico de Imagiologia Geral do Hospital de Santa Maria, Av. Prof. Egas Moniz, 1649-035 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: mluisalobo@gmail.com

    2006-11-15

    Lung diseases represent one of the most life threatening conditions in the newborn. Important progresses in modern perinatal care has resulted in a significantly improved survival and decreased morbidity, in both term and preterm infants. Most of these improvements are directly related to the better management of neonatal lung conditions, and infants of very low gestational ages are now surviving. This article reviews the common spectrum of diseases of the neonatal lung, including medical and surgical conditions, with emphasis to the radiological contribution in the evaluation and management of these infants. Imaging evaluation of the neonatal chest, including the assessment of catheters, lines and tubes are presented.

  13. Interpretation of panoramic radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perschbacher, Susanne

    2012-03-01

    Panoramic radiography has become a commonly used imaging modality in dental practice and can be a valuable diagnostic tool in the dentist's armamentarium. However, the panoramic image is a complex projection of the jaws with multiple superimpositions and distortions which may be exacerbated by technical errors in image acquisition. Furthermore, the panoramic radiograph depicts numerous anatomic structures outside of the jaws which may create additional interpretation challenges. Successful interpretation of panoramic radiographs begins with an understanding of the normal anatomy of the head and neck and how it is depicted in this image type. This article will describe how osseous structures, soft tissues, air spaces and ghost shadows contribute to the final panoramic image. A systematic and repeated approach to examining panoramic radiographs, which is recommended to ensure that critical findings are not overlooked, is also outlined. Examples of challenging interpretations, including variations of anatomy, artefacts and disease, are presented to illustrate these concepts. © 2012 Australian Dental Association.

  14. Flash radiographic technique applied to fuel injector sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vantine, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    A flash radiographic technique, using 50 ns exposure times, was used to study the pattern and density distribution of a fuel injector spray. The experimental apparatus and method are described. An 85 kVp flash x-ray generator, designed and fabricated at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, is utilized. Radiographic images, recorded on standard x-ray films, are digitized and computer processed

  15. Two K versus 4 K storage phosphor chest radiography: detection performance and image quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelblinger, Claus; Prokop, Mathias; Weber, Michael; Sailer, Johannes; Cartes-Zumelzu, Fabiola; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of matrix size (4-K versus 2-K) in digital storage phosphor chest radiographs on image quality and on the detection of CT-proven thoracic abnormalities. In 85 patients who underwent a CT of the thorax, we obtained two additional posteroanterior

  16. A comparative study of collimation in bedside chest radiography for preterm infants in two teaching hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stollfuss

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: In our study, the only identifiable factor influencing the collimation of portable chest radiographs in preterm infants was the radiographer’s dedication and awareness. There were no apparent differences between the hospitals investigated. Exposure of non-thoracic structures was relatively frequent and mainly involved the proximal humeri.

  17. Detection of tuberculosis with digital chest radiography: automatic reading versus interpretation by clinical officers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maduskar, P.; Muyoyeta, M.; Ayles, H.; Hogeweg, L.; Peters-Bax, L.; Ginneken, B. van

    2013-01-01

    SETTING: A busy urban health centre in Lusaka, Zambia. OBJECTIVE: To compare the accuracy of automated reading (CAD4TB) with the interpretation of digital chest radiograph (CXR) by clinical officers for the detection of tuberculosis (TB). DESIGN: A retrospective analysis was performed on 161

  18. Radiographic aspects of xeroradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, G.U.V.; Fatouros, P.P.

    1980-01-01

    The quality of a conventional radiographic image can be characterized in terms of five basic parameters; density, contrast, latitude, resolution and noise. Since xeroradiographic images exhibit very limited broad area contrasts, and image formation is predominantly due to edge enhancement, a straightforward description of image quality using the same five parameters is not adequate. A detailed study was made of the radiographic aspects of xeroradiography with special reference to mammography, and a summary of major findings to date with appropriate references to published papers is presented

  19. Chest physiotherapy compared to no chest physiotherapy for cystic fibrosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Gates; L. Warnock; Dr. C.P. van der Schans

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chest physiotherapy is widely used in people with cystic fibrosis in order to clear mucus from the airways. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness and acceptability of chest physiotherapy compared to no treatment or spontaneous cough alone to improve mucus clearance in cystic

  20. Nondestructive examination - radiographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    First the basic principles of radiography are to be treated, especially the different radiation sources (X-ray, gamma-ray, neutrons, heat). In the second part those radiographic methods are shown, which are in common use for technical purposes, especially under the aspect of flaw recognition. (orig./RW)

  1. Matching hand radiographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauffman, J.A.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Bernelot Moens, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Biometric verification and identification methods of medical images can be used to find possible inconsistencies in patient records. Such methods may also be useful for forensic research. In this work we present a method for identifying patients by their hand radiographs. We use active appearance

  2. Learner concerns of radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popli, Pawan Kumar

    1998-01-01

    Today radiology is fastest developing branch of medical sciences. Most of the radiographers are trained in old fashion, most of training institutes lack proper equipment. It not only affects their career but radiological quality at large. For this purpose it is necessary to find out educational possibilities and needs of group. Therefore this project was taken up

  3. Computed tomography for radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooker, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book is directed towards giving radiographers an introduction to and basic knowledge of computerized tomography. The technical section discusses gantries and x-ray production, computer and disc drive image display, storage, artefacts quality assurance and design of departments. The clinical section includes patient preparation, radiotherapy planning, and interpretation of images from various areas of the anatomy. (U.K.)

  4. Cephalometric-radiographic study, in lateral norm, considering the established standards of white Brazilian teenagers who presented normal occlusions and mal-occlusions of Class I and Class II, 1st Division and the ones from Ricketts' analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bismarck, V.E.

    1986-01-01

    In the present work, our purpose was make a cephalometric-radiographic study, comparing white Brazilian teenagers who presented normal occlusion and the ones who presented malocclusions of Class I and Class II, according to RICKETT'S analysis (1960). (author) [pt

  5. The review on radiographic inspection in 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Junichiro

    1979-01-01

    This is a review paper on the activities of radiographic inspection performed in 1978. The state of safety management in 1978 is reported. The JIS standards for the radiographic inspection were investigated. Problems concerning the measurement of the height of defects by non-destructive test were studied. The radiographic method with narrow irradiation field was developed. Radiography of the welded parts at corners, fiber reinforced plastics, offshore structures, nozzles, pipes and so on was investigated. Scattering ratio, contrast, and beam quality affect on identification, and these effects were studied. Defect-like patterns seen in X-ray graphs of cast metals and welded parts are due to X-ray diffraction. The relation between exposure and density of pictures was obtained as linear relation. The property of scattering ratio and an empirical formula were deduced. Development of instruments and films have been made. (Kato, T.)

  6. Mass chest radiography in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papavasiliou, C.

    1987-01-01

    In Greece mass chest radiography has been performed regularly on various population groups as a measure to control tuberculosis. Routine chest radiography is performed in most Greek hospitals on admission. In this report available data-admittedly inadequate-directly or indirectly addressing the problem of benefit versus the risk or cost associated with this examination is presented

  7. Radiographic interpretation of the appendicular skeleton: A comparison between casualty officers, nurse practitioners and radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, Liz; Piper, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To assess how accurately and confidently casualty officers, nurse practitioners and radiographers, practicing within the emergency department (ED), recognize and describe radiographic trauma within an image test bank of 20 appendicular radiographs. Method: The participants consisted of 7 casualty officers, 13 nurse practitioners and 18 radiographers. All 20 radiographic examinations selected for the image test bank had been acquired following trauma and included some subtle, yet clinically significant abnormalities. The test bank score (maximum 40 marks), sensitivity and specificity percentages were calculated against an agreed radiological diagnosis (reference standard). Alternative Free-response Receiver Operating Characteristic (AFROC) analysis was used to assess the overall performance of the diagnostic accuracy of these professional groups. The variation in performance between each group was measured using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) test, to identify any statistical significant differences in the performance in interpretation between these groups. The relationship between the participants' perceived image interpretation accuracy during clinical practice and the actual accuracy of their image test bank score was examined using Pearson's Correlation Coefficient (r). Results: The results revealed that the radiographers gained the highest mean test bank score (28.5/40; 71%). This score was statistically higher than the mean test bank scores attained by the participating nurse practitioners (21/40; 53%) and casualty officers (21.5/40; 54%), with p < 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively. When compared with each other, the scores from these latter groups showed no significant difference (p = 0.91). The mean 'area under the curve' (AUC) value achieved by the radiographers was also significantly higher (p < 0.01) in comparison to the AUC values demonstrated by the nurse practitioners and casualty officers, whose results, when compared, showed no significant

  8. Radiologic diagnosis of chest disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperber, M.

    1990-01-01

    This book discusses the fundamentals of pulmonary disorders and appropriate use of new diagnostic modalities. Methodologies of choosing techniques are also discussed. The applications of the various radiographic modalities are reviewed. Radiographic manifestations and appropriate imaging techniques most useful for diagnosis are addressed. This book reviews the applications of various recently developed radiographic modalities (CT and MRI) and discusses which are appropriate for specific lung diseases

  9. Early Chest Computed Tomography Scan to Assist Diagnosis and Guide Treatment Decision for Suspected Community-acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessens, Yann-Erick; Debray, Marie-Pierre; Tubach, Florence; Brun, Anne-Laure; Rammaert, Blandine; Hausfater, Pierre; Naccache, Jean-Marc; Ray, Patrick; Choquet, Christophe; Carette, Marie-France; Mayaud, Charles; Leport, Catherine; Duval, Xavier

    2015-10-15

    Clinical decision making relative to community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) diagnosis is difficult. Chest radiograph is key in establishing parenchymal lung involvement. However, radiologic performance may lead to misdiagnosis, rendering questionable the use of chest computed tomography (CT) scan in patients with clinically suspected CAP. To assess whether early multidetector chest CT scan affects diagnosis and management of patients visiting the emergency department with suspected CAP. A total of 319 prospectively enrolled patients with clinically suspected CAP underwent multidetector chest CT scan within 4 hours. CAP diagnosis probability (definite, probable, possible, or excluded) and therapeutic plans (antibiotic initiation/discontinuation, hospitalization/discharge) were established by emergency physicians before and after CT scan results. The adjudication committee established the final CAP classification on Day 28. Chest radiograph revealed a parenchymal infiltrate in 188 patients. CAP was initially classified as definite in 143 patients (44.8%), probable or possible in 172 (53.8%), and excluded in 4 (1.2%). CT scan revealed a parenchymal infiltrate in 40 (33%) of the patients without infiltrate on chest radiograph and excluded CAP in 56 (29.8%) of the 188 with parenchymal infiltrate on radiograph. CT scan modified classification in 187 (58.6%; 95% confidence interval, 53.2-64.0), leading to 50.8% definite CAP and 28.8% excluded CAP, and 80% of modifications were in accordance with adjudication committee classification. Because of CT scan, antibiotics were initiated in 51 (16%) and discontinued in 29 (9%), and hospitalization was decided in 22 and discharge in 23. In CAP-suspected patients visiting the emergency unit, early CT scan findings complementary to chest radiograph markedly affect both diagnosis and clinical management. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01574066).

  10. Practical implementation of the diagnostic reference levels concept for the common radiographic examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vodovatov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern approach to the radiation protection of the patients from medical exposure is mainly based on the principle of optimization using diagnostic reference levels. Implementation of diagnostic reference levels and optimization in Russian radiological practice is limited due to lack of methodology of data collection and patient dose assessment, investigation and management of abnormally high and low patient doses. Current study is focused on the justification of the diagnostic reference levels concept and practical aspects of establishment of diagnostic reference levels for common radiographic X-ray examinations and their use in clinical practice. It is proposed to establish diagnostic reference levels as the 75%-percentiles of X-ray unit distributionby the patient standard doses for a given X-ray examination. Methodology for standard doses assessment is presented for different types of X-ray units. Based on the results of dose data collection in different regions of the Russian Federation in 2009–2014, the national diagnostic reference levels values are estimated in terms of effective dose for the radiographic examinations of skull, chest, cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine,abdomen and pelvis. The methodology of the optimization process is developed for the hospital use. It includes a comparison of the patient standard doses with the national diagnostic reference levels, investigation and correction of abnormally high and low patient doses. A list of corrective measures is proposed: from additional training of the staff and manual adjustment of the parameters of examinations to the replacement of an X-ray unit. It is conferment that even a limited implementation of the optimization methodology would allow to reduce standard doses with a factor of 1,5.

  11. Measurement of Lumbosacral Angle in Normal Radiographs: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    20] Of all these methods, radiography remains the gold standard and lordotic measurement can accurately be measured in a supine lateral lumbosacral spine radiograph.[21-23] ... the following reasons: (1) To avoid ethical issues like patient's.

  12. Chest radiography in acute traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heystraten, F.M.; Rosenbusch, G.; Kingma, L.M.; Lacquet, L.K.; Boo, T. de; Lemmens, W.A.

    Of 123 patients who had suffered blunt trauma to the chest traumatic aortic rupture was eventually confirmed in 61 and absent in 62 patients. The chest radiographs of these patients were examined for 15 signs reported in the literature as being associated with traumatic aortic rupture. Although many individual signs were significantly more frequent in the aortic rupture group they were not useful in differentiating between patients with and those without rupture of the aorta. By using discriminant analysis combining 2 or 3 signs, patients were classified as having aortic rupture or not. The best discrimination between the two groups was obtained using the combined signs of a widened paratracheal stripe, and opacified pulmonary window, a widened right paraspinal interface and a displaced nasogastric tube.

  13. Mediastinal widening on chest radiography caused by combined aortic valve disease and primary large B-cell lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Tomaske, M; Kellenberger, CJ; Bodmer, N; Knirsch, W; Bauersfeld, U

    2007-01-01

    Poststenotic aortic root dilatation in patients with aortic valvular stenosis may result in mediastinal widening on chest radiograph. Main differential diagnosis of mediastinal widening is a tumour. In fact, besides atypical chest pain or dyspnoea at exertion secondary to compression of intrathoracic structures in the latter, symptoms may be absent. This article reports a case of combined aortic valve disease and additional primary large B-cell lymphoma.

  14. Optimizing patient doses in radiographic examinations in the DRC: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazadi Kabuya, F.; Molua Aundu, A.; Ndombasi, Nzeza; Mbongo Tanzia, A.; Ngiulu Mazuka, B.; Kashiya Shiyapebe, S.; Muaka, M.J.; Musau, A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of these investigations was to survey the quality of the radiographic images and the entrance air kerma (ESAK) to patients exposed to simple radiographic examinations and to perform comparisons with diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). Based on the working material provided by the IAEA under the framework of the Project RAF/9/033, in the form of a standardized questionnaire, image quality and patient dose levels were surveyed in 5 radiology departments in the city of Kinshasa. Film reject rate and film quality grading were carried out and causes for poor image quality investigated. Using x-ray tube output measurements and x-ray exposure parameters, the entrance surface doses to adult patients were determined in terms of ESAK. The resulting dose levels were compared with DRLs as an approach to the optimization and the potential for dose reduction. Poor quality images ranged 27% - 67% before implementation of QC tests. The image quality improvement up to 17% was achieved. Doses to Patients were below DRLs and varied by a factor of up to 8.2. The mean ESAK ranged 0.4 - 2.5 mGy (Chest PA), 2.5 - 9.5 mGy (Pelvis AP), 3 - 10.7 mGy (Lumbar Spine AP), and 2.6 - 9.6 mGy Abdomen AP) a