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Sample records for standard cage environment

  1. Evaluation of cage micro-environment of mice housed on various types of bedding materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E.; Stockwell, J.D.; Schweitzer, I.; Langley, S.H.; Smith, A.L.

    2004-01-01

    A variety of environmental factors can affect the outcomes of studies using laboratory rodents. One such factor is bedding. Several new bedding materials and processing methods have been introduced to the market in recent years, but there are few reports of their performance. In the studies reported here, we have assessed the cage micro-environment (in-cage ammonia levels, temperature, and humidity) of mice housed on various kinds of bedding and their combinations. We also compared results for bedding supplied as Nestpaks versus loose bedding. We studied C57BL/6J mice (commonly used) and NOD/LtJ mice (heavy soilers) that were maintained, except in one study, in static duplex cages. In general, we observed little effect of bedding type on in-cage temperature or humidity; however, there was considerable variation in ammonia concentrations. The lowest ammonia concentrations occurred in cages housing mice on hardwood bedding or a mixture of corncob and alpha cellulose. In one experiment comparing the micro-environments of NOD/LtJ male mice housed on woodpulp fiber bedding in static versus ventilated caging, we showed a statistically significant decrease in ammonia concentrations in ventilated cages. Therefore, our data show that bedding type affects the micro-environment in static cages and that effects may differ for ventilated cages, which are being used in vivaria with increasing frequency.

  2. Evaluation of cage micro-environment of mice housed on various types of bedding materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ellen; Stockwell, Jason D; Schweitzer, Isabelle; Langley, Stephen H; Smith, Abigail L

    2004-07-01

    A variety of environmental factors can affect the outcomes of studies using laboratory rodents. One such factor is bedding. Several new bedding materials and processing methods have been introduced to the market in recent years, but there are few reports of their performance. In the studies reported here, we have assessed the cage micro-environment (in-cage ammonia levels, temperature, and humidity) of mice housed on various kinds of bedding and their combinations. We also compared results for bedding supplied as Nestpaks versus loose bedding. We studied C57BL/6J mice (commonly used) and NOD/LtJ mice (heavy soilers) that were maintained, except in one study, in static duplex cages. In general, we observed little effect of bedding type on in-cage temperature or humidity; however, there was considerable variation in ammonia concentrations. The lowest ammonia concentrations occurred in cages housing mice on hardwood bedding or a mixture of corncob and alpha cellulose. In one experiment comparing the micro-environments of NOD/LtJ male mice housed on woodpulp fiber bedding in static versus ventilated caging, we showed a statistically significant decrease in ammonia concentrations in ventilated cages. Therefore, our data show that bedding type affects the micro-environment in static cages and that effects may differ for ventilated cages, which are being used in vivaria with increasing frequency. Copyright 2004 American Association for Laboratory Animal Science

  3. Effect of the environment inside and outside the cage on the activity and behaviour test performance of silver foxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. REKILÄ

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of daily activity in the home cage and the open field test the effect of the internal design and location of cages on the behaviour of silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes during a growth period was evaluated. The inclusion of platforms in cages increased the daytime activity of silver foxes in their home cage, but the inclusion of nest boxes did not. Silver foxes housed at the front of the animal barn were less active during the working day and more active in the evening than were animals housed at the rear. The results of the open field test did not differ significantly between animals housed in cages differing in design. This study demonstrates that the behaviour of silver foxes was only minimally affected by the interior environment of the cage, and that attempts to improve housing design should also take the environment outside the cage into account.;

  4. Standard practice for evaluating and qualifying oil field and refinery corrosion inhibitors using rotating cage

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a generally accepted procedure to use the rotating cage (RC) for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oil field and refinery applications. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  5. The light spot test: Measuring anxiety in mice in an automated home-cage environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, Emmeke; Maroteaux, Gregoire; Loos, Maarten; Koopmans, Bastijn; Kovačević, Jovana; Smit, August B; Verhage, Matthijs; Sluis, Sophie van der

    2015-11-01

    Behavioral tests of animals in a controlled experimental setting provide a valuable tool to advance understanding of genotype-phenotype relations, and to study the effects of genetic and environmental manipulations. To optimally benefit from the increasing numbers of genetically engineered mice, reliable high-throughput methods for comprehensive behavioral phenotyping of mice lines have become a necessity. Here, we describe the development and validation of an anxiety test, the light spot test, that allows for unsupervised, automated, high-throughput testing of mice in a home-cage system. This automated behavioral test circumvents bias introduced by pretest handling, and enables recording both baseline behavior and the behavioral test response over a prolonged period of time. We demonstrate that the light spot test induces a behavioral response in C57BL/6J mice. This behavior reverts to baseline when the aversive stimulus is switched off, and is blunted by treatment with the anxiolytic drug Diazepam, demonstrating predictive validity of the assay, and indicating that the observed behavioral response has a significant anxiety component. Also, we investigated the effectiveness of the light spot test as part of sequential testing for different behavioral aspects in the home-cage. Two learning tests, administered prior to the light spot test, affected the light spot test parameters. The light spot test is a novel, automated assay for anxiety-related high-throughput testing of mice in an automated home-cage environment, allowing for both comprehensive behavioral phenotyping of mice, and rapid screening of pharmacological compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Standard methods for maintaining adult Apis mellifera in cages under in vitro laboratory conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Geoffrey R.; Alaux, Cedric; Costa, Cecilia; Csaki, Tamas; Doublet, Vincent; Eisenhardt, Dorothea; Fries, Ingemar; Kuhn, Rolf; McMahon, Dino P.; Medrzycki, Piotr; Murray, Tomas E.; Natsopoulou, Myrsini E.; Neumann, Peter; Oliver, Randy; Paxton, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Adult honey bees are maintained in vitro in laboratory cages for a variety of purposes. For example, researchers may wish to perform experiments on honey bees caged individually or in groups to study aspects of parasitology, toxicology, or physiology under highly controlled conditions, or they may cage whole frames to obtain newly emerged workers of known age cohorts. Regardless of purpose, researchers must manage a number of variables, ranging from selection of study subjects (e.g. honey bee...

  7. Standard methods for maintaining adult Apis mellifera in cages under in vitro laboratory conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, G.R.; Alaux, C.; Costa, C.; Csaki, C.; Steen, van der, J.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Adult honey bees are maintained in vitro in laboratory cages for a variety of purposes. For example, researchers may wish to perform experiments on honey bees caged individually or in groups to study aspects of parasitology, toxicology, or physiology under highly controlled conditions, or they may cage whole frames to obtain freshly emerged workers of known age cohorts. Regardless of purpose, researchers must manage a number of variables, ranging from selection of study subjects (e.g. honey b...

  8. Standard methods for maintaining adult Apis mellifera in cages under in vitro laboratory conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, G.R.; Alaux, C.; Costa, C.; Csaki, C.; Steen, van der J.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Adult honey bees are maintained in vitro in laboratory cages for a variety of purposes. For example, researchers may wish to perform experiments on honey bees caged individually or in groups to study aspects of parasitology, toxicology, or physiology under highly controlled conditions, or they may

  9. 25 CFR 542.14 - What are the minimum internal control standards for the cage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the minimum internal control standards for the... SERVICES MINIMUM INTERNAL CONTROL STANDARDS § 542.14 What are the minimum internal control standards for... and/or procedures that provide at least the level of control described by the standards in this...

  10. Design and analysis of roll cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angadi, Gurusangappa; Chetan, S.

    2018-04-01

    Wildlife fire fighting vehicles are used to extinguish fires in forests, in this process vehicles face falling objects like rocks, tree branches and other objects. Also due to uneven conditions of the terrain like cliff edges, uneven surfaces etc. makes the vehicle to roll over and these can cause injuries to both the driver and the operator. Roll over of a vehicle is a common incident which makes fatal injuries to the operator and also stands next to the crash accidents. In order to reduce the injury level and continuous roll over of the vehicle it is necessary to equip suitable roll cage according to standards of vehicle. In this present work roll cage for pump operator in wildfire fighting vehicle is designed and analysis is carried out in computer simulated environment when seating position of operator seated outside of the cabin. According to NFPA 1906 standards wildlife fire apparatus, Design and Test procedures that are carried out in Hyperworks maintaining SAE J1194.1983 standards. G load case, roof crush analysis and pendulum impact analysis tests are carried out on roll cage to ensure the saftey of design. These load cases are considerd to satisfy the situation faced in forest terrain. In these test procedures roll cage is analysed for stresses and deformation in various load cases. After recording results these are compared with standards mentioned in SAE J1194.1983.

  11. Long-Term Visual Training Increases Visual Acuity and Long-Term Monocular Deprivation Promotes Ocular Dominance Plasticity in Adult Standard Cage-Raised Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosang, Leon; Yusifov, Rashad; Löwel, Siegrid

    2018-01-01

    For routine behavioral tasks, mice predominantly rely on olfactory cues and tactile information. In contrast, their visual capabilities appear rather restricted, raising the question whether they can improve if vision gets more behaviorally relevant. We therefore performed long-term training using the visual water task (VWT): adult standard cage (SC)-raised mice were trained to swim toward a rewarded grating stimulus so that using visual information avoided excessive swimming toward nonrewarded stimuli. Indeed, and in contrast to old mice raised in a generally enriched environment (Greifzu et al., 2016), long-term VWT training increased visual acuity (VA) on average by more than 30% to 0.82 cycles per degree (cyc/deg). In an individual animal, VA even increased to 1.49 cyc/deg, i.e., beyond the rat range of VAs. Since visual experience enhances the spatial frequency threshold of the optomotor (OPT) reflex of the open eye after monocular deprivation (MD), we also quantified monocular vision after VWT training. Monocular VA did not increase reliably, and eye reopening did not initiate a decline to pre-MD values as observed by optomotry; VA values rather increased by continued VWT training. Thus, optomotry and VWT measure different parameters of mouse spatial vision. Finally, we tested whether long-term MD induced ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in the visual cortex of adult [postnatal day (P)162-P182] SC-raised mice. This was indeed the case: 40-50 days of MD induced OD shifts toward the open eye in both VWT-trained and, surprisingly, also in age-matched mice without VWT training. These data indicate that (1) long-term VWT training increases adult mouse VA, and (2) long-term MD induces OD shifts also in adult SC-raised mice.

  12. Prevalence of coliforms, Salmonella, Listeria, and Campylobacter associated with eggs and the environment of conventional cage and free-range egg production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D R; Anderson, K E; Guard, J Y

    2012-05-01

    There is a desire by US consumers for eggs produced by hens in alternative production systems. As the retail shell-egg market offers these products to accommodate consumer demands, additional information is needed to ensure processing methodologies result in safe eggs from all egg sources. A study was conducted to determine if there were differences in the prevalence of coliforms, Salmonella, Listeria, and Campylobacter on and within eggs and in the environment of a sister flock of conventional cage and free-range laying hens. Microbial sampling occurred approximately every 6 wk between 20 and 79 wk of age. A random sampling of typical coliform colonies produced 371 viable isolates for biochemical identification. Twenty-nine genera or species of bacteria were identified. There was a significantly greater (P prevalence of Campylobacter in the free-range nest box swabs compared with that in the free-range grass and conventional cage swab samples (number of positives: 8 nest box, 1 grass, 0 cage). Seven isolates of Listeria innocua were detected with no significant difference in prevalence between the treatments. Isolates were associated with eggshells (2 free-range floor, 1 cage) and the free-range environment (2 nest box, 2 grass). There were 21 Salmonella isolates detected between all sample locations, with no significant difference in the prevalence of Salmonella detection between the treatments. Additional studies are needed to fully understand the effect of alternative production methods on the prevalence of pathogens and coliforms associated with nest-run eggs and the production environment.

  13. Differences in Anticipatory Behaviour between Rats (Rattus norvegicus Housed in Standard versus Semi-Naturalistic Laboratory Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Joanna Makowska

    Full Text Available Laboratory rats are usually kept in relatively small cages, but research has shown that they prefer larger and more complex environments. The physiological, neurological and health effects of standard laboratory housing are well established, but fewer studies have addressed the sustained emotional impact of a standard cage environment. One method of assessing affective states in animals is to look at the animals' anticipatory behaviour between the presentation of a cue signalling the arrival of a reward and the arrival of that reward. The primary aim of this study was to use anticipatory behaviour to assess the affective state experienced by female rats a reared and housed long-term in a standard laboratory cage versus a semi-naturalistic environment, and b before and after treatment with an antidepressant or an anxiolytic. A secondary aim was to add to the literature on anticipatory behaviour by describing and comparing the frequency and duration of individual elements of anticipatory behaviour displayed by rats reared in these two systems. In all experiments, total behavioural frequency was higher in standard-housed rats compared to rats from the semi-naturalistic condition, suggesting that standard-housed rats were more sensitive to rewards and experiencing poorer welfare than rats reared in the semi-naturalistic environment. What rats did in anticipation of the reward also differed between housing treatments, with standard-housed rats mostly rearing and rats from the semi-naturalistic condition mostly sitting facing the direction of the upcoming treat. Drug interventions had no effect on the quantity or form of anticipatory behaviour, suggesting that the poorer welfare experienced by standard-housed rats was not analogous to depression or anxiety, or alternatively that the drug interventions were ineffective. This study adds to mounting evidence that standard laboratory housing for rats compromises rat welfare, and provides further

  14. NESSE - New Standards in Sample Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schober, H.; Lelievre-Berna, E.

    2011-01-01

    The actual sample environment equipments suite has been designed for instruments built a few decades ago. Since then, we have considerably improved the ILL instruments and the experiments are slowed down by the performance of the sample environment. We propose to establish a new standard that will permit to exploit the new-generation instruments and to develop the environments not presently available for investigating novel scientific challenges. Not only we need reliable equipments covering very large ranges of temperature, pressure, magnetic and electric fields, we must also be able to change the physical parameters much more rapidly as well as exchanging samples automatically. Further to these needs, there are many scientific challenges that cannot be investigated without specific equipment presently unavailable at ILL. For example, among many subjects, high-pressure gas-handling systems are required to improve the storage of hydrogen; specific pressure cells would contribute to the optimization of the food distribution and ultra-high temperature furnaces would allow us to investigate the preparation process of ceramics, cement and refracting materials

  15. Do benthic biofilters contribute to sustainability and restoration of the benthic environment impacted by offshore cage finfish aquaculture?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguado-Gimenez, F.; Piedecausa, M.A.; Carrasco, C.; Gutierrez, J.M.; Aliaga, V.; Garcia-Garcia, B.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Benthic biofilters were deployed under an offshore fish farm and in control locations. → We checked the farm influence on fouling, wild fish and sediment near the biofilters. → Fouling under the cages used fish farm-derived wastes, but at low efficiency. → Wild fish were more abundant in the biofilters located below the cages. → Despite these clear benefits, sediment quality around the biofilters did not improve. - Abstract: Benthic biofilters were deployed under a cage fish farm and in two reference locations to assess the influence of the farm on the biofilters and the surroundings, as well as to verify the usefulness of this technology as a mitigation tool. The biofilters underneath the farm recruited a fouling community practically identical to that of the control biofilters, which included a variety of trophic strategies. The former showed a higher 15 N enrichment, indicating that fouling beneath the farm was benefiting from the farm waste. The waste retention efficiency was low (0.02 g N m -2 month -1 ) beneath the farm. Benthic biofilters aggregated demersal wild fish around and within them. Pelagic wild fish also frequently used the biofilters beneath the farm, forming compact shoals around them. The increased complexity of the habitat below the fish farm enhanced biodiversity, but this improvement did not lead to the recovery of the sediments around the biofilters.

  16. Marketing the indoor environment: standardization or performance on demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bluyssen, P.M.; Adan, O.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    Health problems and complaints with the indoor environment are numerous, even though all available standards are met. For decades now, the standardization of indoor environments is under discussion. Do we approach it via the components of the indoor environment, resulting in standards for lighting,

  17. Interpenetrated Cage Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Marina; Johnstone, Mark D; Clever, Guido H

    2016-09-26

    This Review covers design strategies, synthetic challenges, host-guest chemistry, and functional properties of interlocked supramolecular cages. Some dynamic covalent organic structures are discussed, as are selected examples of interpenetration in metal-organic frameworks, but the main focus is on discrete coordination architectures, that is, metal-mediated dimers. Factors leading to interpenetration, such as geometry, flexibility and chemical makeup of the ligands, coordination environment, solvent effects, and selection of suitable counter anions and guest molecules, are discussed. In particular, banana-shaped bis-pyridyl ligands together with square-planar metal cations have proven to be suitable building blocks for the construction of interpenetrated double-cages obeying the formula [M4 L8 ]. The peculiar topology of these double-cages results in a linear arrangement of three mechanically coupled pockets. This allows for the implementation of interesting guest encapsulation effects such as allosteric binding and template-controlled selectivity. In stimuli-responsive systems, anionic triggers can toggle the binding of neutral guests or even induce complete structural conversions. The increasing structural and functional complexity in this class of self-assembled hosts promises the construction of intelligent receptors, novel catalytic systems, and functional materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Evaluation of Using Caged Clams to Monitor Contaminated Groundwater Exposure in the Near-Shore Environment of the Hanford Site 300 Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Kyle B.; Poston, Ted M.; Tiller, Brett L.

    2008-01-31

    The Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) has been identified as an indicator species for locating and monitoring contaminated groundwater in the Columbia River. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a field study to explore the use of caged Asiatic clams to monitor contaminated groundwater upwelling in the 300 Area near-shore environment and assess seasonal differences in uranium uptake in relation to seasonal flow regimes of the Columbia River. Additional objectives included examining the potential effects of uranium accumulation on growth, survival, and tissue condition of the clams. This report documents the field conditions and procedures, laboratory procedures, and statistical analyses used in collecting samples and processing the data. Detailed results are presented and illustrated, followed by a discussion comparing uranium concentrations in Asiatic clams collected at the 300 Area and describing the relationship between river discharge, groundwater indicators, and uranium in clams. Growth and survival, histology, and other sources of environmental variation also are discussed.

  19. CAGE: A standard design application to nuclear power plants of Cofrentes, Almaraz and Trillo; CAGE: Un diseno estandar de aplicacion a las centrales nucleares de Cofrentes, Almaraz y Trillo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubian Martinez, B.; Gomez Gomez, M.; Zornoza Garcia-Andrade, J.; Turrion Lopez, F.; Barrio, M. A. del; Cobos Perabad, A.; Garcia-Serrano, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    Design, engineering, supply, construction, assembly, supervision and quality control, construction management and commissioning of Alternative Emergency Management Centres (CAGES) of nuclear power plants Cofrentes (CNC), Almaraz (CNA) and Trillo (CNT) were awarded in the first half of 2014 to Iberdrola Engineering and Construction (IIC). After obtaining the required building permits issued by municipalities, following the delivery of the corresponding, basic project and execution, in January 2015, began civil works at CNA, CNT and in February of this year in CNC. (Author)

  20. The effect of early life experience, environment, and genetic factors on spontaneous home-cage aggression-related wounding in male C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Brianna N; Stottler, Aurora M; Garner, Joseph P; Winnicker, Christina W; Mulder, Guy B; Pritchett-Corning, Kathleen R

    2017-03-22

    Aggression is a major welfare issue in mice, particularly when mice unfamiliar to each other are first placed in cages, as happens on receipt from a vendor, and following cage cleaning. Injuries from aggression are the second leading cause of unplanned euthanasia in mice, following ulcerative dermatitis. Commonly employed strategies for reducing aggression-related injury are largely anecdotal, and may even be counterproductive. Here we report a series of experiments testing potential explanations and interventions for post-shipping aggression-related injuries in C57BL/6 mice. First, we examined the effects of weaning: testing whether manipulating weaning age reduced aggression-related injuries, and if repeated mixing of weaned mice before shipping increased these injuries. Contrary to our predictions, repeated mixing did not increase post-shipping injurious aggression, and early weaning reduced aggression-related injuries. Second, we examined potential post-shipping interventions: testing whether lavender essential oil applied to the cage reduced aggression-related injuries, and whether a variety of enrichments decreased injurious aggression. Again, contrary to predictions, lavender increased wounding, and none of the enrichments reduced it. However, consistent with the effects of weaning age in the first experiment, cages with higher mean body weight showed elevated levels of aggression-related wounding. Finally, we tested whether C57BL/6 substrains and identification methods affected levels of intra-cage wounding from aggression. We found no effect of strain, but cages where mice were ear-notched for identification showed higher levels of wounding than cages where mice were tail-tattooed. Overall, these results emphasize the multifactorial nature of home-cage injurious aggression, and the importance of testing received wisdom when it comes to managing complex behavioral and welfare problems. In terms of practical recommendations to reduce aggressive wounding in

  1. Standardization of green building technologies for environment design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benuzh Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the structure and field of standardization ISO / TC 205 “Building environment design”, provides examples of green building technologies. The main purpose of the article is to show the interaction between international ISO / TC 205 “Building environment design” and created in Russia in 2016 the Technical Committee of Standardization № 366 “Green technology of the build environment and green innovative products”. Both of these technical committees promote green building technologies for environment design, thereby deal with the negative impact on the environment and the reasons of global warming. Instead of buildings that attempt to suppress and overcome nature, why not design buildings that integrate with the environment, on every possible level? The international standardization work which ISO/TC 205 “Building environment design” performs seeks, in addition to lowering trade barriers for engineering design, to promote and facilitate the design of high performance buildings: higher performing as economic assets for their owners, higher performing as buildings that provide amenable indoor environment for their occupants, and higher performing with respect to resource utilization and environmental impact.

  2. Analysis of Heavy Metal Content (Pb) on Waters and Fish at The Floating Cages BPPP Ambon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattimena, Rachel L.; Selanno, Debby A. J.; Tuhumury, Semuel F.; Tuahatu, Juliana W.

    2018-02-01

    Coastal waters play important roles due to highly in natural resources and developing of environmental services. However, there are highly intensity of natural resources utilization, environment and settlement. Consequently, environment and natural resources would be degraded such as in the Ambon Bay. One of the potency at the Ambon Bay is mariculture area namely the floating cages (KJA) which belongs to Fisheries education and training (BPPP) Ambon. The research aimed to analyze physical-chemical of waters (temperature, pH, salinity and current speed), to analyze heavy metal concentration (Pb) on water and fish from floating cages (KJA) and to analyze waters pollution status at KJA BPPP Ambon. The average salinity of each floating cage ranged from 30.09 - 30.34°C, pH ranged from 8.03 - 8.44, salinity ranged from 31.36 - 33.34 PSU, and current speed at spring tide ranged from 0.5 - 55.8 Cm/sec while neap tide ranged from 0.1 - 9.8 Cm/sec. Heavy metal concentration (Pb) on waters was below the standard for waters quality and the average concentration was 0.002 mg/l. Whilst, the heavy metal concentration (Pb) on fishes was below standard for floating cages (floating cages 2-6) which was 0.05 and 0.17mg/l. Otherwise, floating cage 1 had been above maximum standard for fish food and its processing following SNI 7387:2009 (0.3mg/l) which was 0.31 mg/l. The status of waters pollution at KJA BPPP Ambon belonged to C class and could be categorized as moderate based on standard for waters quality issued by State Ministerial Decree for the Environment No. 51 Year 2004.

  3. Analysis of Heavy Metal Content (Pb on Waters and Fish at The Floating Cages BPPP Ambon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wattimena Rachel L.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Coastal waters play important roles due to highly in natural resources and developing of environmental services. However, there are highly intensity of natural resources utilization, environment and settlement. Consequently, environment and natural resources would be degraded such as in the Ambon Bay. One of the potency at the Ambon Bay is mariculture area namely the floating cages (KJA which belongs to Fisheries education and training (BPPP Ambon. The research aimed to analyze physical-chemical of waters (temperature, pH, salinity and current speed, to analyze heavy metal concentration (Pb on water and fish from floating cages (KJA and to analyze waters pollution status at KJA BPPP Ambon. The average salinity of each floating cage ranged from 30.09 - 30.34°C, pH ranged from 8.03 − 8.44, salinity ranged from 31.36 − 33.34 PSU, and current speed at spring tide ranged from 0.5 – 55.8 Cm/sec while neap tide ranged from 0.1 – 9.8 Cm/sec. Heavy metal concentration (Pb on waters was below the standard for waters quality and the average concentration was 0.002 mg/l. Whilst, the heavy metal concentration (Pb on fishes was below standard for floating cages (floating cages 2-6 which was 0.05 and 0.17mg/l. Otherwise, floating cage 1 had been above maximum standard for fish food and its processing following SNI 7387:2009 (0.3mg/l which was 0.31 mg/l. The status of waters pollution at KJA BPPP Ambon belonged to C class and could be categorized as moderate based on standard for waters quality issued by State Ministerial Decree for the Environment No. 51 Year 2004.

  4. Effects of Metabolic Cage Housing on Rat Behavior and Performance in the Social Interaction Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Alexandra L; Lymn, Kerry A; Howarth, Gordon S

    2016-01-01

    Although the metabolic cage is commonly used for housing nonhuman animals in the laboratory, it has been recognized as constituting a unique stressor. Such an environment would be expected to affect behavioral change in animals housed therein. However, few studies have specifically addressed the nature or magnitude of this change. The current study sought to characterize the behavioral time budget of rats in metabolic cage housing in comparison to that of individually housed animals in standard open-top cages. Rats in metabolic cages spent less time moving, manipulating enrichment, and carrying out rearing behaviors, and there was a corresponding shift toward inactivity. In an applied Social Interaction Test, behavioral scoring implied that metabolic cage housing had an anxiogenic effect. In conclusion, metabolic cage housing produces measurable effects on spontaneous and evoked behavior in rats in the laboratory. These behavioral changes may lead to a negative emotional state in these animals, which could have negative welfare consequences. Further research is needed to quantify the existence and magnitude of such an effect on rat well being.

  5. Standards development for fiber optic spectroscopic components for adverse environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggese, Steven J.; Greenwell, Roger A.

    1994-09-01

    Optical fiber sensors are finding wider use in all types of applications involving adverse environments, including exposure to radiation. In order to effectively characterize and evaluate the performance of a fiber sensor system for a radiation environment, such as within a nuclear power plant or in a radioactive waste storage/disposal facility, it is beneficial to develop standard test procedures. Science & Engineering Associates (SEA) has developed two such procedures for the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) which address the testing of optical fibers for remote Raman spectroscopic and broadband sensor applications in a steady state radiation environment.

  6. Assessing Learning Environment for Achieving Standard in Primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper is a descriptive survey which sought to identify how the provision of adequate learning environment would affect standard in primary education and subsequently empower both staff and students for capacity development through counselling. Fifteen (15) public primary schools out of 96 identified in Oru-East, ...

  7. Standardization of ionizing radiation in industry and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    In this account a new standardization system is described. This system is intended for the protection of environment, people and employees against the harmful consequences of ionizing radiation. This new system is based upon the actual knowledge of the harmful effects of ionizing radiation and joins to the starting points and objectives of the environment- and industry-protectional policies and is explained for both policies separately. The starting points and objectives are presented of the actual environment- and industry-protectional policies and of the radiation-protection policy pursued up till now. The harmful effects of radiation, the importance of the of the most recent scientific developments and the results of the investigation performed in the framework of this account, are described. Conclusions about these harmful affects are given. The systematics of the standardization are described. Subsequently are considered the radiation sources, their classification, the risk limits for regular situations and for large accidents, the justification principle and the ALARA-principle, emission- and product requirements, objectives for environment quality, standards for combat of the consequences of accidents, the policy with regard to 'building and dwelling' and finally standards for protection of employees. The consequences of the systematics of standardization, which are described in this account, are indicated for environment- as well as industry-protectional policy. Per radiation-source category the corresponding risks are indicated and at which term which continuation activities are necessary. The consequences for the set of instruments and some international aspects are considered. Finally the activity list gives a survey of the continuation activities and the terms at which these have to be carried out. (H.W.). 4 figs.; 1 tab

  8. Reducing organic contamination of shallow areas in brackish lagoons during rearing fish in cages in polyculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Shekk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The development of the technology of the controlled rearing of marine fish remains one of the priority strategic trends of development of national mariculture. A study of the possibility of using polyculture for cage culture has a particular interest. Joint cultivation of several species of fish in the same cage, as practice of fish farming has demonstrated, does not have a tangible positive effect. At the same time, the use of cages of special design can provide significant additional fish products through the use of additional aquaculture objects. The ecological state of water areas, where the cages are located, is of great importance. High fish stocking density and the use of artificial feeds can serve as a source of powerful biogenic and organic pollution, which is especially important for shallow water areas with weak water exchange. The purpose of the study is to develop the methods for joint fish production in cage mariculture capable to provide high fish production and to weaken organic pollution of shallow water areas where cage farms are located. Methodology. The studies were conducted in 1999 and 2004. Cages of special design (internal 10 m3 and external 18.75 m3 installed in the brackish Shabolat Lagoon were used for rearing, steelhead trout, haarder, grass goby and round goby in polyculture. The standard aquaculture research methods were used. For express-analysis of environment hydrochemical parameters in cage location area the following devices were used: "ECOTEST-2000 T" (О2, NO2, NO3, NH4, CO2, phosphates, pH; termooksimetr "АJА-101М" (Т; О2; "pH meter-150 M; Refractometer "ATAGO-100" (salinity and water density. Findings. The results of marine fish cultivation in cages in polyculture in the shallow Shabolat lagoon are presented. It has been shown that joint cultivation of salmon, mullet and gobies in specially designed cages in shallow marine lagoons allows using artificial and natural feeds more fully and

  9. Enriched environment and stress exposure influence splenic B lymphocyte composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurfein, Blake T; Hasdemir, Burcu; Milush, Jeffrey M; Touma, Chadi; Palme, Rupert; Nixon, Douglas F; Darcel, Nicholas; Hecht, Frederick M; Bhargava, Aditi

    2017-01-01

    Prolonged chronic stress has deleterious effects on immune function and is associated with numerous negative health outcomes. The spleen harbors one-fourth of the body's lymphocytes and mediates both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the subset of splenic lymphocytes that respond, either adaptively or maladaptively, to various stressors remains largely unknown. Here we investigated the effects of unpredictable chronic mild stress (CMS) exposure on spleen composition in male mice housed in two different caging conditions: standard caging (Cntl) and enriched environment (EE). EE-caged mice exhibited the greatest absolute number of splenocytes and CMS exposure significantly lowered splenocyte numbers in both caging conditions. Glucocorticoid production, measured by mean fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM), was significantly lower in EE-caged mice vs. Cntl-caged mice. Surprisingly, CMS exposure resulted in an increase in mean FCM in EE-caged mice, but no significant change in Cntl-caged mice. CMS altered the splenic B:T lymphocyte ratio; it reduced the frequency of B cells, but increased the frequency of T cells in EE-caged mice. Splenocyte number and B:T lymphocyte ratio showed a negative relationship with mean FCM. EE-caged mice had a lower frequency of immature and germinal B cells than Cntl-caged mice. CMS markedly increased the frequency of immature and marginal zone B cells, but decreased the frequency of follicular B cells in both caging conditions. Mean FCM correlated positively with frequency of immature, marginal zone and germinal center B cells, but negatively with frequency of follicular B cells. To conclude, splenic immune cells, particularly B lymphocyte composition, are modulated by caging environment and stress and may prime mice differently to respond to immune challenges.

  10. DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 1: Technical standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standard (referred to as the Standard) provides guidance for integrating and enhancing worker, public, and environmental protection during facility disposition activities. It provides environment, safety, and health (ES and H) guidance to supplement the project management requirements and associated guidelines contained within DOE O 430.1A, Life-Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), and amplified within the corresponding implementation guides. In addition, the Standard is designed to support an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), consistent with the guiding principles and core functions contained in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and discussed in DOE G 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Guide. The ISMS guiding principles represent the fundamental policies that guide the safe accomplishment of work and include: (1) line management responsibility for safety; (2) clear roles and responsibilities; (3) competence commensurate with responsibilities; (4) balanced priorities; (5) identification of safety standards and requirements; (6) hazard controls tailored to work being performed; and (7) operations authorization. This Standard specifically addresses the implementation of the above ISMS principles four through seven, as applied to facility disposition activities.

  11. Laboratory rodent welfare: thinking outside the cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcombe, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This commentary presents the case against housing rats and mice in laboratory cages; the commentary bases its case on their sentience, natural history, and the varied detriments of laboratory conditions. The commentary gives 5 arguments to support this position: (a) rats and mice have a high degree of sentience and can suffer, (b) laboratory environments cause suffering, (c) rats and mice in the wild have discrete behavioral needs, (d) rats and mice bred for many generations in the laboratory retain these needs, and (e) these needs are not met in laboratory cages.

  12. Commercial cage fish culture

    OpenAIRE

    Aigbadon, B.V.

    1987-01-01

    With increasing emphasis in Nigeria on aquaculture as an alternative to dwindling artisanal fishing and scarce foreign exchange for fish import, cage fish culture, is a more profitable aquaculture practice than pond culture. It appears to be one of the most viable business ventures with minimum risks. It is a highly recommendable project

  13. Effects of cage density on behavior in young adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Lauren P; Chedester, Alan L; Cole, Marlene N

    2007-08-01

    Optimal housing conditions for mice can be achieved by minimizing environmental variables, such as those that may contribute to anxiety-like behavior. This study evaluated the effects of cage size on juvenile mice through assessment of differences in weaning weight, locomotor skills, and anxiety-like behavior. Eighteen pairs of male and pregnant female Swiss-Webster (Cr:SW) mice were housed in 3 different caging scenarios, providing 429, 505, or 729 cm2 of space. Litters were standardized to 10 pups per litter in each cage. Mice reared in each caging scenario were assessed with the open-field, light-dark exploration, and elevated plus-maze tests. No differences in weaning weight were noted. Mice reared in the 505- and 729-cm2 cages explored a significantly larger area of the open-field arena than did those in the 429-cm2 cages. Those reared in the 505-cm2 cages spent more time in the center of the open field than did those in the 729-cm2 cages, suggesting that anxiety-like behavior may be increased in the animals housed in the larger cages. This study did not establish a consistent link between decreased floor space and increased anxiety-like behavior; neither does there appear to be a consistent effect of available floor area on the development of locomotor skills on mouse pups.

  14. Two RFID standard-based security protocols for healthcare environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picazo-Sanchez, Pablo; Bagheri, Nasour; Peris-Lopez, Pedro; Tapiador, Juan E

    2013-10-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems are widely used in access control, transportation, real-time inventory and asset management, automated payment systems, etc. Nevertheless, the use of this technology is almost unexplored in healthcare environments, where potential applications include patient monitoring, asset traceability and drug administration systems, to mention just a few. RFID technology can offer more intelligent systems and applications, but privacy and security issues have to be addressed before its adoption. This is even more dramatical in healthcare applications where very sensitive information is at stake and patient safety is paramount. In Wu et al. (J. Med. Syst. 37:19, 43) recently proposed a new RFID authentication protocol for healthcare environments. In this paper we show that this protocol puts location privacy of tag holders at risk, which is a matter of gravest concern and ruins the security of this proposal. To facilitate the implementation of secure RFID-based solutions in the medical sector, we suggest two new applications (authentication and secure messaging) and propose solutions that, in contrast to previous proposals in this field, are fully based on ISO Standards and NIST Security Recommendations.

  15. Evaluation of Standard Concepts Design of Library Interior Physical Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debri Harindya Putri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently the function of a room is not only used as a shelter, the function of the room itself to be increased as a refreshing or relaxation area for users to follow the development of creativity and technology in the field of design. The comfortable factor becomes the main factor that indicates a successful process of creating a space. No exception library. The nature of library seemed stiff because of its function as a place to read, now can be developed and made into more dynamic with the special design concepts or color patterns used. Libraries can be created a special concept that suits the characteristics of the users themselves. Most users of the library, especially in college libraries are teenagers. Naturally, teenagers like to gather with their friends and we have to facilitate this activity in our library design concept. In addition we can also determine the needs of users through research by questionnaire method. The answers of users can be mapped and drawn conclusions. To explore the research, the author reviewed some literature about library interior design and observed the library of Ma Chung University as a case study. The combined results of the method can be concluded and the discovery of ideal standards of physical environment. So, the library can be made as a comfortable reading environment so as to increased interest in reading behavior and the frequent visits of students in the library

  16. Analysis of China's radiation environment monitoring standard system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Weiwei; Yue Huiguo; Yuan Zhilun; Yu Zhengwei; Huang Donghui; Wu Yongle

    2014-01-01

    In order to establish and improve the radiation environment monitoring standard system, to provide technical support for the radiation environment monitoring system, this work first retrieve the radiation environment monitoring standards, and clear the domestic status of the radiation environment monitoring standards. According to the Environmental Protection issued by the Ministry of the radiation environment monitoring technology specification '(HJ/T 61-2001), the radiation environment monitoring program (Provisional)' (Central Office (2003) No.56), and the radiation environment monitoring capacity assessment program (Environmental Protection management Division of the Department of nuclear safety, January 2011), environmental Protection Department of the relevant documents and other relevant information, the radiation environment monitoring standards and methods have been accessed, to find the missing items and issues proposed revision of the system requirements. Summarizing radiation environment monitoring national standards, standards of environmental protection industry, the nuclear industry standard, there are 28 standard missing items need to the health industry standards, inspection and quarantine industry standards, a total of 145 of these standards of environmental radiation monitoring, radiation monitoring of pollution sources, emergency response and early warning and monitoring from a management and technology meet the basic needs of the radiation environment monitoring. Research found that the standards in the revised 57 and in the formulation of 47, develop. After the revision of China's standards system will be further improved. The radiation environment monitoring work will be further strengthened. (authors)

  17. Outcomes of contemporary use of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: cage subsidence and cervical alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Toru; Takami, Toshihiro; Uda, Takehiro; Ikeda, Hidetoshi; Nagata, Takashi; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Tsuyuguchi, Naohiro; Ohata, Kenji

    2012-12-01

    Cervical intervertebral disc replacement using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage has become a standard procedure for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). We examined outcomes resulting from the contemporary use of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages for ACDF, particularly focusing on cage subsidence and subsequent kyphotic malalignment. Patient data were collected prospectively, and a total of 47 consecutive patients who underwent periodic follow-up of at least 1 year's duration after ACDF were studied retrospectively. Sixty-three rectangular titanium cages were implanted during 31 1-level and 16 2-level procedures. None of the patients developed surgery-related complications (including cage displacement or extrusion). Mean Neurosurgical Cervical Spine Scale scores were significantly improved at 1 year after surgery. Twelve of the 63 inserted cages (19.0%) were found to have cage subsidence, occurring in 11 of 47 patients (23.4%). There was no significant difference in functional recovery between patients with and without cage subsidence. Logistic regression analysis indicated that fusion level, cage size and cage position were significantly related to cage subsidence. The distraction ratio among patients with cage subsidence was significantly higher than that among patients without cage subsidence. Cage subsidence resulted in early deterioration of local angle and total alignment of the cervical spine. Although a longer follow-up is warranted, a good surgical outcome with negligible complications appears to justify the use of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF. Excessive distraction at the fusion level should be avoided, and cage position should be adjusted to the anterior vertical line. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Towards an environment interface standard for agent platforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behrens, T.M.; Hindriks, K.V.; Dix, J.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce an interface for connecting agent platforms to environments. This interface provides generic functionality for executing actions and for perceiving changes in an agent’s environment. It also provides support for managing an environment, e.g., for starting, pausing and terminating it.

  19. Cage-based performance capture

    CERN Document Server

    Savoye, Yann

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, highly-detailed animations of live-actor performances are increasingly easier to acquire and 3D Video has reached considerable attentions in visual media production. In this book, we address the problem of extracting or acquiring and then reusing non-rigid parametrization for video-based animations. At first sight, a crucial challenge is to reproduce plausible boneless deformations while preserving global and local captured properties of dynamic surfaces with a limited number of controllable, flexible and reusable parameters. To solve this challenge, we directly rely on a skin-detached dimension reduction thanks to the well-known cage-based paradigm. First, we achieve Scalable Inverse Cage-based Modeling by transposing the inverse kinematics paradigm on surfaces. Thus, we introduce a cage inversion process with user-specified screen-space constraints. Secondly, we convert non-rigid animated surfaces into a sequence of optimal cage parameters via Cage-based Animation Conversion. Building upon this re...

  20. Business management and the environment of care standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, O R

    1997-01-01

    In summary, the entire JCAHO manual is built around the concept of "know thyself." This expectation creates the need to engage in a substantial rework of existing practices to remove communication barriers and to eliminate turf warfare. The focus of the standards is on the patient. All aspects of the patient-care delivery cycle are examined during survey, as are key elements of the business-management activities. The EC standards are a case study of business management. They expect leadership and planning, development of human resources, management of information, and improvement of performance. They expect that all four of these management tools will be exercised by all managers and staff members who have an impact on or are impacted by the seven elements of the EC function. The primary focus is on teamwork among providers and maximizing benefits to patients.

  1. Standardized Environmental Enrichment Supports Enhanced Brain Plasticity in Healthy Rats and Prevents Cognitive Impairment in Epileptic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouchi, Hayet Y.; Bodennec, Jacques; Morales, Anne; Georges, Béatrice; Bonnet, Chantal; Bouvard, Sandrine; Sloviter, Robert S.; Bezin, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Environmental enrichment of laboratory animals influences brain plasticity, stimulates neurogenesis, increases neurotrophic factor expression, and protects against the effects of brain insult. However, these positive effects are not constantly observed, probably because standardized procedures of environmental enrichment are lacking. Therefore, we engineered an enriched cage (the Marlau™ cage), which offers: (1) minimally stressful social interactions; (2) increased voluntary exercise; (3) multiple entertaining activities; (4) cognitive stimulation (maze exploration), and (5) novelty (maze configuration changed three times a week). The maze, which separates food pellet and water bottle compartments, guarantees cognitive stimulation for all animals. Compared to rats raised in groups in conventional cages, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited increased cortical thickness, hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal levels of transcripts encoding various genes involved in tissue plasticity and remodeling. In addition, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited better performances in learning and memory, decreased anxiety-associated behaviors, and better recovery of basal plasma corticosterone level after acute restraint stress. Marlau™ cages also insure inter-experiment reproducibility in spatial learning and brain gene expression assays. Finally, housing rats in Marlau™ cages after severe status epilepticus at weaning prevents the cognitive impairment observed in rats subjected to the same insult and then housed in conventional cages. By providing a standardized enriched environment for rodents during housing, the Marlau™ cage should facilitate the uniformity of environmental enrichment across laboratories. PMID:23342033

  2. Standardized environmental enrichment supports enhanced brain plasticity in healthy rats and prevents cognitive impairment in epileptic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raafat P Fares

    Full Text Available Environmental enrichment of laboratory animals influences brain plasticity, stimulates neurogenesis, increases neurotrophic factor expression, and protects against the effects of brain insult. However, these positive effects are not constantly observed, probably because standardized procedures of environmental enrichment are lacking. Therefore, we engineered an enriched cage (the Marlau™ cage, which offers: (1 minimally stressful social interactions; (2 increased voluntary exercise; (3 multiple entertaining activities; (4 cognitive stimulation (maze exploration, and (5 novelty (maze configuration changed three times a week. The maze, which separates food pellet and water bottle compartments, guarantees cognitive stimulation for all animals. Compared to rats raised in groups in conventional cages, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited increased cortical thickness, hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal levels of transcripts encoding various genes involved in tissue plasticity and remodeling. In addition, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited better performances in learning and memory, decreased anxiety-associated behaviors, and better recovery of basal plasma corticosterone level after acute restraint stress. Marlau™ cages also insure inter-experiment reproducibility in spatial learning and brain gene expression assays. Finally, housing rats in Marlau™ cages after severe status epilepticus at weaning prevents the cognitive impairment observed in rats subjected to the same insult and then housed in conventional cages. By providing a standardized enriched environment for rodents during housing, the Marlau™ cage should facilitate the uniformity of environmental enrichment across laboratories.

  3. How the Environment Is Positioned in the "Next Generation Science Standards": A Critical Discourse Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufnagel, Elizabeth; Kelly, Gregory J.; Henderson, Joseph A.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe how the environment and environmental issues are conceptualized and positioned in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) to examine underlying assumptions about the environment. The NGSS are a recent set of science standards in the USA, organized and led by Achieve Inc., that propose science education…

  4. Predicted flash x-ray environments using standard converter configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halbleib, J.A.; Sanford, T.W.L.

    1985-09-01

    Using a sophisticated Monte Carlo model, we have obtained predictions of the forward radiation fields generated by a series of monoenergetic electron sources, with kinetic energies ranging from 0.5 to 15.0 MeV, normally incident on standard converter configurations. The tantalum converter foil thickness that maximizes the total forward-going x-ray energy ranges from 0.3 times the continuous-slowing-down-approximation electron range at 0.5 MeV to 0.6 times that range at 15.0 MeV. This result is not very sensitive to the presence or absence of typical electron absorbers or debris shields. The forward extraction efficiency exhibits a slightly superlinear dependence on source electron kinetic energy. Electron backscatter and photon absorption are shown to be the chief transport phenomena that limit x-ray extraction. Dependence of x-ray spectra on emission angle results from the complicated interplay of cross-section kinematics, slant-thickness absorption, and slant-thickness buildup. The response of common dosimetry materials to the radiation fields was also studied. The systematics of energy deposition in high-Z and low-Z dosimetry materials as a function of source energy, converter geometry, and emission angle are presented in terms of an effective absorption coefficient. The utility of this coefficient for predicting the energy deposition in one material from the measured dose in another material is demonstrated. It is shown that the converter thickness that optimizes dose is less than the thickness that optimizes the forward extraction efficiency. 11 refs., 32 figs.

  5. International standards for the indoor environment. Where are we and do they apply to Asian countries?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2003-01-01

    On the international level, ISO (International Organization for Standardization), CEN (European Committee for Standardization) and ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers) are writing and reviewing standards relating to the indoor environment on a regular...... basis. This presentation will focus on the development of standards for the indoor thermal environment and indoor air quality (ventilation). In the future, recommendations for acceptable indoor environments will be specified as classes. This allows for national differences in the requirements as well...... as for designing buildings for different quality levels. Several of these standards have been developed mainly by experts from Europe, North America and Japan. Are there, however, special considerations relating to South-East Asia (lifestyle, outdoor climate, economy) that are not dealt with in these standards...

  6. Outcomes of interbody fusion cages used in 1 and 2-levels anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: titanium cages versus polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chi-Chien; Liao, Jen-Chung; Chen, Wen-Jer; Chen, Lih-Huei

    2010-07-01

    A prospective study was performed in case with cervical spondylosis who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with titanium or polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages. To find out which fusion cage yielded better clinical and radiographic results. Although use of autogenous iliac-bone grafts in ACDF for cervical disc diseases remain standard surgical procedure, donor site morbidity and graft collapse or breakage are concerns. Cage technology was developed to prevent these complications. However, there is no comparison regarding the efficacy between titanium and PEEK cage. January 2005 to January 2006, 53 patients who had 1 and 2-levels ACDF with titanium or PEEK cages were evaluated. We measured the rate and amount of interspace collapse, segmental sagittal angulations, and the radiographic fusion success rate. Odom criteria were used to assess the clinical results. The fusion rate was higher in the PEEK group (100% vs. 86.5%, P=0.0335). There was no significant difference between both groups in loss of cervical lordosis (3.2 + or - 2.4 vs. 2.8 + or - 3.4, P=0.166). The mean anterior interspace collapse (1.6 + or - 1.0 mm) in the titanium group was significantly higher than the collapse of the PEEK group (0.5 + or - 0.6 mm) (PPEEK group (PPEEK group achieved an 80% rate of successful clinical outcomes, compared with 75% in the titanium group (P=0.6642). The PEEK cage is superior to the titanium cage in maintaining cervical interspace height and radiographic fusion after 1 and 2-levels anterior cervical decompression procedures.

  7. Comparison Between Acrylic Cage and Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Cage in Single-level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Majid R; Nikoo, Zahra; Gholami, Mehrnaz; Hosseini, Khadijeh

    2017-02-01

    Prospective, single-blind randomized-controlled clinical study. To compare polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage with a novel Acrylic cage to find out which fusion cage yielded better clinical outcomes following single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). ACDF is considered a standard neurosurgical treatment for degenerative diseases of cervical intervertebral disks. There are many options, including bone grafts, bone cement, and spacers made of titanium, carbon fiber, and synthetic materials, used to restore physiological disk height and enhance spinal fusion, but the ideal device, which would provide immediate structural support and subsequent osteointegration and stability, has not been identified yet. To overcome this, we designed a new, inexpensive Acrylic cage. A total of 64 patients were eligible to participate and were randomly allocated to undergo ACDF either with Acrylic interbody fusion cage filled with bone substitute (n=32) or PEEK cage (n=32). Nurick's grading was used for quantifying the neurological deficit. Clinical and radiologic outcome was assessed preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and subsequently at 2, 6, and 12 months of follow-up using Odom's criteria and dynamic radiographs (flexion-extension) and computed tomography scans, respectively. There was a statistically significant improvement in the clinical outcomes of the Acrylic cage group compared with the PEEK cage group (mean difference: -0.438; 95% confidence interval, -0.807 to -0.068; P=0.016). There was a statistically significant difference in disk space height increase between the 2 groups at the 6- and 12-month follow-up. The Acrylic cage achieved higher fusion rate (good fusion) than the PEEK cage (96.9% vs. 93.8%). Intervertebral angle demonstrated a significant difference among the 2 treated groups throughout the follow-up period. This study suggests that the use of Acrylic cage is associated with good clinical and radiologic outcomes and it can be therefore a

  8. Marine environmental impact assessment of abalone, Haliotis discus hannai, cage farm in Wan-do, Republic of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun-Taik; Jung, Rae-Hong; Cho, Yoon-Sik; Hwang, Dong-Woon; Yi, Yong-Min

    2015-12-01

    To assess the marine environmental impacts of abalone, Haliotis discus hannai, cage farms in Wan-do, we monitored the benthic environment on top of the sediment underneath cage farm stations and reference stations. We applied two methods for this assessment. One was the A- and B-investigation of the MOM system (Modeling-On fish farm-Monitoring) developed in Norway. The other was a general environmental monitoring method which is widely used. In this study, we found benthic animals in all samples that belonged to condition 1 which were based on group 1(presence of macrofauna) of the B-investigation method. The values of redox potential (group 2-pH, redox potential) in all samples were above +65 mV belonging to condition 1. Based on sensory results (group 3-gas, color, odor, thickness of deposits), five out of seven experiment samples showed condition 1 while stations 2 and 7 showed condition 2, which have been cultured for 10 years in semi-closed waters. As group 2 takes precedence over group 3, the level of the conditions for B-investigation results consequently showed condition 1 in all stations. We found that pollutants and trace metals in the sediment underneath cage farms were lower than the pollution standard. This led us to conclude that the environmental impacts of the cage farms in this study were not significant.

  9. Effects of cage fish culture on water quality and selected biological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growing of fish in cages is currently practiced in Uganda and was first introduced in northern Lake Victoria in 2010. An environment monitoring study was undertaken at Source of the Nile, a private cage fish farm, in Napoleon gulf, northern Lake Victoria. In-situ measurements of key environmental (temperature, dissolved ...

  10. CAGE BREEDING OF WARM WATER FRESHWATER FISH SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Safner

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In the 1970s, Croatia became actively involved in the contemporary trend of breeding fish in floating cages. In addition to various species of marine fishes, breeding was attempted with trout, carp, catfish, cisco and salmon. Of the above freshwater fish species, specific standards were established only for the cage breeding of rainbow trout. Cage breeding of the remaining species remained at the level of occasional attempts, with more of an experimental than a commercial character. The regular attempts to master this technique for cage breeding of warm water freshwater fish species were aimed at achieving the known benefits of such breeding, such as simplicity of implementing technological measures, easier establishment of the breeding system, simpler manipulation, the possibility of denser colonies per unit volume with a high level of production, easier adaptations to market conditions and fewer initial structural investments. Despite the many advantages, the main reasons for the lack of greater implementation of the cage breeding technology for warm water species of freshwater fish include problems in obtaining the appropriate category and quantity of healthy fry, the specificity and applicability of physical and chemical properties of the recipients and human error. In evaluating the advantages and disadvantages, the final decision on the justification of cage breeding for individual warm water freshwater species must be based on both biological and economic factors. Based on the knowledge of cage breeding acquired to date, the rule for virtually all intensive breeding systems is that it is only recommended for those species with high market demand and a high market price. The technology that demands nutrition with highly concentrated feed and other production expenditures is costly, and is therefore not profitable with less expensive fish species. Furthermore, production must be market oriented, i.e. the appropriate market research measures

  11. Mice Do Not Habituate to Metabolism Cage Housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Darusman, Huda Shalahudin

    2013-01-01

    The metabolism cage is a barren, non-enriched, environment, combining a number of recognized environmental stressors. We investigated the ability of male BALB/c mice to acclimatize to this form of housing. For three weeks markers of acute and oxidative stress, as well as clinical signs of abnorma...

  12. Cage culture of sea bass in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    The article discusses the cage culture practice of sea bass (Lates calcarifer) in Malaysia. Problems on feed and seed supply and overcrowding are also discussed. Despite these problems, seabass cage culture still continuously booms.

  13. A Mobile Phone Faraday Cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, M. M. J.

    2011-01-01

    A Faraday cage is an interesting physical phenomenon where an electromagnetic wave can be excluded from a volume of space by enclosure with an electrically conducting material. The practical application of this in the classroom is to block the signal to a mobile phone by enclosing it in a metal can. The background of the physics behind this is…

  14. Caging and Uncaging Genetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom J Little

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available It is important for biology to understand if observations made in highly reductionist laboratory settings generalise to harsh and noisy natural environments in which genetic variation is sorted to produce adaptation. But what do we learn by studying, in the laboratory, a genetically diverse population that mirrors the wild? What is the best design for studying genetic variation? When should we consider it at all? The right experimental approach depends on what you want to know.

  15. DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 1 of 2: Technical standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-05-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standard (referred to as the Standard) provides guidance for integrating and enhancing worker, public, and environmental protection during facility disposition activities. It provides environment, safety, and health (ES and H) guidance to supplement the project management requirements and associated guidelines contained within DOE O 430.1A, Life-Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), and amplified within the corresponding implementation guides. In addition, the Standard is designed to support an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), consistent with the guiding principles and core functions contained in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and discussed in DOE G 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Guide. The ISMS guiding principles represent the fundamental policies that guide the safe accomplishment of work and include: (1) line management responsibility for safety; (2) clear roles and responsibilities; (3) competence commensurate with responsibilities; (4) balanced priorities; (5) identification of safety standards and requirements; (6) hazard controls tailored to work being performed; and (7) operations authorization. This Standard specifically addresses the implementation of the above ISMS principles four through seven, as applied to facility disposition activities

  16. PROBLEMS OF BIOFOULING ON FISH–CAGE NETS IN AQUACULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merica Slišković

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Biofouling on fish–cage netting is a serious technical and economical problem to aquaculture worldwide. Compensation for the effects of biofouling must be included in cage system design and planning, as fouling can dramatically increase both weight and drag. Settlements of sessile plants and animals, with accumulation of the detritus diminish the size of mesh and can rapidly occlude mesh. Negative effect of smaller mesh size is changing in water flow trough the cages. Biofouling problems necessitating purchase of a second sets of nets or more, and frequent cleaning and changing of biofouling. Changing and cleaning frequency depend on many factors such as: location of cages (near the coast or off shore, productivity of that location, time of the year, time period in which the cages are placed on that location (cause of loading of phosphorus and nitrogen from the unconsumed food in the sediment. Net changing and cleaning procedures are labor and capital intensive. Process of the cleaning of the nets is inadequate, especially when there isnžt adequate equipment available as it is case in smaller aquaculture industry. Chemical control of biofouling e. g. use of antifoulants is questioningly cause of their possible negative effects on breeding species and environment.

  17. REINVENTING THE WHEEL: Comparison of Two Wheel Cage Styles for Assessing Mouse Voluntary Running Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward, Tanya; Harfmann, Brianna D; Esser, Karyn A; Schroder, Elizabeth A

    2017-12-21

    Voluntary wheel cage assessment of mouse activity is commonly employed in exercise and behavioral research. Currently, no standardization for wheel cages exists resulting in an inability to compare results among data from different labs. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the distance run or average speed data differs depending on the use of two commonly used commercially available wheel cage systems. Two different wheel cages with structurally similar but functionally different wheels (electromechanical switch vs magnetic switch) were compared side-by-side to measure wheel running data differences. Other variables, including enrichment and cage location, were also tested to assess potential impacts on the running wheel data. We found that cages with the electromechanical switch had greater inherent wheel resistance and consistently led to higher greater running distance/day and higher average running speed. Mice rapidly, within 1-2 days, adapted their running behavior to the type of experimental switch used suggesting these running differences are more behavioral than due to intrinsic musculoskeletal, cardiovascular or metabolic limits. The presence of enrichment or location of the cage had no detectable impact on voluntary wheel running. These results demonstrate that mice run differing amounts depending on the type of cage and switch mechanism used and thus, investigators need to report wheel cage type/ wheel resistance and use caution when interpreting distance/speed run across studies.

  18. Leading in the cage

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at an exploration of leadership in the context of pervasive organizational control, in the form of standardized measurement systems. Measurement practices are proliferating in contemporary organizations, with ever more aspects of both organizational and private life being monitored and measured (Clegg & Courpasson, 2006). These systems are generally seen as an important part of organizational control regulating and shaping both actions of organizational members, an...

  19. Acclimatization of mice to different cage types and social groupings with respect to fecal secretion of IgA and corticosterone metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Cathrine Juel; Kalliokoski, Otto; Abelson, Klas Sp

    2012-01-01

    Stress associated with transport and change of environment may have widespread effects on physiological parameters in laboratory animals. To investigate the time needed for mice to acclimatize to a new environment, based on fecal IgA and corticosterone excretion, eightweek-old BALB/c mice of both...... genders were housed either in groups of eight in different cage types in open conventional cages, in Individual Ventilated Cages (IVC), in open conventional cages inside a plastic isolator, or in different group sizes (8, 4, 8, 10 or 12 mice in each group) in open conventional cages. Feces were collected...... from each cage on routine cage changing. There was no significant difference in corticosterone excretion in feces between animals housed in the different cage types or between animals housed in different group sizes. IgA excretion for both males and females was found to be affected by transfer of mice...

  20. The Effect of Cervical Interbody Cage Morphology, Material Composition, and Substrate Density on Cage Subsidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Paul B; Puttlitz, Christian; Lewis, Chad; Bal, B Sonny; McGilvray, Kirk

    2017-02-01

    Interbody cages used in spinal fusion surgery can subside into the adjacent vertebral bodies after implantation, leading to loss of spinal height, malalignment, and possible radicular symptoms. Several factors may contribute to cage subsidence. This in vitro investigation examined the possible contribution of substrate density, cage contact area (ie, cage footprint), cage filling, cage end plate surface texture, and cage material composition on the magnitude of subsidence. Commercially available cervical interbody cages of two sizes (16 × 12 mm and 17 × 14 mm) were implanted between foam blocks of two different densities and were cyclically loaded. Cages were made of titanium alloy (Ti4Al6V), silicon nitride ceramic (Si3N4), or polyether ether ketone (n = 8 cages of each material type). Additional testing was performed on Si3N4 cages of the smaller size with nontextured surfaces and with filled cores. Subsidence measurements showed that lower foam density had the greatest influence on subsidence, followed by smaller cage footprint. Cage material had no effect on subsidence. In the additional testing of small-footprint Si3N4 cages, the cages in which the core was filled with a load-bearing porous material had less subsidence in lower-density foam than the cages with an empty core had, whereas cage end plate surface texture had no effect on subsidence. Ranking of the relative impact of these factors indicated that substrate density had the greatest contribution to the measured subsidence (approximately 1.7 times and approximately 67 times greater than the contributions of cage footprint area and material, respectively). The contribution of cage footprint area to subsidence was found to be 40 times greater than the contribution of cage material to subsidence.

  1. Human & dog in urban environment: Could basic IMS standards help to improve human & dog mutual understanding?

    OpenAIRE

    Andreeva Elena E.

    2016-01-01

    Modern life, particularly urban one, is well regulated. Standards are developed for almost every sphere of human activities including proper treatment of nature and different working processes. IMS standards, particularly ISO 14001 and ISO 9001, are widely spread. In this human made environment we indicated some space and rules for pets, dogs in particular, how to behave, eat, walk, then for us the advices how to become their pack leaders… Also we could apply some widely used requirements and...

  2. Developing product quality standards for wheelchairs used in less-resourced environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhatre, Anand; Martin, Daniel; McCambridge, Matt; Reese, Norman; Sullivan, Mark; Schoendorfer, Don; Wunderlich, Eric; Rushman, Chris; Mahilo, Dave; Pearlman, Jon

    2017-01-01

    Premature failures of wheelchairs in less-resourced environments (LREs) may be because of shortcomings in product regulation and quality standards. The standards published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) specify wheelchair tests for durability, safety and performance, but their applicability to products used in the rugged conditions of LREs is unclear. Because of this, wheelchair-related guidelines published by the World Health Organization recommended developing more rigorous durability tests for wheelchairs. This study was performed to identify the additional tests needed for LREs. First, a literature review of the development of ISO test standards, wheelchair standards testing studies and wheelchair evaluations in LREs was performed. Second, expert advice from members of the Standards Working Group of the International Society of Wheelchair Professionals (ISWP) was compiled and reviewed. A total of 35 articles were included in the literature review. Participation from LREs was not observed in the ISO standards development. As per wheelchair testing study evidence, wheelchair models delivered in LREs did not meet the minimum standards requirement. Multiple part failures and repairs were observed with reviewed field evaluation studies. ISWP experts noted that several testing factors responsible for premature failures with wheelchair parts are not included in the standards and accordingly provided advice for additional test development. The study findings indicate the need to develop a wide range of tests, with specific tests for measuring corrosion resistance of the entire wheelchair, rolling resistance of castors and rear wheels, and durability of whole wheelchair and castor assemblies.

  3. Usability of HL7 and SNOMED CT standards in Java Persistence API environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Gábor; Végh, Ádám Zoltán; Bilicki, Vilmos

    2014-01-01

    Due to the need for an efficient way of communication between the different stakeholders of healthcare (e.g. doctors, pharmacists, hospitals, patients etc.), the possibility of integrating different healthcare systems occurs. However, during the integration process several problems of heterogeneity might come up, which can turn integration into a difficult task. These problems motivated the development of healthcare information standards. The main goal of the HL7 family of standards is the standardization of communication between clinical systems and the unification of clinical document formats on the structural level. The SNOMED CT standard aims the unification of the healthcare terminology, thus the development of a standard on lexical level. The goal of this article is to introduce the usability of these two standards in Java Persistence API (JPA) environment, and to examine how standard-based system components can be efficiently generated. First, we shortly introduce the structure of the standards, their advantages and disadvantages. Then, we present an architecture design method, which can help to eliminate the possible structural drawbacks of the standards, and makes code generating tools applicable for the automatic production of certain system components.

  4. Motion of Br2 molecules in clathrate cages. A computational study of the dynamic effects on its spectroscopic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Uruchurtu, M I; Janda, Kenneth C; Hernández-Lamoneda, R

    2015-01-22

    This work looks into the spectroscopic behavior of bromine molecules trapped in clathrate cages combining different methodologies. We developed a semiempirical quantum mechanical model to incorporate through molecular dynamics trajectories, the effect movement of bromine molecules in clathrate cages has on its absorption spectra. A simple electrostatic model simulating the cage environment around bromine predicts a blue shift in the spectra, in good agreement with the experimental evidence.

  5. The effect of cage size on reproductive performance and behavior of C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Julia; Moy, Sheryl S; Saville, Benjamin R; Godfrey, Virginia; Nielsen, Judith; Bellinger, Dwight; Bradfield, John

    2007-11-01

    Scientific research has yet to conclusively determine the optimal cage size for mice. The authors examined the effect of cage size on mouse breeding performance and on offspring behavior, which can serve as indications of overall well-being. They housed breeding trios of C57BL/6Tac mice in standard or large individually ventilated cages and measured four reproductive parameters: litter size; litter survival to weaning age; average pup weight at 7, 14 and 21 days; and the number of days between litter births. They investigated the behavior of a subset of male and female pups from parents housed in cages of each size in the elevated plus maze test, the open field assay and the acoustic startle test. Cage size had no significant effect on any of the reproductive parameters measured and few or inconsistent effects on behavior in weaned pups.

  6. Animal Welfare and Food Safety Aspects of Confining Broiler Chickens to Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Sara; Greger, Michael

    2013-05-13

    In most areas of the world, broiler chickens are raised in floor systems, but cage confinement is becoming more common. The welfare of broiler chickens in cages is affected by movement restriction, poor bone strength due to lack of exercise, and prevention of key behavioral patterns such as dustbathing and ground scratching. Cages for broiler chickens also have a long history of causing skin and leg conditions that could further compromise welfare, but a lack of controlled studies makes it difficult to draw conclusions about newer cage designs. Cage environments are usually stocked at a higher density than open floor systems, and the limited studies available suggest that caging may lead to increased levels of fear and stress in the birds. Further, birds reared on the floor appear less likely to harbor and shed Salmonella, as litter may serve as a seeding agent for competitive exclusion by other microorganisms. Cages for laying hens used in egg production have met with substantial opposition due to welfare concerns and caging broiler chickens will likely be subject to the same kinds of social disapproval.

  7. Polymers containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2013-04-23

    Polymers comprising residues of cage compound monomers having at least one polyalkoxy silyl substituent are provided. The cage compound monomers are selected from borane cage compound monomers comprising at least 7 cage atoms and/or carborane cage compound monomers comprising 7 to 11 cage compound monomers. Such polymers can further comprise one or more reactive matrices and/or co-monomers covalently bound with the cage compound monomer residues. Articles of manufacture comprising such polymers are also disclosed.

  8. The hazardous priority substances in Italy: National rules and environmental quality standard in marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggi, Chiara; Onorati, Fulvio; Lamberti, Claudia Virno; Cicero, Anna Maria

    2008-01-01

    Article number 16 of the Water Framework Directive (Directive 2000/60/EC) lays down the community strategy for establishment of harmonised quality standards for the priority substances and other substances posing a significant risk to the aquatic environment. In order to achieve the protection objectives of the Directive 2000/60/EC, the Italian Ministry of the Environment proposed the quality standards for surface water, sediments and biota related to the priority substances listed in the decision No. 2455/2001/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of November 20 (2001) [Decision N. 2455/2001/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 November 2001. The list of priority substances in the field of water policy and amending Directive 2000/60/EC. Official Journal of the European Communities, 15.12.2001, p. 5]. Particularly, for the protection of the marine environment, the proposed Italian rules state that, from 1 January 2021, the concentrations of the hazardous priority substances in Italian marine and lagoon waters must be near the natural background for natural substances, like metals, and near zero for the anthropogenic one. According to Directive 2000/60/EC, the Italian Ministry of Environment issued in 2003 Decree 367 in which has derived 160 Environmental Quality Standard (EQS) for water and 27 Environmental Quality Objective (EQO) for sediment of marine coastal area, lagoons and coastal ponds. Biota quality standards have still to be fixed. The paper illustrates the criteria applied for the definition of the quality standards and some comments are presented

  9. Overview of the OGC CDB Standard for 3D Synthetic Environment Modeling and Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Saeedi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in sensor and platform technologies, such as satellite systems, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV, manned aerial platforms, and ground-based sensor networks have resulted in massive volumes of data being produced and collected about the earth. Processing, managing, and analyzing these data is one of the main challenges in 3D synthetic representation used in modeling and simulation (M&S of the natural environment. M&S devices, such as flight simulators, traditionally require a variety of different databases to provide a synthetic representation of the world. M&S often requires integration of data from a variety of sources stored in different formats. Thus, for simulation of a complex synthetic environment, such as a 3D terrain model, tackling interoperability among its components (geospatial data, natural and man-made objects, dynamic and static models is a critical challenge. Conventional approaches used local proprietary data models and formats. These approaches often lacked interoperability and created silos of content within the simulation community. Therefore, open geospatial standards are increasingly perceived as a means to promote interoperability and reusability for 3D M&S. In this paper, the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC CDB Standard is introduced. “CDB” originally referred to Common DataBase, which is currently considered as a name with no abbreviation in the OGC community. The OGC CDB is an international standard for structuring, modeling, and storing geospatial information required in high-performance modeling and simulation applications. CDB defines the core conceptual models, use cases, requirements, and specifications for employing geospatial data in 3D M&S. The main features of the OGC CDB Standard are described as the run-time performance, full plug-and-play interoperable geospatial data store, usefulness in 3D and dynamic simulation environment, ability to integrate proprietary and open-source data formats

  10. Evaluation of Virtual Teaching-Learning Environments based on usability standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose I. Cocunubo-Suarez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this review article is to determine the necessary sub-characteristics or aspects for the evaluation of Virtual Teaching-Learning Environments (VTLEs as final or finished products based on ISO 9126, 14598 and 25000-SQuaRE standards. A systematic information search was carried out. A total of 108 documents were retrieved about subjects such as web usability, virtual learning environments, usability, educational software, educational web evaluation, usability evaluation and web usability evaluation. Out of the 108 documents, 70 were selected by inclusion and exclusion analysis. The eight subfeatures of greater statistical frequency were identified among the subset of documents and then integrated as a proposal for standard 25000-SQuaRE.

  11. Transmission of Airborne Bacteria across Built Environments and Its Measurement Standards: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Fujiyoshi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Human health is influenced by various factors including microorganisms present in built environments where people spend most of their lives (approximately 90%. It is therefore necessary to monitor and control indoor airborne microbes for occupational safety and public health. Most studies concerning airborne microorganisms have focused on fungi, with scant data available concerning bacteria. The present review considers papers published from 2010 to 2017 approximately and factors affecting properties of indoor airborne bacteria (communities and concentration with respect to temporal perspective and to multiscale interaction viewpoint. From a temporal perspective, bacterial concentrations in built environments change depending on numbers of human occupancy, while properties of bacterial communities tend to remain stable. Similarly, the bacteria found in social and community spaces such as offices, classrooms and hospitals are mainly associated with human occupancy. Other major sources of indoor airborne bacteria are (i outdoor environments, and (ii the building materials themselves. Indoor bacterial communities and concentrations are varied with varying interferences by outdoor environment. Airborne bacteria from the outdoor environment enter an indoor space through open doors and windows, while indoor bacteria are simultaneously released to the outer environment. Outdoor bacterial communities and their concentrations are also affected by geographical factors such as types of land use and their spatial distribution. The bacteria found in built environments therefore originate from any of the natural and man-made surroundings around humans. Therefore, to better understand the factors influencing bacterial concentrations and communities in built environments, we should study all the environments that humans contact as a single ecosystem. In this review, we propose the establishment of a standard procedure for assessing properties of indoor airborne

  12. Listening to Cage: Nonintentional philosophy and music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Fleming

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Listening to Cage: Nonintentional Philosophy and Music threads together the writings of ordinary language philosophy and the music of John Cage, responding specifically to requests made by Cage and Stanley Cavell. While many texts downplay or ignore the philosophical demands in Cage’s music and other texts find grandiose spiritual and philosophical material tied to his work, this text rejects both efforts. It challenges the basic directions of the growing secondary source material on Cage, finding it largely contrary to what Cage himself and his music teaches. That secondary material constantly offers an intentional approach to the music which is to make Cage understandable or easier to understand. The present text makes him appropriately difficult and basically unapproachable, asking the reader for serious acknowledgment of what Cage says he does, namely, “I have nothing to say and I am saying it.” While there is little hope of stopping the Cage industry that academia and publishers have grown, this text wishes at least to try to slow it down. The footnotes of this text include direct conversation material with Cage from the 1980s and 1990s regarding many subjects—his own compositions, our life struggles, remarks on Wittgenstein, Thoreau, philosophy, and music—all with a new context for their hearing.

  13. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramelle, David; Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages' pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages' core and low non-specific binding to the cages' outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage's core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of currently

  14. Determination of water environment standards based on water quality criteria in China: Limitations and feasibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tieyu; Zhou, Yunqiao; Bi, Cencen; Lu, Yonglong; He, Guizhen; Giesy, John P

    2017-07-01

    There is a need to formulate water environment standards (WESs) from the current water quality criteria (WQC) in China. To this end, we briefly summarize typical mechanisms applied in several countries with longer histories of developing WESs, and three limitations to formulating WESs in China were identified. After analyzing the feasibility factors including economic development, scientific support capability and environmental policies, we realized that China is still not ready for a complete change from its current nation-wide unified WES system to a local-standard-based system. Thus, we proposed a framework for transformation from WQC to WESs in China. The framework consists of three parts, including responsibilities, processes and policies. The responsibilities include research authorization, development of guidelines, and collection of information, at both national and local levels; the processes include four steps and an impact factor system to establish water quality standards; and the policies include seven specific proposals. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Social communication in mice--are there optimal cage conditions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allain-Thibeault Ferhat

    Full Text Available Social communication is heavily affected in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. Accordingly, mouse models designed to study the mechanisms leading to these disorders are tested for this phenotypic trait. Test conditions vary between different models, and the effect of these test conditions on the quantity and quality of social interactions and ultrasonic communication is unknown. The present study examines to which extent the habituation time to the test cage as well as the shape/size of the cage influence social communication in freely interacting mice. We tested 8 pairs of male mice in free dyadic social interactions, with two habituation times (20 min and 30 min and three cage formats (rectangle, round, square. We tested the effect of these conditions on the different types of social contacts, approach-escape sequences, follow behavior, and the time each animal spent in the vision field of the other one, as well as on the emission of ultrasonic vocalizations and their contexts of emission. We provide for the first time an integrated analysis of the social interaction behavior and ultrasonic vocalizations. Surprisingly, we did not highlight any significant effect of habituation time and cage shape/size on the behavioral events examined. There was only a slight increase of social interactions with the longer habituation time in the round cage. Remarkably, we also showed that vocalizations were emitted during specific behavioral sequences especially during close contact or approach behaviors. The present study provides a protocol reliably eliciting social contacts and ultrasonic vocalizations in adult male mice. This protocol is therefore well adapted for standardized investigation of social interactions in mouse models of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  16. COATING ALTERNATIVES GUIDE (CAGE) USER'S GUIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The guide provides instructions for using the Coating Alternatives GuidE (CAGE) software program, version 1.0. It assumes that the user is familiar with the fundamentals of operating an IBM-compatible personal computer (PC) under the Microsoft disk operating system (MS-DOS). CAGE...

  17. Jules Verne's Metaphor of the Iron Cage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus R.R.

    2010-01-01

    Max Weber's concept of the iron cage has become a byword in the scholarly world since the publication in 1930 of Talcott Parsons’ translation of The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. What is less well-known is that Jules Verne had earlier used the iron cage metaphor in Twenty Thousand

  18. Understanding and Informing the Policy Environment: State-Level Renewable Fuels Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, E.; Cory, K.; Arent, D.

    2007-01-01

    Renewable fuels standard (RFS) policies are becoming a popular public policy mechanism for developing the market for renewable fuels in the transportation sector. During the past decade, U.S. states and several countries began implementing these more market-based (less command and control) policies to support increased biofuels production and use. This paper presents an overview of current and proposed U.S. state-level policies, as well as selected electric sector policies and international fuel standard policies. Current U.S. state-level renewable fuel policies list drivers including an improved economy and environment, as well as fuel self-sufficiency. Best practices and experience from an evaluation of renewable portfolio standards (RPS) in the United States and international RFS policies can inform U.S. state-level policy by illustrating the importance of policy flexibility, binding targets, effective cost caps, and tradable permits. Understanding and building on the experiences from these previous policies can improve the policy mechanism and further develop a market for renewable fuels to meet the goals of improved economy, environment, and fuel self-sufficiency.

  19. Digestibility and behavior of dogs housed in kennels or metabolic cages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabyta Tamara Sabchuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to compare the apparent digestibility coefficients of a commercial dog food, fecal consistency and behavior of dogs housed in kennels and metabolic cages. Six adult Beagle dogs were distributed in cross-over experimental design, with six replicates per treatment. Dogs were housed in two environments: metabolic cages and in masonry kennels with solarium. Dogs were fed for a five-day adaptation period, and the five following days were used for total feces collection. Dogs behavior was recorded during a 48-h period, with 10-min intervals. Apparent digestibility coefficients were not different between treatments. However, dogs housed in metabolic cages produced lower weight and more consistent feces as compared with dogs housed in kennels. Dogs spent most of the time sleeping in both housing systems; however, dogs housed in the metabolic cages slept more than those in kennels. Stress-related behaviors (barking, whimpering, stereotypies, etc were observed for no longer than 15 minutes per day, and were not different between dogs in kennels or in cages. There is no difference in food digestibility evaluated in dogs housed in metabolic cages or kennels; however, dogs kept in metabolic cages eliminate drier feces and spend more time inactive than those kept in kennels.

  20. Rescue Implantation of Expandable Cages for Severe Osteolysis and Cage Dislocation in the Lumbosacral Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatlo, Bawarjan; Rohde, Veit; Solomiichuk, Volodymyr; von Eckardstein, Kajetan; Behm, Timo

    2017-11-01

    Osteolysis and implant loosening are commonly encountered problems after spinal instrumentation. In a patient who had previously undergone a posterior lumbar interbody fusion procedure, fusion did not occur, and a secondary cage dislocation led to an impingement of the L5 nerve root with severe radiculopathy. Revision surgery was performed. Intraoperatively, osteolysis was found to be so severe that conventional cages did not fill the void to allow for sufficient anterior column support. We used expandable transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion cages and implanted them bilaterally to replace the dislodged posterior lumbar interbody fusion cages. Clinical follow-up was uneventful. Imaging performed at 1 year showed satisfactory cage position and fusion. We propose the use of cages with the ability of ventral distraction in similar rescue interventions with cage dislocation and bone resorption. This may prevent a second surgery via a ventral approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Human & dog in urban environment: Could basic IMS standards help to improve human & dog mutual understanding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreeva Elena E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern life, particularly urban one, is well regulated. Standards are developed for almost every sphere of human activities including proper treatment of nature and different working processes. IMS standards, particularly ISO 14001 and ISO 9001, are widely spread. In this human made environment we indicated some space and rules for pets, dogs in particular, how to behave, eat, walk, then for us the advices how to become their pack leaders… Also we could apply some widely used requirements and rules from IMS (Integrated Management Systems standards for dogs' owners, trainers and breeders. But we'd better always keep in mind that dogs are animals, a part of nature. Why not to see our attitude to dogs through these standards we invented to preserve nature and improve working processes? It will help to put aside the anthropocentric position and to look at dogs as a specific world that exists side by side with ours and that we only learn how to respect and communicate with.

  2. The applicability of the Centeno, Chaudhary and Lopez repair time standard methodology in a rail maintenance environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommelspacher, Karl Otto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of labour standards within a production environment has become common practice, and is receiving growing recognition in the maintenance environment. However, the application of labour standards in a transit maintenance organisation has received limited attention. Centeno, Chaudhary and Lopez have developed a repair time standard methodology that has been applied in the transit bus maintenance facilities of three agencies in central Florida in the USA. An investigation into the applicability of this methodology in a rail maintenance environment in South Africa forms the basis for this study.

  3. DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 2: Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-05-01

    This volume contains the appendices that provide additional environment, safety, and health (ES and H) information to complement Volume 1 of this Standard. Appendix A provides a set of candidate DOE ES and H directives and external regulations, organized by hazard types that may be used to identify potentially applicable directives to a specific facility disposition activity. Appendix B offers examples and lessons learned that illustrate implementation of ES and H approaches discussed in Section 3 of Volume 1. Appendix C contains ISMS performance expectations to guide a project team in developing and implementing an effective ISMS and in developing specific performance criteria for use in facility disposition. Appendix D provides guidance for identifying potential Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) when decommissioning facilities fall under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, Liability Act (CERCLA) process. Appendix E discusses ES and H considerations for dispositioning facilities by privatization. Appendix F is an overview of the WSS process. Appendix G provides a copy of two DOE Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards memoranda that form the bases for some of the guidance discussed within the Standard. Appendix H gives information on available hazard analysis techniques and references. Appendix I provides a supplemental discussion to Sections 3.3.4, Hazard Baseline Documentation, and 3.3.6, Environmental Permits. Appendix J presents a sample readiness evaluation checklist

  4. A standardized SOA for clinical data interchange in a cardiac telemonitoring environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzarata, Roberta; Vergari, Fabio; Cinotti, Tullio Salmon; Giacomini, Mauro

    2014-11-01

    Care of chronic cardiac patients requires information interchange between patients' homes, clinical environments, and the electronic health record. Standards are emerging to support clinical information collection, exchange and management and to overcome information fragmentation and actors delocalization. Heterogeneity of information sources at patients' homes calls for open solutions to collect and accommodate multidomain information, including environmental data. Based on the experience gained in a European Research Program, this paper presents an integrated and open approach for clinical data interchange in cardiac telemonitoring applications. This interchange is supported by the use of standards following the indications provided by the national authorities of the countries involved. Taking into account the requirements provided by the medical staff involved in the project, the authors designed and implemented a prototypal middleware, based on a service-oriented architecture approach, to give a structured and robust tool to congestive heart failure patients for their personalized telemonitoring. The middleware is represented by a health record management service, whose interface is compliant to the healthcare services specification project Retrieve, Locate and Update Service standard (Level 0), which allows communication between the agents involved through the exchange of Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 documents. Three performance tests were carried out and showed that the prototype completely fulfilled all requirements indicated by the medical staff; however, certain aspects, such as authentication, security and scalability, should be deeply analyzed within a future engineering phase.

  5. Maintenance of a Drosophila melanogaster Population Cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, Juan Manuel; Lei, Elissa P

    2016-03-15

    Large quantities of DNA, RNA, proteins and other cellular components are often required for biochemistry and molecular biology experiments. The short life cycle of Drosophila enables collection of large quantities of material from embryos, larvae, pupae and adult flies, in a synchronized way, at a low economic cost. A major strategy for propagating large numbers of flies is the use of a fly population cage. This useful and common tool in the Drososphila community is an efficient way to regularly produce milligrams to tens of grams of embryos, depending on uniformity of developmental stage desired. While a population cage can be time consuming to set up, maintaining a cage over months takes much less time and enables rapid collection of biological material in a short period. This paper describes a detailed and flexible protocol for the maintenance of a Drosophila melanogaster population cage, starting with 1.5 g of harvested material from the previous cycle.

  6. Compositions containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2013-05-28

    Compositions comprising a polymer-containing matrix and a filler comprising a cage compound selected from borane cage compounds, carborane cage compounds, metal complexes thereof, residues thereof, mixtures thereof, and/or agglomerations thereof, where the cage compound is not covalently bound to the matrix polymer. Methods of making and applications for using such compositions are also disclosed.

  7. Self-Assembled Pyridine-Dipyrrolate Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huacheng; Lee, Juhoon; Lammer, Aaron D; Chi, Xiaodong; Brewster, James T; Lynch, Vincent M; Li, Hao; Zhang, Zhan; Sessler, Jonathan L

    2016-04-06

    An inherently nonlinear pyridine dipyrrolate ligand, namely 2,6-bis(3,4-diethyl-5-carboxy-1H-pyrrol-2yl)pyridine (compound 1), is able to distinguish between different zinc(II) cation sources, namely Zn(acac)2 and Zn(OAc)2, respectively. This differentiation is manifest both in terms of the observed fluorescent behavior in mixed organic media and the reaction chemistry. Treatment of 1 with Zn(acac)2 gives rise to a cage dimer, cage-1, wherein two molecules of compound 1 act as double bridging units to connect two individual cage subunits. As inferred from X-ray crystallographic studies, this cage system consists of discrete zinc dimers with hydroxide bridges that, with the assistance of bound DMF solvent molecules, serve to fix the geometry and orientation of the pyridine dipyrrolate building blocks. When a different zinc source, Zn(OAc)2, is used to carry out an ostensibly similar complexation reaction with compound 1, an acetate-bridged 1D abacus-like cage polymer is obtained as inferred from X-ray diffraction analysis. This extended solid state structure, cage-2, contains individual zinc dimer cage submits and appears stabilized by solvent molecules (DMF) and the counteranion (acetate). Rod-like assemblies are also observed by DLS and SEM. This construct, in contrast to cage-1, proved fluorescent in mixed organic media. The structure of the ligand itself (i.e., in the absence of Zn(II)) was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis and was found to assemble into a supramolecular polymer. Conversion to a dimer form was seen upon the addition of TBAOAc. On the basis of the metric parameters, the structures seen in the solid state are stabilized via hydrogen bonding interactions involving solvent molecules.

  8. Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) part 6-2 : generic standards : immunity for industrial environments

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    Applies to electrical and electronic apparatus intended for use in industrial environments, for which no designed product or product-family immunity standard exists. Immunity requirements in the frequency range 0 Hz to 400 GHz are covered, in relation to continuous and transient, conducted and radiated disturbances, including electrostatic discharges. Test requirements are specified for each port considered. Apparatus intended to be used in industrial locations are characterized by the existence of one or more of the following: - a power network exists powered by a high or medium voltage power transformer for the supply of an installation feeding manufacturing or similar plant; - industrial, scientific and medical (ISM) apparatus; - heavy inductive or capacitive loads are frequently switched; - currents and associated magnetic fields are high.

  9. Cross-standard user description in mobile, medical oriented virtual collaborative environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, Rama Rao; Mitrea, Mihai; Joveski, Bojan; Chammem, Afef

    2015-03-01

    By combining four different open standards belonging to the ISO/IEC JTC1/SC29 WG11 (a.k.a. MPEG) and W3C, this paper advances an architecture for mobile, medical oriented virtual collaborative environments. The various users are represented according to MPEG-UD (MPEG User Description) while the security issues are dealt with by deploying the WebID principles. On the server side, irrespective of their elementary types (text, image, video, 3D, …), the medical data are aggregated into hierarchical, interactive multimedia scenes which are alternatively represented into MPEG-4 BiFS or HTML5 standards. This way, each type of content can be optimally encoded according to its particular constraints (semantic, medical practice, network conditions, etc.). The mobile device should ensure only the displaying of the content (inside an MPEG player or an HTML5 browser) and the capturing of the user interaction. The overall architecture is implemented and tested under the framework of the MEDUSA European project, in partnership with medical institutions. The testbed considers a server emulated by a PC and heterogeneous user devices (tablets, smartphones, laptops) running under iOS, Android and Windows operating systems. The connection between the users and the server is alternatively ensured by WiFi and 3G/4G networks.

  10. Mouse housing system using pressurized cages intraventilated by direct-current microfans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinewski, Alexandre; Correia, Caio S C; de Souza, Nívea L; Merusse, José L B

    2012-03-01

    We performed the initial assessment of an alternative pressurized intraventilated (PIV) caging system for laboratory mice that uses direct-current microfans to achieve cage pressurization and ventilation. Twenty-nine pairs of female SPF BALB/c mice were used, with 19 experimental pairs kept in PIV cages and 10 control pairs kept in regular filter-top (FT) cages. Both groups were housed in a standard housing room with a conventional atmospheric control system. For both systems, intracage temperatures were in equilibrium with ambient room temperature. PIV cages showed a significant difference in pressure between days 1 and 8. Air speed (and consequently airflow rate) and the number of air changes hourly in the PIV cages showed decreasing trends. In both systems, ammonia concentrations increased with time, with significant differences between groups starting on day 1. Overall, the data revealed that intracage pressurization and ventilation by using microfans is a simple, reliable system, with low cost, maintenance requirements, and incidence of failures. Further experiments are needed to determine the potential influence of this system on the reproductive performance and pulmonary integrity in mice.

  11. Food consumption and food exchange of caged honey bees using a radioactive labelled sugar solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libor, Anika; Kupelwieser, Vera; Crailsheim, Karl

    2017-01-01

    We measured the distribution of sugar solution within groups of caged honey bees (Apis mellifera) under standard in vitro laboratory conditions using 14C polyethylene glycol as a radioactive marker to analyze ingestion by individual bees after group feeding. We studied the impact of different experimental setups by varying the number of bees, age of bees, origin of bees, duration of experiment, the amount of available diet, and the influence of the neurotoxic pesticide imidacloprid in the diet on the feeding and food sharing behavior (trophallaxis). Sugar solution was non-uniformly distributed in bees in 36 out of 135 cages. As a measure of the extent to which the sugar diet was equally distributed between caged bees, we calculated the (inner 80%) intake ratio by dividing the intake of the 90th percentile bee by the intake of the 10th percentile bee. This intake ratio ranged from 1.3 to 94.8 in 133 individual cages, further supporting a non-uniform distribution of food among caged bees. We can expect a cage with 10 or 30 bees containing one bee that ingests, on average, the 8.8-fold of the bee in the same cage ingesting the smallest quantity of food. Inner 80% intake ratios were lower in experiments with a permanent or chronic offering of labelled sugar solution compared to temporary or acute feedings. After pooling the data of replicates to achieve a higher statistical power we compared different experimental setups. We found that uniform food distribution is best approached with 10 newly emerged bees per cage, which originate from a brood comb from a single colony. We also investigated the trophallaxis between caged honey bees which originally consumed the diet and newly added bees. Color marked bees were starved and added to the cages in a ratio of 10:5 or 20:20 after the initial set of bees consumed all the labelled sugar solution. The distribution of the labelled sugar solution by trophallaxis within 48 hours to added bees was 25% (10:5) or 45% (20:20) of the

  12. Food consumption and food exchange of caged honey bees using a radioactive labelled sugar solution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Brodschneider

    Full Text Available We measured the distribution of sugar solution within groups of caged honey bees (Apis mellifera under standard in vitro laboratory conditions using 14C polyethylene glycol as a radioactive marker to analyze ingestion by individual bees after group feeding. We studied the impact of different experimental setups by varying the number of bees, age of bees, origin of bees, duration of experiment, the amount of available diet, and the influence of the neurotoxic pesticide imidacloprid in the diet on the feeding and food sharing behavior (trophallaxis. Sugar solution was non-uniformly distributed in bees in 36 out of 135 cages. As a measure of the extent to which the sugar diet was equally distributed between caged bees, we calculated the (inner 80% intake ratio by dividing the intake of the 90th percentile bee by the intake of the 10th percentile bee. This intake ratio ranged from 1.3 to 94.8 in 133 individual cages, further supporting a non-uniform distribution of food among caged bees. We can expect a cage with 10 or 30 bees containing one bee that ingests, on average, the 8.8-fold of the bee in the same cage ingesting the smallest quantity of food. Inner 80% intake ratios were lower in experiments with a permanent or chronic offering of labelled sugar solution compared to temporary or acute feedings. After pooling the data of replicates to achieve a higher statistical power we compared different experimental setups. We found that uniform food distribution is best approached with 10 newly emerged bees per cage, which originate from a brood comb from a single colony. We also investigated the trophallaxis between caged honey bees which originally consumed the diet and newly added bees. Color marked bees were starved and added to the cages in a ratio of 10:5 or 20:20 after the initial set of bees consumed all the labelled sugar solution. The distribution of the labelled sugar solution by trophallaxis within 48 hours to added bees was 25% (10:5 or 45

  13. Food consumption and food exchange of caged honey bees using a radioactive labelled sugar solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodschneider, Robert; Libor, Anika; Kupelwieser, Vera; Crailsheim, Karl

    2017-01-01

    We measured the distribution of sugar solution within groups of caged honey bees (Apis mellifera) under standard in vitro laboratory conditions using 14C polyethylene glycol as a radioactive marker to analyze ingestion by individual bees after group feeding. We studied the impact of different experimental setups by varying the number of bees, age of bees, origin of bees, duration of experiment, the amount of available diet, and the influence of the neurotoxic pesticide imidacloprid in the diet on the feeding and food sharing behavior (trophallaxis). Sugar solution was non-uniformly distributed in bees in 36 out of 135 cages. As a measure of the extent to which the sugar diet was equally distributed between caged bees, we calculated the (inner 80%) intake ratio by dividing the intake of the 90th percentile bee by the intake of the 10th percentile bee. This intake ratio ranged from 1.3 to 94.8 in 133 individual cages, further supporting a non-uniform distribution of food among caged bees. We can expect a cage with 10 or 30 bees containing one bee that ingests, on average, the 8.8-fold of the bee in the same cage ingesting the smallest quantity of food. Inner 80% intake ratios were lower in experiments with a permanent or chronic offering of labelled sugar solution compared to temporary or acute feedings. After pooling the data of replicates to achieve a higher statistical power we compared different experimental setups. We found that uniform food distribution is best approached with 10 newly emerged bees per cage, which originate from a brood comb from a single colony. We also investigated the trophallaxis between caged honey bees which originally consumed the diet and newly added bees. Color marked bees were starved and added to the cages in a ratio of 10:5 or 20:20 after the initial set of bees consumed all the labelled sugar solution. The distribution of the labelled sugar solution by trophallaxis within 48 hours to added bees was 25% (10:5) or 45% (20:20) of the

  14. Behavior and Welfare of Domestic Cats Housed in Cages Larger than U.S. Norm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Judith L; Croney, Candace C; Buffington, C Tony

    2017-01-01

    The effect of providing additional floor space on cat behavior and welfare is not well documented. This study involved replication of an investigation of cats' responses to enhanced cage and room environments using cages of 0.56 m 2 with the same methodology but an increased space allowance of 1.1 m 2 . Singly housed adult cats (n = 59) were randomly assigned to a treatment group that was a combination of a managed or unmanaged room and an enriched or unenriched cage environment. Cats were observed for 2 days for maintenance, affiliative, and avoidant behaviors using scan sampling and 5-min, continuous focal sampling. At the end of Day 2, cats' reactions to the approach of an unfamiliar person were assessed. Cats housed in enriched/managed environments exhibited more maintenance and affiliative behaviors and fewer avoidant behaviors than cats in unmanaged/unenriched environments, suggesting that macro and micro environments may be equally relevant to the cat. Increased space did not enhance the cats' welfare outcomes, suggesting that the provision of additional cage space may not be as important to the cat as a managed housing environment.

  15. Structure and dynamics of empty cages in xenon clathrate hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda-Fukazawa, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Nagashima, Kazushige; Kawamura, Katsuyuki

    2008-12-14

    We performed molecular dynamics calculations of xenon clathrate hydrate to investigate the effects of empty cages on the structure and dynamics of the surrounding lattice. The distinct structure and dynamics of the empty cages, and cages including Xe, which coexist in the lattice, were analyzed. The results show that the ellipsoidal tetrakaidecahedral cage shrinks along the minor (100) axis and expands along the major (100) axis due to the absence of Xe from the cage, whereas the dodecahedral cage shrinks isotropically. These distortions of the empty cages cause a reduction in the lattice constant and an enhancement of the thermal vibrations of the surrounding lattice. The vibrational density of states shows that the hydrogen bonds consisting of the tetrakaidecahedral cage are strengthened by the absence of Xe, whereas those of the dodecahedral cage are weakened. These results show differing mechanisms of guest-host interaction for the two types of cages including Xe. Repulsion is the dominant guest-host interaction for the dodecahedral cage, as proposed by previous studies. For the tetrakaidecahedral cage, however, attractive interaction is dominant along the major (100) axis, whereas repulsive interaction is dominant along the minor (100) axis. The present results suggest that a small number of empty cages can affect not only the local structures but also the macroscopic properties of the crystal. It is concluded that the distortions of the empty cages are one of the important factors governing the density and phase equilibrium of clathrate hydrates.

  16. The Universal Thermal Climate Index UTCI compared to ergonomics standards for assessing the thermal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröde, Peter; Błazejczyk, Krzysztof; Fiala, Dusan; Havenith, George; Holmér, Ingvar; Jendritzky, Gerd; Kuklane, Kalev; Kampmann, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The growing need for valid assessment procedures of the outdoor thermal environment in the fields of public weather services, public health systems, urban planning, tourism & recreation and climate impact research raised the idea to develop the Universal Thermal Climate Index UTCI based on the most recent scientific progress both in thermo-physiology and in heat exchange theory. Following extensive validation of accessible models of human thermoregulation, the advanced multi-node 'Fiala' model was selected to form the basis of UTCI. This model was coupled with an adaptive clothing model which considers clothing habits by the general urban population and behavioral changes in clothing insulation related to actual environmental temperature. UTCI was developed conceptually as an equivalent temperature. Thus, for any combination of air temperature, wind, radiation, and humidity, UTCI is defined as the air temperature in the reference condition which would elicit the same dynamic response of the physiological model. This review analyses the sensitivity of UTCI to humidity and radiation in the heat and to wind in the cold and compares the results with observational studies and internationally standardized assessment procedures. The capabilities, restrictions and potential future extensions of UTCI are discussed.

  17. Analysis and interpretation of the model of a Faraday cage for electromagnetic compatibility testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad V. Munić

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the work of the Laboratory for Electromagnetic Compatibility Testing in the Technical Test Center (TTC, we investigated the influence of the Faraday cage on measurement results. The primary goal of this study is the simulation of the fields in the cage, especially around resonant frequencies, in order to be able to predict results of measurements of devices under test in the anechoic chamber or in any other environment. We developed simulation (computer models of the cage step by step, by using the Wipl-D program and by comparing the numerical results with measurements as well as by resolving difficulties due to the complex structure and imperfections of the cage. The subject of this paper is to present these simulation models and the corresponding results of the computations and measurements. Construction of the cage The cage is made of steel plates with the dimensions 1.25 m x 2.5 m. The base of the cage is a square; the footprint interior dimensions are 3.76 m x 3.76 m, and the height is 2.5 m. The cage ceiling is lowered by plasticized aluminum strips. The strips are loosely attached to the carriers which are screwed to the ceiling. The cage has four ventilation openings (two on the ceiling and two on one wall, made of honeycomb waveguide holes. In one corner of the cage, there is a single door with springs made of beryllium bronze. For frequencies of a few tens of MHz, the skin effect is fully developed in the cage walls. By measuring the input impedance of the wire line parallel to a wall of the cage, we calculated the surface losses of the cage plates. In addition, we used a magnetic probe to detect shield discontinuities. We generated a strong current at a frequency of 106 kHz outside the cage and measured the magnetic field inside the cage at the places of cage shield discontinuities. In this paper, we showed the influence of these places on the measurement results, especially on the qualitative and quantitative

  18. Standardization in the field of environment; Normalisation dans le domaine de l`environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jounot, A. [Association Francaise de Normalisation (AFNOR), 92 - Paris-la-Defense (France)

    1999-01-01

    After having recalled the French system of standardization, the author gives into details the standards for the following topics: water quality, air quality, wastes, land quality, noise, bio control. (O.M.)

  19. Estandares: El medio ambiente de las politicas (Standards: The Policy Environment). ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadderman, Margaret

    This digest in Spanish offers a snapshot of the standards movement: its origins, the definitions of standards and which ones matter, its successes at the district and state levels, the backlash against the movement, and possible policy directions. While a broad coalition of constituencies has embraced standards-based reform as a means of improving…

  20. High-throughput Transcriptome analysis, CAGE and beyond

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2008-11-25

    1. Current research - PhD work on discovery of new allergens - Postdoctoral work on Transcriptional Start Sites a) Tag based technologies allow higher throughput b) CAGE technology to define promoters c) CAGE data analysis to understand Transcription - Wo

  1. The effects of climbing cages on behaviour of female mink during the lactation period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidfors, L.; Axelsson, H.; Loberg, J.

    2012-01-01

    =46) or standard cages (2.550 cm², n=44). Behavioural observations were made four weeks before birth until kits were nine weeks old with one-zero sampling during two hours before feeding. During week 1-4 after females had given birth they were mostly recorded in the nest box and there were...

  2. Trace elements in two marine fish cultured in fish cages in Fujian province, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onsanit, Sarayut; Ke Caihuan; Wang Xinhong; Wang Kejian; Wang Wenxiong

    2010-01-01

    Two cultured marine fish, the Japanese seabass (Lateolabrax japonicus) and red seabream (Pagrus major) were collected from eight fish cage sites along the coast of Fujian province in China. The concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Se, and Zn in their muscle, stomach and liver tissue were quantified. The risk of these trace elements to humans through fish consumption was then assessed. The highest concentrations of As, Cd, Se and Zn in fish feed from fish cages were found in Dongshan Station. Moreover, the As levels in the muscles of both species at all sites were generally higher than China's national standard (>1.0 μg/g). Trace element concentrations in two marine fish followed the order of livers > stomachs > muscles. Although the As levels in two marine caged fish exceeded the permissible standards, the estimated daily intake of As did not exceed the reference dose guideline established by US EPA. For other trace elements examined in this study, their concentrations did not exceed the permissible concentrations of the international standards. - As levels in two marine caged fish from China exceeded the permissible standards, whereas the levels of others trace elements did not exceed the permissible concentrations.

  3. Pentagonal dodecahedron methane hydrate cage and methanol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    NBO analysis and red shift of vibrational frequency reveal that hydrogen bond formation between methanol and water molecules of 1CH4@512 cage is favourable subsequently after breaking its original hydrogen bonded network. Keywords. Density functional theory; natural bond orbital; red shift of vibrational frequency;.

  4. Computational study of retro Trp-cage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vymětal, Jiří; Bathula, S. R.; Žídek, L.; Černý, Jiří; Sklenář, V.; Vondrášek, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2012), s. 54-55 ISSN 1210-8529. [10th Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology . 22.03.2012-24.03.2012, Nové Hrady] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : TRP-cage Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  5. Geomechanics of fracture caging in wellbores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijermars, R.; Zhang, X.; Schultz-Ela, D.

    2013-01-01

    This study highlights the occurrence of so-called ‘fracture cages’ around underbalanced wellbores, where fractures cannot propagate outwards due to unfavourable principal stress orientations. The existence of such cages is demonstrated here by independent analytical and numerical methods. We explain

  6. Pentagonal dodecahedron methane hydrate cage and methanol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Density functional theory based studies have been performed to elucidate the role of methanol as an methane hydrate inhibitor. A methane hydrate pentagonal dodecahedron cage's geometry optimization, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, Mullikan charge determination, electrostatic potential evaluation and ...

  7. Radiographic and clinical evaluation of cage subsidence after stand-alone lateral interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Luis; Abdala, Nitamar; Oliveira, Leonardo; Amaral, Rodrigo; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Pimenta, Luiz

    2013-07-01

    Indirect decompression of the neural structures through interbody distraction and fusion in the lumbar spine is feasible, but cage subsidence may limit maintenance of the initial decompression. The influence of interbody cage size on subsidence and symptoms in minimally invasive lateral interbody fusion is heretofore unreported. The authors report the rate of cage subsidence after lateral interbody fusion, examine the clinical effects, and present a subsidence classification scale. The study was performed as an institutional review board-approved prospective, nonrandomized, comparative, single-center radiographic and clinical evaluation. Stand-alone short-segment (1- or 2-level) lateral lumbar interbody fusion was investigated with 12 months of postoperative follow-up. Two groups were compared. Forty-six patients underwent treatment at 61 lumbar levels with standard interbody cages (18 mm anterior/posterior dimension), and 28 patients underwent treatment at 37 lumbar levels with wide cages (22 mm). Standing lateral radiographs were used to measure segmental lumbar lordosis, disc height, and rate of subsidence. Subsidence was classified using the following scale: Grade 0, 0%-24% loss of postoperative disc height; Grade I, 25%-49%; Grade II, 50%-74%; and Grade III, 75%-100%. Fusion status was assessed on CT scanning, and pain and disability were assessed using the visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index. Complications and reoperations were recorded. Pain and disability improved similarly in both groups. While significant gains in segmental lumbar lordosis and disc height were observed overall, the standard group experienced less improvement due to the higher rate of interbody graft subsidence. A difference in the rate of subsidence between the groups was evident at 6 weeks (p = 0.027), 3 months (p = 0.042), and 12 months (p = 0.047). At 12 months, 70% in the standard group and 89% in the wide group had Grade 0 or I subsidence, and 30% in the standard group

  8. Porous Organic Cage Thin Films and Molecular-Sieving Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qilei; Jiang, Shan; Hasell, Tom; Liu, Ming; Sun, Shijing; Cheetham, Anthony K; Sivaniah, Easan; Cooper, Andrew I

    2016-04-06

    Porous organic cage molecules are fabricated into thin films and molecular-sieving membranes. Cage molecules are solution cast on various substrates to form amorphous thin films, with the structures tuned by tailoring the cage chemistry and processing conditions. For the first time, uniform and pinhole-free microporous cage thin films are formed and demonstrated as molecular-sieving membranes for selective gas separation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The radiation performance standard. A presentation model for ionizing radiation in the living environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaap, L.E.J.J.; Bosmans, G.; Van der Graaf, E.R.; Hendriks, Ch.F.

    1998-01-01

    By means of the so-called radiation performance standard (SPN, abbreviated in Dutch) the total radioactivity from building constructions which contributes to the indoor radiation dose can be calculated. The SPN is implemented with related boundary values and is part of the Building Decree ('Bouwbesluit') in the Netherlands. The model, presented in this book, forms the basis of a new Dutch radiation protection standard, to be published by the Dutch Institute for Standardization NEN (formerly NNI). 14 refs

  10. Cage subsidence after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a cage alone or combined with anterior plate fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, E M; Sharp, D J

    2016-04-01

    To compare the extent of cage subsidence after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using a cage alone or combined with anterior plate fixation, and to assess the effect of end plate removal on cage subsidence. Records of 23 men and 13 women aged 32 to 82 (mean, 54) years who underwent ACDF for 61 levels using the Solis cage alone (n=46) or combined with anterior plate fixation (n=15) were reviewed. The extent of cage subsidence was determined by comparing immediately postoperative (within one week) with final follow-up radiographs. Cage subsidence was defined as the sum subsidence of the superior and inferior part of the cage into the vertebral body. Mild and major cage subsidence was defined as ≤2 mm and >2 mm, respectively. Patients who underwent ACDF using a cage alone or combined with anterior plate fixation were comparable in terms of age, gender, follow-up duration, and number of levels decompressed. Cage subsidence occurred in 33 (54%) of the 61 levels decompressed. In the cage alone group, the extent of cage subsidence was greater (1.68 vs. 0.57 mm, p=0.039) and the rate of major cage subsidence was higher (28% vs. 7%, p=0.08). The inferior part of the cage was more vulnerable to subsidence compared with the superior part (median subsidence: 3.0 vs. 1.4 mm, psubsidence occurred more often when the end plate was removed rather than preserved (58% vs. 18%, psubsidence was greater after ACDF with cage alone. Cage subsidence occurred more often when the end plate was removed. Additional anterior plate fixation is recommended when the end plate is removed.

  11. Using Green Building As A Model For Making Health Promotion Standard In The Built Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, Matthew J; Worden, Kelly; Pyke, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    The built environment-the constructed physical parts of the places where people live and work-is a powerful determinant of both individual and population health. Awareness of the link between place and health is growing within the public health sector and among built environment decision makers working in design, construction, policy, and both public and private finance. However, these decision makers lack the knowledge, tools, and capacity to ensure that health and well-being are routinely considered across all sectors of the built environment. The green building industry has successfully established environmental sustainability as a normative part of built environment practice, policy making, and investment. We explore the value of this industry's experience as a template for promoting health and well-being in the built environment. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  12. An update on standards for radiation in the environment and associated estimates of risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    This presentation reviews current and proposed standards, recommendations, and guidances for limiting routine radiation exposures of the public, and estimates the risk corresponding to standards, recommendations, and guidances. These estimates provide a common basis for comparing different criteria for limiting public exposures to radiation, as well as hazardous chemicals

  13. Adaptação e comportamento de pastejo da abelha jandaíra (Melipona subnitida Ducke em ambiente protegido - DOI: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v26i3.1777 Adaptation and foraging behavior of the stingless bee (Melipona subnitida Ducke in a caged environment - DOI: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v26i3.1777

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Mônica Sarmento da Silva

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A influência do ambiente protegido no comportamento de pastejo da abelha sem ferrão jandaíra (Melipona subnitida Ducke foi estudada no Estado do Ceará, região Nordeste do Brasil. Foram investigados aspectos como comportamento, adaptação das abelhas à casa de vegetação e o padrão diário de forrageamento destas na cultura do pimentão (Capsicum annuum L., cultivada em ambiente protegido. Os dados foram analisados estatisticamente por meio de análise de variância, com médias comparadas a posteriori, pelo teste de Tukey. Os resultados obtidos mostraram que M. subnitida Ducke adapta-se bem ao uso em casa de vegetação e realiza vôos de forrageamento durante todo o dia, podendo ser utilizada para polinização de culturas agrícolas, sob cultivo protegido.The effect of caged environment on the foraging behavior of the stingless bee Melipona subnitida Ducke was studied in the state of Ceará, NE Brazil. Species adaptation to enclosures, foraging behavioral aspects and daily foraging pattern were investigated in a greenhouse sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L. crop. Data were analyzed by Anova and means were compared a posteriori using Tukey test. The results showed that M. subnitida Ducke adapts well to greenhouses and forages throughout the day. It may be concluded that this bee species can be used for crop pollination in protected environments.

  14. STANDARDIZATION OF THE REQUIREMENTS TO THE ICT IN INTERNATIONAL EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Zaporozhchenko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effective tool of quality control the standardization is which includes a set of rules, regulations and requirements for product quality. The development and adoption of international standards in the field of ICT in order to ensure their quality is an integral part of the process of building the information society. The introduction of high-quality, open, interoperable and standards-related demand, which takes into account the requirements and needs of all stakeholders, is now a key element of development and diffusion of ICT, streamlining costs for their development and improvement, which is particularly important for countries with transition economies. In the article the necessity of standardizing of the requirements to ICT of educational purposes is grounded. The basic types of documents on technical regulation and standardization are represented. The activities of leading international and regional initiatives and organizations whose activities, among other things, aims to standardize requirements to educational ICT (ISO, CEN, IEEE, IMS, ADL, and their main projects, are reflected. The local problems and achievements in this field are outlined. The aim of the paper is to reflect international experience in the standardization of the requirements for educational ICT, in view of globalization and integration processes.

  15. Biotechnological tools for environmental sustainability: prospects and challenges for environments in Nigeria-a standard review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeonu, Chukwuma S; Tagbo, Richard; Anike, Ephraim N; Oje, Obinna A; Onwurah, Ikechukwu N E

    2012-01-01

    The environment is a very important component necessary for the existence of both man and other biotic organisms. The degree of sustainability of the physical environment is an index of the survival and well-being of the entire components in it. Additionally, it is not sufficient to try disposing toxic/deleterious substances with any known method. The best method of sustaining the environment is such that returns back all the components (wastes) in a recyclable way so that the waste becomes useful and helps the biotic and abiotic relationship to maintain an aesthetic and healthy equilibrium that characterizes an ideal environment. In this study, the method investigated includes biological method of environmental sustainability which seeks to investigate the various biotechnological tools (biotools) in current use and those undergoing investigations for future use.

  16. Biotechnological Tools for Environmental Sustainability: Prospects and Challenges for Environments in Nigeria—A Standard Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chukwuma S. Ezeonu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The environment is a very important component necessary for the existence of both man and other biotic organisms. The degree of sustainability of the physical environment is an index of the survival and well-being of the entire components in it. Additionally, it is not sufficient to try disposing toxic/deleterious substances with any known method. The best method of sustaining the environment is such that returns back all the components (wastes in a recyclable way so that the waste becomes useful and helps the biotic and abiotic relationship to maintain an aesthetic and healthy equilibrium that characterizes an ideal environment. In this study, the method investigated includes biological method of environmental sustainability which seeks to investigate the various biotechnological tools (biotools in current use and those undergoing investigations for future use.

  17. Biotechnological Tools for Environmental Sustainability: Prospects and Challenges for Environments in Nigeria—A Standard Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeonu, Chukwuma S.; Tagbo, Richard; Anike, Ephraim N.; Oje, Obinna A.; Onwurah, Ikechukwu N. E.

    2012-01-01

    The environment is a very important component necessary for the existence of both man and other biotic organisms. The degree of sustainability of the physical environment is an index of the survival and well-being of the entire components in it. Additionally, it is not sufficient to try disposing toxic/deleterious substances with any known method. The best method of sustaining the environment is such that returns back all the components (wastes) in a recyclable way so that the waste becomes useful and helps the biotic and abiotic relationship to maintain an aesthetic and healthy equilibrium that characterizes an ideal environment. In this study, the method investigated includes biological method of environmental sustainability which seeks to investigate the various biotechnological tools (biotools) in current use and those undergoing investigations for future use. PMID:22611499

  18. Effects of increasing dietary standardized ileal digestible lysine for gilts grown in a commercial finishing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, N W; Tokach, M D; Dritz, S S; Goodband, R D; Nelssen, J L; DeRouchey, J M

    2011-11-01

    Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of increasing dietary standardized ileal digestible (SID) Lys on growing and finishing gilts. Diets in all 3 experiments were corn-soybean meal-based and contained 0.15% l-Lys•HCl and 3% added fat from choice white grease. Desired SID Lys concentrations were achieved by altering levels of corn and soybean meal in the diet. Each experiment consisted of 6 treatments with 7 pens per treatment and approximately 27 gilts (PIC 337 × 1050) per pen. In Exp. 1, 1,085 gilts (initially 38.2 kg) were fed diets formulated to contain SID Lys concentrations of 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, 1.0, 1.1, or 1.2% for 28 d, which were analyzed to be total Lys concentrations of 0.78, 0.86, 0.99, 1.06, 1.14, and 1.24%, respectively. As SID Lys increased, ADG and G:F improved (quadratic, P Gilts in this trial required approximately 21.8 g of SID Lys intake per kilogram of BW gain from 38 to 65 kg. In Exp. 2, 1,092 (initially 55.2 kg) gilts were fed diets formulated to contain SID Lys concentrations of 0.66, 0.74, 0.82, 0.90, 0.98, or 1.06% for 28 d, which were analyzed to be total Lys concentrations of 0.75, 0.73, 0.84, 0.90, 0.95, and 0.97%, respectively. Both ADG (quadratic, P = 0.12) and G:F improved (linear, P Gilts in this trial required approximately 19.6 g of SID Lys per kilogram of BW gain from 55 to 80 kg. In Exp. 3, 1,080 gilts (initially 84.1 kg) were fed diets formulated to contain SID Lys concentrations of 0.54, 0.61, 0.68, 0.75, 0.82, or 0.89% for 29 d, which were analyzed to be total Lys concentrations of 0.62, 0.92, 0.79, 0.99, 0.93, and 1.07%, respectively. As the SID Lys concentration increased, ADG and G:F improved (linear, P Gilts in this trial required 23.0 g of SID Lys per kg of BW gain from 85 to 110 kg. The ideal SID Lys:ME ratio was based on the requirement determined by broken-line analysis in Exp. 1, 2, and 3, with the greatest level being tested in Exp. 3. This equation, SID Lys:ME ratio = -0.011 × BW, kg + 3

  19. Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentini, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The term environment refers to the internal and external context in which organizations operate. For some scholars, environment is defined as an arrangement of political, economic, social and cultural factors existing in a given context that have an impact on organizational processes and structures....... For others, environment is a generic term describing a large variety of stakeholders and how these interact and act upon organizations. Organizations and their environment are mutually interdependent and organizational communications are highly affected by the environment. This entry examines the origin...... and development of organization-environment interdependence, the nature of the concept of environment and its relevance for communication scholarships and activities....

  20. To the question of improvement of hygienic standardization of local impulse vibration in working environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sova S.G.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the differences between domestic and European methodology of hygienic standardization of the local impulse vibration. With the assistance of the vibrometer Octava-101-U there were studied hygienic parameters of pulsed local vibrations in mechanical workshops of the State Enterprise "Antonov" and the State Enterprise "Plant 410 civil aviation" according to the procedure set out in SSN 3.3.6.039-99 "State sanitary norms of general and local production vibration". Levels of pulsed local vibration in the workplace of fitter-assemblers and fitters do not exceed the standards of domestic hygiene standards and, at the same time, ten times higher than the exposure limits of the European system of standards “Health and Sufety Executive” (HSE. Discrepancies between national and European system of regulation and assessment of the harmful effects of local vibration can explain the development of early clinical syndromes in workers of vibration-dangerous enterprises, this makes to pical bringing of Ukrainian hygienic standards to European standards.

  1. Solid state and aqueous behavior of uranyl peroxide cage clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Kristi Lynn

    Uranyl peroxide cage clusters include a large family of more than 50 published clusters of a variety of sizes, which can incorporate various ligands including pyrophosphate and oxalate. Previous studies have reported that uranyl clusters can be used as a method to separate uranium from a solid matrix, with potential applications in reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel. Because of the potential applications of these novel structures in an advanced nuclear fuel cycle and their likely presence in areas of contamination, it is important to understand their behavior in both solid state and aqueous systems, including complex environments where other ions are present. In this thesis, I examine the aqueous behavior of U24Pp 12, as well as aqueous cluster systems with added mono-, di-, and trivalent cations. The resulting solutions were analyzed using dynamic light scattering and ultra-small angle X-ray scattering to evaluate the species in solution. Precipitates of these systems were analyzed using powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and Raman spectroscopy. The results of these analyses demonstrate the importance of cation size, charge, and concentration of added cations on the aqueous behavior of uranium macroions. Specifically, aggregates of various sizes and shapes form rapidly upon addition of cations, and in some cases these aggregates appear to precipitate into an X-ray amorphous material that still contains U24Pp12 clusters. In addition, I probe aggregation of U24Pp12 and U60, another uranyl peroxide cage cluster, in mixed solvent water-alcohol systems. The aggregation of uranyl clusters in water-alcohol systems is a result of hydrogen bonding with polar organic molecules and the reduction of the dielectric constant of the system. Studies of aggregation of uranyl clusters also allow for comparison between the newer uranyl polyoxometalate family and century-old transition metal polyoxometalates. To complement the solution studies of uranyl

  2. Influence of measurement uncertainty on classification of thermal environment in buildings according to European Standard EN 15251

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Jakub; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2015-01-01

    European Standard EN 15 251 in its current version does not provide any guidance on how to handle uncertainty of long term measurements of indoor environmental parameters used for classification of buildings. The objective of the study was to analyse the uncertainty for field measurements...... measurements of operative temperature at two measuring points (south/south-west and north/northeast orientation). Results of the present study suggest that measurement uncertainty needs to be considered during assessment of thermal environment in existing buildings. When expanded standard uncertainty was taken...... into account in categorization of thermal environment according to EN 15251, the difference in prevalence of exceeded category limits were up to 17.3%, 8.3% and 2% of occupied hours for category I, II and III respectively....

  3. Integrated methodology for standard-setting norms of innovative product in the new competitive environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakova, Marina; Rubin, Gennadiy

    2017-07-01

    Modern theory of technological and economical development is based on long-term cycles. So far it has been proved that the technological structure of the economy can be subdivided into groups of technological complexes, which are inter-related with each other by similar technological links, so called technological modes. Technological mode is defined as a complex of interrelated production units of similar technological level, which develop simultaneously. In order to provide competitiveness of products in the new changing conditions, it is necessary to make sure that they meet all the regulatory requirements specified in standards. But the existing and the fast changing situation on the merchandise markets causes disbalance between the growing customer requirements and the technological capabilities of the manufacturer. This makes the issue of standardization development even more urgent both from the point of view of establishing the current positions and from the point of view of possible promising development trends in technology. In the paper scientific and engineering principles of developing standardization as a science are described. It is shown that further development of standardization is based on the principles of advanced standardization the main idea of which is to set up the prospective requirements to the innovative product. Modern approaches of advanced standardization are shown in this paper. The complexity of the negotiation procedure between customer and manufacturer as a whole and achieving of consensus, in particular, make it necessary to find conceptually new approaches to developing mathematical models. The developed methodology picture the process of achieving the consensus between customer and manufacturer while developing the standard norms in the form of decreasing S-curve diagram. It means that in the end of the negotiation process, there is no difference between customer and manufacturer positions. It makes it possible to provide the

  4. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G.; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages’ pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages’ core and low non-specific binding to the cages’ outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage’s core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of

  5. The Correlation Between Cage Subsidence, Bone Mineral Density, and Clinical Results in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kyu Won; Lee, Jae Hyup; Lee, Ji-Ho; Lee, Do-Yoon; Shim, Hee Jong

    2017-07-01

    A retrospective review of prospectively collected radiographic and clinical data. This study aims to investigate the relationship between cage subsidence and bone mineral density (BMD), and to reveal the clinical implications of cage subsidence. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) has become one of the standard treatment modality for lumbar degenerative disease. However, cage subsidence might result in recurrent foraminal stenosis and deteriorate the clinical results. Furthermore, numbers of osteoporosis patients who underwent PLIF are increasing. Therefore, the information on the correlations between cage subsidence, BMD, and clinical results will be of great significance. A total 139 segments was included in this retrospective study. We examined functional rating index (Visual Analogue Scale for pain, Oswestry Disability Index, Short Form-36 score) preoperatively, and investigated their changes after postoperative 1 year. Correlation between cage subsidence and clinical scores was investigated. Plain anteroposterior and lateral radiograph were taken preoperatively and postoperatively and during follow-up. Preoperative BMD and subsidence measured by postoperative 1 year 3-dimensional computed tomography were achieved and their correlation was assessed. All postoperative clinical scores improved significantly compared with preoperative ones (pain Visual Analogue Scale: 7.34-2.89, Oswestry Disability Index: 25.34-15.86, Short Form-36: 26.45-16.46, all Psubsidence (r=-0.285, Psubsidence (>3 mm) compared with the segments in which T score were higher than -3.0 (P=0.012), and its odds ratio was 8.44. Subsidence had no significant correlation with all clinical scores. This study revealed that cage subsidence is relevant to BMD. However, it was demonstrated that subsidence is not related to the clinical deterioration. Therefore, PLIF procedure which is conducted carefully can be a good surgical option to treat lumbar degenerative disease for osteoporotic patients.

  6. 78 FR 78962 - Criteria for a Recommended Standard; Occupational Exposure to Heat and Hot Environments; Draft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ..., Cincinnati, Ohio, 45226. Background: Workers who are exposed to extreme heat or work in hot environments may be at risk of heat stress. Exposure to extreme heat can result in occupational illnesses and injuries. Heat stress can result in heat-related illnesses such as heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, or...

  7. 3D Technology Selection for a Virtual Learning Environment by Blending ISO 9126 Standard and AHP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Aydin; Guler, Inan

    2011-01-01

    Web3D presents many opportunities for learners in a virtual world or virtual environment over the web. This is a great opportunity for open-distance education institutions to benefit from web3d technologies to create courses with interactive 3d materials. There are many open source and commercial products offering 3d technologies over the web…

  8. Education and the Environment: Creating Standards-Based Programs in Schools and Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Gerald A.

    2013-01-01

    In this timely book, curriculum expert Gerald A. Lieberman provides an innovative guide to creating and implementing a new type of environmental education that combines standards-based lessons on English language arts, math, history, and science with community investigations and service learning projects. By connecting academic content with local…

  9. Chemistry and Biology of the Caged Garcinia Xanthones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantarasriwong, Oraphin; Batova, Ayse; Chavasiri, Warinthorn

    2011-01-01

    Natural products have been a great source of many small molecule drugs for various diseases. In spite of recent advances in biochemical engineering and fermentation technologies that allow us to explore microorganisms and the marine environment as alternative sources of drugs, more than 70% of the current small molecule therapeutics derive their structures from plants used in traditional medicine. Natural-product-based drug discovery relies heavily on advances made in the sciences of biology and chemistry. Whereas biology aims to investigate the mode of action of a natural product, chemistry aims to overcome challenges related to its supply, bioactivity, and target selectivity. This review summarizes the explorations of the caged Garcinia xanthones, a family of plant metabolites that possess a unique chemical structure, potent bioactivities, and a promising pharmacology for drug design and development. PMID:20648491

  10. Does Rearing Laying Hens in Aviaries Adversely Affect Long-Term Welfare following Transfer to Furnished Cages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahamtani, Fernanda M.; Hansen, Tone Beate; Orritt, Rachel; Nicol, Christine; Moe, Randi O.; Janczak, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that hens that are reared in aviaries but produce in furnished cages experience poorer welfare in production than hens reared in caged systems. This hypothesis is based on the suggestion that the spatial restriction associated with the transfer from aviaries to cages results in frustration or stress for the aviary reared birds. To assess the difference in welfare between aviary and cage reared hens in production, non-beak trimmed white leghorn birds from both rearing backgrounds were filmed at a commercial farm that used furnished cage housing. The videos were taken at 19 and 21 weeks of age, following the birds' transition to the production environment at 16 weeks. Videos were analysed in terms of the performance of aversion-related behaviour in undisturbed birds, comfort behaviour in undisturbed birds, and alert behaviour directed to a novel object in the home cage. A decrease in the performance of the former behaviour and increase in the performance of the latter two behaviours indicates improved welfare. The results showed that aviary reared birds performed more alert behaviour near to the object than did cage reared birds at 19 but not at 21 weeks of age (P = 0.03). Blood glucose concentrations did not differ between the treatments (P>0.10). There was a significant difference in mortality between treatments (P = 0.000), with more death in aviary reared birds (5.52%) compared to cage birds (2.48%). The higher mortality of aviary-reared birds indicates a negative effect of aviary rearing on bird welfare, whereas the higher duration of alert behavior suggests a positive effect of aviary rearing. PMID:25229879

  11. Standard Test Method for Saltwater Pressure Immersion and Temperature Testing of Photovoltaic Modules for Marine Environments

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method provides a procedure for determining the ability of photovoltaic modules to withstand repeated immersion or splash exposure by seawater as might be encountered when installed in a marine environment, such as a floating aid-to-navigation. A combined environmental cycling exposure with modules repeatedly submerged in simulated saltwater at varying temperatures and under repetitive pressurization provides an accelerated basis for evaluation of aging effects of a marine environment on module materials and construction. 1.2 This test method defines photovoltaic module test specimens and requirements for positioning modules for test, references suitable methods for determining changes in electrical performance and characteristics, and specifies parameters which must be recorded and reported. 1.3 This test method does not establish pass or fail levels. The determination of acceptable or unacceptable results is beyond the scope of this test method. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be ...

  12. Providing support to nursing students in the clinical environment: a nursing standard requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carina; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

    2016-10-01

    This discussion paper poses the question 'What enables or deters Registered Nurses to take up their professional responsibility to support undergraduate nursing students through the provision of clinical education?'. Embedded within many nursing standards are expectations that Registered Nurses provide support and professional development to undergraduate nursing students undertaking clinical placements. Expectations within nursing standards that Registered Nurses provide support and professional development to nursing students are important because nursing students depend on Registered Nurses to help them to become competent practitioners. Contributing factors that enable and deter Registered Nurses from fulfilling this expectation to support nursing students in their clinical learning include; workloads, preparedness for the teaching role, confidence in teaching and awareness of the competency requirement to support students. Factors exist which can enable or deter Registered Nurses from carrying out the licence requirement to provide clinical education and support to nursing students.

  13. Unbridle biomedical research from the laboratory cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahvis, Garet P

    2017-06-29

    Many biomedical research studies use captive animals to model human health and disease. However, a surprising number of studies show that the biological systems of animals living in standard laboratory housing are abnormal. To make animal studies more relevant to human health, research animals should live in the wild or be able to roam free in captive environments that offer a natural range of both positive and negative experiences. Recent technological advances now allow us to study freely roaming animals and we should make use of them.

  14. Mechanical Development of a Very Non-Standard Patch Array Antenna for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Richard; Chamberlain, Neil; Jakoboski, Julie; Petkov, Mihail

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical development of patch antenna arrays for the Juno mission. The patch arrays are part of a six-frequency microwave radiometer instrument that will be used to measure thermal emissions from Jupiter. The very harsh environmental conditions in Jupiter orbit, as well as a demanding launch environment, resulted in a design that departs radically from conventional printed circuit patch antennas. The paper discusses the development and qualification of the Juno patch array antennas, with emphasis on the materials approach that was devised to mitigate the effects of electron charging in Jupiter orbit.

  15. SSTL I/O Standard Based Environment Friendly Energy Efficient ROM Design on FPGA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bansal, Neha; Bansal, Meenakshi; Saini, Rishita

    2014-01-01

    GHz frequency in place of 4GHz. There is no change in clock power and signal power but SSTL2_II_DCI having 80.24%, 83.38%, 62.92%, and 76.52% and 83.03% more I/O power consumption with respect to SSTL2_I, SST18_I, SSTL2_I_DCI, SSTL2_II, and SSTL15 respectively at 3.3GHz.......Stub Series Terminated Logic (SSTL) is an Input/output standard. It is used to match the impedance of line, port and device of our design under consideration. Therefore, selection of energy efficient SSTL I/O standard among available different class of SSTL logic family in FPGA, plays a vital role...... to achieve energy efficiency in design under test (DUT). Here, DUT is ROM. ROM is an integral part of processor. Therefore, energy efficient design of RAM is a building block of energy efficient processor. We are using Verilog hardware description language, Virtex-6 FPGA, and Xilinx ISE simulator. We...

  16. Response of phytoplankton to an experimental fish culture in net cages in a subtropical reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartozek, E C R; Bueno, N C; Feiden, A; Rodrigues, L C

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate nutrients concentration and spatial-temporal changes in phytoplankton biovolume during an experimental fish culture in net cages in a lateral arm of Salto Caxias reservoir, Brazil. Two sampling stations were placed in the affected lateral arm and other two in a cageless lateral arm. Neither abiotic variables nor phytoplankton biovolume presented significant differences between the treatments. Only temporal changes were confirmed by the analysis performed. Both lateral arms were classified as oligotrophic, reflecting low influence of the net cages. Phytoplankton growth seems to be limited by nitrogen. Biovolume values were, in general, low and five major functional groups were recognized (E, F, G, K and P). In summer higher biovolume values were observed and representatives of Chlorophyceae and Cyanobacteria belonging to the functional groups F and K, respectively, were the most important. In winter phytoplankton was mainly composed by Bacillariophyceae taxa from P group. G group was also restricted to winter and E group occurred in winter and summer. The variations recorded in phytoplankton structure appear to have been mainly influenced by seasonal changes in temperature, precipitation and nutrients availability. The effects of net cages on the abiotic variables and phytoplankton biovolume appear to have been small, probably due to the small number of net cages employed and the system dilution capacity. However, a permanent monitoring of phytoplankton is recommended, since this environment has a carrying capacity, from which the trophic state may increase.

  17. Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    biodiversity. Consequently, the major environmental challenges facing us in the 21st century include: global climate change , energy, population and food...technological prowess, and security interests. Challenges Global Climate Change – Evidence shows that our environment and the global climate ... urbanization will continue to pressure the regional environment . Although most countries have environmental protection ministries or agencies, a lack of

  18. Influence of a net cage tilapia culture on the water quality of the Nova Avanhandava reservoir, São Paulo State, Brazil - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v34i3.7298

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Scarano Camargo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the influence of a net cage tilapia culture on the environment, water quality parameters were investigated during the period between December, 2005 and November, 2007. Three sampling stations were established in the reservoir of Nova Avanhandava (Zacarias, São Paulo State as follows: upstream of net cage area (P1, in the rearing place (P2 and downstream of net cage area (P3. The mean values of the parameters examined in the water sampling stations were within the standards of water quality recommended by resolution no. 357/2005 of the Conselho Nacional do Meio Ambiente for class 2 freshwater bodies. A significantly higher mean concentration of total phosphorus (p -1 was the result of the uneaten feed and feces of fish. The average concentration of total phosphorus in P3 was lower (0.015 mg L-1, which was assimilated by the aquatic ecosystem. The frequent monitoring of the water parameters is fundamental, so the producer can adjust the management according to environmental conditions, by reducing fish density or changing feeding rates for example, to mitigate or avoid water quality deterioration. 

  19. Standard practice for determining cracking susceptibility of metals exposed under stress to a hot salt environment

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1990-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for testing metals for embrittlement and cracking susceptibility when exposed under stress to a hot salt environment. This practice can be used for testing all metals for which service conditions dictate the need for such information. The test procedures described herein are generally applicable to all metal alloys; required adjustments in environmental variables (temperature, stress) to characterize a given materials system should be made. This practice describes the environmental conditions and degree of control required, and suggests means for obtaining this desired control. 1.2 This practice can be used both for alloy screening for determination of relative susceptibility to embrittlement and cracking, and for the determination of time-temperature-stress threshold levels for onset of embrittlement and cracking. However, certain specimen types are more suitable for each of these two types of characterizations. Note 1 This practice relates solely to the performance of ...

  20. A basic plan for the environment-friendly aspects of improved Korean standard nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hoon-Seok; Lee, Yong-Koo; Kim, Kwang-Ho

    2006-01-01

    The Improved Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP+) design has been made possible on the basis of engineering experiences and referring to an in-depth analysis of the design and construction of all the domestic nuclear power plants in operation. The KSNP+ is designed for improved safety, better economics, operability and maintainability by means of advanced technology expecting to demonstrate enhanced performance. The plant also has incorporated several environmentally friendly features through the restoration of excavated areas using an ecological approach, external coloring, figure of turbine generator building and landscaping around nuclear power plant. This is the first time that KOPEC has embarked on inducing environmentally friendly features into the basic plan. This is expected to mitigate the negative perceptions held by the residents in the vicinity of nuclear power plants and will contribute to a new and improved image of nuclear power plants. (authors)

  1. Comparative analysis of EU standards in food safety, environment, animal welfare and other non-trade concerns with some selected countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenberg, van C.P.A.; Brouwer, F.M.; Hoste, R.; Rau, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    Standards for food safety, animal and plant health in Brazil, New Zealand and the USA are similar to those in the EU. Ukraine is in transition towards comparable standards. These topics are already incorporated in the framework of trade agreements. Standards for the environment, animal welfare and

  2. Standards of socially responsible management – Impact on sustainable development of the organization, the social and natural environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Peršič

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to outline the results of a study on the importance of the introduction/implementation of standards of socially responsible management and their impact on the business performance of organizations as well as to confirm the correlations with the sustainable development of the broader social and natural environment. The research included a population of medium-sized and large organizations (over 50 employees in the fields of marketing services in the Republic of Slovenia. Research results confirmed a direct link of understanding the management standards in organizations with a larger number of employees and the achieved higher income from operations. Research participants are familiar with the requirements of the Quality Management System Standard ISO 9001 and the Environmental Management System Standard ISO 14001, which is particularly significant for older business executives with many years of work experience in the company they run. The hypothesis that the implementation of the principles of social responsibility has a positive impact on sustainable development and the financial indicators of the organization – higher profits, business growth, productivity and cost-effectiveness in operations – has been confirmed.

  3. Biomechanical evaluation of DTRAX® posterior cervical cage stabilization with and without lateral mass fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voronov LI

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Leonard I Voronov,1,2 Krzysztof B Siemionow,3 Robert M Havey,1,2 Gerard Carandang,2 Avinash G Patwardhan1,2 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, 2Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Laboratory, Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, Hines, 3Department of Orthopaedics, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Introduction: Lateral mass screw (LMS fixation with plates or rods is the current standard procedure for posterior cervical fusion. Recently, implants placed between the facet joints have become available as an alternative to LMS or transfacet screws for patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical stability of the DTRAX® cervical cage for single- and two-level fusion and compare this to the stability achieved with LMS fixation with rods in a two-level construct.Methods: Seven cadaveric cervical spine (C3–C7 specimens were tested in flexion–extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation to ±1.5 Nm moment without preload (0 N in the following conditions: 1 intact (C3–C7, 2 LMS and rods at C4–C5 and C5–C6, 3 removal of all rods (LMS retained and placement of bilateral posterior cages at C5–C6, 4 bilateral posterior cages at C4–C5 and C5–C6 (without LMS and rods, and 5 C4–C5 and C5–C6 bilateral posterior cages at C4–C5 and C5–C6 with rods reinserted.Results: Bilateral posterior cervical cages significantly reduced range of motion in all tested directions in both single- and multilevel constructs (P<0.05. Similar stability was achieved with bilateral posterior cages and LMS in a two-level construct: 0.6°±0.3° vs 1.2°±0.4° in flexion–­extension (P=0.001, (5.0°±2.6° vs 3.1°±1.3° in lateral bending (P=0.053, (1.3°±1.0° vs 2.2°±0.9° in axial rotation (P=0.091 for posterior cages and LMS, respectively. Posterior cages, when placed as an adjunct to LMS, further reduced

  4. Preinjector for Linac 1, Faraday cage

    CERN Document Server

    1974-01-01

    The 50 MeV Linac 1 started up in 1958 as injector to the 26 GeV PS, with a 520 kV Cockcroft-Walton generator as its preinjector, housed in a vast Faraday cage, visible here. When the Cockcroft-Walton broke down in 1973, it was replaced by a much smaller SAMES generator, of the kind used for electrostatic separators. From 1980 on, Linac 2 took over as injector for the 800 MeV Booster, and Linac 1 continued as injector for LEAR. In 1984, the electrostatic preinjector (i.e. the Faraday cage with its contents, SAMES generator and all) was replaced by a 520 keV RFQ. At the lower left corner we see the HV connectors to the SAMES generator, at the right edge part of the opened electronics-platform. Jean-Luc Vallet sees to it that all parts are properly grounded. See also 7403073X, 7403074X, 7403081X, 7403083X.

  5. Bulletproof Love : Luke Cage (2016 and Religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derry, Ken

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There are many ways to think about religion and popular culture. One method is to ask where and when we see what might be commonly understood as “religious tradition(s” explicitly on display. Another is to think about superhero narratives themselves as “religious”, using this term as a conceptual tool for categorizing and thereby better understanding particular dimensions of human experience. This article takes a variety of approaches to understanding religion in relation to the recent television series LUKE CAGE (Netflix, US 2016. These approaches take their hermeneutical cues from a range of disciplines, including studies of the Bible; Hip Hop; gender; Black Theology; African American religion; and philosophy. The results of this analysis highlight the polysemic nature of popular culture in general, and of superhero stories in particular. Like religious traditions themselves, the show is complex and contradictory: it is both progressive and reactionary; emphasizes community and valorizes an individual; critiques and endorses Christianity; subverts and promotes violence. Depending on the questions asked, LUKE CAGE (2016 provides a range of very different answers.

  6. Standard Test Method for Mechanical Hydrogen Embrittlement Evaluation of Plating/Coating Processes and Service Environments

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes mechanical test methods and defines acceptance criteria for coating and plating processes that can cause hydrogen embrittlement in steels. Subsequent exposure to chemicals encountered in service environments, such as fluids, cleaning treatments or maintenance chemicals that come in contact with the plated/coated or bare surface of the steel, can also be evaluated. 1.2 This test method is not intended to measure the relative susceptibility of different steels. The relative susceptibility of different materials to hydrogen embrittlement may be determined in accordance with Test Method F1459 and Test Method F1624. 1.3 This test method specifies the use of air melted AISI E4340 steel per SAE AMS-S-5000 (formerly MIL-S-5000) heat treated to 260 – 280 ksi (pounds per square inch x 1000) as the baseline. This combination of alloy and heat treat level has been used for many years and a large database has been accumulated in the aerospace industry on its specific response to exposure...

  7. The effect of space allowance and cage size on laying hens housed in furnished cages, Part II: Behavior at the feeder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widowski, T. M; Caston, L. J; Casey-Trott, T. M; Hunniford, M. E

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Standards for feeder (a.k.a. feed trough) space allowance (SA) are based primarily on studies in conventional cages where laying hens tend to eat simultaneously, limiting feeder space. Large furnished cages (FC) offer more total space and opportunities to perform a greater variety of behaviors, which may affect feeding behavior and feeder space requirements. Our objective was to determine the effects of floor/feeder SA on behavior at the feeder. LSL-Lite hens were housed in FC equipped with a nest, perches, and a scratch mat. Hens with SA of either 520 cm2 (Low; 8.9 cm feeder space/hen) or 748 cm2 (High; 12.8 cm feeder space/hen) per bird resulted in groups of 40 vs. 28 birds in small FC (SFC) and 80 vs. 55 in large FC (LFC). Chain feeders ran at 0500, 0800, 1100, 1400, and 1700 with lights on at 0500 and off at 1900 hours. Digital recordings of FC were scanned at chain feeder onset and every 15 min for one h after (5 scans × 5 feeding times × 2 d) to count the number of birds with their head in the feeder. All occurrences of aggressive pecks and displacements during 2 continuous 30-minute observations at 0800 h and 1700 h also were counted. Mixed model repeated analyses tested the effects of SA, cage size, and time on the percent of hens feeding, and the frequency of aggressive pecks and displacements. Surprisingly, the percent of birds feeding simultaneously was similar regardless of cage size (LFC: 23.0 ± 0.9%; SFC: 24.0 ± 1.0%; P = 0.44) or SA (Low: 23.8 ± 0.9%; High: 23.3 ± 1.0%; P = 0.62). More birds were observed feeding at 1700 h (35.3 ± 0.1%) than any at other time (P < 0.001). Feeder use differed by cage area (nest, middle, or scratch) over the d (P < 0.001). The frequency of aggressive pecks was low overall and not affected by SA or cage size. Frequency of displacements was also low but greater at Low SA (P = 0.001). There was little evidence of feeder competition at the Low SA in this study. PMID:29050409

  8. Computed tomography measurement of rib cage morphometry in emphysema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Sverzellati

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Factors determining the shape of the human rib cage are not completely understood. We aimed to quantify the contribution of anthropometric and COPD-related changes to rib cage variability in adult cigarette smokers. METHODS: Rib cage diameters and areas (calculated from the inner surface of the rib cage in 816 smokers with or without COPD, were evaluated at three anatomical levels using computed tomography (CT. CTs were analyzed with software, which allows quantification of total emphysema (emphysema%. The relationship between rib cage measurements and anthropometric factors, lung function indices, and %emphysema were tested using linear regression models. RESULTS: A model that included gender, age, BMI, emphysema%, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%, and forced vital capacity (FVC% fit best with the rib cage measurements (R(2 = 64% for the rib cage area variation at the lower anatomical level. Gender had the biggest impact on rib cage diameter and area (105.3 cm(2; 95% CI: 111.7 to 98.8 for male lower area. Emphysema% was responsible for an increase in size of upper and middle CT areas (up to 5.4 cm(2; 95% CI: 3.0 to 7.8 for an emphysema increase of 5%. Lower rib cage areas decreased as FVC% decreased (5.1 cm(2; 95% CI: 2.5 to 7.6 for 10 percentage points of FVC variation. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that simple CT measurements can predict rib cage morphometric variability and also highlight relationships between rib cage morphometry and emphysema.

  9. Storage quality-of-service in cloud-based scientific environments: a standardization approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Paul; Fuhrmann, Patrick; Hardt, Marcus; Ertl, Benjamin; Brzezniak, Maciej

    2017-10-01

    When preparing the Data Management Plan for larger scientific endeavors, PIs have to balance between the most appropriate qualities of storage space along the line of the planned data life-cycle, its price and the available funding. Storage properties can be the media type, implicitly determining access latency and durability of stored data, the number and locality of replicas, as well as available access protocols or authentication mechanisms. Negotiations between the scientific community and the responsible infrastructures generally happen upfront, where the amount of storage space, media types, like: disk, tape and SSD and the foreseeable data life-cycles are negotiated. With the introduction of cloud management platforms, both in computing and storage, resources can be brokered to achieve the best price per unit of a given quality. However, in order to allow the platform orchestrator to programmatically negotiate the most appropriate resources, a standard vocabulary for different properties of resources and a commonly agreed protocol to communicate those, has to be available. In order to agree on a basic vocabulary for storage space properties, the storage infrastructure group in INDIGO-DataCloud together with INDIGO-associated and external scientific groups, created a working group under the umbrella of the Research Data Alliance (RDA). As communication protocol, to query and negotiate storage qualities, the Cloud Data Management Interface (CDMI) has been selected. Necessary extensions to CDMI are defined in regular meetings between INDIGO and the Storage Network Industry Association (SNIA). Furthermore, INDIGO is contributing to the SNIA CDMI reference implementation as the basis for interfacing the various storage systems in INDIGO to the agreed protocol and to provide an official Open-Source skeleton for systems not being maintained by INDIGO partners.

  10. First Results from the ALICE TPC Field Cage Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Bächler, J; CERN. Geneva; Garabatos, C; Goret, B; Hoch, M; Klempt, W; Lagrue, X; Lenoir, P; Lesenechal, Y; Mast, M; Meyer, T C; Raynaud, J; Renfordt, R E; Schäfer, E; Sharma, A; Vranic, D

    2000-01-01

    Abstract This note summarizes the first phase in a series of tests with the ALICE TPC field cage prototype. We will demonstrate that the chosen design of the field cage and the layout of the potential degrader are able to satisfy our specific demands on static HV stability of the ALICE TPC at the LHC Heavy-Ion- Collider.

  11. Polymers containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, III, Daniel E.; Eastwood, Eric A [Raymore, MO

    2012-06-05

    Polymers comprising residues of borane and/or carborane cage compound monomers having at least one polyalkoxy silyl substituent. Such polymers can further comprise one or more reactive matrices and/or co-monomers covalently bound with the cage compound monomer residues. Methods of making and applications for using such polymers are also disclosed.

  12. 48 CFR 204.7202-1 - CAGE codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Contractor Identification 204.7202-1 CAGE codes. (a... CD ROM that contains the H-4/H-8 CAGE master file issued by DLIS (Their address is: Customer Service... assignments to DLIS Customer Service: toll-free (888) 227-2423 or (888) 352-9333; DSN 932-4725; or commercial...

  13. Comparative architecture of octahedral protein cages. I. Indexed enclosing forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janner, A.

    2008-07-01

    The architecture of four protein cages (bacterio ferritin, human mitochondrial ferritin, sulfur oxygenase reductase and small heat-shock protein) are compared top-to-bottom, starting from polyhedra with vertices at cubic lattice points enclosing the cage down to indexed polyhedral forms of single monomers.

  14. Influence of Clarias gariepinus (Teugels) cage cultures on water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water quality, periphyton and phytoplankton growing as a function Clarias gariepinus (Burchell, 1822) cage cultures have rarely been investigated. Physical and chemical factors associated with cage culture of Clarias gariepinus in relation to phytoplankton and periphyton were examined fortnightly from May to June 2009 ...

  15. Abnormal Behavior in Relation to Cage Size in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulk, H. H.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Examines the effects of cage size on stereotyped and normal locomotion and on other abnormal behaviors in singly caged animals, whether observed abnormal behaviors tend to co-occur, and if the development of an abnormal behavior repertoire leads to reduction in the number of normal behavior categories. (Author/RK)

  16. Teaching in the Institutional Cage: Metaphor and Collateral Oppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël Smith, Becky L.

    2014-01-01

    This analysis is a philosophical exploration of Marilyn Frye's metaphor of the cage and Patricia Hill Collins' theory of intersecting oppressions. It argues that social structures and forms of oppressive knowledge make up the individual wires on each person's cage and that these work to confine individuals, particularly those in the…

  17. Generation of Multicomponent Molecular Cages using Simultaneous Dynamic Covalent Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drożdż, Wojciech; Bouillon, Camille; Kotras, Clément; Richeter, Sébastien; Barboiu, Mihail; Clément, Sébastien; Stefankiewicz, Artur R; Ulrich, Sébastien

    2017-12-19

    Cage compounds are very attractive structures for a wide range of applications and there is ongoing interest in finding effective ways to access such kinds of complex structures, particularly those possessing dynamic adaptive features. Here we report the accessible synthesis of new type of organic cage architectures, possessing two different dynamic bonds within one structure: hydrazones and disulfides. Implementation of three distinct functional groups (thiols, aldehydes and hydrazides) in the structure of two simple building blocks resulted in their spontaneous and selective self-assembly into aromatic cage-type architectures. These organic cages contain up to ten components linked together by twelve reversible covalent bonds. The advantage provided by the presented approach is that these cage structures can adaptively self-sort from a complex virtual mixture of polymers or macrocycles and that dynamic covalent chemistry enables their deliberate disassembly through controlled component exchange. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Photoactivatable Caged Prodrugs of VEGFR-2 Kinase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Pinchuk

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report on the design, synthesis, photokinetic properties and in vitro evaluation of photoactivatable caged prodrugs for the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR-2. Highly potent VEGFR-2 inhibitors 1 and 3 were caged by introduction of a photoremovable protecting group (PPG to yield the caged prodrugs 4 and 5. As expected, enzymatic and cellular proliferation assays showed dramatically diminished efficacy of caged prodrugs in vitro. Upon ultraviolet (UV irradiation of the prodrugs original inhibitory activity was completely restored and even distinctly reinforced, as was the case for the prodrug 4. The presented results are a further evidence for caging technique being an interesting approach in the protein kinase field. It could enable spatial and temporal control for the inhibition of VEGFR-2. The described photoactivatable prodrugs might be highly useful as biological probes for studying the VEGFR-2 signal transduction.

  19. A Simple, Inexpensive Metabolism Cage for Small Mammals **

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, C. J.; Gass, G. H.

    1963-01-01

    By utilizing ordinary laboratory equipment and a spherical feces-urine separator, a simple, inexpensive metabolism cage for small mammals can be constructed. A hardware cloth animal cage over a cylindrical battery jar containing a spherical feces-urine separator affords the following advantages not commonly found in commercial metabolism cages: 1) complete separation of feces and urine through minimal contact, 2) minimal evaporation of urine due to proximity of storage vessel and lack of exogenous air currents, and 3) extremely low cost of less than five dollars. The metabolism cage is designed to allow measurement of fluid intake, and to separate and collect feces and urine for numerous qualitative and quantitative determinations. In addition, the metabolism cage permits observation of the animal, feces, and urine at all times, is readily cleaned or sterilized, and is easily fashioned from common laboratory equipment. ImagesFIG. 1. PMID:17649428

  20. Entropic cages for trapping DNA near a nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Skanata, Mirna Mihovilovic; Stein, Derek

    2015-02-01

    Nanopores can probe the structure of biopolymers in solution; however, diffusion makes it difficult to study the same molecule for extended periods. Here we report devices that entropically trap single DNA molecules in a 6.2-femtolitre cage near a solid-state nanopore. We electrophoretically inject DNA molecules into the cage through the nanopore, pause for preset times and then drive the DNA back out through the nanopore. The saturating recapture time and high recapture probability after long pauses, their agreement with a convection-diffusion model and the observation of trapped DNA under fluorescence microscopy all confirm that the cage stably traps DNA. Meanwhile, the cages have 200 nm openings that make them permeable to small molecules, like the restriction endonuclease we use to sequence-specifically cut trapped DNA into fragments whose number and sizes are analysed upon exiting through the nanopore. Entropic cages thus serve as reactors for chemically modifying single DNA molecules.

  1. Microbiota composition of simultaneously colonized mice housed under either a gnotobiotic isolator or individually ventilated cage regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundberg, Randi; Bahl, Martin Iain; Licht, Tine Rask

    2017-01-01

    focused on the microbiome are increasingly combining or substituting isolator housing with individually ventilated cage (IVC) systems. We compared the effect of housing systems on the gut microbiota composition of germ-free mice colonized with a complex microbiota and housed in either multiple IVC cages......Germ-free rodents colonized with microbiotas of interest are used for host-microbiota investigations and for testing microbiota-targeted therapeutic candidates. Traditionally, isolators are used for housing such gnotobiotic rodents due to optimal protection from the environment, but research groups...... microbiotas are protected in IVC systems, but challenges related to temporal dynamics should be addressed....

  2. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. M. de Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN, in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and consequently, a smaller variation of the thickness/height relation can be obtained. The compound layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and microhardness test profile. The results were compared with the properties of samples obtained with the conventional nitriding, for the three steel types. It was verified that samples treated by CCPN process presented, at the same temperature, a better uniformity in the thickness and absence of the edge effect.

  3. Alejandra Pizarnik: the bird that was cage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Abellán Chuecos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well known the relation –sometimes deceiving– that has been established by poets between literature and life. In the case of cursed poets, literature and life usually identify with each other, and talking about Alejandra Pizarnik, we could even establish this relation between literature and death, thus nothing is more daily than life. With this essay we try to identify the threads that converge and interweave the verses and the life, to be wandering and at the same time a prisoner, to have wings but stay in a cage, the confinement in a wandering reality. We will analyse the poetic individual and, at the same time, the construction of a character in life.

  4. Transcription regulatory networks analysis using CAGE

    KAUST Repository

    Tegnér, Jesper N.

    2009-10-01

    Mapping out cellular networks in general and transcriptional networks in particular has proved to be a bottle-neck hampering our understanding of biological processes. Integrative approaches fusing computational and experimental technologies for decoding transcriptional networks at a high level of resolution is therefore of uttermost importance. Yet, this is challenging since the control of gene expression in eukaryotes is a complex multi-level process influenced by several epigenetic factors and the fine interplay between regulatory proteins and the promoter structure governing the combinatorial regulation of gene expression. In this chapter we review how the CAGE data can be integrated with other measurements such as expression, physical interactions and computational prediction of regulatory motifs, which together can provide a genome-wide picture of eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks at a new level of resolution. © 2010 by Pan Stanford Publishing Pte. Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Proper utilization of solar energy in Bangladesh: effect on the environment, food supply and the standard of living

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, S.; Huda, A.-U.

    1999-01-01

    The only really sustainable form of energy is solar energy. The densely populated tropical countries can do very well from this completely sustainable energy source without any novel technologies. Most of the commercial energy used worldwide is supplied by using non-renewable resources. Environmental damage - global warming, ozone hole, noise, chemical and radioactive waste - is due to high energy use. Environmental deterioration is a direct consequence of wealth generated and sustained by extremely cheap fossil fuel. The price of fossil fuel does not include the cost for the deterioration of the environment. We show in this paper that even a densely populated country like Bangladesh can attain a high standard of living by a proper utilization of solar energy. We suggest that poor tropical countries should mobilize their resources to develop solar technology. (author)

  6. Morphometric and allometric relations of cage-reared Iguaçu surubim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldi Feiden

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the morphometric and allometric relations of Iguaçu surubim (Steindachneridion melanodermatum cultivated in net cages. One hundred and twenty specimens were cultivated at a density of 50 fish per square meter in three 6 m³ net cages. Fish were fed three times a day with commercial feed. Thirty fish were evaluated at 60, 120, 180, and 360 days of cultivation as to the variables: total body, head, clean trunk, viscera, skin, and fin weight; total, standard, and head length; and head and body height. The Iguaçu surubim shows later development of the clean trunk and early development of the other body parts.

  7. Fuel taxes, motor vehicle emission standards and patents related to the fuel-efficiency and emissions of motor vehicles. Joint Meetings of Tax and Environment Experts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollebergh, H. [Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency MNP, Den Haag (Netherlands)

    2010-01-21

    Contribution to the project on Taxation, Innovation and the Environment of OECD's Joint Meetings of Tax and Environment Experts. It studies the impacts of motor vehicle fuel taxes and mandatory fuel efficiency standards on relevant car-related innovation activity in selected car-producing countries.

  8. Evaluation of Standard Concepts Design of Library Interior Physical Environment (Case Study at University of Ma Chung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debri Haryndia Putri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently the function of a room is not only used as a shelter, the function of the room itself to be increased as a refreshing or relaxation area for users to follow the development of creativity and technology in the field of design. The comfortable factor becomes the main factor that indicates a successful process of creating a space. No exception library. The nature of library seemed stiff because of its function as a place to read, now can be developed and made into more dynamic with the special design concepts or color patterns used. Libraries can be created a special concept that suits the characteristics of the users themselves. Most users of the library, especially in college libraries are teenagers. Naturally, teenagers like to gather with their friends and we have to facilitate this activity in our library design concept. In addition we can also determine the needs of users through research by questionnaire method. The answers of users can be mapped and drawn conclusions. To explore the research, the author reviewed some literature about library interior design and observed the library of Ma Chung University as a case study. The combined results of the method can be concluded and the discovery of ideal standards of physical environment. So, the library can be made as a comfortable reading environment so as to increased interest in reading behavior and the frequent visits of students in the library.

  9. Speed Control of Multiphase Cage Induction Motors Incorporating Supply Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drozdowski Piotr

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is the control possibility of the multiphase cage induction motors having number of phases greater than 3. These motors have additional properties for speed control that distinguish them from the standard 3 phase motors: operation at various sequences of supplying voltages due to the inverter control and possible operation with few open-circuited phases. For each supply sequence different no load speeds at the same frequency can be obtained. This feature extends the motor application for miscellaneous drive demands including vector or scalar control. This depends mainly on the type of the stator winding for a given number of phases, since the principle of motor operation is based on co-operation of higher harmonics of magnetic field. Examples of operation are presented for a 9-phase motor, though general approach has been discussed. This motor was fed by a voltage source inverter at field oriented control with forced currents. The mathematical model of the motor was reduced to the form incorporating all most important physical features and appropriate for the control law formulation. The operation was illustrated for various supply sequences for “healthy” motor and for the motor operating at one phase broken. The obtained results have shown that parasitic influence of harmonic fields interaction has negligible influence on motor operation with respect to the useful coupling for properly designed stator winding.

  10. Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, A.D.; Turnbull, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    The development of the hydrocarbon resources of the North Sea has resulted in both offshore and onshore environmental repercussions, involving the existing physical attributes of the sea and seabed, the coastline and adjoining land. The social and economic repercussions of the industry were equally widespread. The dramatic and speedy impact of the exploration and exploitation of the northern North Sea resources in the early 1970s, on the physical resources of Scotland was quickly realised together with the concern that any environmental and social damage to the physical and social fabric should be kept to a minimum. To this end, a wide range of research and other activities by central and local government, and other interested agencies was undertaken to extend existing knowledge on the marine and terrestrial environments that might be affected by the oil and gas industry. The outcome of these activities is summarized in this paper. The topics covered include a survey of the marine ecosystems of the North Sea, the fishing industry, the impact of oil pollution on seabirds and fish stocks, the ecology of the Scottish coastline and the impact of the petroleum industry on a selection of particular sites. (author)

  11. Biomechanics of Nested Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Baron, Hector; Newcomb, Anna G U S; Malhotra, Devika; de Tranaltes, Kaylee; Martinez-Del-Campo, Eduardo; Reyes, Phillip M; Crawford, Neil R; Theodore, Nicholas; Tumialán, Luis M

    2016-02-01

    Arthrodesis is optimized when the structural graft occupies most of the surface area within a disc space. The transforaminal corridor inherently limits interbody size. To evaluate the biomechanical implications of nested interbody spacers (ie, a second curved cage placed behind a first) to increase disc space coverage in transforaminal approaches. Seven lumbar human cadaveric specimens (L3-S1) underwent nondestructive flexibility and axial compression testing intact and after transforaminal instrumentation at L4-L5. Specimens were tested in 5 conditions: (1) intact, (2) interbody, (3) interbody plus bilateral pedicle screws and rods (PSR), (4) 2 nested interbodies, and (5) 2 nested interbodies plus PSR. Mean range of motion (ROM) with 1 interbody vs 2 nested interbodies, respectively, was: flexion, 101% vs 85%; extension, 97% vs 92%; lateral bending, 127% vs 132%; and axial rotation, 145% vs 154%. One interbody and 2 nested interbodies did not differ significantly by loading mode (P > .10). With PSR, ROM decreased significantly compared with intact, but not between interbody and interbody plus PSR or 2 interbodies plus PSR (P > .80). Mean vertical height during compressive loading (ie, axial compressive stiffness) was significantly different with 2 nested interbodies vs 1 interbody alone (P < .001) (compressive stiffness, 89% of intact vs 67% of intact, respectively). Inserting a second interbody using a transforaminal approach is anatomically feasible and nearly doubles the disc space covered without affecting ROM. Compressive stiffness significantly increased with 2 nested interbodies, and foraminal height increased. Evaluation of the clinical safety and efficacy of nested interbodies is underway.

  12. Net-bottom Cage Inserts for Water Bird Casualties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie Belle

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available My Bright Idea is a net-bottomed cage insert, which is used to support pelagic avian casualties. The idea was designed and modified by the International Bird Rescue in California (Bird Rescue.

  13. Environmental impact analysis of aquaculture in net cages in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environmental impact analysis of aquaculture in net cages in a Brazilian water reservoir, based in zooplankton communities. Maria Cristina Crispim, Karla Patrícia Ponte Araújo, Hênio do Nascimento Melo Júnior ...

  14. La cage qui cache : La Cage Dorée de Ruben Alves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Marinho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The French Comedy La Cage Dorée (produced by the luso descendant Ruben Alves, 2013 success seems to be mainly due to its clichés of Portuguese epics in Paris, and its miseries may not have been underlined enough. Thus, under this apparently naif portrait an intriguing painting of Portuguese immigrants’ French dis-integration may really be hiding, which is the aim of this essay, on one hand, to bring out and, on the other one, to clarify, by questioning comparative critical common denominators of the two countries.

  15. La cage qui cache : La Cage Dorée de Ruben Alves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Marinho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The French Comedy La Cage Dorée (produced by the luso descendant Ruben Alves, 2013 success seems to be mainly due to its clichés of Portuguese epics in Paris, and its miseries may not have been underlined enough. Thus, under this apparently naif portrait an intriguing painting of Portuguese immigrants’ French dis-integration may really be hiding, which is the aim of this essay, on one hand, to bring out and, on the other one, to clarify, by questioning comparative critical common denominators of the two countries.

  16. Effect of different spectral transmittances through tinted animal cages on circadian metabolism and physiology in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Melissa A; Dauchy, Robert T; Hanifin, John P; Jablonski, Michael R; Warfield, Benjamin; Brainard, George C; Blask, David E; Hill, Steven M; Ooms, Tara G; Bohm, Rudolf P

    2014-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus is synchronized by the light:dark cycle and is the master biologic clock that serves as a pacemaker to regulate circadian rhythms. We explored the hypothesis that spectral transmittance (tint) of light through caging alters circadian rhythms of endocrine and metabolic plasma constituents in nonpigmented Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats (Crl:SD; n = 12 per group) were housed in a 12:12-h light:dark environment (300 lx; 123.0 μ W/cm(2); lights on, 0600) in either clear-, amber-, blue-, or red-tinted rodent cages. Blood was collected at 0400, 0800, 1200, 1600, 2000, and 2400 and measured for melatonin, total fatty acids, pH, glucose, lactic acid, corticosterone, insulin, and leptin. As expected, plasma melatonin levels were low during the light phase but higher during the dark phase in all groups; however, when compared with the clear-cage group, rats in amber-, blue-, and red-tinted cages had 29%, 74%, and 48%, respectively, greater total daily melatonin levels due to an increased duration and, in some cases, amplitude of the nocturnal melatonin signal. No differences were found in dietary and water intake, body growth rates, total fatty acids, pH, or glucose among groups. Disruptions in circadian rhythms, manifesting as alterations in phase timing, amplitude, or duration, occurred in the melatonin, lactic acid, corticosterone, insulin, and leptin levels of rats in tinted compared with clear cages. Therefore, the use of variously tinted animal cages significantly alters circadian rhythms in plasma measures of metabolism and physiology in laboratory rats, thus potentially altering the outcomes of scientific investigations.

  17. Effect of Different Spectral Transmittances through Tinted Animal Cages on Circadian Metabolism and Physiology in Sprague–Dawley Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Melissa A; Dauchy, Robert T; Hanifin, John P; Jablonski, Michael R; Warfield, Benjamin; Brainard, George C; Blask, David E; Hill, Steven M; Ooms, Tara G; Bohm, Rudolf P

    2014-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus is synchronized by the light:dark cycle and is the master biologic clock that serves as a pacemaker to regulate circadian rhythms. We explored the hypothesis that spectral transmittance (tint) of light through caging alters circadian rhythms of endocrine and metabolic plasma constituents in nonpigmented Sprague–Dawley rats. Rats (Crl:SD; n = 12 per group) were housed in a 12:12-h light:dark environment (300 lx; 123.0 μW/cm2; lights on, 0600) in either clear-, amber-, blue-, or red-tinted rodent cages. Blood was collected at 0400, 0800, 1200, 1600, 2000, and 2400 and measured for melatonin, total fatty acids, pH, glucose, lactic acid, corticosterone, insulin, and leptin. As expected, plasma melatonin levels were low during the light phase but higher during the dark phase in all groups; however, when compared with the clear-cage group, rats in amber-, blue-, and red-tinted cages had 29%, 74%, and 48%, respectively, greater total daily melatonin levels due to an increased duration and, in some cases, amplitude of the nocturnal melatonin signal. No differences were found in dietary and water intake, body growth rates, total fatty acids, pH, or glucose among groups. Disruptions in circadian rhythms, manifesting as alterations in phase timing, amplitude, or duration, occurred in the melatonin, lactic acid, corticosterone, insulin, and leptin levels of rats in tinted compared with clear cages. Therefore, the use of variously tinted animal cages significantly alters circadian rhythms in plasma measures of metabolism and physiology in laboratory rats, thus potentially altering the outcomes of scientific investigations. PMID:24411779

  18. Caged molecular beacons: controlling nucleic acid hybridization with light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunming; Zhu, Zhi; Song, Yanling; Lin, Hui; Yang, Chaoyong James; Tan, Weihong

    2011-05-28

    We have constructed a novel class of light-activatable caged molecular beacons (cMBs) that are caged by locking two stems with a photo-labile biomolecular interaction or covalent bond. With the cMBs, the nucleic acid hybridization process can be easily controlled with light, which offers the possibility for a high spatiotemporal resolution study of intracellular mRNAs. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  19. Musica come divenire. Il paesaggio sonoro secondo John cage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Aste

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available John Cage ha dedicato tutta la sua vita all’indagine delle possibilità di relazione dell’uomo con i suoni che lo circondano, allargando il campo dell’arte musicale a quello dell’etica e dell’ecologia. Cage non si è occupato di soundscape come un genere compositivo specifico, come forse oggi potremmo identificarlo, tuttavia l’ambiente occupa un ruolo centrale in relazione al suo modo di comporre.

  20. Comparing alternative methods for holding virgin honey bee queens for one week in mailing cages before mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigio, Gianluigi; Grüter, Christoph; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2012-01-01

    In beekeeping, queen honey bees are often temporarily kept alive in cages. We determined the survival of newly-emerged virgin honey bee queens every day for seven days in an experiment that simultaneously investigated three factors: queen cage type (wooden three-hole or plastic), attendant workers (present or absent) and food type (sugar candy, honey, or both). Ten queens were tested in each of the 12 combinations. Queens were reared using standard beekeeping methods (Doolittle/grafting) and emerged from their cells into vials held in an incubator at 34C. All 12 combinations gave high survival (90 or 100%) for three days but only one method (wooden cage, with attendants, honey) gave 100% survival to day seven. Factors affecting queen survival were analysed. Across all combinations, attendant bees significantly increased survival (18% vs. 53%, p<0.001). In addition, there was an interaction between food type and cage type (p<0.001) with the honey and plastic cage combination giving reduced survival. An additional group of queens was reared and held for seven days using the best method, and then directly introduced using smoke into queenless nucleus colonies that had been dequeened five days previously. Acceptance was high (80%, 8/10) showing that this combination is also suitable for preparing queens for introduction into colonies. Having a simple method for keeping newly-emerged virgin queens alive in cages for one week and acceptable for introduction into queenless colonies will be useful in honey bee breeding. In particular, it facilitates the screening of many queens for genetic or phenotypic characteristics when only a small proportion meets the desired criteria. These can then be introduced into queenless hives for natural mating or insemination, both of which take place when queens are one week old.

  1. Comparing alternative methods for holding virgin honey bee queens for one week in mailing cages before mating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Bigio

    Full Text Available In beekeeping, queen honey bees are often temporarily kept alive in cages. We determined the survival of newly-emerged virgin honey bee queens every day for seven days in an experiment that simultaneously investigated three factors: queen cage type (wooden three-hole or plastic, attendant workers (present or absent and food type (sugar candy, honey, or both. Ten queens were tested in each of the 12 combinations. Queens were reared using standard beekeeping methods (Doolittle/grafting and emerged from their cells into vials held in an incubator at 34C. All 12 combinations gave high survival (90 or 100% for three days but only one method (wooden cage, with attendants, honey gave 100% survival to day seven. Factors affecting queen survival were analysed. Across all combinations, attendant bees significantly increased survival (18% vs. 53%, p<0.001. In addition, there was an interaction between food type and cage type (p<0.001 with the honey and plastic cage combination giving reduced survival. An additional group of queens was reared and held for seven days using the best method, and then directly introduced using smoke into queenless nucleus colonies that had been dequeened five days previously. Acceptance was high (80%, 8/10 showing that this combination is also suitable for preparing queens for introduction into colonies. Having a simple method for keeping newly-emerged virgin queens alive in cages for one week and acceptable for introduction into queenless colonies will be useful in honey bee breeding. In particular, it facilitates the screening of many queens for genetic or phenotypic characteristics when only a small proportion meets the desired criteria. These can then be introduced into queenless hives for natural mating or insemination, both of which take place when queens are one week old.

  2. Hard Work in Soft Regulation: A Discussion of the Social Mechanisms in OHS Management Standards and Possible Dilemmas in the Regulation of Psychosocial Work Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernille Hohnen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Certified occupational health and safety (OHS management systems have become a global instrument in regulation of the work environment. However, their actual impact on OHS—in particular on softer psychosocial issues in the work environment—has been questioned. The most important standard of OHS management is OHSAS 18001, which has recently been supplemented with a British publically available guideline (PAS 1010 focusing specifically on psychosocial risk management. On the basis of the international literature on management standards, the present paper analyses OHSAS 18001 and PAS 1010 in order to understand the mechanism by which they work. The paper takes a social constructionist approach conceptualizing standards and their expected mechanisms as socially constructed—based on a particular kind of knowledge and logic—although they are presented as objective. Such a constructionist approach also emphasizes how standards transform specific work environment problems into generic procedures that can be audited. In the case of OHS standards, both the work environment in general and the psychosocial risks in particular are transformed into simple monocausal auditable relations whereby the complexity of psychosocial work environment issues seems to disappear. The new PAS 1010 guideline, which is particularly focusing on regulation of the psychosocial work environment, only partly succeeds in solving these shortcomings of OHSAS 18001.

  3. IMPACT OF HEAVY METAL TO FISH AQUACULTURE IN FLOATING NET CAGE IN CIRATA RESERVOIR, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Heru Prihadi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of Cirata Reservoir for fisheries aquaculture with floating net cage system has been increasing rapidly. Industrial waste existed along watershed brings significant heavy metal pollutant that flows and difficult to control. Consequences of such activities were reflected in the degradation of reservoir environment indicated by sedimentation, water quality degradation and fish mass mortality because of up welling. The objectives of this research were: 1 to obtain data and information on heavy metal content in Cirata Reservoir waters, and 2 to observe and understand the effect of heavy metal to the fish cultured in floating net cage to support aquaculture in floating net cage system. Water quality and fish histology analyses were the methodologies used in this research. Descriptive and laboratory analysis were carry out to analysis the data. Based on observation and descriptive analyses, the content of heavy metal in Cirata Reservoir was classified as worse. Concentration of Pb, Cr, Hg, and Cd in the sample of water and tilapia digestive organ becomes fragile. Infiltration of hemoglobin cell, necrosis, degeneration and pigmentation occurred in body organs when up welling happened. Beside that, during up-welling digestive organ become easily breakable resulted in fish mass mortality in floating net cage. The affinity of hemoglobin to the toxic gas was higher than to oxygen, therefore aeration was not affective and mass mortality cannot be avoided. This was because of various events that occured to the fish and the other water biota that encompassed regular diffusion, bio-magnification, and bio-concentration to fish.

  4. Mitochondria mediate septin cage assembly to promote autophagy of Shigella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirianni, Andrea; Krokowski, Sina; Lobato-Márquez, Damián; Buranyi, Stephen; Pfanzelter, Julia; Galea, Dieter; Willis, Alexandra; Culley, Siân; Henriques, Ricardo; Larrouy-Maumus, Gerald; Hollinshead, Michael; Sancho-Shimizu, Vanessa; Way, Michael; Mostowy, Serge

    2016-07-01

    Septins, cytoskeletal proteins with well-characterised roles in cytokinesis, form cage-like structures around cytosolic Shigella flexneri and promote their targeting to autophagosomes. However, the processes underlying septin cage assembly, and whether they influence S. flexneri proliferation, remain to be established. Using single-cell analysis, we show that the septin cages inhibit S. flexneri proliferation. To study mechanisms of septin cage assembly, we used proteomics and found mitochondrial proteins associate with septins in S. flexneri-infected cells. Strikingly, mitochondria associated with S. flexneri promote septin assembly into cages that entrap bacteria for autophagy. We demonstrate that the cytosolic GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) interacts with septins to enhance mitochondrial fission. To avoid autophagy, actin-polymerising Shigella fragment mitochondria to escape from septin caging. Our results demonstrate a role for mitochondria in anti-Shigella autophagy and uncover a fundamental link between septin assembly and mitochondria. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  5. Caged Protein Prenyltransferase Substrates: Tools for Understanding Protein Prenylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGraw, Amanda J.; Hast, Michael A.; Xu, Juhua; Mullen, Daniel; Beese, Lorena S.; Barany, George; Distefano, Mark D. (Duke); (UMM)

    2010-11-15

    Originally designed to block the prenylation of oncogenic Ras, inhibitors of protein farnesyltransferase currently in preclinical and clinical trials are showing efficacy in cancers with normal Ras. Blocking protein prenylation has also shown promise in the treatment of malaria, Chagas disease and progeria syndrome. A better understanding of the mechanism, targets and in vivo consequences of protein prenylation are needed to elucidate the mode of action of current PFTase (Protein Farnesyltransferase) inhibitors and to create more potent and selective compounds. Caged enzyme substrates are useful tools for understanding enzyme mechanism and biological function. Reported here is the synthesis and characterization of caged substrates of PFTase. The caged isoprenoid diphosphates are poor substrates prior to photolysis. The caged CAAX peptide is a true catalytically caged substrate of PFTase in that it is to not a substrate, yet is able to bind to the enzyme as established by inhibition studies and X-ray crystallography. Irradiation of the caged molecules with 350 nm light readily releases their cognate substrate and their photolysis products are benign. These properties highlight the utility of those analogs towards a variety of in vitro and in vivo applications.

  6. Homogenized boundary conditions and resonance effects in Faraday cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, I. J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a mathematical study of two-dimensional electrostatic and electromagnetic shielding by a cage of conducting wires (the so-called ‘Faraday cage effect’). Taking the limit as the number of wires in the cage tends to infinity, we use the asymptotic method of multiple scales to derive continuum models for the shielding, involving homogenized boundary conditions on an effective cage boundary. We show how the resulting models depend on key cage parameters such as the size and shape of the wires, and, in the electromagnetic case, on the frequency and polarization of the incident field. In the electromagnetic case, there are resonance effects, whereby at frequencies close to the natural frequencies of the equivalent solid shell, the presence of the cage actually amplifies the incident field, rather than shielding it. By appropriately modifying the continuum model, we calculate the modified resonant frequencies, and their associated peak amplitudes. We discuss applications to radiation containment in microwave ovens and acoustic scattering by perforated shells. PMID:27279775

  7. The ALICE DATE the benefits of using hardware and software industry standards in a real-time environment

    CERN Document Server

    Beker, H; Divià, R; Ganz, M; Kocper, B; Tomasicchio, G; Van de Vyvre, P; Vascotto, Alessandro

    1997-01-01

    In 1996, the ALICE DAQ group was confronted to future demands which Abstract:were exceeding the capabilities of the system used up to then. After Abstract:some review of the market, we decided to integrate a newAbstract:data-acquisition system using several different new components.Abstract:In six months, a system has been developed using new VME boards,Abstract:a new version of Unix, a new switching netowrk and new I/O interfaces. Abstract:Despite the very short deadline, the integration of this system Abstract:has been extremely effective and has been ready on time and usedAbstract:during the tests of fall '97. One of the reasons of this success Abstract:was the use of industrially supported hardware and software standards.Abstract:The general architecture of the system will be described togetherAbstract:with the different input/output devices used in the system Abstract:(Fast Ethernet, PCI, FDDI, Fast Wide SCSI) and the corresponding Abstract:performances. The software environment, tools and languages (Uni...

  8. TiN thin film deposition by cathodic cage discharge: effect of cage configuration and active species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Freitas Daudt, N; Cavalcante Braz, D; Alves Junior, C; Pereira Barbosa, J C; Barbalho Pereira, M

    2012-01-01

    Plasma cathodic cage technique was developed recently in order to eliminate phenomena such as edge effects and overheating, which occur during conventional nitriding processes. In this work, the effect of plasma active species and cage configurations during thin film deposition of TiN were studied. This compound was chosen because its properties are very sensitive to slight variations in chemical composition and film thickness, becoming a good monitoring tool in fabrication process control. In order to verify the effect of cage geometry on the discharge and characteristics of the grown film, a cage made of titanium was used with different numbers and distribution of holes. Furthermore, different amounts of hydrogen were added to the Ar + N2 plasma atmosphere. Flow rates of Ar and N2 gas were fixed at 4 and 3 sccm, respectively and flow rates of H 2 gas was 0, 1 and 2 sccm. Plasma species, electrical discharge and physical characteristics of the grown film were analyzed by Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), X-Ray Diffraction. It was observed by OES that the luminous intensity associated to Hα species is not proportional to flow rate of H 2 gas. Electrical efficiency of the system, crystal structure and topography of the TiN film are strongly influenced by this behavior. For constant flow rate of H 2 gas, it was found that with more holes at the top of the cage, deposition rate, crystallinity and roughness are higher, if compared to cages with a small number of holes at the top of cage. On the other hand, the opposite behavior was observed when more holes were located at the sidewall of cage.

  9. Subsidence of polyetheretherketone cage after minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon-Chan; Chung, Hung-Tae; Cho, Jae-Lim; Kim, Dong-Jun; Chung, Nam-Su

    2013-04-01

    A retrospective case series. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of cage subsidence after minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MITLIF) conducted using a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage, and to identify associated risk factors. Although various rates of cage subsidence after lumbar interbody fusion have been reported, few studies have addressed subsidence rate after MITLIF using PEEK cage. A total of 104 consecutive patients who had undergone MITLIF using a PEEK cage with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included in this study. Cage subsidence was defined to have occurred when a cage was observed to sink into an adjacent vertebral body by ≥2 mm on the postoperative or serial follow-up lateral radiographs. The demographic variables considered to affect cage subsidence were the following: age, sex, body mass index, bone mineral density, diagnosis, number of fusion segment, and the quality/quantity of back muscle, and the cage-related variables considered were: level of fusion, intervertebral angle, cage size, cage position, and postoperative distraction of disc height. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to explore relations between these variables and cage subsidence. : For the 122 cages inserted, the rate of cage subsidence was 14.8% (18 cages), and cage subsidence occurred within 7.2±8.5 (1-25) months of surgery. The odds ratios for factors found to significantly increase the risk of cage subsidence were; 1.950 (95% confidence interval, 1.002-4.224) for L5-S1 level, and 1.018 (95% confidence interval, 1.000-1.066) for anterior cage position. The rate of PEEK cage subsidence after MITLIF was relatively low. End-plate manipulation and cage insertion during MITLIF were not influenced by a small operation window.

  10. Multicomponent Protein Cage Architectures for Photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Arunava [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Prevelige, Peter E [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2016-01-04

    The primary goal of the project was to develop protein-templated approaches for the synthesis and directed assembly of semiconductor nanomaterials that are efficient for visible light absorption and hydrogen production. In general, visible-light-driven photocatalysis reactions exhibit low quantum efficiency for solar energy conversion primarily because of materials-related issues and limitations, such as the control of the band gap, band structure, photochemical stability, and available reactive surface area of the photocatalyst. Synthesis of multicomponent hierarchical nano-architectures, consisting of semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) with desired optical properties fabricated to maximize spatial proximity for optimum electron and energy transfer represents an attractive route for addressing the problem. Virus capsids are highly symmetrical, self-assembling protein cage nanoparticles that exist in a range of sizes and symmetries. Selective deposition of inorganic, by design, at specific locations on virus capsids affords precise control over the size, spacing, and assembly of nanomaterials, resulting in uniform and reproducible nano-architectures. We utilized the self-assembling capabilities of the 420 subunit, 60 nm icosahedral, P22 virus capsid to direct the nucleation, growth, and proximity of a range of component materials. Controlled fabrication on the exterior of the temperature stable shell was achieved by genetically encoding specific binding peptides into an externally exposed loop which is displayed on each of the 420 coat protein subunits. Localization of complimentary materials to the interior of the particle was achieved through the use “scaffolding-fusion proteins. The scaffolding domain drives coat protein polymerization resulting in a coat protein shell surrounding a core of approximately 300 scaffolding/fusion molecules. The fusion domain comprises a peptide which specifically binds the semiconductor material of interest.

  11. Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the AUDIT and CAGE Questionnaires in Tanzanian Swahili for a Traumatic Brain Injury Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissoci, Joao Ricardo Nickenig; Hertz, Julian; El-Gabri, Deena; Andrade Do Nascimento, José Roberto; Pestillo De Oliveira, Leonardo; Mmbaga, Blandina Theophil; Mvungi, Mark; Staton, Catherine A

    2018-01-01

    To develop Swahili versions of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and CAGE questionnaires and evaluate their psychometric properties in a traumatic brain injury (TBI) population in Tanzania. Swahili versions of the AUDIT and CAGE were developed through translation and back-translation by a panel of native speakers of both English and Swahili. The translated instruments were administered to a sample of Tanzanian adults from a TBI registry. The validity and reliability were analyzed using standard statistical methods. The translated versions of both the AUDIT and CAGE questionnaires were found to have excellent language clarity and domain coherence. Reliability was acceptable (>0.85) for all tested versions. Confirmatory factor analysis of one, two and three factor solution for the AUDIT and one factor solution for the CAGE showed adequate results. AUDIT and CAGE scores were strongly correlated to each other (R > 0.80), and AUDIT scores were significantly lower in non-drinkers compared to drinkers. This article presents the first Swahili and Tanzanian adaptations of the AUDIT and CAGE instruments as well as the first validation of these questionnaires with TBI patients. Both instruments were found to have acceptable psychometric properties, resulting in two new useful tools for medical and social research in this setting. © The Author 2017. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of the Results of Use of Bone Graft and Reconstruction Cages in a Group of Patients with Severe Acetabular Bone Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainhoa Toro-Ibarguen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Rings and cages are indicated for use in revision total hip with severe bone loss. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed on 37 acetabular revision cases with an average age at revision of 67.8 years. According to Paprosky classification, 54% grade II and 46% grade III. We used two types of cages, Protrusio and Contour cage. We used 23 standard liners and 14 dual mobility cups. Results. The average follow-up was 5.4 years. The mean Merlé-d’Aubigné score improved from 5.48 to 10.5 points (P<0.05. There were 10 nerve palsies, 6 rings that lost fixation, 10 dislocations, and 4 infections. The need for reoperation for any reason rose to 32% (12/37. Success, defined as a stable reconstruction, was 73%. We found that, using a dual mobility cup cemented into the cage, the dislocation rate and revision rate came down (P<0.05. Conclusions. The treatment of severe acetabular defects using bone graft and reconstruction cages is a viable option. The use of a dual mobility cup cemented into the cage could avoid dislocations and the insertion of the ischial flap inside the ischial portion of the acetabulum for further ring stability and protection of the sciatic nerve.

  13. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion using a barbell-shaped cage: a biomechanical comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, H; Boden, S D; Hutton, W C

    2001-10-01

    There are drawbacks to using threaded cylindrical cages (e.g., limited area for bone ingrowth and metal precluding radiographic visualization of bone healing). To somewhat offset these drawbacks, a barbell-shaped cage has been designed. The central core of the barbell can be wrapped with collagen sheets infiltrated with bone morphogenetic protein. The obvious theoretical advantages of a barbell cage have to be weighed against potential biomechanical disadvantages. Our purpose was to compare the biomechanical properties of an anterior lumbar interbody reconstruction using 18-mm-diameter threaded cylindrical cages, with a reconstruction using barbell cages (18-mm diameter and 6 mm wide at both cylindrical ends, with a round 4-mm-diameter bar joining the two ends). Twelve cadaveric lumbar motion segments were tested. Three L5-S1 segments received two threaded cylindrical cages, and three L5-S1 segments received two barbell cages. Three L3-L4 segments received one threaded cylindrical cage, and three L3-L4 segments received one barbell cage. A series of biomechanical loading sequences were carried out on each motion segment, and stiffness curves were obtained. After the biomechanical testing, an axial compressive load was applied to the motion segments until failure. They were then radiographed and bisected through the disc, and the subsidence (or penetration) of the cage(s) in the cancellous bone of the vertebral bodies was measured. There was no difference in terms of stiffness between the motion segments with the threaded cylindrical cage(s) inserted and those with the barbell cage(s) inserted (p > 0.15). The average values of subsidence was 0.96 mm for the threaded cylindrical cage group and 0.80 mm for the barbell cage group (difference not significant: p = 0.38). The results suggest that a reconstruction using barbell cages is a biomechanically acceptable alternative to one using threaded cylindrical cages.

  14. First Results of the “Carbonaceous Aerosol in Rome and Environs (CARE” Experiment: Beyond Current Standards for PM10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Costabile

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In February 2017 the “Carbonaceous Aerosol in Rome and Environs (CARE” experiment was carried out in downtown Rome to address the following specific questions: what is the color, size, composition, and toxicity of the carbonaceous aerosol in the Mediterranean urban background area of Rome? The motivation of this experiment is the lack of understanding of what aerosol types are responsible for the severe risks to human health posed by particulate matter (PM pollution, and how carbonaceous aerosols influence radiative balance. Physicochemical properties of the carbonaceous aerosol were characterised, and relevant toxicological variables assessed. The aerosol characterisation includes: (i measurements with high time resolution (min to 1–2 h at a fixed location of black carbon (eBC, elemental carbon (EC, organic carbon (OC, particle number size distribution (0.008–10 μ m, major non refractory PM1 components, elemental composition, wavelength-dependent optical properties, and atmospheric turbulence; (ii 24-h measurements of PM10 and PM2.5 mass concentration, water soluble OC and brown carbon (BrC, and levoglucosan; (iii mobile measurements of eBC and size distribution around the study area, with computational fluid dynamics modeling; (iv characterisation of road dust emissions and their EC and OC content. The toxicological assessment includes: (i preliminary evaluation of the potential impact of ultrafine particles on lung epithelia cells (cultured at the air liquid interface and directly exposed to particles; (ii assessment of the oxidative stress induced by carbonaceous aerosols; (iii assessment of particle size dependent number doses deposited in different regions of the human body; (iv PAHs biomonitoring (from the participants into the mobile measurements. The first experimental results of the CARE experiment are presented in this paper. The objective here is to provide baseline levels of carbonaceous aerosols for Rome, and to address

  15. Synthesis of copper and zinc sulfide nanocrystals via thermolysis of the polymetallic thiolate cage

    OpenAIRE

    Toshihiro Kuzuya, Yutaka Tai, Saeki Yamamuro and Kenji Sumiyama

    2005-01-01

    In this paper report on the synthesis of copper and zinc sulfide nanocrystals (NCs) via the formation of polymetallic thiolate cages. Cu2S NCs derived from Cu–dodecanethiol complex formed well-defined spherers, which were sufficiently monodisperse (with a size distribution of ~10% standard deviation of approximately 4.7 nm diameter on average) to generate ordered self-assemblies. An electron diffraction pattern and UV–vis spectrum of Cu2S NCs indicate that this process can provide pure β-chal...

  16. IntelliCages and automated assessment of learning in group-housed mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puścian, Alicja; Knapska, Ewelina

    2014-11-01

    IntelliCage is a fully automated, computer controlled system, which can be used for long-term monitoring of behavior of group-housed mice. Using standardized experimental protocols we can assess cognitive abilities and behavioral flexibility in appetitively and aversively motivated tasks, as well as measure social influences on learning of the subjects. We have also identified groups of neurons specifically activated by appetitively and aversively motivated learning within the amygdala, function of which we are going to investigate optogenetically in the future.

  17. A comprehensive molecular dynamics study on the self-assembly and properties of SiC based cage structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Congyan; Xin, Zihua; Yu, Ming; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.; Shanghai University Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    A molecular dynamics study to investigate a plausible way of fabricating SiC based cage structures has been performed. In this work, the existence of the stable SiC based cage nanostructures SimCn with the size up to about 2.05nm in diameter and the compositions n/(n +m) from 0.4 to 0.6 has been demonstrated using an efficient semi-empirical Hamiltonian method (SCED-LCAO) [PRB 74, 15540 (2006)]. The structural properties are analyzed in terms of the composition, the bonding nature, the surface environment, the local strain, and types of ring structures. It is found that the sp2 bonding nature between Si and C atoms and the environmental mediation are two key factors for the self-assembly of the stable SiC based cage structures. In particular, the transition from one stable cage structure to another of similar composition might occur due to the mending process in the self-assembly. The first and second authors acknowledge the support from the NSFC (grant No.: 61176118) and 085 project of Shanghai University (China) for this work.

  18. Effects of prenatal ethanol exposure and early experience on home-cage and open-field activity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothes, H K; Opitz, B; Werner, R; Clausing, P

    1996-01-01

    -C57BL/6 mice were intubated from gestational day 14-18 twice daily with 1.58 g/kg ethanol, 4.2 g/kg sucrose, or remained untreated. Offspring of ethanol treated or lab chow control groups were raised either by group-housed dams and weaned on postnatal day (PND) 28 or by individually housed dams and weaned on PND 21. Offspring of the sucrose control group were raised by individually housed dams and weaned on PND 21. Groups did not differ in pup weight or litter size. Offspring were assessed for home-cage activity (PND 36-38) and open-field behavior (PND 40-42). Mice prenatally exposed to ethanol showed increased activity in their home cages, whereas open-field behavior was generally not different from that of control groups. Conversely, different preweaning rearing conditions had affected open-field behavior, but not home-cage activity. In conclusion, home-cage behavior was a sensitive paradigm for detecting hyperactivity subsequent to a relatively low dose of prenatal ethanol in mice, and communal nesting/late weaning vs. individual nesting/ standard weaning may be a useful preweaning environmental manipulation to study possible modifications of prenatal neurobehavioral effects.

  19. High levitation pressures with cage-cooled superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. [Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Komori, Mochimitsu [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Iizuka, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    We present an analysis of and experimental results from a levitational system comprising a stationary, bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS) and a levitated component (rotor) that consists of a cylindrical permanent magnet surrounded by an annular HTS. The rotor is cooled below the critical temperature of the HTS while surrounded by a ferromagnetic cage. When the ferromagnetic cage is removed, the flux from the permanent magnet is essentially excluded from the interior of the HTS. When brought into proximity with the HTS stator, the cage-cooled rotor experiences a levitational force. The levitational force may be calculated by applying magnetic circuit theory. Such calculations indicate that for a sufficiently high critical current density, the levitational pressure may exceed that between the permanent magnet and its mirror image. We constructed a rotor from an NdFeB permanent magnet and YBCO bulk HTS with a critical current density of {approx}5 kA cm{sup -2}. A soft ferromagnetic steel cage was constructed in segments. The critical current density of the stator HTS was also {approx}5 kA cm{sup -2}. Experimental results obtained with the cage-cooled rotor and stationary HTS show a significant increase in force over that of an equivalent PM rotor and stationary HTS. (author)

  20. Study on the relationship between uranium mine cage hoisting system and quality of inlet air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Penghua; Li Xianjie; Hong Changshou; Li Xiangyang

    2014-01-01

    Those skip hoisting shafts and cage hoisting shafts with over 100000-ton hoisting capacity per year can not be designed as air inlet shafts is particularly emphasized in nuclear industrial standard Technical Regulations for Radon Exhaustion and Ventilation in Underground Uranium Mine (EJ/T 359-2006) referring to previous production experiences of the former Soviet Union's uranium mines. Cage hoisting shafts are generally served as the main air inlet shafts for the widely adopted of exhaust ventilation in terms of uranium mines in China. Nevertheless, the above-mentioned standard has been considered as a constraint on designing and producing of China's prospective large uranium mines. Through theoretical analysis and field experiments on the main influencing factors over the quality of inlet air of selected experimental uranium mines hoisting system such as piston wind pressure, ore heap's radon emanation of shaft station, radon contamination of loaded mine cars etc, we finally established the calculation model of inlet air contamination deriving from ore heap and loaded mine cars' radon emanation in vertical shaft station. The acquired research achievements would lav a theoretical foundation for further works on revising relevant standards. (authors)

  1. An optimized Faraday cage design for electron beam current measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.N.; Hausner, G.G.; Parsons, D.F.

    1975-01-01

    A Faraday cage detector is described for measuring electron beam intensity for use with energies up to 1.2 Mev, with the present data taken at 100 keV. The design features a readily changeable limiting aperture and detector cup geometry, and a secondary electron suppression grid. The detection efficiency of the cage is shown to be limited only by primary backscatter through the detector solid angle of escape, which is optimized with respect to primary backscattered electrons and secondary electron escape. The geometry and stopping material of the detection cup are varied, and the results show that for maximum detection efficiency with carbon as the stopping mateiral, the solid angle of escape must be equal to or less than 0.05πsr. The experimental results are consistent within the +-2% accuracy of the detection electronics, and are not limited by the Faraday cage detection efficiency. (author)

  2. Design and Operation of an IR-CAGE For Thermal Vacuum Testing of a Communication Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuersching, C.

    2004-08-01

    A specific infrared radiation device was designed and manufactured for infrared simulation on a communication satellite. For the thermal vacuum test of this satellite, radiation fields with different sizes, shapes and radiation intensities were required to deliver additional heating power onto the space- craft panels. Five of the six sides of the cube- shaped satellite had to be equipped with flat IR- frames so that a cage surrounding the S/C had to be designed. The following features of the IR-cage were re- quired: A lightweight, but still rigid construction of the frame with space-proofed materials; using of standard components for cost reasons; radiation intensities of 400 to 1100 W/m2; a computer-based system for individual control of the heating circuits; a user friendly and safe handling of the operation panel and the recording of all operational parame- ter. The mechanical construction was realised by using aluminium profiles. The standard components al- lowed completing the mechanical set-up within a short time. After some investigation concerning the heating devices it was decided to use heating strips for the radiation fields of low intensity and com- mercial IR-quartz radiators for fields with higher intensity. A special suspension for the heating strips was designed to keep them under defined tension. The power supplies for the heating circuits were computer-controlled. The software allowed the individual power setting of each heater. Addition- ally an automatic mode for controlling the heaters by a reference thermocouple was foreseen. Beside design features of the cage, this paper will also describe the heater concept and the control system, and it will have a look at QA relevant mat- ters.

  3. Treatment of cervical radiculopathy by anterior cervical discectomy and cage fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman A Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since the pioneering days of the anterior cervical approach introduced by Cloward et al. in the early 1950s, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF has been the standard procedure for most discogenic and degenerative cervical spinal lesions. Although traditional interbody fusion using iliac bone can maintain the patency of the neuroforamen and ensure solid fusion, selection of patients, and of surgical procedure for ACDF is a continuous challenge. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the results of cervical discectomy and fusion with cervical cages in treatment of cervical radiculopathy clinically and radiologically. Materials and Methods: Eighteen patients suffering from cervical radiculopathy were operated upon using this technique. They were 15 males and 3 females. Clinical and radiological assessment, visual analog scale (VAS for neck and arm and modified Oswestery neck disability index (NDI were done preoperatively and at 4 weeks, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Polyetheretherketone (Peek cages filled with iliac bone graft were used after cervical discectomy. The levels operated upon were C 5-6 in 16 patients and C4-5 in 2 patients. Results: Marked clinical improvement as regard arm and neck pain, and NDI was observed. The pre and post operative mean and standard deviations (SD of the various scores were as follows. VAS for pain in arm reduced from mean of 8 (SD 1.76 to mean 0.4 (SD 0.4, VAS for neck pain reduced from mean of 3.5 (SD 1.58 to mean of 0.8 (SD 0.47, and NDI from mean of 20.2 (SD 0.89 to 2.1(SD 1.05. Fusion occurred in all patients. Subjectively 79% of the patients reported marked improvement in neck pain, and 95% reported marked reduction in arm pain. Conclusion: Anterior cervical discectomy and cage fusion resulted in high fusion rate with minimal preservation of lordosis.

  4. (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_annotation - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us FANTOM5 (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_annotation Data detail Data name (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_ann...rence sequences (hg38/mm10). Data file File name: (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_annotation (Homo sapiens) File URL...: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/fantom5/datafiles/reprocessed/hg38_latest/extra/CAGE_peaks_annotation/ ...File size: 16 MB File name: (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_annotation (Mus musculus) Fil...e URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/fantom5/datafiles/reprocessed/mm10_latest/extra/CAGE_peaks_annotat

  5. (reprocessed)CAGE peaks - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us FANTOM5 (reprocessed)CAGE peaks Data detail Data name (reprocessed)CAGE peaks DOI 10.18908/l...g38/mm10). Data file File name: (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks (Homo sapiens) File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/...archive/fantom5/datafiles/reprocessed/hg38_latest/extra/CAGE_peaks/ File size: 11 MB File name: (reprocessed...)CAGE_peaks (Mus musculus) File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/fantom5/datafiles/reprocess...his Database Site Policy | Contact Us (reprocessed)CAGE peaks - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive ...

  6. (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_expression - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us FANTOM5 (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_expression Data detail Data name (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_exp... (hg38/mm10). Data file File name: (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_expression (Homo sapiens) File URL: ftp://ftp.bio...sciencedbc.jp/archive/fantom5/datafiles/reprocessed/hg38_latest/extra/CAGE_peaks_expression/ File size: 3.3 GB File name: (reprocess...tp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/fantom5/datafiles/reprocessed/mm10_latest/extra/CAGE_peaks_expression/ File size...f This Database Site Policy | Contact Us (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_expression - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive ...

  7. Chaotic Dynamics of Cage Behavior in a High-Speed Cylindrical Roller Bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a mathematical model to investigate the nonlinear dynamic behavior of cage in high-speed cylindrical bearing. Variations of cage behavior due to varying cage eccentricity and cage guidance gap are observed. Hydrodynamic behavior in cage contacts is taken into consideration for a more realistic calculation of acting forces owing to high working speed. Analysis of real-time cage dynamic behavior on radial plane is carried out using chaos theory based on the theoretical and mathematical model established in the paper. The analytical results of this paper provide a solid foundation for designing and manufacturing of high-speed cylindrical roller bearing.

  8. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages in cervical applications: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Roel Frederik Mark Raymond; van Gaalen, Steven M; de Gast, Arthur; Öner, F Cumhur

    2015-06-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages have been widely used during the past decade in patients with degenerative disorders of the cervical spine. Their radiolucency and low elastic modulus make them attractive attributes for spinal fusion compared with titanium and bone graft. Still, limitations are seen such as pseudoarthrosis, subsidence, and migration of the cages. Limited evidence on the clinical outcome of PEEK cages is found in the literature other than noncomparative cohort studies with only a few randomized controlled trials. To assess the clinical and radiographic outcome of PEEK cages in the treatment of degenerative disc disorders and/or spondylolisthesis in the cervical spine. Systematic review of all randomized controlled trials and prospective and retrospective nonrandomized comparative studies with a minimum follow-up of 6 months and all noncomparative cohort studies with a long-term follow-up of more than 5 years. The primary outcome variable was clinical performance. Secondary outcome variables consisted of radiographic scores. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched according to the Preferred Reporting Items of Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses statement and Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines. No conflict of interest reported. No funding received. A total of 223 studies were identified, of which 10 studies were included. These comprised two randomized controlled trials, five prospective comparative trials, and three retrospective comparative trials. Minimal evidence for better clinical and radiographic outcome is found for PEEK cages compared with bone grafts in the cervical spine. No differences were found between PEEK, titanium, and carbon fiber cages. Future studies are needed to improve methodology to minimize bias. Publication of lumbar interbody fusion studies needs to be promoted because differences in clinical and/or radiographic scores are more likely to be demonstrated in this part

  9. 14C-age tracers in global ocean circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeve, W.; Wagner, H.; Kähler, P.; Oschlies, A.

    2014-10-01

    The natural abundance of 14C in total CO2 dissolved in seawater is a property applied to evaluate the water age structure and circulation in the ocean and in ocean models. In this study we use three different representations of the global ocean circulation augmented with a suite of idealised tracers to study the potential and limitations of using natural 14C to determine water age, the time elapsed since a body of water had contact with the atmosphere. We find that, globally, bulk 14C-age is dominated by two equally important components, one associated with aging, i.e. the time component of circulation and one associated with a "preformed 14C-age". This latter quantity exists because of the slow and incomplete atmosphere/ocean equilibration of 14C in particular in high latitudes where many water masses form. The relative contribution of the preformed component to bulk 14C-age varies regionally within a given model, but also between models. Regional variability, e.g. in the Atlantic Ocean is associated with the mixing of waters with very different end members of preformed 14C-age. In the Atlantic, variations in the preformed component over space and time mask the circulation component to an extent that its patterns are not detectable from bulk 14C-age alone. Between models the variability of age can also be considerable (factor of 2), related to the combinations of physical model parameters, which influence circulation dynamics, and gas exchange in the models. The preformed component was found to be very sensitive to gas exchange and moderately sensitive to ice cover. In our model evaluation exercise, the choice of the gas exchange constant from within the current range of uncertainty had such a strong influence on preformed and bulk 14C-age that if model evaluation would be based on bulk 14C-age it could easily impair the evaluation and tuning of a models circulation on global and regional scales. Based on the results of this study, we propose that considering

  10. Rib cage deformities alter respiratory muscle action and chest wall function in patients with severe osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella LoMauro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is an inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by bone fragility, multiple fractures and significant chest wall deformities. Cardiopulmonary insufficiency is the leading cause of death in these patients. METHODS: Seven patients with severe OI type III, 15 with moderate OI type IV and 26 healthy subjects were studied. In addition to standard spirometry, rib cage geometry, breathing pattern and regional chest wall volume changes at rest in seated and supine position were assessed by opto-electronic plethysmography to investigate if structural modifications of the rib cage in OI have consequences on ventilatory pattern. One-way or two-way analysis of variance was performed to compare the results between the three groups and the two postures. RESULTS: Both OI type III and IV patients showed reduced FVC and FEV(1 compared to predicted values, on condition that updated reference equations are considered. In both positions, ventilation was lower in OI patients than control because of lower tidal volume (p<0.01. In contrast to OI type IV patients, whose chest wall geometry and function was normal, OI type III patients were characterized by reduced (p<0.01 angle at the sternum (pectus carinatum, paradoxical inspiratory inward motion of the pulmonary rib cage, significant thoraco-abdominal asynchronies and rib cage distortions in supine position (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, the restrictive respiratory pattern of Osteogenesis Imperfecta is closely related to the severity of the disease and to the sternal deformities. Pectus carinatum characterizes OI type III patients and alters respiratory muscles coordination, leading to chest wall and rib cage distortions and an inefficient ventilator pattern. OI type IV is characterized by lower alterations in the respiratory function. These findings suggest that functional assessment and treatment of OI should be differentiated in these two forms of the

  11. Effect of a zero g environment on flammability limits as determined using a standard flammability tube apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehlow, R. A.; Reuss, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Flammability limits in a zero gravity environment were defined. Key aspects of a possible spacelab experiment were investigated analytically, experimentally on the bench, and in drop tower facilities. A conceptual design for a spacelab experiment was developed.

  12. (reprocessed)HeliscopeCAGE sequencing, Delve mapping and CAGE TSS aggregation - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us FANTOM5 (reprocessed)HeliscopeCAGE sequencing, Delve mapping and CAGE TSS aggregation Data detail Data name (reproces...ls.zip File size: 237 KB File name: (reprocessed)basic (Homo sapiens) File URL: f...tp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/fantom5/datafiles/reprocessed/hg38_latest/basic/ File size: 1.4 TB File name: (reprocess...ed)basic (Mus musculus) File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/fantom5/datafiles/reprocess...A format) About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us (reproce

  13. The effect of manure and litter handling and climate conditions on ammonia emissions from a cage system and an aviary housing system for laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot Koerkamp, P.W.G.; Keen, A.; Niekerk, van T.; Smit, S.

    1996-01-01

    Ammonia emissions from both traditional and new welfare-based housing systems for laying hens must be reduced to prevent detrimental effects on the environment. In a comparative study, the effect of manure handling (variation in drying and removal frequency) in a battery cage and the effect of

  14. Assessment of environmental quality and inland water pollution using biomarker responses in caged carp (Cyprinus carpio): Use of a bioactivation:detoxication ratio as a biotransformation index (BTI).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Oost, R.; Lopes, S.C.C.; Komen, H.; Satumalay, K.; Bos, R.; Heida, H.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study the bioaccumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) as well as the responses of a suite of biochemical parameters were investigated in a standardized carp (Cyprinus carpio) fish line. Carps were caged for 2 to 8 weeks at two Amsterdam

  15. Impacts of cage culture on physico-chemical and bacteriological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of cage fish farming on physico-chemical and bacteriological water quality in Lake Volta, Ghana, were investigated in 2013–2014. Farmed ... The bacteriological analysis, however, revealed contamination of the lake water by fish farming. ... Keywords: aquaculture, contamination, fish farming, large lake, pollution ...

  16. Diet manipulation and post-moulting responses in caged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred and fifty caged commercial laying hens were induced to moult through a 15-day feed and water withdrawal programme. Immediate and subsequent effects on egg production and follicular developments were monitored. Results showed that moulted hens attained over 60% egg production after 6 weeks of ...

  17. Clathrates - An Exploration of the Chemistry of Caged Compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The hollow cage structure are made up of hexagonal and pentagonal homo- atomic shells of carbon. Twenty hexagons and twelve isolated pentagons interact to .... The guests are generally alkali and alkaline-earth atoms. The cavity size of Si and Ge are compa- rable only with those ofNa+ ofK+ and compounds like KgGe.

  18. Regioselective nitration of aromatic substrates in zeolite cages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Phenol is nitrated regioselectively by fuming nitric acid inside the cages of faujasite zeolites (dependent on the loading level) and a remarkable orthoselectivity is observed in solid state nitration. Toluene and chlorobenzene also containing ortho-/para-orienting substituents, undergo faster nitration, though the ...

  19. power generation and control of a self excited squirrel cage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    powering customers isolated from the utility grid by wind energy because it derives its excitation from its own output terminal and neither an ... mechanically to the rotor of a squirrel cage induction which is fed with grid powerthat the generator supplies. A back ... than a conventional synchronous generator in micro- hydro and ...

  20. Power generation and control of a self excited squirrel cage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The self-excited squirrel cage induction generator (SEIG) is frequently considered as the most economical solution for powering customers isolated from the utility grid by wind energy because it derives its excitation from its own output terminal and neither an exciter nor voltage regulator is required. Its major drawbacks ...

  1. Fish cage culture catches on in Nepal | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-10-25

    Oct 25, 2010 ... Fish Cage Culture in Nepal: from Displacement to Development An audio slideshow. Success Stories in Asian Aquaculture The stories presented in this book reflect the unique nature of Asian aquaculture, providing first-time insight into how and why it has become so successful. Utilizing Different Aquatic ...

  2. utilization of ensiled metabolizable mixture of cassava peel and caged

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toluwande

    2011-09-05

    Sep 5, 2011 ... component of farm animal feed has been documented [8, 9]. Therefore, this investigation was carried out to study the response of broiler chicken to fermented mixture of cassava peel and caged layers' manure (obtained as farm residue or waste) and fed as a component of energy source in the feed.

  3. variations in dimensions and shape of thoracic cage with aging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The thoracic cage variations in dimensions and proportions are influenced by age, sex and race. The objective of the present review was to describe the age related changes occurring in thoracic wall and its influence on the pattern of respiration in infants, adult and elderly. We had systematically reviewed, ...

  4. Clathrates-An Exploration of the Chemistry of Caged Compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 7. Clathrates – An Exploration of the Chemistry of Caged Compounds. Srivathsa Vaidya. General Article ... Author Affiliations. Srivathsa Vaidya1. 64400 Freret Street Department of Chemistry Tulane University New Orleans, LA 70118 USA ...

  5. Rotational dynamics of propylene inside Na-Y zeolite cages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    molecules etc. Several such dependences have been under investigation [2]. We have in particular been investigating the diffusivities of hydrocarbons in Na-Y ze- olitic cages. In this context we had earlier reported the translational diffusivities of propane, acetylene and 1,3-butadiene in Na-Y zeolite [3–5]. The translational.

  6. FANTOM5 CAGE profiles of human and mouse samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noguchi, Shuhei; Arakawa, Takahiro; Fukuda, Shiro; Furuno, Masaaki; Hasegawa, Akira; Hori, Fumi; Ishikawa-Kato, Sachi; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kojima, Miki; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Nakazato, Kenichi; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori-Sueki, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Saijyo, Eri; Saka, Akiko; Sakai, Mizuho; Simon, Christophe; Suzuki, Naoko; Tagami, Michihira; Watanabe, Shoko; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Arner, Peter; Axton, Richard A; Babina, Magda; Baillie, J Kenneth; Barnett, Timothy C; Beckhouse, Anthony G; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Carlisle, Ailsa J; Clevers, Hans C; Davis, Carrie A; Detmar, Michael; Dohi, Taeko; Edge, Albert S B; Edinger, Matthias; Ehrlund, Anna; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Eslami, Afsaneh; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Ferrai, Carmelo; Fisher, Malcolm E; Forrester, Lesley M; Fujita, Rie; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B; Gingeras, Thomas; Goldowitz, Daniel; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Hasegawa, Yuki; Herlyn, Meenhard; Heutink, Peter; Hitchens, Kelly J; Hume, David A; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Ishizu, Yuri; Kai, Chieko; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I; Kempfle, Judith S; Kenna, Tony J; Kere, Juha; Khachigian, Levon M; Kitamura, Toshio; Klein, Sarah; Klinken, S Peter; Knox, Alan J; Kojima, Soichi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Mejhert, Niklas; Mizuno, Yosuke; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Morris, Kelly J; Motohashi, Hozumi; Mummery, Christine L; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakahara, Fumio; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Nozaki, Tadasuke; Ogishima, Soichi; Ohkura, Naganari; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Pombo, Ana; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Qin, Xian-Yang; Rehli, Michael; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roy, Sugata; Sajantila, Antti; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sato, Hiroki; Satoh, Hironori; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schmidl, Christian; Schneider, Claudio; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G; Schwegmann, Anita; Sheng, Guojun; Shin, Jay W; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaaki; Summers, Kim M; Takahashi, Naoko; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tomoiu, Andru; Toyoda, Hiroo; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M; Verardo, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Wells, Christine A; Winteringham, Louise N; Wolvetang, Ernst; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yanagi-Mizuochi, Chiyo; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Zhang, Peter G; Zucchelli, Silvia; Abugessaisa, Imad; Arner, Erik; Harshbarger, Jayson; Kondo, Atsushi; Lassmann, Timo; Lizio, Marina; Sahin, Serkan; Sengstag, Thierry; Severin, Jessica; Shimoji, Hisashi; Suzuki, Masanori; Suzuki, Harukazu; Kawai, Jun; Kondo, Naoto; Itoh, Masayoshi; Daub, Carsten O; Kasukawa, Takeya; Kawaji, Hideya; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2017-01-01

    In the FANTOM5 project, transcription initiation events across the human and mouse genomes were mapped at a single base-pair resolution and their frequencies were monitored by CAGE (Cap Analysis of Gene Expression) coupled with single-molecule sequencing. Approximately three thousands of samples,

  7. Caged ceramide 1-phosphate analogues: synthesis and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankalapalli, Ravi S; Ouro, Alberto; Arana, Lide; Gómez-Muñoz, Antonio; Bittman, Robert

    2009-11-20

    Sphingolipid phosphate analogues bearing 7-(diethylamino)coumarin (DECM) and 4-bromo-5-hydroxy-2-nitrobenzhydryl (BHNB) groups in a photolabile ester bond were synthesized. The ability of the "caged" ceramide 1-phosphate analogues to release the bioactive parent molecule upon irradiation at 400-500 nm was demonstrated by stimulation of macrophage cell proliferation.

  8. Thoracic cage injury imaging in rugby players | de Villiers | SA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rugby players often sustain high-impact collisions and are therefore at risk of significant traumatic thoracic injuries. Injury to the thoracic cage may be associated with potentially life-threatening sequelae. Player management is often based on the accuracy of the imaging report. The author suggests a combination of ...

  9. Business plan Tilapia cage farming in Tete Zambezi Valley, Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van der Magnus; Brouwer, Herman

    2015-01-01

    Tete province offers great opportunities for cage farming of tilapia in Lake Cahora Bassa. The climate and water quality are favourable for fish production, and the fast economic developments in the region will facilitate fish sales. In Tete tilapia (pende) is highly valued food. Major markets for

  10. Cages Based on the Carbon-Carbon Composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sochor, M.; Balík, Karel; Tichý, P.; Vtípil, J.; Suchý, Tomáš; Sedláček, R.; Kolář, František; Černý, Martin; Beneš, J.; Hulejová, H.; Pešáková, V.

    12(132) (2003), s. 49-57 ISSN 1212-1576 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/00/1407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : carbon-carbon composites * cage * spine treatment Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  11. EFFECTS OF CAGING DENSITY ON PITUITARY AND TESTICLE RELATED RESPONSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of caging density on pituitary and testicle related responses A significant negative correlation between the incidence of testicular interstitial cell tumors (ICT) and of pituitary tumors (PT) in control male F344 rats is reported associated with the number of ani...

  12. Microbial control of caged population of Zonocerus variegatus using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbial control of caged populations of Zonocerus variegatus was carried out using indigenous fungal entomopathogens isolated from the grasshopper's cadaver. Bioassay response indicated a dose-dependent mortality coupled with drastic reduction in food consumption among spores infected grasshoppers. Lethal time ...

  13. FANTOM5 CAGE profiles of human and mouse samples

    KAUST Repository

    Noguchi, Shuhei

    2017-08-29

    In the FANTOM5 project, transcription initiation events across the human and mouse genomes were mapped at a single base-pair resolution and their frequencies were monitored by CAGE (Cap Analysis of Gene Expression) coupled with single-molecule sequencing. Approximately three thousands of samples, consisting of a variety of primary cells, tissues, cell lines, and time series samples during cell activation and development, were subjected to a uniform pipeline of CAGE data production. The analysis pipeline started by measuring RNA extracts to assess their quality, and continued to CAGE library production by using a robotic or a manual workflow, single molecule sequencing, and computational processing to generate frequencies of transcription initiation. Resulting data represents the consequence of transcriptional regulation in each analyzed state of mammalian cells. Non-overlapping peaks over the CAGE profiles, approximately 200,000 and 150,000 peaks for the human and mouse genomes, were identified and annotated to provide precise location of known promoters as well as novel ones, and to quantify their activities.

  14. Sex effect in mutual olfactory relationships of individually caged rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Finzi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To assess the sex influence on sniffing behavior of rabbits, sets of three rabbits each were located for seven days in contiguous cages divided by a metal wall with holes that prevented the neighboring rabbits to see each other. A buck was located in the central cage, with a doe at each side. Rabbit behavior was video recorded to observe animals sniffing with the muzzle near the wall. The bucks displayed an olfactory preference towards one of the two does, which decreased in few days. The significance was p  0.05. The interest of bucks towards the does was also characterized by a frenetic scratching of the separation wall, contemporary with intense sniffing, displayed only for the first 35 min of the first day. The sniffing behavior of does at the central cage housing the male was not so marked as in bucks, and it progressively changed across the trial (p < 0.01. In conclusion, rabbits establish a transitory sex-oriented olfactory relationship with the conspecifics housed in contiguous cages, which looks no longer necessary once the rabbits have recognized each other.

  15. Mooring Design Selection of Aquaculture Cage for Indonesian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyadi, Y.; Syahroni, N.; Sambodho, K.; Zikra, M.; Wahyudi; Adia, H. B. P.

    2018-03-01

    Fish production is important for the economy in fishing community and for ensuring food security. Climate change will lead a threat to fish productivity. Therefore, a solution offered is to cultivate certain fish, especially those with high economic value by using offshore aquaculture technology. A Sea Station cage is one of the offshore aquaculture cage model that has been used in some locations. As a floating structure, the Sea Station cage need a mooring system to maintain its position. This paper presents the selection analysis of the mooring system designs of the Sea Station cage model that it is suitable with Indonesia Ocean. There are 3 mooring configurations that are linear array, rectangular array, and 4 points mooring type. The nylon mooring rope type has been selected to be used on the 3 mooring configurations and the rope has a diameter of 104 mm with a breaking force of 2.3 MN. Based on results from comparing the 3 mooring configurations, the best mooring configuration is linear array with the tension on the rope of 217 KN and has the safety factor of 0.2 based on DNVGL OS-E301

  16. power generation and control of a self excited squirrel cage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    The self-excited squirrel cage induction generator (SEIG) is frequently considered as the most economical solution for powering customers isolated from the utility grid by wind energy because it derives its excitation from its own output terminal and neither an exciter nor voltage regulator is required. Its major drawbacks ...

  17. Assessment of the Usability of the Workbench Faraday Cage Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten; Franek, Ondrej; Christensen, Søren K.

    2011-01-01

    The workbench Faraday Cage method (WBFC) is a time efficient module pre-compliance test regarding radiated emission. This work investigates the method’s usability and credibility and concludes that for this particular case the WBFC perform a tolerable compliance test for frequencies below 360 MHz...

  18. Complex susceptibility of the cage model of polar liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Coffey, W T; Kalmykov, Yu P; Titov, S V

    2003-01-01

    The Langevin equations of motion of the cage model of polar liquids originally proposed by Hill (1963 Proc. Phys. Soc. 82 723) are solved for the first time for the particular case of rotation about a fixed axis, using a newly developed matrix continued fraction method. It is shown that the cage model predicts both the low-frequency Debye relaxation and a pronounced high-frequency (Poley) absorption peak in the far-infrared (FIR) region. The similarity of the equations of motion of the cage model to the equations which arise in the problem of generalizing the Onsager model of polar fluids to include a time-varying applied field suggests that the FIR (Poley) absorption may have its origins in the combined influence of molecular inertia and the torque due to the reaction field in the frequency-dependent version of the Onsager model. The complex susceptibility yielded by the cage model is shown to be in good agreement with experimental data on CH sub 3 Cl that were taken as a typical example. Moreover, a simple ...

  19. Radiological outcomes of static vs expandable titanium cages after corpectomy: a retrospective cohort analysis of subsidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Darryl; Song, Yeohan; Guan, Zhe; La Marca, Frank; Park, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Mesh cages have commonly been used for reconstruction after corpectomy. Recently, expandable cages have become a popular alternative. Regardless of cage type, subsidence is a concern following cage placement. To assess whether subsidence rates differ between static and expandable cages, and identify independent risk factors for subsidence and extent of subsidence when present. A consecutive population of patients who underwent corpectomy between 2006 and 2009 was identified. Subsidence was assessed via x-ray at 1-month and 1-year follow-ups. In addition to cage type, demographic, medical, and cage-related covariates were recorded. Multivariate models were used to assess independent associations with rate, odds, and extent of subsidence. Of 91 patients, 44.0% had expandable cages and 56.0% had static cages. One-month subsidence rate was 36.3%, and the 1-year subsidence rate was 51.6%. Expandable cages were independently associated with higher rates and odds of subsidence in comparison with static cages. Infection, trauma, and footplate-to-vertebral body endplate ratio of less than 0.5 were independent risk factors for subsidence. The presence of prongs on cages and posterior fusion 2 or more levels above and below corpectomy level had lower rates and odds of subsidence. Infection and cage placement in the thoracic or lumbar region had greater extent of subsidence when subsidence was present. Expandable cages had higher rates and risk of subsidence in comparison with static cages. When subsidence was present, expandable cages had greater magnitudes of subsidence. Other factors including footplate-to-vertebral body endplate ratio, prongs, extent of supplemental posterior fusion, spinal region, and diagnosis also impacted subsidence.

  20. Position and Orientation Insensitive Wireless Power Transmission for EnerCage-Homecage System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yaoyao; Mirbozorgi, S Abdollah; Wang, Zheyuan; Hsu, Chia-Chun; Madsen, Teresa E; Rainnie, Donald; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2017-10-01

    We have developed a new headstage architecture as part of a smart experimental arena, known as the EnerCage-HC2 system, which automatically delivers stimulation and collects behavioral data over extended periods with minimal small animal subject handling or personnel intervention in a standard rodent homecage. Equipped with a four-coil inductive link, the EnerCage-HC2 system wirelessly powers the receiver (Rx) headstage, irrespective of the subject's location or head orientation, eliminating the need for tethering or carrying bulky batteries. On the transmitter (Tx) side, a driver coil, five high-quality (Q) factor segmented resonators at different heights and orientations, and a closed-loop Tx power controller create a homogeneous electromagnetic (EM) field within the homecage 3-D space, and compensate for drops in power transfer efficiency (PTE) due to Rx misalignments. The headstage is equipped with four small slanted resonators, each covering a range of head orientations with respect to the Tx resonators, which direct the EM field toward the load coil at the bottom of the headstage. Moreover, data links based on Wi-Fi, UART, and Bluetooth low energy are utilized to enables remote communication and control of the Rx. The PTE varies within 23.6%-33.3% and 6.7%-10.1% at headstage heights of 8 and 20 cm, respectively, while continuously delivering >40 mW to the Rx electronics even at 90° rotation. As a proof of EnerCage-HC2 functionality in vivo, a previously documented on-demand electrical stimulation of the globus pallidus, eliciting consistent head rotation, is demonstrated in three freely behaving rats.

  1. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a stand-alone polyetheretherketone cage packed with local autobone : assessment of bone fusion and subsidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Ill; Cho, Dae-Chul; Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Sung, Joo-Kyung

    2013-09-01

    It remains debatable whether cervical spine fusion cages should be filled with any kind of bone or bone substitute. Cortical and subcortical bone from the anterior and posterior osteophytes of the segment could be used to fill the cage. The purposes of the present study are to evaluate the clinical outcomes and radiological outcomes including bone fusion and subsidence that occurred after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a stand-alone cage packed with local autobone graft. Thirty-one patients who underwent anterior cervical fusion using a stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage packed with local autobone graft from July 2009 to december 2011 were enrolled in this study. Bone fusion was assessed by cervical plain radiographs and computed tomographic scan. Nonunion was evaluated according to the absence of bony bridge on computed tomographic scan. Subsidence was defined as a ≥2 mm decrease of the interbody height at the final follow-up compared to that measured at the immediate postoperative period. Subsidence was observed in 7 patients (22.6%). Of 7 patients with subsidence greater 2 mm, nonunion was developed in 3. Three patients with subsidence greater 2 mm were related with endplate damage during intraoperative endplate preparation. Solid bone fusion was achieved in 28 out of 31 patients (90.3%). With proper patient selection and careful endplate preparation, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using a stand-alone PEEK cage packed with local autobone graft could be a good alternative to the standard ACDF techniques with plating.

  2. Corpectomy cage subsidence with rectangular versus round endcaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deukmedjian, Armen R; Manwaring, Jotham; Le, Tien V; Turner, Alexander W L; Uribe, Juan S

    2014-09-01

    Corpectomy cages with rectangular endcaps utilize the stronger peripheral part of the endplate, potentially decreasing subsidence risk. The authors evaluated cage subsidence during cyclic biomechanical testing, comparing rectangular versus round endcaps. Fourteen cadaveric spinal segments (T12-L2) were dissected and potted at T12 and L2, then assigned to a rectangular (n=7) or round (n=7) endcap group. An L1 corpectomy was performed and under uniform conditions a cage/plate construct was cyclically tested in a servo-hydraulic frame with increasing load magnitude. Testing was terminated if the test machine actuator displacement exceeded 6mm, or the specimen completed cyclic loading at 2400 N. Number of cycles, compressive force and force-cycles product at test completion were all greater in the rectangular endcap group compared with the round endcap group (cycles: 3027 versus 2092 cycles; force: 1943 N versus 1533 N; force-cycles product: 6162kN·cycles versus 3973 kN·cycles), however these differences were not statistically significant (p ⩾ 0.076). After normalizing for individual specimen bone mineral density, the same measures increased to a greater extent with the rectangular endcaps (cycles: 3014 versus 1855 cycles; force: 1944 N versus 1444 N; force-cycles product: 6040 kN·cycles versus 2980 kN·cycles), and all differences were significant (p⩽0.030). The rectangular endcap expandable corpectomy cage displayed increased resistance to subsidence over the round endcap cage under cyclic loading as demonstrated by the larger number of cycles, maximum load and force-cycles product at test completion. This suggests rectangular endcaps will be less susceptible to subsidence than the round endcap design. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 48 CFR 252.204-7001 - Commercial and Government Entity (CAGE) code reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Entity (CAGE) code reporting. 252.204-7001 Section 252.204-7001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Entity (CAGE) Code Reporting (AUG 1999) (a) The offeror is requested to enter its CAGE code on its offer... AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.204-7001 Commercial and Government Entity...

  4. 30 CFR 75.1403-3 - Criteria-Drum clutch; cage construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criteria-Drum clutch; cage construction. 75... § 75.1403-3 Criteria—Drum clutch; cage construction. (a) The clutch of a free-drum on a personnel hoist... withdrawal of the clutch. (b) Cages used for hoisting persons should be constructed with the sides enclosed...

  5. A real-time computer simulation of nuclear simulator software using standard PC hardware and linux environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, K. H.; Kweon, K. C.

    2001-01-01

    A feasibility study, which standard PC hardware and Real-Time Linux are applied to real-time computer simulation of software for a nuclear simulator, is presented in this paper. The feasibility prototype was established with the existing software in the Compact Nuclear Simulator (CNS). Throughout the real-time implementation in the feasibility prototype, we has identified that the approach can enable the computer-based predictive simulation to be approached, due to both the remarkable improvement in real-time performance and the less efforts for real-time implementation under standard PC hardware and Real-Time Linux envrionments

  6. Can forced hot air quickly dry feces on transport cage flooring and eliminate campylobacter before cage re-use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allowing feces left on transport coops to dry is an effective way to reduce numbers of viable Campylobacter left by positive flocks. The problem with this approach is that poultry processors do not have the time, space or resources to maintain several times the minimum number of transport cages that...

  7. Subsidence of Cylindrical Cage (AMSLU™ Cage) : Postoperative 1 Year Follow-up of the Cervical Anterior Interbody Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Young Il; Ko, Yong; Yi, Hyeong Joong; Lee, Seung Ku

    2007-01-01

    Objective There are numerous reports on the primary stabilizing effects of the different cervical cages for cervical radiculopathy. But, little is known about the subsidence which may be clinical problem postoperatively. The goal of this study is to evaluate subsidence of cage and investigate the correlation between radiologic subsidence and clinical outcome. Methods To assess possible subsidence, the authors investigated clinical and radiological results of the one-hundred patients who underwent anterior cervical fusion by using AMSLU™ cage during the period between January 2003 and June 2005. Preoperative and postoperative lateral radiographs were measured for height of intervertebral disc space where cages were placed. Intervertebral disc space was measured by dividing the sum of anterior, posterior, and midpoint interbody distance by 3. Follow-up time was 6 to 12 months. Subsidence was defined as any change in at least one of our parameters of at least 3 mm. Results Subsidence was found in 22 patients (22%). The mean value of subsidence was 2.21 mm, and mean subsidence rate was 22%. There were no cases of the clinical status deterioration during the follow-up period. No posterior or anterior migration was observed. Conclusion The phenomenon of subsidence is seen in substantial number of patients. Nevertheless, clinical and radiological results of the surgery were favorable. An excessive subsidence may result in hardware failure. Endplate preservation may enables us to control subsidence and reduce the number of complications. PMID:19096571

  8. State standards, norms and rules as a mechanism of formation of the institutional environment of territorial planning of land use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Dorosh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article states, that coordinated system of national standards, rules and regulations is an important mechanism for regional land use planning for sustainable land use and for the ways of its improvement. Research provides an idea, that norms should be focused in a single system of legal acts both in land management and in the field of land protection (SSLA.

  9. Abstinence environment contributes to age differences in reinstatement of cocaine seeking between adolescent and adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Frantz, Kyle J

    2017-07-01

    Extinction responding and cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking after 60-days of forced abstinence are attenuated in male rats that self-administered cocaine during adolescence, compared with adults. Given that environmental enrichment during abstinence decreases reinstatement among adults, a possible explanation for attenuated reinstatement among adolescents is that standard pair-housing in prior studies creates a more stimulating environment for younger rats. Therefore, we tested whether standard pair-housing is necessary for the attenuated reinstatement among adolescents by determining whether an impoverished environment during abstinence would increase reinstatement among adolescents, up to adult levels. Conversely, we also tested whether environmental enrichment could further decrease reinstatement among adolescents, and whether we could replicate effects of environmental enrichment to decrease reinstatement among adults down to adolescent levels (positive controls). Adolescent and adult male Wistar rats self-administered cocaine intravenously for 12days (fixed ratio 1; 0.36mg/kg per infusion; 2h sessions). Rats were then moved into enriched (grouped, large cages, novel toys), standard (pair-housed, shoebox cages), or impoverished (isolated, hanging cages) housing conditions. After 60days, extinction and cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking were tested, followed by drug-primed reinstatement (0, 5, 10mg/kg cocaine, i.p.). Consistent with previous results, extinction and cue-induced reinstatement were attenuated in adolescent-onset groups compared with adults; this age difference also extended to drug-primed reinstatement. In support of the present hypothesis, an impoverished environment during abstinence increased reinstatement among adolescents to levels that were not different from adult standard-housing levels. These data suggest that abstinence environment influences the enduring effects of cocaine among adolescents as well as adults

  10. Effects of single caging and cage size on behavior and stress level of domestic neutered cats housed in an animal shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetake, Katsuji; Goto, Akihiro; Koyama, Rumi; Kikuchi, Rieko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2013-03-01

    Cats need a minimum amount of space even in animal shelters. In this study the effects of single caging and cage size on the behavior and stress level of domestic cats were investigated. Six neutered cats (2-15 years old) that had been housed in a group for at least 7 months were moved to three kinds of single cages (small, medium and large) by rotation on a Latin square design. They experienced each cage size for 6 days. Cats could use vertical dimensions when housed in a group room and the large cage. Behavioral observation was conducted for 3 h in the evening, and stress levels were assessed by urine cortisol-to-creatinine ratios. The amounts (estimated proportions) of time spent in locomotion and social/solitary play were lower even in large cages than in group housing (both P housed singly (P = 0.104). The urine cortisol-to-creatinine ratios of singly housed cats tended to be higher than that of group-housed cats (P = 0.086). The results indicate that cats become less active when they are housed singly in cages regardless of the cage size. Cats seem to feel no undue stress even in small cages if the stay is short. © 2012 The Authors. Animal Science Journal © 2012 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  11. Conception and synthesis of new molecular cages for xenon MRI applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delacour, L.

    2011-01-01

    Non-invasive proton magnetic resonance imaging ( 1 H MRI) is a powerful clinical tool for the detection of numerous diseases. Although MRI contrast agents are often used to improve diagnostic specificity, this technique has limited applications in molecular imaging because of its inherently low sensitivity when compared to nuclear medicine or fluorescence imaging. Laser-polarized 129 Xe NMR spectroscopy is a promising tool to circumvent sensitivity limitations. Indeed, optical pumping increases the nuclear spin polarization of xenon by several orders of magnitude (10 4 to 10 5 ), thus small amounts of gas dissolved in biological tissues (blood, lungs...) can be rapidly detected with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, the high polarizability of the xenon electron cloud, which induces a very high sensitivity to its environment, makes this nucleus very attractive for molecular imaging. Detection of biomolecules can be achieved by biosensors, which encapsulate xenon atoms in molecular cages that have been functionalized to bind the desired biological target. Cage molecules such as cryptophanes have high affinity for xenon and thus appear as ideal candidates for its encapsulation. During this PhD thesis we worked on the synthesis and the functionalization of new cryptophanes. (author) [fr

  12. Standard test method for determining a threshold stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the environment-assisted cracking threshold stress intensity factor parameters, KIEAC and KEAC, for metallic materials from constant-force testing of fatigue precracked beam or compact fracture specimens and from constant-displacement testing of fatigue precracked bolt-load compact fracture specimens. 1.2 This test method is applicable to environment-assisted cracking in aqueous or other aggressive environments. 1.3 Materials that can be tested by this test method are not limited by thickness or by strength as long as specimens are of sufficient thickness and planar size to meet the size requirements of this test method. 1.4 A range of specimen sizes with proportional planar dimensions is provided, but size may be variable and adjusted for yield strength and applied force. Specimen thickness is a variable independent of planar size. 1.5 Specimen configurations other than those contained in this test method may be used, provided that well-established stress ...

  13. Complete cage migration/subsidence into the adjacent vertebral body after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corniola, Marco V; Jägersberg, Max; Stienen, Martin N; Gautschi, Oliver P

    2015-03-01

    A variety of implant-related short and long-term complications after lumbar fusion surgery are recognized. Mid to long-term complications due to cage migration and/or cage subsidence are less frequently reported. Here, we report a patient with a complete cage migration into the superior adjacent vertebral body almost 20 years after the initial posterior lumbar interbody fusion procedure. In this patient, the cage migration/subsidence was clinically silent, but a selective decompression for adjacent segment degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis was performed. We discuss the risk factors for cage migration/subsidence in view of the current literature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Description of nestbox visits and suckling events in a group housing system for rabbit does as compared to individual cages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorine M. Rommers

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Research was conducted to study nursing associated events of lactating rabbit does. Nest box visits and suckling events were investigated using 6 group pens (8 does/pen and 12 enriched individual cages. Each group pen and individual cage was observed by video for one day per week until weaning at 35 d of lactation, with exception of the third week of lactation. In the first 2 wk of lactation, videotapes were analysed for the frequency and duration of nest box visits per day. The fourth and fifth week of lactation, suckling events on the floor of the group pens and nest box visits in the individual cages were analysed for one day per week. The first 2 wk of lactation, does visits to the nest boxes were less frequent (respectively 1.9±0.2 vs. 2.6±0.3, P<0.1 and shorter (respectively 113±9 s vs. 158±15 s, P< 0.05 in the group pens than in the individual cages. In the group pens, 32% of the does had intervals of >24 h between nest box visits. In the cages, all does visited the nest boxes at least once a day. In the last 2 wk of lactation, in the group pens suckling duration (mean±standard deviation was 89±49 and 92.2±37 s in respectively week 4 and 5. In 79% of the suckling events a mix of the does’ own and other kits were suckled. No difference was found in suckling duration between litters consisting of own and/or other kits. Thirty-two per cent of the does in week 4 and 62% of the does in week 5 did not suckle kits on the floor of the pen, whereas all the does in the cages still visited the nest boxes at least once every 24 h. Based on this study, it can be concluded that in group housing less frequent and shorter nest box visits as well as suckling events were found as compared to individual housing.

  15. Spatial cognition in a virtual reality home-cage extension for freely moving rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaupert, Ursula; Thurley, Kay; Frei, Katja; Bagorda, Francesco; Schatz, Alexej; Tocker, Gilad; Rapoport, Sophie; Derdikman, Dori; Winter, York

    2017-04-01

    Virtual reality (VR) environments are a powerful tool to investigate brain mechanisms involved in the behavior of animals. With this technique, animals are usually head fixed or secured in a harness, and training for cognitively more complex VR paradigms is time consuming. A VR apparatus allowing free animal movement and the constant operator-independent training of tasks would enable many new applications. Key prospective usages include brain imaging of animal behavior when carrying a miniaturized mobile device such as a fluorescence microscope or an optetrode. Here, we introduce the Servoball, a spherical VR treadmill based on the closed-loop tracking of a freely moving animal and feedback counterrotation of the ball. Furthermore, we present the complete integration of this experimental system with the animals' group home cage, from which single individuals can voluntarily enter through a tunnel with radio-frequency identification (RFID)-automated access control and commence experiments. This automated animal sorter functions as a mechanical replacement of the experimenter. We automatically trained rats using visual or acoustic cues to solve spatial cognitive tasks and recorded spatially modulated entorhinal cells. When electrophysiological extracellular recordings from awake behaving rats were performed, head fixation can dramatically alter results, so that any complex behavior that requires head movement is impossible to achieve. We circumvented this problem with the use of the Servoball in open-field scenarios, as it allows the combination of open-field behavior with the recording of nerve cells, along with all the flexibility that a virtual environment brings. This integrated home cage with a VR arena experimental system permits highly efficient experimentation for complex cognitive experiments. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Virtual reality (VR) environments are a powerful tool for the investigation of brain mechanisms. We introduce the Servoball, a VR treadmill for

  16. Ten years in a golden cage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riehl, N.

    1988-01-01

    The book presents the personal experiences of the author who spent the years from 1945 to 1955 in post-war Russia as head of a group of German scientists and engineers. Due to his perfect command of the Russian language and the significance of his professional position, he was able to get a closer insight into the life in the Soviet Union than foreigners usually have the chance to. The author met people on government level, in the ministerial administration, in research establishments and factories, and in everyday life. He tells about the deportation to the Soviet Union in 1945, the difficulties in finding a suitable site for the uranium laboratories and in starting work, and about the successful work of the group, first in Elektrostal near Moscow and later in Sungul in the Urals (1950-1952). He tells about their struggle for a return to Germany which finally came true in 1955. His report is full of interesting details about the secrecy regime, planned economy, training of Soviet scientists and experts, the situation of the group of German experts and their behaviour, the living standard and political life in the Soviet Union, the Lyssenko affair. The author's impression is that the deeply solidified structures of state capitalism will not permit a profound change of the economic system in the Soviet Union, but trends towards liberalisation are detectable. (orig./HSCH) [de

  17. Cathodic cage nitriding of samples with different dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, R.R.M. de; Araujo, F.O. de; Ribeiro, K.J.B.; Mendes, M.W.D.; Costa, J.A.P. da; Alves, C.

    2007-01-01

    A series of AISI 1020 steel cylindrical samples with different heights were simultaneously nitrided in cathodic cage plasma nitriding. In this technique, the samples are placed under a floating potential inside a cage in which the cathodic potential is applied. A systematic study of the nitriding temperature variation effects was carried out in order to evaluate the efficiency of such a technique over the uniformity of the formed layers. The samples were characterized by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and microhardness measurement. The results were compared with those ones obtained in the ionic nitriding, and was verified that the samples nitrided by this conventional technique presents less uniformity than the ones treated through this new technique

  18. Cathodic cage nitriding of samples with different dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, R.R.M. de [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica do Piaui, Department of Mechanical, Teresina, PI (Brazil); Araujo, F.O. de [Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-Arido, Mossoro, RN (Brazil); Ribeiro, K.J.B.; Mendes, M.W.D. [Labplasma, Departamento de Fisica-UFRN, Campus Universitario, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Costa, J.A.P. da [Departamento de Fisica-UFC, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Alves, C. [Labplasma, Departamento de Fisica-UFRN, Campus Universitario, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil)], E-mail: alvesjr@pesquisador.cnpq.br

    2007-09-15

    A series of AISI 1020 steel cylindrical samples with different heights were simultaneously nitrided in cathodic cage plasma nitriding. In this technique, the samples are placed under a floating potential inside a cage in which the cathodic potential is applied. A systematic study of the nitriding temperature variation effects was carried out in order to evaluate the efficiency of such a technique over the uniformity of the formed layers. The samples were characterized by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and microhardness measurement. The results were compared with those ones obtained in the ionic nitriding, and was verified that the samples nitrided by this conventional technique presents less uniformity than the ones treated through this new technique.

  19. The BetaCage: Ultrasensitive Screener for Radioactive Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael; BetaCage Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Rare event searches, such as dark matter detection and neutrinoless double beta decay, require screening of materials for backgrounds such as beta emission and alpha decaying isotopes. The BetaCage is a proposed ultra-sensitive time-projection chamber to screen for alpha-emitting and low energy beta-emitting (10-200 keV) contaminants. The expected sensitivity is 0.1 beta particles (perkeV -m2 - day) and 0.1 alpha particles (perm2 - day) , where the former will be limited by Compton scattering of external photons in the screening samples and the latter is expected to be signal-limited. The prototype BetaCage under commissioning at South Dakota School of Mines & Technology is filled with P10 gas (10% methane, 90% argon) in place of neon and is 40×40×20 cm in size. Details on design, construction and characterization will be presented.

  20. ORNL necessary and sufficient standards for environment, safety, and health. Final report of the Identification Team for other industrial, radiological, and non-radiological hazard facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) set of standards is for Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These facility classifications are based on a laboratory-wide approach to classify facilities by hazard category. An analysis of the hazards associated with the facilities at ORNL was conducted in 1993. To identify standards appropriate for these Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities, the activities conducted in these facilities were assessed, and the hazards associated with the activities were identified. A preliminary hazards list was distributed to all ORNL organizations. The hazards identified in prior hazard analyses are contained in the list, and a category of other was provided in each general hazard area. A workshop to assist organizations in properly completing the list was held. Completed hazard screening lists were compiled for each ORNL division, and a master list was compiled for all Other Industrial, Radiological Hazard, and Non-Radiological facilities and activities. The master list was compared against the results of prior hazard analyses by research and development and environment, safety, and health personnel to ensure completeness. This list, which served as a basis for identifying applicable environment, safety, and health standards, appears in Appendix A.

  1. ORNL necessary and sufficient standards for environment, safety, and health. Final report of the Identification Team for other industrial, radiological, and non-radiological hazard facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    This Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) set of standards is for Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These facility classifications are based on a laboratory-wide approach to classify facilities by hazard category. An analysis of the hazards associated with the facilities at ORNL was conducted in 1993. To identify standards appropriate for these Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities, the activities conducted in these facilities were assessed, and the hazards associated with the activities were identified. A preliminary hazards list was distributed to all ORNL organizations. The hazards identified in prior hazard analyses are contained in the list, and a category of other was provided in each general hazard area. A workshop to assist organizations in properly completing the list was held. Completed hazard screening lists were compiled for each ORNL division, and a master list was compiled for all Other Industrial, Radiological Hazard, and Non-Radiological facilities and activities. The master list was compared against the results of prior hazard analyses by research and development and environment, safety, and health personnel to ensure completeness. This list, which served as a basis for identifying applicable environment, safety, and health standards, appears in Appendix A

  2. Segmental kyphosis after cervical interbody fusion with stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages: a comparative study on 2 different PEEK cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Park, Sung Bae; Sohn, Seil; Lee, Sungjoon

    2015-02-01

    Retrospective comparative study. Two polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages of different designs were compared in terms of the postoperative segmental kyphosis after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Segmental kyphosis occasionally occurs after the use of a stand-alone cage for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Although PEEK material seems to have less risk of segmental kyphosis compared with other materials, the occurrence of segmental kyphosis for PEEK cages has been reported to be from 0% to 29%. There have been a few reports that addressed the issue of PEEK cage design. A total of 41 consecutive patients who underwent single-level anterior discectomy and fusion with a stand-alone cage were included. Either a round tube-type (Solis; 18 patients, S-group) or a trapezoidal tube-type (MC+; 23 patients, M-group) cage was used. The contact area between the cage and the vertebral body is larger in MC+ than in Solis, and anchoring pins were present in the Solis cage. The effect of the cage type on the segmental angle (SA) (lordosis vs. kyphosis) at postoperative month 24 was analyzed. Preoperatively, segmental lordosis was present in 12/18 S-group and 16/23 M-group patients (P=0.84). The SA was more lordotic than the preoperative angle in both groups just after surgery, with no difference between groups (P=0.39). At 24 months, segmental lordosis was observed in 9/18 S-group and 20/23 M-group patients (P=0.01). The patients in M-group were 7.83 times more likely than patients in S-group (P=0.04; odds ratio, 7.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-56.28) not to develop segmental kyphosis. The design of the PEEK cage used may influence the SA, and this association needs to be considered when using stand-alone PEEK cages.

  3. Cage structure application in photoelectric experiment and teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiufang; Zhao, Peng; Liu, Shugang

    2017-08-01

    A new type of photoelectric system structure, cage system, is introduced. This kind of coaxial modularized structure not only can be quickly assembled, but also can easily realize different purposes by substituting elements in the system. In addition, it's light and portable, which enable teachers to carry it to wherever suitable for teaching. In conclusion, this structure can improve teaching effect and stimulate student's interest in photoelectric courses.

  4. Pulsed EPR characterization of encapsulated atomic hydrogen in octasilsesquioxane cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrikas, George

    2012-03-21

    Hydrogen atoms encapsulated in molecular cages are potential candidates for quantum computing applications. They provide the simplest two-spin system where the 1s electron spin, S = 1/2, is hyperfine-coupled to the proton nuclear spin, I = 1/2, with a large isotropic hyperfine coupling (A = 1420.40575 MHz for a free atom). While hydrogen atoms can be trapped in many matrices at cryogenic temperatures, it has been found that they are exceptionally stable in octasilsesquioxane cages even at room temperature [Sasamori et al., Science, 1994, 256, 1691]. Here we present a detailed spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation study of atomic hydrogen encapsulated in Si(8)O(12)(OSiMe(2)H)(8) using X-band pulsed EPR spectroscopy. The spin-lattice relaxation times T(1) range between 1.2 s at 20 K and 41.8 μs at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the relaxation rate shows that for T 100 K a thermally activated process with activation energy E(a) = 753 K (523 cm(-1)) prevails. The phase memory time T(M) = 13.9 μs remains practically constant between 200 and 300 K and is determined by nuclear spin diffusion. At lower temperatures T(M) decreases by an order of magnitude and exhibits two minima at T = 140 K and T = 60 K. The temperature dependence of T(M) between 20 and 200 K is attributed to dynamic processes that average inequivalent hyperfine couplings, e.g. rotation of the methyl groups of the cage organic substituents. The hyperfine couplings of the encapsulated proton and the cage (29)Si nuclei are obtained through numerical simulations of field-swept FID-detected EPR spectra and HYSCORE experiments, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of existing phenomenological models based on the spherical harmonic oscillator and compared to those of endohedral fullerenes.

  5. Energy saving work of frequency controlled induction cage machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnacinski, P.

    2007-01-01

    Energy saving work, understood as lowering the supply voltage when load torque is much less than rated, is one way of reducing power losses in an induction cage machine working with a variable load. Reduction in power losses also affects the thermal properties of an induction machine because the energy saving work allows the temperature rise of the windings to decrease. Thanks to a lower temperature of the windings, the same load torque can be carried by a machine of less rated power. The ability of energy saving work to reduce the temperature of windings depends on the thermal properties of an induction machine, which are different in the case of a machine with foreign ventilation and its own ventilation. This paper deals with the thermal effect of energy saving work on a frequency controlled induction cage machine. A comparison of the properties of a machine with its own and outside ventilation is presented. The results of the investigations are shown for a 3 kW induction cage machine with the two previously mentioned ways of ventilation: one provided with a fan placed on a shaft and the other provided with a fan driven by an auxiliary motor

  6. Experience with titanium cages in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junaid, M.; Afsheen, A.; Bukhari, S.S.; Rashid, M.U.; Kalsoom, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cervical discectomy is a common procedure for treating patients for cervical disc prolapse. This study was conducted to study the surgical outcome and demographic characteristics of patients who were treated for anterior cervical disc prolapse. Methods: Study was conducted in the combined military hospital (CMH) Peshawar. Study interval was 3 years from 1st September, 2011 to 31st August, 2014. Total number of patients were 84. Males were 54 (64.28 percentage) and females were 30 (35.71 percentage). All the patients had undergone the procedure of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with titanium cages (ACDF). All the patients had plain MRI cervical spine done for diagnosis of anterior cervical disc prolapse. Results: Total 84 patients were operated. In the patients who complained of brachialgia, 100 percentage improvement was seen after the operation. Three (3.5 percentage) of the patients, who presented with axial neck pain, continued to complain of pain and 2 (2.5 percentage) of the patients complained of pain at the donor site after the operation. One of the patient had dural tear which resulted in subcutaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation and was treated conservatively with repeated aspiration. Fusion rate was 100 percentage with titanium cages used for fusion after anterior cervical discectomy. No complications were noted after the surgery at 1 year of interval. Conclusion: Results with titanium cages are expectedly good. Symptoms resolved and fusion rate was 100 percentage at 1 year follow up. (author)

  7. Former uranium mine-induced effects in caged roach: a multiparametric approach for the evaluation of in situ metal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnaire, Béatrice; Bado-Nilles, Anne; Betoulle, Stéphane; Amara, Rachid; Camilleri, Virginie; Cavalié, Isabelle; Chadili, Edith; Delahaut, Laurence; Kerambrun, Elodie; Orjollet, Daniel; Palluel, Olivier; Sanchez, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    To characterize environmental risks linked to former uranium mines in the Limousin region of France, a study was conducted on fish health effects from uranium releases. Two private ponds were compared in this study, one with uranium contamination and one background site, upstream of the mining zone. Roach, Rutilus rutilus, were caged for 28 days in both ponds. Physico-chemical parameters of water and sediments and bioaccumulation of metals in several organs were determined. After 14 and 28 days of caging, immune, oxidative stress, biotransformation, neurotoxicity and physiological parameters were measured. Iron and aluminium were quantified in the water of both sites; however, barium and manganese were only present in the water of the uranium contaminated site. Uranium was present in both sites but at very different concentrations. The sediments from the uranium contaminated site contained high levels of radioactive elements coming from the disintegration chain of uranium. Results of biological parameters indicated stimulation of immune parameters and of oxidative stress and a decrease of AChE in fish caged in the uranium contaminated pond compared to the uranium-free pond. Overall, the results determined roach health status in the context of pollution from poly-metallic mining. The data strengthen our knowledge of the environmental risk assessment associated with radioactive substances in the environment.

  8. Radiological and clinical outcomes of novel Ti/PEEK combined spinal fusion cages: a systematic review and preclinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assem, Yusuf; Mobbs, Ralph J; Pelletier, Matthew H; Phan, Kevin; Walsh, William R

    2017-03-01

    The primary objective of this paper was to provide a systematic review of the available clinical studies of Ti/PEEK combined cages in spinal interbody fusion surgeries, focusing on their radiological and clinical outcomes. A secondary aim was to provide a review and evaluation of the in vitro and preclinical studies reported on Ti/PEEK-coated implants. A systematic search of the literature was performed in March 2015 via three databases: Medline, Embase and Cochrane library. The following key search terms were combined with synonyms to identify relevant articles: "spinal fusion," "PEEK," "titanium" and "cage." The novelty of this intervention translates into a paucity of clinical trials, albeit the results of the seven clinical studies that met the criteria for inclusion are promising. All studies reported rate of fusion as a primary outcome. Two studies reported slightly improved fusion in the experimental Ti/PEEK combination cohort, one study identical fusion (91.7 %) and three studies excellent fusion (96, 100 and 94 %) in the Ti/PEEK cohort, although no differences reached statistical significance. Clinical studies at this early stage demonstrate that Ti/PEEK implants are safe and efficacious, exhibiting similar fusion rates and clinical outcomes compared to the current standard PEEK. There is clinical evidence substantiating the improved radiographic fusion of Ti/PEEK, albeit the differences were not significant. This field is promising, gaining substantial popularity, and further clinical trials are needed in the future to establish Ti/PEEK cages as a mainstay of clinical practice.

  9. Rib cage deformities alter respiratory muscle action and chest wall function in patients with severe osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoMauro, Antonella; Pochintesta, Simona; Romei, Marianna; D'Angelo, Maria Grazia; Pedotti, Antonio; Turconi, Anna Carla; Aliverti, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by bone fragility, multiple fractures and significant chest wall deformities. Cardiopulmonary insufficiency is the leading cause of death in these patients. Seven patients with severe OI type III, 15 with moderate OI type IV and 26 healthy subjects were studied. In addition to standard spirometry, rib cage geometry, breathing pattern and regional chest wall volume changes at rest in seated and supine position were assessed by opto-electronic plethysmography to investigate if structural modifications of the rib cage in OI have consequences on ventilatory pattern. One-way or two-way analysis of variance was performed to compare the results between the three groups and the two postures. Both OI type III and IV patients showed reduced FVC and FEV(1) compared to predicted values, on condition that updated reference equations are considered. In both positions, ventilation was lower in OI patients than control because of lower tidal volume (pfunction was normal, OI type III patients were characterized by reduced (prespiratory pattern of Osteogenesis Imperfecta is closely related to the severity of the disease and to the sternal deformities. Pectus carinatum characterizes OI type III patients and alters respiratory muscles coordination, leading to chest wall and rib cage distortions and an inefficient ventilator pattern. OI type IV is characterized by lower alterations in the respiratory function. These findings suggest that functional assessment and treatment of OI should be differentiated in these two forms of the disease.

  10. The influence of the "cage effect" on the mechanism of reversible bimolecular multistage chemical reactions in solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktorov, Alexander B

    2015-08-21

    Manifestations of the "cage effect" at the encounters of reactants are theoretically treated by the example of multistage reactions in liquid solutions including bimolecular exchange reactions as elementary stages. It is shown that consistent consideration of quasi-stationary kinetics of multistage reactions (possible only in the framework of the encounter theory) for reactions proceeding near reactants contact can be made on the basis of the concepts of a "cage complex." Though mathematically such a consideration is more complicated, it is more clear from the standpoint of chemical notions. It is established that the presence of the "cage effect" leads to some important effects not inherent in reactions in gases or those in solutions proceeding in the kinetic regime, such as the appearance of new transition channels of reactant transformation that cannot be caused by elementary event of chemical conversion for the given mechanism of reaction. This results in that, for example, rate constant values of multistage reaction defined by standard kinetic equations of formal chemical kinetics from experimentally measured kinetics can differ essentially from real values of these constants.

  11. Evaluation of the performance of Hy-Line Brown laying hens fed soybean or soybean-free diets using cage or free-range rearing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ajeeli, M N; Leyva-Jimenez, H; Abdaljaleel, R A; Jameel, Y; Hashim, M M; Archer, G; Bailey, C A

    2018-03-01

    This study evaluated egg production and quality variables of caged and free-range Hy-Line Brown laying hens fed soybean meal (SBM) and soybean-meal-free (SBMF) diets. Hens were randomly assigned to the same 2 dietary treatments within 3 location blocks. SBM and SBMF diets with equivalent calculated nutrient content were prepared based on Hy-Line Brown rearing guidelines. The SBMF diets utilized cottonseed meal, corn distillers dried grains with solubles, corn gluten meal, and wheat middlings in place of dehulled soybean meal. The experiment was conducted between August 2015 and January of 2016 within the TAMU Poultry Research Center and data analyzed over 6 consecutive 28-day periods. Data were analyzed as a split-plot with rearing systems designated whole plots and diets designated as subplots. Hens reared in the free-range rearing system peaked a couple of wk later than those hens within the more conventional indoor caged system, and cumulative production data were considerably more variable for hens raised in the free-range environment. Cumulative egg production, feed per dozen eggs and feed conversion ratio (g feed/g egg) were 92 ± 1.23 and 86 ± 1.84%, 1.45 ± 0.02 and 1.89 ± 0.05 kg, and 2.14 ± 0.04 and 2.77 ± 0.08 (P free-range rearing systems. Cumulative egg weight, feed per dozen eggs, and feed conversion ratio were 59.9 ± 0.59 and 56.5 ± 0.60 g, 1.57 ± 0.04 and 1.77 ± 0.05 kg, and 2.24 ± 0.06 and 2.67 ± 0.08 kg (P egg production (P > 0.05). With respect to egg quality, there were no differences in cumulative albumen height, Haugh unit, or breaking strength, but there was a significant rearing system by diet interaction for shell thickness, with the free-range hens averaging 40.77 ± 0.19 and 39.86 ± 0.31 μm (P free-range production is more variable than traditional closed-house cage systems based on standard errors, and SBMF diets containing cottonseed meal can be used in both caged and free-range production

  12. Ensuring an optimal environment for peer education in South African schools: Goals, systems, standards and policy options for effective learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Sharlene; Deutsch, Charles; Moolman, Benita; Arogundade, Emma; Isaacs, Dane; Michel, Barbara

    2016-12-01

    Peer education has long been seen as a key health promotion strategy and an important tool in preventing HIV infection. In South African schools, it is currently one of the strategies employed to do so. Based on both a recent research study of peer education across 35 schools and drawing on multiple previous studies in South Africa, this paper examines the key elements of peer education that contribute to its effectiveness and asks how this aligns with current educational and health policies. From this research, it summarises and proposes shared goals and aims, minimum standards of implementation and reflects on the necessary infrastructure required for peer education to be effective. In light of these findings, it offers policy recommendations regarding who should be doing peer education and the status peer education should have in a school's formal programme.

  13. Dynamic modeling of an asynchronous squirrel-cage machine; Modelisation dynamique d'une machine asynchrone a cage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerette, D.

    2009-07-01

    This document presented a detailed mathematical explanation and validation of the steps leading to the development of an asynchronous squirrel-cage machine. The MatLab/Simulink software was used to model a wind turbine at variable high speeds. The asynchronous squirrel-cage machine is an electromechanical system coupled to a magnetic circuit. The resulting electromagnetic circuit can be represented as a set of resistances, leakage inductances and mutual inductances. Different models were used for a comparison study, including the Munteanu, Boldea, Wind Turbine Blockset, and SimPowerSystem. MatLab/Simulink modeling results were in good agreement with the results from other comparable models. Simulation results were in good agreement with analytical calculations. 6 refs, 2 tabs, 9 figs.

  14. Annotating public fungal ITS sequences from the built environment according to the MIxS-Built Environment standard – a report from a May 23-24, 2016 workshop (Gothenburg, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kessy Abarenkov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent molecular studies have identified substantial fungal diversity in indoor environments. Fungi and fungal particles have been linked to a range of potentially unwanted effects in the built environment, including asthma, decay of building materials, and food spoilage. The study of the built mycobiome is hampered by a number of constraints, one of which is the poor state of the metadata annotation of fungal DNA sequences from the built environment in public databases. In order to enable precise interrogation of such data – for example, “retrieve all fungal sequences recovered from bathrooms” – a workshop was organized at the University of Gothenburg (May 23-24, 2016 to annotate public fungal barcode (ITS sequences according to the MIxS-Built Environment annotation standard (http://gensc.org/mixs/. The 36 participants assembled a total of 45,488 data points from the published literature, including the addition of 8,430 instances of countries of collection from a total of 83 countries, 5,801 instances of building types, and 3,876 instances of surface-air contaminants. The results were implemented in the UNITE database for molecular identification of fungi (http://unite.ut.ee and were shared with other online resources. Data obtained from human/animal pathogenic fungi will furthermore be verified on culture based metadata for subsequent inclusion in the ISHAM-ITS database (http://its.mycologylab.org.

  15. Caged Gammarus as biomonitors identifying thresholds of toxic metal bioavailability that affect gammarid densities at the French national scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciliberti, Alexandre; Chaumot, Arnaud; Recoura-Massaquant, Rémi; Chandesris, André; François, Adeline; Coquery, Marina; Ferréol, Martial; Geffard, Olivier

    2017-07-01

    Bioaccumulated concentrations of toxic elements in biomonitor invertebrate species have already been used to successfully link metal bioavailability and impairments of stream macroinvertebrate communities at the scale of the watershed. However, implementing this empirical comparative approach at a greater spatial scale remains a challenge due to the diversity of biogeographical contexts encompassed by regional and national scales. We showed in previous studies that the use of standard organisms caged permits the use of a common biomonitor over a far greater geographical range, while limiting the influence of confounding factors on levels of bioavailable contamination. In this study, levels of Cd, Hg, Ni and Pb contamination assessed by active biomonitoring with caged Gammarus fossarum were compared to abundances of on-site gammarids on 94 sites in France. Based on this national dataset of in situ bioassays, we first re-determined bioavailable background assessment concentrations (BBACs), i.e. concentrations measured in caged G. fossarum indicating a significant bioavailable contamination, which we had previously defined at a regional scale for these four metallic elements. On-site gammarid abundances were retrieved from monitoring programs implemented by French water agencies for the evaluation of ecological status for the European Water Framework Directive. These abundances were corrected for the influence of stream physico-chemical typology in order to permit a reliable comparison of gammarid densities between sites at the national scale. Clear trends of degradation of gammarid densities with increasing levels of bioaccumulated concentrations were identified for three of the four elements (Cd, Ni and Pb). Threshold concentrations in caged organisms above which the numbers of free-ranging gammarids were abnormally low - namely bioavailable ecological assessment concentrations (BEACs) - were determined. The reliability and validity of the BEACs, their comparison

  16. Validation of a self-administered modified CAGE test (CAGE-C) in a somatic hospital ward: comparison with biochemical markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zierau, F; Hardt, F; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    2005-01-01

    Objective. The time frame for the original CAGE questionnaire is lifetime and it does not quantify drinking frequency and may be less suitable in a population with very few teetotalers. The purpose of this study was to validate a variant of the CAGE questionnaire and compare it with the outcome...

  17. Cage drying and the application of a dry treatment (absorbent cornstarch powder) as a means to diminish Campylobacter on transport cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broiler transport cages soiled with Campylobacter-positive feces have been shown to facilitate cross contamination of broilers. Campylobacter organisms are sensitive to dry stress. Allowing feces left on transport cage flooring to dry during extended periods of nonuse would be an effective method ...

  18. New caged neurotransmitter analogs selective for glutamate receptor sub-types based on methoxynitroindoline and nitrophenylethoxycarbonyl caging groups

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palma-Cerda, F.; Auger, C.; Crawford, D.J.; Hodgson, A.C.C.; Reynolds, S.J.; Cowell, J.K.; Swift, K.A.D.; Cais, Ondřej; Vyklický ml., Ladislav; Corrie, J.E.T.; Ogden, D.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 4 (2012), s. 624-634 ISSN 0028-3908 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/07/0271 Grant - others:EC(XE) LSHM-CT-2007-037765 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : photolysis * glutamate receptors * caged neurotransmitters Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.114, year: 2012

  19. SemantGeo: Powering Ecological and Environment Data Discovery and Search with Standards-Based Geospatial Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed, P.; Ashby, B.; Khan, I.; Patton, E. W.; McGuinness, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Recent efforts to create and leverage standards for geospatial data specification and inference include the GeoSPARQL standard, Geospatial OWL ontologies (e.g., GAZ, Geonames), and RDF triple stores that support GeoSPARQL (e.g., AllegroGraph, Parliament) that use RDF instance data for geospatial features of interest. However, there remains a gap on how best to fuse software engineering best practices and GeoSPARQL within semantic web applications to enable flexible search driven by geospatial reasoning. In this abstract we introduce the SemantGeo module for the SemantEco framework that helps fill this gap, enabling scientists find data using geospatial semantics and reasoning. SemantGeo provides multiple types of geospatial reasoning for SemantEco modules. The server side implementation uses the Parliament SPARQL Endpoint accessed via a Tomcat servlet. SemantGeo uses the Google Maps API for user-specified polygon construction and JsTree for providing containment and categorical hierarchies for search. SemantGeo uses GeoSPARQL for spatial reasoning alone and in concert with RDFS/OWL reasoning capabilities to determine, e.g., what geofeatures are within, partially overlap with, or within a certain distance from, a given polygon. We also leverage qualitative relationships defined by the Gazetteer ontology that are composites of spatial relationships as well as administrative designations or geophysical phenomena. We provide multiple mechanisms for exploring data, such as polygon (map-based) and named-feature (hierarchy-based) selection, that enable flexible search constraints using boolean combination of selections. JsTree-based hierarchical search facets present named features and include a 'part of' hierarchy (e.g., measurement-site-01, Lake George, Adirondack Region, NY State) and type hierarchies (e.g., nodes in the hierarchy for WaterBody, Park, MeasurementSite), depending on the ';axis of choice' option selected. Using GeoSPARQL and aforementioned ontology

  20. Assembly and structural analysis of a covalently closed nano-scale DNA cage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Félicie Faucon; Knudsen, Bjarne; Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto De

    2008-01-01

     The inherent properties of DNA as a stable polymer with unique affinity for partner molecules determined by the specific Watson-Crick base pairing makes it an ideal component in self-assembling structures. This has been exploited for decades in the design of a variety of artificial substrates...... are necessary before complex DNA structures can be routinely designed for the use in basal science and/or biotechnology. Here we present the design, construction and structural analysis of a covalently closed and stable 3D DNA structure with the connectivity of an octahedron, as defined by the double...... be described as a nano-scale DNA cage, Hence, in theory it could hold proteins or other bio-molecules to enable their investigation in certain harmful environments or even allow their organization into higher order structures...

  1. Development of 4-methoxy-7-nitroindolinyl (MNI)-caged auxins which are extremely stable in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Kusaka, Naoyuki; Yamasaki, Soma; Zhao, Yunde; Nozaki, Hiroshi

    2015-10-15

    Phytohormone auxin is a master regulator in plant growth and development. Regulation of cellular auxin level plays a central role in plant development. Auxin polar transport system modulates an auxin gradient that determines plant developmental process in response to environmental conditions and developmental programs. Photolabile caged auxins allow optical control of artificial auxin gradients at cellular resolution. Especially, two-photon uncaging system achieves high spatiotemporal control of photolysis reaction at two-photon cross-section. However, the development of caged versions of auxin has been limited by the instability of the caged auxins to higher plant metabolic activities. Here, we describe the synthesis and application of highly stable caged auxins, 4-methoxy-7-nitroindolinyl (MNI)-caged auxins. Natural auxin, indole 3-acetic acid, and two synthetic auxins, 1-NAA and 2,4-D were caged by MNI caging group. MNI-caged auxins showed a high stability in planta and a rapid release the original auxin when photolyzed. We demonstrated that optical control of auxin-responsive gene expression and auxin-related physiological responses by using MNI-caged auxins. We anticipate that MNI-caged auxins will be an effective tool for high-resolution control of endogenous auxin level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Graft Subsidence and Revision Rates Following Anterior Cervical Corpectomy: A Clinical Study Comparing Different Interbody Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Michael H; Fortin, Maryse; Shen, Jian; Tay, Bobby; Hu, Serena S; Berven, Sigurd; Burch, Shane; Chou, Dean; Ames, Christopher; Deviren, Vedat

    2017-11-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To assess the subsidence and revision rates associated with different interbody cages following anterior cervical corpectomy and reconstruction. Different interbody cages are currently used for surgical reconstruction of the anterior and middle columns of the spine following anterior cervical corpectomy. However, subsidence and delayed union/nonunion associated with allograft and cage reconstruction are common complications, which may require revision with instrumentation. We reviewed the cases of 75 patients who underwent cervical corpectomy and compared the radiographic graft subsidence and revision rates for fibula allograft, titanium mesh cage, titanium expandable cage, and carbon fiber cages. Subsidence was calculated by comparing the immediate postoperative lateral x-ray films to those obtained during follow-up visits. The average graft subsidence was 3 mm and revision rate was 25% for fibula allograft versus 2.9 mm and 11.1%, 2.9 mm and 18.8% for titanium mesh cages and titanium expandable cages, respectively. The average graft subsidence for carbon fiber cages was 0.7 mm with no revision surgery in this subset. Our findings suggest that subsidence and revision rates following anterior corpectomy and interbody fusion could be minimized with the use of a carbon fiber cage.

  3. The Right Amount of Glue: Technologies and Standards Relevant to a Future Solar-Terrestrial Data Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurman, J. B.; Dimitoglou, G.; Bogart, R.; Tian, K. Q.; Hill, F.; Wampler, S.; Martens, P. C.; Davey, A. R.

    2002-01-01

    In order to meet the challenge of developing a new system science, we will need to employ technology that enables researchers to access data from fields with which they are at least initially unfamiliar as well as from sources they use more regularly. At the same time, the quantity of data to be obtained by missions such as the Solar Dynamics Observatory demands ease and simplicity of data access. These competing demands must in turn fit within severely constrained funding for data analysis in such projects. Based on experience in only a single discipline but with a diversity of data types and sources, we will give examples of technology that have made a significant difference in the way people do science. Similarly, we will show how adoption of a well-documented data format has made it easier for one community to search, reduce, and analyze data. We will also describe a community-supported data reduction and analysis software tree with useful features. We will attempt to generalize the lessons learned in these instances to features the broader, solar-terrestrial community might find compelling, while avoiding overdesign of a common data environment.

  4. Effects of Furnished Cage Type on Behavior and Welfare of Laying Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Chen, Donghua; Li, Jianhong; Bao, Jun

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the effects of layout of furniture (a perch, nest, and sandbox) in cages on behavior and welfare of hens. Two hundred and sixteen Hyline Brown laying hens were divided into five groups (treatments) with four replicates per group: small furnished cages (SFC), medium furnished cages type I (MFC-I), medium furnished cages type II (MFC-II), and medium furnished cages type III (MFC-III) and conventional cages (CC). The experiment started at 18 week of age and finished at 52 week of age. Hens’ behaviors were filmed during the following periods: 8:00 to 10:00; 13:00 to 14:00; 16:00 to 17:00 on three separate days and two hens from each cage were measured for welfare parameters at 50 wk of age. The results showed that feeding and laying of all hens showed no effect by cage type (p>0.05), and the hens in the furnished cages had significantly lower standing and higher walking than CC hens (phens between the furnished cages (p>0.05). The hens in MFC-I, −II, and −III showed a significant higher socializing behavior than SFC and CC (phens in SFC and the highest perching found for the hens in MFC-III. Overall, the hens in CC showed poorer welfare conditions than the furnished cages, in which the feather condition score, gait score and tonic immobility duration of the hens in CC was significantly higher than SFC, MFC-I, MFC-II, and MFC-III (phens. Overall, MFC-III cage design was better than SFC, MFC-I, and MFC-II cage designs. PMID:26954171

  5. Effects of Furnished Cage Type on Behavior and Welfare of Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to compare the effects of layout of furniture (a perch, nest, and sandbox in cages on behavior and welfare of hens. Two hundred and sixteen Hyline Brown laying hens were divided into five groups (treatments with four replicates per group: small furnished cages (SFC, medium furnished cages type I (MFC-I, medium furnished cages type II (MFC-II, and medium furnished cages type III (MFC-III and conventional cages (CC. The experiment started at 18 week of age and finished at 52 week of age. Hens’ behaviors were filmed during the following periods: 8:00 to 10:00; 13:00 to 14:00; 16:00 to 17:00 on three separate days and two hens from each cage were measured for welfare parameters at 50 wk of age. The results showed that feeding and laying of all hens showed no effect by cage type (p>0.05, and the hens in the furnished cages had significantly lower standing and higher walking than CC hens (p0.05. The hens in MFC-I, −II, and −III showed a significant higher socializing behavior than SFC and CC (p<0.05. The lowest perching was for the hens in SFC and the highest perching found for the hens in MFC-III. Overall, the hens in CC showed poorer welfare conditions than the furnished cages, in which the feather condition score, gait score and tonic immobility duration of the hens in CC was significantly higher than SFC, MFC-I, MFC-II, and MFC-III (p<0.05. In conclusion, the furnished cage design affected both behavior and welfare states of hens. Overall, MFC-III cage design was better than SFC, MFC-I, and MFC-II cage designs.

  6. Incidence and clinical relevance of cage subsidence in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordhoek, Iris; Koning, Marvyn T; Jacobs, Wilco C H; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A

    2018-04-01

    The placement of intervertebral cages in anterior cervical discectomy (ACDF) supposedly maintains foraminal height. The most commonly reported cage-related complication is subsidence, although it is unknown whether a correlation between subsidence and clinical outcome exists. To assess the incidence and relevance of subsidence. Literature searches were performed in PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, COCHRANE, and CENTRAL. The inclusion criteria were as follows: ≥ 20 patients, ADCF with cage, subsidence assessed, and primary data. Risk of bias was assessed using adjusted Cochrane checklists. Seventy-one studies, comprising 4784 patients, were included. Subsidence was generally defined as ≥ 3-mm loss of height comparing postoperative intervertebral heights with heights at last follow-up. Mean incidence of subsidence was 21% (range 0-83%). Of all patients, 46% of patients received polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) cages, 31% received titanium cages, 18% received cage-screw-combinations, and 5% received polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) cages. Patients treated with cage-screw-combinations had significantly less subsidence than patients treated with PEEK, titanium, or PMMA cages (15.1% vs. 23.5% vs. 24.9% vs. 30.2%; p subsidence; the majority did not find a significant correlation. Only four studies correlated subsidence to cage size and/or height; no correlation was established. Subsidence in ACDF with cages occurs in 21% of patients. The risk for subsidence seems lower using PEEK or titanium cages or adding screws. Whether subsidence affects clinical outcome is not satisfactorily evaluated in the available literature. Future studies on this correlation are warranted in order to establish the additional value of the interposition of a cage in ACDF.

  7. Elimination of Subsidence with 26-mm-Wide Cages in Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Gernot; Navarro-Ramirez, Rodrigo; Gandevia, Lena; Hussain, Ibrahim; Nakhla, Jonathan; Zubkov, Micaella; Härtl, Roger

    2017-08-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion (ELIF) has gained popularity as a minimally invasive technique for indirect decompression. However, graft subsidence potentially threatens long-term success of ELIF. This study evaluated whether 26-mm-wide cages can eliminate subsidence and subsequent loss of decompression in ELIF. Patients undergoing ELIF surgery using a 26-mm-wide cage were analyzed retrospectively. Patient demographics and perioperative data for radiographic and clinical outcomes were recorded. Radiographic parameters included regional sagittal lumbar lordosis and foraminal and disc height. Clinical parameters were evaluated using the Oswestry Disability Index and visual analog scale. Subsidence of 26-mm-wide cages was compared with previous outcomes of patients undergoing ELIF using 18-mm-wide and 22-mm-wide cages. There were 21 patients and 28 spinal segments analyzed. Radiographic outcome measures such as disc and foraminal height revealed significant improvement at follow-up compared with before surgery (P = 0.001). Postoperative to last follow-up cage subsidence translated into 0.34 mm ± 0.26 and -0.55 mm ± 0.64 in disc and foraminal height loss, respectively. Patients with 26-mm-wide cages experienced less subsidence by means of disc (26 mm vs. 18 mm and 22 mm, P ≤ 0.05) and foraminal height (26 mm vs. 18 mm, P = 0.005; 26 mm vs. 22 mm, P = 0.208) loss compared with patients receiving 18-mm-wide and 22-mm-wide cages. The 26-mm-wide cages almost eliminated cage subsidence in ELIF. Compared with 18-mm-wide and 22-mm-wide cages, 26-mm-wide cages significantly reduced cage subsidence in ELIF at midterm follow-up. A 26-mm-wide cage should be used in ELIF to achieve sustained indirect decompression. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Design the Professional Educational Environment for Teacher in the Conditions of the Introduction and Development of Professional Standard of the Activity: the Leningrad Oblast Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayeva I.A.,

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available On the example of the educational system of Leningrad oblast the authors analyse how the environmental approach can be used in the implementation of the professional standard for teachers. The issues concerning the process of the implementation and acquisition of the professional standard are discussed in relation to the innovative project “Safe Educational Environment” carried out in collaboration with the Russian Academy of Education. This project is aimed at setting up the most socially significant components of professional and educational environment as well as at creating and testing a system of psychological safety support for subjects of the educational process in the region. The authors emphasize the advantages of the system approach that implies the introduction of various innovations in education and helps to achieve a synergistic effect in the teacher’s professional activity. Also, they show how the methodology of the environmental approach may be employed in the designing of professional educational environment as one of the technologies in the teacher’s practice.

  9. Plastic cages to protect Douglas-fir seedlings from animal damage in western Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen C. Crouch

    1980-01-01

    Effects of plastic mesh cages designed to protect Douglas-fir seedlings from animals were evaluated in western Oregon. In two tests over 5-year periods, caging increased survival by 0 and 13 percent and increased height growth by 0.8 and 1.2 feet compared with uncaged trees. Benefits from caging might have been greater if damage had been more prevalent during the tests...

  10. Lumbar interbody fusion: a parametric investigation of a novel cage design with and without posterior instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbusera, Fabio; Schmidt, Hendrik; Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2012-03-01

    A finite element model of the L4-L5 human segment was employed to carry out a parametric biomechanical investigation of lumbar interbody fusion with a novel "sandwich" cage having an inner stiff core and two softer layers in the areas close to the endplates, with and without posterior fixation. Considered cage designs included: (a) cage in a homogeneous material with variable elastic modulus (19-2,000 MPa), (b) "sandwich" cage having an inner core (E=2,000 MPa) and softer layers (E=19 MPa) with variable thickness (1-2.5 mm). The latter cage was also considered in combination with posterior rods made with a material having variable elastic modulus (19-210,000 MPa). All the models were loaded with 500 N compression and moments of 7.5 Nm in flexion, extension, lateral bending and axial rotation. The homogeneous cage stabilized the segment in flexion, lateral bending and axial rotation; in extension there was a destabilization up to 60% and remarkable cage movement (1 mm). The "sandwich" cage limited this phenomenon (cage movement<0.6 mm), effectively stabilized the segment in the other directions and lowered the maximal contact pressure on the endplates, reducing the risk of subsidence. Posterior fixation reduced spinal flexibility and cage movement. The soft layers of the "sandwich" cage had the potential to limit the risk of cage subsidence and to preserve a significant loading of the structure even in combination with flexible posterior instrumentation, which may have a beneficial effect in promoting bony fusion.

  11. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Three Cage Layer Housing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Feddes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture accounts for 10 to 12% of the World’s total greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. Manure management alone is responsible for 13% of GHG emissions from the agricultural sector. During the last decade, Québec’s egg production systems have shifted from deep-pit housing systems to manure belt housing systems. The objective of this study was to measure and compare carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O emissions from three different cage layer housing systems: a deep liquid manure pit and a manure belt with natural or forced air drying. Deep liquid manure pit housing systems consist of “A” frame layer cages located over a closed pit containing the hens’ droppings to which water is added to facilitate removal by pumping. Manure belt techniques imply that manure drops on a belt beneath each row of battery cages where it is either dried naturally or by forced air until it is removed. The experiment was replicated with 360 hens reared into twelve independent bench-scale rooms during eight weeks (19–27 weeks of age. The natural and forced air manure belt systems reduced CO2 (28.2 and 28.7 kg yr−1 hen−1, respectively, CH4 (25.3 and 27.7 g yr−1 hen−1, respectively and N2O (2.60 and 2.48 g yr−1 hen−1, respectively emissions by about 21, 16 and 9% in comparison with the deep-pit technique (36.0 kg CO2 yr−1 hen−1, 31.6 g CH4 yr−1 hen−1 and 2.78 g N2O yr−1 hen−1. The shift to manure belt systems needs to be encouraged since this housing system significantly decreases the production of GHG.

  12. The Usage of Geographical Information System in the Selection of Floating Cages Location for Aquaculture at Prigi Bay, Trenggalek Regency, East Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armono, H. D.; Mahaputra, B. G.; Zikra, M.

    2018-03-01

    Floating cages is one of the methods of fish farming (aqua culture) that can be developed at rivers, lakes or seas. To determine a proper location for floating cages, there are some requirements that need to be fulfilled to maintain sustainibility of floating cages. Those requirements are the quality of the environment. This paper will discuss the selection of best location for aquaculture activities using Weighted Overlay method in the Geographical Information System, based on the the concentration of chlorophyll-a, sea surface temperature presented by Aqua MODIS Level 1b satellite images. The satellite data will be associated with the measured field data on March and October 2016. The study take place on Prigi Bay, at Trenggalek Regency, East Java. Based on spatial analysis in the Geographical Information System, the Prigi bay generally suitable for aquaculture activities using floating net cages. The result of Weighted Overlay combinations in both periods showed a mean score of 2.18 of 3 where 8.33 km2 (23.13% of the water area) considered as "very suitable" and 27.67 km2 (76.87% of water area) considered "suitable".

  13. Preinjector for Linac 1, inside the Faraday cage

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    For a description of the Linac 1 preinjector, please see first 7403070X. Here, the view is towards the upper level of the Faraday cage. Far to the right, a technician is peering through the service door. The huge box-shaped cubicle is the electronics platform, at 520 kV potential during operation. The "bull eye" at the left back sits at the top end of the accelerating column (see 7403081X) and houses the ion source with its electronics (see 7403083X). The SAMES generator, providing the 520 kV HV (7403074) sits on the floor and is not visible here.

  14. Evidences of long lived cages in functionalized polymers: Effects on chromophore dynamic and spectroscopic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prampolini, Giacomo; Monti, Susanna; De Mitri, Nicola; Barone, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    The formation of long-lived cages in a functionalized polymer is evidenced through an integrated computational approach. The investigated material is described with a purposely refined force field and long lasting simulations are used to sample the configurational space of the complex. The resulting virtual scenario is validated by comparing calculated and experimental spectra. The deeper insight offered by the computational procedure has lead to the identification of flexible cage like structures of the polymer bundle, that evolve very slowly, readapting their shape to the thermal movements of the probe, hence affecting the broadening of the electronic spectra. pair correlation functions between the center of mass of the dye and the surrounding heavy atoms mean fields W(δi) due to the surrounding environment experienced by δi, where δi are the torsional angles of the dye most influencing its optical behavior [24] residence times that characterize the resulting first neighbor shells of the dye. These descriptors were all very useful to depict the polymer caging effect, also through the comparison with the behavior of toluene molecules around the dye. As suggested by the examination of the position and trend of the first neighbor peaks of the pair correlation functions computed for the NfO-TEMPO EES in polymer and in toluene solution (see left panel of Figure 1), the polymer chains are closer to the dye (Rmax1tolu=6.6 Å, Rmax1polymer=5.1 Å) more tightly packed and persistently located in that region. On the contrary, toluene molecules are farther from the dye, exchange more frequently between the different shells and allow the probe to rearrange its groups in quite different conformations. Indeed, the greater mobility of toluene around the solute and the short-lived cage formed in this case are confirmed by the absence of definite minima between the first and the second coordination shells (R=8.8 Å). This implies a fast and continuous motion of the solvent

  15. Behavioral differences of laying hens with fractured keel bones within furnished cages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Marie Casey-Trott

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available High prevalence of keel bone fractures in laying hens is reported in all housing systems. Keel fractures have been associated with pain and restricted mobility in hens in loose housing. The objective was to determine whether keel fractures were associated with activity of hens in furnished cages. Thirty-six pairs of LSL Lite hens (72 wk were enrolled in the study. One hen with a fractured keel and one hen without were identified by palpation in each of 36 groups of hens housed in either 30 or 60-bird cages stocked at 750cm2/hen. Behavioral activity of each hen was recorded by four observers blind to keel status using focal animal sampling for 10 min within a 2 hr period in the morning (08:00-10:00, afternoon (12:00-14:00, and evening (17:00-19:00. All hens were observed during each of the three sample periods for three days totaling 90 min, and individual hen data was summed for analysis. Hens were euthanized 48hr after final observations, dissected, and classified by keel status: F0 (no fracture, N=24; F1 (single fracture, N=17; F2 (multiple fractures, N=31. The percentages of time hens performed each behavior were analyzed using a mixed procedure in SAS with fracture severity, body weight, cage size, rearing environment, and tier in the model. Fracture severity affected the duration of perching (P=0.04 and standing (P=0.001, bout length of standing (P<0.0001, and location (floor vs perch of resting behaviors (P=0.01. F2 hens perched longer than F0 hens, 20.0% ± 2.9 and 11.6% ± 3.2. F2 hens spent less time standing, 15.2% ± 1.5, than F0 and F1 hens, 20.7% ± 1.6 and 21.6% ± 1.8. F2 hens had shorter standing bouts (22.0 sec ± 4.2 than both F0 and F1 hens, 33.1 sec ± 4.3 and 27.4 sec ± 4.4. Non-fractured hens spent 80.0% ± 6.9 of total resting time on the floor whereas F1 and F2 hens spent 56.9% ± 12.4 and 51.5% ± 7.7, resting on the floor. Behavioral differences reported here provide insight into possible causes of keel damage, or

  16. Sensitivity of BN nano-cages to caffeine and nicotine molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Alireza; Baei, Mohammad T.; Tazikeh Lemeski, E.; Shahini, Malihe

    2014-12-01

    Adsorption of caffeine and nicotine molecules over B12N12 and B16N16 nano-cages were investigated by using first-principles calculations to define whether BN nano-cages are applicable for filtering or sensing caffeine and nicotine molecules. The chemisorption energy of nicotine molecule on BN nano-cages is very stronger than caffeine molecule. Upon the adsorption of caffeine and nicotine molecules, the electronic properties of the BN nano-cages can be significantly changed, being too much sensitized on the caffeine and nicotine adsorptions.

  17. Manipulation of intracellular auxin in a single cell by light with esterase-resistant caged auxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaka, Naoyuki; Maisch, Jan; Nick, Peter; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Nozaki, Hiroshi

    2009-09-04

    Auxin, a plant hormone, is polar transported from its site of production. This auxin polar transport system establishes an auxin gradient in plant tissue that is necessary for proper plant development. Therefore, the spatial effect of the auxin gradient on plant development is highly important for the understanding of plant auxin responses. Herein we report the design, syntheses and biological properties of esterase-resistant caged auxins. The conventional caging group, 2-nitrobenzyl ester, was found to be enzymatically hydrolyzed in plant cells and released original auxin without photolysis. The esterase-resistant caging group, (2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)(2-nitrobenzyl) ester, (DMPNB) was designed to improve the stability of caged auxins. Three auxins, indole 3-acetic acid, naphthalene 1-acetic acid and 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid were caged with the DMPNB caging group. DMPNB-caged auxins were inactive within a plant cell until photolysis, but they release auxins with photoirradiation to activate auxin-responsive gene expression. We demonstrated spatial and temporal control of intracellular auxin levels with photoirradiation by using this caged auxin system and were able to photocontrol the physiological auxin response in Arabidopsis plants. Additionally, the photoirradiation of DMPNB-caged auxin within a single cell can manipulate the intracellular auxin level and triggers auxin response.

  18. A stochastic frontier analysis of technical efficiency of fish cage culture in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Gazi Md Nurul; Tai, Shzee Yew; Kusairi, Mohd Noh

    2016-01-01

    Cage culture plays an important role in achieving higher output and generating more export earnings in Malaysia. However, the cost of fingerlings, feed and labour have increased substantially for cage culture in the coastal areas in Peninsular Malaysia. This paper uses farm level data gathered from Manjung, Perak and Kota Tinggi, Johor to investigate the technical efficiency of brackish water fish cage culture using the stochastic frontier approach. The technical efficiency was estimated and specifically the factors affecting technical inefficiencies of fish cage culture system in Malaysia was investigated. On average, 37 percent of the sampled fish cage farms are technically efficient. The results suggest very high degrees of technical inefficiency exist among the cage culturists. This implies that great potential exists to increase fish production through improved efficiency in cage culture management in Peninsular Malaysia. The results indicate that farmers obtained grouper fingerlings from other neighboring countries due to scarcity of fingerlings from wild sources. The cost of feeding for grouper (Epinephelus fuscoguttatus) requires relatively higher costs compared to seabass (Lates calcarifer) production in cage farms in the study areas. Initiatives to undertake extension programmes at the farm level are needed to help cage culturists in utilizing their resources more efficiently in order to substantially enhance their fish production.

  19. A high-precision instrument for analyzing nonlinear dynamic behavior of bearing cage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Z.; Yu, T.; Chen, H.; Li, B.

    2016-01-01

    The high-precision ball bearing is fundamental to the performance of complex mechanical systems. As the speed increases, the cage behavior becomes a key factor in influencing the bearing performance, especially life and reliability. This paper develops a high-precision instrument for analyzing nonlinear dynamic behavior of the bearing cage. The trajectory of the rotational center and non-repetitive run-out (NRRO) of the cage are used to evaluate the instability of cage motion. This instrument applied an aerostatic spindle to support and spin test the bearing to decrease the influence of system error. Then, a high-speed camera is used to capture images when the bearing works at high speeds. A 3D trajectory tracking software TEMA Motion is used to track the spot which marked the cage surface. Finally, by developing the MATLAB program, a Lissajous’ figure was used to evaluate the nonlinear dynamic behavior of the cage with different speeds. The trajectory of rotational center and NRRO of the cage with various speeds are analyzed. The results can be used to predict the initial failure and optimize cage structural parameters. In addition, the repeatability precision of instrument is also validated. In the future, the motorized spindle will be applied to increase testing speed and image processing algorithms will be developed to analyze the trajectory of the cage.

  20. Determining basic parameters of shafts with cage hoisting systems in mines with steep seams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durov, E.M.

    1982-05-01

    This paper analyzes problems associated with increasing depth of mine shafts in operating coal mines. Schemes of shaft excavation in mines with steep coal seams are analyzed. Removal of mine rock and the ground surface by existing mine shafts is most economical in most cases. Yuzhgiproshakht has investigated a number of hoisting schemes during mine shaft excavation in order to select the optimum shaft diameter which permits shaft reconstruction and deepening to be optimized. The following conditions are analyzed: coal output of a coal mine ranges from 0.9 megatons (Mt) to 1.8 Mt/year, mining depth ranges from 600 m to 1600 m (with intermediary depth of 800, 1000, 1200 and 1400 m also considered). Separate hoisting of coal and rock waste is used. Shaft sinking rate ranges from 10 to 50 m/month. The following hoisting schemes are analyzed: two independent systems which consist of a cage with counterweight, three systems of a cage with counterweight, double cage system and a cage with counterweight. Hoisting schemes are shown in 9 diagrams. Investigations show that a 7 to 8 m diameter of mine shafts is most economic. In mine shafts 7 m in diameter equipped with two cages with counterweights one of the cages is removed to form a free space for the hoisting bucket. In the 8 m shaft equipped with a double cage system and a cage with counterweight the cage with counterweight is removed to form a free place for the hoisting bucket used during shaft excavation.

  1. Performance Comparison of Wireless Sensor Network Standard Protocols in an Aerospace Environment: ISA100.11a and ZigBee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Raymond S.; Barton, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) can provide a substantial benefit in spacecraft systems, reducing launch weight and providing unprecedented flexibility by allowing instrumentation capabilities to grow and change over time. Achieving data transport reliability on par with that of wired systems, however, can prove extremely challenging in practice. Fortunately, much progress has been made in developing standard WSN radio protocols for applications from non-critical home automation to mission-critical industrial process control. The relative performances of candidate protocols must be compared in representative aerospace environments, however, to determine their suitability for spaceflight applications. In this paper, we will present the results of a rigorous laboratory analysis of the performance of two standards-based, low power, low data rate WSN protocols: ZigBee Pro and ISA100.11a. Both are based on IEEE 802.15.4 and augment that standard's specifications to build complete, multi-hop networking stacks. ZigBee Pro targets primarily the home and office automation markets, providing an ad-hoc protocol that is computationally lightweight and easy to implement in inexpensive system-on-a-chip components. As a result of this simplicity, however, ZigBee Pro can be susceptible to radio frequency (RF) interference. ISA100.11a, on the other hand, targets the industrial process control market, providing a robust, centrally-managed protocol capable of tolerating a significant amount of RF interference. To achieve these gains, a coordinated channel hopping mechanism is employed, which entails a greater computational complexity than ZigBee and requires more sophisticated and costly hardware. To guide future aerospace deployments, we must understand how well these standards relatively perform in analog environments under expected operating conditions. Specifically, we are interested in evaluating goodput -- application level throughput -- in a representative crewed environment

  2. Survey of rainbow trout mortality in cage culture farms in Hasanloo Dam, west Azerbaijan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    amin Khodadadi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In late June 2013, because of sudden and unjustified increase in mortality of apparent healthy fish in Hasanloo dam cage culture, random sampling was convicted from a live dying and dead fishes. Forty fishes (20 alive and 20 dead fishes from two cage with the weight of 200-300 gr were sampled. Samples were sent to private factor laboratory ice pieces for evolution. Some physicochemical parameters of Hasanloo dam water including nitrite, nitrate, ammonium, soluble solid materials, temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH was measured.  To investing the probability of bacterial, fungal and parasitic discover outbreaks sample were taken from the kidney, gills and skin of fish. The result of different investing revealed the presence of algal bloom, oxygen shortage, executive problems and fishing net fountain obstruction due to accumulation of planktons and suspended material. Because of increase in light intensity, nutritive substances level, warming of water temperature and static suability of water hydrological status, algal blooming had occurred in Hasanloo dam that not only destroyed the gills of fish but also created competition for soluble oxygen at night with some phytoplankton species causing hypoxia and death of salmon in the breeding farm. The result of general bacterial cutler was negative and mild secondary infection with S aprolegnia species was detected in PGYEA culture. The result of liver histopathology indicated the presence of hepatic ceroidosis because of non-standard diets with high levels of carbohydrates. Gill blade inflammation and hyperplasia was the observed. Due to high amounts of ionized ammonia among culture nets resolving from summer mortality syndrome.

  3. Comparison of the growth of males and females of tilapia Oreochromis Niloticus cultured in cages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alvarado-Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose of evaluating productive performance and potential weight gain capacity of snapper O. Niloticus without reversing, we evaluated the growth of males and females raised in floating cages in captivity grouped by gender. The experiment was conducted for a term of 150 days.  We used a simple 4 836 alevins of 26.2±19.7g, fish that were nourished until they visibly reached sexual differentiation to 119.3±56.5 g to be separated by sex and nourished in floating cages to a final average weight of 387.0±128.9g (harvestto determine differences in growth. The weight distribution of the undefined gender sample showed a decrease in the coefficient of variation (CV of 75.13% to 31.49 and 30.22 for males and females respectively. This indicates that the distribution of sizes of the samples tended to become normal during the cycle of harvest. Significant differences (P=0.05 for the weight of harvest 429.2±135.1g and 339.65±102.64 g.   For the growth rate 2.74±0.86g day y 2.18±0.68 g day were determined between males and females respectively. The standard error of the estimation of the difference of average weight between males and females was 89.62±7.23g for an accuracy level of 95%. Males displayed  better growth rate and weight gain for harvest.

  4. Protection characteristics of a Faraday cage compromised by lightning burnthrough.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Bystrom, Edward; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Montoya, Sandra L.; Merewether, Kimball O.; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Martinez, Leonard E.; Jojola, John M.

    2012-01-01

    A lightning flash consists of multiple, high-amplitude but short duration return strokes. Between the return strokes is a lower amplitude, continuing current which flows for longer duration. If the walls of a Faraday cage are made of thin enough metal, the continuing current can melt a hole through the metal in a process called burnthrough. A subsequent return stroke can couple energy through this newly-formed hole. This LDRD is a study of the protection provided by a Faraday cage when it has been compromised by burnthrough. We initially repeated some previous experiments and expanded on them in terms of scope and diagnostics to form a knowledge baseline of the coupling phenomena. We then used a combination of experiment, analysis and numerical modeling to study four coupling mechanisms: indirect electric field coupling, indirect magnetic field coupling, conduction through plasma and breakdown through the hole. We discovered voltages higher than those encountered in the previous set of experiments (on the order of several hundreds of volts).

  5. Regulation of a phage endolysin by disulfide caging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuty, Gabriel F; Xu, Min; Struck, Douglas K; Summer, Elizabeth J; Young, Ry

    2010-11-01

    In contrast to canonical phage endolysins, which require holin-mediated disruption of the membrane to gain access to attack the cell wall, signal anchor release (SAR) endolysins are secreted by the host sec system, where they accumulate in an inactive form tethered to the membrane by their N-terminal SAR domains. SAR endolysins become activated by various mechanisms upon release from the membrane. In its inactive form, the prototype SAR endolysin, Lyz(P1), of coliphage P1, has an active-site Cys covalently blocked by a disulfide bond; activation involves a disulfide bond isomerization driven by a thiol in the newly released SAR domain, unblocking the active-site Cys. Here, we report that Lyz(103), the endolysin of Erwinia phage ERA103, is also a SAR endolysin. Although Lyz(103) does not have a catalytic Cys, genetic evidence suggests that it also is activated by a thiol-disulfide isomerization triggered by a thiol in the SAR domain. In this case, the inhibitory disulfide in nascent Lyz(103) is formed between cysteine residues flanking a catalytic glutamate, caging the active site. Thus, Lyz(P1) and Lyz(103) define subclasses of SAR endolysins that differ in the nature of their inhibitory disulfide, and Lyz(103) is the first enzyme found to be regulated by disulfide bond caging of its active site.

  6. Automated Operant Conditioning in the Mouse Home Cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Nikolas A; Kanold, Patrick O

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging and genetics have made mice an advantageous animal model for studying the neurophysiology of sensation, cognition, and locomotion. A key benefit of mice is that they provide a large population of test subjects for behavioral screening. Reflex-based assays of hearing in mice, such as the widely used acoustic startle response, are less accurate than operant conditioning in measuring auditory processing. To date, however, there are few cost-effective options for scalable operant conditioning systems. Here, we describe a new system for automated operant conditioning, the Psibox. It is assembled from low cost parts, designed to fit within typical commercial wire-top cages, and allows large numbers of mice to train independently in their home cages on positive reinforcement tasks. We found that groups of mice trained together learned to accurately detect sounds within 2 weeks of training. In addition, individual mice isolated from groups also showed good task performance. The Psibox facilitates high-throughput testing of sensory, motor, and cognitive skills in mice, and provides a readily available animal population for studies ranging from experience-dependent neural plasticity to rodent models of mental disorders.

  7. Gene expression changes in the olfactory bulb of mice induced by exposure to diesel exhaust are dependent on animal rearing environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Yokota

    Full Text Available There is an emerging concern that particulate air pollution increases the risk of cranial nerve disease onset. Small nanoparticles, mainly derived from diesel exhaust particles reach the olfactory bulb by their nasal depositions. It has been reported that diesel exhaust inhalation causes inflammation of the olfactory bulb and other brain regions. However, these toxicological studies have not evaluated animal rearing environment. We hypothesized that rearing environment can change mice phenotypes and thus might alter toxicological study results. In this study, we exposed mice to diesel exhaust inhalation at 90 µg/m(3, 8 hours/day, for 28 consecutive days after rearing in a standard cage or environmental enrichment conditions. Microarray analysis found that expression levels of 112 genes were changed by diesel exhaust inhalation. Functional analysis using Gene Ontology revealed that the dysregulated genes were involved in inflammation and immune response. This result was supported by pathway analysis. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed 10 genes. Interestingly, background gene expression of the olfactory bulb of mice reared in a standard cage environment was changed by diesel exhaust inhalation, whereas there was no significant effect of diesel exhaust exposure on gene expression levels of mice reared with environmental enrichment. The results indicate for the first time that the effect of diesel exhaust exposure on gene expression of the olfactory bulb was influenced by rearing environment. Rearing environment, such as environmental enrichment, may be an important contributive factor to causation in evaluating still undefined toxic environmental substances such as diesel exhaust.

  8. Bisphenol A is released from used polycarbonate animal cages into water at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howdeshell, Kembra L.; Peterman, Paul H.; Judy, Barbara M.; Taylor, Julia A.; Orazio, Carl E.; Ruhlen, Rachel L.; vom Saal, Frederick S.; Welshons, Wade V.

    2003-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a monomer with estrogenic activity that is used in the production of food packaging, dental sealants, polycarbonate plastic, and many other products. The monomer has previously been reported to hydrolyze and leach from these products under high heat and alkaline conditions, and the amount of leaching increases as a function of use. We examined whether new and used polycarbonate animal cages passively release bioactive levels of BPA into water at room temperature and neutral pH. Purified water was incubated at room temperature in new polycarbonate and polysulfone cages and used (discolored) polycarbonate cages, as well as control (glass and used polypropylene) containers. The resulting water samples were characterized with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and tested for estrogenic activity using an MCF-7 human breast cancer cell proliferation assay. Significant estrogenic activity, identifiable as BPA by GC/MS (up to 310 micro g/L), was released from used polycarbonate animal cages. Detectable levels of BPA were released from new polycarbonate cages (up to 0.3 micro g/L) as well as new polysulfone cages (1.5 micro g/L), whereas no BPA was detected in water incubated in glass and used polypropylene cages. Finally, BPA exposure as a result of being housed in used polycarbonate cages produced a 16% increase in uterine weight in prepubertal female mice relative to females housed in used polypropylene cages, although the difference was not statistically significant. Our findings suggest that laboratory animals maintained in polycarbonate and polysulfone cages are exposed to BPA via leaching, with exposure reaching the highest levels in old cages.

  9. Outcome of single level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide-66 cage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cages have been widely used for the anterior reconstruction and fusion of cervical spine. Nonmetal cages have become popular due to prominent stress shielding and high rate of subsidence of metallic cages. This study aims to assess fusion with n-HA/PA66 cage following one level anterior cervical discectomy. Materials and Methods: Forty seven consecutive patients with radiculopathy or myelopathy underwent single level ACDF using n-HA/PA66 cage. We measured the segmental lordosis and intervertebral disc height on preoperative radiographs and then calculated the loss of segmental lordosis correction and cage subsidence over followup. Fusion status was evaluated on CT scans. Odom criteria, Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA and Visual Analog Pain Scales (VAS scores were used to assess the clinical results. Statistically quantitative data were analyzed while Categorical data by χ2 test. Results: Mean correction of segmental lordosis from surgery was 6.9 ± 3.0° with a mean loss of correction of 1.7 ± 1.9°. Mean cage subsidence was 1.2 ± 0.6 mm and the rate of cage subsidence (>2 mm was 2%. The rate of fusion success was 100%. No significant difference was found on clinical or radiographic outcomes between the patients (n=27 who were fused by n-HA/PA66 cage with pure local bone and the ones (n=20 with hybrid bone (local bone associating with bone from iliac crest. Conclusions: The n-HA/PA66 cage is a satisfactory reconstructing implant after anterior cervical discectomy, which can effectively promote bone graft fusion and prevent cage subsidence.

  10. Subsidence after single-level anterior cervical fusion with a stand-alone cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Young; Choi, Ki-Young; Moon, Bong Ju; Hur, Hyuk; Jang, Jae-Won; Lee, Jung-Kil

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the risk factors for subsidence in patients treated with stand-alone anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages for single-level degenerative cervical disease. Seventy-seven consecutive patients who underwent single-level stand-alone ACDF with a PEEK cage between 2005 and 2012 were included. Subsidence was defined as a decrease in the interbody height of more than 3mm on radiographs at the 1-year follow-up compared with that in the immediate post-operative image. Patients were divided into the subsidence and non-subsidence groups. The following factors were investigated in relation to the occurrence of subsidence: age, pre-operative overall cervical sagittal angle, segmental angle of the operated level, interbody height, cage height, cage devices and cage location (distance between anterior margin of the body endplate and that of the cage). The clinical outcomes were assessed with visual analog scale, modified Japanese Orthopedic Association score and neck disability index. Twenty-six out of the 77 (33.8%) patients had radiological signs of cage subsidence. Solid fusion was achieved in 25 out of the 26 patients (96.2%) in the subsidence group and in 47 out of the 51 patients (92.2%) in the non-subsidence group. More than 3mm distance between anterior margin of the vertebral body and that of the cage was significantly associated with subsidence (psubsidence did not correlate with fusion rate or clinical outcomes. Cage location was the only significant risk factor. Therefore, cage location should be taken into consideration during stand-alone ACDF using PEEK cages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Do Large-Scale Exams Adequately Assess Inquiry? An Evaluation of the Alignment of the Inquiry Behaviors in New York State's "Living Environment Regents Examination" to the NYS Inquiry Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Heather L.; Matthews, Dorothy M.

    2008-01-01

    The "Living Environment Regents Examination" is meant to provide a measure of the quality of New York State students' knowledge and understanding of biological content and science inquiry ability, as it is defined in the "MST Standards" and the "Living Environment Core Curriculum". This article examines the degree to…

  12. Monitoring the effects of exposure to lead and cadmium in working and living environment through standard biochemical blood parameters and liver endonucleases activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Ružica S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals as pollutants in the working and living environment are a serious health and environmental problem because they are toxic, non-biodegradable, accumulate in living systems and have a long half-life in soil. Sources of lead contamination are combustion products in the chemical industry and metallurgy, industrial waste water, landfills, traffic etc. Lead enters into the body via the food chain and drinking water. In the body lead is deposited in the liver, kidneys, brain and mineral tissues. Excretion of lead causes damage to the epithelial cells of certain organs. High level exposure to cadmium is usually the result of environmental pollution by human activities. Exposure to cadmium can lead to acute and chronic tissue damage of various organs, including liver and kidneys in humans and in animals. In this paper we analyzed the effects of lead and cadmium exposure, in working and living environment, on the model system of experimental animals, particularly the activity of certain liver enzymes, acid and alkaline DNase, and standard biochemical blood parameters. The study showed that lead and cadmium significantly affect the protein content, red blood cells, hemoglobin and hematocrit, and the activity of liver enzymes. This harmful effect of this toxic metal can be reduced by the supplements.

  13. Performance Comparison of Wireless Sensor Network Standard Protocols in an Aerospace Environment: ISA100.11a and ZigBee Pro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Raymond S.; Barton, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Standards-based wireless sensor network (WSN) protocols are promising candidates for spacecraft avionics systems, offering unprecedented instrumentation flexibility and expandability. Ensuring reliable data transport is key, however, when migrating from wired to wireless data gathering systems. In this paper, we conduct a rigorous laboratory analysis of the relative performances of the ZigBee Pro and ISA100.11a protocols in a representative crewed aerospace environment. Since both operate in the 2.4 GHz radio frequency (RF) band shared by systems such as Wi-Fi, they are subject at times to potentially debilitating RF interference. We compare goodput (application-level throughput) achievable by both under varying levels of 802.11g Wi-Fi traffic. We conclude that while the simpler, more inexpensive ZigBee Pro protocol performs well under moderate levels of interference, the more complex and costly ISA100.11a protocol is needed to ensure reliable data delivery under heavier interference. This paper represents the first published, rigorous analysis of WSN protocols in an aerospace environment that we are aware of and the first published head-to-head comparison of ZigBee Pro and ISA100.11a.

  14. PDE5 inhibition improves object memory in standard housed rats but not in rats housed in an enriched environment: implications for memory models?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Akkerman

    Full Text Available Drug effects are usually evaluated in animals housed under maximally standardized conditions. However, it is assumed that an enriched environment (EE more closely resembles human conditions as compared to maximally standardized laboratory conditions. In the present study, we examined the acute cognition enhancing effects of vardenafil, a PDE5 inhibitor, which stimulates protein kinase G/CREB signaling in cells, in three different groups of male Wistar rats tested in an object recognition task (ORT. Rats were either housed solitarily (SOL or socially (SOC under standard conditions, or socially in an EE. Although EE animals remembered object information longer in the vehicle condition, vardenafil only improved object memory in SOL and SOC animals. While EE animals had a heavier dorsal hippocampus, we found no differences between experimental groups in total cell numbers in the dentate gyrus, CA2-3 or CA1. Neither were there any differences in markers for pre- and postsynaptic density. No changes in PDE5 mRNA- and protein expression levels were observed. Basal pCREB levels were increased in EE rats only, whereas β-catenin was not affected, suggesting specific activation of the MAP kinase signaling pathway and not the AKT pathway. A possible explanation for the inefficacy of vardenafil could be that CREB signaling is already optimally stimulated in the hippocampus of EE rats. Since previous data has shown that acute PDE5 inhibition does not improve memory performance in humans, the use of EE animals could be considered as a more valid model for testing cognition enhancing drugs.

  15. Improving aeration for efficient oxygenation in sea bass sea cages. Blood, brain and gill histology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berillis Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An air diffusion based system (Airx was developed to control the dissolved oxygen levels in aquaculture sea cages. The system was introduced and then tested for 37 days in a sea bass sea cage (aerated cage. A second sea bass sea cage, without the AirX, was used as a control. Oxygen levels were measured in both cages at the start of the trial, before the AirX system was introduced, and during the working period of the AirX system. Fish samples were collected 15 days after the AirX system was introduced and at the end of the experiment. Blood smears were prepared and examined microscopically. Erythrocyte major axis, minor axis and area of fish erythrocytes were measured. Leucocyte differentiation was also examined. In the control cage, the fish had significantly larger red blood cells when compared with the red blood cells of the fish in the aerated cage. Histological examination of the gills and brain revealed no morphological differences or alterations between the two groups of fish. This study demonstrated that an air diffuser system could improve the water quality of fish farmed in sea cages and enhance sea bass physiological performance, especially if DO levels fall below 60% oxygen saturation.

  16. A pyrrolo-tetrathiafulvalene cage: Synthesis and X-ray crystal structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kent A.; Jeppesen, Jan O.; Levillain, Eric

    2002-01-01

    A novel type of tetrathiafulvalene-cage 4 containing three monopyrrolo-tetrathiafulvalene units has been prepared employing a general and efficient synthetic approach. X-ray crystal structure analysis revealed that the cage is able to accommodate solvent molecules within a cavity in the solid state....

  17. Formation of Ti28 ln cages, the highest nuclearity polyoxotitanates (Ln = La, Ce).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yaokang; Willkomm, Janina; Leskes, Michal; Steiner, Alexander; King, Timothy C; Gan, Lihua; Reisner, Erwin; Wood, Paul T; Wright, Dominic S

    2012-09-17

    The solvothermal reactions of Ti(OEt)(4) with LnCl(3) (Ln = La, Ce) produced new Ti(28) Ln cages, in which the Ln(3+) ions are coordinated within a metallocrown arrangement, which represents the highest nuclearity cages of this type (see figure). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Recombinant expression and purification of 'virus-like' bacterial encapsulin protein cages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rurup, W.F.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria; Koay, M.S.T.; Orner, Brendan P.

    2015-01-01

    Ultracentrifugation, particularly the use of sucrose or cesium chloride density gradients, is a highly reliable and efficient technique for the purification of virus-like particles and protein cages. Since virus-like particles and protein cages have a unique size compared to cellular macromolecules

  19. The Effects of Caging on the Colonization of Fouling Organisms in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of caging on the colonization and development of the fouling community in the upper Bonny estuary was studied. The experimental design was such that sets of wooden panels (20x20 cm) were screened with cages constructed with plastic netting while another set was left uncaged. Both sets of panels were ...

  20. Sterilization and strength of 70/30 polylactide cages: e-beam versus ethylene oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Theo H.; Thomas, Kevin A.; Hoogendoorn, Roel J. W.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Helder, Marco N.; Wuisman, Paul I. J. M.

    2007-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies on the degradation of 70/30 poly(L,DL-lactide) (PLDLLA) cages. To evaluate the effect of e-beam and ethylene oxide sterilization on degradation and strength. e-beam-sterilized PLDLLA cages were shown to maintain mechanical strength for at least 6 months during

  1. Effects of housing system (outdoor vs cages) and age of laying hens on egg characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, van den H.; Parmentier, H.K.; Kemp, B.

    2004-01-01

    1. Effects of two housing systems (cages vs outdoor) on external and internal egg characteristics were investigated. 2. In total 785 eggs from three different lines in cages and 268 eggs from outdoor-housed layers were examined for egg weight, albumen, yolk and shell content, albumen height and pH,

  2. Self-Assembly, Guest Capture, and NMR Spectroscopy of a Metal-Organic Cage in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Eun Bin; Srisuknimit, Veerasak; Cheng, Stephanie L.; Vosburg, David A.

    2016-01-01

    A green organic-inorganic laboratory experiment has been developed in which students prepare a self-assembling iron cage in D[subscript 2]O at room temperature. The tetrahedral cage captures a small, neutral molecule such as cyclohexane or tetrahydrofuran. [Superscript 1]H NMR analysis distinguishes captured and free guests through diagnostic…

  3. Effects of manual rib cage compressions on expiratory flow and mucus clearance during mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Joan Daniel; Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Rigol, Montserrat; Saucedo, Lina; Ranzani, Otavio Tavares; Esperatti, Mariano; Luque, Nestor; Ferrer, Miquel; Vilaro, Jordi; Kolobow, Theodor; Torres, Antoni

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the effects of two different types of manual rib cage compression on expiratory flow and mucus clearance during prolonged mechanical ventilation in pigs. Prospective randomized animal study. Animal research facility, University of Barcelona, Spain. Nine healthy pigs. Pigs were tracheally intubated, sedated, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. The animals were prone on a surgical bed in the anti-Trendelenburg position. The experiments were carried out at approximately 60 and 80 hrs from the beginning of mechanical ventilation. Two types of manual rib cage compressions were tested: Hard and brief rib cage compressions synchronized with early expiratory phase (hard manual rib cage compression) and soft and gradual rib cage compressions applied during the late expiratory phase (soft manual rib cage compression). The interventions were randomly applied for 15min with a 15-min interval between treatments. Respiratory flow and mucus movement were assessed during the interventions. Respiratory mechanics and hemodynamics were assessed prior to and after the interventions. Peak expiratory flow increased to 60.1±7.1L/min in comparison to 51.2±4.6L/min without treatment (p < 0.0015) and 48.7±4.3L/min with soft manual rib cage compression (p = 0.0002). Similarly, mean expiratory flow increased to 28.4±5.2L/min during hard manual rib cage compression vs. 15.9±2.2 and 16.6±2.8L/min without treatment and soft manual rib cage compression, respectively (p = 0.0006). During hard manual rib cage compression, mucus moved toward the glottis (1.01 ± 2.37mm/min); conversely, mucus moved toward the lungs during no treatment and soft manual rib cage compression, -0.28 ± 0.61 and -0.15±0.95mm/min, respectively (p = 0.0283). Soft manual rib cage compression slightly worsened static lung elastance and cardiac output (p = 0.0391). Hard manual rib cage compression improved mucus clearance in animals positioned in the anti-Trendelenburg position. The technique

  4. Particulate waste outflow from fish-farming cages. How much is uneaten feed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester-Moltó, M; Sanchez-Jerez, P; Cerezo-Valverde, J; Aguado-Giménez, F

    2017-06-15

    Particulate wastes drive benthic organic enrichment from cage fish farming. Differentiation between faeces and uneaten feed estimates at cage level are of great value to both economize the feeding process and reduce waste. This study estimates the particulate waste outflowing cages at different depths and orientations, and the wasted feed component by combining in situ measurements and modelling. Particulate matter flux (PMF) was greater vertically through the cage bottoms (60.89%), but lateral outflow was also substantial (39.11%). PMF occurs all around the cages, and the influence of the mainstream current was low. Wasted feed was greatly variable, reaching high values (about 50% of supplied feed. The self-application of feed wastage monitoring and estimates by fish farmers is recommended to improve sustainability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Parameters estimation of squirrel-cage induction motors using ANN and ANFIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ahmadi Jirdehi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the transient behavior analysis of a squirrel-cage induction motor, the parameters of the single-cage and double-cage models are studied. These parameters are usually hard to obtain. This paper presents two new methods to predict the induction motor parameters in the single-cage and double-cage models based on artificial neural network (ANN and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS. For this purpose, the experimental data (manufacturer data of 20 induction motors with the different power are used. The experimental data are including of the starting torque and current, maximum torque, full load sleep, efficiency, rated active power and reactive power. The obtained results from the proposed ANN and ANFIS models are compared with each other and with the experimental data, which show a good agreement between the predicted values and the experimental data. But the proposed ANFIS model is more accurate than the proposed ANN model.

  6. Effect of small cage guests on hydrogen bonding of tetrahydrofuran in binary structure II clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A

    2012-08-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the pure structure II tetrahydrofuran clathrate hydrate and binary structure II tetrahydrofuran clathrate hydrate with CO(2), CH(4), H(2)S, and Xe small cage guests are performed to study the effect of the shape, size, and intermolecular forces of the small cages guests on the structure and dynamics of the hydrate. The simulations show that the number and nature of the guest in the small cage affects the probability of hydrogen bonding of the tetrahydrofuran guest with the large cage water molecules. The effect on hydrogen bonding of tetrahydrofuran occurs despite the fact that the guests in the small cage do not themselves form hydrogen bonds with water. These results indicate that nearest neighbour guest-guest interactions (mediated through the water lattice framework) can affect the clathrate structure and stability. The implications of these subtle small guest effects on clathrate hydrate stability are discussed.

  7. Salmon welfare index model 2.0: an extended model for overall welfare assessment of caged Atlantic salmon, based on a review of selected welfare indicators and intended for fish health professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pettersen, J.M.; Bracke, M.B.M.; Midtlyng, P.J.; Folkedal, O.; Stien, L.H.; Steffenak, H.; Kristiansen, T.S.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present an extended version of a semantic model for overall welfare assessment of Atlantic salmon reared in sea cages. The model, called SWIM 2.0, is designed to enable fish health professionals to make a formal and standardized assessment of fish welfare using a set of reviewed welfare

  8. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Integrated Screw Cages: Intrinsic Load Generation, Subsidence, and Torsional Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assem, Yusuf; Pelletier, Matthew H; Mobbs, Ralph J; Phan, Kevin; Walsh, William R

    2017-05-01

    To perform a repeatable idealized in vitro model to evaluate the effects of key design features and integrated screw fixation on unloaded surface engagement, subsidence, and torsional stability. We evaluated four different stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) cages with two, three, and four screw designs. Polyurethane (saw-bone) foam blocks were used to simulate the vertebral bone. Fuji Film was used to measure the contact footprint, average pressure, and load generated by fixating the cages with screws. Subsidence was tested by axially loading the constructs at 10 N/s to 400 N and torsional load was applied +/-1 Nm for 10 cycles to assess stability. Outcome measures included total subsidence and maximal torsional angle range. Cages 1, 2, and 4 were symmetrical and produced similar results in terms of contact footprint, average pressure, and load. The addition of integrated screws into the cage-bone block construct demonstrated a clear trend towards decreased subsidence. Cage 2 with surface titanium angled ridges and a keel produced the greatest subsidence with and without screws, significantly more than all other cages ( P < 0.05). Angular rotation was not significantly affected by the addition of screws ( P < 0.066). A statistically significant correlation existed between subsidence and reduced angular rotation across all cage constructs ( P = 0.018). Each stand-alone cage featured unique surface characteristics, which resulted in differing cage-foam interface engagement, influencing the subsidence and torsional angle. Increased subsidence significantly reduced the torsional angle across all cage constructs. © 2017 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Two-piece ALIF cage optimizes the bone-implant interface in a 360° setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Volkheimer, David; Robie, Bruce; Christensen, Finn B

    2017-11-01

    Clinical research has documented that cage subsidence and the loss of balance correction is a significant complication related to spinal fusion. Subsidence is a multifactorial complication, where implant design is one important element. The aim of the study is to compare the rigidity and bone-implant relative motion of segments treated with either a conventional one-piece ALIF cage versus a two-piece ALIF cage, which adapts in situ and permits 7°-21° of lordosis. Seven lumbosacral (L3-S1) human cadaver specimens were tested in a universal spine tester in the intact condition, the specimens instrumented with a two-piece ALIF cage (Statur ® -L, FBC Device, Denmark) and a one-piece ALIF cage (Pezo™-A, Ulrich GmbH & Co. KG., Germany), both supplemented with a pedicle screw system using pure moments of ±7.5 Nm in three principal motion directions. For assessment of the bone-implant interface, fluoroscopic videos were captured during motion and 3D motion was measured using an optical motion capturing system. Significantly less motion at the implant-endplate interface was found for the two-piece cage (1.0° ± 0.6°) in comparison to the one-piece cage (4.2° ± 1.7°) in flexion/extension. No significant differences in segment rigidity were found between the one-piece and two-piece cages in the 360° setup, while both configurations significantly reduced the range of motion compared to the intact condition (p one-piece ALIF cages, the two-piece cage concept reduced the relative motion at the bone-implant interface without compromising stability.

  10. Resonance Spectra of Caged Stringy Black Hole and Its Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sakalli

    2015-01-01

    quasinormal mode (QNM frequencies, is used to investigate the entropy/area spectra of the Garfinkle–Horowitz–Strominger black hole (GHSBH. Instead of the ordinary QNMs, we compute the boxed QNMs (BQNMs that are the characteristic resonance spectra of the confined scalar fields in the GHSBH geometry. For this purpose, we assume that the GHSBH has a confining cavity (mirror placed in the vicinity of the event horizon. We then show how the complex resonant frequencies of the caged GHSBH are computed using the Bessel differential equation that arises when the scalar perturbations around the event horizon are considered. Although the entropy/area is characterized by the GHSBH parameters, their quantization is shown to be independent of those parameters. However, both spectra are equally spaced.

  11. Magnetotactic Bacterial Cages as Safe and Smart Gene Delivery Vehicles

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaiari, Shahad K.

    2016-07-27

    In spite of the huge advances in the area of synthetic carriers, their efficiency still poorly compares to natural vectors. Herein, we report the use of unmodified magnetotactic bacteria as a guidable delivery vehicle for DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). High cargo loading is established under anaerobic conditions (bacteria is alive) through endocytosis where AuNPs are employed as transmembrane proteins mimics (facilitate endocytosis) as well as imaging agents to verify and quantify loading and release. The naturally bio-mineralized magnetosomes, within the bacteria, induce heat generation inside bacteria through magnetic hyperthermia. Most importantly after exposing the system to air (bacteria is dead) the cell wall stays intact providing an efficient bacterial vessel. Upon incubation with THP-1 cells, the magnetotactic bacterial cages (MBCs) adhere to the cell wall and are directly engulfed through the phagocytic activity of these cells. Applying magnetic hyperthermia leads to the dissociation of the bacterial microcarrier and eventual release of cargo.

  12. CAGE Analysis of China’s Trade Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Olusegun STOBER

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Gravity model of international trade states that trade interaction between two countries is in direct proportion to their size measured by Gross Domestic Product and in inverse proportion to the geographic distance. Conley and Ligon (2001 argued that the relevant economic distance between countries is often not the geographic distance. Thus, this study uses original datasets on economic distance to structure observed variations, to decompose the multidimensional CAGE distance framework of globalization derived from the Newton’s Law of gravitation as it applies to China’s international interaction, to evaluate bilateral trade patterns in identifying and prioritizing the importance of cross-border flows and differences that accounted for the development of China’s global strategies. This study confirms that distance must be accounted for in the decision making of any country’s globalization process or any firm’s global expansion as the effects on cross-border economic activities are enormous.

  13. Gaiola de metabolismo para equinos Metabolism cage for horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorinha Miriam Silber Schmidt Vitti

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available A gaiola de metabolismo, modelo proposto neste trabalho, foi construida na Seção de Oficina da FCAV-Unesp, Jaboticabal-SP e utilizada no Laboratório de Ciências Animais do Cena-USP, Piracicaba-SP. Este equipamento permite alojar eqüinos machos com idade a partir do desmame. Os animais foram treinados (condicionados diariamente a permanecer na gaiola de metabolismo por um período de aproximadamente 30 dias antes do início do experimento. O material necessário e a construção de uma gaiola metabólica para eqüinos machos é descrita e ilustrada. A estrutura principal da gaiola (2,68 m de comprimento x 0,80 m de largura x 2,02 m de altura é constituida por canos de metal de duas polegadas e todas as unidades de apoio - tábuas do piso, grade de urina, bebedouro, comedouro, bandeja coletora de urina e barras de contenção - estão fixas à estrutura principal de modo a serem removidas desta, faciltando o manejo e a limpeza do equipamento. O equipamento foi projetado para alojar animais de vários tamanhos e também para ser efetiva na coleta total de fezes e urina e no fornecimento de alimento e água. Os animais permaneceram em pé durante todo o período de confinamento, sem contudo ter havido a ocorrência de edemas graves nos membros. O modelo proposto foi testado em experimentos de metabolismo de fósforo utilizando-se radioisótopos.The metabolism cage here proposed was built at FCAV-Unesp, Jaboticabal, state of São Paulo, Brazil, and used in the Animal Science Laboratory at Cena-USP, Piracicaba, state of São Paulo, Brazil. The equipment allows to host male horses from weaning to adult age. Before starting the experiment, the animals were daily conditioned for a 30-day period to remain in the cage. The necessary material and the building process of the horse metabolic cage are described and illustrated. The main structure of the cage (2.68m long x 0.80 m wide x 2.02 m high was made of 2-inch-diameter metal tube, and all the

  14. Performance Analysis of a Brushless Double Fed Cage Induction Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruencos, F. [WEG S.A., Jaragua do Sul (Brazil); Carlson, R.; Oliveira, A.M.; Kuo-Peng, P.; Sadowski, N. [GRUCAD-UFSC, Florianopolis (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    This paper analyses design and performance aspects of a brushless double fed cage induction generator as an economic and technical alternative to the classical wound rotor induction generator used in wind power generation. It focuses firstly on the machine operational characteristics and main design criteria and secondly on steady state and dynamic analytical and numerical models for efficient prediction of machine behavior. The analytical dynamic model is obtained by transforming the equations written in machine variables into equations written in an arbitrary reference frame. In the finite element approach the electrical machine is modeled in a 2D domain, using the Maxwell equations to formulate the field behavior and the FE method to discretize the domain of study. A prototype was built and tested to validate the simulation models and to verify the design criteria.

  15. The Application of Integrated Multi Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA Using Stratified Double Net Rounded Cage (SDFNC for Aquaculture Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapto P. Putro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The increase of fishery production nationally and internationally may impact on the potential emergence of a variety of environmental problems. The application of sustainable aquaculture is urgently needed by breeding fish for commercial purposes in a manner such that it has a minimum impact on the environment, contributing to the development of local communities and generating economic benefits. The design of the cage and farming practice in aquaculture activities are the important steps to ensure that farming activity is still observed in order to anticipate the risk of organic enrichment caused by the activities. The application of Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture  (IMTA on the Stratified Double Floating Net Cage  (SDFNC integrated with biomonitoring are an appropriate solution to the ongoing productive farming practices. IMTA is an aquaculture practice using more than one species of biotas which have ecologically mutual relationship as a part of the food chain in the area at the same time. The application of IMTA allows farmers to get several aquaculture products in the same area without increasing the horizontal area of the farms. At first, the SDFNC has been applied for farming Cyprinus carpio and Tilapia niloticus as polyculture system in freshwater ecosystem of Rawapening Lake, Central Java. Its operation has been able to increase the production capacity of at least 75% of conventional cages. The application of SDFNC-IMTA using milkfish (Chanos Chanos, seaweed (Kappaphycus alvarezii, and white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei has been able to minimize the impact and maintain the water ecosystem in the Gulf Awerange, South Sulawesi.

  16. Natural chlorate in the environment: Application of a new IC-ESI/MS/MS method with a Cl18O3- internal standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Balaji; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Böhlke, John Karl; Sturchio, Neil C.; Andraski, Brian J.; Eckardt, Frank D.; Jackson, W. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    A new ion chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (IC-ESI/MS/MS) method has been developed for quantification and confirmation of chlorate (ClO3−) in environmental samples. The method involves the electro-chemical generation of isotopically labeled chlorate internal standard (Cl18O3−) using 18O water (H218O). The standard was added to all samples prior to analysis thereby minimizing the matrix effects that are associated with common ions without the need for expensive sample pretreatments. The method detection limit (MDL) for ClO3− was 2 ng L−1 for a 1 mL volume sample injection. The proposed method was successfully applied to analyze ClO3− in difficult environmental samples including soil and plant leachates. The IC-ESI/MS/MS method described here was also compared to established EPA method 317.0 for ClO3− analysis. Samples collected from a variety of environments previously shown to contain natural perchlorate (ClO4−) occurrence were analyzed using the proposed method and ClO3− was found to co-occur with ClO4− at concentrations ranging from 500 mg kg−1 in caliche salt deposits from the Atacama Desert in Chile. Relatively low concentrations of ClO3− in some natural groundwater samples (<0.1 μg L−1) analyzed in this work may indicate lower stability when compared to ClO4− in the subsurface. The high concentrations of ClO3− in caliches and soils (3−6 orders of magnitude greater) as compared to precipitation samples indicate that ClO3−, like ClO4−, may be atmospherically produced and deposited, then concentrated in dry soils, and is possibly a minor component in the biogeochemical cycle of chlorine.

  17. Intraligand Charge Transfer Sensitization on Self-Assembled Europium Tetrahedral Cage Leads to Dual-Selective Luminescent Sensing toward Anion and Cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cui-Lian; Zhang, Rui-Ling; Lin, Chen-Sheng; Zhou, Li-Peng; Cai, Li-Xuan; Kong, Jin-Tao; Yang, Song-Qiu; Han, Ke-Li; Sun, Qing-Fu

    2017-09-13

    Luminescent supramolecular lanthanide edifices have many potential applications in biology, environments, and materials science. However, it is still a big challenge to improve the luminescent performance of multinuclear lanthanide assemblies in contrast to their mononuclear counterparts. Herein, we demonstrate that combination of intraligand charge transfer (ILCT) sensitization and coordination-driven self-assembly gives birth to bright Eu III tetrahedral cages with a record emission quantum yield of 23.1%. The ILCT sensitization mechanism has been unambiguously confirmed by both time-dependent density functional theory calculation and femtosecond transient absorption studies. Meanwhile, dual-responsive sensing toward both anions and cations has been demonstrated making use of the ILCT transition on the ligand. Without introduction of additional recognition units, high sensitivity and selectivity are revealed for the cage in both turn-off luminescent sensing toward I - and turn-on sensing toward Cu 2+ . This study offers important design principles for the future development of luminescent lanthanide molecular materials.

  18. Rattling the Cage: Moving beyond Ethical Standards to Ethical Praxis in Self-Study Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Robyn; Gervasoni, Ann

    2012-01-01

    The ethical practice underpinning self-study research has been addressed extensively in the literature of self-study of teacher education practices. Less attention has been paid to how researchers deal with ethical tensions and dilemmas when they arise unexpectedly during self-study research. In this article, we examine how the extrapolation and…

  19. Screening for drug and alcohol abuse among older adults using a modified version of the CAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkin, C H; Castellon, S A; Dickson-Fuhrman, E; Daum, G; Jaffe, J; Jarvik, L

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves of a modified version of the CAGE, a screening measure used in the detection of older alcohol- and drug-abusing individuals. In a retrospective review of clinical records of 976 patients screened by a geriatric substance abuse program, the authors examined patients' responses on a modified version of the CAGE that included queries regarding drug use. The CAGE was administered to individuals age 50 or over draw from three diagnostic groups: alcohol abuse/dependence, drug abuse/dependence, and normal controls. Analysis of variance and discriminant function analyses revealed that the modified CAGE was able to discriminate both alcohol and drug abusers from controls. Analyses examining test sensitivity, specificity, and ROC curves revealed the CAGE to demonstrate excellent sensitivity but poor specificity. Omitting the "cut down'' item from the CAGE significantly improved specificity with only a modest drop in sensitivity. Given the ease of administration and sensitivity to both alcohol and drug abuse, these data suggest that the modified CAGE is well suited as a screening instrument for geriatric drug and alcohol abuse.

  20. Effect of curcumin caged silver nanoparticle on collagen stabilization for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivatsan, Kunnavakkam Vinjimur; Duraipandy, N; Begum, Shajitha; Lakra, Rachita; Ramamurthy, Usha; Korrapati, Purna Sai; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala

    2015-04-01

    The current study aims at understanding the influence of curcumin caged silver nanoparticle (CCSNP) on stability of collagen. The results indicated that curcumin caged silver nanoparticles efficiently stabilize collagen, indicated by enhanced tensile strength, fibril formation and viscosity. The tensile strength of curcumin caged silver nanoparticle cross-linked collagen and elongation at break was also found to be higher than glutaraldehyde cross-linked collagen. The physicochemical characteristics of curcumin caged nanoparticle cross-linked collagen exhibited enhanced strength. The thermal properties were also good with both thermal degradation temperature and hydrothermal stability higher than native collagen. CD analysis showed no structural disparity in spite of superior physicochemical properties suggesting the significance of curcumin caged nanoparticle mediated cross-linking. The additional enhancement in the stabilization of collagen could be attributed to multiple sites for interaction with collagen molecule provided by curcumin caged silver nanoparticles. The results of cell proliferation and anti-microbial activity assays indicated that curcumin caged silver nanoparticles promoted cell proliferation and inhibited microbial growth making it an excellent biomaterial for wound dressing application. The study opens scope for nano-biotechnological strategies for the development of alternate non-toxic cross-linking agents facilitating multiple site interaction thereby improving therapeutic values to the collagen for biomedical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Evolution of lone pair of excess electrons inside molecular cages with the deformation of the cage in e2@C60F60 systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin-Feng; Chen, Wei; Yu, Guang-Tao; Li, Zhi-Ru; Wu, Di; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2011-07-15

    For unusual e(2)@C(60)F(60)(I(h), D(6h), and D(5d)) cage structures with two excess electrons, it is reported that not only the lone pair in singlet state but also two single excess electrons in triplet state can be encapsulated inside the C(60)F(60) cages to form single molecular solvated dielectrons. The interesting relationship between the shape of the cage and the spin state of the system has revealed that ground states are singlet state for spherical shaped e(2)@C(60)F(60)(I(h)) and triplet states for short capsular shaped e(2)@C(60)F(60)(D(6h)) and long capsular shaped e(2)@C(60)F(60)(D(5d)), which shows a spin evolution from the singlet to triplet state with the deformation of the cage from spherical to capsular shape. For these excess electron systems, the three ground state structures have large vertical electron detachment energies (VDEs (I) of 1.720-2.283 eV and VDEs (II) of 3.959-5.288 eV), which shows their stabilities and suggests that the large C(60)F(60) cage is the efficient container of excess electrons. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Chiral Organic Cages with a Triple-Stranded Helical Structure Derived from Helicene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Abaid Ullah; Gan, Fuwei; Shen, Chengshuo; Yu, Na; Wang, Ruibin; Crassous, Jeanne; Shu, Mouhai; Qiu, Huibin

    2018-02-28

    We report the use of helicene with an intrinsic helical molecular structure to prepare covalent organic cages via imine condensation. The organic cages revealed a [3+2]-type architecture containing a triple-stranded helical structure with three helicene units arranged in a propeller-like fashion with the framework integrally twisted. Such structural chirality was retained upon dissolution in organic solvents, as indicated by a strong diastereotopy effect in proton NMR and unique Cotton effects in circular dichroism spectra. Further study on chiral adsorption showed that the chiral organic cages possess considerable enantioselectivity toward a series of aromatic racemates.

  3. A practical guide to the synthesis of dinitroindolinyl-caged neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis-Davies, Graham C R

    2011-03-01

    This protocol describes a method for efficient chemical synthesis of dinitroindolinyl derivatives of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid. These caged neurotransmitters are currently the most chemically and photochemically efficient probes for two-photon photolysis in living brain slices. The protocol only requires basic organic synthesis equipment, and no silica gel column chromatography or NMR spectroscopy is needed at any stage. HPLC is used to purify the caged transmitters at the end of the syntheses. Thus, the synthesis of dinitroindolinyl-caged neurotransmitters is within the scope of a modestly equipped chemistry laboratory.

  4. Spiro annulation of cage polycycles via Grignard reaction and ring-closing metathesis as key steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambasivarao Kotha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple synthetic strategy to C2-symmetric bis-spiro-pyrano cage compound 7 involving ring-closing metathesis is reported. The hexacyclic dione 10 was prepared from simple and readily available starting materials such as 1,4-naphthoquinone and cyclopentadiene. The synthesis of an unprecedented octacyclic cage compound through intramolecular Diels–Alder (DA reaction as a key step is described. The structures of three new cage compounds 7, 12 and 18 were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies.

  5. Effects of declawing and cage shape on productivity, feathering, and fearfulness of egg-type chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanskike, K P; Adams, A W

    1983-04-01

    Declawing day-old egg-type chicks did not significantly (P less than .05) alter 20-week body weight. However, declawed hens tended to mature earlier and lay more eggs than the intact hens. Hens housed in shallow cages tended to be better feathered than those housed in deep cages. Neither declawing nor cage shape had a significant effect on the time required for birds to return to feeding after exposure to a noise stimulus, which was used as an indicator of fearfulness.

  6. Investigation of different cage designs and mechano-regulation algorithms in the lumbar interbody fusion process - a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postigo, Sergio; Schmidt, Hendrik; Rohlmann, Antonius; Putzier, Michael; Simón, Antonio; Duda, Georg; Checa, Sara

    2014-04-11

    Lumbar interbody fusion cages are commonly used to treat painful spinal degeneration and instability by achieving bony fusion. Many different cage designs exist, however the effect of cage morphology and material properties on the fusion process remains largely unknown. This finite element model study aims to investigate the influence of different cage designs on bone fusion using two mechano-regulation algorithms of tissue formation. It could be observed that different cages play a distinct key role in the mechanical conditions within the fusion region and therefore regulate the time course of the fusion process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mating competitiveness of sterile male Anopheles coluzzii in large cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maïga, Hamidou; Damiens, David; Niang, Abdoulaye; Sawadogo, Simon P; Fatherhaman, Omnia; Lees, Rosemary S; Roux, Olivier; Dabiré, Roch K; Ouédraogo, Georges A; Tripet, Fréderic; Diabaté, Abdoulaye; Gilles, Jeremie R L

    2014-11-26

    Understanding the factors that account for male mating competitiveness is critical to the development of the sterile insect technique (SIT). Here, the effects of partial sterilization with 90 Gy of radiation on sexual competitiveness of Anopheles coluzzii allowed to mate in different ratios of sterile to untreated males have been assessed. Moreover, competitiveness was compared between males allowed one versus two days of contact with females. Sterile and untreated males four to six days of age were released in large cages (~1.75 sq m) with females of similar age at the following ratios of sterile males: untreated males: untreated virgin females: 100:100:100, 300:100:100, 500:100:100 (three replicates of each) and left for two days. Competitiveness was determined by assessing the egg hatch rate and the insemination rate, determined by dissecting recaptured females. An additional experiment was conducted with a ratio of 500:100:100 and a mating period of either one or two days. Two controls of 0:100:100 (untreated control) and 100:0:100 (sterile control) were used in each experiment. When males and females consort for two days with different ratios, a significant difference in insemination rate was observed between ratio treatments. The competitiveness index (C) of sterile males compared to controls was 0.53. The number of days of exposure to mates significantly increased the insemination rate, as did the increased number of males present in the untreated: sterile male ratio treatments, but the number of days of exposure did not have any effect on the hatch rate. The comparability of the hatch rates between experiments suggest that An. coluzzii mating competitiveness experiments in large cages could be run for one instead of two days, shortening the required length of the experiment. Sterilized males were half as competitive as untreated males, but an effective release ratio of at least five sterile for one untreated male has the potential to impact the fertility of

  8. Metal bioaccumulation and effects biomarkers in mussels caged in the Athabasca OS mining area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilote, M.; André, C.; Turcotte, P.; Gagné, F.; Gagnon, C.

    2016-12-01

    The Athabasca oil-sand (OS) deposit area is the largest world's known stock of crude bitumen and the third-largest proven crude oil reserve. Mining activity is well known to release associated contaminants, such as metals, and causes potential risk to the environment and aquatic life. The purpose of this study aimed to determine the impacts of OS mining on water quality and mussels in the area of Fort McMurray, Northern Alberta (Canada), for 2 consecutive years which showed different river water flow and metals coefficient of distribution. Autochthonous mussels (Pyganodon grandis) were placed in cages and in-situ exposed in the Athabasca R. for 4 weeks. Thereafter, metals and inorganic elements, including rare earth elements, were analyzed in water, and mussel gills and digestive glands to evaluate bioaccumulation, bioconcentration factor (BCF) and determine the resulting effects by measuring biomarkers of stress. This study clearly shows high bioaccumulation of Be (2012), V, Ni and Pb (2013) in mussel digestive glands in the Steepbank R. which flows directly of OS mining area than at the reference site, while Al, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Mo (2012) and Ni (2013) were significantly higher in mussel gills which shows different pathways of exposure for V and Ni. Metals exposure consequently impacted metallothionein and lipid peroxidation (oxidative tissues damage) in mussel. These results confirm that some metals and inorganic elements are bioavailable in mussel tissues, which was associated to metal detoxification and oxidative stress in mussels located downstream OS mining area.

  9. SISGR - Hydrogen Caged in Carbon-Exploration of Novel Carbon-Hydrogen Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueking, Angela [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Badding, John [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Crespi, Vinent [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen trapped in a carbon cage, captured through repulsive interactions, is a novel concept in hydrogen storage. Trapping hydrogen via repulsive interactions borrows an idea from macroscale hydrogen storage (i.e. compressed gas storage tanks) and reapplies these concepts on the nanoscale in specially designed molecular containers. Under extreme conditions of pressure, hydrogen solubility in carbon materials is expected to increase and carbon is expected to restructure to minimize volume via a mixed sp2/sp3 hydrogenated state. Thermodynamics dictate that pre-formed C-H structures will rearrange with increased pressure, yet the final carbon-hydrogen interactions may be dependent upon the mechanism by which hydrogen is introduced. Gas “trapping” is meant to denote gas present in a solid in a high density, adsorbed-like state, when the external pressure is much less than that necessary to provide a comparable fluid density. Trapping thus denotes a kinetically metastable state rather than thermodynamic equilibrium. This project probed mechanochemical means to polymerize select hydrocarbons in the presence of gases, in an attempt to form localized carbon cages that trap gases via repulsive interactions. Aromatic, polyaromatic, and hydroaromatic molecules expected to undergo cyclo-addition reactions were polymerized at high (~GPa) pressures to form extended hydrogenated amorphous carbon networks. Notably, aromatics with a pre-existing internal free volume (such as Triptycene) appeared to retain an internal porosity upon application of pressure. However, a high photoluminescence background after polymerization precluded in situ identification of trapped gases. No spectroscopic evidence was found after depressurization that would be indicative of pockets of trapped gases in a localized high-pressure environment. Control studies suggested this measurement may be insensitive to gases at low pressure. Similarly, no spectral fingerprint was found for gas-imbued spherical

  10. Synthesis of copper and zinc sulfide nanocrystals via thermolysis of the polymetallic thiolate cage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Kuzuya, Yutaka Tai, Saeki Yamamuro and Kenji Sumiyama

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper report on the synthesis of copper and zinc sulfide nanocrystals (NCs via the formation of polymetallic thiolate cages. Cu2S NCs derived from Cu–dodecanethiol complex formed well-defined spherers, which were sufficiently monodisperse (with a size distribution of ~10% standard deviation of approximately 4.7 nm diameter on average to generate ordered self-assemblies. An electron diffraction pattern and UV–vis spectrum of Cu2S NCs indicate that this process can provide pure β-chalcocite (Cu2S. Nearly monodisperse ZnS NCs with a size ranging from 3 to 7 nm were obtained by thermolysis of the S–Zn–dodecanethiol precursor. The electron diffraction pattern indicates that zinc sulfide NCs are either wurtzite or a mixture of wurtzite and zincblende. TEM observation and UV–vis spectra revealed that the growth rate of ZnS NCs depends strongly on the annealing temperature. UV–vis spectra of 3 nm ZnS NCs show sharp excitonic features and a large blue shift from the bulk material. The photoluminescence spectra exhibit a large red shift from the absorption band edges. These shifts could be attributed to recombination from the surface traps. The narrow size distribution of Cu2S and ZnS NCs led to the formation of ordered self-assemblies with various well-defined but nonclosed-packing.

  11. Squeezing clathrate cages to host trivalent rare-earth guests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Department of Chemistry; Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); He, Yuping [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Mordvinova, Natalia E. [Laboratoire CRISMAT, ENSICAEN, CNRS UMR (France); Lebedev, Oleg [Laboratoire CRISMAT, ENSICAEN, CNRS UMR (France); Kovnir, Kirill [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Department of Chemistry; Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Strike difference of the trivalent rare-earth cations from their alkali and alkaline-earth peers is in the presence of localized 4f-electrons and strong spin-orbit coupling. Placing trivalent rare-earth cations inside the fullerene molecules or in between the blocks of itinerant magnetic intermetallics gave rise to plethora of fascinating properties and materials. A long-time missing but hardly desired piece is the semiconducting or metallic compound where rare-earth cations are situated inside the oversized polyhedral cages of three-dimensional framework. In this work we present a synthesis of such compounds, rare-earth containing clathrates Ba8-xRxCu16P30. The unambiguous proofs of their composition and crystal structure were achieved by a combination of synchrotron powder diffraction, time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction, scanning-transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Our quantum-mechanical calculations and experimental characterizations show that the incorporation of the rare-earth cations significantly enhances the hole mobility and concentration which results in the drastic increase in the thermoelectric performance.

  12. Model of a generator end-winding cage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leger, A.C.; Fanton, J.P.; Davies, C.

    1994-09-01

    This document presents some studies concerning the vibratory characterization of particular structures called: generator end-winding cages. These structures are mainly made up of the endings of armature windings. The question of their good mechanical behaviour is of prime importance, since they are submitted to high electromagnetic efforts during the different electrical ratings encountered during operation. The designer (GEC-Alsthom) and the user (EDF) have both undertaken numerical calculations in order to characterize a given machine, in this case a 600 MW bipolar generator; it appeared interesting to compare such calculations. The models realized respectively by GEC-Alsthom and EDF make use of different techniques and hypotheses. GEC-Alsthom represents the sets of rods and spacers by plates, which properties are determined by a pre-processor. The model is simplified to take into account the existing symmetries. It takes profit of previous experience and aims at a fast utilisation. The EDF model tends to allow a further comprehensive calculation, form the electromagnetic efforts to the determination of local stresses. The whole set of the constituting elements of the structure is modelled by beams, which leads to an important size for the model (21 000 degrees of freedom). The validation performed on the two models has been focused on the comparison between respective results and also with experimental results. Each model provides values for the first eigenfrequencies and the associated modes shapes. (authors). 3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Closed-cage tungsten oxide clusters in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D M David Jeba; Pradeep, T; Thirumoorthy, Krishnan; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2010-05-06

    During the course of a study on the clustering of W-Se and W-S mixtures in the gas phase using laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry, we observed several anionic W-O clusters. Three distinct species, W(6)O(19)(-), W(13)O(29)(-), and W(14)O(32)(-), stand out as intense peaks in the regular mass spectral pattern of tungsten oxide clusters suggesting unusual stabilities for them. Moreover, these clusters do not fragment in the postsource decay analysis. While trying to understand the precursor material, which produced these clusters, we found the presence of nanoscale forms of tungsten oxide. The structure and thermodynamic parameters of tungsten clusters have been explored using relativistic quantum chemical methods. Our computed results of atomization energy are consistent with the observed LDI mass spectra. The computational results suggest that the clusters observed have closed-cage structure. These distinct W(13) and W(14) clusters were observed for the first time in the gas phase.

  14. Structure and assembly of scalable porous protein cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Eita; Böhringer, Daniel; van de Waterbeemd, Michiel; Leibundgut, Marc; Zschoche, Reinhard; Heck, Albert J. R.; Ban, Nenad; Hilvert, Donald

    2017-03-01

    Proteins that self-assemble into regular shell-like polyhedra are useful, both in nature and in the laboratory, as molecular containers. Here we describe cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structures of two versatile encapsulation systems that exploit engineered electrostatic interactions for cargo loading. We show that increasing the number of negative charges on the lumenal surface of lumazine synthase, a protein that naturally assembles into a ~1-MDa dodecahedron composed of 12 pentamers, induces stepwise expansion of the native protein shell, giving rise to thermostable ~3-MDa and ~6-MDa assemblies containing 180 and 360 subunits, respectively. Remarkably, these expanded particles assume unprecedented tetrahedrally and icosahedrally symmetric structures constructed entirely from pentameric units. Large keyhole-shaped pores in the shell, not present in the wild-type capsid, enable diffusion-limited encapsulation of complementarily charged guests. The structures of these supercharged assemblies demonstrate how programmed electrostatic effects can be effectively harnessed to tailor the architecture and properties of protein cages.

  15. John Cage's Aria viewed through the prism of contextual determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Bojana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analysis the three contextual layers of creating John Cage's Aria for solo voice performed by Cathy Berberia at the 'big stage' of musical neo-avant-garde in Darmstadt. The layers in question are: (1 the socio-political context of Germany after World War II, where the denazification process was started at the time, (2 the artistic context of neo-avant-garde musical milieu which was being formed in Darmstadt in that period, and (3 the context of a new epoch in the history of vocal art. The thesis presented here is that an encounter occurred between American experimental and European avant-garde musical practice during the accelerated denazification and liberalisation of German society and the establishment of the Cold War relationship between the East and the West. The piece Aria represents an example of a collaborative work between American and European artists, which turned to be an important step in the history of extended vocal techniques in musical performing and composing.

  16. Porous organic cage membranes for water desalination: a simulation exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xian; Jiang, Jianwen

    2017-07-19

    Porous organic cages (POCs) have emerged as a new class of porous materials and received considerable interest for their potential applications. Herein we report the first proof-of-concept simulation study on POC membranes for water desalination. Five [4+6] POCs (CC1, CC2, CC3, CC16, and CC17) are considered with similar crystal structures, but different periphery groups and pore morphologies. CC1 is found to be impermeable to water due to disconnected pores. With an interconnected tetrahedral pore network, CC3 and CC16 have an intermediate water permeability of 1-5 × 10 -7 kg m (m 2 h bar) -1 . CC2 and CC17 contain straight pores and a widely open pore network, respectively, thus exhibit a high water permeability of 2-3 × 10 -6 kg m (m 2 h bar) -1 ; nevertheless, salt rejection in CC17 is only 89%. Among the five POC membranes, CC2 is the best for water desalination with performance superior to other membranes reported in the literature. The membrane flexibility is revealed to have a weak effect on water permeation. To provide further microscopic understanding, the permeation duration, diffusion and hydrogen bonding of water in the POC membranes are quantitatively analyzed. From this simulation study, the key factors governing water permeation in the POC membranes are unraveled and CC2 is identified to be an interesting candidate for water desalination.

  17. Four-dimensional multi-site photolysis of caged neurotransmitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ann eGo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurons receive thousands of synaptic inputs that are distributed in space and time. The systematic study of how neurons process these inputs requires a technique to stimulate multiple yet highly targeted points of interest along the neuron's dendritic tree. Three-dimensional multi-focal patterns produced via holographic projection combined with two-photon photolysis of caged compounds can provide for highly localized release of neurotransmitters within each diffraction-limited focus, and in this way emulate simultaneous synaptic inputs to the neuron. However, this technique so far cannot achieve time-dependent stimulation patterns due to fundamental limitations of the hologram-encoding device and other factors that affect the consistency of controlled synaptic stimulation. Here, we report an advanced technique that enables the design and application of arbitrary spatio-temporal photostimulation patterns that resemble physiological synaptic inputs. By combining holographic projection with a programmable high-speed light-switching array, we have overcome temporal limitations with holographic projection, allowing us to mimic distributed activation of synaptic inputs leading to action potential generation. Our experiments uniquely demonstrate multi-site two-photon glutamate uncaging in three dimensions with submillisecond temporal resolution. Implementing this approach opens up new prospects for studying neuronal synaptic integration in four dimensions.

  18. Progesterone after Estradiol Modulates Shuttle-Cage Escape by Facilitating Volition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darryl J. Mayeaux

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In animal models of depression, depression is defined as performance on a learning task. That task is typically escaping a mild electric shock in a shuttle cage by moving from one side of the cage to the other. Ovarian hormones influence learning in other kinds of tasks, and these hormones are associated with depressive symptoms in humans. The role of these hormones in shuttle-cage escape learning, however, is less clear. This study manipulated estradiol and progesterone in ovariectomized female rats to examine their performance in shuttle-cage escape learning without intentionally inducing a depressive-like state. Progesterone, not estradiol, within four hours of testing affected latencies to escape. The improvement produced by progesterone was in the decision to act, not in the speed of learning or speed of escaping. This parallels depression in humans in that depressed people are slower in volition, in their decisions to take action.

  19. Perioperative complications in patients treated with posterior cervical fusion and bilateral cages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof B Siemionow

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The results of our study show that PCF with cages can be considered a safe alternative for patients undergoing cervical spine surgery. The procedure has a favorable overall complication profile, short length of stay, and negligible blood loss.

  20. Direct gravimetric sensing of GBL by a molecular recognition process in organic cage compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutschy, Malte; Schneider, Markus W; Mastalerz, Michael; Waldvogel, Siegfried R

    2013-09-28

    Organic cages were identified as highly potent affinity materials for the tracing of γ-butyrolactone. The selectivity over ethanol and water is based on the interior functional groups which allow preferential hydrogen bonding to the target analyte.

  1. From Coordination Cages to a Stable Crystalline Porous Hydrogen-Bonded Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Zhanfeng [State Key Lab of Structure Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, CAS, Fuzhou 350002 P. R. China; Liu, Guoliang [State Key Lab of Structure Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, CAS, Fuzhou 350002 P. R. China; Chen, Yu-Sheng [ChemMatCARS, Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, The University of Chicago, Argonne Illinois 60439 USA; Yuan, Daqiang [State Key Lab of Structure Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, CAS, Fuzhou 350002 P. R. China; Chen, Banglin [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio Texas 78249-0698 USA

    2017-03-20

    A stable framework has been constructed through multiple charge-assisted H-bonds between cationic coordination cages and chloride ions. The framework maintained its original structure upon desolvation, which has been established by single-crystal structure analysis. This is the first fully characterized stable porous framework based on coordination cages after desolvation, with a moderately high Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area of 1201 m2 g-1. This work will not only give a light to construct stable porous frameworks based on coordination cages and thus broaden their applications, but will also provide a new avenue to the assembly of other porous materials such as porous organic cages and hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks (HOFs) through non covalent bonds.

  2. Dye-sensitization of CdS nano-cage - A density functional theory approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Kalpna; Singh, Kh. S.; Kishor, Shyam; Josefsson, Ida; Odelius, Michael; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dots a few nanometer in size exhibit unique properties in comparison to bulk due to quantum confinement. Their properties can be tuned according to their sizes. Dye sensitized quantum dot (DSQD) solar cells are based on the same principle with surface dangling bonds as a challenge. Researches have shown the existence and stability of nano-cages which are assembled such as to minimize the surface dangling bonds and hence maximize stability. Here, we report a first principles DFT study of optical and electronic properties of CdS-cage (Cd 34 S 34 ) sensitized with nkx-2388 dye in three different geometric configurations of dye attachment. A significant distortion is found to occur in the geometric structure of the cage when it interacts strongly with the dye. The relative positioning of dye and cage energy levels is found to be different in different configurations. The absorption spectrum has been analyzed with the help of natural transition orbitals (NTO).

  3. Exterior egg quality as affected by enrichment resources layout in furnished laying-hen cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Chen, Donghua; Meng, Fanyu; Su, Yingying; Wang, Lisha; Zhang, Runxiang; Li, Jianhong; Bao, Jun

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of enrichment resources (a perch, dustbath, and nest) layout in furnished laying-hen cages (FC) on exterior quality of eggs. One hundred and sixty-eight (168) Hy-Line Brown laying hens at 16 weeks of age were randomly distributed to four treatments: small furnished cages (SFC), medium furnished cages type I (MFC-I), medium furnished cages type II (MFC-II), and medium furnished cages type III (MFC-III). Each treatment had 4 replicates or cages with 6 hens for SFC (24 birds for each SFC) and 12 hen/cage for MFC-I, -II, and -III (48 birds for each MFC-I, -II and -III). Following a 2-week acclimation, data collection started at 18 weeks of age and continued till 52 weeks of age. Dirtiness of egg surface or cracked shell as indicators of the exterior egg quality were recorded each week. The results showed that the proportion of cracked or dirty eggs was significantly affected by the FC type (p<0.01) in that the highest proportion of cracked or dirty eggs was found in MFC-I and the lowest proportion of dirty eggs in SFC. The results of this showed that furnished cage types affected both dirty eggs and cracked eggs (p<0.01). The results also indicated that not nest but dustbath lead to more dirty eggs. Only MFC-I had higher dirty eggs at nest than other FC (p< 0.01). The results of dirty eggs in MFC-I and MFC-II compared with SFC and MFC-III seemed suggest that a low position of dustbath led to more dirty eggs. SFC design affected exterior egg quality and the low position of dustbath in FC resulted in higher proportion of dirty eggs.

  4. [The finite element analysis of polyetheretherketone/hydroxyapatite/carbon fiber cage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueyong; Zhu, Hongxin; Jing, Yanfeng; Sui, Guoxin; Zhang, Zongfu

    2013-08-01

    To compare the bio-mechanical characteristics of cages of two types, i. e., polyetheretherketone/ hydroxyapatite/carbon fiber (PEEK/HA/CF) and titanium combined with internal pedicle screw fixation in lumbar model, and to provide experimental evidences for clinical application, we constructed a three-dimensional finite element model of an intact L2-L4 segment by using computer tomography scans of a healthy male. The three-dimensional finite element models of an intact L2-L4 segment and single cage plus bilateral vertebral pedicle screw fixation were established. The angular motion of fused segment and stress distribution in the bone graft and cage and L3 inferior endplate under different loads were recorded. The result showed that the peak Von Mises stresses of the bone graft of PEEK/HA/CF group were at least 2.2 time as that of titanium group. The peak Von Mises stresses of L3 inferior endplate of the titanium group were at least 2. 3 times as that of PEEK/HA/CF group. These stresses were concentrated at places where the cage interfaced with the endplate. The angular variation of the titanium group showed similarity to PEEK/HA/CF group. The PEEK/HA/CF cage could provide stability similar to that of titanium cage in the presence of posterior instrumentation. It could increase the load transfer through the bone graft and promote the bone fusion. It could also reduce the stresses in endplates adjacent to the cage and reduce the subsidence of the cage.

  5. A practical guide to the synthesis of dinitroindolinyl-caged neurotransmitters

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis-Davies, Graham C R

    2011-01-01

    This protocol describes a method for efficient chemical synthesis of dinitroindolinyl derivatives of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid. these caged neurotransmitters are currently the most chemically and photochemically efficient probes for two-photon photolysis in living brain slices. the protocol only requires basic organic synthesis equipment, and no silica gel column chromatography or NMR spectroscopy is needed at any stage. Hplc is used to purify the caged transmitters at the end of ...

  6. Late Results of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion with Interbody Cages

    OpenAIRE

    Da?l?, Murat; Er, Uygur; ?im?ek, Serkan; Bavbek, Murad

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion for degenerative cervical disc disease. Overview of Literature Anterior spinal surgery originated in the mid-1950s and graft for fusion was also employed. Currently anterior cervical microdiscectomy and fusion with an intervertebral cage is a widely accepted procedure for treatment of cervical disc hernia. Artificial grafts and cages for fusion are preferred because of their ...

  7. Comparison of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage and cervical disc prostheses used in anterior cervical microscopic discectomy operations

    OpenAIRE

    Bahadir Alkan; Murat Cosar; Mustafa Guven; Adem Bozkurt Aras; Tarik Akman

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to radiologically and clinically compare the polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage and cervical disc prostheses used in anterior cervical microdiscectomy operations during the postoperative period. Methods: The study evaluated 25 cervical disc hernia patients. The cervical disc prosthesis group (Group A) comprised 10 patients while the PEEK cage group (Group B) comprised 15 patients. Before and after the operation, the cervical graphics from radiological mon...

  8. Characteristics Of Smoked Catfish (Hemibagrus Nemurus) Prepared Frompond Culture, Cage And Wild Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Maskilin, Jippo; Hasan, Bustari; Leksono, Tjipto

    2017-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the sensory quality, proximate composition, amino acids and fatty acids profiles of smoked catfish prepared from pond, cage culture and wild fish. Catfish samples 300-350 grams in weight wastaken respectualy from wild (Kampar river), pond and cage culture in Sungai Paku, Kampar. The fish was smoked using hot smoking method, and the smoked fish was evaluated for smoking yield, sensory quality, proximate composition, amino acid and fatty acid profile.The smoking...

  9. Effects of interaction of breed by pen and cage position on hen day ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in which Pen location was designated as ' L' and mean cage position as 'C',the mean hen day lay of the breeds were estimated in percentages. This were subjected to a two way Analysis of variance to determine the effect of breed by pen and cage interaction on hen-day performance.Mean hen day lay of Haco black by pen ...

  10. Comparison of Long terms Follow up Results in Patients with Cervical Disk DiseaseTreated With Anterior PEEK CageImplantation and Without it in Rasoul Akram Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Abolfazl Motiei

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Anterior interbody fusion of the cervical spine have become the gold standard for treating spinal diseases, hence the aim of this study was to compare long term follow up results in patients with cervical disk disease treated with anterior PEEK cage implantation and without it in anterior approach. Methods: Retrospectively 63 patients with known cervical discogenic disorders who went under surgery with and without cage implantation were enrolled. The neurological examination and neurologic function were assessed by using the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA scoring system and neurological cervical spine scale (NCSS before and 8 years after surgery in each patient and at the end all complications were recorded. Results: In the first group, there were 15 males and 14 females (mean age: 49±10 years and in the second group there were 27 male and 7 female (mean age: 47±9 years. The NCSS score was significantly different between two groups after surgery (p=0.035 but there was no significant difference before surgery (p=0.163. No statistical significance difference was also observed in JOA score and complications before and after procedure, but JOA post surgery score between two groups had significant difference (p=0.047 . Conclusion: In conclusion, present study showed that PEEK cage implantation is a highly useful alternative to the conventional treatment methods.

  11. Literacy, Numeracy, and Problem Solving in Technology-Rich Environments among U.S. Adults: Results from the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies 2012. Appendix D: Standard Error Tables. First Look. NCES 2014-008

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides Appendix D, Standard Error tables, for the full report, entitled. "Literacy, Numeracy, and Problem Solving in Technology-Rich Environments among U.S. Adults: Results from the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies 2012. First Look. NCES 2014-008." The full report presents results of the Program…

  12. Evaluation of cage designs and feeding regimes for honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shao Kang; Csaki, Tamas; Doublet, Vincent; Dussaubat, Claudia; Evans, Jay D; Gajda, Anna M; Gregorc, Alex; Hamilton, Michele C; Kamler, Martin; Lecocq, Antoine; Muz, Mustafa N; Neumann, Peter; Ozkirim, Asli; Schiesser, Aygün; Sohr, Alex R; Tanner, Gina; Tozkar, Cansu Ozge; Williams, Geoffrey R; Wu, Lyman; Zheng, Huoqing; Chen, Yan Ping

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to improve cage systems for maintaining adult honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) workers under in vitro laboratory conditions. To achieve this goal, we experimentally evaluated the impact of different cages, developed by scientists of the international research network COLOSS (Prevention of honey bee COlony LOSSes), on the physiology and survival of honey bees. We identified three cages that promoted good survival of honey bees. The bees from cages that exhibited greater survival had relatively lower titers of deformed wing virus, suggesting that deformed wing virus is a significant marker reflecting stress level and health status of the host. We also determined that a leak- and drip-proof feeder was an integral part of a cage system and a feeder modified from a 20-ml plastic syringe displayed the best result in providing steady food supply to bees. Finally, we also demonstrated that the addition of protein to the bees' diet could significantly increase the level ofvitellogenin gene expression and improve bees' survival. This international collaborative study represents a critical step toward improvement of cage designs and feeding regimes for honey bee laboratory experiments.

  13. Comparison growth of Kappaphycus alvarezii (Rhodophyta, Solieriaceae cultivation in floating cage and longline in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma’ruf Kasim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, cultivation using cages for Kappaphycus alvarezii was limited reported before. This study aims to reveal growth of K. alvarezii cultivated in floating cages and longline. The study was conducted in one of cultivation areas in Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia. Total gross weight, propagule growth rate and specific growth rate were performing in this study. During our field experiment, total gross weight of K. alvarezii after 40 days, from 5 kg was growth to 22.5 ± 1.40 kg and 38.8 ± 1.6 kg on longline and floating cages, respectively. Propagule growth rate after 40 days, from 50 g was 107.8 ± 7.0 g and 152.5 ± 7.9 g during April, and 132.0 ± 8.0 g and 218.8 ± 8.6 g during August, on longline and floating cage, respectively. Specific growth rate of K. alvarezii was high during August, 2.43% day−1 and 3.69% day−1 cultivated in longline and floating cage, respectively. Propagule morphology was white and damage in 40% cultivated by longline and no damage by using floating cage particular in August and September while high dense of herbivorous fish surrounding the experimental sites.

  14. Model of a generator end-winding cage; Modelisation d`une cage de developpantes d`alternateur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leger, A.C.; Fanton, J.P.; Davies, C.

    1994-09-01

    This document presents some studies concerning the vibratory characterization of particular structures called: generator end-winding cages. These structures are mainly made up of the endings of armature windings. The question of their good mechanical behaviour is of prime importance, since they are submitted to high electromagnetic efforts during the different electrical ratings encountered during operation. The designer (GEC-Alsthom) and the user (EDF) have both undertaken numerical calculations in order to characterize a given machine, in this case a 600 MW bipolar generator; it appeared interesting to compare such calculations. The models realized respectively by GEC-Alsthom and EDF make use of different techniques and hypotheses. GEC-Alsthom represents the sets of rods and spacers by plates, which properties are determined by a pre-processor. The model is simplified to take into account the existing symmetries. It takes profit of previous experience and aims at a fast utilisation. The EDF model tends to allow a further comprehensive calculation, form the electromagnetic efforts to the determination of local stresses. The whole set of the constituting elements of the structure is modelled by beams, which leads to an important size for the model (21 000 degrees of freedom). The validation performed on the two models has been focused on the comparison between respective results and also with experimental results. Each model provides values for the first eigenfrequencies and the associated modes shapes. (authors). 3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Biologic activity of cyclic and caged phosphates: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorke, Dietrich E; Stegmeier-Petroianu, Anka; Petroianu, Georg A

    2017-01-01

    The recognition in the early 1960s by Morifusa Eto that tri-o-cresyl phosphate (TOCP) is hydroxylated by the cytochrome P450 system to an intermediate that spontaneously cyclizes to a neurotoxic phosphate (saligenin phosphate ester) ignited the interest in this group of compounds. Only the ortho isomer can cyclize and clinically cause Organo Phosphate Induced Delayed Neurotoxicity (OPIDN); the meta and para isomers of tri-cresyl phosphate are not neuropathic because they are unable to form stable cyclic saligenin phosphate esters. This review identifies the diverse biological effects associated with various cyclic and caged phosphates and phosphonates and their possible use. Cyclic compounds that inhibit acetylcholine esterase (AChE), such as salithion, can be employed as pesticides. Others are neurotoxic, most probably because of inhibition of neuropathy target esterase (NTE). Cyclic phosphates that inhibit lipases, the cyclipostins, possibly represent promising therapeutic avenues for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or microbial infections; those compounds inhibiting β-lactamase may prevent bacterial resistance against β-lactam antibiotics. Naturally occurring cyclic phosphates, such as cyclic AMP, cyclic phosphatidic acid and the ryanodine receptor modulator cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose, play an important physiological role in signal transduction. Moreover, some cyclic phosphates are GABA-antagonists, while others are an essential component of Molybdenum-containing enzymes. Some cyclic phosphates (cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide) are clinically used in tumor therapy, while the coupling of therapeutic agents with other cyclic phosphates (HepDirect® Technology) allows drugs to be targeted to specific organs. Possible clinical applications of these compounds are considered. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Impact of sea waves on underwater fish-breeding cages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilyaev Sergey Ivanovich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of sea objects is of great importance while solving the problems of providing the constantly growing requirements of the national economy with sea products. Cultivation of sea objects uses special hydrobiotechnical constructions. As the practice showed, cultivation of seafood is commercially impossible without solving the questions of calculating and designing such constructions. In special literature these questions are poorly covered or not considered at all. In the article the results of theoretical and pilot studies of waves influence on hydrobiotechnical constructions is provided, in particular on underwater fish-breeding cages.This article offers the theoretical solution to the problem of determining the efforts of the ropes holding the fish tank under wave influences. In order to solve this problem, the equations of hard drives movements were set up and the differential equations of free oscillations of buzz were obtained.When determining the horizontal movements, the four different configurations of connections and the system motion directions in general are possible in case of waveoscillations. Next step is the solution of the differential equations and determination of natural oscillation frequency in the direction of the vertical axis. Defining efforts in the ropes from their own weight (static calculation is self-explanatory, it should be noted that accounting for the weighing influence of water on such structures does not have significant influence.Further the authors defined loading and efforts from the regular waves’ impacts.Modeling of the waves influence on submersible fish tank was carried by Fraud method. The studies were conducted with two models with large and small mesh. The signals of strain gauge sensors were registered by electronic measuring equipment.When comparing the theoretical and experimental data, satisfactory results have been obtained. It was determined that in order to improve the calculation

  17. Ferrimagnetic ferritin cage nanoparticles used as MRI contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Y.; Cao, C.; Zhang, T.; Xu, H.; Pan, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The nano-sized ferrimagnetic ferritin cage nanoparticles are ideal materials for understanding of superparamagnetism, biomimetic synthesis of ultrafine magnetic particles and their application in biomedicine. Ferrimagnetic M-HFn nanoparticles with size of magnetite cores in a mean size ranges from 2.7 nm to 5.3 nm were synthesized through loading different amount of iron into recombinant human H chain ferritin (HFn) shells. Both the saturation magnetization (Ms) and blocking temperature (Tb) were increased with the size of ferrimagnetic cores. In essence, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis showed that the synthesized M-HFn nanoparticles (5.3 nm magnetite core) has extremely high transverse relaxivity (r2) values up to 320.9 mM-1S-1, which indicate that M-HFn nanoparticles are promising negative contrast agent in early detection of tumors. In addition, the longitudinal relaxivity (r1) (10.4 mM-1S-1) and r2/r1 ratio ( 2.2) of M-HFn nanoparticles ( 2.7 nm magnetite core in diameter) will make it a considerable potential as a positive contrast agent in MRI. This means the M-HFn nanoparticles can be used as dual functional MR contrast agent. Acute toxicity study of M-HFn in rats showed that a dosage of 20 mg Fe/kg makes no abnormalities by serum biochemical and hematological analysis as well as histopathological examination. Compared with a similar commercial contrast agent, combidex (with a clinical dosage of 2.7 mg Fe/kg), it indicates that M-HFn nanoparticle is of a relative safe ferrimagnetic nanoparticle when used in vivo.

  18. Sea-cage aquaculture, sea lice, and declines of wild fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazer, L Neil

    2009-06-01

    A sea cage, sometimes referred to as a net pen, is an enclosure designed to prevent farm fish from escaping and to protect them from large predators, while allowing a free flow of water through the cage to carry away waste. Farm fish thus share water with wild fish, which enables transmission of parasites, such as sea lice, from wild to farm and farm to wild fishes. Sea lice epidemics, together with recently documented population-level declines of wild salmon in areas of sea-cage farming, are a reminder that sea-cage aquaculture is fundamentally different from terrestrial animal culture. The difference is that sea cages protect farm fish from the usual pathogen-control mechanisms of nature, such as predators, but not from the pathogens themselves. A sea cage thus becomes an unintended pathogen factory. Basic physical theory explains why sea-cage aquaculture causes sea lice on sympatric wild fish to increase and why increased lice burdens cause wild fish to decline, with extirpation as a real possibility. Theory is important to this issue because slow declines of wild fish can be difficult to detect amid large fluctuations from other causes. The important theoretical concepts are equilibrium, host-density effect, reservoir-host effect, and critical stocking level of farmed fish (stocking level at which lice proliferate on farm fish even if wild fish are not present to infect them). I explored these concepts and their implications without mathematics through examples from salmon farming. I also considered whether the lice-control techniques used by sea-cage farmers (medication and shortened grow-out times) are capable of protecting wild fish. Elementary probability showed that W ≈ W* - εF (where W is the abundance of wild fish, W* is the prefarm abundance, F is the abundance of farm fish, and ε is the ratio of lice per farm fish to lice per wild fish). Declines of wild fish can be reduced by short growing cycles for farm fish, medicating farm fish, and keeping

  19. Effect of cage type on the behaviour patterns of rabbit does at different physiological stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Alfonso-Carrillo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Interest in commercially farmed rabbit welfare has increased in recent years. As a result, new alternativehousing systems have been developed, although they require evaluation in order to demonstrate their potential for improving welfare. The aim of this trial was to study the behavioural traits of rabbit does housed in 2 different types of cage (TC: conventional vs. alternative with an elevated platform, at different physiological stages (PS; lactation and gestation. Behavioural observations were carried out on 12 rabbit commercial does using continuous 24 h video recording. Independently of PS and TC, rabbit does spent most of their time on foot mats (on av. 57.7%. However, due to the use of platforms (on av. 23.0% of time, lactating does spent 36.6% less time on foot mats (P<0.001 and gestating does spent 27.0% less time on wire mesh (P<0.001 in alternative cages than in conventional cages. Alternative cages allowed for standing posture, but this behaviour was only observed in gestating does (on av. 4.6 times a day. Frequency of drinking was higher in conventional than in alternative cages (24.6 vs. 19.1 times a day; P<0.05. Gestating does housed in conventional cages reached the highest duration and frequency of interacting with neighbours (276 s/d and 4.6 times/d; P<0.05. The frequency of interacting with kits was lower in alternative than in conventional cages (2.4 vs. 8.6 times a day; P<0.01. Doe behaviour was influenced by the time of day, with less activity during the midday hours. During dark hours, rabbit does more frequently performed restless behaviour such as hyperactivity or nursing, matching the time at which rabbit does spent more time on the platform. The platform was frequently used by rabbit does, regardless of their physiological stage, and during late lactation phase, when mothers were not receptive to nursing, does housed in alternative cages used the platform as a mean to flee from kits trying to suckle

  20. Depopulation of Caged Layer Hens with a Compressed Air Foam System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Shailesh; Hoffman, John; Stringfellow, Kendre; Abi-Ghanem, Daad; Zhao, Dan; Caldwell, David; Lee, Jason; Styles, Darrel; Berghman, Luc; Byrd, James; Farnell, Yuhua; Archer, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    Simple Summary Reportable diseases, such as avian influenza, spread rapidly among poultry, resulting in the death of a large number of birds. Once such a disease has been diagnosed at a farm, infected and susceptible birds are rapidly killed to prevent the spread of the disease. The methods to eliminate infected caged laying hens are limited. An experiment was conducted to study the effectiveness of foam made from compressed air, water, and soap to kill laying hens in cages. The study found that stress levels of the hens killed using compressed air foam in cages to be similar to the hens killed by carbon dioxide or the negative control. Hens exposed to carbon dioxide died earlier as compared to the foam methods. The authors conclude that application of compressed air foam in cages is an alternative to methods such as gas inhalation and ventilation shutdown to rapidly and humanely kill laying hens during epidemics. Abstract During the 2014–2015 US highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) outbreak, 50.4 million commercial layers and turkeys were affected, resulting in economic losses of $3.3 billion. Rapid depopulation of infected poultry is vital to contain and eradicate reportable diseases like HPAI. The hypothesis of the experiment was that a compressed air foam (CAF) system may be used as an alternative to carbon dioxide (CO2) inhalation for depopulating caged layer hens. The objective of this study was to evaluate corticosterone (CORT) and time to cessation of movement (COM) of hens subjected to CAF, CO2 inhalation, and negative control (NEG) treatments. In Experiment 1, two independent trials were conducted using young and spent hens. Experiment 1 consisted of five treatments: NEG, CO2 added to a chamber, a CO2 pre-charged chamber, CAF in cages, and CAF in a chamber. In Experiment 2, only spent hens were randomly assigned to three treatments: CAF in cages, CO2 added to a chamber, and aspirated foam. Serum CORT levels of young hens were not significantly

  1. Effect of space allowance and cage size on laying hens housed in furnished cages, Part I: Performance and well-being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widowski, T. M; Caston, L. J; Hunniford, M. E; Cooley, L; Torrey, S

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There are few published data on the effects of housing laying hens at different densities in large furnished cages (FC; a.k.a. enriched colony cages). The objective of this study was to determine the effects of housing laying hens at 2 space allowances (SA) in 2 sizes of FC on measures of production and well-being. At 18 wk of age, 1,218 LSL-Lite hens were housed in cages furnished with a curtained nesting area, perches, and scratch mat, and stocked at either 520 cm2 (Low) or 748 cm2 (High) total floor space. This resulted in 4 group sizes: 40 vs. 28 birds in smaller FC (SFC) and 80 vs. 55 in larger FC (LFC). Data were collected from 20 to 72 wks of age. There was no effect of cage size (P = 0.21) or SA (P = 0.37) on hen day egg production, egg weight (PSize = 0.90; PSA = 0.73), or eggshell deformation (PSize = 0.14; PSA = 0.053), but feed disappearance was higher in SFC than LFC (P = 0.005). Mortality to 72 wk was not affected by cage size (P = 0.78) or SA (P = 0.55). BW (P = 0.006) and BW CV (P = 0.008) increased with age but were not affected by treatment. Feather cleanliness was poorer in FC with low SA vs. high (P hens housed at the lower space allowance may be compromised according to some welfare assessment criteria. PMID:29050408

  2. General and simple approach for control cage and cylindrical mesopores, and thermal/hydrothermal stable frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, Sherif A; Mizukami, Fujio; Hanaoka, Takaaki

    2005-05-19

    Highly ordered cage and cylindrical mesoporeous silica monoliths (HOM) with 2- and 3-dimensional (2D and 3D, respectively) structures, mesopore/micropore volumes, and thick-walled frameworks were successfully fabricated by instant direct templating of lyotropic phases of copolymer (EO(m)-PO(n)-EO(m)) surfactants. Large cage-like pores with uniform constriction sizes up to 10 nm and open cylindrical channel-like mesopores can be easily achieved by this simple and efficient synthesis design. Our results show that the cage-like pores could be fabricated at relatively lower copolymer concentrations used in the lyotropic phase domains at copolymer/TMOS ratios of 35 wt %. These ordered cage pore architectures underwent transition to open-cylindrical pores by increasing the copolymer concentration. High EO/PO block copolymers, in general, were crucially affected on the increase of the interior cavity sizes and on the stability of the cage mesopore characters. However, for F108 (EO(141)PO(44)EO(141)) systems, the fabrication of ordered and stable cage pore monoliths was achieved with significantly higher copolymer concentrations up to 90 wt %. Interestingly, the effective copolymer molecular nature was also observed in the ability to design various ordered mesophase geometries in large domain sizes. Our findings here show evidence that the synthetic strategy provides realistic control over a wide range of mesostructured phase geometries and their extended long-range ordering in the final replicas of the silica monolith frameworks. In addition, the HOM silica monoliths exhibited considerable structural stability against higher thermal temperature (up to 1000 degrees C) and longer hydrothermal treatment times under boiling water and steam. The remarkable structural findings of 3D frameworks, transparent monoliths, and micropores combined with large cage- and cylindrical-like mesopores are expected to find promising uses in materials chemistry.

  3. Subsidence of polyetheretherketone intervertebral cages in minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tien V; Baaj, Ali A; Dakwar, Elias; Burkett, Clinton J; Murray, Gisela; Smith, Donald A; Uribe, Juan S

    2012-06-15

    A retrospective review. The objective is to evaluate subsidence related to minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal lumbar interbody fusion by reviewing our experience with this procedure. Polyetheretherketone intervertebral cages of different lengths, widths, and heights filled with various allograft types are commonly used as spacers in lumbar fusions. Subsidence is a potential complication. To date, there are no published reports specifically addressing subsidence, because it relates to a series of patients undergoing minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas lumbar interbody fusion. An institutional review board-approved, retrospective review of a prospectively collected database was conducted. One hundred forty consecutive patients who underwent this procedure between L1 and L5 during a 2-year period were included. All patients had T scores of -2.5 or more. Postoperative radiographs during routine follow-ups were reviewed for subsidence, defined as any violation of the vertebral end plate. Radiographical subsidence occurred in 14.3% (20 of 140), whereas clinical subsidence occurred in 2.1%. Subsidence occurred in 8.8% (21 of 238) of levels fused. Construct length had a significant positive correlation with increasing subsidence rates. Subsidence rates decreased progressively with lower levels in the lumbar spine, but had a higher than expected rate at L4-L5. Subsidence rates of 14.1% (19 of 135) and 1.9% (2 of 103) were associated with 18-and 22-mm-wide cages, respectively. No significant trends were observed with cage lengths. Supplemental lateral plates had a higher rate of subsidence than bilateral pedicle screws. Subsidence occurred at the superior end plate 70% of the time. The use of wider intervertebral cages leads to a significantly lower rate of subsidence, but a longer cage does not necessarily offer a similar advantage. Wide cages are protective against subsidence, and the widest cages should be used whenever feasible for interbody

  4. Field cage studies and progressive evaluation of genetically-engineered mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Facchinelli

    Full Text Available A genetically-engineered strain of the dengue mosquito vector Aedes aegypti, designated OX3604C, was evaluated in large outdoor cage trials for its potential to improve dengue prevention efforts by inducing population suppression. OX3604C is engineered with a repressible genetic construct that causes a female-specific flightless phenotype. Wild-type females that mate with homozygous OX3604C males will not produce reproductive female offspring. Weekly introductions of OX3604C males eliminated all three targeted Ae. aegypti populations after 10-20 weeks in a previous laboratory cage experiment. As part of the phased, progressive evaluation of this technology, we carried out an assessment in large outdoor field enclosures in dengue endemic southern Mexico.OX3604C males were introduced weekly into field cages containing stable target populations, initially at 10:1 ratios. Statistically significant target population decreases were detected in 4 of 5 treatment cages after 17 weeks, but none of the treatment populations were eliminated. Mating competitiveness experiments, carried out to explore the discrepancy between lab and field cage results revealed a maximum mating disadvantage of up 59.1% for OX3604C males, which accounted for a significant part of the 97% fitness cost predicted by a mathematical model to be necessary to produce the field cage results.Our results indicate that OX3604C may not be effective in large-scale releases. A strain with the same transgene that is not encumbered by a large mating disadvantage, however, could have improved prospects for dengue prevention. Insights from large outdoor cage experiments may provide an important part of the progressive, stepwise evaluation of genetically-engineered mosquitoes.

  5. Lumbar sagittal contour after posterior interbody fusion: threaded devices alone versus vertical cages plus posterior instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemme, W R; Owens, B D; Dhawan, A; Zeidman, S; Polly, D W

    2001-03-01

    An observational radiographic study examining lumbar sagittal contour of patients undergoing posterior interbody arthrodesis. To compare operative alterations of lumbar sagittal contour after posterior interbody fusion using threaded interbody devices alone versus vertical cages combined with posterior compression instrumentation. Technique-related alterations of lumbar sagittal contour during interbody arthrodesis have received little attention in the spinal literature. Standing lumbar radiographs were measured for preoperative and postoperative segmental lordosis at levels undergoing posterior interbody arthrodesis using either stand-alone side-by-side threaded devices or vertical cages combined with posterior transpedicular compression instrumentation. Sagittal plane segmental correction (or loss of correction) was calculated and statistically compared. The radiographs of 30 patients (34 spinal segments) undergoing lumbar or lumbosacral arthrodesis were compared. Seventeen patients (18 segments) had undergone interbody fusion using threaded cages,whereas 13 patients (16 segments) underwent fusion using vertically oriented mesh cages combined with posterior compression instrumentation. Preoperative segmental lordosis averaged 8 degrees for both groups. For patients undergoing fusion with threaded cages, there was a mean lordotic loss of 3 degrees/segment. For patients undergoing fusion with vertically oriented mesh cages combined with posterior compression instrumentation,there was a mean lordotic gain of 5 degrees/segment. This difference in segmental sagittal plane contour was highly significant (P = 0.00). Threaded fusion devices placed under interbody distraction with the endplates parallel fail to preserve or reestablish segmental lordosis. Vertical cages, however, when combined with posterior compression instrumentation, not only maintain segmental lordosis, but also can correct sagittal plane deformity.

  6. Controlled Formation of Heteroleptic [Pd2(La)2(Lb)2](4+) Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Dan; Barnsley, Jonathan E; Gordon, Keith C; Crowley, James D

    2016-08-24

    Metallosupramolecular architectures are beginning to be exploited for a range of applications including drug delivery, catalysis, molecular recognition, and sensing. For the most part these achievements have been made with high-symmetry metallosupramolecular architectures composed of just one type of ligand and metal ion. Recently, considerable efforts have been made to generate metallosupramolecular architectures that are made up of multiple different ligands and/or metals ions in order to obtain more complex systems with new properties. Herein we show that the addition of an electron-rich 2-amino-substituted tripyridyl ligand, 2,6-bis(pyridin-3-ylethynyl)pyridine (2A-tripy), to a solution of the [Pd2(tripy)4](4+) cage resulted in the clean generation of a heteroleptic [Pd2(tripy)2(2A-tripy)2](4+) architecture. The formation of the mixed-ligand cage [Pd2(tripy)2(2A-tripy)2](4+) was confirmed using (1)H NMR spectroscopy, diffusion-ordered spectroscopy, and rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy and high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Density functional theory calculations suggested the cis isomer was more stable that the trans isomer. Additionally, the calculations indicated that the heteroleptic palladium(II) cages are kinetically metastable intermediates rather than the thermodynamic product of the reaction. Competition experiments supported that finding and showed the cages are long-lived in solution at room temperature. Finally, it was shown that the addition of 2A-tripy to a range of preformed [Pd2(Ltripy)4](4+) cages cleanly generated the mixed-ligand systems. Three other systems displaying different exo and endo functionalities within the cage assembly were generated, suggesting that this method could be applied to synthesize a range of highly functionalized heteroleptic cis-[Pd2(La)2(Lb)2](4+) cages.

  7. The physical environment mediates male harm and its effect on selection in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Li; Chen, Patrick J; Singh, Amardeep; Agrawal, Aneil F; Rundle, Howard D

    2017-07-12

    Recent experiments indicate that male preferential harassment of high-quality females reduces the variance in female fitness, thereby weakening natural selection through females and hampering adaptation and purging. We propose that this phenomenon, which results from a combination of male choice and male-induced harm, should be mediated by the physical environment in which intersexual interactions occur. Using Drosophila melanogaster , we examined intersexual interactions in small and simple (standard fly vials) versus slightly more realistic (small cages with spatial structure) environments. We show that in these more realistic environments, sexual interactions are less frequent, are no longer biased towards high-quality females, and that overall male harm is reduced. Next, we examine the selective advantage of high- over low-quality females while manipulating the opportunity for male choice. Male choice weakens the viability advantage of high-quality females in the simple environment, consistent with previous work, but strengthens selection on females in the more realistic environment. Laboratory studies in simple environments have strongly shaped our understanding of sexual conflict but may provide biased insight. Our results suggest that the physical environment plays a key role in the evolutionary consequences of sexual interactions and ultimately the alignment of natural and sexual selection. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. The model of double-cage induction motor for the analysis of thermal fields in transient operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mróz Jan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Emergency motor switch-on happens occasionally while operating a doublesquirrel- cage motor at full supply voltage with the rotor blocked (e.g., in coal mills. After releasing the blockage, the by now heated motor is started up again. However, the mechanical stress caused by the increased temperature poses considerable hazards to the squirrel-cage winding. This paper presents a double-cage induction motor model for analysis of thermal fields in transient operation. The thermal field for the rotor of a doublesquirrel- cage motor of soldered or cast structure, operating in the conditions described, has been calculated in the present paper using a thermal network method. Measurement results have been presented for the double-squirrel-cage winding temperature for a soldered cage construction in the blocked rotor state.

  9. Final Report for DUSEL R&D: BetaCage: A Screener of Ultra-Low-Level Radioactive Surface Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golwala, Sunil R. [California Institute of Technology

    2013-12-20

    The eventual full-size, radiopure BetaCage will be a low-background, atmospheric-pressure neon drift chamber with unprecedented sensitivity to emitters of low-energy electrons and alpha particles. We expect that the prototype BetaCage already developed will be an excellent screener of alpha particles. Both the prototype and final BetaCage will provide new infrastructure for rare-event science.

  10. John Cage y su influencia en la obra del video artista Nam June Paik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarriugarte Gómez, Íñigo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1958, the Korean artist Nam June Paik (*1932; †2006 meets in Germany John Cage (*1912; †1992, avant-garde musician, who was deeply interested in the Zen Buddhism. The meeting with Cage was vital, because the North American composer will convince him to orient his career towards the artistic avant-garde, giving up his facet like classic pianist. The philosophy of Cage is refl ected in compositions like “4’ 33’’, from 1952, where the spectator doesn’t listen the sound of the piano, because this isn’t played, but he listens a silence that is interrupted by the environmental sound. There are several versions of this piece, marking the silences by means of processes at random with the “I Ching”. In this sense, the silence used by John Cage is related to the vacuity of the Zen Buddhism. Also, Paik makes use of silence in numerous works, like “1963 TV Clock”, where 24 colour television sets are manipulated, feeling at the same time the silence, interrupted again by the own momentary circumstances of the spectator. This same infl uence of the Zen Buddhism in the music of Cage is observed when argues that the music composed of melodies has the same value than the sound understood by us like noises. This aspect, among others, infl uenced to Paik, whose video images are defi ned like attributes of traditional works that don’t impress to the audience, but they suggest variable conditions. Some of his works related to Cage’s philosophy have been “Hommage à John Cage” from 1959; “Study for pianoforte” from 1960; and “Global Grove” from 1973, where Paik uses as a collage the images of his avant-garde collaborators John Cage, Allen Ginsberg and Merce Cunningham.

    En 1958, el artista coreano Nam June Paik (*1932; †2006 conoce en Alemania a John Cage (*1912; †1992, músico vanguardista, quien estaba profundamente interesado en el budismo zen. Su encuentro con Cage fue vital, ya que el compositor

  11. Genotype by production environment interaction in the GIFT strain of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaw, H.L.; Ponzonia, R.W.; Hamzah, A.; Abu-Bakara, K.R.; Bijma, P.

    2012-01-01

    Three discrete generations of GIFT fish (Nile tilapia strain, Oreochromis niloticus; a total of 10,065 fish with pedigree and phenotypic information) were tested in pond and cage culture environments to determine genotype by production environment interaction between both environments in Malaysia.

  12. Octahedral [Pd6L8]12+Metallosupramolecular Cages: Synthesis, Structures and Guest-Encapsulation Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Y; Digal, Lori; Gardiner, Michael G; Lucas, Nigel T; Crowley, James D

    2017-10-26

    Four planar tripyridyl ligands (L tripy ), 1,3,5-tris(pyridin-3-ylethynyl)benzene 1 a, 1,3,5-tris[4-(3-pyridyl)phenyl]benzene 2 a, and the hexyloxy chain functionalized derivatives 1,3,5-tris[(3-hexyloxy-5-pyridyl)ethynyl]benzene 1 b, and 1,3,5-tris[4-(3-hexyloxy-5-pyridyl)phenyl]benzene 2 b, were synthesized and used to generate a family of [Pd 6 (L tripy ) 8 ](BF 4 ) 12 octahedral cages (L tripy =1 a, b or 2 a, b). The ligands and cages were characterized using a combination of 1 H, 13 C, and DOSY nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, high resolution electrospray mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and in three cases, X-ray crystallography. The molecular recognition properties of the cages with neutral and anionic guests were examined, in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), using NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and molecular modeling. No binding was observed with simple aliphatic and aromatic guest molecules. However, anionic sulfonates were found to interact with the octahedral cages and the binding interaction was size selective. The smaller [Pd 6 (1 a, b) 8 ] 12+ cages were able to interact with three p-toluenesulfonate guest molecules while the larger [Pd 6 (2 a, b) 8 ] 12+ systems could host four of the anionic guest molecules. To probe the importance of the hydrophobic effect, a mixed water-DMSO (1:1) solvent system was used to reexamine the binding of the neutral organic guests adamantane, anthracene, pyrene and 1,8-naphthalimide within the cages. In this solvent system all the guests except adamantane were observed to bind within the cavities of the cages. NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling indicated that the cages bind multiple copies of the individual guests (between 3-6 guest molecules per cage). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Biomechanical Evaluation of a Novel Apatite-Wollastonite Ceramic Cage Design for Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Finite Element Model Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Celal; Şenköylü, Alpaslan; Aktaş, Erdem; Sarıkaya, Baran; Sipahioğlu, Serkan; Gürbüz, Rıza; Timuçin, Muharrem

    2018-01-01

    Cage design and material properties play a crucial role in the long-term results, since interbody fusions using intervertebral cages have become one of the basic procedures in spinal surgery. Our aim is to design a novel Apatite-Wollastonite interbody fusion cage and evaluate its biomechanical behavior in silico in a segmental spinal model. Mechanical properties for the Apatite-Wollastonite bioceramic cages were obtained by fitting finite element results to the experimental compression behavior of a cage prototype. The prototype was made from hydroxyapatite, pseudowollastonite, and frit by sintering. The elastic modulus of the material was found to be 32 GPa. Three intact lumbar vertebral segments were modelled with the ANSYS 12.0.1 software and this model was modified to simulate a Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion. Four cage designs in different geometries were analyzed in silico under axial loading, flexion, extension, and lateral bending. The K2 design had the best overall biomechanical performance for the loads considered. Maximum cage stress recorded was 36.7 MPa in compression after a flexion load, which was within the biomechanical limits of the cage. Biomechanical analyses suggest that K2 bioceramic cage is an optimal design and reveals essential material properties for a stable interbody fusion.

  14. Biomechanical evaluation of immediate stability with rectangular versus cylindrical interbody cages in stabilization of the lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webb John K

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent cadaver studies show stability against axial rotation with a cylindrical cage is marginally superior to a rectangular cage. The purpose of this biomechanical study in cadaver spine was to evaluate the stability of a new rectangular titanium cage design, which has teeth similar to the threads of cylindrical cages to engage the endplates. Methods Ten motion segments (five L2-3, five L4-5 were tested. From each cadaver spine, one motion segment was fixed with a pair of cylindrical cages (BAK, Sulzer Medica and the other with paired rectangular cages (Rotafix, Corin Spinal. Each specimen was tested in an unconstrained state, after cage introduction and after additional posterior translaminar screw fixation. The range of motion (ROM in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and rotation was tested in a materials testing machine, with +/- 5 Nm cyclical load over 10 sec per cycle; data from the third cycle was captured for analysis. Results ROM in all directions was significantly reduced (p Conclusions There was no significant difference in immediate stability in any direction between the threaded cylindrical cage and the new design of the rectangular cage with endplate teeth.

  15. DNA damage in caged Gammarus fossarum amphipods: A tool for freshwater genotoxicity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacaze, Emilie [Universite de Lyon, INRA-ENTPE, Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement, rue Maurice Audin, Vaulx en Velin F-69518 (France); Cemagref, Unite de Recherche des Milieux Aquatiques, (UR MALY), 3 bis quai Chauveau, 69336 Lyon, Cedex 9 (France); Devaux, Alain [Universite de Lyon, INRA-ENTPE, Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement, rue Maurice Audin, Vaulx en Velin F-69518 (France); Mons, Raphael [Cemagref, Unite de Recherche des Milieux Aquatiques, (UR MALY), 3 bis quai Chauveau, 69336 Lyon, Cedex 9 (France); Bony, Sylvie [Universite de Lyon, INRA-ENTPE, Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement, rue Maurice Audin, Vaulx en Velin F-69518 (France); Garric, Jeanne [Cemagref, Unite de Recherche des Milieux Aquatiques, (UR MALY), 3 bis quai Chauveau, 69336 Lyon, Cedex 9 (France); Geffard, Alain [EA 2069 URVVC-SE, Laboratoire d' Eco-Toxicologie, UFR Sciences, Moulin de la Housse, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Geffard, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.geffard@cemagref.fr [Cemagref, Unite de Recherche des Milieux Aquatiques, (UR MALY), 3 bis quai Chauveau, 69336 Lyon, Cedex 9 (France)

    2011-06-15

    The aim of this study was to propose a tool for freshwater environmental genotoxicity assessment using Gammarus fossarum, a high ecologically relevant species. In a first part, gammarids were caged upstream and downstream wastewater treatment plant effluent output. The sensitivity of genotoxic responses of haemocytes, oocytes and spermatozoa was compared using the Comet assay. Spermatozoa appeared to be the most sensitive, suitable and relevant cell type for genotoxicity risk assessment. In a second part, a watershed-scale study was conducted over 2 years to evaluate the applicability of our caging procedure. The genotoxic impact of a contamination was followed, taking into account seasonal variability. DNA damage in spermatozoa exhibited low basal level and low variability in control upstream sites, providing a reliable discrimination of polluted sites. Finally, DNA damage in caged G. fossarum has been proved to be a sensitive and reproducible tool for freshwater genotoxicity assessment. - Highlights: > Two different contamination contexts: WWTP effluents and polymetallic contamination. > DNA damage in caged Gammarus fossarum is a sensitive tool for freshwater quality assessment. > Spermatozoa is the most relevant cell type for biomonitoring freshwater genotoxicity. > Combining biomarker responses with analytical chemistry provides rich ecotoxicological information. - We propose an approach to assess freshwater genotoxicity in the field based on caged Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea, amphipoda).

  16. Triangular Monometallic Cyanide Cluster Entrapped in Carbon Cage with Geometry-Dependent Molecular Magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fupin; Gao, Cong-Li; Deng, Qingming; Zhu, Xianjun; Kostanyan, Aram; Westerström, Rasmus; Wang, Song; Tan, Yuan-Zhi; Tao, Jun; Xie, Su-Yuan; Popov, Alexey A; Greber, Thomas; Yang, Shangfeng

    2016-11-09

    Clusterfullerenes are capable of entrapping a variety of metal clusters within carbon cage, for which the entrapped metal cluster generally keeps its geometric structure (e.g., bond distance and angle) upon changing the isomeric structure of fullerene cage, and whether the properties of the entrapped metal cluster is geometry-dependent remains unclear. Herein we report an unusual triangular monometallic cluster entrapped in fullerene cage by isolating several novel terbium cyanide clusterfullerenes (TbNC@C 82 ) with different cage isomeric structures. Upon varying the isomeric structure of C 82 cage from C 2 (5) to C s (6) and to C 2v (9), the entrapped triangular TbNC cluster exhibits significant distortions as evidenced by the changes of Tb-C(N) and C-N bond distances and variation of the Tb-C(N)-N(C) angle by up to 20°, revealing that the geometric structure of the entrapped triangular TbNC cluster is variable. All three TbNC@C 82 molecules are found to be single-ion magnets, and the change of the geometric structure of TbNC cluster directly leads to the alternation of the magnetic relaxation time of the corresponding TbNC@C 82 clusterfullerene.

  17. RESULTS OF THE USE OF PEEK CAGES IN THE TREATMENT OF BASILAR INVAGINATION BY GOEL TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Eduardo Carelli Teixeira da Silva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Analysis of the use of polyetheretherketone (PEEK cages for atlantoaxial facet realignment and distraction for treatment of basilar invagination by Goel technique. Method: Retrospective descriptive statistical analysis of the neurological status, pain, presence of subsidence and bone fusion with the use of PEEK cages in 8 atlantoaxial joints of 4 patients with basilar invagination. All patients were treated with atlantoaxial facet distraction and realignment and subsequent arthrodesis C1-C2 by the technique of Goel modified by the use of PEEK cage. Results: All patients showed improvement in Nurick neurological assessment scale and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS of pain. There were no cases of subsidence, migration, or damage to the vertebral artery during the insertion of the cage. All joints evolved with bone fusion, assessed by dynamic radiographs, and computed tomography. Two patients developed neuropathic pain in dermatome of C2 and one patient had unilateral vertebral artery injury during C2 instrumentation treated with insertion of pedicle screw to control the bleeding. Conclusion: The results of the treatment of basilar invagination by the Goel technique with the use of PEEK cages shown to be effective and safe although further studies are needed to confirm this use.

  18. Small Cages with Insect Couples Provide a Simple Method for a Preliminary Assessment of Mating Disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Briand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mating disruption by sex pheromones is a sustainable, effective and widely used pest management scheme. A drawback of this technique is its challenging assessment of effectiveness in the field (e.g., spatial scale, pest density. The aim of this work was to facilitate the evaluation of field-deployed pheromone dispensers. We tested the suitability of small insect field cages for a pre-evaluation of the impact of sex pheromones on mating using the grape moths Eupoecilia ambiguella and Lobesia botrana, two major pests in vineyards. Cages consisted of a cubic metal frame of 35 cm sides, which was covered with a mosquito net of 1500 μm mesh size. Cages were installed in the centre of pheromone-treated and untreated vineyards. In several trials, 1 to 20 couples of grape moths per cage were released for one to three nights. The proportion of mated females was between 15 to 70% lower in pheromone-treated compared to untreated vineyards. Overall, the exposure of eight couples for one night was adequate for comparing different control schemes. Small cages may therefore provide a fast and cheap method to compare the effectiveness of pheromone dispensers under standardised semi-field conditions and may help predict the value of setting-up large-scale field trials.

  19. How CAGE, RAPS4QF and AUDIT can help practitioners for patients admitted with acute alcohol intoxication in emergency departments?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges eBrousse

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To help clinicians to identify the severity of Alcohol Use Disorders (AUD from optimal thresholds found for recommended scales. Especially, taking account of the high prevalence of alcohol dependence among patients admitted to the Emergency Department (ED for acute alcohol intoxication (AAI, we propose to define thresholds of severity of dependence based on the AUDIT score.Methods: All patients admitted to the ED with AAI (blood alcohol level >0.8g/L, in a two-month period, were assessed using the CAGE, RAPS-QF and AUDIT, with the alcohol dependence/abuse section of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI used as the gold standard. To explore the relation between the AUDIT and the MINI the sum of the positive items on the MINI (dependence as a quantitative variable and as an ordinal parameter were analyzed. From the threshold score (TS found for each scale we proposed intervals of severity of Alcohol Use Disorders (AUDs. Results: The mean age of the sample (122 males, 42 females was 46 years. Approximately 12 % of the patients were identified with alcohol abuse and 78 % with dependence (DSM-IV. Cut points were determined for the AUDIT in order to distinguish mild and moderate dependence from severe dependence. A strategy of intervention based on levels of severity of AUD was proposed. Conclusion: Different thresholds proposed for the CAGE, RAPS4-QF and AUDIT could be used to guide the choice of intervention for a patient: brief intervention, brief negotiation interviewing or longer more intensive motivational intervention.

  20. Review of a monograph by L. I. Broslavskiy “Technical regulation and standardization of goods quality and environment safety. Laws and realities in Russia, the USA and the European Union”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albina S. Panova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to conduct a comprehensive analysis of a monograph by L. I. Broslavskiy devoted to the study of technical regulation and standardization of quality and safety of products and the environment in the Russian Federation the United States and the European Union. Methods dialectical approach to cognition of social phenomena which allows analyzing them in historical development and functioning in the context of a set of objective and subjective factors which determined the choice of the following research methods formallegal comparativelegal etc. Results the main approaches presented in the reviewed monograph are evaluated concerning the legal nature of technical regulation and standardization the system of documentation on standardization the practice of technical regulation and standardization in the Russian Federation the United States of America and the European Union. Scientific novelty for the first time the provisions presented in the monograph were estimated namely the provisions on the legal nature of standardization on the coordination of technical regulation and standardization normative acts and lawenforcement practice in the sphere of technical regulation and standardization of Russia the United States of America and the European Union the authorrsquos proposals aimed at improvement of the Russian Law No. 184FZ ldquoOn technical regulationrdquo of 27.12.2002 and No. 162FZ ldquoOn standardization in the Russian Federationrdquo of 29.06.2015. The conclusion is made about the essential contribution of L. I. Broslavskiyrsquos monograph to the development of the Russian legal doctrine on technical regulation and standardization. Practical significance the reviewer concludes that the monographic research by L. I. Broslavskiy can be used by scientists professors of law and economics at universities and faculties practicing lawyers employees of industrial enterprises representatives of the judiciary system and of the federal and

  1. Sulfur radicals embedded in various cages of ultramarine analogs prepared from zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalak, Stanislaw; Jankowska, Aldona; Zeidler, Sebastian; Wieckowski, Andrzej B.

    2007-01-01

    The colored (greenish) products analogous to ultramarine obtained from zeolite A, cancrinite and erionite by means of high-temperature (500-800 deg. C) treatment of zeolites mixed with elemental sulfur and alkalis can maintain the original structure of the parent zeolite under certain preparation conditions. The ESR spectra of samples recorded at room temperature always indicate the presence of radicals · S 3 - (the blue chromophore). The spectra of samples prepared from zeolites recorded at 77 K exhibit additional signals that could be assigned to the yellow chromophore (the radical · S 2 - ) encapsulated inside the β or ε-cages. It is remarkable that in the case of products with preserved cancrinite structure, where the · S 2 - radicals are encapsulated inside the ε-cages, the above signals are visible already at room temperature. It may result from retarded mobility of these species in small cancrinite cages. - Graphical abstract: Structures of SOD, LTA, cancrinite and erionite

  2. Design Concepts of Polycarbonate-Based Intervertebral Lumbar Cages: Finite Element Analysis and Compression Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Obedt Figueroa-Cavazos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work explores the viability of 3D printed intervertebral lumbar cages based on biocompatible polycarbonate (PC-ISO® material. Several design concepts are proposed for the generation of patient-specific intervertebral lumbar cages. The 3D printed material achieved compressive yield strength of 55 MPa under a specific combination of manufacturing parameters. The literature recommends a reference load of 4,000 N for design of intervertebral lumbar cages. Under compression testing conditions, the proposed design concepts withstand between 7,500 and 10,000 N of load before showing yielding. Although some stress concentration regions were found during analysis, the overall viability of the proposed design concepts was validated.

  3. Anterior cervical discectomy with or without fusion with ray titanium cage: a prospective randomized clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerberg, J.; Kosteljanetz, M.; Bøge-Rasmussen, Torben

    2008-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A prospective randomized clinical study. OBJECTIVE: To compare 2 surgical methods in the treatment of cervical radiculopathy caused by hard or soft disc herniation; namely, simple discectomy versus discectomy with an additional interbody fusion with a Ray titanium cage. SUMMARY...... of the nervous elements have been performed. To date, no randomized studies have compared simple discectomy with discectomy followed by an interbody fusion with a titanium cage. METHODS: Eighty-six patients with symptoms of nerve root compression at 1 level were randomly allocated to either discectomy followed...... by fusion with a Ray titanium cage (40 patients) or to discectomy alone (46 patients). Clinical and radiologic follow-up was performed 3, 12, and 24 months after surgery. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups concerning self-reported satisfaction or severity of pain...

  4. The use of porous tantalum cages in the treatment of unremitting spondylodiscitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samo Karel Fokter

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unsuccessful medical treatment of pyogenic multifocal spondylodiscitis including signs of sepsis and unremitting pain is challenging. The aim of our report was to present a case of multilevel spondylodiscitis successfully treated by posterior lumbar interbody fusion using porous tantalum cages. Case presentation: A 59-year-old male was diagnosed with spondylodiscitis at T8-T9 level. Although treated with antibiotics, the patient again presented with worsening of systemic signs of infection and back pain. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed spondylodiscitis at L1 to S1 level. Posterior lumbar interbody bone fusion with tantalum cages from L1 to S1 was performed. The inflammation rapidly subsided. Computer tomography studies showed a stable construct at 24 months. Conclusion: Porous tantalum cages used in combination with transpedicular fixation seem to be a sound alternative to interbody devices made from other materials when treating spondylodiscitis cases without definite osseous destruction.

  5. Cytotoxic and anti-HIV-1 caged xanthones from the resin and fruits of Garcinia hanburyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutrakul, Vichai; Anantachoke, Natthinee; Pohmakotr, Manat; Jaipetch, Thaworn; Sophasan, Samaisukh; Yoosook, Chalobon; Kasisit, Jittra; Napaswat, Chanita; Santisuk, Thawatchai; Tuchinda, Patoomratana

    2007-01-01

    Three new caged xanthones, 7-methoxydesoxymorellin (1), 2-isoprenylforbesione (2) and 8,8a-epoxymorellic acid (3), together with nine known caged xanthones were isolated from the EtOAc extracts of resin and fruits of Garcinia hanburyi. The structures were determined by spectroscopic methods. Most of the isolated compounds showed significant cytotoxicities against a panel of mammalian cancer cell lines. Compound 3, together with the known compounds desoxymorellin, morellic acid, gambogic acid, hanburin, forbesione and dihydroisomorellin, exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity in the reverse transcriptase (RT) assay while the known compounds desoxygambogenin and dihydroisomorellin were found moderately active in the syncytium assay. This work represents the first report on the anti-HIV-1 activities of caged xanthones.

  6. Mediterranean fruit fly: interference of oviposition by radiation-sterilized females in field cages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McInnis, D.O.; Wong, T.T.Y.

    1990-01-01

    In experiments between April and September 1984, the behaviour of nonirradiated and radiation-sterilized laboratory-adapted adults of the tephritid Ceratitis capitata was observed on apples hung on guava trees in outdoor cages in Hawaii. The numbers of nonirradiated females observed resting on fruit were reduced several times by the presence of irradiated females, either alone or with irradiated males, but not by irradiated males alone. Similarly, the number of nonirradiated females observed ovipositing and the duration of oviposition was reduced by the presence of irradiated females. In control cages (all nonirradiated flies), the duration of oviposition by females averaged 255.9±15.0 s on fruit, while most of nonirradiated and irradiated females in the mixed (treatment) cage averaged 157±19.8 s and 77.5±7.5 s on fruit, resp. Irradiated females behaved skittishly on fruit and frequently engaged in physical encounters with other flies

  7. EFFICACY OF CAGE PLACEMENT WITHOUT PLATE IN PATIENTS WITH CERVICAL MYELOPATHY WITH SINGLE-LEVEL AFFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS ALBERTO ZUÑIGA-MAZÓN

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the efficacy of PEEK (Poly-ether-ether-ketone cage without plate for the treatment of single-level cervical spondylosis. Methods: Ten patients with cervical myelopathy data, with a single-level root condition, seen at the outpatient clinic of the Neurosurgery Service, operated in 2016, mean age 53 years, 6 (60% female, 4 (40% obese, 3 (30% smokers. The Cloward technique was used by anterior approach, discectomy, and PEEK cage placement. Results: At six months of surgery, 100% of the patients had increased intervertebral space, with a 100% reduction in osteophytes; only one patient had dysphagia, no patient had lesion of the adjacent segment and 10% had persistent root pathology. Cervical lordosis was observed in 90% of the patients and arthrodesis in 100% of the cases. Conclusions: Anterior approach arthrodesis using PEEK cage without cervical plate is effective as a treatment of cervical myelopathy in a single level.

  8. Multifunctional ferritin cage nanostructures for fluorescence and MR imaging of tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Luo, Ming; Yu, Xiang; Han, Yu; Wei, Hong-Ping; Cui, Zong-Qiang; Zhang, Xian-En

    2011-12-01

    Bionanoparticles and nanostructures have attracted increasing interest as versatile and promising tools in many applications including biosensing and bioimaging. In this study, to image and detect tumor cells, ferritin cage-based multifunctional hybrid nanostructures were constructed that: (i) displayed both the green fluorescent protein and an Arg-Gly-Asp peptide on the exterior surface of the ferritin cages; and (ii) incorporated ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles into the ferritin interior cavity. The overall architecture of ferritin cages did not change after being integrated with fusion proteins and ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. These multifunctional nanostructures were successfully used as a fluorescent imaging probe and an MRI contrast agent for specifically probing and imaging αvβ3 integrin upregulated tumor cells. The work provides a promising strategy for tumor cell detection by simultaneous fluorescence and MR imaging.Bionanoparticles and nanostructures have attracted increasing interest as versatile and promising tools in many applications including biosensing and bioimaging. In this study, to image and detect tumor cells, ferritin cage-based multifunctional hybrid nanostructures were constructed that: (i) displayed both the green fluorescent protein and an Arg-Gly-Asp peptide on the exterior surface of the ferritin cages; and (ii) incorporated ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles into the ferritin interior cavity. The overall architecture of ferritin cages did not change after being integrated with fusion proteins and ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. These multifunctional nanostructures were successfully used as a fluorescent imaging probe and an MRI contrast agent for specifically probing and imaging αvβ3 integrin upregulated tumor cells. The work provides a promising strategy for tumor cell detection by simultaneous fluorescence and MR imaging. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr11132

  9. Depopulation of Caged Layer Hens with a Compressed Air Foam System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Gurung

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During the 2014–2015 US highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI outbreak, 50.4 million commercial layers and turkeys were affected, resulting in economic losses of $3.3 billion. Rapid depopulation of infected poultry is vital to contain and eradicate reportable diseases like HPAI. The hypothesis of the experiment was that a compressed air foam (CAF system may be used as an alternative to carbon dioxide (CO2 inhalation for depopulating caged layer hens. The objective of this study was to evaluate corticosterone (CORT and time to cessation of movement (COM of hens subjected to CAF, CO2 inhalation, and negative control (NEG treatments. In Experiment 1, two independent trials were conducted using young and spent hens. Experiment 1 consisted of five treatments: NEG, CO2 added to a chamber, a CO2 pre-charged chamber, CAF in cages, and CAF in a chamber. In Experiment 2, only spent hens were randomly assigned to three treatments: CAF in cages, CO2 added to a chamber, and aspirated foam. Serum CORT levels of young hens were not significantly different among the CAF in cages, CAF in a chamber, NEG control, and CO2 inhalation treatments. However, spent hens subjected to the CAF in a chamber had significantly higher CORT levels than birds in the rest of the treatments. Times to COM of spent hens subjected to CAF in cages and aspirated foam were significantly greater than of birds exposed to the CO2 in a chamber treatment. These data suggest that applying CAF in cages is a viable alternative for layer hen depopulation during a reportable disease outbreak.

  10. Depopulation of Caged Layer Hens with a Compressed Air Foam System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Shailesh; Hoffman, John; Stringfellow, Kendre; Abi-Ghanem, Daad; Zhao, Dan; Caldwell, David; Lee, Jason; Styles, Darrel; Berghman, Luc; Byrd, James; Farnell, Yuhua; Archer, Gregory; Farnell, Morgan

    2018-01-11

    During the 2014-2015 US highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) outbreak, 50.4 million commercial layers and turkeys were affected, resulting in economic losses of $3.3 billion. Rapid depopulation of infected poultry is vital to contain and eradicate reportable diseases like HPAI. The hypothesis of the experiment was that a compressed air foam (CAF) system may be used as an alternative to carbon dioxide (CO₂) inhalation for depopulating caged layer hens. The objective of this study was to evaluate corticosterone (CORT) and time to cessation of movement (COM) of hens subjected to CAF, CO₂ inhalation, and negative control (NEG) treatments. In Experiment 1, two independent trials were conducted using young and spent hens. Experiment 1 consisted of five treatments: NEG, CO₂ added to a chamber, a CO₂ pre-charged chamber, CAF in cages, and CAF in a chamber. In Experiment 2, only spent hens were randomly assigned to three treatments: CAF in cages, CO₂ added to a chamber, and aspirated foam. Serum CORT levels of young hens were not significantly different among the CAF in cages, CAF in a chamber, NEG control, and CO₂ inhalation treatments. However, spent hens subjected to the CAF in a chamber had significantly higher CORT levels than birds in the rest of the treatments. Times to COM of spent hens subjected to CAF in cages and aspirated foam were significantly greater than of birds exposed to the CO₂ in a chamber treatment. These data suggest that applying CAF in cages is a viable alternative for layer hen depopulation during a reportable disease outbreak.

  11. Ni adsorption on Al12P12 nano-cage: A DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rad, Ali Shokuhi; Ayub, Khurshid

    2016-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to evaluate the geometries and electronic properties of nickel decorated aluminum phosphide (AlP) nano-cages. At the lowest coverage of our system (one Ni per one Al 12 P 12 ), four adsorption sites (P 1 −P 4 ) of Ni on AlP nano-cage are studied. Band structures, binding energies, total density of states, natural bond orbital (NBO) charges, and electron density differences of Ni-adsorbed Al 12 P 12 nano-cages are studied for each adsorption site. We found that three orientations (P 1 , P 2 , and P 3 ) show electron transfer from the Ni to Al 12 P 12 whereas one orientation (P 4 ) has reverse direction of electron transfer. The adsorption energies of Ni on AlP nano-cage are −136.7, −108.5, −102.7, and −99.4 kcal mol −1 for P4, P3, P1 and P2, respectively. Formation of new Al−Ni and P−Ni bonds is observed concomitant with the dissociation of some Al−P bonds of the nano-cage. - Highlights: • There are four adsorption sites (P 1 , P 2 , P 3 , and P 4 ) on Al 12 P 12 nano-cage for Ni adsorption. • Direction of charge transfer for P 1 , P 2 , and P 3 are from the Ni to Al 12 P 12 while reverse direction is found for P 4 . • The order of Ni adsorption on Al 12 P 12 is: P4> P3> P1 >P2. • Dissociation of some Al−P bonds of the Al 12 P 12 and formation of new Al−Ni and P−Ni bonds upon adsorption of Ni.

  12. Interacting Stochastic Processes: From Viciousness to Caging to Force Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shiliyang

    This thesis documents a quest to develop and study several novel interacting stochastic processes. As for the first example, we generalize a system of vicious random walkers in which the only interaction between any two random walkers is that when they intersect, both walkers are annihilated. We define a system of N vicious accelerating walkers with each walker undergoing random acceleration and compute the survival probability distribution for this system. We also define and study a system of N vicious Levy flights in which any two Levy flights crossing one another annihilate each other. The average mean-squared displacement of a Levy flight is not proportional to time, but scales with what is known as the Levy index divided by two. In both cases, vicious accelerating walkers and vicious Levy flights, we are motivated by ultimately generalizing our understanding of Gaussian random matrices via non-Markovian and non-Gaussian extensions respectively. Moreover, inspired by recent experiments on periodically sheared colloids at low densities, we define and investigate several new contact processes, or interacting stochastic processes, with conserved particle number and three-or-more-body interactions. We do so to characterize the periodically sheared colloidal system at higher densities. We find two new dynamical phase transitions between an active phase, where some fraction of the colloids are always being displaced from their position at the beginning and end of each shear cycle, and an inactive phase in which all colloids return to their initial positions at the end of each shear cycle. One of the transitions is discontinuous, while the second, which is due to a caging, or crowding, effect at high densities, appears to be continuous and in a new universality from what is known as conserved directed percolation. The latter transition may have implications for the onset of glassiness in dense, particulate systems. In addition, this thesis also includes analysis of

  13. Metal ion cage complexes as imaging agents for cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Bartolo, N.; Smith, S.; Sargeson, A.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Cage ligands are very attractive for use in radiolabelling antibodies. Their synthesis is based around Co(III) octahedral co-ordination chemistry and they may be easily derivatised for attachment to antibodies. They are known to form kinetically inert metal complexes. Copper-64 (t 1/2 = 12.7 h) has been identified as having potential value in diagnostic and therapeutic application. Its positron annihilation radiation is useful for PET imaging, while its beta (E max 578 keV, 37.2 %) emissions may also be suitable for therapy. In the current study, the new hexa-aza-cryptand, 1 -N-(4-amino-benzyl)-3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaaza-bicyclo[6.6.6]eicosane- 1,8-diamine, or SarAr, has been synthesised specifically for radiolabelling antibodies with 64 Cu and a kit formulation has been produced. The resulting radiolabelled immunoconjugate ( 64 Cu-SarArB-72.3) was injected into nude mice bearing LS174t colorectal carcinoma. Clearance of 64 CuSarAr-B72.3 from the liver and kidneys was typical of a whole IgG antibody. Tumour localisation was comparable to similar radiolabelled immunoconjugates (38± 5 % ID/g at 48 hours). Biodistribution studies of 123 I- and 111 In- radiolabelled B72.3 were conducted in the same animal model. MIRDOSE 3 was used to compare target to non-target dose of their analogous therapeutic counterparts ( 90 Y and 131 I respectively) with 64 Cu-SarAr-B72.3. Total body dose for 64 Cu-SarAr-B72.3 was significantly lower (0.09 rad/mCi) than analogous products ( 131 I-B72.3, 2.64 rad/mCi; 90 Y- B72.3, 2.387 rad/mCi) while still providing enough dose to small tumours to be potentially therapeutic. In order to assess therapeutic effect of 64 Cu, a biological study was conducted over a 12 month period. Nude mice bearing tumours between 3.5 - 5.5 mm in length were injected with various doses (0, 10, 20, 30, 40 MBq) of 64 Cu-SarAr-B72.3. Animals were regularly monitored for tumour size, animal mass, behavioural and physical abnormalities (e.g. movement / gait

  14. IPM Standards for Schools: A Program for Reducing Pest and Pesticide Risks in Schools and Other Sensitive Environments. Version 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Thomas A., Ed.

    This guide presents Integrated Pest Management (IPM) practice standards for educational facilities to help schools become certified in providing effective and safe pest control. The guide is divided into two parts with three modules each for both buildings and grounds. The first module addresses building the IPM foundation to meet all legal…

  15. Effects of perch on feed consumption and behaviour of caged laying hens

    OpenAIRE

    E. VALKONEN; R. RINNE; J. VALAJA

    2008-01-01

    This experiment studied the effects of perches in furnished cages on behaviour and feed consumption of laying hens. The study used 352 Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL) hens. The hens were housed at 16 weeks of age in furnished cages in groups of 8 birds. The experiment lasted for 205 days. The treatments were: perches present from 16 weeks of age (P16), perches present from 19 weeks of age (P19), and no perches present (NP). Feed consumption and egg production were measured over the pre-laying ...

  16. Diffusion Monte Carlo characterization of a methane molecule in a (H2O)20 dodecahedral cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kenneth; Deible, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The diffusion Monte Carlo method is used to investigate the interaction of a water molecule with a dodecahedral (H2O)20 cage as found in the methane hydrate crystal. The DMC value of the interaction energy between the methane molecule and the cage are compared with the results of MP2 and symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) calculations. In addition, the net interaction energy is decomposed into two- and three-, and n >= four-body contributions. The two- and three-body contributions are further analyzed in terms of SAPT calculations. An award of computer time was provided by the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program.

  17. The Design and its Verification of the Double Rotor Double Cage Induction Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sumita; Deb, Nirmal K.; Biswas, Sujit K.

    2017-02-01

    The concept of a double rotor motor presented earlier and its equivalent circuit has been developed, showing a non-linear parameter content. The two rotors (which are recommended to be double cage type for development of high starting torque) can run with equal or unequal speed independently, depending on their individual loading. This paper presents the elaborate design procedure, step-by-step, for the double rotor double cage motor and verifies the designed data with that obtained from three separate tests (compared to two for conventional motor) on a prototype, such that optimum performance can be obtained from the motor.

  18. Calculation of the environmental capacity of cooling ponds for cage fish farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Starco

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The determination of a maximum annual amount of fish reared in cagesm which does not result in the deterioration of the ecological state of water cooling ponds of the Zmiev Thermal Power Plant and Kursk Nuclear Power Plant series Ι and ΙΙ. Methodology. The specific (per 1 ton of farmed fish nutrient intake necessary for calculations was determined according to the data of own studies. For this purpose, we perfrormed the determination of the input of suspended solids into cooling ponds from cage lines. The calculation of mean fish weight increase during the period of trap exposition bsed on fish farm data allowed calculating the specific input of suspended solids from cages. The effect of artificial feeds and a mixture of feed resideus and fish of fishes collected under cages on water quality were evaluated in the condoitins of laboratory experiments. The effect of fish metabolites on water quality was taken into account according to literature data. Findings. In the specific conditions of the investigated cooling ponds, the environmentally allowable concentrations of biogenic elements are established based on the mineral nitrogen content. With the mean volume of the Zmiev Thermal Power Plant of 40.5 million m3, the total amount of mineral nitrogen, which can be introduced with cage aquaculture residues, is 21.87 tons. When rearing one ton of fish in cages, 91.3 kg of mineral nitrogen get into the cooling pond. Thus, the environmental capacity of the Zmiev Thermal Power Plant cooling pond for cage fish farming is 281.7 tons. Accordingly, the allowable amounts of the production of cage fish farming for the Kursk NPP taking into account N content of 0.406 mgN/dm3 and volume of the cooling pond is 625.5 tons. Originality. For the first time, we calculated the ecological capacity of cooling ponds of the Zmiev TPP and Kursk NPP, series I–II. Practical value. Application of the results presented in the paper will allow creating and

  19. Growth and stress of dourado cultivated in cages at different stocking densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neiva Braun

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the growth and the stress levels of juvenile dourado (Salminus brasiliensis cultivated in cages. Fish stocked at densities of 15 (D15 and 30 (D30 fish per square meter were evaluated in a completely randomized design with three replicates. Fish were fed twice a day with extruded ration (42% crude protein. Density influenced only biomass and daily food intake, and glucose and lactate concentrations increased over time. D15 and D30 did not influence the growth of dourado. However, the increase of glucose and lactate levels over time indicates that cultivation in cages is a stressful condition for this species.

  20. PRODUCTIVITY OF LAYERS AND EGG QUALITY IN FREE RANGE AND CAGE SYSTEM OF HOUSING

    OpenAIRE

    Đ. Senčić; Danijela Butko

    2006-01-01

    The research was conducted with two groups of Lohmann Brown hybrid layers. Production of eggs lasted for 52 weeks. A control group of layers was kept in the conventional housing system, that is, in cages, while experimental group was kept in the free range system. Layers from the free range system, compared to those kept in cages, laid fewer eggs, (266:295), they consumed more feed on daily basis (129 g : 115 g), more feed per kilogram of egg weight (2.83 kg : 2.35 kg), they had higher mor...

  1. Thermal Degradation Mechanism of a Thermostable Polyester Stabilized with an Open-Cage Oligomeric Silsesquioxane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Bautista

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A polyester composite was prepared through the polymerization of an unsaturated ester resin with styrene and an open-cage oligomeric silsesquioxane with methacrylate groups. The effect of the open-cage oligomeric silsesquioxane on the thermal stability of the thermostable polyester was studied using both thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. The results showed that the methacryl oligomeric silsesquioxane improved the thermal stability of the polyester. The decomposition mechanism of the polyester/oligomer silsesquioxane composite was proposed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR analysis of the volatiles.

  2. Thermal Degradation Mechanism of a Thermostable Polyester Stabilized with an Open-Cage Oligomeric Silsesquioxane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozalbo, Ana; Mestre, Sergio; Sanz, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    A polyester composite was prepared through the polymerization of an unsaturated ester resin with styrene and an open-cage oligomeric silsesquioxane with methacrylate groups. The effect of the open-cage oligomeric silsesquioxane on the thermal stability of the thermostable polyester was studied using both thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. The results showed that the methacryl oligomeric silsesquioxane improved the thermal stability of the polyester. The decomposition mechanism of the polyester/oligomer silsesquioxane composite was proposed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the volatiles. PMID:29295542

  3. A lightweight field cage for a large TPC prototype for the ILC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnke, Ties; Dehmelt, Klaus; Diener, Ralf; Hallermann, Lea; Matsuda, Takeshi; Prahl, Volker; Schade, Peter

    2010-06-01

    We have developed and constructed the field cage of a prototype Time Projection Chamber for research and development studies for a detector at the International Linear Collider. This prototype has an inner diameter of 72 cm and a length of 61 cm. The design of the field cage wall was optimized for a low material budget of 1.21% of a radiation length and a drift field homogeneity of ΔE/E -4 . Since November 2008 the prototype has been part of a comprehensive test beam setup at DESY and used as a test chamber for the development of Micro Pattern Gas Detector based readout devices. (orig.)

  4. The Effect of Cage Space on Behavior and Reproduction in Crl:CD1(Icr and C57BL/6NCrl Laboratory Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna N Gaskill

    Full Text Available Recommendations for the amount of cage space required for female mice with litters were first made in the 2011 Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. We hypothesized that if a difference in mouse behavior and reproduction exists within the limits of commercially available caging, this difference would be detected between the smallest and largest cages. C57BL/6NCrl and Crl:CD1(Icr breeding mice were randomly assigned to a cage treatment: LP 18790 (226 cm2; A RC1 (305 cm2; A N10 (432 cm2; T 1291 (800 cm2 and a breeding configuration: single (male removed after birth; pair (1 male + 1 female; or trio (1 male + 2 females in a factorial design for 12 weeks. All cages received 8-10 g of nesting material and nests were scored weekly. Pups were weaned between post-natal day 18 and 26 and were weighed at weaning. Adult behavior and location in the cage were recorded by scan samples every 30 min over 48 hr of video recorded on PND 0-8 and PND 14-21 when pups were in the cage. Press posture and play behavior were recorded by 1/0 sampling method. Cage space did not significantly alter typical reproductive measures. Pups in the smallest cage played less than in the other cages. Adults in the smallest cage displayed more press posture than in the two largest cages. Mice in the largest cage spent more time under the feeder than in other areas of the cage. Nest score was also the highest in the largest cage. Housing breeding groups of mice in a range of commercially available cage sizes does not affect reproduction but behavioral measures suggest that the smallest cage tested, LP 18790, may be stressful for outbred mice when pups are present.

  5. 46 CFR Appendix A to Part 520 - Standard Terminology and Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... AUTOMATED TARIFFS Pt. 520, App. A Appendix A to Part 520—Standard Terminology and Codes I—Publishing... BSK Bushel BUS Box, with Inner Cntn BXI Bucket BXT Cabinet CAB Cage CAG Can CAN Carrier CAR Case CAS... HED Hogshead HGH Hopper Car HPC Hopper Truck HPT On Hanger/Rack in bx HRB Half-Standard Rack HRK Half...

  6. Energy-bounded caging: Formal definition and 2-D energy lower bound algorithm based on weighted alpha shapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahler, Jeffrey; Pokorny, Florian T.; McCarthy, Zoe; van der Stappen, A.F.; Goldberg, Ken

    Caging grasps are valuable as they can be robust to bounded variations in object shape and pose, do not depend on friction, and enable transport of an object without full immobilization. Complete caging of an object is useful but may not be necessary in cases where forces such as gravity are

  7. On the growth of Penaeus indicus experimented in cages at different densities in a selected nursery ground

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Aravindakshan, P.N.; Paulinose, V.T.; Balasubramanian, T.; Menon, P.G.; Kutty, M.K.

    Effect of different densities on the growth of Penaeus indicus was studied in a higly productive nursery ground located at Ramanthuruth Island (lat. 9~'58'50"N, long. 76~'15'40"E) using cages. Eight cages of the same size were placed with prawns...

  8. Spray washing, absorbent corn starch powder and dry time to reduce bacterial numbers on soiled boiler transport cage flooring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most broilers in the U.S. are transported live to slaughter facilities in cages with fiberglass floors. Cages are often used repeatedly without washing and fecal matter deposited on the floor surface can transfer Campylobacter from one flock to another. Drying feces out between uses is an effectiv...

  9. Technical Note: Comparison between a direct and the standard, indirect method for dissolved organic nitrogen determination in freshwater environments with high dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeber, Daniel; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Kronvang, Brian

    2012-01-01

    was successfully applied to a range of samples from waste water treatment plants to forest and agricultural streams. With 2.5 h of measurement time per sample, SEC is slower, but more accurate than the standard approach for determination of DON concentrations in freshwaters with DIN : TDN ratios >0.6. To sum up......, the direct DON measurement by SEC enables better understanding of the nitrogen cycle of urban and agricultural freshwater systems....

  10. The effects of individually ventilated cages on the respiratory systems of male and female Wistar rats from birth until adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Guilherme D’Aprile; de Fatima Soto, Sônia; de Castro, Isac; Rodrigues, Thiago Guimarães; Moriya, Henrique Takachi; de Almeida, Francine Maria; Pazetti, Rogerio; Heimann, Joel Claudio; Furukawa, Luzia Naôko Shinohara

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the respiratory systems of male and female rats maintained in individually ventilated cages (IVCs) from birth until adulthood. METHODS: Female Wistar rats were housed in individually ventilated cages or conventional cages (CCs) and mated with male Wistar rats. After birth and weaning, the male offspring were separated from the females and kept in cages of the same type until 12 weeks of age. RESULTS: The level of food consumption was lower in male offspring (IVC=171.7±9; CC=193.1±20) than in female offspring (IVC=100.6±7; CC=123.4±0.4), whereas the water intake was higher in female offspring (IVC=149.8±11; CC=99.2±0) than in male offspring (IVC=302.5±25; CC=249.7±22) at 11 weeks of age when housed in IVCs. The cage temperature was higher in individually ventilated cages than in conventional cages for both male (IVCs=25.9±0.5; CCs=22.95±0.3) and female (IVCs=26.2±0.3; CCs=23.1±0.3) offspring. The respiratory resistance (IVC=68.8±2.8; CC=50.6±3.0) and elastance (IVC=42.0±3.9; CC=32.4±2.0) at 300 µm/kg were higher in the female offspring housed in ventilated cages. The ciliary beat values were lower in both the male (IVCs=13.4±0.2; CC=15±0.4) and female (IVC=13.5±0.4; CC=15.9±0.6) offspring housed in individually ventilated cages than in those housed in conventional cages. The total cell (IVC=117.5±9.7; CC=285.0±22.8), neutrophil (IVC=13.1±4.8; CC=75.6±4.1) and macrophage (IVC=95.2±11.8; CC=170.0±18.8) counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were lower in the female offspring housed in individually ventilated cages than in those housed in conventional cages. CONCLUSIONS: The environmental conditions that exist in individually ventilated cages should be considered when interpreting the results of studies involving laboratory animals. In this study, we observed gender dimorphism in both the water consumption and respiratory mechanics of rats kept in ventilated cages. PMID:28355363

  11. The Effects of Cold Environments on Double-Poling Performance and Economy in Male Cross-Country Skiers Wearing a Standard Racing Suit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggen, Øystein N; Heidelberg, Cecilie T; Waagaard, Silje H; F X E Revik, Hilde; Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2016-09-01

    To investigate differences in double-poling (DP) endurance performance, economy, and peak oxygen uptake (V̇O 2peak ) at low (-15°C) and moderate (6°C) ambient temperatures (T A ) in cross-country skiers wearing standard racing suits. Thirteen well-trained male cross-country skiers performed a standardized warm-up followed by a 5-min submaximal test (Sub1), a 20-min self-paced performance test, a 2nd 5-min submaximal test (Sub2), and an incremental test to exhaustion while DP on an ergometer at either low or moderate T A , randomized on 2 different days. Skin and rectal temperatures, as well as power output and respiratory variables, were measured continuously during all tests. Skin and rectal temperatures were more reduced at low T A than moderate T A (both P < .05). There was a 5% (P < .05) lower average power output during the 20-min performance test at low T A than at moderate T A , which primarily occurred in the first 8 min of the test (P < .05). Although DP economy decreased from Sub1 to Sub2 for both T A s (both P < .01), a 3.7% (P < .01) larger decrease in DP economy from Sub1 to Sub2 emerged for the low T A . Across the sample, V̇O 2peak was independent of T A . These results demonstrate a lower body temperature and reduced performance for cross-country skiers when DP at low than at moderate TA while wearing standard cross-country-skiing racing suits. Lower DP performance at the low T A was mainly due to lower power production during the first part of the test and coincided with reduced DP economy.

  12. INTERACTIVE EFFECT OF CAGE DENSITY AND DIETARY BLACK CUMIN LEVEL ON PRODUCTIVE EFFICIENCY IN BROILER CHICKENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Mahfudz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present research was aimed to evaluate an interactive effect of cage density and level ofdietary black cumin (BC on productive efficiency of broiler chickens. A total of 270 broiler chickens(initial body weight of 163.12 ± 8.10g were allocated into a completely randomized design with a 3 x 3factorial pattern. The first factor was the cage density (bird/m2 namely, D1 = 8; D2 = 10, and D3 = 12.The second factor was BC level (%, namely, B1 = 1; B2 = 2, and B3 = 3. Feed consumption, bodyweight gain (BWG, feed conversion ratio (FCR, protein digestibility, and income over feed cost(IOFC were the parameters measured. Data were subjected to ANOVA and continued to Duncan test.No interaction between cage density and black cumin on all parameters was observed. Feedconsumption and FCR were increased, but BWG was lowered significantly (P<0.05 due to the cagedensities of 10 and 12 birds/m2 on weeks 2 and 3. Protein digestibility was significantly increased byfeeding 2 and 3% BC. IOFC decreased significantly (P<0.05 when cage densities were 10 and 12birds/m2. In conclusion, the improvement of productive efficiency of broiler chicken reared at the cagedensity of 12 birds /m2 can be sufficiently achieved by feeding 1% black cumin.

  13. Romantic Remediation? John Cage and Henry David Thoreau’s Walden State of Mind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehring, F.

    2014-01-01

    Rather than identifying Cage as a romantic soul mate of the transcendentalists exhibiting a rebellious attitude against conventions, I will investigate new ways to detect with greater exactness what Sean Wilentz described in the context of David S. Reynolds work on the American Renaissance as “the

  14. Urea and Guanidinium Induced Denaturation of a Trp-Cage Miniprotein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heyda, Jan; Kožíšek, Milan; Bednárová, Lucie; Thompson, G.; Konvalinka, Jan; Vondrášek, Jiří; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 28 (2011), s. 8910-8924 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GA203/08/0114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : trp-cage denaturation * urea * guanidinium * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2011

  15. That Entertainment Called a Discussion: The Critical Arts Pedagogy of John Cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Just as John Cage used chance techniques to relinquish control in his practice as a composer, he used pedagogical techniques that facilitated shared learning and experimentation. The tenets of Critical Pedagogy, as laid out by Paulo Freire in "The Pedagogy of the Oppressed," offer insights into the structures and strategies implicit in…

  16. Effect of cage tier and age on performance, egg quality and stress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of cage tiers on week 42 BW, feed conversion ratio (FCR), tonic immobility (TI), egg weight (EW), egg yield (EY), and most external and internal quality traits of the hens' eggs were found to be insignificant. Except for shape index (SI) and albumen pH, internal and external quality traits of eggs were significantly ...

  17. the benefits of the cage as a screening tool for alcoholism in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diseases such as tuberculosis, the leading notifiable disease in. South Africa.17. The 'CAGE' acronym, representing a four-item test with questions on 'Cutting down, Armoyance at criticism, Guilty feelings and use of Eye-openers' (Table 1) was first described by. Ewing in 1970. It is one of several questionnaires designed to.

  18. Stability of gold cages (Au16 and Au17) at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... We have employed ab initio molecular dynamics to investigate the stability of the smallest gold cages, namely Au16 and Au17, at finite temperatures. First, we obtain the ground state structure along with at least 50 distinct isomers for both the clusters. This is followed by the finite temperature simulations of ...

  19. Fish cage culture catches on in Nepal | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... for their children, unlike many rural communities in Nepal. And the role of women in decision-making has been strengthened. Women take part alongside the men in all activities, from cleaning and repairing the fish cages to participating in meetings of farmers'' associations, attending workshops, and marketing the catch.

  20. Methodology for the nuclear design validation of an Alternate Emergency Management Centre (CAGE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueso, C.; De La Fuente, C.; Janes, A.; Massuet, J.; Zamora, I.; Fabbri, M.; Gasca, C.; Hernandez, H.; Angel Vega, J.

    2017-01-01

    As a consequence of the Fukushima accident, Spanish nuclear authorities have decided to equip each nuclear power plant with an Alternate Emergency Management Centre (CAGE) that will manage safely any emergency occurring on the site. The living conditions of the occupants of the CAGE in the event of a Severe Accident imply that TEDE (Total Effective Dose Equivalent) must be<50 mSv and the equivalent dose to the thyroid<500 mSv within 30 days following the accident. This paper presents the methodology followed to design CAGE in order to comply with above dose limits. The study of weather conditions as part of the data of the site will determine the relative concentrations of radionuclides in the air using ARCON96. The activity in the air is characterized depending on the source and release sequence specified in NUREG-1465 by RADTRAD code, which provides results of the inner cloud source term contribution. Known activities and energy spectra are inferred using ORIGEN-S, which are used as input for the models of the outer cloud, filters and containment generated with MCNP5. The sum of the different contributions must be below radiation dose limits. The radiation dose is optimized by varying parameters including CAGE location on the plant site, flow filtering need for recirculation, thicknesses and compositions of the walls, etc. The calculation codes selected for the development of this methodology are widely available, internationally used and validated in many studies

  1. Le marécage de Fouwarate (Kenitra, Maroc) : site de conservation d ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ouest de la plaine littorale du Gharb, sur le cours de l'oued Fouwarate, petit affluent du cours terminal de l'oued Sebou. Cette zone humide est l'un des derniers représentant d'un complexe de marécages qui occupait ladite plaine et qui offrait ...

  2. Assessing mouse behaviour throughout the light/dark cycle using automated in-cage analysis tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Rasneer S; Wells, Sara; Sillito, Rowland R; Armstrong, J Douglas; Cater, Heather L; Banks, Gareth; Nolan, Patrick M

    2018-04-15

    An important factor in reducing variability in mouse test outcomes has been to develop assays that can be used for continuous automated home cage assessment. Our experience has shown that this has been most evidenced in long-term assessment of wheel-running activity in mice. Historically, wheel-running in mice and other rodents have been used as a robust assay to determine, with precision, the inherent period of circadian rhythms in mice. Furthermore, this assay has been instrumental in dissecting the molecular genetic basis of mammalian circadian rhythms. In teasing out the elements of this test that have determined its robustness - automated assessment of an unforced behaviour in the home cage over long time intervals - we and others have been investigating whether similar test apparatus could be used to accurately discriminate differences in distinct behavioural parameters in mice. Firstly, using these systems, we explored behaviours in a number of mouse inbred strains to determine whether we could extract biologically meaningful differences. Secondly, we tested a number of relevant mutant lines to determine how discriminative these parameters were. Our findings show that, when compared to conventional out-of-cage phenotyping, a far deeper understanding of mouse mutant phenotype can be established by monitoring behaviour in the home cage over one or more light:dark cycles. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Rate constant and reaction coordinate of Trp-cage folding in explicit water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juraszek, J.; Bolhuis, P.G.

    2008-01-01

    We report rate constant calculations and a reaction coordinate analysis of the rate-limiting folding and unfolding process of the Trp-cage mini-protein in explicit solvent using transition interface sampling. Previous transition path sampling simulations revealed that in this (un)folding process the

  4. Effects of three agricultural by-products on cage culture growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In man-made Lake Ayame, a 180-day cage culture feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effects of three agricultural byproducts — chicken droppings, wheat bran and corn bran — on the survival rates, mean daily weight gain and feed conversion ratio in juveniles of a landlocked population of Sarotherodon ...

  5. Sternum Length and Rib Cage Dimensions Compared with Bodily Proportions in Adults with Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Philippe Laurin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A greater structural expansion of the rib cage in females compared with males has been described in cystic fibrosis (CF patients; however, conflicting data exist as to whether an elongation of the bony ribs and sternum contributes to this expansion.

  6. Cage occupancies in the high pressure structure H methane hydrate: a neutron diffraction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulk, C A; Klug, D D; dos Santos, A M; Karotis, G; Guthrie, M; Molaison, J J; Pradhan, N

    2012-02-07

    A neutron diffraction study was performed on the CD(4) : D(2)O structure H clathrate hydrate to refine its CD(4) fractional cage occupancies. Samples of ice VII and hexagonal (sH) methane hydrate were produced in a Paris-Edinburgh press and in situ neutron diffraction data collected. The data were analyzed with the Rietveld method and yielded average cage occupancies of 3.1 CD(4) molecules in the large 20-hedron (5(12)6(8)) cages of the hydrate unit cell. Each of the pentagonal dodecahedron (5(12)) and 12-hedron (4(3)5(6)6(3)) cages in the sH unit cell are occupied with on average 0.89 and 0.90 CD(4) molecules, respectively. This experiment avoided the co-formation of Ice VI and sH hydrate, this mixture is more difficult to analyze due to the proclivity of ice VI to form highly textured crystals, and overlapping Bragg peaks of the two phases. These results provide essential information for the refinement of intermolecular potential parameters for the water-methane hydrophobic interaction in clathrate hydrates and related dense structures.

  7. PRODUCTIVITY OF LAYERS AND EGG QUALITY IN FREE RANGE AND CAGE SYSTEM OF HOUSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đ. Senčić

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted with two groups of Lohmann Brown hybrid layers. Production of eggs lasted for 52 weeks. A control group of layers was kept in the conventional housing system, that is, in cages, while experimental group was kept in the free range system. Layers from the free range system, compared to those kept in cages, laid fewer eggs, (266:295, they consumed more feed on daily basis (129 g : 115 g, more feed per kilogram of egg weight (2.83 kg : 2.35 kg, they had higher mortality rate (6.80 % : 5.50 % and lower end of lay body weight (1.95 kg : 2.10 kg. Eggs from free range layers, compared to those from the cages system, had significantly (P0.05 were determined between the free range and the cages system of housing hens. Considering somewhat lower productivity and higher mortality rate of hens, higher feed consumption per kilogram of egg mass, but also better quality of eggs, profitability of egg production in the free range system will depend, to the maximum extent, on market evaluation of the production.

  8. Effect of thermal processing on retinol levels of free-range and caged hen eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Héryka M M; Santos, Videanny V A; Medeiros, Vanessa P Q; Silva, Keith H D; Dimenstein, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Purpose Eggs are a food item of high nutritional value, a source of vitamin A and readily accessible to the general population. Methods This paper analysed the effect of cooking on the retinol levels of free-range and caged hen eggs, using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The retinol levels of hen and quail eggs were also compared. Results The raw egg yolk retinol concentrations of free-range and caged hen eggs were 476.53+/-39.44 and 474.93+/-41.10 microg/100 g and cooked egg yolk concentrations were 393.53+/-24.74 and 379.01+/-30.78 microg/100 g, respectively; quail egg concentration was 636.56+/-32.71 microg retinol/100 g. No significant difference was found between the retinol of free-range and caged hen egg yolks; however, cooking diminished retinol levels, causing a loss of 17 and 20% in the free-range and caged hen egg yolks, respectively. Quail egg retinol concentration was significantly higher than that of the hens. Conclusion The retinol found in 100 g of hen and quail egg yolks could supply around 42 and 70.7% of the vitamin A requirements of an adult man, and is accordingly considered an excellent source of this vitamin.

  9. Let the Caged Bird Sing: Using Literature to Teach Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyatzis, Chris J.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the use of fictional literature in a college-level developmental psychology class. Focuses specifically on Maya Angelou's "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings" and its relation to several child development topics. Contends that literature should be used more often as part of instruction, especially in the sciences. (CFR)

  10. Anterior cervical discectomy with or without fusion with ray titanium cage: a prospective randomized clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerberg, J.; Kosteljanetz, M.; Bøge-Rasmussen, Torben

    2008-01-01

    adjacent disc degeneration or spondylosis were the same in both groups. CONCLUSION: This study showed no statistically significant difference between simple discectomy and discectomy followed by interbody fusion with a titanium cage in the surgical treatment of cervical radiculopathy caused by disc...

  11. Alternatives for the battery cage system: a comparison of economic, environmental and societal performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijpp, van der A.J.; Mollenhorst, H.; Berentsen, P.B.M.; Boer, de I.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The ban on the battery cage system in the European Union after 2012, mainly due to impaired hen welfare, forces farmers to change to alternative housing systems for laying hens. Large-scale introduction of more hen-friendly systems, however, requires a comparison of these systems on their economic,

  12. Dumbbells of five-connected Ge atoms and superconductivity in CaGe3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelle, Walter; Ormeci, Alim; Wosylus, Aron; Meier, Katrin; Grin, Yuri; Schwarz, Ulrich

    2012-05-21

    CaGe(3) has been synthesized at high-pressure, high-temperature conditions. The atomic pattern comprises intricate germanium layers of condensed moleculelike dimers. Below T(c) = 6.8 K, type II superconductivity with moderately strong electron-phonon coupling is observed.

  13. Nicolas Cage otsib kadunud tütart naistesaarelt / Triin Tael

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tael, Triin

    2006-01-01

    Õudusfilm "Ohvripidu" : režissöör Neil LaBute : peaosas Nicholas Cage : Ameerika Ühendriigid - Saksamaa 2006. Film on uusversioon briti 1973.a. filmist, mille režissöör oli Robin Hardy ja ühes peaosadest Christopher Lee

  14. Comparison of polyetheretherketone (PEEK cage and cervical disc prostheses used in anterior cervical microscopic discectomy operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadir Alkan

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: It was shown that in the cervical disc prosthesis group (Group A in the early and later postoperative period, intervertebral disk heights were preserved by a statistically significant amount compared to the PEEK cage group (Group B. However, this scenario did not create any significant difference in the clinical evaluation results. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2017; 6(1.000: 1-8

  15. FUZZY LOGIC BASED INTELLIGENT CONTROL OF A VARIABLE SPEED CAGE MACHINE WIND GENERATION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper describes a variable-speed wind generation system where fuzzy logic principles are used to optimize efficiency and enhance performance control. A squirrel cage induction generator feeds the power to a double-sided pulse width modulated converter system which either pump...

  16. Photoactivatable Drug-Caged Fluorophore Conjugate Allows Direct Quantification of Intracellular Drug Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Rainer H.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    We report here a method that utilizes photoactivatable drug-caged fluorophore conjugate to quantify intracellular drug trafficking processes at single cell resolution. Photoactivation is performed in labeled cellular compartments to visualize intracellular drug exchange at physiologic conditions, without the need for washing, facilitating its translation to in vivo cancer models. PMID:24135896

  17. Non-Covalent Photo-Patterning of Gelatin Matrices Using Caged Collagen Mimetic Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Hoa San, Boi; L. Kessler, Julian; Hwan Kim, Jin; Xu, Qingguo; Hanes, Justin; Yu, Seungju Michael

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in photolithography have enabled us to spatially encode biochemical cues in biocompatible platforms such as synthetic hydrogels. Conventional patterning works through photo-activated chemical reactions on inert polymer networks. However, these techniques cannot be directly applied to protein hydrogels without chemically altering the protein scaffolds. To this end, we developed a non-covalent photo-patterning strategy for gelatin (denatured collagen) hydrogels utilizing a caged collagen mimetic peptide (caged CMP) which binds to gelatin strands through UV activated, triple helix hybridization. Here we present 2D and 3D photo-patterning of gelatin hydrogels enabled by the caged CMPs as well as creation of concentration gradients of CMPs. We show that photo-patterning of PEG-conjugated caged CMPs can be used to spatially control cell adhesion on gelatin films. CMP’s specificity for binding to gelatin allows patterning of almost any synthetic or natural gelatin-containing matrix, such as zymograms, gelatin-methacrylate hydrogels, and even a corneal tissue. Since the CMP is a chemically and biologically inert peptide which is proven to be an ideal carrier for bioactive molecules, our patterning method provides a radically new tool for immobilizing drugs to natural tissues and for functionalizing scaffolds for complex tissue formation. PMID:25476588

  18. Effets de la couverture des cages flottantes et de la période de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aliment n\\'a aucune influence sur la croissance des poissons. The effects of covering the breeding floating cages with a black plastic canvas and the feeding period (day or night) on the survival and growth of the african cat-fish Heterobranchus ...

  19. Using Finite Element Method to Estimate the Material Properties of a Bearing Cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED AD-E403 988 Technical Report ARMET-TR-17035 USING FINITE ELEMENT METHOD TO ESTIMATE THE MATERIAL ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE USING FINITE ELEMENT METHOD TO ESTIMATE THE MATERIAL PROPERTIES OF A BEARING CAGE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This report summarizes the development of a material

  20. Photomodulating Gene Expression by Using Caged siRNAs with Single-Aptamer Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liangliang; Chen, Changmai; Fan, Xinli; Tang, Xinjing

    2018-02-28

    Caged siRNAs incorporating terminal modification were rationally designed for photochemical regulation of gene silencing induced by RNA interference (RNAi). Through the conjugation of a single oligonucleotide aptamer at the 5' terminus of the antisense RNA strand, enhancement of the blocking effect for RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) formation/processing was expected, due both/either to the aptamers themselves and/or to their interaction with large binding proteins. Two oligonucleotide aptamers (AS1411 and MUC-1) were chosen for aptamer-siRNA conjugation through a photolabile linker. This caging strategy was successfully used to photoregulate gene expression both of firefly luciferase and of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in cells. Further patterning experiments revealed that spatial regulation of GFP expression was successfully achieved by using the aptamer-modified caged siRNA and light activation. We expect that further optimized caged siRNAs featuring aptamer conjugation will be promising for practical applications to spatiotemporal photoregulation of gene expression in the future. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Effect of rearing technique in outdoor floor cage on slow growing rabbit population performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Preziuso

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to test the effect of floor cage in outdoor pen on productive performance and carcass characteristics of a rabbit local population characterized by slow growing rate. A sample of 48 rabbits female 57 days old was divided into two groups: Indoor group, housed in colony cages indoor at the density of 14 animals/m2 and Outdoor group, in wire net floor colony cages in outdoor pen, at the density of 5 animals/ m2. The animals were fed a commercial feed and ad libitum alfa-alfa hay. Individual live weight and cage feed consumption were checked every week and feed conversion ratio was calculated; at 103 ± 2 days old a sample of 24 animals was slaughtered and carcass traits were recorded. The results showed that the Outdoor group had the highest live weight and the best daily weight gain, together with an higher feed intake. Outdoor group showed the lower mortality, the higher slaughtering weight, the higher reference carcass incidence and hind leg percentage. These favourable results encouraged this kind of rearing system characterized also by lower investment costs.

  2. Mathematical Modelling and Parameter Determination of Reluctance Synchronous Motor with Squirrel Cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudák, Peter; Hrabovcová, Valéria

    2010-11-01

    The paper provides an analysis of reluctance synchronous motor (RSM) with asymmetrical rotor cage. Its performances during its starting up is investigated. A mathematical model is created on the basis of detailed investigation of model parameters. The RSM starting up by switching it directly across the line was simulated and verified by measurements.

  3. Timing Diatomaceous Earth-Filled Dustbox Use for Management of Northern Fowl Mites (Acari: Macronyssidae) in Cage-Free Poultry Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Amy C; Mullens, Bradley A

    2016-12-01

    Northern fowl mite management on conventionally caged birds relies on synthetic pesticide sprays to wet the vent. Cage-free chickens cannot be effectively treated this way, and pesticide use is restricted in organic production. Dustbathing behavior is encouraged in newer production systems for increased hen welfare. Diatomaceous earth (DE) is an approved organic insecticide that can be mixed with sand in dustboxes, suppressing mites but not excluding them, and potentially allowing development of mite immunity. We tested two hypotheses: 1) that DE-filled dustboxes placed before northern fowl mite introduction (prophylactic use) prevents mite populations from reaching economically damaging thresholds, and 2) that bird exposure to low mite numbers allows for protective hen immunity to develop and suppress mites after dustboxes are removed. We also tested if different beak trimming techniques (a commercial practice) affect mite growth. Mites were introduced to birds after dustboxes were made available. Average mite densities in flocks remained below damaging levels while dustboxes were available. Average mite populations rebounded after dustbox removal (even though DE persisted in the environment) regardless of the timing of removal. Mite densities on birds where a traditional hot-blade beak trimming technique was used (trial 1) were high. Mite densities in trial 2, where a newer precision infra-red trimming was used, were lower. The newer infra-red trimming method resulted in nearly intact beaks, which were better for mite control by bird grooming behaviors. The combination of early dustbox use and infra-red beak trimming should allow producers to avoid most mite damage in cage-free flocks. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Polar self-assembly: steric effects leading to polar mixed-ligand coordination cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianyong; Miller, Philip W; Nieuwenhuyzen, Mark; James, Stuart L

    2006-03-08

    We present a highly unusual example of self-assembly, specifically a polar, mixed-ligand cage which forms in preference to symmetrical homo-ligand products, and which suggests that steric effects can be exploited to obtain novel non-uniform polyhedral cages. In particular, reaction between the bulky tripodal triphosphine 2,4,6-tris(diphenylphosphino)triazine, L1, the non-bulky tripodal trinitrile 2,4,6-tris(cyanomethyl)trimethylbenzene, L2 and silver hexafluoroantimonate, AgSbF6, in a 3:1:4 ratio gives the mixed-ligand aggregate [Ag4(L1)3(L2)(SbF6)]3+, 1-SbF6, instantly as the only product in quantitative yield. The X-ray crystal structure of complex 1-SbF6 is consistent with the suspected solution-state structure. The cage derives from trigonal-pyramidal geometry, the basal vertices of which are defined by three bulky triphosphines, L1, and the apical vertex by the non-bulky trinitrile, L2. There is apical elongation amounting to 19% in comparison to the ideal uniform tetrahedron. The cage also encapsulates an SbF6 anion. 19F NMR spectra in solution for the analogous PF6 complex [Ag4(L1)3(L2)(PF6)]3+, 1-PF6, confirm that one anion is also encapsulated in solution. The synthesis of the analogous CF3SO3(-) complex, [Ag4(L1)3(L2)(OTf)]3+, 1-OTf, in solution is also described, although 1-PF6 and 1-OTf could not be isolated due to slow decomposition in solution. The selective formation of these mixed-ligand cages is discussed in terms of ligand-ligand and ligand-included anion steric repulsions, which we propose prevent the formation of the competing hypothetical homo-ligand tetrahedral structure [Ag4(L1)4(SbF6)]3+, and thus favour the mixed ligand cage. "Cage cone angles" for L1 and L2 are estimated at 115 degrees and 101 degrees, respectively. Variable-temperature 31P NMR spectroscopy shows that complex 1-SbF6 and the related previously reported partial tetrahedral complex [Ag4(L1)3(anion)]3+ undergo dynamic twisting processes in solution between enantiomeric C3

  5. Use of a Deuterated Internal Standard with Pyrolysis-GC/MS Dimeric Marker Analysis to Quantify Tire Tread Particles in the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M. Panko

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis(pyr-GC/MS analysis of characteristic thermal decomposition fragments has been previously used for qualitative fingerprinting of organic sources in environmental samples. A quantitative pyr-GC/MS method based on characteristic tire polymer pyrolysis products was developed for tread particle quantification in environmental matrices including soil, sediment, and air. The feasibility of quantitative pyr-GC/MS analysis of tread was confirmed in a method evaluation study using artificial soil spiked with known amounts of cryogenically generated tread. Tread concentration determined by blinded analyses was highly correlated (r2 ³ 0.88 with the known tread spike concentration. Two critical refinements to the initial pyrolysis protocol were identified including use of an internal standard and quantification by the dimeric markers vinylcyclohexene and dipentene, which have good specificity for rubber polymer with no other appreciable environmental sources. A novel use of deuterated internal standards of similar polymeric structure was developed to correct the variable analyte recovery caused by sample size, matrix effects, and ion source variability. The resultant quantitative pyr-GC/MS protocol is reliable and transferable between laboratories.

  6. Use of a Deuterated Internal Standard with Pyrolysis-GC/MS Dimeric Marker Analysis to Quantify Tire Tread Particles in the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unice, Kenneth M.; Kreider, Marisa L.; Panko, Julie M.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrolysis(pyr)-GC/MS analysis of characteristic thermal decomposition fragments has been previously used for qualitative fingerprinting of organic sources in environmental samples. A quantitative pyr-GC/MS method based on characteristic tire polymer pyrolysis products was developed for tread particle quantification in environmental matrices including soil, sediment, and air. The feasibility of quantitative pyr-GC/MS analysis of tread was confirmed in a method evaluation study using artificial soil spiked with known amounts of cryogenically generated tread. Tread concentration determined by blinded analyses was highly correlated (r2 ≥ 0.88) with the known tread spike concentration. Two critical refinements to the initial pyrolysis protocol were identified including use of an internal standard and quantification by the dimeric markers vinylcyclohexene and dipentene, which have good specificity for rubber polymer with no other appreciable environmental sources. A novel use of deuterated internal standards of similar polymeric structure was developed to correct the variable analyte recovery caused by sample size, matrix effects, and ion source variability. The resultant quantitative pyr-GC/MS protocol is reliable and transferable between laboratories. PMID:23202830

  7. Use, fate and ecological risks of antibiotics applied in tilapia cage farming in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rico, Andreu; Oliveira, Rhaul; McDonough, Sakchai; Matser, Arrienne; Khatikarn, Jidapa; Satapornvanit, Kriengkrai; Nogueira, António J.A.; Soares, Amadeu M.V.M.; Domingues, Inês; Van den Brink, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    The use, environmental fate and ecological risks of antibiotics applied in tilapia cage farming were investigated in the Tha Chin and Mun rivers in Thailand. Information on antibiotic use was collected through interviewing 29 farmers, and the concentrations of the most commonly used antibiotics, oxytetracycline (OTC) and enrofloxacin (ENR), were monitored in river water and sediment samples. Moreover, we assessed the toxicity of OTC and ENR on tropical freshwater invertebrates and performed a risk assessment for aquatic ecosystems. All interviewed tilapia farmers reported to routinely use antibiotics. Peak water concentrations for OTC and ENR were 49 and 1.6 μg/L, respectively. Antibiotics were most frequently detected in sediments with concentrations up to 6908 μg/kg d.w. for OTC, and 2339 μg/kg d.w. for ENR. The results of this study indicate insignificant short-term risks for primary producers and invertebrates, but suggest that the studied aquaculture farms constitute an important source of antibiotic pollution. - Highlights: • First study assessing the risks of antibiotics applied in freshwater tilapia cages. • Ten antibiotics were reported to be used by tilapia cage farmers in two Thai rivers. • Peak oxytetracycline and enrofloxacin concentrations were in the order of μg/L. • Antibiotic concentrations in river sediments next to cages were up to several mg/kg. • Antibiotics are not posing a short-term risk for pelagic aquatic organisms. - Antibiotics applied in tilapia cage farming in Thailand are released into surrounding aquatic ecosystems and constitute an important source of environmental pollution

  8. Cage slip characteristics of a cylindrical roller bearing with a trilobe-raceway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sier DENG

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on dynamic analysis of rolling bearings, the nonlinear dynamic differential equations of a cylindrical roller bearing with a trilobe-raceway were established and solved by the GSTIFF (gear stiff integer algorithm with a variable step. The influences of structural parameters and the tolerance of the trilobe-raceway, working conditions of the bearing, and the outer ring installation method on cage slip characteristics were investigated. The results show that: (i The cage slip ratio and bearing rating life of a cylindrical roller bearing with a trilobe-raceway would reduce when the low-radius (radius of the outer raceway contour at the lowest point and D-value (difference value between the high and low points of the outer raceway contour decrease, and the former (low-radius contributes more significantly. (ii The cage slip ratio of a cylindrical roller bearing with a trilobe-raceway rises with the increase of the bearing speed, and decreases with the increase of the radial force; the variation range increases with the increase of the low-radius. (iii When the installation angle of the outer ring increases in a period, the cage slip ratio remains unchanged while the bearing rating life rises up a little. Therefore, when installing a cylindrical roller bearing with a trilobe-raceway, the location of the maximum radius shall be under that of the radial force to improve the bearing rating life. (iv With the increase of the roundness of the base circle where the radius of the lowest points of the trilobe-raceway contour locates, the cage slip ratio rises gradually and the bearing rating life decreases.

  9. Expiratory rib cage compression in mechanically ventilated adults: systematic review with meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Lúcia Faria; Saraiva, Mateus Sasso; Saraiva, Marcos Ariel Sasso; Macagnan, Fabrício Edler; Kessler, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on the effects of expiratory rib cage compression on ventilatory mechanics, airway clearance, and oxygen and hemodynamic indices in mechanically ventilated adults. Methods Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials in the databases MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, PEDro, and LILACS. Studies on adult patients hospitalized in intensive care units and under mechanical ventilation that analyzed the effects of expiratory rib cage compression with respect to a control group (without expiratory rib cage compression) and evaluated the outcomes static and dynamic compliance, sputum volume, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, peripheral oxygen saturation, and ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure to fraction of inspired oxygen were included. Experimental studies with animals and those with incomplete data were excluded. Results The search strategy produced 5,816 studies, of which only three randomized crossover trials were included, totaling 93 patients. With respect to the outcome of heart rate, values were reduced in the expiratory rib cage compression group compared with the control group [-2.81 bpm (95% confidence interval [95%CI]: -4.73 to 0.89; I2: 0%)]. Regarding dynamic compliance, there was no significant difference between groups [-0.58mL/cmH2O (95%CI: -2.98 to 1.82; I2: 1%)]. Regarding the variables systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, significant differences were found after descriptive evaluation. However, there was no difference between groups regarding the variables secretion volume, static compliance, ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure to fraction of inspired oxygen, and peripheral oxygen saturation. Conclusion There is a lack of evidence to support the use of expiratory rib cage compression in routine care, given that the literature on this topic offers low methodological quality and is inconclusive. PMID

  10. Individually ventilated cages impose cold stress on laboratory mice: a source of systemic experimental variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, John M; Knowles, Scott; Lamkin, Donald M; Stout, David B

    2013-11-01

    Individual ventilated cages (IVC) are increasing in popularity. Although mice avoid IVC in preference testing, they show no aversion when provided additional nesting material or the cage is not ventilated. Given the high ventilation rate in IVC, we developed 3 hypotheses: that mice housed in IVC experience more cold stress than do mice housed in static cages; that IVC-induced cold stress affects the results of experiments using mice; and that, when provided shelters, mice behaviorally thermoregulate and thereby rescue the cold-stress effects of IVC. To test these hypotheses, we housed mice in IVC, IVC with shelters, and static cages maintained at 20 to 21 °C. We quantified the cold stress of each housing system on mice by assessing nonshivering thermogenesis and brown adipose vacuolation. To test housing effects in a common, murine model of human disease, we implanted mice with subcutaneous epidermoid carcinoma cells and quantified tumor growth, tumor metabolism, and adrenal weight. Mice housed in IVC had histologic signs of cold stress and significantly higher nonshivering thermogenesis, smaller subcutaneous tumors, lower tumor metabolism, and larger adrenal weights than did mice in static cages. Shelters rescued IVC-induced nonshivering thermogenesis, adrenal enlargement, and phenotype-dependent cold-mediated histologic changes in brown adipose tissue and tumor size. IVC impose chronic cold stress on mice, alter experimental results, and are a source of systemic confounders throughout rodent-dependent research. Allowing mice to exhibit behavioral thermoregulation through seeking shelter markedly rescues the experiment-altering effects of housing-imposed cold stress, improves physiologic uniformity, and increases experimental reproducibility across housing systems.

  11. Vertebral Body Hounsfield Units are Associated With Cage Subsidence After Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion With Unilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Jie; Li, Kang; Zhao, Xin; Zhao, Chang-Qing; Li, Hua; Zhao, Jie

    2017-10-01

    To assess the association between Hounsfield units (HU) measurement and cage subsidence after lumbar interbody fusion. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) with unilateral fixation becomes a popular treatment modality for lumbar degenerative disease. Cage subsidence is a potentially devastating complication after lumbar interbody fusion with unilateral fixation. Recently, a new technique for assessing bone mineral density using HU values from computed tomography has been proposed. Bone quality is believed to be one of the important factors that cause cage subsidence after TLIF. Cage subsidence after single-level (L4/5) TLIF with unilateral fixation was prospectively documented at a single institution between 2013 and 2014. Patients with cage subsidence were matched 1:1 to a control cohort without cage subsidence on the basis of age and sex. HU values were measured from the preoperative computed tomography. All patients received computed tomographic scans at a minimum of 6 months postoperatively. Sagittal images were evaluated for evidence of cage subsidence. Eighteen patients with cage subsidence were well matched 1:1 to a cohort without cage subsidence and had complete imaging data. The global lumbar HU values were significantly lower in patients with cage subsidence than in the controls (112.4±10.08 vs. 140.2±10.17; P=0.0015). Similarly, a regional assessment of HU across the fusion levels was significantly lower in patients with cage subsidence (113.4±10.47 vs. 127.9±8.13; P=0.0075). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic cure were 0.715 and 0.636 for global and regional assessment, respectively. The best cut-offs for global and regional assessment were 132 (sensitivity: 83.3%; specificity: 61.1%) and 122 (sensitivity: 72.2%; specificity: 55.6%), respectively. Lower preoperative HU values is associated with cage subsidence after TLIF with unilateral fixation. HU measurement may be used as a predictor of cage subsidence after

  12. Enacting Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar

    2013-01-01

    Enacting Environments is an ethnography of the midst of the encounter between corporations, sustainable development and climate change. At this intersection 'environmental management' and 'carbon accounting' are put into practice. Purportedly, these practices green capitalism. Drawing on fieldwork...... of day-to-day practices of corporate environmental accountants and managers, Ingmar Lippert reconstructs their work as achieving to produce a reality of environment that is simultaneously stable and flexible enough for a particular corporate project: to stage the company, and in consequence capitalism......, as in control over its relations to an antecedent environment. Not confined to mere texts or meetings between shiny stakeholders co-governing the corporation – among them some of the world's biggest auditing firms, an environmental non-governmental organisation (NGO) and standards – control is found...

  13. Influence of cervical bone mineral density on cage subsidence in patients following stand-alone anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenke, Christopher; Dostal, Martin; Scharf, Johann; Weiß, Christel; Schmieder, Kirsten; Barth, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a common procedure for the treatment of cervical degenerative diseases. However, cage subsidence remains a frequent problem. We therefore investigated if cage design and site-specific bone mineral density (BMD) contribute to the rate and direction of subsidence following ACDF. Patients were prospectively included and received two different cages (groups 1 and 2) using minimization randomization. The degree and direction of cage subsidence were determined using plain radiographs. Neck pain intensity on the visual analogue scale (VAS), the neck disability index (NDI), and the patient satisfaction index were recorded up to 12 months after surgery. 88 patients were analysed with a mean age of 53.7 ± 11.8 years. BMD values decreased in craniocaudal direction from 302.0 ± 62.2 to 235.5 ± 38.9 mg/cm(3). Both groups showed significant height gain after the operation (both p  0.05). Both groups showed improvement of VAS neck pain intensity (both p subsidence was similar, no correlations were found between cage subsidence and BMD or various clinical parameters. Implant geometry of both cages and variations of the operative procedure promoted a relatively high degree of cage subsidence. Further studies are necessary to identify a relation of BMD and subsidence using optimized implant geometry and by controlling additional intraoperative variables.

  14. Medium throughput cage state stability screen of conditions for the generation of gold nanoparticles encapsulated within a mini-ferritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, T A; Orner, B P

    2018-03-26

    Methods for the generation of nanoparticles encapsulated within cage proteins, such as ferritins, provide particles with low polydispersities due to size constraint by the cage. The proteins can provide enhanced water solubility to enable biological applications and affinity and identification tags to facilitate delivery or the assembly of advanced materials. Many effective methods have been developed, however, they are often impeded by cage protein instability in the presence of reagents or conditions for formation of the nanoparticles. Although the stability of ferritin cage quaternary structure can be enhanced, application of ferritins to materials science remains limited by unpredictable behaviour. Recently, we reported a medium throughput technique to directly detect the ferritin cage state. Herein, we expand this strategy to screen conditions commonly used for the formation of gold nanoparticles. Not only do we report nanoparticle formation conditions that permit ferritin stability, we establish a general screening strategy based on protein cage stability that could be applied to other protein cages or for the generation of other types of particles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Controlling the Recognition and Reactivity of Alkyl Ammonium Guests using an Anion Coordination-based Tetrahedral Cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyao; Yang, Dong; Zhao, Jie; Hou, Lekai; Sessler, Jonathan L; Yang, Xiao-Juan; Wu, Biao

    2018-03-27

    Caged structures have found wide application in a variety of areas, including guest encapsulation and catalysis. Although metal-based cages have dominated the field, anion-coordination-based cages are emerging as a new type of supramolecular ensemble with interesting host-guest properties. In the current work, we report a C3-symmetric tris-bis(urea) ligand based on the 2,4,6-triphenyl-1,3,5-triazine spacer, which assembles with phosphate anions to form an A4L4-type (A = anion, L = ligand) tetrahedral cage, 3, with unusually high packing coefficients (up to 99.5% for the best substrate). Cage 3 is able to adjust its size and shape (from 136 to 216 Å3) by bending of the triphenyltriazine plane. This allows it to accommodate relatively large guests. In the case of DABCO, inclusion within the cage allows the degree of methylation to be controlled and the monomethylated product to be isolated cleanly under conditions where mixtures of the mono- and dimethylated adduct are obtained in the absence of cage 3.

  16. Standard Specification for ESD Controlled Garments Required in Cleanrooms and Controlled Environments for Spacecraft for Non-Hazardous and Hazardous Operations

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of the heat-transfer rate or the heat flux to the surface of a solid body (test sample) using the measured transient temperature rise of a thermocouple located at the null point of a calorimeter that is installed in the body and is configured to simulate a semi-infinite solid. By definition the null point is a unique position on the axial centerline of a disturbed body which experiences the same transient temperature history as that on the surface of a solid body in the absence of the physical disturbance (hole) for the same heat-flux input. 1.2 Null-point calorimeters have been used to measure high convective or radiant heat-transfer rates to bodies immersed in both flowing and static environments of air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, helium, hydrogen, and mixtures of these and other gases. Flow velocities have ranged from zero (static) through subsonic to hypersonic, total flow enthalpies from 1.16 to greater than 4.65 × 101 MJ/kg (5 × 102 to greater than 2 × 104 ...

  17. Standard Test Method for Measuring Extreme Heat-Transfer Rates from High-Energy Environments Using a Transient, Null-Point Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of the heat-transfer rate or the heat flux to the surface of a solid body (test sample) using the measured transient temperature rise of a thermocouple located at the null point of a calorimeter that is installed in the body and is configured to simulate a semi-infinite solid. By definition the null point is a unique position on the axial centerline of a disturbed body which experiences the same transient temperature history as that on the surface of a solid body in the absence of the physical disturbance (hole) for the same heat-flux input. 1.2 Null-point calorimeters have been used to measure high convective or radiant heat-transfer rates to bodies immersed in both flowing and static environments of air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, helium, hydrogen, and mixtures of these and other gases. Flow velocities have ranged from zero (static) through subsonic to hypersonic, total flow enthalpies from 1.16 to greater than 4.65 × 101 MJ/kg (5 × 102 to greater than 2 × 104 ...

  18. CVD Prevention Through Policy: a Review of Mass Media, Food/Menu Labeling, Taxation/Subsidies, Built Environment, School Procurement, Worksite Wellness, and Marketing Standards to Improve Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshin, Ashkan; Penalvo, Jose; Del Gobbo, Liana; Kashaf, Michael; Micha, Renata; Morrish, Kurtis; Pearson-Stuttard, Jonathan; Rehm, Colin; Shangguan, Siyi; Smith, Jessica D; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2015-11-01

    Poor diet is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease in the USA and globally. Evidence-based policies are crucial to improve diet and population health. We reviewed the effectiveness for a range of policy levers to alter diet and diet-related risk factors. We identified evidence to support benefits of focused mass media campaigns (especially for fruits, vegetables, salt), food pricing strategies (both subsidies and taxation, with stronger effects at lower income levels), school procurement policies (for increasing healthful or reducing unhealthful choices), and worksite wellness programs (especially when comprehensive and multicomponent). Evidence was inconclusive for food and menu labeling (for consumer or industry behavior) and changes in local built environment (e.g., availability or accessibility of supermarkets, fast food outlets). We found little empiric evidence evaluating marketing restrictions, although broad principles and large resources spent on marketing suggest utility. Widespread implementation and evaluation of evidence-based policy strategies, with further research on other strategies with mixed/limited evidence, are essential "population medicine" to reduce health and economic burdens and inequities of diet-related illness worldwide.

  19. Clinical and radiological outcomes after stand-alone ALIF for single L5-S1 degenerative discopathy using a PEEK cage filled with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles without bone graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norotte, Gilles; Barrios, Carlos

    2018-05-01

    Recent improvements in cage designs with integral fixation and screw attachments have made stand-alone ALIF a viable option with several possible advantages. The aim of this study was to confirm the efficacy and safety of a PEEK cage filled with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles without adding a bone graft for stand-alone ALIF in the treatment of L5-S1 isolated degenerative disc discopathy (DDD). Sixty-five patients who required surgery for DDD were evaluated. Clinical outcome evaluations included back and leg pain (VAS), disability (Oswestry Disability Index), and patient satisfaction (Macnab's criteria). Radiological outcomes include the assessment of disc height, the L5-S1 intervertebral disc angle, and anterior intervertebral fusion through standard and functional sagittal X-rays of the lumbar spine. Clinical and radiological measurements were assessed 2, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Clinical outcomes improved progressively and stabilized from 12- to 24-month follow-up. Final postoperative ODI scores showed a notable improvement (95%CI = 36.1-48.9 points; p < .001). Similarly, 24-month postoperative VAS scores revealed a significant decrease in pain (95%CI = 5.4-6.2; p < .001). The fusion rate was 95.4%. Anterior disc height was restored from 4.1 ± 3.2 mm at baseline to 9.5 ± 1.6 mm in the immediate postoperative period (p < .001). A small collapse (17.9%) of the disc height was detected from the 2- and 24-month follow-ups. Cage subsidence (more than 3 mm collapse) was detected in 4 cases (6.2%) and was related to cage size (more than 11 mm height; P < .05). There were no serious bone substitute-related adverse events and no revision surgeries. Stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion using hydroxyapatite nanoparticles without an autologous bone graft is an effective and safe treatment option for L5-S1 degenerative pathology. Clinical outcomes were very satisfactory with a high fusion rate. Copyright © 2018

  20. The Crystal Structure of a Maxi/Mini-Ferritin Chimera Reveals Guiding Principles for the Assembly of Protein Cages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornell, Thomas A. [Department; Division; Srivastava, Yogesh [Genome; Jauch, Ralf [Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore; Genome; Fan, Rongli [Division; Orner, Brendan P. [Department; Division

    2017-07-19

    Cage proteins assemble into nanoscale structures with large central cavities. They play roles, including those as virus capsids and chaperones, and have been applied to drug delivery and nanomaterials. Furthermore, protein cages have been used as model systems to understand and design protein quaternary structure. Ferritins are ubiquitous protein cages that manage iron homeostasis and oxidative damage. Two ferritin subfamilies have strongly similar tertiary structure yet distinct quaternary structure: maxi-ferritins normally assemble into 24-meric, octahedral cages with C-terminal E-helices centered around 4-fold symmetry axes, and mini-ferritins are 12-meric, tetrahedral cages with 3-fold axes defined by C-termini lacking E-domains. To understand the role E-domains play in ferritin quaternary structure, we previously designed a chimera of a maxi-ferritin E-domain fused to the C-terminus of a mini-ferritin. The chimera is a 12-mer cage midway in size between those of the maxi- and mini-ferritin. The research described herein sets out to understand (a) whether the increase in size over a typical mini-ferritin is due to a frozen state where the E-domain is flipped out of the cage and (b) whether the symmetrical preference of the E-domain in the maxi-ferritin (4-fold axis) overrules the C-terminal preference in the mini-ferritin (3-fold axis). With a 1.99 Å resolution crystal structure, we determined that the chimera assembles into a tetrahedral cage that can be nearly superimposed with the parent mini-ferritin, and that the E-domains are flipped external to the cage at the 3-fold symmetry axes.

  1. Energetics and bonding study of hexamethylenetetramine and fourteen related cage molecules: An ab initio G3(MP2 investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HO-ON HO

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The ab initio G3(MP2method has been applied to hexamethylenetetramine (HMT and fourteen related cage systems. The agreement between the calculated and experimental molecular dimensions, which are available for five of the 15 cage species, ranges from satisfactory to excellent. In addition, the G3(MP2 heat of formation at 298 K for HMT is in excellent accord with experimental results. Hence, the calculated heats of formation for the other 14 cage systems should be reliable estimates.

  2. Biomechanical effects of polyaxial pedicle screw fixation on the lumbosacral segments with an anterior interbody cage support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hsiang-Ho

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbosacral fusion is a relatively common procedure that is used in the management of an unstable spine. The anterior interbody cage has been involved to enhance the stability of a pedicle screw construct used at the lumbosacral junction. Biomechanical differences between polyaxial and monoaxial pedicle screws linked with various rod contours were investigated to analyze the respective effects on overall construct stiffness, cage strain, rod strain, and contact ratios at the vertebra-cage junction. Methods A synthetic model composed of two ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene blocks was used with four titanium pedicle screws (two in each block and two rods fixation to build the spinal construct along with an anterior interbody cage support. For each pair of the construct fixed with polyaxial or monoaxial screws, the linked rods were set at four configurations to simulate 0°, 7°, 14°, and 21° lordosis on the sagittal plane, and a compressive load of 300 N was applied. Strain gauges were attached to the posterior surface of the cage and to the central area of the left connecting rod. Also, the contact area between the block and the cage was measured using prescale Fuji super low pressure film for compression, flexion, lateral bending and torsion tests. Results Our main findings in the experiments with an anterior interbody cage support are as follows: 1 large segmental lordosis can decrease the stiffness of monoaxial pedicle screws constructs; 2 polyaxial screws rather than monoaxial screws combined with the cage fixation provide higher compression and flexion stiffness in 21° segmental lordosis; 3 polyaxial screws enhance the contact surface of the cage in 21° segmental lordosis. Conclusion Polyaxial screws system used in conjunction with anterior cage support yields higher contact ratio, compression and flexion stiffness of spinal constructs than monoaxial screws system does in the same model when the spinal segment

  3. Influence of the cage on friction torque in low loaded thrust ball bearing operating in dry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaru, D.; Balan, M. R.; Tufescu, A.

    2016-08-01

    The authors investigated analytically and experimentally the friction torque in a modified thrust ball bearing operating at very low axial load in dry conditions by using only three balls and a cage. The experiments were conducted by using spin-down methodology. The results evidenced the influence of the sliding friction between the cage and the balls on the total friction torque. It was concluded that at very low loads the friction between cage and balls in a thrust ball bearing has an important contribution on total friction torque.

  4. Enantioselective Synthesis of Chiral-at-Cage o-Carboranes via Pd-Catalyzed Asymmetric B-H Substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ruofei; Li, Bowen; Wu, Jie; Zhang, Jie; Qiu, Zaozao; Tang, Wenjun; You, Shu-Li; Tang, Yong; Xie, Zuowei

    2018-03-26

    Carborane cage chirality is an outstanding issue of great interest as the icosahedral carboranes have wide applications in medicinal and materials chemistry. The synthesis of optically active carborane derivatives, whose chirality is associated with the substitution patterns on the polyhedron, will open new avenues to carborane chemistry. We report herein an efficient method to achieve chiral-at-cage arylation of o-carboranes with high regio- and enantio-selectivities by a strategy of palladium-catalyzed asymmetric intramolecular B-H arylation and cyclization. This represents the first example of the enantioselective reaction on carboranes, providing an efficient way for the construction of chiral-at-cage compounds with new skeletons.

  5. Mercury and stable isotope signatures in caged marine fish and fish feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onsanit, Sarayut; Chen, Min; Ke, Caihuan [State Key Laboratory for Marine Environmental Science, College of Oceanography and Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wang, Wen-Xiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [State Key Laboratory for Marine Environmental Science, College of Oceanography and Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercury concentrations in caged fish were closely related to Hg concentrations in fish feeds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The trophic transfer factor of methylmercury was dependent on fish feeds, and was the highest for fish fed on pellet feeds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fish farming may be a good way of reducing the human exposure to Hg because Hg levels can be carefully controlled. - Abstract: Total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations were determined in four species of marine caged carnivorous fish, one species of herbivorous fish and three types of fish feeds (dried pellet feed, forage fish and fish viscera), collected from five cage sites in the rural areas along Fujian coastline, China. For the carnivorous fish, the concentrations of THg and MeHg ranged from 0.03 to 0.31 {mu}g/g and from 0.02 to 0.30 {mu}g/g on wet weight basis, respectively. The concentrations were lower for the herbivorous fish with both within the range of 0.01-0.03 {mu}g/g. Out of the three tested fish feeds, tuna viscera contained the highest level of mercury (0.20 {mu}g/g THg and 0.13 {mu}g/g MeHg), with pellet feed containing the lowest level (0.05 {mu}g/g THg and 0.01 {mu}g/g MeHg). The calculated trophic transfer factor of MeHg was the highest (12-64) for fish fed on pellet feeds, and was the lowest for fish fed on tuna viscera. A significant relationship was found between Hg concentrations in caged fish and in fish feeds, thus Hg was primarily accumulated from the diet. Furthermore, the stable isotope {delta}{sup 15}N was positively correlated with the Hg concentration in two caged sites, indicating that {delta}{sup 15}N may be a suitable tool for tracking mercury in caged fish. We conclude that fish farming may be a good way of reducing the human exposure to Hg because mercury levels can be carefully controlled in such farming systems.

  6. Mercury and stable isotope signatures in caged marine fish and fish feeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onsanit, Sarayut; Chen, Min; Ke, Caihuan; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mercury concentrations in caged fish were closely related to Hg concentrations in fish feeds. ► The trophic transfer factor of methylmercury was dependent on fish feeds, and was the highest for fish fed on pellet feeds. ► Fish farming may be a good way of reducing the human exposure to Hg because Hg levels can be carefully controlled. - Abstract: Total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations were determined in four species of marine caged carnivorous fish, one species of herbivorous fish and three types of fish feeds (dried pellet feed, forage fish and fish viscera), collected from five cage sites in the rural areas along Fujian coastline, China. For the carnivorous fish, the concentrations of THg and MeHg ranged from 0.03 to 0.31 μg/g and from 0.02 to 0.30 μg/g on wet weight basis, respectively. The concentrations were lower for the herbivorous fish with both within the range of 0.01–0.03 μg/g. Out of the three tested fish feeds, tuna viscera contained the highest level of mercury (0.20 μg/g THg and 0.13 μg/g MeHg), with pellet feed containing the lowest level (0.05 μg/g THg and 0.01 μg/g MeHg). The calculated trophic transfer factor of MeHg was the highest (12–64) for fish fed on pellet feeds, and was the lowest for fish fed on tuna viscera. A significant relationship was found between Hg concentrations in caged fish and in fish feeds, thus Hg was primarily accumulated from the diet. Furthermore, the stable isotope δ 15 N was positively correlated with the Hg concentration in two caged sites, indicating that δ 15 N may be a suitable tool for tracking mercury in caged fish. We conclude that fish farming may be a good way of reducing the human exposure to Hg because mercury levels can be carefully controlled in such farming systems.

  7. Subsidence and nonunion after anterior cervical interbody fusion using a stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jae Jun; Yu, Chang Hun; Chang, Bong-Soon; Yeom, Jin Sup; Lee, Jae Hyup; Lee, Choon-Ki

    2011-03-01

    The purposes of the present study are to evaluate the subsidence and nonunion that occurred after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a stand-alone intervertebral cage and to analyze the risk factors for the complications. Thirty-eight patients (47 segments) who underwent anterior cervical fusion using a stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage and an autologous cancellous iliac bone graft from June 2003 to August 2008 were enrolled in this study. The anterior and posterior segmental heights and the distance from the anterior edge of the upper vertebra to the anterior margin of the cage were measured on the plain radiographs. Subsidence was defined as ≥ a 2 mm (minor) or 3 mm (major) decrease of the segmental height at the final follow-up compared to that measured at the immediate postoperative period. Nonunion was evaluated according to the instability being ≥ 2 mm in the interspinous distance on the flexion-extension lateral radiographs. The anterior and posterior segmental heights decreased from the immediate postoperative period to the final follow-up at 1.33 ± 1.46 mm and 0.81 ± 1.27 mm, respectively. Subsidence ≥ 2 mm and 3 mm were observed in 12 segments (25.5%) and 7 segments (14.9%), respectively. Among the expected risk factors for subsidence, a smaller anteroposterior (AP) diameter (14 mm vs. 12 mm) of cages (p = 0.034; odds ratio [OR], 0.017) and larger intraoperative distraction (p = 0.041; OR, 3.988) had a significantly higher risk of subsidence. Intervertebral nonunion was observed in 7 segments (7/47, 14.9%). Compared with the union group, the nonunion group had a significantly higher ratio of two-level fusion to one-level fusions (p = 0.001). Anterior cervical fusion using a stand-alone cage with a large AP diameter while preventing anterior intraoperative over-distraction will be helpful to prevent the subsidence of cages. Two-level cervical fusion might require more careful attention for avoiding nonunion.

  8. Validez interna y reproducibilidad de la prueba CAGE en Bucaramanga, Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar F. Herrán

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Evaluar la validez interna y la reproducibilidad de cutting down, annoyance by criticism, guilty feeling, and eye-openers (CAGE en Bucaramanga, Colombia, de junio de 2002 a noviembre de 2003. Método. Estudio de consistencia interna y reproducibilidad de tecnología diagnóstica. Ciento nueve sujetos entre 18 y 60 años respondieron en dos ocasiones a CAGE y a una encuesta sobre variables biol6gicas, sociodemográficas y de dieta. La consistencia interna de CAGE se evalu6 con el alfa de Cronbach y la reproducibilidad con el coeficiente de Spearman y el valor kappa de Cohen. Con regresión binomial obtuvimos medidas de asociación entre el riesgo de alcoholismo y las variables biológicas, sociodemográficas y de dieta. Resultados. El riesgo de alcoholismo para la población estudiada fue de 15,6% (IC, 9,0, 22,5. Los hombres presentaron un riesgo aumentado de alcoholismo tres veces mayor que las mujeres (p=0,02. El coeficiente alfa de Cronbach fue bajo para todas las preguntas de CAGE (mínimo, 0,08; máximo, 0,28. En la primera aplicación de CAGE se obtuvo un alfa de Cronbach de 0,20, y en la segunda, de 0,27 (p=0,226. El coeficiente de correlaci6n de Spearman fue de 0,65 (IC, 0,53, 0,75 para la población; de 0,58 (IC, 0,36, 0,73 para hombres, y de 0,80 (IC, 0,68, 0,88 para mujeres. Los valores de kappas alcanzados están entre moderados y buenos. Ninguna variable biológica, sociodemográfica o de dieta se asoció con el riesgo de alcoholismo. Conclusión. La baja consistencia interna de CAGE es debida a la multidimensionalidad de la prueba; dada su reproducibilidad y estabilidad de las medidas de asociación derivadas, es útil en la investigación epidemiológica en esta población.

  9. Resolution and identification of scalemic caged xanthones from the leaf extract of Garcinia propinqua having potent cytotoxicities against colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriyatep, Teerayut; Tantapakul, Cholpisut; Andersen, Raymond J; Patrick, Brian O; Pyne, Stephen G; Muanprasat, Chatchai; Seemakhan, Sawinee; Borwornpinyo, Suparerk; Laphookhieo, Surat

    2018-01-01

    A new scalemic 8,8a-dihydro caged xanthone (1) was isolated from the leaf extract of Garcinia propinqua. Five other known natural products, the three caged xanthones (2, 5 and 6) and the two neocaged xanthones, (3 and 4) were also isolated as scalemic mixtures. Their structures were characterized by spectroscopic methods. The enantiomeric ratios (er) of compounds 1-6 ranged from 1:0.7 to 1:0.9. These compounds were also resolved by semipreparative chiral HPLC. The absolute configurations of (+)-2 and (+)-3 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis using Cu Kα radiation while the absolute configurations of the other compounds were determined by comparisons of their ECD spectra. Compounds (-)-4, (+)-4, (-)-5, (+)-5, and (-)-6 showed potent cytotoxicities against a colon cancer cell line HCT116 with IC 50 values of 2.60, 7.02, 1.47, 3.37, and 4.14μM, respectively, which were better than the standard control doxorubicin (IC 50 9.74μM). Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. International Electronical Committee (IEC 61850 Mapping with Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP in Smart Grids Based European Telecommunications Standard Institute Machine-to-Machine (M2M Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Jae Shin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available As power systems develop rapidly into smarter and more flexible configurations, so too must the communication technologies that support them. Machine-to-machine (M2M communication in power systems enables information collection by combining sensors and communication protocols. In doing so, M2M technology supports communication between machines to improve power quality and protection coordination. When functioning in a “smart grid” environment, M2M has been labelled by the European Telecommunications Standard Institute (ETSI. International Electronical Committee (IEC 61850 as the most important standard in power network systems. As evidence, this communication platform has been used for device data collection/control in substation automation systems and distribution automation systems. If the IEC 61850 information model were to be combined with a set of contemporary web protocols, the potential benefits would be enormous. Therefore, a constrained application protocol (CoAP has been adopted to create an ETSI M2M communication architecture. CoAP is compared with other protocols (MQTT, SOAP to demonstrate the validity of using it. This M2M communication technology is applied in an IEC61850, and use the OPNET Modeler 17.1 to demonstrate intercompatibility of CoAP Gateway. The proposed IEC 61850 and CoAP mapping scheme reduces the mapping time and improves throughput. CoAP is useful in the ETSI M2M environment where device capability is able to be limited.

  11. Standards, Standards, Standards: The Unintended Consequences of Widening Participation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Mary

    2002-01-01

    Debate over widening access to higher education is narrowing to a focus on preservation of standards. Examination of the discourses of school policy, classroom environment, and peer culture shows how these competing cultures can work against efforts to increase participation. (Contains 17 references.) (SK)

  12. Synthetic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukes, George E.; Cain, Joel M.

    1996-02-01

    The Advanced Distributed Simulation (ADS) Synthetic Environments Program seeks to create robust virtual worlds from operational terrain and environmental data sources of sufficient fidelity and currency to interact with the real world. While some applications can be met by direct exploitation of standard digital terrain data, more demanding applications -- particularly those support operations 'close to the ground' -- are well-served by emerging capabilities for 'value-adding' by the user working with controlled imagery. For users to rigorously refine and exploit controlled imagery within functionally different workstations they must have a shared framework to allow interoperability within and between these environments in terms of passing image and object coordinates and other information using a variety of validated sensor models. The Synthetic Environments Program is now being expanded to address rapid construction of virtual worlds with research initiatives in digital mapping, softcopy workstations, and cartographic image understanding. The Synthetic Environments Program is also participating in a joint initiative for a sensor model applications programer's interface (API) to ensure that a common controlled imagery exploitation framework is available to all researchers, developers and users. This presentation provides an introduction to ADS and the associated requirements for synthetic environments to support synthetic theaters of war. It provides a technical rationale for exploring applications of image understanding technology to automated cartography in support of ADS and related programs benefitting from automated analysis of mapping, earth resources and reconnaissance imagery. And it provides an overview and status of the joint initiative for a sensor model API.

  13. Enriched environment and masticatory activity rehabilitation recover spatial memory decline in aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Fabíola de Carvalho Chaves de Siqueira; de Almeida, Marina Negrão Frota; Felício, André Pinheiro Gurgel; Fadel, Ana Carla; Silva, Diego de Jesus; Borralho, Thaíssa Gomes; da Silva, Rodrigo Perez; Bento-Torres, João; Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa; Perry, Victor Hugh; Ramos, Edson Marcos Leal Soares; Picanço-Diniz, Cristovam Wanderley; Sosthenes, Marcia Consentino Kronka

    2013-06-28

    To measure the impact of masticatory reduction on learning and memory, previous studies have produced experimental masticatory reduction by modified diet or molar removal. Here we induced spatial learning impairment in mice by reducing masticatory activity and then tested the effect of a combination of environmental enrichment and masticatory rehabilitation in recovering spatial learning at adulthood and in later life. For 6 months (6M) or 18 months (18M), we fed three groups of mice from postnatal day 21 respectively with a hard diet (HD) of pellets; pellets followed by a powdered, soft diet (HD/SD, divided into equal periods); or pellets followed by powder, followed by pellets again (HD/SD/HD, divided into equal periods). To mimic sedentary or active lifestyles, half of the animals from each group were raised from weaning in standard cages (impoverished environment; IE) and the other half in enriched cages (enriched environment; EE). To evaluate spatial learning, we used the Morris water maze. IE6M-HD/SD mice showed lower learning rates compared with control (IE6M-HD) or masticatory rehabilitated (IE6MHD/SD/HD) animals. Similarly, EE-HD/SD mice independent of age showed lower performance than controls (EE-HD) or rehabilitated mice (EE-HD/SD/HD). However, combined rehabilitation and EE in aged mice improved learning rate up to control levels. Learning rates did not correlate with swim speed. Reduction in masticatory activity imposed on mice previously fed a hard diet (HD/SD) impaired spatial learning in the Morris water maze. In adults, masticatory rehabilitation recovered spatial abilities in both sedentary and active mice, and rehabilitation of masticatory activity combined with EE recovered these losses in aged mice.

  14. Covalent Organic Frameworks and Cage Compounds: Design and Applications of Polymeric and Discrete Organic Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuerle, Florian; Gole, Bappaditya

    2017-12-05

    Porous organic materials are an emerging class of functional nanostructures with unprecedented properties. Dynamic covalent assembly of small organic building blocks under thermodynamic control is utilized for the intriguingly simple formation of complex molecular architectures in one-pot procedures. In this review, we aim to analyze the basic design principles that govern the formation of either covalent organic frameworks as crystalline porous polymers or covalent organic cage compounds as shape-persistent molecular objects. Common synthetic protocols and characterization techniques will be discussed besides more advanced strategies such as postsynthetic modification or self-sorting. When appropriate, healthy comparisons are drawn between polymeric frameworks and discrete organic cages considering their underlying properties. Furthermore, we highlight the potential of these materials for applications ranging from gas storage to catalysis or organic electronics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Weighted density approximation for bonding in molecules: ring and cage polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Sweatman, M B

    2003-01-01

    The focus of this work is the bonded contribution to the intrinsic Helmholtz free energy of molecules. A weighted density approximation (WDA) for this contribution is presented within the interaction site model (ISM) for ring and cage polymers. The resulting density functional theory (ISM/WDA) for these systems is no more complex than theories for a pure simple fluid, and much less complex than density functional approaches that treat the bonding functional exactly. The ISM/WDA bonding functional is much more accurate than either the ISM/HNC or ISM/PY bonding functionals, which are related to the reference interaction-site model (RISM)/HNC and RISM/PY integral equations respectively, for ideal ring polymers. This means that the ISM/WDA functional should generally be more accurate for most 'real' ring or cage polymer systems when any reasonable approximation for the 'excess' contribution to the intrinsic Helmholtz free energy is employed.

  16. Weighted density approximation for bonding in molecules: ring and cage polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweatman, M B

    2003-01-01

    The focus of this work is the bonded contribution to the intrinsic Helmholtz free energy of molecules. A weighted density approximation (WDA) for this contribution is presented within the interaction site model (ISM) for ring and cage polymers. The resulting density functional theory (ISM/WDA) for these systems is no more complex than theories for a pure simple fluid, and much less complex than density functional approaches that treat the bonding functional exactly. The ISM/WDA bonding functional is much more accurate than either the ISM/HNC or ISM/PY bonding functionals, which are related to the reference interaction-site model (RISM)/HNC and RISM/PY integral equations respectively, for ideal ring polymers. This means that the ISM/WDA functional should generally be more accurate for most 'real' ring or cage polymer systems when any reasonable approximation for the 'excess' contribution to the intrinsic Helmholtz free energy is employed

  17. Introduced, Captive, Caged and Escaped Exotic and Native Bird Species in the Littoral Area of Lebanon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan -Jradi, G.; Ramadan -Jradi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Some introduced exotic bird species may cause damages to the ecosystem they are introduced to; others may have no effect or can be beneficial to humans and ecosystems.Whatever the case is, the exotic bird species remain an issue in Lebanon, especially that they are not given the appropriate priority at the national level. With the recent intentional or accidental introduction of exotic species,the problem is increasing and therefore necessitating comprehensive evaluation of the status and origin of these species in Lebanon.Since many of the introduced species are escapes from cages, it was necessary to also evaluate both status and origin of all caged birds in order to see whether they are introduced or native to the country. (author)

  18. Theoretical analysis of a YBCO squirrel-cage type induction motor based on an equivalent circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, G; Nakamura, T; Muta, I

    2006-01-01

    A HTS induction motor, with a HTS squirrel-cage rotor, is analysed using an electrical equivalent circuit. The squirrel-cage winding in the rotor consists of rotor bars and end rings, and both are considered to be made of YBCO film conductors. A wide range of electric field versus current density in YBCO film is formulated based on the Weibull function, and analysed as a non-linear resistance in the equivalent circuit. It is shown that starting and accelerating torques of the HTS induction motor are improved drastically compared to those of a conventional induction motor. Furthermore, large synchronous torque can also be realized by trapping the magnetic flux in the rotor circuit because of the persistent current mode

  19. Shape-Controlled Synthesis and Self-Sorting of Covalent Organic Cage Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotzbach, Stefanie; Beuerle, Florian

    2015-08-24

    The directional bonding approach is a powerful tool to rationally control both shape and stoichiometry of three-dimensional objects built from rigid building blocks under dynamic covalent conditions. Co-condensation of catechol-functionalized tribenzotriquinacene derivatives which have 90° angles between the reactive sites and diboronic acids with bite angles of 60°, 120°, and 180°, led to the efficient formation of, respectively, bipyramidal, tetrahedral, or cubic covalent organic cage compounds in a predictable manner. Investigations on the self-sorting of ternary mixtures containing two competitive boronic acids revealed either narcissistic or social self-sorting depending on the stability of the segregated cages relative to feasible three-component assemblies. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Mechanical Thrombectomy with the Embolus Retriever with Interlinked Cages in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steglich-Arnholm, H; Kondziella, D; Wagner, A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The Embolus Retriever with Interlinked Cages (ERIC) device is a novel stent retriever for mechanical thrombectomy. It consists of interlinked cages and could improve procedural benchmarks and clinical outcome compared with classic stent retrievers. This study compares.......00). However, in patients treated with the ERIC device, thrombectomy procedures were less time-consuming (67 versus 98 minutes,P= .009) and a rescue device was needed less often (18% versus 39%,P= .02) compared with classic stent retrievers. CONCLUSIONS: Mechanical thrombectomy with the ERIC device...... the rates of recanalization, favorable clinical outcome, procedural adverse events, and benchmarks between the ERIC device and classic stent retrievers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 545 patients treated with thrombectomy between 2012 and 2015, 316 patients were included. The mean age was 69 ±13 years...