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Sample records for standard atmosphere supplements

  1. Determination of bitter orange alkaloids in dietary supplement Standard Reference Materials by liquid chromatography with atmospheric-pressure ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzbach, Karsten; Rimmer, Catherine A; Sharpless, Katherine E; Wise, Stephen A; Sander, Lane C

    2007-09-01

    A liquid chromatographic atmospheric-pressure ionization electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-API-ES-MS) method has been developed for the determination of five bitter orange alkaloids (synephrine, octopamine, n-methyltyramine, tyramine, and hordenine) in bitter orange-containing dietary supplement standard reference materials (SRMs). The materials represent a variety of natural, extracted, and processed sample matrices. Two extraction techniques were evaluated: pressurized-fluid extraction (PFE) and sonication extraction. The influence of different solvents, extraction temperatures, and pH were investigated for a plant material and a processed sample. The LC method uses a new approach for the separation of highly polar alkaloids. A fluorinated, silica-based stationary phase separated the five alkaloids and the internal standard terbutaline in less than 20 min. This method enabled the determination of the dominant alkaloid synephrine and other minor alkaloids in a variety of dietary supplement SRMs.

  2. Standardization in digital pathology: Supplement 145 of the DICOM standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As digital slides need a lot of storage space, lack of a singular method to acquire and store these large, two-dimensional images has been a major stumbling block in the universal acceptance of this technology. The DICOMS Standard Committee Working Group 26 has put in a tremendous effort to standardize storage methods so that they are more in line with currently available PACS in most hospitals for storage of radiology images. A recent press release (Supplement 145 of these standards was hailed by one and all involved in the field of digital pathology as it will make it easier for hospitals to integrate digital pathology into their already established systems without adding too much overhead costs. Besides, it will enable different vendors developing the scanners to upgrade their products to storage systems that are common across all systems.

  3. STELLA Supplements Superior Standards in School!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Known as the "STELLA" (Standards for Teachers of English Language & Literacy in Australia) Standards Framework, there are a set of nine principles which all teachers of English in Australia should aspire to weave into their professional teaching practices. This article describes the journey that Miss Amy Andrew had embarked on in…

  4. 77 FR 38717 - Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees AGENCY: Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction... the concurrence of the Office of Government Ethics (OGE), is adopting as final, without changes, an interim rule for SIGAR employees that will supplement the executive branch-wide Standards of Ethical...

  5. Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Part 23: Water; Atmospheric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Society for Testing and Materials, Philadelphia, PA.

    Standards for water and atmospheric analysis are compiled in this segment, Part 23, of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) annual book of standards. It contains all current formally approved ASTM standard and tentative test methods, definitions, recommended practices, proposed methods, classifications, and specifications. One…

  6. Supplemental Information for New York State Standardized Interconnection Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingram, Michael [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Narang, David J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mather, Barry A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kroposki, Benjamin D. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-24

    This document is intended to aid in the understanding and application of the New York State Standardized Interconnection Requirements (SIR) and Application Process for New Distributed Generators 5 MW or Less Connected in Parallel with Utility Distribution Systems, and it aims to provide supplemental information and discussion on selected topics relevant to the SIR. This guide focuses on technical issues that have to date resulted in the majority of utility findings within the context of interconnecting photovoltaic (PV) inverters. This guide provides background on the overall issue and related mitigation measures for selected topics, including substation backfeeding, anti-islanding and considerations for monitoring and controlling distributed energy resources (DER).

  7. Standard practice for conducting atmospheric corrosion tests on metals

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers and defines conditions for exposure of metals and alloys to the weather. It sets forth the general procedures that should be followed in any atmospheric test. It is presented as an aid in conducting atmospheric corrosion tests so that some of the pitfalls of such testing may be avoided. As such, it is concerned mainly with panel exposures to obtain data for comparison purposes. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of whoever uses this standard to consult and establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  8. 76 FR 22293 - Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Court Services and Offender...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ...-0009-P] RIN 3209-AA15 and 3225-AA07 Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the...), with the concurrence of the Office of Government Ethics (OGE), is issuing interim regulations for... independent entity within CSOSA, that supplement the Standards of Ethical Conduct (Standards) for Employees of...

  9. 76 FR 35957 - Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Court Services and Offender...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ...-0009-P] RIN 3209-AA15 and 3225-AA07 Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the... of the Office of Government Ethics (OGE), is adopting as final, without change, the interim CSOSA rule that supplements the executive-branch- wide Standards of Ethical Conduct (Standards) issued by OGE...

  10. Biological and Chemical Standardization of a Hop (Humulus lupulus) Botanical Dietary Supplement

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Elizabeth; Yuan, Yang; Hajirahimkhan, Atieh; Dong, Huali; Dietz, Birgit M.; Nikolic, Dejan; Pauli, Guido F.; Bolton, Judy L.; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Concerned about the safety of conventional estrogen replacement therapy, women are using botanical dietary supplements as alternatives for the management of menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes. Before botanical dietary supplements can be evaluated clinically for safety and efficacy, botanically authenticated and standardized forms are required. To address the demand for a standardized, estrogenic botanical dietary supplement, an extract of hops (Humulus lupulus, L.) was developed. Althoug...

  11. 75 FR 19909 - Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Federal Housing Finance Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... 2590-AA02, 3209-AA15 Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Federal Housing... concurrence of the Office of Government Ethics, which would supplement the Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Executive Branch. To ensure a comprehensive and effective ethics program at FHFA and to...

  12. A spectroscopic transfer standard for accurate atmospheric CO measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaboh, Javis A.; Li, Gang; Serdyukov, Anton; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) is a precursor of essential climate variables and has an indirect effect for enhancing global warming. Accurate and reliable measurements of atmospheric CO concentration are becoming indispensable. WMO-GAW reports states a compatibility goal of ±2 ppb for atmospheric CO concentration measurements. Therefore, the EMRP-HIGHGAS (European metrology research program - high-impact greenhouse gases) project aims at developing spectroscopic transfer standards for CO concentration measurements to meet this goal. A spectroscopic transfer standard would provide results that are directly traceable to the SI, can be very useful for calibration of devices operating in the field, and could complement classical gas standards in the field where calibration gas mixtures in bottles often are not accurate, available or stable enough [1][2]. Here, we present our new direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) sensor capable of performing absolute ("calibration free") CO concentration measurements, and being operated as a spectroscopic transfer standard. To achieve the compatibility goal stated by WMO for CO concentration measurements and ensure the traceability of the final concentration results, traceable spectral line data especially line intensities with appropriate uncertainties are needed. Therefore, we utilize our new high-resolution Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy CO line data for the 2-0 band, with significantly reduced uncertainties, for the dTDLAS data evaluation. Further, we demonstrate the capability of our sensor for atmospheric CO measurements, discuss uncertainty calculation following the guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) principles and show that CO concentrations derived using the sensor, based on the TILSAM (traceable infrared laser spectroscopic amount fraction measurement) method, are in excellent agreement with gravimetric values. Acknowledgement Parts of this work have been

  13. 42 CFR 403.206 - General standards for Medicare supplemental policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General standards for Medicare supplemental policies. 403.206 Section 403.206 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS Medicare Supplemental Policies...

  14. Marketplace analysis demonstrates quality control standards needed for black raspberry dietary supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is currently no standard for the minimum anthocyanin concentration a black raspberry dietary supplement must contain for legal sale in the US. All consumer available black raspberry products (n=19), packaged as dietary supplements or otherwise prepared (freeze-dried whole and pre-ground powder...

  15. 78 FR 56127 - Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Department of Housing and Urban...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ...-AD61 Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Department of Housing and Urban... Government Ethics (OGE), amends its Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct, which are regulations for HUD officers and employees that supplement the Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Executive...

  16. 77 FR 20697 - Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... Security Forces, and (4) provide products or services to the people of Afghanistan. Given the importance of... provided is a nonprofit charitable, religious, professional, social, fraternal, educational, recreational... of Executive Order 12988, Civil Justice Reform, and certify that it meets the applicable standards...

  17. 75 FR 55941 - Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Export-Import Bank of the United...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ...] Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Export-Import Bank of the United States AGENCY... the concurrence of the Office of Government Ethics (OGE), is issuing a final rule that supplements the Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Executive Branch (Standards). This final rule adopts prior...

  18. Biological and chemical standardization of a hop (Humulus lupulus) botanical dietary supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Elizabeth; Yuan, Yang; Hajirahimkhan, Atieh; Dong, Huali; Dietz, Birgit M; Nikolic, Dejan; Pauli, Guido F; Bolton, Judy L; van Breemen, Richard B

    2014-06-01

    Concerned about the safety of conventional estrogen replacement therapy, women are using botanical dietary supplements as alternatives for the management of menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes. Before botanical dietary supplements can be evaluated clinically for safety and efficacy, botanically authenticated and standardized forms are required. To address the demand for a standardized, estrogenic botanical dietary supplement, an extract of hops (Humulus lupulus L.) was developed. Although valued in the brewing of beer, hop extracts are used as anxiolytics and hypnotics and have well-established estrogenic constituents. Starting with a hop cultivar used in the brewing industry, spent hops (the residue remaining after extraction of bitter acids) were formulated into a botanical dietary supplement that was then chemically and biologically standardized. Biological standardization utilized the estrogen-dependent induction of alkaline phosphatase in the Ishikawa cell line. Chemical standardization was based on the prenylated phenols in hops that included estrogenic 8-prenylnaringenin, its isomer 6-prenylnaringenin, and pro-estrogenic isoxanthohumol and its isomeric chalcone xanthohumol, all of which were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The product of this process was a reproducible botanical extract suitable for subsequent investigations of safety and efficacy. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. SI-traceable standards for atmospheric monitoring of halogenated gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillevic, Myriam; Wyss, Simon A.; Pascale, Céline; Vollmer, Martin K.; Niederhauser, Bernhard; Reimann, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    To support atmospheric monitoring of greenhouse gases and in particular halogenated gases, we have developed a method to produce reference gas mixtures at nmol/mol (ppb) to pmol/mol levels (ppt). This method is dynamic and SI-traceable. This work is conducted in the framework of the EMRP projects HIGHGAS and KEY-VOCs as well as METAS' AtmoChemECV project. The method has been already applied to HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane, widely used in air conditioners), HFC-1234yf (2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene, a car air conditioner fluid of growing importance) and SF6 (insulant in electric switch-gears). It is currently being extended to HCFC-132b and CFC-13. It is particularly suitable for gas species and/or concentration ranges that are not stable in cylinders and it can be applied to a large variety of molecules related to air pollution and climate change (e.g., NO2, volatile organic compounds such as BTEX, NH3, water vapour at ppm level, CFCs, HCFCs, HFCs). The expanded uncertainty is less than 3 % (95 % confidence interval or k=2). The generation process is composed of four successive steps. In the first step the matrix gas, nitrogen or synthetic air is purified. Then this matrix gas is spiked with the pure substance, using a permeation device which contains a few grams of the pure substance (e.g., HFC-125) in the liquid form and loses it linearly over time by permeation through a membrane. This mass loss is precisely calibrated in our lab in Bern, using a magnetic suspension balance. In a third step the desired concentration is reached by dilution of the high concentration mixture exiting the permeation chamber with a chosen flow of the matrix gas in one or two subsequent dilution steps. All flows are piloted by mass flow controllers. All parts in contact with the gas mixture - including the balance - are passivated using coated surfaces, to reduce adsorption/desorption processes as much as possible. In the last step the mixture can be i) directly used to calibrate an

  20. 75 FR 52607 - Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Federal Housing Finance Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ... Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Federal Housing Finance Agency AGENCY: Federal Housing Finance Agency..., with the concurrence of the Office of Government Ethics, which supplements the Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Executive Branch. To ensure a comprehensive and effective ethics program at...

  1. 76 FR 14777 - Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Federal Labor Relations Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... / Friday, March 18, 2011 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY 5 CFR Part 5901 Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Federal Labor Relations Authority AGENCY..., Government employees. Authority and Issuance Accordingly, the Federal Labor Relations Authority, with the...

  2. 48 CFR 852.222-70 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement. 852.222-70 Section 852.222-70 Federal...—nursing home care contract supplement. As prescribed in 822.305, for nursing home care requirements, insert the following clause: Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act—Nursing Home Care Contract...

  3. The impact of short-term feeding of magnesium supplements on the quality of pork packaged in modified atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Verónica; Provincial, Laura; Gil, Mario; Guillén, Elena; Roncalés, Pedro; Beltrán, José A

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the effect of dietary magnesium (Mg) supplementation on pork quality during 13 days of storage at 4±1°C under modified atmosphere. The experiment was conducted with 40 gilts (Pietrain×(Landrace×Large White)) which were fed one of four diets five days prior to slaughter: 1) control diet; 2) Mg oxide; 3) Mg sulphate; or 4) Mg chelate. Dietary Mg supplementation did not affect 24-h pH, colour, and Warner-Bratzler shear force values. Pork from pigs fed the Mg chelate-supplemented diet had the lowest (P≤0.05) drip, exudative, and cooking losses. Furthermore, pork from pig supplemented with Mg oxide had the lowest TBARS values. Visual assessment of pork from pigs supplemented with Mg chelate received higher colour and lower exudative scores, as well as overall acceptability scores, throughout display. Thus, Mg chelated supplementation could be effective in improving pork quality during 13 days of storage under modified atmosphere conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Standard multivitamin supplementation does not improve vitamin D insufficiency after burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, David N.; Chen, Tai C.; Kulp, Gabriela; Holick, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Children suffering severe burns develop progressive vitamin D deficiency because of inability of burned skin to produce normal quantities of vitamin D3 and lack of vitamin D supplementation on discharge. Our study was designed to determine whether a daily supplement of a standard multivitamin tablet containing vitamin D2 400 IU (10 μg) for 6 months would raise serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] to normal. We recruited eight burned children, ages 5–18, whose families were deemed reliable by the research staff. These children were given a daily multivitamin tablet in the hospital for 3 months in the presence of a member of the research staff and then given the remainder at home. At 6 months, the subjects returned for measurements of serum levels of 25(OH)D,1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), Ca, P, albumin, and total protein as well as bone mass by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Serum 25(OH)D levels were compared to a group of seven age-matched burned children studied at an earlier date without the vitamin supplement but with the same method of determination of 25(OH)D at 6 months post-burn. In addition, the chewable vitamins were analyzed for vitamin D2 content by high performance liquid chromatography. Serum concentration of 25(OH)D was 21 ± 11(SD) ng/ml (sufficient range 30–100) with only one of the eight children having a value in the sufficient range. In comparison, the unsupplemented burn patients had mean serum 25(OH)D level of 16 ± 7, P = 0.33 versus supplemented. Serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D, iPTH, Ca, P, albumin, and total protein were all normal in the supplemented group. Vitamin D2 content of the chewable tablets after being saponified and extracted was 460 ± 20 IU. Bone mineral content of the total body and lumbar spine, as well as lumbar spine bone density, failed to increase as expected in the supplemented group. No correlations were found between serum 25(OH)D levels and age, length of stay

  5. Standard practice for conducting wire-on-bolt test for atmospheric galvanic corrosion

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the evaluation of atmospheric galvanic corrosion of any anodic material that can be made into a wire when in contact with a cathodic material that can be made into a threaded rod. 1.2 When certain materials are used for the anode and cathode, this practice has been used to rate the corrosivity of atmospheres. 1.3 The wire-on-bolt test was first described in 1955 (1), and has since been used extensively with standard materials to determine corrosivity of atmospheres under the names CLIMAT Test (CLassify Industrial and Marine ATmospheres) (2-5) and ATCORR (ATmospheric CORRosivity) (6-9). 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations p...

  6. Standard test method for determining atmospheric chloride deposition rate by wet candle method

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a wet candle device and its use in measuring atmospheric chloride deposition (amount of chloride salts deposited from the atmosphere on a given area per unit time). 1.2 Data on atmospheric chloride deposition can be useful in classifying the corrosivity of a specific area, such as an atmospheric test site. Caution must be exercised, however, to take into consideration the season because airborne chlorides vary widely between seasons. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. BARTTest: Community-Standard Atmospheric Radiative-Transfer and Retrieval Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Joseph; Himes, Michael D.; Cubillos, Patricio E.; Blecic, Jasmina; Challener, Ryan C.

    2018-01-01

    Atmospheric radiative transfer (RT) codes are used both to predict planetary and brown-dwarf spectra and in retrieval algorithms to infer atmospheric chemistry, clouds, and thermal structure from observations. Observational plans, theoretical models, and scientific results depend on the correctness of these calculations. Yet, the calculations are complex and the codes implementing them are often written without modern software-verification techniques. The community needs a suite of test calculations with analytically, numerically, or at least community-verified results. We therefore present the Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Test Suite, or BARTTest. BARTTest has four categories of tests: analytically verified RT tests of simple atmospheres (single line in single layer, line blends, saturation, isothermal, multiple line-list combination, etc.), community-verified RT tests of complex atmospheres, synthetic retrieval tests on simulated data with known answers, and community-verified real-data retrieval tests.BARTTest is open-source software intended for community use and further development. It is available at https://github.com/ExOSPORTS/BARTTest. We propose this test suite as a standard for verifying atmospheric RT and retrieval codes, analogous to the Held-Suarez test for general circulation models. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NX12AI69G, NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G, and NASA Exoplanets Research Program grant NNX17AB62G.

  8. Comparison of melatonin products against USP's nutritional supplements standards and other criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, H; Kujawa, J; Augsburger, L

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the quality of a sample of melatonin products, as measured by the United States Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) General Tests and Assays for Nutritional Supplements (other than Microbial Limits) and certain other tests. Five immediate-release, two sublingual, and two controlled-release products were randomly gathered from a health food store, groceries, and pharmacies in the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area. Weight variation, disintegration (not applicable for controlled-release products), and drug dissolution, based on USP standards. Twelve-hour dissolution profiles were obtained from the controlled-release products. All tablets were also evaluated for friability following the USP procedure and for hardness following unofficial procedures. All products passed the weight variation test. Two products showed excessive friability. Three immediate-release products failed both the disintegration and the dissolution tests. One of the three products demonstrated a threefold difference in hardness. One controlled-release product released 90% of melatonin in four hours in the dissolution test; the other released 90% of its content in 12 hours. Some products showed evidence of poor formulation and/or poor quality control as indicated by excessive friability, failure to disintegrate and dissolve, and excessive variation in hardness. In vitro release profiles of the two controlled-release products were substantially different. The poor quality of some supplements should be a concern to consumers and health care providers.

  9. The effect of a standardized protocol for iron supplementation to blood donors low in hemoglobin concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Karin; Bork, Nanna; Asmussen, Lisa

    2008-04-01

    Iron deficiency leading to low hemoglobin concentration (cHb) is a common problem for blood donors as well as for blood banks. A standardized protocol offering iron supplementation based on P-ferritin determination may help to reduce the problem and retain donors. This was a prospective study where 879 blood donors, presenting with cHb at or below the limit of acceptance for donation, were included. The predonation cHb result was read after donation. The donors received 50 iron tablets (JernC or Ferrochel, 100 or 25 mg elemental iron, respectively), and samples for P-ferritin, mean corpuscular volume, and control of cHb were secured. Based on a P-ferritin level of less than 60 microg per L, 20 iron tablets were offered after all following donations. Mean cHb was 7.6 mmol per L (122 g/L) and 8.2 mmol per L (132 g/L) in women and men, respectively. In 80 percent of the women and 48 percent of the men, iron stores were low (P-ferritin protocol offering iron supplementation and simple oral and written advice based on P-ferritin measurements is effective in normalizing cHb and retaining donors presenting with cHb at or below the limit of acceptance for donation.

  10. Determination of arsenic in food and dietary supplement standard reference materials by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic was measured in food and dietary supplement standard reference materials by neutron activation analysis for the purpose of assigning certified or reference As mass fractions and to assess material homogeneity. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to value assign As in candidate SRM 3532 Calcium Dietary Supplement and candidate SRM 3262 Hypericum perforatum (St. John's Wort) Aerial Parts down to about 100 μg/kg. Values were also determined for two additional candidate St. John's Wort SRMs with As mass fractions 24 Na and 82 Br limited the reproducibility of the method below 100 μg/kg. For measurement of lower As mass fractions, a radiochemical neutron activation analysis method with extraction of As 3+ into diethyl-dithiocarbamate in chloroform and detection limits down to 0.1 μg/kg. As was used to value-assign As mass fractions for SRM 3280 Multivitamin/Multielement Tablets and for candidate SRM 3233 Fortified Breakfast Cereal, and at <10 μg/kg in candidate SRM 1845a Whole Egg Powder. (author)

  11. Glutathione and riboflavin status in supplemented patients undergoing home nocturnal hemodialysis versus standard hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannampuzha, Jovil; Donnelly, Sandra M; McFarlane, Philip A; Chan, Christopher T; House, James D; Pencharz, Paul B; Darling, Pauline B

    2010-05-01

    Patients on conventional hemodialysis (HD) have elevated markers of oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, which may contribute to a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease. Glutathione (GSH), an important intracellular antioxidant, requires cysteine as a rate-limiting amino acid for its synthesis and riboflavin for its regeneration. We aimed to examine whether erythrocyte GSH (eGSH) concentrations and riboflavin status are influenced by the increased dialysis dose provided to vitamin-supplemented patients receiving home nocturnal hemodialysis (HNHD) (6-8 hours/session, 5-7 nights/week) compared with patients on standard hemodialysis (SHD) (4 hours/session, 3 days/week). This was a cross-sectional comparative study involving 30 patients undergoing SHD or HNHD regimens and a group of 15 healthy control subjects (HC). We measured eGSH concentration by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, riboflavin status by eGSH reductase activity coefficient (EGRAC) as well as plasma total cysteine (Cys) and total homocysteine (Hcy), vitamin C by high-performance liquid chromatography, and C-reactive protein (CRP) by standard method. Estimated dietary protein and energy intakes were determined by 3-day food records, and nutritional status was assessed by subjective global assessment (SGA). There were no significant differences among groups in eGSH concentration, EGRAC, dietary protein intake, and SGA score. SHD patients had significantly higher plasma Cys (P patients.

  12. Standard practice for monitoring atmospheric SO2 using the sulfation plate technique

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a weighted average effective SO2 level for a 30-day interval through the use of the sulfation plate method, a technique for estimating the effective SO2 content of the atmosphere, and especially with regard to the atmospheric corrosion of stationary structures or panels. This practice is aimed at determining SO2 levels rather than sulfuric acid aerosol or acid precipitation. 1.2 The results of this practice correlate approximately with volumetric SO2 concentrations, although the presence of dew or condensed moisture tends to enhance the capture of SO2 into the plate. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. Non-standard interactions with high-energy atmospheric neutrinos at IceCube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvado, Jordi; Mena, Olga; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Rius, Nuria [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC-Universitat de València,Apartado de Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2017-01-31

    Non-standard interactions in the propagation of neutrinos in matter can lead to significant deviations from expectations within the standard neutrino oscillation framework and atmospheric neutrino detectors have been considered to set constraints. However, most previous works have focused on relatively low-energy atmospheric neutrino data. Here, we consider the one-year high-energy through-going muon data in IceCube, which has been already used to search for light sterile neutrinos, to constrain new interactions in the μτ-sector. In our analysis we include several systematic uncertainties on both, the atmospheric neutrino flux and on the detector properties, which are accounted for via nuisance parameters. After considering different primary cosmic-ray spectra and hadronic interaction models, we improve over previous analysis by using the latest data and showing that systematics currently affect very little the bound on the off-diagonal ε{sub μτ}, with the 90% credible interval given by −6.0×10{sup −3}<ε{sub μτ}<5.4×10{sup −3}, comparable to previous results. In addition, we also estimate the expected sensitivity after 10 years of collected data in IceCube and study the precision at which non-standard parameters could be determined for the case of ε{sub μτ} near its current bound.

  14. 75 FR 45579 - Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Supplemental Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Supplemental Notice of Data...), proposing numeric nutrient water quality criteria to protect aquatic life in lakes and flowing waters within... that would use the lake criteria themselves as criteria for upstream waters flowing into the lake. EPA...

  15. 75 FR 57657 - Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Special Inspector General for Iraq...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction AGENCY: Special... Iraq Reconstruction (SIGIR), with the concurrence of the Office of Government Ethics (OGE), is... of Ethical Conduct (Standards) issued by OGE. With certain exceptions, this supplemental regulation...

  16. Do Studies Evaluating QT/QTc Interval Prolongation with Dietary Supplements Meet FDA Standards: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tinh An; Kurian, Amy; Leong, Jessica; Patel, Umang M; Shah, Sachin A

    2017-07-04

    Dietary supplement use is continuously increasing, but the safety evaluation of these products remains partial. While dietary supplements have no mandate for assessing cardiovascular safety, all new drug entities (NDE) are required to undergo a thorough QT/corrected QT (QTc) assessment to determine their propensity to impact cardiac repolarization. Independent investigators and manufacturers of dietary supplements voluntarily initiate safety studies; however, the quality of these studies is controversial. We sought to compare studies evaluating the QT/QTc effects of dietary supplements based on the International Conference of Harmonization (ICH)-E14 recommendations for NDE. Twenty-six published dietary supplement studies assessed QT/QTc interval prolongation. Sample sizes ranged from nine subjects to 206 among the 15 crossover studies, six parallel design studies, and five observational studies. A plan to account for electrocardiogram (ECG) morphological abnormalities was included in 10 studies, and two studies reported cardiovascular adverse events. Eight studies found a significant change in QT/QTc intervals. The majority of studies included in this review contained many of the critical elements recommended by the ICH E14, which includes the U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidance document for QT/QTc interval assessment. Compared with the thorough QT (TQT) standards, studies are typically well performed but can be bolstered by some study design changes. More than 30% of the included studies showed some degree of ECG changes, suggesting the need for continued cardiovascular safety assessment of dietary supplements.

  17. 5 CFR 9901.332 - Standard and targeted local market supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... for coverage under a targeted local market supplement may be based on occupation, band, organizational unit, geographic location of official worksite, specializations, special skills or qualifications, or...

  18. Sleep-Promoting Effects and Possible Mechanisms of Action Associated with a Standardized Rice Bran Supplement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyejin Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural sleep aids are becoming more popular due to the widespread occurrence of sleep disorders. The objective of this study was to assess the sleep-promoting effects of rice bran—a product that is considered as a functional ingredient. To evaluate the sleep-promoting effects of a standardized rice bran supplement (RBS, we employed a pentobarbital-induced sleep test and conducted analyses of sleep architecture. In addition, the effect of RBS on a caffeine-induced sleep disturbance was investigated. Oral administration of RBS (500 and 1000 mg/kg produced a significant decrease in sleep latency and increase in sleep duration in pentobarbital-induced sleep in mice. Moreover, both RBS (1000 mg/kg and doxepin hydrochloride (histamine H1 receptor antagonist, 30 mg/kg counteracted a caffeine-induced sleep disturbance in mice. In terms of sleep phases, RBS (500 mg/kg promoted non-rapid eye movement sleep for the first 3 h following its administration. Lastly, we unveiled a possible mechanism for RBS action as the hypnotic effect of RBS was blocked by a histamine H1 receptor agonist. The present study revealed sleep-promoting effects of RBS using various animal assays. Such effects seem to be mediated through the histaminergic system. Our findings suggest that RBS may be a promising natural aid for relieving sleep problems.

  19. Sleep-Promoting Effects and Possible Mechanisms of Action Associated with a Standardized Rice Bran Supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyejin; Yoon, Minseok; Um, Min Young; Lee, Jaekwang; Jung, Jonghoon; Lee, Changho; Kim, Yun-Tai; Kwon, Sangoh; Kim, Boknam; Cho, Suengmok

    2017-05-18

    Natural sleep aids are becoming more popular due to the widespread occurrence of sleep disorders. The objective of this study was to assess the sleep-promoting effects of rice bran-a product that is considered as a functional ingredient. To evaluate the sleep-promoting effects of a standardized rice bran supplement (RBS), we employed a pentobarbital-induced sleep test and conducted analyses of sleep architecture. In addition, the effect of RBS on a caffeine-induced sleep disturbance was investigated. Oral administration of RBS (500 and 1000 mg/kg) produced a significant decrease in sleep latency and increase in sleep duration in pentobarbital-induced sleep in mice. Moreover, both RBS (1000 mg/kg) and doxepin hydrochloride (histamine H₁ receptor antagonist, 30 mg/kg) counteracted a caffeine-induced sleep disturbance in mice. In terms of sleep phases, RBS (500 mg/kg) promoted non-rapid eye movement sleep for the first 3 h following its administration. Lastly, we unveiled a possible mechanism for RBS action as the hypnotic effect of RBS was blocked by a histamine H₁ receptor agonist. The present study revealed sleep-promoting effects of RBS using various animal assays. Such effects seem to be mediated through the histaminergic system. Our findings suggest that RBS may be a promising natural aid for relieving sleep problems.

  20. Hydrocarbon gas standards at the pmol/mol level to support ambient atmospheric measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoderick, George C; Duewer, David L; Ning, Li; DeSirant, Kathryn

    2010-02-01

    Studies of climate change increasingly recognize the diverse influences exerted by hydrocarbons in the atmosphere, including roles in particulates and ozone formation. Measurements of key non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) suggest atmospheric concentrations ranging from low pmol/mol to nmol/mol, depending on location and compound. To accurately establish concentration trends and to relate measurement records from many laboratories and researchers, it is essential to have good calibration standards. Several of the world's National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) are developing primary and secondary reference gas standards at the nmol/mol level. While the U.S. NMI, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), has developed pmol/mol standards for halocarbons and some volatile organics, the feasibility of preparing well-characterized, stable standards for NMHCs at the pmol/mol level is not yet established. NIST recently developed a suite of primary standards by gravimetric dilution that contains 18 NMHCs covering the concentration range of 60 pmol/mol to 230 pmol/mol. Taking into account the small but chemically significant contribution of NMHCs in the high-purity diluent nitrogen used in their preparation, the relative concentrations and short-term stability (2 to 3 months) of these NMHCs in the primary standards have been confirmed by chromatographic analysis. The gravimetric values assigned from the methods used to prepare the materials and the analytical concentrations determined from chromatographic analysis generally agree to within +/-2 pmol/mol. However, anomalous results for several of the compounds reflect the difficulties inherent in avoiding contamination and making accurate measurements at these very low levels.

  1. Supplemental mathematical formulations, Atmospheric pathway: The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droppo, J.G.; Buck, J.W.

    1996-03-01

    The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) is an integrated software implementation of physics-based fate and transport models for health and environmental risk assessments of both radioactive and hazardous pollutants. This atmospheric component report is one of a series of formulation reports that document the MEPAS mathematical models. MEPAS is a ''multimedia'' model; pollutant transport is modeled within, through, and between multiple media (air, soil, groundwater, and surface water). The estimated concentrations in the various media are used to compute exposures and impacts to the environment, to maximum individuals, and to populations

  2. A Dietary Supplement Containing Standardized Phaseolus vulgaris Extract Influences Body Composition of Overweight Men and Women

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Celleno, Maria Vittoria Tolaini, Alessandra D'Amore, Nicholas V. Perricone, Harry G. Preuss

    2007-01-01

    Background: More than one billion human adults worldwide are overweight and, therefore, are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and a variety of other chronic perturbations. Many believe that use of natural dietary supplements could aid in the struggle against obesity. So-called "starch blockers" are listed among natural weight loss supplements. Theoretically, they may promote weight loss by interfering with the breakdown of complex carbohydrates thereby reducing, ...

  3. Standard guide for estimating the atmospheric corrosion resistance of low-alloy steels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This guide presents two methods for estimating the atmospheric corrosion resistance of low-alloy weathering steels, such as those described in Specifications A242/A242M, A588/A588M, A606 Type 4, A709/A709M grades 50W, HPS 70W, and 100W, A852/A852M, and A871/A871M. One method gives an estimate of the long-term thickness loss of a steel at a specific site based on results of short-term tests. The other gives an estimate of relative corrosion resistance based on chemical composition. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard.

  4. A Framework for Simulation of Aircraft Flyover Noise Through a Non-Standard Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntzen, Michael; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Visser, Hendrikus G.; Simons, Dick G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a new framework for the simulation of aircraft flyover noise through a non-standard atmosphere. Central to the framework is a ray-tracing algorithm which defines multiple curved propagation paths, if the atmosphere allows, between the moving source and listener. Because each path has a different emission angle, synthesis of the sound at the source must be performed independently for each path. The time delay, spreading loss and absorption (ground and atmosphere) are integrated along each path, and applied to each synthesized aircraft noise source to simulate a flyover. A final step assigns each resulting signal to its corresponding receiver angle for the simulation of a flyover in a virtual reality environment. Spectrograms of the results from a straight path and a curved path modeling assumption are shown. When the aircraft is at close range, the straight path results are valid. Differences appear especially when the source is relatively far away at shallow elevation angles. These differences, however, are not significant in common sound metrics. While the framework used in this work performs off-line processing, it is conducive to real-time implementation.

  5. Educational Labeling System for Atmospheres (ELSA): Python Tool Development for Archiving Under the PDS4 Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neakrase, Lynn; Hornung, Danae; Sweebe, Kathrine; Huber, Lyle; Chanover, Nancy J.; Stevenson, Zena; Berdis, Jodi; Johnson, Joni J.; Beebe, Reta F.

    2017-10-01

    The Research and Analysis programs within NASA’s Planetary Science Division now require archiving of resultant data with the Planetary Data System (PDS) or an equivalent archive. The PDS Atmospheres Node is developing an online environment for assisting data providers with this task. The Educational Labeling System for Atmospheres (ELSA) is being designed with Django/Python coding to provide an easier environment for facilitating not only communication with the PDS node, but also streamlining the process of learning, developing, submitting, and reviewing archive bundles under the new PDS4 archiving standard. Under the PDS4 standard, data are archived in bundles, collections, and basic products that form an organizational hierarchy of interconnected labels that describe the data and relationships between the data and its documentation. PDS4 labels are implemented using Extensible Markup Language (XML), which is an international standard for managing metadata. Potential data providers entering the ELSA environment can learn more about PDS4, plan and develop label templates, and build their archive bundles. ELSA provides an interface to tailor label templates aiding in the creation of required internal Logical Identifiers (URN - Uniform Resource Names) and Context References (missions, instruments, targets, facilities, etc.). The underlying structure of ELSA uses Django/Python code that make maintaining and updating the interface easy to do for our undergraduate/graduate students. The ELSA environment will soon provide an interface for using the tailored templates in a pipeline to produce entire collections of labeled products, essentially building the user’s archive bundle. Once the pieces of the archive bundle are assembled, ELSA provides options for queuing the completed bundle for peer review. The peer review process has also been streamlined for online access and tracking to help make the archiving process with PDS as transparent as possible. We discuss the

  6. Gravimetric Standard Gas Mixtures for Global Monitoring of Atmospheric SF6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong Sik; Lee, Jinbok; Moon, Dongmin; Kim, Jin Seog; Lee, Jeongsoon; Hall, Bradley D

    2017-11-21

    In this study, standard gas mixtures of SF 6 in synthetic air were gravimetrically developed as a suite consisting of 6 mixtures with mole fractions of SF 6 ranging from 5 to 15 pmol/mol. For precision in weighing the gas fills, an automatic weighing system coupled with a high sensitivity mass balance was used and a gravimetry precision of 3 mg (2σ) was achieved. Impurity profiles of the raw gases were determined by various analyzers. In particular, sub pmol/mol levels of SF 6 in the matrix components (N 2 , O 2 , and Ar) were carefully measured, since the mole fraction of SF 6 in the final step can be significantly biased by this trace amount of SF 6 in the raw gases of the matrix components. Gravimetric dilution of SF 6 by purity-assessed N 2 was performed in 6 steps to achieve a mole fraction of 440 pmol/mol. In the final step, O 2 and Ar were added to mimic the atmospheric composition. Gravimetric fractions of SF 6 and the associated standard uncertainty in each step were computed according to the ISO 6142 and JCGM 100:2008, respectively, and validated experimentally. Eventually, the SF 6 fraction uncertainty of the standard gas mixtures combined by uncertainties of gravimetric preparation and verification measurements were found to be nominally 0.08% at a 95% confidence interval. A comparison with independent calibration standards from NOAA shows agreement within 0.49%, satisfying the extended WMO compatibility goal, 0.05 ppt.

  7. Bridging the gap between Hydrologic and Atmospheric communities through a standard based framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrini, E.; Salas, F.; Maidment, D. R.; Mazzetti, P.; Santoro, M.; Nativi, S.; Domenico, B.

    2012-04-01

    services, and executes complex queries against the available metadata. - inventory service (implemented as a THREDDS) being able to hierarchically organize and publish a local collection of multi-dimensional arrays (e.g. NetCDF, GRIB files), as well as publish auxiliary standard services to realize the actual data access and visualization (e.g. WCS, OPeNDAP, WMS). The approach followed in this research is to build on top of the existing standards and implementations, by setting up a standard-aware interoperable framework, able to deal with the existing heterogeneity in an organic way. As a methodology, interoperability tests against real services were performed; existing problems were thus highlighted and possibly solved. The use of flexible tools, able to deal in a smart way with heterogeneity has proven to be successful, in particular experiments were carried on with both GI-cat broker and ESRI GeoPortal frameworks. GI-cat discovery broker was proven successful at implementing the CSW interface, as well as federating heterogeneous resources, such as THREDDS and WCS services published by Unidata, HydroServer, WFS and SOS services published by CUAHSI. Experiments with ESRI GeoPortal were also successful: the GeoPortal was used to deploy a web interface able to distribute searches amongst catalog implementations from both the hydrologic and the atmospheric communities, including HydroServers and GI-cat, combining results from both the domains in a seamless way.

  8. Determination of Bitter Orange alkaloids in dietary supplements standard reference materials by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet absorbance and fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzbach, Karsten; Rimmer, Catherine A; Sharpless, Katherine E; Sander, Lane C

    2007-07-13

    Four adrenergic amines [synephrine, octopamine, tyramine, and n-methyltyramine] were determined in a variety of Bitter Orange containing dietary supplements. Two extraction techniques were evaluated in detail: Soxhlet extraction and sonication extraction. A liquid chromatographic separation using a reversed-phase C(18) stationary phase and the ion-pairing reagent sodium dodecyl sulfate was developed to separate the Bitter Orange alkaloids. Ultraviolet absorbance detection at 220 nm and fluorescence detection with excitation at 273 nm and emission at 304 nm were used for the alkaloid detection. The method described was used for the assignment of the levels of the predominant alkaloids in three candidate standard reference materials containing Bitter Orange.

  9. A Dietary supplement containing standardized Phaseolus vulgaris extract influences body composition of overweight men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celleno, Leonardo; Tolaini, Maria Vittoria; D'Amore, Alessandra; Perricone, Nicholas V; Preuss, Harry G

    2007-01-24

    More than one billion human adults worldwide are overweight and, therefore, are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and a variety of other chronic perturbations. Many believe that use of natural dietary supplements could aid in the struggle against obesity. So-called "starch blockers" are listed among natural weight loss supplements. Theoretically, they may promote weight loss by interfering with the breakdown of complex carbohydrates thereby reducing, or at least slowing, the digestive availability of carbohydrate-derived calories and/or by providing resistant starches to the lower gastrointestinal tract. The present research study examines a dietary supplement containing 445 mg of Phaseolus vulgaris extract derived from the white kidney bean, previously shown to inhibit the activity of the digestive enzyme alpha amylase, on body composition of overweight human subjects. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study was conducted on 60 pre-selected, slightly overweight volunteers, whose weight had been essentially stable for at least six months. The volunteers were divided into two groups, homogeneous for age, gender, and body weight. The test product containing Phaseolus vulgaris extract and the placebo were taken one tablet per day for 30 consecutive days before a main meal rich in carbohydrates. Each subject's body weight, fat and non-fat mass, skin fold thickness, and waist/hip/thigh circumferences were measured. After 30 days, subjects receiving Phaseolus vulgaris extract with a carbohydrate-rich, 2000- to 2200-calorie diet had significantly (preduction of body weight, BMI, fat mass, adipose tissue thickness, and waist,/hip/ thigh circumferences while maintaining lean body mass compared to subjects receiving placebo. The results indicate that Phaseolus vulgaris extract produces significant decrements in body weight and suggest decrements in fat mass in the face of maintained lean body mass.

  10. Standardized electrolyte supplementation and fluid management improves survival during amphotericin therapy for cryptococcal meningitis in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Nathan C; Rolfes, Melissa A; Musubire, Abdu; Nabeta, Henry; Williams, Darlisha A; Rhein, Joshua; Kambugu, Andrew; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2014-09-01

    Amphotericin B is the preferred treatment for cryptococcal meningitis, but it has cumulative severe side effects, including nephrotoxicity, hypokalemia, and hypomagnesemia. Amphotericin-induced severe hypokalemia may predispose the patient to cardiac arrhythmias and death, and there is very little data available regarding these toxicities in resource-limited settings. We hypothesized that standardized electrolyte management during amphotericin therapy is essential to minimize toxicity and optimize survival in sub-Saharan Africa. Human immunodeficiency virus-infected, antiretroviral therapy naive adults with cryptococcal meningitis were prospectively enrolled at Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda in 3 sequential cohorts with amphotericin B deoxycholate induction treatment. Intravenous fluid use was intermittent in 2001-2002, and universal in 2006-2012. In 2001-2009, serum potassium (K(+)) was monitored on days 1, 7, and 14 of treatment with replacement (K(+), Mg(2+)) per clinician discretion. In 2011-2012, K(+) was measured on days 1, 5, and approximately every 48 hours thereafter with universal electrolyte (K(+), Mg(2+)) supplementation and standardized replacement. Clinical outcomes were retrospectively compared between fluid and electrolyte management strategies. With limited intravenous fluids, the 14-day survival was 49% in 2001-2002. With universal intravenous fluids, the 30-day survival improved to 62% in 2006-2010 (P = .003). In 2011-2012, with universal supplementation of fluids and electrolytes, 30-day cumulative survival improved to 78% (P = .021 vs 2006-2010 cohort). The cumulative incidence of severe hypokalemia (<2.5 mEq/L) decreased from 38% in 2010 to 8.5% in 2011-2012 with universal supplementation (P < .001). Improved survival was seen in a resource-limited setting with proactive fluid and electrolyte management (K(+), Mg(2+)), as part of comprehensive amphotericin-based cryptococcal therapy.

  11. Autofluorescence of atmospheric bioaerosols - Biological standard particles and the influence of environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöhlker, Christopher; Huffman, J. Alex; Förster, Jan-David; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    standard bioparticles (pollen, fungal spores, and bacteria) as well as atmospherically relevant chemical substances. We addressed the sensitivity and selectivity of autofluorescence based online techniques. Moreover, we investigated the influence of environmental conditions, such as relative humidity and oxidizing agents in the atmosphere, on the autofluorescence signature of standard bioparticles. Our results will support the molecular understanding and quantitative interpretation of data obtained by real-time FBAP instrumentation [5,6]. [1] Elbert, W., Taylor, P. E., Andreae, M. O., & Pöschl, U. (2007). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 4569-4588. [2] Huffman, J. A., Treutlein, B., & Pöschl, U. (2010). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 3215-3233. [3] Pöschl, U., et al. (2010). Science, 329, 1513-1516. [4] Lakowicz, J., Principles of fluorescence spectroscopy, Plenum publishers, New York, 1999. [5] Pöhlker, C., Huffman, J. A., & Pöschl, U., (2012). Atmos. Meas. Tech., 5, 37-71. [6] Pöhlker, C., Huffman, J. A., Förster J.-D., & Pöschl, U., (2012) in preparation.

  12. Standard Guide for Conducting Supplemental Surveillance Tests for Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels, E 706 (IH)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide discusses test procedures that can be used in conjunction with, but not as alternatives to, those required by Practices E185 and E2215 for the surveillance of nuclear reactor vessels. The supplemental mechanical property tests outlined permit the acquisition of additional information on radiation-induced changes in fracture toughness, notch ductility, and yield strength properties of the reactor vessel steels. 1.2 This guide provides recommendations for the preparation of test specimens for irradiation, and identifies special precautions and requirements for reactor surveillance operations and postirradiation test planning. Guidance on data reduction and computational procedures is also given. Reference is made to other ASTM test methods for the physical conduct of specimen tests and for raw data acquisition.

  13. 76 FR 4102 - Smart Grid Interoperability Standards; Supplemental Notice of Technical Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... Standards will be held on Monday, January 31, 2011, beginning at 1 p.m. (EST). The staff-led conference will....ferc.gov . The conference will be Webcast. Anyone with Internet access who desires to listen to this...

  14. Autofluorescence of atmospheric bioaerosols - fluorescent biomolecules, biological standard particles and potential interferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöhlker, C.; Huffmann, J. A.; Pöschl, U.

    2012-04-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) such as pollen, fungal spores, bacteria, biogenic polymers and debris from larger organisms are known to influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere and public health. PBAP account for up to ~30% of fine and up to ~70% of coarse particulate matter in urban, rural and pristine environment and are released with estimated emission rates of up to ~1000 Tg/a [1]. Continuous measurements of the abundance, variability and diversity of PBAP have been difficult until recently, however. The application of on-line instruments able to detect autofluorescence from biological particles in real-time has been a promising development for the measurement of PBAP concentrations and fluxes in different environments [2,3]. The detected fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP) can be regarded as a subset of PBAP, although the exact relationship between PBAP and FBAP is still being investigated. Autofluorescence of FBAP is usually a superposition of fluorescence from a mixture of individual fluorescent molecules (fluorophores). Numerous biogenic fluorophores such as amino acids (e.g., tryptophan, tyrosine), coenzymes (e.g., NAD(P)H, riboflavin) and biopolymers (e.g., cellulose) emit fluorescent light due to heterocyclic aromatic rings or conjugated double bonds within their molecular structures. The tryptophan emission peak is a common feature of most bioparticles because the amino acid is a constituent of many proteins and peptides. The influence of the coenzymes NAD(P)H and riboflavin on the autofluorescence of bacteria can be regarded as an indicator for bacterial metabolism and has been utilized to discriminate between viable and non-viable organisms [4]. However, very little information is available about other essential biofluorophores in fungal spores and pollen. In order to better understand the autofluorescence behavior of FBAP, we have used fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy to analyze standard

  15. Standard YPD, even supplemented with extra nutrients, does not always compensate growth defects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae auxotrophic strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbacho, Isaac; Teixidó, Francisco; Velázquez, Rocío; Hernández, Luis M; Olivero, Isabel

    2011-03-01

    Conventional complex media are routinely used to grow auxotrophic strains under the assumption that they can compensate the latter's nutritional deficiencies. We here demonstrate that this is not always true. This study compares the growth parameters of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S288C) and its derived auxotrophic strains FY1679-14C and BY4741 in synthetic minimal medium (SD), standard YPD medium from two of the most commonly used suppliers, or modified YPD medium. Maximum specific growth rates of auxotrophic strains were slightly lower than the prototrophic case in all growth conditions tested. Also, the biomass production of auxotrophic strains in synthetic medium was slightly less than the prototrophic case. However in both of the two standard YPD media used, the biomass production of both auxotrophic strains was markedly lower than that of the prototrophic one. The extent of the differences depended on the medium used. Indeed in one of the two YPD media, the lower biomass production of auxotrophic strains was evident even at the diauxic shift. Uracil seems to be the main limiting growth factor for both auxotrophic strains growing in the two standard YPD medium tested. No YPD media or specific supplement was able to compensate for the effect of the auxotrophic mutations in the multiple auxotrophic marker strain BY4741. The fact that auxotrophic strains grew poorly on YPD when compared to their prototrophic counterpart indicates that standard YPD medium is not sufficient to overcome the effect of auxotrophic mutations.

  16. A natural pharma standard supplement formulation to control treatment-related toxicity and oxidative stress in genitourinary cancer: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledda, A; Belcaro, G; Dugall, M; Luzzi, R; Hosoi, M; Feragalli, B; Cotellese, R; Cosentino, V; Cosentino, M; Eggenhoffner, R; Pellizzato, M; Fratter, A; Giacomelli, L

    2017-09-01

    Oncological treatments are associated with toxicities that may decrease compliance to treatment in most genitourinary cancer patients. Supplementation with pharmaceutical-standardized supplement may be a supplementary method to control the side effects after chemo- and radiotherapy and the increased oxidative stress associated to treatments. This registry study evaluated a natural combination of supplements containing curcumin, cordyceps, and astaxanthin (Oncotris™) used as supplementary management in genitourinary cancer patients who had undergone oncological therapy. Patients with genitourinary cancers (prostate or bladder malignancies) who had undergone and completed cancer treatments (radiotherapy, chemotherapy or intravesical immunotherapy with increased oxidative stress and residual symptoms) were recruited in this registry, supplement study. Registry subjects (n = 61) freely decided to follow either a standard management (SM) (control group = 35) or SM plus oral daily supplementation (supplement group = 26). Evaluation of severity of treatment-related residual side effects, blood count test, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test and plasma free radicals (oxidative stress) were performed at inclusion and at the end of the observational period (6 weeks). Two patients dropped out during the registry. Therefore, the analysis included 59 participants: 26 individuals in the supplementation group and 33 in the control group. In the supplement group, the intensity of signs and symptoms (treatment-related) and residual side effects significantly decreased at 6 weeks: minimal changes were observed in controls. Supplementation with Oncotris™ was associated with a significant improvement in blood cell count and with a decreased level of plasmatic PSA and oxidative stress. Naturally-derived supplements, specifically Oncotris™ (patent pending), could support the body to overcome the treatment-related toxicities - and the relative oxidative stress in cancer patients.

  17. Assessing Resilience in Students Who Are Deaf or Blind: Supplementing Standardized Achievement Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Michelle A.; Katayama, Andrew D.; Schindling, Casey; Dials, Katherine

    2018-01-01

    Although testing accommodations for standardized assessments are available for students with disabilities, interpretation remains challenging. The authors explored resilience to see if it could contribute to the interpretation of academic success for students who are deaf or hard of hearing or blind or have low vision. High school students (30…

  18. Zinc supplementation as an adjunct to standard therapy in childhood nephrotic syndrome - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Girish Chandra; Jain, Shikha; Das, Rashmi Ranjan

    2016-11-08

    To evaluate the role of zinc as add on treatment to the "recommended treatment" of nephrotic syndrome (NS) in children. All the published literature through the major databases including Medline/Pubmed, Embase, and Google Scholar were searched till 31 st December 2015. Reference lists from the articles were reviewed to identify additional pertinent articles. Retrieved papers concerning the role of zinc in childhood NS were reviewed by the authors, and the data were extracted using a standardized data collection tool. Randomized trials (RCTs) comparing zinc vs placebo was included. Effect of zinc was studied in both steroid sensitive and steroid dependent/frequent relapsing NS. The primary outcome measure was the risk of relapse in 12 mo. The secondary outcome measures were mean relapse rate per patient in 12 mo, mean relapse rate per patient in 6 mo, risk of infection associated relapse in 12 mo, cumulative dose of steroids in two groups, mean length of time to next relapse, adverse effects of therapy, and change in serum zinc levels. Of 54 citations retrieved, a total of 6 RCTs were included. Zinc was used at a dose of 10-20 mg/d, for the duration that varied from 6-12 mo. Compared to placebo, zinc reduced the frequency of relapses, induced sustained remission/no relapse, reduced the proportion of infection episodes associated with relapse with a mild adverse event in the form of metallic taste. The GRADE evidence generated was of "very low-quality". Zinc may be a useful additive in the treatment of childhood NS. The evidence generated mostly was of "very low-quality". We need more good quality RCTs in different country setting as well different subgroups of children before any firm recommendation can be made.

  19. Comparison of two standard test methods for determining explosion limits of gases at atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smedt, G; de Corte, F; Notelé, R; Berghmans, J

    1999-12-31

    A comparison is made between two internationally accepted methods to determine the explosion limits of gases at atmospheric pressure and room temperature (20 l sphere - DIN 51649). Significant differences (about 1 vol.%) in the upper explosion limits (UEL) values are found for four hydrocarbons tested. A new criterion is proposed which leads to close agreement between the UEL values obtained by the two methods.

  20. Randomized trial of human milk cream as a supplement to standard fortification of an exclusive human milk-based diet in infants 750-1250 g birth weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to evaluate whether premature infants who received an exclusive human milk (HM)-based diet and a HM-derived cream supplement (cream) would have weight gain (g/kg/d) at least as good as infants receiving a standard feeding regimen (control). In a prospective noninferiority, randomiz...

  1. Standard practice for measurement of time-of-wetness on surfaces exposed to wetting conditions as in atmospheric corrosion testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1989-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a technique for monitoring time-of-wetness (TOW) on surfaces exposed to cyclic atmospheric conditions which produce depositions of moisture. 1.2 The practice is also applicable for detecting and monitoring condensation within a wall or roof assembly and in test apparatus. 1.3 Exposure site calibration or characterization can be significantly enhanced if TOW is measured for comparison with other sites, particularly if this data is used in conjunction with other site-specific instrumentation techniques. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  2. Determination of kava lactones in food supplements by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobeldijk, I.; Boonzaaijer, G.; Spies-Faber, E.J.; Vaes, W.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Reversed-phase liquid chromatography and detection with atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry was used for the determination of kava extracts in herbal mixtures. One percent of kava extract can be detected, corresponding to approximately 0.05-0.2 mg/g of the individual

  3. Can a standard dose of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA supplementation reduce the symptoms of delayed onset of muscle soreness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houghton David

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unaccustomed exercise can result in delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS which can affect athletic performance. Although DOMS is a useful tool to identify muscle damage and remodelling, prolonged symptoms of DOMS may be associated with the over-training syndrome. In order to reduce the symptoms of DOMS numerous management strategies have been attempted with no significant effect on DOMS-associated cytokines surge. The present study aimed to investigate the acute and chronic effects of a 2 × 180 mg per day dose of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA on interleukin-6 (IL-6 mediated inflammatory response and symptoms associated with DOMS. Methods Seventeen healthy non-smoking females (age 20.4 ± 2.1 years, height 161.2 ± 8.3 cm and mass 61.48 ± 7.4 kg were randomly assigned to either placebo (N = 10 or EPA (N = 7. Serum IL-6, isometric and isokinetic (concentric and eccentric strength, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE were recorded on four occasions: i-prior to supplementation, ii-immediately after three weeks of supplementation (basal effects, iii-48 hours following a single bout of resistance exercise (acute training response effects, and iv-48 hours following the last of a series of three bouts of resistance exercise (chronic training response effects. Results There was only a group difference in the degree of change in circulating IL-6 levels. In fact, relative to the first baseline, by the third bout of eccentric workout, the EPA group had 103 ± 60% increment in IL-6 levels whereas the placebo group only had 80 ± 26% incremented IL-6 levels (P = 0.020. We also describe a stable multiple linear regression model which included measures of strength and not IL-6 as predictors of RPE scale. Conclusion The present study suggests that in doubling the standard recommended dose of EPA, whilst this may still not be beneficial at ameliorating the symptoms of DOMS, it counter intuitively appears to enhance the cytokine response to

  4. Position paper on the applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer at the Uranium Mill Tailings Vitro Processing Site, Salt Lake City, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This report documents the results of the evaluation of the potential applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer underlying the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, Vitro Processing Site, Salt Lake City, Utah. There are two goals for this evaluation: provide the landowner with information to make an early qualitative decision on the possible use of the Vitro property, and evaluate the proposed application of supplemental standards as the ground water compliance strategy at the site. Justification of supplemental standards is based on the contention that the uppermost aquifer is of limited use due to wide-spread ambient contamination not related to the previous site processing activities. In support of the above, this report discusses the site conceptual model for the uppermost aquifer and related hydrogeological systems and establishes regional and local background water quality. This information is used to determine the extent of site-related and ambient contamination. A risk-based evaluation of the contaminants` effects on current and projected land uses is also provided. Reports of regional and local studies and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site investigations provided the basis for the conceptual model and established background ground water quality. In addition, a limited field effort (4 through 28 March 1996) was conducted to supplement existing data, particularly addressing the extent of contamination in the northwestern portion of the Vitro site and site background ground water quality. Results of the field investigation were particularly useful in refining the conceptual site model. This was important in light of the varied ground water quality within the uppermost aquifer. Finally, this report provides a critical evaluation, along with the related uncertainties, of the applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer at the Salt Lake City Vitro processing site.

  5. Position paper on the applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer at the Uranium Mill Tailings Vitro Processing Site, Salt Lake City, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    This report documents the results of the evaluation of the potential applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer underlying the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, Vitro Processing Site, Salt Lake City, Utah. There are two goals for this evaluation: provide the landowner with information to make an early qualitative decision on the possible use of the Vitro property, and evaluate the proposed application of supplemental standards as the ground water compliance strategy at the site. Justification of supplemental standards is based on the contention that the uppermost aquifer is of limited use due to wide-spread ambient contamination not related to the previous site processing activities. In support of the above, this report discusses the site conceptual model for the uppermost aquifer and related hydrogeological systems and establishes regional and local background water quality. This information is used to determine the extent of site-related and ambient contamination. A risk-based evaluation of the contaminants' effects on current and projected land uses is also provided. Reports of regional and local studies and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site investigations provided the basis for the conceptual model and established background ground water quality. In addition, a limited field effort (4 through 28 March 1996) was conducted to supplement existing data, particularly addressing the extent of contamination in the northwestern portion of the Vitro site and site background ground water quality. Results of the field investigation were particularly useful in refining the conceptual site model. This was important in light of the varied ground water quality within the uppermost aquifer. Finally, this report provides a critical evaluation, along with the related uncertainties, of the applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer at the Salt Lake City Vitro processing site

  6. Standard practice for atmospheric leaks using a thermal conductivity leak detector

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for detecting the sources of gas leaking at the rate of 1 × 10–5 Pa m3/s (1 × 10–4 standard cm3/s) or greater. The tests may be conducted on any object that can be pressurized with a tracer gas that is detectable by a thermal conductivity detector. The test sensitivity will vary widely depending on the tracer gas used. 1.2 Units—The values stated in either SI or std-cc/sec units are to be regarded separately as standard. The values stated in each system may not be exact equivalents: therefore, each system shall be used independently of the other. Combining values from the two systems may result in non-conformance with the standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. A systematic review of the cost and cost effectiveness of using standard oral nutritional supplements in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, M; Normand, C; Norman, K; Laviano, A

    2016-04-01

    There is limited information about the economic impact of nutritional support despite its known clinical benefits. This systematic review examined the cost and cost effectiveness of using standard (non-disease specific) oral nutritional supplements (ONS) administered in the hospital setting only. A systematic literature search of multiple databases, data synthesis and analysis were undertaken according to recommended procedures. Nine publications comprising four full text papers, two abstracts and three reports, one of which contained 11 cost analyses of controlled cohort studies, were identified. Most of these were based on retrospective analyses of randomised controlled trials designed to assess clinically relevant outcomes. The sample sizes of patients with surgical, orthopaedic and medical problems and combinations of these varied from 40 to 1.16 million. Of 14 cost analyses comparing ONS with no ONS (or routine care), 12 favoured the ONS group, and among those with quantitative data (12 studies) the mean cost saving was 12.2%. In a meta-analysis of five abdominal surgical studies in the UK, the mean net cost saving was £746 per patient (se £338; P = 0.027). Cost savings were typically associated with significantly improved outcomes, demonstrated through the following meta-analyses: reduced mortality (Risk ratio 0.650, P < 0.05; N = 5 studies), reduced complications (by 35% of the total; P < 0.001, N = 7 studies) and reduced length of hospital stay (by ∼2 days, P < 0.05; N = 5 surgical studies) corresponding to ∼13.0% reduction in hospital stay. Two studies also found ONS to be cost effective, one by avoiding development of pressure ulcers and releasing hospital beds, and the other by gaining quality adjusted life years. This review suggests that standard ONS in the hospital setting produce a cost saving and are cost effective. The evidence base could be further strengthened by prospective studies in which the primary outcome measures are

  8. Bacterial community dynamics during cold storage of minced meat packaged under modified atmosphere and supplemented with different preservatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoops, J; Ruyters, S; Busschaert, P; Spaepen, R; Verreth, C; Claes, J; Lievens, B; Van Campenhout, L

    2015-06-01

    Since minced meat is very susceptible for microbial growth, characterisation of the bacterial community dynamics during storage is important to optimise preservation strategies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different production batches and the use of different preservatives on the composition of the bacterial community in minced meat during 9 days of cold storage under modified atmosphere (66% O2, 25% CO2 and 9% N2). To this end, both culture-dependent (viable aerobic and anaerobic counts) and culture-independent (454 pyrosequencing) analyses were performed. Initially, microbial counts of fresh minced meat showed microbial loads between 3.5 and 5.0 log cfu/g. The observed microbial diversity was relatively high, and the most abundant bacteria differed among the samples. During storage an increase of microbial counts coincided with a dramatic decrease in bacterial diversity. At the end of the storage period, most samples showed microbial counts above the spoilage level of 7 log cfu/g. A relatively similar bacterial community was obtained regardless of the manufacturing batch and the preservative used, with Lactobacillus algidus and Leuconostoc sp. as the most dominant microorganisms. This suggests that both bacteria played an important role in the spoilage of minced meat packaged under modified atmosphere. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Using of standard marine radar for determination of a water surface and an atmosphere near-surface layer parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatov, Nikolay A.; Bakhanov, Victor V.; Ermoshkin, Aleksei V.; Kazakov, Vasily I.; Kemarskaya, Olga N.; Titov, Victor I.; Troitskaya, Yulia I.

    2014-10-01

    At present time radar methods of the seas and oceans diagnostics are actively developing. Using of the radar stations based on satellites and planes allows to receive information on a sea surface and a atmosphere near-surface layer with coverage of big water surface areas independently of day time. The developed methods of satellite radio images processing can be applied to marine radar stations. In Institute of Applied Physics RAS works on sea surface diagnostics systems development on the basis of standard marine radar are actively conducted. Despite smaller coverage of the territory in comparison with satellite data, marine radar have possibility to record spatially temporary radar images and to receive information on a surrounding situation quickly. This work deals with results of the researches which were conducted within the international expedition in the Atlantic Ocean in the autumn of 2012 on a route Rotterdam (Netherlands) - Ushuaya (Argentina) - Antarctica — Ushuaya. During this expedition a complex measurements of a sea surface, a atmosphere near-surface layer parameters and subsurface currents in the wide range of hydroweather conditions, including the storm were carried out. The system developed in IAP RAS on the basis of a marine radar ICOM MR-1200RII and the ADC (Analog Digital Converter) block for data recording on the personal computer was used. Display of a non-uniform near-surface current on sea surface radar images in storm conditions is shown. By means of the high-speed anemometer and meteorological station the measurements of the atmosphere parameters were carried out. Comparison of the anemometer data with calculated from radar images is carried out. Dependence of radar cross section from wind speed in the wide range of wind speeds, including storm conditions is investigated. Possibility of marine radar using for surface waves intensity and ice situation estimates also as icebergs detection is shown.

  10. Glutamine effects on heat shock protein 70 and interleukines 6 and 10: Randomized trial of glutamine supplementation versus standard parenteral nutrition in critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Iolanda; Balaguer, Mònica; Esteban, M Esther; Cambra, Francisco José; Felipe, Aida; Hernández, Lluïsa; Alsina, Laia; Molero, Marta; Villaronga, Miquel; Esteban, Elisabeth

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether glutamine (Gln) supplementation would have a role modifying both the oxidative stress and the inflammatory response of critically ill children. Prospective, randomized, double-blind, interventional clinical trial. Selection criteria were children requiring parenteral nutrition for at least 5 days diagnosed with severe sepsis or post major surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to standard parenteral nutrition (SPN, 49 subjects) or standard parenteral nutrition with glutamine supplementation (SPN + Gln, 49 subjects). Glutamine levels failed to show statistical differences between groups. At day 5, patients in the SPN + Gln group had significantly higher levels of HSP-70 (heat shock protein 70) as compared with the SPN group (68.6 vs 5.4, p = 0.014). In both groups, IL-6 (interleukine 6) levels showed a remarkable descent from baseline and day 2 (SPN: 42.24 vs 9.39, p < 0.001; SPN + Gln: 35.20 vs 13.80, p < 0.001) but only the treatment group showed a statistically significant decrease between day 2 and day 5 (13.80 vs 10.55, p = 0.013). Levels of IL-10 (interleukine 10) did not vary among visits except in the SPN between baseline and day 2 (9.55 vs 5.356, p < 0.001). At the end of the study, no significant differences between groups for PICU and hospital stay were observed. No adverse events were detected in any group. Glutamine supplementation in critically-ill children contributed to maintain high HSP-70 levels for longer. Glutamine supplementation had no influence on IL-10 and failed to show a significant reduction of IL-6 levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  11. Model developments in TERRA_URB, the upcoming standard urban parametrization of the atmospheric numerical model COSMO(-CLM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Hendrik; Blahak, Ulrich; Helmert, Jürgen; Raschendorfer, Matthias; Demuzere, Matthias; Fay, Barbara; Trusilova, Kristina; Mironov, Dmitrii; Reinert, Daniel; Lüthi, Daniel; Machulskaya, Ekaterina

    2015-04-01

    In order to address urban climate at the regional scales, a new efficient urban land-surface parametrization TERRA_URB has been developed and coupled to the atmospheric numerical model COSMO-CLM. Hereby, several new advancements for urban land-surface models are introduced which are crucial for capturing the urban surface-energy balance and its seasonal dependency in the mid-latitudes. This includes a new PDF-based water-storage parametrization for impervious land, the representation of radiative absorption and emission by greenhouse gases in the infra-red spectrum in the urban canopy layer, and the inclusion of heat emission from human activity. TERRA_URB has been applied in offline urban-climate studies during European observation campaigns at Basel (BUBBLE), Toulouse (CAPITOUL), and Singapore, and currently applied in online studies for urban areas in Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, Helsinki, Singapore, and Melbourne. Because of its computational efficiency, high accuracy and its to-the-point conceptual easiness, TERRA_URB has been selected to become the standard urban parametrization of the atmospheric numerical model COSMO(-CLM). This allows for better weather forecasts for temperature and precipitation in cities with COSMO, and an improved assessment of urban outdoor hazards in the context of global climate change and urban expansion with COSMO-CLM. We propose additional extensions to TERRA_URB towards a more robust representation of cities over the world including their structural design. In a first step, COSMO's standard EXTernal PARarameter (EXTPAR) tool is updated for representing the cities into the land cover over the entire globe. Hereby, global datasets in the standard EXTPAR tool are used to retrieve the 'Paved' or 'sealed' surface Fraction (PF) referring to the presence of buildings and streets. Furthermore, new global data sets are incorporated in EXTPAR for describing the Anthropogenic Heat Flux (AHF) due to human activity, and optionally the

  12. Validation of Ammonia Diffusive and Active Samplers in a Controlled Atmosphere Test Facility Using Traceable Primary Standard Gas Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, N. A.; Ferracci, V.; Cassidy, N.; Hook, J.; Battersby, R. M.; Tang, Y. S.; Stevens, A. C. M.; Jones, M. R.; Braban, C. F.; Gates, L.; Hangartner, M.; Sacco, P.; Pagani, D.; Hoffnagle, J.

    2016-12-01

    Intensive farming, the increased use of fertilizers, and certain industrial processes are believed to be responsible for increases in the amount fraction of ammonia (NH3) found in Europe. NH3 contributes to eutrophication and acidification of land and freshwater, leading to a loss of biodiversity, undesirable changes to the ecosystem, and to secondary particulate matter (PM) formation. Measurements of ambient ammonia over a wide geographical area, are principally carried out with low-cost diffusive samplers or by active sampling with denuders, with each technique delivering time-integrated values over the monitoring period. The goal of this work was to measure the NH3 diffusive sampling rates of five different designs of commercial diffusive samplers (FSM Radiello radial sampler, Gradko diffusion tube, Gradko DIFRAM-400, Passam ammonia sampler, and CEH ALPHA sampler), together with validation tests with a denuder sampler (CEH DELTA denuder). The would deliver validated improvements in the accuracy of ambient measurements of NH3 in the field through the establishment of metrological traceability using new stable ammonia Primary Standard Gas Mixtures (PSMs), developed by gravimetry at NPL. All devices were simultaneously exposed in a controlled atmosphere test facility (CATFAC) containing traceable amount fractions of ammonia applicable to a range of ambient monitoring conditions, with well-defined conditions of temperature, relative humidity and wind speed. Online continuous monitoring of the test atmospheres was carried out with a calibrated cavity ring-down spectrometer modified to account for cross interference by water. Exposed samplers were analysed by individual manufacturers for ammonium using traceable wet chemical techniques. The measured diffusive sampling rates were then applied to field measurements carried out at the Whim Bog experimental station in Scotland, where there is a facility in place for controlled releases of NH3 and also a background site.

  13. 75 FR 76337 - 2017 and Later Model Year Light-Duty Vehicle GHG Emissions and CAFE Standards: Supplemental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... agencies should break the MY 2017- 2025 standard setting process into three separate rulemakings, rather than establishing standards for all of these MYs in the current rulemaking process. OEM recommendations... provide a strong basis for setting a standard of at least 6 percent annual improvement rate, which they...

  14. Effect of High-Dose vs Standard-Dose Wintertime Vitamin D Supplementation on Viral Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Young Healthy Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglipay, Mary; Birken, Catherine S; Parkin, Patricia C; Loeb, Mark B; Thorpe, Kevin; Chen, Yang; Laupacis, Andreas; Mamdani, Muhammad; Macarthur, Colin; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Mazzulli, Tony; Maguire, Jonathon L

    2017-07-18

    Epidemiological studies support a link between low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and a higher risk of viral upper respiratory tract infections. However, whether winter supplementation of vitamin D reduces the risk among children is unknown. To determine whether high-dose vs standard-dose vitamin D supplementation reduces the incidence of wintertime upper respiratory tract infections in young children. A randomized clinical trial was conducted during the winter months between September 13, 2011, and June 30, 2015, among children aged 1 through 5 years enrolled in TARGet Kids!, a multisite primary care practice-based research network in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Three hundred forty-nine participants were randomized to receive 2000 IU/d of vitamin D oral supplementation (high-dose group) vs 354 participants who were randomized to receive 400 IU/d (standard-dose group) for a minimum of 4 months between September and May. The primary outcome was the number of laboratory-confirmed viral upper respiratory tract infections based on parent-collected nasal swabs over the winter months. Secondary outcomes included the number of influenza infections, noninfluenza infections, parent-reported upper respiratory tract illnesses, time to first upper respiratory tract infection, and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at study termination. Among 703 participants who were randomized (mean age, 2.7 years, 57.7% boys), 699 (99.4%) completed the trial. The mean number of laboratory-confirmed upper respiratory tract infections per child was 1.05 (95% CI, 0.91-1.19) for the high-dose group and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.90-1.16) for the standard-dose group, for a between-group difference of 0.02 (95% CI, -0.17 to 0.21) per child. There was no statistically significant difference in number of laboratory-confirmed infections between groups (incidence rate ratio [RR], 0.97; 95% CI, 0.80-1.16). There was also no significant difference in the median time to the first laboratory-confirmed infection: 3.95 months

  15. Validation of ammonia diffusive and active samplers in a controlled atmosphere test facility using traceable Primary Standard Gas Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicholas A.; Ferracci, Valerio; Cassidy, Nathan; Hook, Josh; Battersby, Ross M.; Tang, Yuk S.; Stevens, Amy C. M.; Jones, Matthew R.; Braban, Christine F.; Gates, Linda; Hangartner, Markus; Stoll, Jean-Marc; Sacco, Paolo; Pagani, Diego; Hoffnagle, John A.

    2017-04-01

    Intensive animal farming, the increased use of fertilizers, and certain industrial processes are believed to be responsible for the observed increases in the amount fraction of ammonia (NH3) found in Europe. NH3 contributes to eutrophication and acidification of land and freshwater, potentially leading to a loss of biodiversity and undesirable changes to the ecosystem. It also contributes to the formation of secondary particulate matter (PM) formation, which is associated with poor air quality and adverse health outcomes. Measurements of ambient ammonia are principally carried out with low-cost diffusive samplers or by active sampling with denuders, with each method delivering time-integrated values over the monitoring period. However, such techniques have not yet been extensively validated. The goal of this work was to provide improvements in the metrological traceability through the determination of NH3 diffusive sampling rates. Five different designs of commercial diffusive samplers (FSM Radiello radial sampler, Gradko diffusion tube, Gradko DIFRAM-400, Passam ammonia sampler, and CEH ALPHA sampler) were employed, together with a pumped denuder sampler (CEH DELTA denuder) for comparison. All devices were simultaneously exposed for either 28 days or 14 days (dependent on sampler type) in a controlled atmosphere test facility (CATFAC) containing traceable amount fractions of humidified ammonia using new stable ammonia Primary Standard Gas Mixtures developed by gravimetry at NPL, under a wide range of conditions that are relevant to ambient monitoring. Online continuous monitoring of the ammonia test atmospheres was carried out by extractive sampling, employing a calibrated cavity ring-down spectrometer, which had been modified to account for cross interference by water vapour. Each manufacturer extracted the captured ammonia on the exposed samplers in the form of ammonium (NH4+) using their own accredited traceable wet chemical techniques, and then reported data

  16. Need for accurate and standardized determination of amino acids and bioactive peptides for evaluating protein quality and potential health effects of foods and dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, G Sarwar; Xiao, Chaowu; Lee, Nora

    2008-01-01

    Accurate standardized methods for the determination of amino acid in foods are required to assess the nutritional safety and compositional adequacy of sole source foods such as infant formulas and enteral nutritionals, and protein and amino acid supplements and their hydrolysates, and to assess protein claims of foods. Protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS), which requires information on amino acid composition, is the official method for assessing protein claims of foods and supplements sold in the United States. PDCAAS has also been adopted internationally as the most suitable method for routine evaluation of protein quality of foods by the Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization. Standardized methods for analysis of amino acids by ion-exchange chromatography have been developed. However, there is a need to develop validated methods of amino acid analysis in foods using liquid chromatographic techniques, which have replaced ion-exchange methods for quantifying amino acids in most laboratories. Bioactive peptides from animal and plant proteins have been found to potentially impact human health. A wide range of physiological effects, including blood pressure-lowering effects, cholesterol-lowering ability, antithrombotic effects, enhancement of mineral absorption, and immunomodulatory effects have been described for bioactive peptides. There is considerable commercial interest in developing functional foods containing bioactive peptides. There is also a need to develop accurate standardized methods for the characterization (amino acid sequencing) and quantification of bioactive peptides and to carry out dose-response studies in animal models and clinical trials to assess safety, potential allergenicity, potential intolerance, and efficacy of bioactive peptides. Information from these studies is needed for determining the upper safe levels of bioactive peptides and as the basis for developing potential health claims for bioactive

  17. Sports Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Sports Supplements KidsHealth / For Teens / Sports Supplements What's in ... really work? And are they safe? What Are Sports Supplements? Sports supplements (also called ergogenic aids ) are ...

  18. Randomized controlled trial: Standard versus supplemental bowel preparation in patients with Bristol stool form 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueyue; Jia, Xinyong; Liu, Baozhen; Qi, Yanmei; Zhang, Xiubin; Ji, Rui; Yu, Yanbo; Zuo, Xiuli; Li, Yanqing

    2017-01-01

    Bristol stool form 1 and 2 is an important predictor of inadequate bowel preparation. To evaluate the efficacy of supplemental preparation in bowel cleansing quality among patients with Bristol stool form 1 and 2, as well as the feasibility of tailored bowel preparation guided by Bristol stool form scale. Patients with Bristol stool form 1 and 2 from 3 Chinese tertiary hospitals randomly received either 2 L PEG-ELP (group A) or 10 mg bisacodyl plus 2 L PEG-ELP (group B); patients with Bristol stool form 3 to 7 received 2 L PEG-ELP (group C) for bowel preparation. The primary endpoint is the rate of adequate bowel reparation for the whole colon. The adequate bowel preparation rate for separate colon segments, the polyp detection rate (PDR), tolerability, acceptability, sleeping quality and compliance were evaluated as secondary endpoints. 700 patients were randomized. In per-protocol analysis, patients in group B attained significantly higher successful preparation rate than group A (88.7% vs. 61.2%, pBristol stool form 1 and 2. Bristol stool form scale may be an easy and efficient guide for tailored bowel preparation before colonoscopy.

  19. Randomized controlled trial: Standard versus supplemental bowel preparation in patients with Bristol stool form 1 and 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueyue Li

    Full Text Available Bristol stool form 1 and 2 is an important predictor of inadequate bowel preparation.To evaluate the efficacy of supplemental preparation in bowel cleansing quality among patients with Bristol stool form 1 and 2, as well as the feasibility of tailored bowel preparation guided by Bristol stool form scale.Patients with Bristol stool form 1 and 2 from 3 Chinese tertiary hospitals randomly received either 2 L PEG-ELP (group A or 10 mg bisacodyl plus 2 L PEG-ELP (group B; patients with Bristol stool form 3 to 7 received 2 L PEG-ELP (group C for bowel preparation. The primary endpoint is the rate of adequate bowel reparation for the whole colon. The adequate bowel preparation rate for separate colon segments, the polyp detection rate (PDR, tolerability, acceptability, sleeping quality and compliance were evaluated as secondary endpoints.700 patients were randomized. In per-protocol analysis, patients in group B attained significantly higher successful preparation rate than group A (88.7% vs. 61.2%, p<0.001 and similar with group C (88.7% vs. 85.0%, p = 0.316. The PDR in group B was significantly higher than group A (43.2% vs. 25.7%, p<0.001. Acceptability was much higher in group B and C.10 mg bisacodyl plus 2 L PEG-ELP can significantly improve both bowel preparation quality and PDR in patients with Bristol stool form 1 and 2. Bristol stool form scale may be an easy and efficient guide for tailored bowel preparation before colonoscopy.

  20. Inspection of radiation sources and regulatory enforcement (supplement to IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-G-1.5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-08-01

    The achievement and maintenance of a high level of safety in the use of radiation sources depends on there being a sound legal and governmental infrastructure, including a national regulatory body with well-defined responsibilities and functions. These responsibilities and functions include establishing and implementing a system for carrying out regulatory inspections, and taking necessary enforcement actions. The Safety Requirements publication entitled Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety establishes the requirements for legal and governmental infrastructure. The term 'infrastructure' refers to the underlying structure of systems and organizations. This includes requirements concerning the establishment of a regulatory body for radiation sources and the responsibilities and functions assigned to it. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (the Basic Safety Standards or the BSS) establish basic requirements for protection against risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources. The application of the BSS is based on the presumption that national infrastructures are in place to enable governments to discharge their responsibilities to for radiation protection and safety. This TECDOC provides practical guidance on the processes for carrying out regulatory inspections and taking enforcement actions. It includes information on the development and use of procedures and standard review plans (i.e. checklists) for inspection. Specific procedures for inspection of radiation practices and sources are provided in the Appendices

  1. Inspection of radiation sources and regulatory enforcement (supplement to IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-G-1.5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-04-01

    The achievement and maintenance of a high level of safety in the use of radiation sources depends on there being a sound legal and governmental infrastructure, including a national regulatory body with well-defined responsibilities and functions. These responsibilities and functions include establishing and implementing a system for carrying out regulatory inspections, and taking necessary enforcement actions. The Safety Requirements publication entitled Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety establishes the requirements for legal and governmental infrastructure. The term 'infrastructure' refers to the underlying structure of systems and organizations. This includes requirements concerning the establishment of a regulatory body for radiation sources and the responsibilities and functions assigned to it. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (the Basic Safety Standards or the BSS) establish basic requirements for protection against risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources. The application of the BSS is based on the presumption that national infrastructures are in place to enable governments to discharge their responsibilities to for radiation protection and safety. This TECDOC provides practical guidance on the processes for carrying out regulatory inspections and taking enforcement actions. It includes information on the development and use of procedures and standard review plans (i.e. checklists) for inspection. Specific procedures for inspection of radiation practices and sources are provided in the Appendices

  2. Methane standards made in whole and synthetic air compared by cavity ring down spectroscopy and gas chromatography with flame ionization detection for atmospheric monitoring applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Edgar; Rhoderick, George C; Viallon, Joële; Moussay, Philippe; Choteau, Tiphaine; Gameson, Lyn; Guenther, Franklin R; Wielgosz, Robert Ian

    2015-03-17

    There is evidence that the use of whole air versus synthetic air can bias measurement results when analyzing atmospheric samples for methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and wavelength scanned-cavity ring down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) were used to compare CH4 standards produced with whole air or synthetic air as the matrix over the mole fraction range of 1600-2100 nmol mol(-1). GC-FID measurements were performed by including ratios to a stable control cylinder, obtaining a typical relative standard measurement uncertainty of 0.025%. CRDS measurements were performed using the same protocol and also with no interruption for a limited time period without use of a control cylinder, obtaining relative standard uncertainties of 0.031% and 0.015%, respectively. This measurement procedure was subsequently used for an international comparison, in which three pairs of whole air standards were compared with five pairs of synthetic air standards (two each from eight different laboratories). The variation from the reference value for the whole air standards was determined to be 2.07 nmol mol(-1) (average standard deviation) and that of synthetic air standards was 1.37 nmol mol(-1) (average standard deviation). All but one standard agreed with the reference value within the stated uncertainty. No significant difference in performance was observed between standards made from synthetic air or whole air, and the accuracy of both types of standards was limited only by the ability to measure trace CH4 levels in the matrix gases used to produce the standards.

  3. Particle mobility size spectrometers: harmonization of technical standards and data structure to facilitate high quality long-term observations of atmospheric particle number size distributions

    OpenAIRE

    A. Wiedensohler; W. Birmili; A. Nowak; A. Sonntag; K. Weinhold; M. Merkel; B. Wehner; T. Tuch; S. Pfeifer; M. Fiebig; A. M. Fjäraa; E. Asmi; K. Sellegri; R. Depuy; H. Venzac

    2010-01-01

    Particle mobility size spectrometers often referred to as DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizers) or SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers) have found a wide application in atmospheric aerosol research. However, comparability of measurements conducted world-wide is hampered by lack of generally accepted technical standards with respect to the instrumental set-up, measurement mode, data evaluation as well as quality control. This article results from several instrument intercomp...

  4. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16018, Lat: -14.55140 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020224-20020420.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  5. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16025, Lat: -14.55134 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060307-20070902.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  6. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44652 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020424-20020802.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  7. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, LIS; Long: -173.91608, Lat: 25.96767 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20011020-20011225.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  8. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34455, Lat: 28.41863 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040629-20041005.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  9. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81595, Lat: 27.85396 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.91m; Data Range: 20060915-20080828.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  10. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81590, Lat: 27.85408 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.50m; Data Range: 20030801-20030810.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  11. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81590, Lat: 27.85408 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020505-20020810.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  12. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34453, Lat: 28.41852 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060918-20080929.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  13. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44643 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20051020-20060907.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  14. A conceptual prediction model for seasonal drought processes using atmospheric and oceanic standardized anomalies: application to regional drought processes in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenchen; Lu, Guihua; He, Hai; Wu, Zhiyong; He, Jian

    2018-01-01

    Reliable drought prediction is fundamental for water resource managers to develop and implement drought mitigation measures. Considering that drought development is closely related to the spatial-temporal evolution of large-scale circulation patterns, we developed a conceptual prediction model of seasonal drought processes based on atmospheric and oceanic standardized anomalies (SAs). Empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis is first applied to drought-related SAs at 200 and 500 hPa geopotential height (HGT) and sea surface temperature (SST). Subsequently, SA-based predictors are built based on the spatial pattern of the first EOF modes. This drought prediction model is essentially the synchronous statistical relationship between 90-day-accumulated atmospheric-oceanic SA-based predictors and SPI3 (3-month standardized precipitation index), calibrated using a simple stepwise regression method. Predictor computation is based on forecast atmospheric-oceanic products retrieved from the NCEP Climate Forecast System Version 2 (CFSv2), indicating the lead time of the model depends on that of CFSv2. The model can make seamless drought predictions for operational use after a year-to-year calibration. Model application to four recent severe regional drought processes in China indicates its good performance in predicting seasonal drought development, despite its weakness in predicting drought severity. Overall, the model can be a worthy reference for seasonal water resource management in China.

  15. Performance of Broiler Chickens Fed Low Protein, Limiting Amino Acid Supplemented Diets Formulated Either on Total or Standardized Ileal Digestible Amino Acid Basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Basavanta Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present experiment was to investigate the effect of protein reduction in commercial broiler chicken rations with incorporation of de-oiled rice bran (DORB and supplementation of limiting amino acids (valine, isoleucine, and/or tryptophan with ration formulation either on total amino acid (TAA or standardized ileal digestible amino acids (SIDAA. The experimental design consisted of T1, TAA control; T2 and T3, 0.75% and 1.5% protein reduction by 3% and 6% DORB incorporation, respectively by replacing soybean meal with supplemental limiting amino acids to meet TAA requirement; T4, SIDAA control, T5 and T6, 0.75% and 1.5% protein reduction by DORB incorporation (3% and 6% with supplemental limiting amino acids on SIDAA basis. A total of 360 d-old fast growing broiler chicks (Vencobb-400 were divided into 36 homogenous groups of ten chicks each, and six dietary treatments described were allocated randomly with six replications. During 42 days trial, the feed intake was significantly (p<0.05 reduced by TAA factor compared to SIDAA factor and protein factor significantly (p<0.05 reduced the feed intake at 1.5% reduction compared to normal protein group. This was observed only during pre-starter phase but not thereafter. The cumulative body weight gain (BWG was significantly (p<0.05 reduced in TAA formulations with protein step-down of 1.5% (T3, 1,993 g compared to control (T1, 2,067 g, while under SIDAA formulations, BWG was not affected with protein reduction of 1.5% (T6, 2,076 g compared to T4 (2,129 g. The feed conversion ratio (FCR was significantly (p<0.05 reduced in both TAA and SIDAA formulations with 1.5% protein step-down (T3, 1.741; T6, 1.704 compared to respective controls (T1, 1.696; T4, 1.663. The SIDAA formulation revealed significantly (p<0.05 higher BWG (2,095 g and better FCR (1.684 compared to TAA formulation (2,028 g; 1.721. Intake of crude protein and all limiting amino acids (SID basis was higher in SIDAA group than TAA

  16. Estimation of the optimum standardized ileal digestible total sulfur amino acid to lysine ratio in late finishing gilts fed low protein diets supplemented with crystalline amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenfeng; Zhu, Jinlong; Zeng, Xiangfang; Liu, Xutong; Thacker, Philip; Qiao, Shiyan

    2016-01-01

    A total of 90 gilts were used to investigate the effects of various standard ileal digestible (SID) total sulfur amino acid (TSAA) to lysine (Lys) ratios on the performance and carcass characteristics of late finishing gilts receiving low crude protein (CP) diets supplemented with crystalline amino acids (CAA). Graded levels of crystalline methionine (Met) (0, 0.3, 0.5, 0.8 or 1.1 g/kg) were added to the basal diet to produce diets providing SID TSAA to Lys ratios of 0.48, 0.53, 0.58, 0.63 or 0.68. At the termination of the experiment, 30 gilts (one pig per pen) with an average body weight (BW) of 120 kg were killed to evaluate carcass traits. Increasing the SID TSAA to Lys ratio increased average daily gain (ADG) (linear and quadratic effect, P gilts. No effects were obtained for carcass traits. The optimum SID TSAA to Lys ratios to maximize ADG as well as to minimize FCR and SUN levels were 0.57, 0.58 and 0.53 using a linear-break point model and 0.64, 0.62 and 0.61 using a quadratic model. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  17. Chemical Kinetics and Photochemical Data for Use in Atmospheric Studies Evaluation Number 16. Supplement to Evaluation 15: Update of Key Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, S. P.; Friedl, R. R.; Barker, J. R.; Golden, D. M.; Kurylo, M. J.; Wine, P. H.; Abbatt, J.; Burkholder, J. B.; Kolb, C. E.; Moortgat, G. K.; hide

    2009-01-01

    This is the supplement to the fifteenth in a series of evaluated sets of rate constants and photochemical cross sections compiled by the NASA Panel for Data Evaluation. The data are used primarily to model stratospheric and upper tropospheric processes, with particular emphasis on the ozone layer and its possible perturbation by anthropogenic and natural phenomena. Copies of this evaluation are available in electronic form and may be printed from the following Internet URL: http://jpldataeval.jpl.nasa.gov/.

  18. Analysis and design of the installation of a lightning rod in risk areas of atmospheric discharge according to the standards NFPA 70, NFPA 780 and IEC 62305

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordoba Alfaro, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The design, analysis of the installation and handling of electrical protections oriented to atmospheric discharge in specific locations of the north zone of Costa Rica, are focused. Related topics with the devices of protection against atmospheric discharge, definitions, types, uses and characteristics were developed. The regulations NFPA 70, NFPA 780 and IEC 62305 are studied for the analysis and design of the lightning rod. The standards are analyzed, according to the rules applied at specialized companies in the elaboration and installation of lightning rod, in order to determine if these are adequate and used in correctly shape . A report is made about the design of a lightning rod and preventive measures for areas with regular activity of atmospheric discharges. The different devices for the elaboration and installation of a lightning rod are investigated in order to later use and exploitation. The design for the implementation of a system of conventional lightning rod, type tips of Franklin, was realized at the Iglesia Catedral of Ciudad Quesada. The materials that were used in this type of lightning rod, have followed the regulation NFPA 780. Several approximate plans of the cathedral have been performed to appreciate good the design, both in 2D as in 3D; these allow a better panorama of the installation. The distance between devices has been fundamental to take into account in the design of a system of lightning rod, as it marks an important difference between the area to protect and areas that may be exposed to an atmospheric discharge. The rule NFPA 780 has been established that to design the location of the lightning captors can use the rolling sphere method, also has marked the requirements of the downspouts systems and grounding systems. Before locating a lightning protection system it is important to be informed of the principal characteristics of the area to be protected; as on several occasions, the particularities of the selected area have

  19. A systematic review of the cost and cost effectiveness of using standard oral nutritional supplements in community and care home settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, M; Normand, C; Laviano, A; Norman, K

    2016-02-01

    Despite the clinical benefits of using standard (non-disease specific) oral nutritional supplements (ONS) in the community and care homes, there is uncertainty about their economic consequences. A systematic review was undertaken according to recommended procedures to assess whether ONS can produce cost savings and cost-effective outcomes. 19 publications with and without a hospital component were identified: 9 full text papers, 9 abstracts, and 1 report with retrospective analyses of 6 randomised controlled trials. From these publications a total of 31 cost and 4 cost-effectiveness analyses were identified. Most were retrospective analyses based on clinical data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). In 9 studies/economic models involving ONS use for 0.05; 5 studies). In RCTs, ONS accounted for less than 5% of the total costs and the investment in the community produced a cost saving in hospital. Meta-analysis indicated that ONS reduced hospitalisation significantly (16.5%; P < 0.001; 9 comparisons) and mortality non-significantly (Relative risk 0.86 (95% CI, 0.61, 1.22); 8 comparisons). Many clinically relevant outcomes favouring ONS were reported: improved quality of life, reduced infections, reduced minor post-operative complications, reduced falls, and functional limitations. Of the cost-effectiveness analyses involving quality adjusted life years or functional limitations, most favoured the ONS group. The care home studies (4 cost analyses; 2 cost-effectiveness analyses) had differing aims, designs and conclusions. Overall, the reviewed studies, mostly based on retrospective cost analyses, indicate that ONS use in the community produce an overall cost advantage or near neutral balance, often in association with clinically relevant outcomes, suggesting cost effectiveness. There is a need for prospective studies designed to examine primary economic outcomes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Dynamic Solution Injection: a new method for preparing pptv–ppbv standard atmospheres of volatile organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Abrell

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS and thermal desorption Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS allow for absolute quantification of a wide range of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs with concentrations in the ppbv to pptv range. Although often neglected, routine calibration is necessary for accurate quantification of VOCs by PTR-MS and GC-MS. Several gas calibration methods currently exist, including compressed gas cylinders, permeation tubes, diffusion tubes, and liquid injection. While each method has its advantages and limitations, no single technique has emerged that is capable of dynamically generating known concentrations of complex mixtures of VOCs over a large concentration range (ppbv to pptv and is technically simple, field portable, and affordable. We present the development of a new VOC calibration technique based on liquid injection with these features termed Dynamic Solution Injection (DSI. This method consists of injecting VOCs (0.1–0.5 mM dissolved in cyclohexane (PTR-MS or methanol (GC-MS into a 1.0 slpm flow of purified dilution gas in an unheated 25 ml glass vial. Upon changes in the injection flow rate (0.5–4.0 μl min−1, new VOC concentrations are reached within seconds to minutes, depending on the compound, with a liquid injection flow rate accuracy and precision of better than 7% and 4% respectively. We demonstrate the utility of the DSI technique by calibrating a PTR-MS to seven different cyclohexane solutions containing a total of 34 different biogenic compounds including volatile isoprenoids, oxygenated VOCs, fatty acid oxidation products, aromatics, and dimethyl sulfide. We conclude that because of its small size, low cost, and simplicity, the Dynamic Solution Injection method will be of great use to both laboratory and field VOC studies.

  1. Dynamic Solution Injection: a new method for preparing pptv-ppbv standard atmospheres of volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, K. J.; Henderson, W. M.; Huxman, T. E.; Abrell, L.

    2010-11-01

    Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and thermal desorption Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) allow for absolute quantification of a wide range of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with concentrations in the ppbv to pptv range. Although often neglected, routine calibration is necessary for accurate quantification of VOCs by PTR-MS and GC-MS. Several gas calibration methods currently exist, including compressed gas cylinders, permeation tubes, diffusion tubes, and liquid injection. While each method has its advantages and limitations, no single technique has emerged that is capable of dynamically generating known concentrations of complex mixtures of VOCs over a large concentration range (ppbv to pptv) and is technically simple, field portable, and affordable. We present the development of a new VOC calibration technique based on liquid injection with these features termed Dynamic Solution Injection (DSI). This method consists of injecting VOCs (0.1-0.5 mM) dissolved in cyclohexane (PTR-MS) or methanol (GC-MS) into a 1.0 slpm flow of purified dilution gas in an unheated 25 ml glass vial. Upon changes in the injection flow rate (0.5-4.0 μl min-1), new VOC concentrations are reached within seconds to minutes, depending on the compound, with a liquid injection flow rate accuracy and precision of better than 7% and 4% respectively. We demonstrate the utility of the DSI technique by calibrating a PTR-MS to seven different cyclohexane solutions containing a total of 34 different biogenic compounds including volatile isoprenoids, oxygenated VOCs, fatty acid oxidation products, aromatics, and dimethyl sulfide. We conclude that because of its small size, low cost, and simplicity, the Dynamic Solution Injection method will be of great use to both laboratory and field VOC studies.

  2. Mobility particle size spectrometers: harmonization of technical standards and data structure to facilitate high quality long-term observations of atmospheric particle number size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wiedensohler

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mobility particle size spectrometers often referred to as DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizers or SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers have found a wide range of applications in atmospheric aerosol research. However, comparability of measurements conducted world-wide is hampered by lack of generally accepted technical standards and guidelines with respect to the instrumental set-up, measurement mode, data evaluation as well as quality control. Technical standards were developed for a minimum requirement of mobility size spectrometry to perform long-term atmospheric aerosol measurements. Technical recommendations include continuous monitoring of flow rates, temperature, pressure, and relative humidity for the sheath and sample air in the differential mobility analyzer.

    We compared commercial and custom-made inversion routines to calculate the particle number size distributions from the measured electrical mobility distribution. All inversion routines are comparable within few per cent uncertainty for a given set of raw data.

    Furthermore, this work summarizes the results from several instrument intercomparison workshops conducted within the European infrastructure project EUSAAR (European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research and ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network to determine present uncertainties especially of custom-built mobility particle size spectrometers. Under controlled laboratory conditions, the particle number size distributions from 20 to 200 nm determined by mobility particle size spectrometers of different design are within an uncertainty range of around ±10% after correcting internal particle losses, while below and above this size range the discrepancies increased. For particles larger than 200 nm, the uncertainty range increased to 30%, which could not be explained. The network reference mobility spectrometers with identical design agreed within ±4% in the

  3. A conceptual prediction model for seasonal drought processes using atmospheric and oceanic standardized anomalies and its application to four recent severe regional drought events in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; LU, G.; He, H.; Wu, Z.; He, J.

    2017-12-01

    Reliable drought prediction is fundamental for seasonal water management. Considering that drought development is closely related to the spatio-temporal evolution of large-scale circulation patterns, we develop a conceptual prediction model of seasonal drought processes based on atmospheric/oceanic Standardized Anomalies (SA). It is essentially the synchronous stepwise regression relationship between 90-day-accumulated atmospheric/oceanic SA-based predictors and 3-month SPI updated daily (SPI3). It is forced with forecasted atmospheric and oceanic variables retrieved from seasonal climate forecast systems, and it can make seamless drought prediction for operational use after a year-to-year calibration. Simulation and prediction of four severe seasonal regional drought processes in China were forced with the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis datasets and the NCEP Climate Forecast System Version 2 (CFSv2) operationally forecasted datasets, respectively. With the help of real-time correction for operational application, model application during four recent severe regional drought events in China revealed that the model is good at development prediction but weak in severity prediction. In addition to weakness in prediction of drought peak, the prediction of drought relief is possible to be predicted as drought recession. This weak performance may be associated with precipitation-causing weather patterns during drought relief. Based on initial virtual analysis on predicted 90-day prospective SPI3 curves, it shows that the 2009/2010 drought in Southwest China and 2014 drought in North China can be predicted and simulated well even for the prospective 1-75 day. In comparison, the prospective 1-45 day may be a feasible and acceptable lead time for simulation and prediction of the 2011 droughts in Southwest China and East China, after which the simulated and predicted developments clearly change.

  4. Two standards - CSA-N288.1 and USNRC regulatory guides 1.109, 1.111 for chronic atmospheric releases from nuclear facilities - compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S-R.

    1997-05-01

    Although the Canadian Standards Association's 'Guidelines for Calculating Derived Release Limits for Radioactive Material in Airborne and Liquid Effluents for Normal Operation of Nuclear Facilities', CSA-N288.1-M87 (CSA 1987) can be used to license CANDU (CANadian Deuterium Uranium) reactors sold off-shore, in practice purchasers may wish to use the United States Regulatory Guides (RG) 1.109 (United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1977a) and 1.111 (USNRC 1977b) to calculate doses from routine atmospheric releases to members of a critical group. When differences in dose predictions are found between the two standards, CSA-N288.1 comes under attack. This paper explains the differences between the two models. The two atmospheric dispersion models were compared for a ground level release and an elevated release such as from CANDU 6. For a ground level release, CSA's dilution factors were slightly more than half of RG's. For the elevated release, following recommendations in each guide, CSA's dilution coefficient is higher than RG's within 1000 m of the stack and only slightly lower farther away. All differences can be accounted for by different mathematical formulations and assumptions about height at which wind speed is measured. Ingestion, inhalation, immersion and external doses predicted by the two models were compared for unit release (Bq s -1 ) and for realistic source terms of a suite of 33 radionuclides commonly released from both CANDUs and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). To demonstrate real differences in the models, ingestion doses for the two models were compared using the CSA diet in both models and CSA predictions were recalculated to account for decay which occurs between harvest and ingestion in RG. Once all assumptions are equalized, there is very little difference in dose predictions of the two models that cannot be explained by different parameter values. Both models have outdated dose conversion factors, and the use of improved numbers will

  5. A conceptual prediction model for seasonal drought processes using atmospheric and oceanic standardized anomalies: application to regional drought processes in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable drought prediction is fundamental for water resource managers to develop and implement drought mitigation measures. Considering that drought development is closely related to the spatial–temporal evolution of large-scale circulation patterns, we developed a conceptual prediction model of seasonal drought processes based on atmospheric and oceanic standardized anomalies (SAs. Empirical orthogonal function (EOF analysis is first applied to drought-related SAs at 200 and 500 hPa geopotential height (HGT and sea surface temperature (SST. Subsequently, SA-based predictors are built based on the spatial pattern of the first EOF modes. This drought prediction model is essentially the synchronous statistical relationship between 90-day-accumulated atmospheric–oceanic SA-based predictors and SPI3 (3-month standardized precipitation index, calibrated using a simple stepwise regression method. Predictor computation is based on forecast atmospheric–oceanic products retrieved from the NCEP Climate Forecast System Version 2 (CFSv2, indicating the lead time of the model depends on that of CFSv2. The model can make seamless drought predictions for operational use after a year-to-year calibration. Model application to four recent severe regional drought processes in China indicates its good performance in predicting seasonal drought development, despite its weakness in predicting drought severity. Overall, the model can be a worthy reference for seasonal water resource management in China.

  6. Emissions of greenhouse gases, ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide from pigs fed standard diets and diets supplemented with dried distillers grains with solubles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swine growers are increasingly supplementing animal diets with dried distillers grains soluble (DDGS) to offset cost of a typical corn-soybean meal diet. An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of DDGS diets on both on manure composition and emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), ammoni...

  7. Supplemental Colleges

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Supplemental Colleges layer attempts to capture additional Post Secondary Education campuses of colleges and universities associated with a single campus listed...

  8. Probiotic-enriched foods and dietary supplement containing SYNBIO positively affects bowel habits in healthy adults: an assessment using standard statistical analysis and Support Vector Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvi, Stefania; Verdenelli, M Cristina; Cecchini, Cinzia; Coman, M Magdalena; Bernabei, M Simonetta; Rosati, Jessica; De Leone, Renato; Orpianesi, Carla; Cresci, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study assessed in healthy adults how daily consumption of the probiotic combination SYNBIO®, administered in probiotic-enriched foods or in a dietary supplement, affected bowel habits. Primary and secondary outcomes gave the overall assessment of bowel well-being, while a Psychological General Well-Being Index compiled by participants estimated the health-related quality of life as well as the gastrointestinal tolerance determined with the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale. Support Vector Machine models for classification problems were used to validate the total outcomes on bowel well-being. SYNBIO® consumption improved bowel habits of volunteers consuming the probiotic foods or capsules, while the same effects were not registered in the control groups. The recovery of probiotic bacteria from the faeces of a cohort of 100 subjects for each supplemented group showed the persistence of strains in the gastrointestinal tract.

  9. Dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Ron J; King, Doug S; Lea, Trevor

    2004-01-01

    For the athlete training hard, nutritional supplements are often seen as promoting adaptations to training, allowing more consistent and intensive training by promoting recovery between training sessions, reducing interruptions to training because of illness or injury, and enhancing competitive performance. Surveys show that the prevalence of supplement use is widespread among sportsmen and women, but the use of few of these products is supported by a sound research base and some may even be harmful to the athlete. Special sports foods, including energy bars and sports drinks, have a real role to play, and some protein supplements and meal replacements may also be useful in some circumstances. Where there is a demonstrated deficiency of an essential nutrient, an increased intake from food or from supplementation may help, but many athletes ignore the need for caution in supplement use and take supplements in doses that are not necessary or may even be harmful. Some supplements do offer the prospect of improved performance; these include creatine, caffeine, bicarbonate and, perhaps, a very few others. There is no evidence that prohormones such as androstenedione are effective in enhancing muscle mass or strength, and these prohormones may result in negative health consequences, as well as positive drug tests. Contamination of supplements that may cause an athlete to fail a doping test is widespread.

  10. Analysis of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids by chiral liquid chromatography/electron capture atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using [13C]-analog internal standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesaros, Clementina; Lee, Seon Hwa; Blair, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    The metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) is thought to be mediated primarily by the cytochromes P450 (P450s) from the 2 family (2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 2J2). In contrast, P450s of the 4 family are primarily involved in omega oxidation of AA (4A11 and 4A22). The ability to determine enantioselective formation of the regioisomeric EETs is important in order to establish their potential biological activities and to asses which P450 isoforms are involved in their formation. It has been extremely difficult to analyze individual EET enantiomers in biological fluids because they are present in only trace amounts and they are extremely difficult to separate from each other. In addition, the deuterium-labeled internal standards that are commonly used for stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analyses have different LC retention times when compared with the corresponding protium forms. Therefore, quantification by LC/MS-based methodology can be compromised by differential suppression of ionization of the closely eluting isomers. We report the preparation of [13C20]-EET analog internal standards and the use of a validated high-sensitivity chiral LC/electron capture atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (ECAPCI)-MS method for the trace analysis of endogenous EETs as their pentafluorobenzyl (PFB) ester derivatives. The assay was then used to show the exquisite enantioselectivity of P4502C19-, P4502D6-, P4501A1-, and P4501B1-mediated conversion of AA into EETs and to quantify the enantioselective formation of EETs produced by AA metabolism in a mouse epithelial hepatoma (Hepa) cell line. PMID:20972997

  11. Atmospheric Models for Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dale L.; Roberts, Barry C.; Vaughan, William W.; Justus, C. G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper will review the historical development of reference and standard atmosphere models and their applications. The evolution of the U.S. Standard Atmosphere will be addressed, along with the Range Reference Atmospheres and, in particular, the NASA Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM). The extensive scope and content of the GRAM will be addressed since it represents the most extensive and complete 'Reference' atmosphere model in use today. Its origin was for engineering applications and that remains today as its principal use.

  12. Supplemental information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Supplemental information showing results of inter-comparison between C-PORT, AERMOD and R-LINE dispersion algorithms. This dataset is associated with the following...

  13. Dietary Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by Audience For Women Dietary Supplements: Tips for Women Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... State & Local Officials Consumers Health Professionals Science & Research Industry Scroll back to top Popular Content Home Latest ...

  14. Creatine supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew; Trojian, Thomas H

    2013-01-01

    Creatine monohydrate is a dietary supplement that increases muscle performance in short-duration, high-intensity resistance exercises, which rely on the phosphocreatine shuttle for adenosine triphosphate. The effective dosing for creatine supplementation includes loading with 0.3 g·kg·d for 5 to 7 days, followed by maintenance dosing at 0.03 g·kg·d most commonly for 4 to 6 wk. However loading doses are not necessary to increase the intramuscular stores of creatine. Creatine monohydrate is the most studied; other forms such as creatine ethyl ester have not shown added benefits. Creatine is a relatively safe supplement with few adverse effects reported. The most common adverse effect is transient water retention in the early stages of supplementation. When combined with other supplements or taken at higher than recommended doses for several months, there have been cases of liver and renal complications with creatine. Further studies are needed to evaluate the remote and potential future adverse effects from prolonged creatine supplementation.

  15. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...

  16. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and over: 1,200 mg/day The body needs vitamin D to help absorb calcium. You can get ... from your diet. Ask your provider whether you need to take a vitamin D supplement. SIDE EFFECTS AND SAFETY DO NOT ...

  17. Accession Medical Standards Analysis and Research Activity (AMSARA) 2014, Annual Report, and four Supplemental Applicants and Accessions Tables for: Army, Air Force, Marine, and Navy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-02

    Asthma 877 8.1 81 6.4 Depressive disorder, not elsewhere class 906 8.4 44 3.5 Shoulder pain , disease, injury (current) 260 2.4 43 3.4 Hearing...eighteenth year of providing the Department of Defense (DoD) with evidence-based evaluations of accession medical standards. AMSARA evaluates medical...Disability evaluation is infrequent among new enlistees, with less than one percent of enlistees being considered for such a discharge within the

  18. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Durango, Colorado: Attachment 6, Supplemental standard for Durango processing site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    Excavation control to the 15 pCi/g radium-226 (Ra-226) standard at certain areas along the Animas River on the Durango Site would require extensive engineering and construction support. Elevated Ra-226 concentrations have been encountered immediately adjacent to the river at depths in excess of 7 feet below the present river stage. Decontamination to such depths to ensure compliance with the EPA standards will, in our opinion, become unreasonable. This work does not appear to be in keeping with the intent of the standards. Because the principal reason for radium removal is reduction of radon daughter concentrations (RDC) in homes to be built onsite, and because radon produced at depth will be attenuated in clean fill cover before entering such homes, it is appropriate to calculate the depth of excavation needed under a home to reduce RDC to acceptable levels. Potential impact was assessed through radon emanation estimation, using the RAECOM computer model. Elevated Ra-226 concentrations were encountered during final radium excavation of the flood plain below the large tailings pile, adjacent to the slag area. Data from 7 test pits excavated across the area were analyzed to provide an estimate of the Ra-226 concentration profile. Results are given in this report

  19. Jovian atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, M.; Travis, L.D.

    1986-10-01

    A conference on the atmosphere of Jupiter produced papers in the areas of thermal and ortho-para hydrogen structure, clouds and chemistry, atmospheric structure, global dynamics, synoptic features and processes, atmospheric dynamics, and future spaceflight opportunities. A session on the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune was included, and the atmosphere of Saturn was discussed in several papers

  20. Mobility particle size spectrometers : Harmonization of technical standards and data structure to facilitate high quality long-term observations of atmospheric particle number size distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiedensohler, A.; Birmili, W.; Nowak, A.; Sonntag, A.; Weinhold, K.; Merkel, M.; Wehner, B.; Tuch, T.; Pfeifer, S.; Fiebig, M.; Fjäraa, A.M.; Asmi, E.; Sellegri, K.; Depuy, R.; Venzac, H.; Villani, P.; Laj, P.; Aalto, P.; Ogren, J.A.; Swietlicki, E.; Williams, P.; Roldin, P.; Quincey, P.; Hüglin, C.; Fierz-Schmidhauser, R.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, S.; Grüning, C.; Faloon, K.; Beddows, D.; Harrison, R.; Monahan, C.; Jennings, S.G.; O'Dowd, C.D.; Marinoni, A.; Horn, H.-G.; Keck, L.; Jiang, J.; Scheckman, J.; McMurry, P.H.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, C.S.; Moerman, M.; Henzing, B.; Leeuw, G. de; Löschau, G.; Bastian, S.

    2012-01-01

    Mobility particle size spectrometers often referred to as DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizers) or SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers) have found a wide range of applications in atmospheric aerosol research. However, comparability of measurements conducted world-wide is hampered by lack

  1. Notification and authorization for the use of radiation sources (supplement to IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-G-1.5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-10-01

    The achievement and maintenance of a high level of safety in the use of radiation sources depend on there being a sound legal and governmental infrastructure, including a national regulatory body with well-defined responsibilities and functions. These responsibilities and functions include establishing and implementing a system for notification and authorization for control over radiation sources, including a system for review and assessment of applications for authorization. The Safety Requirements publication entitled Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety establishes the requirements for legal and governmental infrastructure. The term 'infrastructure' refers to the underlying structure of systems and organizations. This includes requirements concerning the establishment of a regulatory body for radiation sources and the responsibilities and functions assigned to it. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (the Basic Safety Standards or the BSS) establish basic requirements for protection against risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources. The application of the BSS is based on the presumption that national infrastructures are in place to enable governments to discharge their responsibilities to for radiation protection and safety. This TECDOC provides practical guidance on the process for dealing with applications for authorization and accepting notifications to regulatory bodies. Examples of guidelines that may be used by persons required to notify or apply for authorization and of the regulatory body's review and assessment procedures are provided in the Appendices. The TECDOC is oriented towards national regulatory infrastructures concerned with protection and safety for radiation sources used in medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education

  2. Notification and authorization for the use of radiation sources (supplement to IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-G-1.5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-04-01

    The achievement and maintenance of a high level of safety in the use of radiation sources depend on there being a sound legal and governmental infrastructure, including a national regulatory body with well-defined responsibilities and functions. These responsibilities and functions include establishing and implementing a system for notification and authorization for control over radiation sources, including a system for review and assessment of applications for authorization. The Safety Requirements publication entitled Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety establishes the requirements for legal and governmental infrastructure. The term 'infrastructure' refers to the underlying structure of systems and organizations. This includes requirements concerning the establishment of a regulatory body for radiation sources and the responsibilities and functions assigned to it. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (the Basic Safety Standards or the BSS) establish basic requirements for protection against risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources. The application of the BSS is based on the presumption that national infrastructures are in place to enable governments to discharge their responsibilities to for radiation protection and safety. This TECDOC provides practical guidance on the process for dealing with applications for authorization and accepting notifications to regulatory bodies. Examples of guidelines that may be used by persons required to notify or apply for authorization and of the regulatory body's review and assessment procedures are provided in the Appendices. The TECDOC is oriented towards national regulatory infrastructures concerned with protection and safety for radiation sources used in medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education

  3. Notification and authorization for the use of radiation sources (Supplement to IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-G-1.5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-10-01

    The achievement and maintenance of a high level of safety in the use of radiation sources depend on there being a sound legal and governmental infrastructure, including a national regulatory body with well-defined responsibilities and functions. These responsibilities and functions include establishing and implementing a system for notification and authorization for control over radiation sources, including a system for review and assessment of applications for authorization. The Safety Requirements publication entitled Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety establishes the requirements for legal and governmental infrastructure. The term 'infrastructure' refers to the underlying structure of systems and organizations. This includes requirements concerning the establishment of a regulatory body for radiation sources and the responsibilities and functions assigned to it. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (the Basic Safety Standards or the BSS) establish basic requirements for protection against risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources. The application of the BSS is based on the presumption that national infrastructures are in place to enable governments to discharge their responsibilities to for radiation protection and safety. This TECDOC provides practical guidance on the process for dealing with applications for authorization and accepting notifications to regulatory bodies. Examples of guidelines that may be used by persons required to notify or apply for authorization and of the regulatory body's review and assessment procedures are provided in the Appendices. The TECDOC is oriented towards national regulatory infrastructures concerned with protection and safety for radiation sources used in medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education. The IAEA

  4. Supplementation of standard antibiotic therapy with oral probiotics for bacterial vaginosis and aerobic vaginitis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heczko, Piotr B; Tomusiak, Anna; Adamski, Paweł; Jakimiuk, Artur J; Stefański, Grzegorz; Mikołajczyk-Cichońska, Aleksandra; Suda-Szczurek, Magdalena; Strus, Magdalena

    2015-12-03

    This multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed to determine whether the use of oral probiotic preparation (prOVag®) containing three Lactobacillus strains together with standard metronidazole treatment and also targeted antibiotic treatment (following the failure of metronidazole therapy) could reduce the recurrence rates of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and aerobic vaginitis (AV). Patients at private gynaecological clinics in Poland with histories of recurrent BV/AV and current symptoms were randomly allocated to receive metronidazole and probiotic or placebo, and assessed monthly on visits II and III-V. The total number of study visits was 5-6 (I, II, II bis - if applicable, III, IV, V). One probiotic or placebo capsule was administered with metronidazole/targeted antibiotic twice daily for 10 days; during follow up, patients took one capsule daily for 10 days perimenstrually. Clinical examination and vaginal swabbing were performed at each visit. Primary outcomes were clinical or microbiological BV/AV recurrence and probiotic safety. Secondary outcomes were vaginal pH, Nugent score, and Lactobacillus counts in the vaginal microbiota. Safety analysis was performed in 578 (probiotic, n = 285; placebo, n = 293) 18-50-year-old women who were randomised. BV/AV was confirmed microbiologically in 241 (probiotic, n = 118; placebo, n = 123) participants, who continued the trial. Data from 154 (probiotic, n = 73; placebo, n = 81) participants who completed the study were analysed to determine the efficacy of prOVag. Additional analyses included 37 (probiotic, n = 22; placebo, n = 15) participants who received targeted antibiotics and probiotics or placebo. prOVag lengthened the time to clinical relapse of BV/AV symptoms up to 51 % (p Probiotic use also reduced and maintained low vaginal pH and Nugent score, and increased vaginal Lactobacillus counts following standard treatment. This study demonstrated that

  5. Smoking Cessation for Pregnant Smokers: Development and Pilot Test of an Emotion Regulation Treatment Supplement to Standard Smoking Cessation for Negative Affect Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradizza, Clara M; Stasiewicz, Paul R; Zhuo, Yue; Ruszczyk, Melanie; Maisto, Stephen A; Lucke, Joseph F; Brandon, Thomas H; Eiden, Rina D; Slosman, Kim S; Giarratano, Paulette

    2017-05-01

    Negative affect has been identified as a factor influencing continued smoking during pregnancy. In this study, a multi-component emotion regulation intervention was developed to address negative emotional smoking triggers and pilot-tested among low-income pregnant smokers. Treatment feasibility and acceptability, cotinine-verified rates of smoking cessation, and self-report of mean cigarettes smoked were assessed. Pregnant smokers who self-reported smoking in response to negative affect (N = 70) were randomly assigned to receive one of two 8-session interventions: (1) emotion regulation treatment combined with standard cognitive-behavioral smoking cessation (ERT + CBT) or (2) a health and lifestyle plus standard smoking cessation active control (HLS + CBT). Outcomes for the 4-month period following the quit date are reported. Treatment attendance and subjective ratings provide evidence for the feasibility and acceptability of the ERT + CBT intervention. Compared with the HLS + CBT control condition, the ERT + CBT condition demonstrated higher abstinence rates at 2 months (ERT + CBT = 23% vs. HLS + CBT = 0%, OR = 13.51; 95% CI = 0.70-261.59) and 4 months (ERT = 18% vs. HLS = 5%; OR = 2.98; 95% CI = 0.39-22.72) post-quit. Mean number of cigarettes per day was significantly lower in ERT + CBT at 2 months (ERT + CBT = 2.73 (3.35) vs. HLS + CBT = 5.84 (6.24); p = .05) but not at 4 months (ERT + CBT = 2.15 (3.17) vs. HLS + CBT = 5.18 (2.88); p = .06) post-quit. The development and initial test of the ERT + CBT intervention supports its feasibility and acceptability in this difficult-to-treat population. Further development and testing in a Stage II randomized clinical trial are warranted. Negative affect has been identified as a motivator for continued smoking during pregnancy. To date, smoking cessation interventions for pregnant smokers have not specifically addressed the role of negative affect as a smoking trigger. This treatment development pilot study provides

  6. Determination of the relations governing trends in the standard deviations of the distribution of pollution based on observations on the atmospheric turbulence spectrum and the possibility of laboratory simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crabol, B.

    1980-01-01

    Using TAYLOR's calculation, which takes account of the low-pass filter effect of the transfer time on the value for the standard deviation of particle dispersion, we have introduced a high-pass filter which translate the effect of the time of observation, by definition finite, onto the true atmospheric scale. It is then possible to identify those conditions under which the relations governing variation of the standard deviations of pollution distribution are dependent upon: the distance of transfer alone, the time of transfer alone. Thence, making certain simplifying assumptions, practical quantitive relationships are deduced for the variation of the horizontal standard deviation of pollution dispersion as a function of wind speed and time of transfer

  7. Herbal Supplements: What to Know Before You Buy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition and healthy eating Regulations ensure that herbal supplements meet manufacturing standards but don't guarantee that ... of herbal remedies goes on and on. Herbal supplements, sometimes called botanicals, are one type of dietary ...

  8. Atmospheric contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruetter, Juerg

    1997-01-01

    It is about the levels of contamination in center America, the population's perception on the problem, effects of the atmospheric contamination, effects in the environment, causes of the atmospheric contamination, possibilities to reduce the atmospheric contamination and list of Roeco Swisscontac in atmospheric contamination

  9. In rats fed high-energy diets, taste, rather than fat content, is the key factor increasing food intake: a comparison of a cafeteria and a lipid-supplemented standard diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Laia; Aranda, Tània; Caviola, Giada; Fernández-Bernal, Anna; Alemany, Marià; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Remesar, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Food selection and ingestion both in humans and rodents, often is a critical factor in determining excess energy intake and its related disorders. Two different concepts of high-fat diets were tested for their obesogenic effects in rats; in both cases, lipids constituted about 40% of their energy intake. The main difference with controls fed standard lab chow, was, precisely, the lipid content. Cafeteria diets (K) were self-selected diets devised to be desirable to the rats, mainly because of its diverse mix of tastes, particularly salty and sweet. This diet was compared with another, more classical high-fat (HF) diet, devised not to be as tasty as K, and prepared by supplementing standard chow pellets with fat. We also analysed the influence of sex on the effects of the diets. K rats grew faster because of a high lipid, sugar and protein intake, especially the males, while females showed lower weight but higher proportion of body lipid. In contrast, the weight of HF groups were not different from controls. Individual nutrient's intake were analysed, and we found that K rats ingested large amounts of both disaccharides and salt, with scant differences of other nutrients' proportion between the three groups. The results suggest that the key differential factor of the diet eliciting excess energy intake was the massive presence of sweet and salty tasting food. The significant presence of sugar and salt appears as a powerful inducer of excess food intake, more effective than a simple (albeit large) increase in the diet's lipid content. These effects appeared already after a relatively short treatment. The differential effects of sex agree with their different hedonic and obesogenic response to diet.

  10. In rats fed high-energy diets, taste, rather than fat content, is the key factor increasing food intake: a comparison of a cafeteria and a lipid-supplemented standard diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Oliva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Food selection and ingestion both in humans and rodents, often is a critical factor in determining excess energy intake and its related disorders. Methods Two different concepts of high-fat diets were tested for their obesogenic effects in rats; in both cases, lipids constituted about 40% of their energy intake. The main difference with controls fed standard lab chow, was, precisely, the lipid content. Cafeteria diets (K were self-selected diets devised to be desirable to the rats, mainly because of its diverse mix of tastes, particularly salty and sweet. This diet was compared with another, more classical high-fat (HF diet, devised not to be as tasty as K, and prepared by supplementing standard chow pellets with fat. We also analysed the influence of sex on the effects of the diets. Results K rats grew faster because of a high lipid, sugar and protein intake, especially the males, while females showed lower weight but higher proportion of body lipid. In contrast, the weight of HF groups were not different from controls. Individual nutrient’s intake were analysed, and we found that K rats ingested large amounts of both disaccharides and salt, with scant differences of other nutrients’ proportion between the three groups. The results suggest that the key differential factor of the diet eliciting excess energy intake was the massive presence of sweet and salty tasting food. Conclusions The significant presence of sugar and salt appears as a powerful inducer of excess food intake, more effective than a simple (albeit large increase in the diet’s lipid content. These effects appeared already after a relatively short treatment. The differential effects of sex agree with their different hedonic and obesogenic response to diet.

  11. Diabetes and Dietary Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Diabetes and Dietary Supplements: In Depth Share: On This ... much do we know about dietary supplements for diabetes? Many studies have investigated dietary supplements, including vitamins, ...

  12. Using Dietary Supplements Wisely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... U V W X Y Z Using Dietary Supplements Wisely Share: On This Page Key Points About ... help ensure coordinated and safe care. About Dietary Supplements Dietary supplements were defined in a law passed ...

  13. Multivitamin/Mineral Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... en español Health Professional Other Resources Multivitamin/mineral Supplements Fact Sheet for Consumers Have a question? Ask ... MVMs? Disclaimer What are multivitamin/mineral (MVM) dietary supplements? Multivitamin/mineral (MVM) supplements contain a combination of ...

  14. Standard versus pH-adjusted and lidocaine supplemented radiocolloid for patients undergoing sentinel-lymph-node mapping and biopsy for early breast cancer (PASSION-P trial): a double-blind, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojadinovic, Alexander; Peoples, George E; Jurgens, Jennifer S; Howard, Robin S; Schuyler, Brandi; Kwon, Kyung H; Henry, Leonard R; Shriver, Craig D; Buckenmaier, Chester C

    2009-09-01

    Sentinel-lymph-node (SLN) mapping and biopsy maintains staging accuracy in early breast cancer and identifies patients for selective lymphadenectomy. SLN mapping requires injection of technetium-99m-sulfur colloid-an effective but sometimes painful method, for which better pain-management strategies are needed. In this randomised, double-blind trial, we compared degree of pain between standard radiocolloid injection and pH-adjusted and lidocaine-supplemented formulations for patients undergoing SLN mapping for breast cancer. Between Jan 13, 2006, and April 30, 2009, 140 patients with early breast cancer were randomly assigned in a 1:1:1:1 fashion to receive the standard topical 4% lidocaine cream and injection of [(99m)Tc]Tc-sulfur colloid (n=35), or to one of three other study groups: topical placebo cream and injection of Tc-sulfur colloid containing either sodium bicarbonate (n=35), 1% lidocaine (n=35), or sodium bicarbonate and 1% lidocaine (n=35). The randomisation sequence was computer generated, and all patients and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was patient-reported breast pain immediately after radioisotope injection, using the Wong-Baker FACES pain rating scale and McGill pain questionnaire, analysed in the per-protocol population. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00940199. 19 of the 140 patients enrolled were excluded from analysis: nine declined study participation or sought care elsewhere, nine did not undergo SLN mapping because of disease extent or a technical problem, and one had unreliable data. There were no adverse events. Mean pain scores on the Wong-Baker scale (0-10) were: 6.0 (SD 2.6) for those who received standard of practice, 4.7 (3.0) for those who received radiocolloid plus bicarbonate, 1.6 (1.4) for those who received radiocolloid plus 1% lidocaine, and 1.6 (1.3) for those who received radiocolloid plus bicarbonate and 1% lidocaine (psodium bicarbonate group, 4.6 (4

  15. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2001 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  16. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2011 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  17. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2003 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  18. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2015 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  19. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2000 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  20. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2005 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  1. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2014 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  2. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2009 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  3. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2017

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2017 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  4. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2008 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  5. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2010 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  6. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2016 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  7. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2004 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  8. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2002 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  9. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2007 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  10. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2006 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  11. Style as Supplement - Supplement as Style

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    as a meta-documentary, or an always-already deconstructed communication mainly dealing with the act of communicating about philosophy, rather than communicating philosophical insight as such. Philosophy is thus shown to be communication, transmission, situated and framed speech acts - supplements...... and deferrals. This is of course another link in the infinite Derridean chain of supplements to supplements of supplements - in his writings, his persona and the legacy of images of him left behind in the archives. How does this perpetual deferral reflect itself in Derrida's visual and verbal style......, or inversely how does his style always/already produce these supplements and deferrals?...

  12. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel. Pt. II. Marine atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, E.; Morcillo, M.; Rosales, B.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results obtained in the MICAT project for mild steel specimens exposed for 1 to 4 years in 47 marine atmospheres in the Ibero-American region. All these atmospheres were characterized for climatology, pollution and corrosion rates according to ISO standards. Complementary morphological and chemical characterization of the steel corrosion product layers (SCPLs) formed in these atmospheres was carried out. The overall analysis of results contributes to understanding, in a systematic way, how atmospheric corrosivity categories can be correlated with corrosion mechanisms. Special aspects of the atmospheres, from pure to mixed marine, were considered. (orig.)

  13. Atlantic Sharpnose and Blacknose Shark Congressional Supplemental Sampling

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Life history data were collected from Atlantic sharpnose and blacknose sharks during the Congressional Supplemental Program during 2011. Data collected include...

  14. Hood Canal Steelhead - Hood Canal Steelhead Supplementation Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hood Canal Steelhead Project is a 17-year before-after-control-impact experiment that tests the effects of supplementation on natural steelhead populations in...

  15. Atmospheric electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Chalmers, J Alan

    1957-01-01

    Atmospheric Electricity brings together numerous studies on various aspects of atmospheric electricity. This book is composed of 13 chapters that cover the main problems in the field, including the maintenance of the negative charge on the earth and the origin of the charges in thunderstorms. After a brief overview of the historical developments of atmospheric electricity, this book goes on dealing with the general principles, results, methods, and the MKS system of the field. The succeeding chapters are devoted to some aspects of electricity in the atmosphere, such as the occurrence and d

  16. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Kajita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses atmospheric neutrino experiments and the neutrino oscillation studies with these neutrinos.

  17. Atmospheric electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volland, H.

    1984-01-01

    The book Atmospheric Electrodynamics, by Hans Voland is reviewed. The book describes a wide variety of electrical phenomena occurring in the upper and lower atmosphere and develops the mathematical models which simulate these processes. The reviewer finds that the book is of interest to researchers with a background in electromagnetic theory but is of only limited use as a reference work

  18. Atmospheric Dispositifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    , the conceptual foundations and protocols for the production of atmosphere in architecture might be found beneath the surface of contemporary debates. In this context, the notion of atmospheric dispositif – illustrated through an oeuvre of the German architect Werner Ruhnau and its theoretical and historical...

  19. Urban atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandy, Matthew

    2017-07-01

    What is an urban atmosphere? How can we differentiate an 'atmosphere' from other facets of urban consciousness and experience? This essay explores some of the wider cultural, political, and philosophical connotations of atmospheres as a focal point for critical reflections on space and subjectivity. The idea of an 'affective atmosphere' as a distinctive kind of mood or shared corporeal phenomenon is considered in relation to recent developments in phenomenology, extended conceptions of agency, and new understandings of materialism. The essay draws in particular on the changing characteristics of air and light to reflect on different forms of sensory experience and their wider cultural and political connotations. The argument highlights some of the tensions and anomalies that permeate contemporary understandings of urban atmospheres.

  20. Integration of Infrasound Propagation Models and Near-Real-Time Atmospheric Characterizations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gibson, Robert G; Norris, David E

    2004-01-01

    .... Near-real-time atmospheric updates, such as the output from numerical weather prediction models, supplement the baseline climatological characterization of temperature, wind and air composition...

  1. AKRO: Standard Prices

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard prices are generated for cost recovery programs in the Individual Fishing Quota (IFQ) halibut and sablefish, BSAI Rationalized crab, and Central Gulf of...

  2. Children and Dietary Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Digest for health professionals Children and Dietary Supplements Share: September 2012 © Matthew Lester Research has shown that many children use herbs and other dietary supplements. However, there are little data available on their ...

  3. Dietary Supplements for Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Dietary Supplements for Toddlers Page Content ​​If you provide your ... growth and brain development, so particular vitamins and supplements may be recommended. Rickets , for example, is a ...

  4. Taking iron supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007478.htm Taking iron supplements To use the sharing features on this page, ... levels. You may also need to take iron supplements as well to rebuild iron stores in your ...

  5. Supplement consumption in body builder athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimian, Jahangir; Esfahani, Parivash Shekarchizadeh

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Widespread use of supplements is observed among world athletes in different fields. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and determinants of using supplements among body builder athletes. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 250 men and 250 women from 30 different bodybuilding clubs. Participants were asked to complete a self-administered standardized anonymous check-list. RESULTS: Forty nine percent of the respondents declared supplement use. Men were more likely to take supplements than women (86.8% vs. 11.2%, p = 0.001). Reasons for using supplements were reported to be for health (45%), enhancing the immune system (40%) and improving athletic performance (25%). Most athletes (72%) had access to a nutritionist but underused this resource. Coaches (65%) had the greatest influence on supplementation practices followed by nutritionists (30%) and doctors (25%) after them. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of supplement use among bodybuilders was high. Sex, health-related issues and sport experts were determinant factors of supplement use. PMID:22973330

  6. Examples of Dietary Supplement Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products Drug-Nutrient Interactions and Drug-Supplement Interactions | Examples of Dietary Supplement Interactions Drug-Nutrient Interactions and Drug-Supplement Interactions | Examples of Dietary Supplement Interactions Share Print Almost half ...

  7. U.S. Standard Atmosphere, 1976

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-10-01

    correction of •, te anualmea ozoe cncetraton nd is erl- the mean rocket data, have been derived from theability at heights to 72 km. This model is a revision...derived properties. Part 2 describes the model and data used up to 85 kmi, in the first section; and the model and data used above 85 kin, in the second...section. The theoreti- cal basis of the high-altitude model is given in an appendix. Part 3 contains information on -ninor constituents in the

  8. Atmospheric Photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Harrie; Potter, A. E.

    1961-01-01

    The upper atmosphere offers a vast photochemical laboratory free from solid surfaces, so all reactions take place in the gaseous phase. At 30 km altitude the pressure has fallen to about one-hundredth of that at ground level, and we shall, rather arbitrarily, regard the upper atmosphere as beginning at that height. By a little less than 100 km the pressure has fallen to 10(exp -3) mm Hg and is decreasing by a power of ten for every 15 km increase in altitude. Essentially we are concerned then with the photochemistry of a nitrogen-oxygen mixture under low-pressure conditions in which photo-ionization, as well as photodissociation, plays an important part. Account must also be taken of the presence of rare constituents, such as water vapour and its decomposition products, including particularly hydroxyl, oxides of carbon, methane and, strangely enough, sodium, lithium and calcium. Many curious and unfamiliar reactions occur in the upper atmosphere. Some of them are luminescent, causing the atmosphere to emit a dim light called the airglow. Others, between gaseous ions and neutral molecules, are almost a complete mystery at this time. Similar interesting phenomena must occur in other planetary atmospheres, and they might be predicted if sufficient chemical information were available.

  9. Atmospheric thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Iribarne, J V

    1973-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the atmosphere is the subject of several chapters in most textbooks on dynamic meteorology, but there is no work in English to give the subject a specific and more extensive treatment. In writing the present textbook, we have tried to fill this rather remarkable gap in the literature related to atmospheric sciences. Our aim has been to provide students of meteorology with a book that can playa role similar to the textbooks on chemical thermodynamics for the chemists. This implies a previous knowledge of general thermodynamics, such as students acquire in general physics courses; therefore, although the basic principles are reviewed (in the first four chapters), they are only briefly discussed, and emphasis is laid on those topics that will be useful in later chapters, through their application to atmospheric problems. No attempt has been made to introduce the thermodynamics of irreversible processes; on the other hand, consideration of heterogeneous and open homogeneous systems permits a...

  10. Greenhouse effect in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2016-04-01

    Average optical atmospheric parameters for the infrared spectrum range are evaluated on the basis of the Earth energetic balance and parameters of the standard atmosphere. The average optical thickness of the atmosphere is u ≈ 2.5 and this atmospheric emission is originated at altitudes below 10 km. Variations of atmospheric radiative fluxes towards the Earth and outward are calculated as a function of the concentration of \\text{CO}2 molecules for the regular model of molecular spectrum. As a result of doubling of the \\text{CO}2 concentration the change of the global Earth temperature is (0.4 +/- 0.2) \\text{K} if other atmospheric parameters are conserved compared to the value (3.0 +/- 1.5) \\text{K} under real atmospheric conditions with the variation of the amount of atmospheric water. An observed variation of the global Earth temperature during the last century (0.8 ^\\circ \\text{C}) follows from an increase of the mass of atmospheric water by 7% or by conversion of 1% of atmospheric water in aerosols.

  11. The effect and safety of highly standardized Ginger (Zingiber officinale) and Echinacea (Echinacea angustifolia) extract supplementation on inflammation and chronic pain in NSAIDs poor responders. A pilot study in subjects with knee arthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondanelli, Mariangela; Riva, Antonella; Morazzoni, Paolo; Allegrini, Pietro; Faliva, Milena Anna; Naso, Maurizio; Miccono, Alessandra; Peroni, Gabriella; Degli Agosti, Irene; Perna, Simone

    2017-06-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of Zingiber officinale and Echinacea angustifolia extract supplementation (25 mg of ginger and 5 mg of Echinacea) for 30 days on inflammation and chronic pain in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Consecutive nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory-drugs (NSAIDs) poor responders with chronic inflammation and pain due to knee arthrosis were assessed (15 subjects, age: 67.2 ± 7.9, body mass index: 30.6 ± 7.1, men/women:2/13). The primary endpoint was to determine pain improvement from baseline to Day 30 by Tegner Lysholm Knee Scoring. The secondary endpoints were the assessment of Visual Analog Scale for Pain, health-related quality of life, by the ShortForm36 (SF-36), anthropometric parameters, hydration. After supplementation, a significant improvement of 12.27 points was observed for Lysholm scale score (p < 0.05), SF-36 (p < 0.05), and a decrease in -0.52 cm in knee circumference (left) (p < 0.01). This pilot study provides feasibility and safety data for the use of highly standardised ginger and Echinacea extract supplementation in people with knee OA.

  12. Plume spread and atmospheric stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, R.O. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The horizontal spread of a plume in atmospheric dispersion can be described by the standard deviation of horizontal direction. The widely used Pasquill-Gifford classes of atmospheric stability have assigned typical values of the standard deviation of horizontal wind direction and of the lapse rate. A measured lapse rate can thus be used to estimate the standard deviation of wind direction. It is examined by means of a large dataset of fast wind measurements how good these estimates are. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  13. Profiling the Use of Dietary Supplements by Brazilian Physical Education Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Ricardo Borges; Silva, Maria Sebastiana; da Silva, Wellington Fernando; Campos, Mário Hebling; Andrade, Marília Dos Santos; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; Andre Barbosa de Lira, Claudio

    2017-12-27

    A survey was designed to examine the use of dietary supplements by Brazilian physical education professionals. The study included 131 Brazilian physical education professionals (83 men and 48 women). A descriptive statistical analysis was performed (mean, standard deviation, and absolute and relative frequencies). A chi-square test was applied to evaluate differences in use of dietary supplements according to particular variables of interest (p supplements. Approximately 59% of dietary supplement users took two or more kinds of supplements. Among users of supplements, men professionals (73%) consumed more dietary supplements than women (27%). The most-consumed dietary supplement was whey protein (80%). The results showed a higher use of dietary supplements by men. The most-consumed supplements were rich in protein. The consumption of dietary supplements by almost half of the participants in this study suggests that participants did not consider their dietary needs to be met by normal diet alone.

  14. Atmospheric monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Radioactivity in air was measured by a network of continuously operating air samplers at nineteen locations near the Site perimeter and five locations somewhat distant from the Site. The Site perimeter samplers provided for general coverage in all directions but with emphasis in the prevalent downwind directions to the south and east of the Site including the communities of Benton City, Richland, Pasco, Connell, and Othello. The distant air sample locations provided background airborne radioactivity data for comparison. These samplers were located at Sunnyside, Moses Lake, Washtucna, Walla Walla, and at McNary Dam. Airborne radionuclide concentrations during 1982 were lower than those observed in 1981 because of the gradual decline of atmospheric fallout associated with a foreign atmospheric nuclear test that occurred in the fall of 1980. Airborne radioactivity data collected during 1982 did not indicate the presence of detectable levels of Hanford origin radionuclides in the offsite environs

  15. Atmospheric materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    A disjunction between the material and the immaterial has been at the heart of the architectural debate for decades. In this dialectic tension, the notion of atmosphere which increasingly claims attention in architectural discourse seems to be parallactic, leading to the re-evaluation of perceptual...... experience and, consequently, to the conceptual and methodological shifts in the production of space, and hence in the way we think about materiality. In this context, architectural space is understood as a contingent construction – a space of engagement that appears to us as a result of continuous...... and complex interferences revealed through our perception; ‘the atmospheric’ is explored as a spatial and affective quality as well as a sensory background, and materiality as a powerful and almost magical agency in shaping of atmosphere. Challenging existing dichotomies and unraveling intrinsic...

  16. Integration of InfraMAP with Near-Real-Time Atmospheric Characterizations and Applications to Infrasound Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gibson, Robert

    2003-01-01

    .... Of particular interest herein is the recently developed capability to incorporate near-real-time atmospheric updates, such as the output from numerical weather prediction models, to supplement...

  17. Determination of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes from atmospheric neutrino data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, C.; Maltoni, M.; Rojo, J.

    2006-06-01

    The precise knowledge of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes is a key ingredient in the interpretation of the results from any atmospheric neutrino experiment. In the standard data analysis, these fluxes are theoretical inputs obtained from sophisticated numerical calculations based on the convolution of the primary cosmic ray spectrum with the expected yield of neutrinos per incident cosmic ray. In this work we present an alternative approach to the determination of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes based on the direct extraction from the experimental data on neutrino event rates. The extraction is achieved by means of a combination of artificial neural networks as interpolants and Monte Carlo methods for faithful error estimation. (author)

  18. Resveratrol food supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica; Grunert, Klaus G

    2015-01-01

    Background: Consumers increasingly choose food supplements in addition to their diet. Research on supplement users finds they are likely to be female, older and well-educated; Furthermore, supplement users are often characterised as being especially health-oriented, an observation which is termed...... the ‘inverse supplement hypothesis’. However, results are dependent on the substance in question. Little is known so far about botanicals in general, and more specifically, little is known about resveratrol. The psychographic variables of food supplement users are yet relatively underexplored. By comparing US...... and Danish respondents, we aimed to identify whether sociodemographic variables, health status, health beliefs and behaviour and interest in food aspects specifically relevant to resveratrol (e.g., naturalness, indulgence, and Mediterranean food) explain favourable attitudes and adoption intentions toward...

  19. Using Smartphones to Supplement Classroom Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Supplementing classroom reading with smartphones can develop better vocabulary knowledge, comprehension, technology skills, and writing. This article connects smartphones to reading complex, informational text and the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). The author suggests that smartphones motivate, scaffold comprehension, and invite…

  20. Status of conversion of NE standards to national consensus standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, S.D.

    1990-06-01

    One major goal of the Nuclear Standards Program is to convert existing NE standards into national consensus standards (where possible). This means that an NE standard in the same subject area using the national consensus process. This report is a summary of the activities that have evolved to effect conversion of NE standards to national consensus standards, and the status of current conversion activities. In some cases, all requirements in an NE standard will not be incorporated into the published national consensus standard because these requirements may be considered too restrictive or too specific for broader application by the nuclear industry. If these requirements are considered necessary for nuclear reactor program applications, the program standard will be revised and issued as a supplement to the national consensus standard. The supplemental program standard will contain only those necessary requirements not reflected by the national consensus standard. Therefore, while complete conversion of program standards may not always be realized, the standards policy has been fully supported in attempting to make maximum use of the national consensus standard. 1 tab

  1. Beware of Fraudulent 'Dietary Supplements'

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates Beware of Fraudulent Dietary Supplements Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... at 1-800-FDA-1088 or online . Dietary Supplements and FDA Dietary supplements, in general, are not ...

  2. Herbs, Supplements and Alternative Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Herbs, Supplements and Alternative Medicines It is best to get ... also more likely to use dietary supplements. Using Supplements Safely If you’re one of the many ...

  3. Botanical Dietary Supplements: Background Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Office of Dietary Supplements Health Professional Other Resources Botanical Dietary Supplements Background Information Have a question? Ask ... on botanical dietary supplements? Disclaimer What is a botanical? A botanical is a plant or plant part ...

  4. Omega-3 Supplements: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... uncertain whether people with fish or shellfish allergies can safely consume fish oil supplements. Fish liver oils (which are not ... uncertain whether people with fish or shellfish allergies can safely consume fish oil supplements. Omega-3 supplements may extend bleeding ...

  5. Model Regulations for the Use of Radiation Sources and for the Management of the Associated Radioactive Waste. Supplement to IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-G-1.5 (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This publication provides advice on an appropriate set of regulations covering all aspects of the use of radiation sources and the safe management of the associated radioactive waste. The publication provides the framework for the regulatory requirements and conditions to be incorporated into individual authorizations for the use of radiation sources in industry, medical facilities, research and education, and in agriculture. It also establishes criteria to be used for assessing compliance. The content allows States to appraise the adequacy of their existing regulations and regulatory guides, and acts as a reference for those States developing regulations for the first time. The publication is a supplement to the guidance in the IAEA Safety Guide GS-G-1.5, Regulatory Control of Radiation Sources

  6. 49 CFR 193.2627 - Atmospheric corrosion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Atmospheric corrosion control. 193.2627 Section... LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2627 Atmospheric corrosion... atmospheric corrosion by— (a) Material that has been designed and selected to resist the corrosive atmosphere...

  7. Atmospheric Smell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenslund, Anette

    revealed how a museum-staged hospital atmosphere of an art installation was directly addressed owing to its smell. Curiously, this observation speaks against prevailing literature portraying smell as the ‘mute sense’, and what is more, the museum display did not alter smell curatorially. Rather, smell......, hospital-based and museum-staged. Prompted by the ambition to acknowledge the museum’s need to have its activities rooted in thorough investigation of the given culture on show, the dual analytical disposition is a sine qua non spanning varied fields and disciplines. The conceptual discussion offered...... in the thesis is spurred on by philosophical phenomenology predominantly paired with sociological and anthropological theory. It finds support in empirical work from both a hospital and a museum setting. Thus, it draws on a three-month ethnographic fieldwork conducted in 2012 in a Danish hospital, including...

  8. Supplementation in the Columbia Basin : Summary Report Series : Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-12-01

    This progress report broadly defines the scope of supplementation plans and activities in the Columbia Basin. It provides the foundation for more detailed analysis of supplementation in subsequent reports in this series. Topics included in this report are: definition of supplementation, project diversity, objectives and performance standards, uncertainties and theory. Since this is a progress report, the content is subject to modification with new information. The supplementation theory will continue to evolve throughout the duration of RASP and beyond. The other topics in this report are essentially complete and are not expected to change significantly. This is the first of a series of four reports which will summarize information contained in the larger, RASP progress and completion reports. Our goal is to make the findings of RASP more accessible by grouping related topics into smaller but complete narratives on important aspects of supplementation. We are planning to publish the following reports under the general title Supplementation in the Columbia River Basin: Part 1, Background, Description, Performance Measures, Uncertainty and Theory; Part 2, Theoretical Framework and Models; Part 3, Planning Guidelines; and Part 4, Regional Coordination of Research and Monitoring. Supplementation is expected to be a major contributor to the planned increase in salmon and steelhead production in the Columbia Basin. The Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) uses three approaches to protect and enhance salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin: (1) enhance fish production; (2) improve passage in the mainstem rivers; and (3) revise harvest management to support the rebuilding of fish runs (NPPC 1987). The fish production segment calls for a three-part approach focused on natural production, hatchery production, and supplementation. Supplementation is planned to provide over half of the total production increases. The Regional Assessment

  9. Supplements for exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia-Fava, Johanna; Colitz, Carmen M H

    2014-09-01

    The use of supplements has become commonplace in an effort to complement traditional therapy and as part of long-term preventive health plans. This article discusses historical and present uses of antioxidants, vitamins, and herbs. By complementing traditional medicine with holistic and alternative nutrition and supplements, the overall health and wellness of exotic pets can be enhanced and balanced. Further research is needed for understanding the strengths and uses of supplements in exotic species. Going back to the animals' origin and roots bring clinicians closer to nature and its healing powers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reducing supplementation frequency for Nellore beef steers grazing tropical pastures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Carrilho Canesin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Reduced supplementation frequency is a broadly applied management practice. Ruminants consuming low quality forages/pastures, supplemented less than once daily are able to maintain body weight gain (BWG, efficiency of use of dry matter, nitrogen and other nutrients, as compared with animals supplemented once daily. We evaluated the feeding behavior, dry matter intake (DMI, dry matter and organic matter digestibility (DMD and OMD, BWG, Longissimus muscle area and backfat depth of Nellore steers raised on Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu pastures during the dry season, with different supplementation patterns. Thirty six animals (338 ± 40.7 kg were distributed over nine paddocks according to a completely randomized design. Treatments were based on supplementation frequency: once daily (OD, once daily except Saturdays and Sundays (SS, or on alternate days (AD, at 1.0 %, 1.4 % and 2.0 % BW, respectively. Average total DMI accounted for 1.6 % BW day-1, with no effect of supplementation frequency. Supplementation frequency had no effect on BWG or grazing time during the day. There was no difference in Longissimus muscle area animals supplemented daily, SS and AD. The backfat depth was thinner in animals supplemented AD, but even in this case, it was within the standards considered satisfactory for a finishing steer. Reducing supplementation frequency seems a good option to lower labor costs without affecting feed efficiency or carcass quality in beef cattle grazing tropical pastures.

  11. Use of Dietary Supplements among Professional Athletes in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljaloud, Sulaiman O.; Ibrahim, Salam A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the usage patterns of dietary supplements among professional athletes in Saudi Arabia. The survey consisted of sixteen questions divided into four categories: use of supplements, reason for consumption of supplements, personal beliefs about supplements, and behavior. The questionnaires were given to the three teams residing in Riyadh: Al Hilal, Al Nasr, and Al-Shabab. Out of the 105 athletes surveyed, we found that only 98 are currently taking dietary supplements and the mean age and standard deviation were 25.74 ± 2.90. The survey results showed a high percentage of athletes (93.3%; n = 98) using different dietary supplements throughout the season, 43.8% (n = 43) reported using supplements for performance, and 32.6% (n = 32) believed in health benefits as a reason for using dietary supplements. Our results showed that a total of 87 (88.7%), 81 (82.6%), and 51 (52.0%) athletes are consuming sports drinks, vitamin C, and multivitamins, respectively. Meanwhile, those supplements ranking among the least used included omega 6 (18.6%), creatine (16.3%), and Ginkgo biloba (10.2%). A majority of athletes indicated that their use of supplements was for the purpose of improving their health and performance. PMID:23762541

  12. Use of Dietary Supplements among Professional Athletes in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman O. Aljaloud

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to understand the usage patterns of dietary supplements among professional athletes in Saudi Arabia. The survey consisted of sixteen questions divided into four categories: use of supplements, reason for consumption of supplements, personal beliefs about supplements, and behavior. The questionnaires were given to the three teams residing in Riyadh: Al Hilal, Al Nasr, and Al-Shabab. Out of the 105 athletes surveyed, we found that only 98 are currently taking dietary supplements and the mean age and standard deviation were 25.74±2.90. The survey results showed a high percentage of athletes (93.3%; n=98 using different dietary supplements throughout the season, 43.8% (n=43 reported using supplements for performance, and 32.6% (n=32 believed in health benefits as a reason for using dietary supplements. Our results showed that a total of 87 (88.7%, 81 (82.6%, and 51 (52.0% athletes are consuming sports drinks, vitamin C, and multivitamins, respectively. Meanwhile, those supplements ranking among the least used included omega 6 (18.6%, creatine (16.3%, and Ginkgo biloba (10.2%. A majority of athletes indicated that their use of supplements was for the purpose of improving their health and performance.

  13. Calibration of atmospheric hydrogen measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jordan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Interest in atmospheric hydrogen (H2 has been growing in recent years with the prospect of H2 being a potential alternative to fossil fuels as an energy carrier. This has intensified research for a quantitative understanding of the atmospheric hydrogen cycle and its total budget, including the expansion of the global atmospheric measurement network. However, inconsistencies in published observational data constitute a major limitation in exploring such data sets. The discrepancies can be mainly attributed to difficulties in the calibration of the measurements. In this study various factors that may interfere with accurate quantification of atmospheric H2 were investigated including drifts of standard gases in high pressure cylinders. As an experimental basis a procedure to generate precise mixtures of H2 within the atmospheric concentration range was established. Application of this method has enabled a thorough linearity characterization of the commonly used GC-HgO reduction detector. We discovered that the detector response was sensitive to the composition of the matrix gas. Addressing these systematic errors, a new calibration scale has been generated defined by thirteen standards with dry air mole fractions ranging from 139–1226 nmol mol−1. This new scale has been accepted as the official World Meteorological Organisation's (WMO Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW H2 mole fraction scale.

  14. Model Regulations for the Use of Radiation Sources and for the Management of the Associated Radioactive Waste. Supplement to IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-G-1.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-12-01

    IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GSR Part 1, Governmental, Legal and Regulatory Framework for Safety, requires that governments establish laws and statutes to make provisions for an effective governmental, legal and regulatory framework for safety. The framework for safety includes the establishment of a regulatory body. The regulatory body has the authority and responsibility for promulgating regulations, and for preparing their implementation. This publication provides advice on an appropriate set of regulations covering all aspects of the use of radiation sources and the safe management of the associated radioactive waste. The regulations provide the framework for the regulatory requirements and conditions to be incorporated into individual authorizations for the use of radiation sources in industry, medical facilities, research and education and agriculture. The regulations also establish criteria to be used for assessing compliance. This publication allows States to appraise the adequacy of their existing regulations and regulatory guides, and can be used as a reference for those States developing regulations for the first time. The regulations set out in this publication will need to be adapted to take account of local conditions, technical resources and the scale of facilities and activities in the State. The set of regulations in this publication is based on the requirements established in the IAEA safety standards series, in particular in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GSR Part 3 (Interim), Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources: International Basic Safety Standards, in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GSR Part 5, Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste, and in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSR-5, Disposal of Radioactive Waste. They are also derived from the Code of Conduct of the Safety and Security of Radiation Sources and the Guidance on the Import and Export of Radioactive Sources. This publication allows States to appraise the

  15. Model Regulations for the Use of Radiation Sources and for the Management of the Associated Radioactive Waste. Supplement to IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-G-1.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GSR Part 1, Governmental, Legal and Regulatory Framework for Safety, requires that governments establish laws and statutes to make provisions for an effective governmental, legal and regulatory framework for safety. The framework for safety includes the establishment of a regulatory body. The regulatory body has the authority and responsibility for promulgating regulations, and for preparing their implementation. This publication provides advice on an appropriate set of regulations covering all aspects of the use of radiation sources and the safe management of the associated radioactive waste. The regulations provide the framework for the regulatory requirements and conditions to be incorporated into individual authorizations for the use of radiation sources in industry, medical facilities, research and education and agriculture. The regulations also establish criteria to be used for assessing compliance. This publication allows States to appraise the adequacy of their existing regulations and regulatory guides, and can be used as a reference for those States developing regulations for the first time. The regulations set out in this publication will need to be adapted to take account of local conditions, technical resources and the scale of facilities and activities in the State. The set of regulations in this publication is based on the requirements established in the IAEA safety standards series, in particular in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GSR Part 3 (Interim), Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources: International Basic Safety Standards, in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GSR Part 5, Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste, and in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSR-5, Disposal of Radioactive Waste. They are also derived from the Code of Conduct of the Safety and Security of Radiation Sources and the Guidance on the Import and Export of Radioactive Sources. This publication allows States to appraise the

  16. Atmospheric Models/Global Atmospheric Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-30

    Atmospheric Models /Global Atmospheric Modeling Timothy F. Hogan Naval Research Laboratory Monterey, CA 93943-5502 phone: (831) 656-4705 fax: (831...to 00-00-1998 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Atmospheric Models /Global Atmospheric Modeling 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...initialization of increments, improved cloud prediction, and improved surface fluxes) have been transition to 6.4 (Global Atmospheric Models , PE 0603207N, X-0513

  17. Supplements to Textbook Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Ken

    1994-01-01

    Describes the many kinds of materials that English teachers can draw upon to enrich and expand students' experiences with literature. Outlines ancillary materials used to supplement the study of William Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar." (HB)

  18. Iron supplements (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  19. Dietary supplements for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Philip J; Sperry, Morgan; Wilson, Amy Friedman

    2008-01-15

    A large number of dietary supplements are promoted to patients with osteoarthritis and as many as one third of those patients have used a supplement to treat their condition. Glucosamine-containing supplements are among the most commonly used products for osteoarthritis. Although the evidence is not entirely consistent, most research suggests that glucosamine sulfate can improve symptoms of pain related to osteoarthritis, as well as slow disease progression in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Chondroitin sulfate also appears to reduce osteoarthritis symptoms and is often combined with glucosamine, but there is no reliable evidence that the combination is more effective than either agent alone. S-adenosylmethionine may reduce pain but high costs and product quality issues limit its use. Several other supplements are promoted for treating osteoarthritis, such as methylsulfonylmethane, Harpagophytum procumbens (devil's claw), Curcuma longa (turmeric), and Zingiber officinale (ginger), but there is insufficient reliable evidence regarding long-term safety or effectiveness.

  20. Breastfeeding: Vitamin D Supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Vitamin D Supplementation Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir While ... not provide infants with an adequate intake of vitamin D. Most breastfed infants are able to synthesize additional ...

  1. Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and US Department of Agriculture Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database Toggle navigation Menu Home About DSID Mission Current ... values can be saved to build a small database or add to an existing database for national, ...

  2. Antioxidant supplements and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Nikolova, Dimitrinka; Gluud, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative damage to cells and tissues is considered involved in the aging process and in the development of chronic diseases in humans, including cancer and cardiovascular diseases, the leading causes of death in high-income countries. This has stimulated interest in the preventive potential of a...... of antioxidant supplements. Today, more than one half of adults in high-income countries ingest antioxidant supplements hoping to improve their health, oppose unhealthy behaviors, and counteract the ravages of aging....

  3. Fluid supplementation for neonatal unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Nai Ming; Ahmad Kamar, Azanna; Choo, Yao Mun; Kong, Juin Yee; Ngim, Chin Fang

    2017-08-01

    Neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia is a common problem which carries a risk of neurotoxicity. Certain infants who have hyperbilirubinaemia develop bilirubin encephalopathy and kernicterus which may lead to long-term disability. Phototherapy is currently the mainstay of treatment for neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia. Among the adjunctive measures to compliment the effects of phototherapy, fluid supplementation has been proposed to reduce serum bilirubin levels. The mechanism of action proposed includes direct dilutional effects of intravenous (IV) fluids, or enhancement of peristalsis to reduce enterohepatic circulation by oral fluid supplementation. To assess the risks and benefits of fluid supplementation compared to standard fluid management in term and preterm newborn infants with unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia who require phototherapy. We used the standard search strategy of Cochrane Neonatal to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 5), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 7 June 2017), Embase (1980 to 7 June 2017), and CINAHL (1982 to 7 June 2017). We also searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials. We included randomised controlled trials that compared fluid supplementation against no fluid supplementation, or one form of fluid supplementation against another. We extracted data using the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group using the Covidence platform. Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility and risk of bias of the retrieved records. We expressed our results using mean difference (MD), risk difference (RD), and risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Out of 1449 articles screened, seven studies were included. Three articles were awaiting classification, among them, two completed trials identified from the trial registry appeared to be unpublished so far.There were

  4. Proposal and Evaluation of Subordinate Standard Solar Irradiance Spectra: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wilbert, Stefan [German Aerospace Center (DLR); Jessen, Wilko [German Aerospace Center (DLR); Gueymard, Chris [Solar Consulting Services; Polo, Jesus [CIEMAT; Bian, Zeqiang [China Meteorological Administration; Driesse, Anton [Photovoltaic Performance Labs; Marzo, Aitor [University of Antofagasta; Armstrong, Peter [Masdar Institute of Science & Technology; Vignola, Frank [University of Oregon; Ramirez, Lourdes [CIEMAT

    2018-04-12

    This paper introduces a concept for global tilted irradiance (GTI) subordinate standard spectra to supplement the current standard spectra used in solar photovoltaic applications as defined in ASTM G173 and IEC60904. The proposed subordinate standard spectra correspond to atmospheric conditions and tilt angles that depart significantly from the main standard spectrum, and they can be used to more accurately represent various local conditions. For the definition of subordinate standard spectra cases with an elevation 1.5 km above sea level, the question arises whether the air mass should be calculated including a pressure correction or not. This study focuses on the impact of air mass used in standard spectra, and it uses data from 29 locations to examine which air mass is most appropriate for GTI and direct normal irradiance (DNI) spectra. Overall, it is found that the pressure-corrected air mass of 1.5 is most appropriate for DNI spectra. For GTI, a non-pressure-corrected air mass of 1.5 was found to be more appropriate.

  5. Progress in developing analytical and label-based dietary supplement databases at the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Johanna T.; Picciano, Mary Frances; Betz, Joseph M.; Fisher, Kenneth D.; Saldanha, Leila G.; Yetley, Elizabeth A.; Coates, Paul M.; Milner, John A.; Whitted, Jackie; Burt, Vicki; Radimer, Kathy; Wilger, Jaimie; Sharpless, Katherine E.; Holden, Joanne M.; Andrews, Karen; Roseland, Janet; Zhao, Cuiwei; Schweitzer, Amy; Harnly, James; Wolf, Wayne R.; Perry, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Although an estimated 50% of adults in the United States consume dietary supplements, analytically substantiated data on their bioactive constituents are sparse. Several programs funded by the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the National Institutes of Health enhance dietary supplement database development and help to better describe the quantitative and qualitative contributions of dietary supplements to total dietary intakes. ODS, in collaboration with the United States Department of Agriculture, is developing a Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID) verified by chemical analysis. The products chosen initially for analytical verification are adult multivitamin-mineral supplements (MVMs). These products are widely used, analytical methods are available for determining key constituents, and a certified reference material is in development. Also MVMs have no standard scientific, regulatory, or marketplace definitions and have widely varying compositions, characteristics, and bioavailability. Furthermore, the extent to which actual amounts of vitamins and minerals in a product deviate from label values is not known. Ultimately, DSID will prove useful to professionals in permitting more accurate estimation of the contribution of dietary supplements to total dietary intakes of nutrients and better evaluation of the role of dietary supplements in promoting health and well-being. ODS is also collaborating with the National Center for Health Statistics to enhance the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey dietary supplement label database. The newest ODS effort explores the feasibility and practicality of developing a database of all dietary supplement labels marketed in the US. This article describes these and supporting projects. PMID:25346570

  6. An investigation of atmospheric turbidity over Kerkennah Island in Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, A.; Masmoudi, M.

    2011-07-01

    Atmospheric turbidity is an important parameter for assessing the air pollution in local areas and controlling the attenuation of solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface under cloudless sky. An investigation of atmospheric turbidity has been undertaken in Kerkennah Island (in Tunisia). Turbidity indexes, namely, Linke factor (T L) and Angstrom coefficient (β) were derived directly from measurements taken by pyrheliometer during a year: July (2008) to June (2009). Data obtained from these measurements in this area were compared with measurements performed in a coastal and urban region (Sidi Bou Said) located in the North of Tunisia. A comparison of the seasonal cycle of turbidity at both sites showed: *) maximum values of turbidity in the summer due to dust storms, vertical convection and breeze sea circulation; *) Values of turbidity decrease in the autumn season, due to the decreasing of days of Sirocco and to the increasing of amount of rainfall; *) low values of turbidity index in the winter, due to precipitation removal as well as relative humidity-impacted deposition; *) middle values of turbidity were observed in the spring season. Monthly, diurnal, hourly mean values and frequency of occurrence of the value of each turbidity index were used to characterize variations of atmospheric turbidity. The three-hourly standard meteorological data given by the Meteorological National Institute (Sfax) represent a valuable supplement to the data sets with the pyrheliometer measurements. The analysis of the results shows that there is a high correlation between atmospheric turbidity and local weather conditions, especially temperature and wind speed. The correlation of meteorological parameters (wind speed and temperature) with the turbidity coefficients was analyzed and discussed.

  7. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects (supplement)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    A digest of technical papers is presented. Topics include aerosol size distribution from spectral attenuation with scattering measurements; comparison of extinction and backscattering coefficients for measured and analytic stratospheric aerosol size distributions; using hybrid methods to solve problems in radiative transfer and in multiple scattering; blue moon phenomena; absorption refractive index of aerosols in the Denver pollution cloud; a two dimensional stratospheric model of the dispersion of aerosols from the Fuego volcanic eruption; the variation of the aerosol volume to light scattering coefficient; spectrophone in situ measurements of the absorption of visible light by aerosols; a reassessment of the Krakatoa volcanic turbidity, and multiple scattering in the sky radiance.

  8. Active components in food supplements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemelink M; Jansen EHJM; Piersma AH; Opperhuizen A; LEO

    2000-01-01

    The growing food supplement market, where supplements are both more diverse and more easily available (e.g. through Internet) formed the backdrop to the inventory of the active components in food supplements. The safety of an increased intake of food components via supplements was also at issue

  9. The use of nutritional supplements among master athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegel, H; Simon, P; Wurster, C; Niess, A M; Ulrich, R

    2006-03-01

    We assessed the use of nutritional supplements among master athletes focusing on their source of information and source of supply of nutritional supplements. 1560 standardized, anonymous questionnaires were distributed among participants of the World Masters Athletics Championships Indoors 2004. These questions were related to biometric parameters, social indicators, training parameters, illicit drugs, and nutritional supplements. Chi2-tests were computed to reveal meaningful associations between basic information (age, gender, family status, children, education, country of origin, disciplines, training years, smoking, and the use of alcohol, illicit drugs, and doping) and the intake of nutritional supplements. Descriptive information on the history of their use of nutritional supplements was also provided. 60.5 % of all participants reported the actual use of nutritional supplements. We found no significant differences between nutritional supplement users and non-users with regard to basic information. The substances predominantly used were vitamins (35.4 %) and minerals (29.9 %). In contrast to elite athletes who use nutritional supplements to increase their athletic performance, master athletes use these substances predominantly for health reasons and, thus, have a closer contact to the health care system. Physicians are their preferred source of information about nutritional supplements. More than half of the interviewed athletes obtain their nutritional supplements from pharmacies or physicians. The results of this study indicate that nutritional supplement users in master athletics show no specific user profile. Since it is not rare for nutritional supplements to contain trace contaminations of anabolic androgenic steroids or pro-hormones, physicians should also inform master competitive athletes of the dangers of testing positive for doping substances due to their intake of nutritional supplements and advise them accordingly.

  10. Equine dietary supplements: an insight into their use and perceptions in the Irish equine industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, J M D; Hanna, E; Hastie, P

    2018-01-01

    Nutritional supplements are frequently used by horse owners/caregivers to supplement their horse(s) diets. Some work has been done to identify the types of supplements fed and the reasons for doing so; however, this has been predominantly disciple-specific and with little focus on participants' perceptions of supplement testing and regulation. The aim of this study was to gain an insight into the use and perceptions of equine dietary supplements in the Irish equestrian industry. An online survey was designed to ascertain the following information: demographics, types of supplements fed and reasons for use, factors that influenced respondents' choice of supplement, where advice was sought and perceptions of testing and regulation of equine supplements. The survey yielded 134 responses, 70% non-professionals and 30% professionals. A greater percentage of professionals included supplements in their horse(s) diets (98%) compared to non-professionals (86%). Almost 70% of professionals fed more than two supplements, whereas 80% of non-professionals reported to feed only one supplement. Joint supplements were most commonly fed by all respondents (22%) followed by calming supplements (13%). The enhancement of performance (35%) and prevention of joint disorders (34%) were the most common reasons reported by respondents for using a supplement. Over 53% of respondents sought advice on choosing a supplement from their feed merchant, followed by their veterinarian (46%). Veterinary recommendation was given as the most influential factor when choosing a supplement by 90% of respondents, followed by cost (69%). Most (93%) respondents thought that feed supplements had to meet legal standards, with each batch analysed for quality (72%) and the supplement tested on horses before being launched on to the market (92%). This study has identified the main types of supplements used in the Irish equestrian industry along with the reasons for their use. However, it has also highlighted

  11. Atmospheric pollution in Lisbon urban atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, C.

    2009-04-01

    Lisbon is the capital city of Portugal with about 565,000 residents in 2008 and a population density of 6,600 inhabitants per square kilometre. Like several other major metropolis, the town is surrounded by satellite cities, forming together a region known as "Lisbon Metropolitan Area" with about 3 million inhabitants, a quarter of the overall Portuguese population. Besides their local residents, it is estimated that more than one million citizens come into the Lisbon area every day from the outskirts, leading to elevated traffic densities and intense traffic jams, with important consequences on air pollution levels and obvious negative impacts on human health. Airborne particulate matter limit values are frequently exceeded, making urgent the existence of consistent programs to monitor and help taking measures to control them. Within the Portuguese project PAHLIS (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Contamination in Lisbon Urban Atmosphere) financed by the Portuguese Science Foundation ("Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia"), an aerosol and vapour phase sampling program is being implemented in the city of Lisbon at two selected contrasting zones, namely a typically busy area with intense road traffic and frequent exceedences of the particulate matter standard for the maximum allowable concentration, and a residential quieter area, thus with a cleaner atmosphere characterised as an urban background site. An one month-long sampling campaign was performed during the summer of 2008, where particulate matter was collected in two fractions (coarse 2.5µmmethod was applied on a portion of the aerosol collected on the quartz filters to quantify black or elemental and organic carbon (EC/OC). Another portion of the quartz filters was Soxhlet extracted with dichloromethane and the resulting extracts fractionated by flash chromatography prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis regarding their organic content. The inorganic content of particulate

  12. 76 FR 15856 - Standards of Conduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... 1] RIN 3090-AJ10 Standards of Conduct AGENCY: General Services Administration (GSA). ACTION: Final... Regulations because it no longer provides employees with guidance on employee standards of conduct. DATES... codified GSA's supplemental standards of ethical conduct in the new 5 CFR part 6701. At that time, GSA...

  13. An empirical investigation on factors influencing export of herbal supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Hajmirzahosseini Yazdi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available During the past few years, there have been growing interests in business development of herbal supplements in many developing countries especially in Iran. Herbal supplements are used to cure many deceases such as medicating anxiety, acne, weight loss, depression, etc. In this paper, we present an empirical investigation to detect important factors influencing exporting herbal supplements. The proposed study designs a questionnaire consists of 31 questions, distributes it among 210 experts who are professional in the area of production and distribution of herbal supplements and using factor analysis, the study detects eight factors including supportive laws and regulations, organizational atmosphere, marketing structure, knowledge oriented, feasibility study, research and development, competitive strategy and partnership strategies.

  14. Supplements and sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, David M; Harbert, Allison J

    2008-11-01

    Use of performance-enhancing supplements occurs at all levels of sports, from professional athletes to junior high school students. Although some supplements do enhance athletic performance, many have no proven benefits and have serious adverse effects. Anabolic steroids and ephedrine have life-threatening adverse effects and are prohibited by the International Olympic Committee and the National Collegiate Athletic Association for use in competition. Blood transfusions, androstenedione, and dehydroepiandrosterone are also prohibited in competition. Caffeine, creatine, and sodium bicarbonate have been shown to enhance performance in certain contexts and have few adverse effects. No performance benefit has been shown with amino acids, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate, chromium, human growth hormone, and iron. Carbohydrate-electrolyte beverages have no serious adverse effects and can aid performance when used for fluid replacement. Given the widespread use of performance-enhancing supplements, physicians should be prepared to counsel athletes of all ages about their effectiveness, safety, and legality.

  15. Ergogenic Aids and Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porrini, Marisa; Del Boʼ, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Great interest is currently shown for the contribution of nutrition to optimize training and athletic performance, and a considerable debate exists about the potential ergogenic value of several dietary supplements. However, most of the products used by athletes do not provide sufficient scientific evidence regarding their efficacy in enhancing physical performance as well as their specificity of action and safety. For this reason, sport nutrition professionals need skills in evaluating the scientific value of papers and advertisements on ergogenic aids and supplements in order to support athletes in their choice. In the present chapter, the efficacy of some of the most popular supplements used by athletes and sport practitioners will be discussed. Particular attention will be devoted to amino acids and derivatives, caffeine and caffeinated energy drinks, and some antioxidants. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Petition for Partial Supplemental Waiver of the 2016 Cellulosic Biofuel Volumetric Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    January 13, 2017, EPA sent a letter to the American Petrochemical and Fuel Manufacturers (“AFPM”) denying its petition for a partial supplemental waiver of the 2016 cellulosic biofuel standard established under the Renewable Fuel Standard.

  17. Atmosphere: Power, Critique, Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    This paper hans three interrelated parts. First, atmosphere is approached through the concept of power. Atmospheres 'grip' us directly or mediate power indirectly by manipulating moods and evoking emotions. How does atmosphere relate to different conceptions of power? Second, atmospheric powers may...... be critiqued. Which conception of critique can be involved? Third, critiquing atmospheric powers can generate political conflict. How does atmospheric disputes relate to conceptions of politics and the political?...

  18. Iron bioavailability from commercially available iron supplements

    OpenAIRE

    Christides, Tatiana; Wray, David; McBride, Richard; Fairweather, Rose; Sharp, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a global public health problem. Treatment with the standard of care ferrous iron salts may be poorly tolerated, leading to non-compliance and ineffective correction of IDA. Employing supplements with higher bioavailability might permit lower doses of iron to be used with fewer side effects, thus improving treatment efficacy. Here, we compared the iron bioavailability of ferrous sulphate tablets with alternative commercial iron products, including thre...

  19. 77 FR 43808 - Supplement to the Draft Programmatic Restoration Plan and Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC117 Supplement.... ACTION: Notice of availability; request for comments. SUMMARY: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric... Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), the Oil Pollution Act (OPA) of 1990, the Clean Water Act (CWA), the National...

  20. Psychology: Teacher Supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Rebecca

    This supplement provides teachers with tests, quizzes, answers to questions in the text, and general teaching information for using the student text, "Psychology," by Rebecca Stark. Quizzes included are on the topics of human development; the nervous system; the brain; cognitive development; sensation and perception; conditioning; learning;…

  1. Protein supplementation with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Juergen M; Diekmann, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    To highlight the recent evicence for optimal protein intake and protein supplementation in older adults. A special focus has been placed on the effects on muscle protein synthesis, strength and overall performance in this population. Although for older adults, some additional evidence on the benefits of a higher protein intake than 0.8 g/kg body weight per day has been provided, the results of studies focusing on the timing of protein intake over the day have been contradictory. Supplementation with so-called 'fast' proteins, which are also rich in leucine, for example whey protein, proved superior with regard to muscle protein synthesis. First studies in frail older persons showed increased strength after supplementation with milk protein, whereas the combination with physical exercise increased muscle mass without additional benefit for strength or functionality. Recent evidence suggests positive effects of protein supplementation on muscle protein synthesis, muscle mass and muscle strength. However, as most studies included only small numbers of participants for short treatment periods, larger studies with longer duration are necessary to support the clinical relevance of these observations.

  2. Supplementation in Rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    We therefore designed this study to measure thoracic aortic ring .... contraction obtained from pilot study (1 x 10-6. M for control and 1 x .... muscle cell hyperpolarisation20. Similarly, several reports have suggested that potassium supplementation enhances endothelium- dependent relaxations, increased vascular activity of ...

  3. Development of Safe and Effective Botanical Dietary Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Regulated differently than drugs or foods, the market for botanical dietary supplements continues to grow worldwide. The recently implemented U.S. FDA regulation that all botanical dietary supplements must be produced using good manufacturing practice is an important step toward enhancing the safety of these products, but additional safeguards could be implemented, and unlike drugs, there are currently no efficacy requirements. To ensure a safe and effective product, botanical dietary supplements should be developed in a manner analogous to pharmaceuticals that involves identification of mechanisms of action and active constituents, chemical standardization based on the active compounds, biological standardization based on pharmacological activity, preclinical evaluation of toxicity and potential for drug–botanical interactions, metabolism of active compounds, and finally, clinical studies of safety and efficacy. Completing these steps will enable the translation of botanicals from the field to safe human use as dietary supplements. PMID:26125082

  4. Development of Safe and Effective Botanical Dietary Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Breemen, Richard B

    2015-11-12

    Regulated differently than drugs or foods, the market for botanical dietary supplements continues to grow worldwide. The recently implemented U.S. FDA regulation that all botanical dietary supplements must be produced using good manufacturing practice is an important step toward enhancing the safety of these products, but additional safeguards could be implemented, and unlike drugs, there are currently no efficacy requirements. To ensure a safe and effective product, botanical dietary supplements should be developed in a manner analogous to pharmaceuticals that involves identification of mechanisms of action and active constituents, chemical standardization based on the active compounds, biological standardization based on pharmacological activity, preclinical evaluation of toxicity and potential for drug-botanical interactions, metabolism of active compounds, and finally, clinical studies of safety and efficacy. Completing these steps will enable the translation of botanicals from the field to safe human use as dietary supplements.

  5. Evaluating Living Standard Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birčiaková Naďa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the evaluation of selected available indicators of living standards, divided into three groups, namely economic, environmental, and social. We have selected six countries of the European Union for analysis: Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Luxembourg, France, and Great Britain. The aim of this paper is to evaluate indicators measuring living standards and suggest the most important factors which should be included in the final measurement. We have tried to determine what factors influence each indicator and what factors affect living standards. We have chosen regression analysis as our main method. From the study of factors, we can deduce their impact on living standards, and thus the value of indicators of living standards. Indicators with a high degree of reliability include the following factors: size and density of population, health care and spending on education. Emissions of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere also have a certain lower degree of reliability.

  6. Weight Loss Nutritional Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerson, Joan M.

    Obesity has reached what may be considered epidemic proportions in the United States, not only for adults but for children. Because of the medical implications and health care costs associated with obesity, as well as the negative social and psychological impacts, many individuals turn to nonprescription nutritional weight loss supplements hoping for a quick fix, and the weight loss industry has responded by offering a variety of products that generates billions of dollars each year in sales. Most nutritional weight loss supplements are purported to work by increasing energy expenditure, modulating carbohydrate or fat metabolism, increasing satiety, inducing diuresis, or blocking fat absorption. To review the literally hundreds of nutritional weight loss supplements available on the market today is well beyond the scope of this chapter. Therefore, several of the most commonly used supplements were selected for critical review, and practical recommendations are provided based on the findings of well controlled, randomized clinical trials that examined their efficacy. In most cases, the nutritional supplements reviewed either elicited no meaningful effect or resulted in changes in body weight and composition that are similar to what occurs through a restricted diet and exercise program. Although there is some evidence to suggest that herbal forms of ephedrine, such as ma huang, combined with caffeine or caffeine and aspirin (i.e., ECA stack) is effective for inducing moderate weight loss in overweight adults, because of the recent ban on ephedra manufacturers must now use ephedra-free ingredients, such as bitter orange, which do not appear to be as effective. The dietary fiber, glucomannan, also appears to hold some promise as a possible treatment for weight loss, but other related forms of dietary fiber, including guar gum and psyllium, are ineffective.

  7. Should You Take Dietary Supplements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2013 Print this issue Should You Take Dietary Supplements? A Look at Vitamins, Minerals, Botanicals and More ... Gut in Check Wise Choices Safe Use of Supplements Tell all of your health care providers about ...

  8. Dietary supplements for chronic gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Mariano; Sivera, Francisca; Falzon, Louise; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Carmona, Loreto

    2014-10-07

    Dietary supplements are frequently used for the treatment of several medical conditions, both prescribed by physicians or self administered. However, evidence of benefit and safety of these supplements is usually limited or absent. To assess the efficacy and safety of dietary supplementation for people with chronic gout. We performed a search in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL on 6 June 2013. We applied no date or language restrictions. In addition, we performed a handsearch of the abstracts from the 2010 to 2013 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) conferences, checked the references of all included studies and trial registries. We considered all published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs that compared dietary supplements with no supplements, placebo, another supplement or pharmacological agents for adults with chronic gout for inclusion. Dietary supplements included, but were not limited to, amino acids, antioxidants, essential minerals, polyunsaturated fatty acids, prebiotic agents, probiotic agents and vitamins. The main outcomes were reduction in frequency of gouty attacks and trial participant withdrawal due to adverse events. We also considered pain reduction, health-related quality of life, serum uric acid (sUA) normalisation, function (i.e. activity limitation), tophus regression and the rate of serious adverse events. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We identified two RCTs (160 participants) that fulfilled our inclusion criteria. As these two trials evaluated different diet supplements (enriched skim milk powder (SMP) and vitamin C) with different outcomes (gout flare prevention for enriched SMP and sUA reduction for vitamin C), we reported the results separately.One trial including 120 participants, at moderate risk of bias, compared SMP enriched with glycomacropeptides (GMP) with

  9. An archetype hydrogen atmosphere problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athay, R.G.; Mihalas, D.; Shine, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    Populations for the first three bound states and the continuum of hydrogen are determined for an isothermal, hydrostatic atmosphere at 20000K. The atmosphere is treated as being optically thin in the Balmer and Paschen continua and illuminated by continuum radiation at these wavelengths with prescribed radiation temperatures. The atmosphere is optically thick in the 2-1,3-1,3-2 and c-1 transitions. Three stages of approximation are treated: (1) radiative detailed balance in the 2-1, 3-1 and 3-2 transitions, (2) radiative detailed balance in the 3-1 and 3-2 transitions, and (3) all transitions out of detailed balance. The solution of this problem is non-trivial, and presents sufficient difficulty to have caused failure of at least one rather standard technique. The problem is thus a good archetype against which new methods, or new implementations of old methods may be tested. (Auth.)

  10. An archetype hydrogen atmosphere problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athay, R. G.; Mihalas, D.; Shine, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Populations for the first three bound states and the continuum of hydrogen are determined for an isothermal hydrostatic atmosphere at 20,000 K. The atmosphere is treated as optically thin in the Balmer and Paschen continua and illuminated by continuum radiation at these wavelengths with prescribed radiation temperatures. The atmosphere is optically thick in the 2-1, 3-1, 3-2 and c-1 transitions. Three stages of approximation are treated: (1) radiative detailed balance in the 2-1, 3-1 and 3-2 transitions, (2) radiative detailed balance in the 3-1 and 3-2 transitions, and (3) all transitions out of detailed balance. The solution of this problem is nontrivial and presents sufficient difficulty to have caused the failure of at least one rather standard technique. The problem is thus a good archetype against which new methods or new implementations of old methods may be tested.

  11. Factors to consider in the selection of a calcium supplement.

    OpenAIRE

    Shangraw, R F

    1989-01-01

    Calcium supplements are widely used, yet many questions remain as to the absorption of various calcium salts. Because the solubility of many calcium salts is dependent upon pH, the type of salt used, the condition of the patient, and the time of administration should be considered. Studies show that many calcium supplements on the market today do not meet standards of quality established in the "U.S. Pharmacopeia" (USP). Consumers must be discerning about the products they purchase. Calcium s...

  12. Dietary Supplements for Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary Supplements for Weight Loss Fact Sheet for Consumers If you’re thinking about taking a dietary supplement to lose weight, talk with your health care provider. What are weight-loss dietary supplements and what do they do? The ...

  13. Supplemental tooth in primary dentition

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash Sasankoti; Verma, Sankalp; Singh, Udita; Agarwal, Neha

    2014-01-01

    An extra tooth causing numerical excess in dentition is described as supernumerary tooth, and the resultant condition is termed as hyperdontia. Hyperdontia is more commonly seen in the permanent dentition than primary one. Supernumerary tooth which resembles tooth shape and supplements for occlusion is called as supplemental tooth. We present a case with supplemental tooth in primary dentition.

  14. Supplemental tooth in primary dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash Sasankoti; Verma, Sankalp; Singh, Udita; Agarwal, Neha

    2014-06-09

    An extra tooth causing numerical excess in dentition is described as supernumerary tooth, and the resultant condition is termed as hyperdontia. Hyperdontia is more commonly seen in the permanent dentition than primary one. Supernumerary tooth which resembles tooth shape and supplements for occlusion is called as supplemental tooth. We present a case with supplemental tooth in primary dentition. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Tyrosine supplementation for phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Diana; Wildgoose, Joanne

    2013-06-05

    Phenylketonuria is an inherited disease for which the main treatment is the dietary restriction of the amino acid phenylalanine. The diet has to be initiated in the neonatal period to prevent or reduce mental handicap. However, the diet is very restrictive and unpalatable and can be difficult to follow. A deficiency of the amino acid tyrosine has been suggested as a cause of some of the neuropsychological problems exhibited in phenylketonuria. Therefore, this review aims to assess the efficacy of tyrosine supplementation for phenylketonuria. To assess the effects of tyrosine supplementation alongside or instead of a phenylalanine-restricted diet for people with phenylketonuria, who commenced on diet at diagnosis and either continued on the diet or relaxed the diet later in life. To assess the evidence that tyrosine supplementation alongside, or instead of a phenylalanine-restricted diet improves intelligence, neuropsychological performance, growth and nutritional status, mortality rate and quality of life. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Trials Register which is comprised of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Additional studies were identified from handsearches of the Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease (from inception in 1978 to 1998). The manufacturers of prescribable dietary products used in the treatment of phenylketonuria were also contacted for further references.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Inborn Errors of Metabolism Trials Register: 28 June 2012. All randomised or quasi-randomised trials investigating the use of tyrosine supplementation versus placebo in people with phenylketonuria in addition to, or instead of, a phenylalanine-restricted diet. People treated for maternal phenylketonuria were excluded. Two authors independently assessed the trial eligibility, methodological quality

  16. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining licensees and applicants for reactor operator and senior reactor operator licenses at power reactor facilities pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). The Examiner Standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the initial and requalification examination processes and to ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator licensing policy changes. Revision 7 was published in January 1993 and became effective in August 1993. Supplement 1 is being issued primarily to implement administrative changes to the requalification examination program resulting from the amendment to 10 CFR 55 that eliminated the requirement for every licensed operator to pass an NRC-conducted requalification examination as a condition for license renewal. The supplement does not substantially alter either the initial or requalification examination processes and will become effective 30 days after its publication is noticed in the Federal Register. The corporate notification letters issued after the effective date will provide facility licensees with at least 90 days notice that the examinations will be administered in accordance with the revised procedures

  17. Light Atmosphere in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone Mandrup

    by the patients in the ward. The project is based on the Danish Regulation for light in hospitals (DS703), which is a supplement to the regulation of artificial lighting in workplaces (DS700). The kick-off to the project was reading the DS703, second paragraph, chapter 2 about general requirements for lighting...... the hospitals by research base the design of the buildings. The present PhD project expands the existing knowledge of lighting research by focusing on the experienced light atmosphere. The project uses multi strategies of methodology based on a flexible design to elaborate on the sociocultural aspect of light...... and the sensory impact of light. To frame the work, the “Model of Light Atmosphere” is created and improved throughout the study, first as an abstract model and then it is exposed for detailed study. The detailed study first of all creates a theoretical and visual context. Then explorative studies seek...

  18. [ERGOGENIC SPORT SUPPLEMENTS FOR ATHLETES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arieli, Rakefet; Lahav, Yair

    2016-06-01

    Use of performance-enhancing supplements occurs at all levels of sports, from recreational athletes to professional athletes. Although some supplements do enhance athletic performance, many have no proven benefits and have adverse effects. Nutritional supplements are categorized into the following categories: I. Apparently Effective. II. Possibly Effective. III. Too Early To Tell. IV. Apparently Ineffective. This article will review 4 ergogenic supplements which are categorized in the first category--"Apparently Effective"--1) Buffer agents 2) Creatine 3) Caffeine and 4 Nitric Oxide. Given the widespread use of performance enhancing supplements, physicians, and dietitians should be prepared to counsel athletes about their effectiveness, safety and legality.

  19. EDM forum supplement overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calonge, Ned

    2012-07-01

    The Agency for Health Research and Quality funded the Electronic Data Methods Forum (EDM Forum) to share the experiences and learnings from 11 research teams funded through three different grant programs, each of which involve the use of electronic clinical data in Comparative Effectiveness Research and Patient-Centered Outcomes Research. This overview is meant to describe the context in which the EDM forum was created and to introduce the set of papers in this supplement to Medical Care that describe the challenges and approaches to the use of electronic clinical data in the three key areas of analytic methods, clinical informatics and data governance. The participants in the EDM Forum are providing innovative approaches to generate information that can support the building of a "learning health care system." The compilation of papers presented in this supplement should serve as a resource to others working to develop the infrastructure for collecting, validating and using electronic data for research.

  20. Atmospheric composition change: Ecosystems–Atmosphere interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fowler, D.; Pilegaard, Kim; Sutton, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Ecosystems and the atmosphere: This review describes the state of understanding the processes involved in the exchange of trace gases and aerosols between the earth's surface and the atmosphere. The gases covered include NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, NH3, SO2, DMS, Biogenic VOC, O3, CH4, N2O and particles...

  1. Atmospheric composition change: Ecosystems-Atmosphere interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fowler, D.; Pilegaard, K.; Sutton, M.A.; Ambus, P.; Raivonen, M.; Duyzer, J.; Simpson, D.; Fagerli, H.; Fuzzi, S.; Schjoerring, J.K.; Granier, C.; Neftel, A.; Isaksen, I.S.A.; Laj, P.; Maione, M.; Monks, P.S.; Burkhardt, J.; Daemmgen, U.; Neirynck, J.; Personne, E.; Wichink Kruit, R.J.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Flechard, C.; Tuovinen, J.P.; Coyle, M.; Gerosa, G.; Loubet, B.; Altimir, N.; Gruenhage, L.; Ammann, C.; Cieslik, S.; Paoletti, E.; Mikkelsen, T.N.; Ro-Poulsen, H.; Cellier, P.; Cape, J.N.; Horvath, L.; Loreto, F.; Niinemets, U.; Palmer, P.I.; Rinne, J.; Misztal, P.; Nemitz, E.; Nilsson, D.; Pryor, S.; Gallagher, M.W.; Vesala, T.; Skiba, U.; Brueggemann, N.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.; Williams, J.; O'Dowd, C.; Facchini, M.C.; Leeuw, de G.; Flossman, A.; Chaumerliac, N.; Erisman, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Ecosystems and the atmosphere: This review describes the state of understanding the processes involved in the exchange of trace gases and aerosols between the earth's surface and the atmosphere. The gases covered include NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, NH3, SO2, DMS, Biogenic VOC, O-3, CH4, N2O and particles

  2. Comparison of a Medication Inventory and a Dietary Supplement Interview in Assessing Dietary Supplement Use in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keturah R. Faurot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although dietary supplement use is common, its assessment is challenging, especially among ethnic minority populations such as Hispanics/Latinos. Using the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL (n = 16,415, this report compares two strategies for capturing dietary supplement use over a 30-day period: a medication-based inventory and a nutrition-based dietary supplement interview. Age-standardized prevalence was calculated across multiple dietary supplement definitions, adjusted with survey/nonresponse weights. The prevalence of dietary supplement use was substantially higher as measured in the dietary supplement interview, compared to the medication inventory: for total dietary supplements (39% vs 26%, respectively, for nonvitamin, nonmineral supplements (24% vs 12%, and for botanicals (9.2% vs 4.5%. Concordance between the two assessments was fair to moderate (Cohen's kappa: 0.31–0.52. Among women, inclusion of botanical teas increased the prevalence of botanical supplement use from 7% to 15%. Supplement assessment that includes queries about botanical teas yields more information about patient supplement use.

  3. Red-light initiated atmospheric reactions of vibrationally excited molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaida, V; Donaldson, D J

    2014-01-21

    We present a brief review of long wavelength, red-light initiated chemistry from excited vibrational levels of the ground electronic state of atmospheric trace species. When sunlight driven electronic state reactions are not effective, photochemical processes occurring by vibrational overtone excitation have been found to be important in reactions of oxidized atmospheric compounds (acids, alcohols and peroxides) prevalent in the Earth's atmosphere. This review focuses on the fundamental energetic, mechanistic and dynamical aspects of unimolecular reactions of vibrationally excited atmospheric species. We will discuss the relevance of these red light initiated reactions to address the discrepancies between atmospheric measurements and results of standard atmospheric models.

  4. ['Gold standard', not 'golden standard'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, J.A.H.R.

    2005-01-01

    In medical literature, both 'gold standard' and 'golden standard' are employed to describe a reference test used for comparison with a novel method. The term 'gold standard' in its current sense in medical research was coined by Rudd in 1979, in reference to the monetary gold standard. In the same

  5. Enteral iron supplementation in preterm and low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Ryan John; Davies, Mark W

    2012-03-14

    Preterm infants are at risk of exhausting their body iron stores much earlier than healthy term newborns. It is widespread practice to give enteral iron supplementation to preterm and low birth weight infants to prevent iron deficiency anaemia. However, it is unclear whether supplementing preterm and low birth weight infants with iron improves growth and neurodevelopment. It is suspected that excess exogenous iron can contribute to oxidative injury in preterm babies, causing or exacerbating conditions such as necrotising enterocolitis and retinopathy of prematurity. Additionally, the optimal dose and timing of commencement and cessation of iron supplementation are uncertain. To evaluate the effect of prophylactic enteral iron supplementation on growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm and low birth weight infants. The secondary objectives were to determine whether iron supplementation results in improved haematological parameters and prevents other causes of morbidity and mortality. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 8), MEDLINE (1951 to August 2011), CINAHL (1982 to August 2011) and conference proceedings and previous reviews. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised trials that compared enteral iron supplementation with no iron supplementation, or different regimens of enteral iron supplementation in preterm or low birth weight infants or both. We extracted data using the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. Both review authors separately evaluated trial quality and data extraction. We synthesised data using risk ratios (RRs), risk differences (RDs) and weighted mean differences (WMDs). Where data about the methodology and results or both were lacking, we made an attempt to contact the study authors for further information. We included twenty-six studies (2726 infants) in the

  6. Marked Seizure Reduction after MCT Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed Azzam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 43-year-old man with history of nonsurgical partial epilepsy who previously failed multiple trials of antiepileptic drugs. Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT were added to his regular diet in the form of pure oil. Subsequently, his seizure frequency was markedly reduced from multiple daily seizures to one seizure every four days. His seizures recurred after transient discontinuation of MCT over a period of ten days. His seizure improvement was achieved at a dose of four tablespoons of MCT twice daily with no reported side effects. He developed significant diarrhea and flatulence at higher doses. We conclude that MCT oil supplementation to regular diet may provide better seizure control in some patients. MCT oil supplementation may be a more tolerable alternative to the standard ketogenic diet.

  7. Marine oil supplements for arthritis pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senftleber, Ninna K.; Nielsen, Sabrina M.; Andersen, Jens Rikardt

    2017-01-01

    Arthritis patients often take fish oil supplements to alleviate symptoms, but limited evidence exists regarding their efficacy. The objective was to evaluate whether marine oil supplements reduce pain and/or improve other clinical outcomes in patients with arthritis. Six databases were searched......-regression analysis. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to rate the overall quality of the evidence. Forty-two trials were included; 30 trials reported complete data on pain. The standardized mean difference (SMD) suggested a favorable effect (-0.24; 95% confidence.......57–0.24). The evidence for using marine oil to alleviate pain in arthritis patients was overall of low quality, but of moderate quality in rheumatoid arthritis patients....

  8. Protein Supplements: Pros and Cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Jay Rabindra Kumar; Samal, Indira R

    2018-05-04

    To provide a comprehensive analysis of the literature examining the pros and cons of protein supplementation, various articles on protein supplementation were obtained from Google Scholar, PubMed, and National Center for Biotechnology Information. Over the past few years, protein supplementation has become commonplace for gym-goers as well as for the public. A large segment of the general population relies on protein supplementation for meal replacement, weight reduction, and purported health benefits. These protein supplements have varying pros and cons associated with them, which are often overlooked by the public. This review aims to assimilate existing studies and form a consensus regarding the benefits and disadvantages of protein supplementation. The purported health benefits of protein supplementation have led to overuse by both adults and adolescents. Although the pros and cons of protein supplementation is a widely debated topic, not many studies have been conducted regarding the same. The few studies that exist either provide insufficient evidence or have not employed proper conditions for the conduct of the tests. It should be considered that protein supplements are processed materials and often do not contain other essential nutrients required for the sustenance of a healthy lifestyle. It is suggested that the required protein intake should be obtained from natural food sources and protein supplementation should be resorted to only if sufficient protein is not available in the normal diet.

  9. Determinants of dietary supplement use - healthy individuals use dietary supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Christina L F; Christensen, Jane; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2015-01-01

    and lifestyle between 1993 and 1997. A health index including smoking, physical activity, alcohol and diet, and a metabolic risk index including waist circumference, urinary glucose and measured hypertension were constructed. Logistic regression was used to investigate these determinants in relation...... common supplement use. In conclusion, those with the healthiest lifestyle were more likely to use dietary supplements. Thus, lifestyle and dietary composition should be considered as confounders on supplement use and health outcomes....

  10. Effects of Three Oral Nutritional Supplements on Human Hydration Indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Lindsay A; Yates, Brandon A; McKenzie, Amy L; Muñoz, Colleen X; Casa, Douglas J; Armstrong, Lawrence E

    2016-08-01

    Urine color (Ucol) as a hydration assessment tool provides practicality, ease of use, and correlates moderately to strongly with urine specific gravity (Usg) and urine osmolality (Uosm). Indicative of daily fluid turnover, along with solute and urochrome excretion in 24-hr samples, Ucol may also reflect dietary composition. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to determine the efficacy of Ucol as a hydration status biomarker after nutritional supplementation with beetroot (880 mg), vitamin C (1000 mg), and riboflavin (200 mg). Twenty males (Mean ± SD; age, 21 ± 2 y; body mass, 82.12 ± 15.58 kg; height, 1.77 ± 0.06 m) consumed a standardized breakfast and collected all urine voids on one control day (CON) and 1 day after consuming a standardized breakfast and a randomized and double-blinded supplement (SUP) over 3 weeks. Participants replicated exercise and diet for one day before CON, and throughout CON and SUP. Ucol, Usg, Uosm, and urine volume were measured in all 24-hr samples, and Ucol and Usg were measured in all single samples. Ucol was a significant predictor of single sample Usg after all supplements (p supplementation (p = .20, p = .21). Further, there was a significant difference between CON and SUP 24-h Ucol only after riboflavin supplementation (p supplementation when classifying hydration status and use a combination of urinary biomarkers (e.g., Usg and Ucol), both acutely and over 24 hr.

  11. Planetary Atmospheric Electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Leblanc, F; Yair, Y; Harrison, R. G; Lebreton, J. P; Blanc, M

    2008-01-01

    This volume presents our contemporary understanding of atmospheric electricity at Earth and in other solar system atmospheres. It is written by experts in terrestrial atmospheric electricity and planetary scientists. Many of the key issues related to planetary atmospheric electricity are discussed. The physics presented in this book includes ionisation processes in planetary atmospheres, charge generation and separation, and a discussion of electromagnetic signatures of atmospheric discharges. The measurement of thunderstorms and lightning, including its effects and hazards, is highlighted by articles on ground and space based instrumentation, and new missions.Theory and modelling of planetary atmospheric electricity complete this review of the research that is undertaken in this exciting field of space science. This book is an essential research tool for space scientists and geoscientists interested in electrical effects in atmospheres and planetary systems. Graduate students and researchers who are new to t...

  12. Our shared atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our atmosphere is a precious and fascinating resource, providing air to breath, shielding us from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UV), and maintaining a comfortable climate. Since the industrial revolution, people have significantly altered the composition of the atmosphere throu...

  13. Dietary supplements for dysmenorrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanittum, Porjai; Kunyanone, Naowarat; Brown, Julie; Sangkomkamhang, Ussanee S; Barnes, Joanne; Seyfoddin, Vahid; Marjoribanks, Jane

    2016-03-22

    Dysmenorrhoea refers to painful menstrual cramps and is a common gynaecological complaint. Conventional treatments include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and oral contraceptive pills (OCPs), which both reduce myometrial activity (contractions of the uterus). A suggested alternative approach is dietary supplements. We used the term 'dietary supplement' to include herbs or other botanical, vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and amino acids. We excluded traditional Chinese medicines. To determine the efficacy and safety of dietary supplements for treating dysmenorrhoea. We searched sources including the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, PsycINFO (all from inception to 23 March 2015), trial registries, and the reference lists of relevant articles. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of dietary supplements for moderate or severe primary or secondary dysmenorrhoea. We excluded studies of women with an intrauterine device. Eligible comparators were other dietary supplements, placebo, no treatment, or conventional analgesia. Two review authors independently performed study selection, performed data extraction and assessed the risk of bias in the included trials. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and adverse effects. We used a fixed-effect model to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for dichotomous data, and mean differences (MDs) or standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous data, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We presented data that were unsuitable for analysis either descriptively or in additional tables. We assessed the quality of the evidence using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methods. We included 27 RCTs (3101 women). Most included studies were conducted amongst cohorts of students with primary dysmenorrhoea in their late teens or early twenties. Twenty-two studies were

  14. Special supplement introduction: hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernyhough, Charles; Waters, Flavie

    2014-07-01

    This Special Supplement presents reports from 11 working groups of the interdisciplinary International Consortium on Hallucination Research meeting in Durham, UK, September 2013. Topics include psychological therapies for auditory hallucinations, culture and hallucinations, hallucinations in children and adolescents, visual hallucinations, interdisciplinary approaches to the phenomenology of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs), AVHs in persons without need for care, a multisite study of the PSYRATS instrument, subtypes of AVHs, the Hearing Voices Movement, Research Domain Criteria for hallucinations, and cortical specialization as a route to understanding hallucinations. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  15. Accounting standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stellinga, B.; Mügge, D.

    2014-01-01

    The European and global regulation of accounting standards have witnessed remarkable changes over the past twenty years. In the early 1990s, EU accounting practices were fragmented along national lines and US accounting standards were the de facto global standards. Since 2005, all EU listed

  16. Strategic technology policy as a supplement to renewable energy standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, Carolyn; Greaker, Mads; Rosendahl, Knut Einar

    2018-01-01

    In many regions, renewable energy targets are a primary decarbonization policy. Most of the same jurisdictions also subsidize the manufacturing and/or deployment of renewable energy technologies, some being sufficiently aggressive as to engender WTO disputes. We consider a downstream energy-using

  17. Atmospheric water harvester

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-10

    Sep 10, 2017 ... ... involve condensation and precipitation. So, in order to examine the potential water in the atmosphere, atmospheric water harvester model was developed since it is one of the sustainable alternative water resources [6]. Normally, the atmosphere contains water in the form of water vapor, moisture and so ...

  18. Atmospheric refraction : a history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehn, WH; van der Werf, S

    2005-01-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of

  19. A Ground-based validation of GOSAT-observed atmospheric CO2 in Inner-Mongolian grasslands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, X; Lei, L; Zeng, Z; Kawasaki, M; Oohasi, M

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is a long-lived greenhouse gas that significantly contributes to global warming. Long-term and continuous measurements of atmospheric CO 2 to investigate its global distribution and concentration variations are important for accurately understanding its potential climatic effects. Satellite measurements from space can offer atmospheric CO 2 data for climate change research. For that, ground-based measurements are required for validation and improving the precision of satellite-measured CO 2 . We implemented observation experiment of CO 2 column densities in the Xilinguole grasslands in Inner Mongolia, China, using a ground-based measurement system, which mainly consists of an optical spectrum analyzer (OSA), a sun tracker and a notebook controller. Measurements from our ground-based system were analyzed and compared with those from the Greenhouse gas Observation SATellite (GOSAT). The ground-based measurements had an average value of 389.46 ppm, which was 2.4 ppm larger than from GOSAT, with a standard deviation of 3.4 ppm. This result is slightly larger than the difference between GOSAT and the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). This study highlights the usefulness of the ground-based OSA measurement system for analyzing atmospheric CO 2 column densities, which is expected to supplement the current TCCON network

  20. ?-Alanine supplementation and military performance

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Jay R.; Stout, Jeffrey R.; Harris, Roger C.; Moran, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    During sustained high-intensity military training or simulated combat exercises, significant decreases in physical performance measures are often seen. The use of dietary supplements is becoming increasingly popular among military personnel, with more than half of the US soldiers deployed or garrisoned reported to using dietary supplements. ?-Alanine is a popular supplement used primarily by strength and power athletes to enhance performance, as well as training aimed at improving muscle grow...

  1. Issues in Nutrition: Dietary Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Margaret E; Noel, Mary Barth

    2017-01-01

    The majority of American adults report use of one or more dietary supplements every day or occasionally. The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 defines dietary supplements and regulates their manufacture and distribution. One of the most commonly used supplements is vitamin D. Measurement of serum levels of vitamin D must be undertaken with the caveats that different laboratories define normal levels differently, and that there is rarely a clinical correlation with the actual level. Patients should understand that supplements should not be used to excess, as there are toxicities and other adverse effects associated with most of them. There currently is considerable research being performed on probiotics and how the gut microbiome affects health and disease states. Protein supplements may be useful in reducing mortality rates in elderly patients but they do not appear to increase quality of life. If used, protein supplements should contain essential amino acids. Casein and whey supplements, derived from dairy sources, help transport essential amino acids to tissues. Although there have been many studies investigating the role of vitamin supplements in disease prevention, there have been few conclusive positive results. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  2. Lead in calcium supplements (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, S.; Khalid, N.

    2011-01-01

    Lead present in calcium supplements is of grave concern as some lead levels have been measured up to the extent of regulatory limit set by the United States. Calcium supplements inevitably get contaminated with lead as both are naturally occurring elements. Therefore, it is imperative to indicate its level in these supplements in order to create awareness among consumers. In this study, a sophisticated analytical technique, atomic absorption spectrometry was used to analyze Pb contents in 27 commonly consumed Ca supplements manufactured by different national and multinational companies. The daily intake of lead through these supplements was calculated. Only 10% of the calcium supplements analyzed met the criteria of acceptable Pb levels (1.5 mu g/daily dose) in supplements/consumer products set by the United States. It was also found that Pb intake was highest in chelated calcium supplements 28.5 mu g/daily dose, whereas lowest 0.47 mu g/daily dose through calcium supplements with vitamin D formulation. In order to validate our results from the study conducted, IAEA-certified reference material (animal bone, H-5) was analyzed for its Pb levels. The levels of Pb determined were quite in good agreement with the certified values. (author)

  3. Dietary supplements for aquatic sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derave, Wim; Tipton, Kevin D

    2014-08-01

    Many athletes use dietary supplements, with use more prevalent among those competing at the highest level. Supplements are often self-prescribed, and their use is likely to be based on an inadequate understanding of the issues at stake. Supplementation with essential micronutrients may be useful when a diagnosed deficiency cannot be promptly and effectively corrected with food-based dietary solutions. When used in high doses, some supplements may do more harm than good: Iron supplementation, for example, is potentially harmful. There is good evidence from laboratory studies and some evidence from field studies to support health or performance benefits from appropriate use of a few supplements. The available evidence from studies of aquatic sports is small and is often contradictory. Evidence from elite performers is almost entirely absent, but some athletes may benefit from informed use of creatine, caffeine, and buffering agents. Poor quality assurance in some parts of the dietary supplements industry raises concerns about the safety of some products. Some do not contain the active ingredients listed on the label, and some contain toxic substances, including prescription drugs, that can cause health problems. Some supplements contain compounds that will cause an athlete to fail a doping test. Supplement quality assurance programs can reduce, but not entirely eliminate, this risk.

  4. Bodybuilding supplementation and tooth decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M S; Batley, H; Ahmed, F

    2015-07-10

    Supplementation is a key component in bodybuilding and is increasingly being used by amateur weight lifters and enthusiasts to build their ideal bodies. Bodybuilding supplements are advertised to provide nutrients needed to help optimise muscle building but they can contain high amounts of sugar. Supplement users are consuming these products, while not being aware of their high sugar content, putting them at a higher risk of developing dental caries. It is important for dental professionals to recognise the increased risk for supplement users and to raise awareness, provide appropriate preventative advice and be knowledgeable of alternative products to help bodybuilders reach their goals, without increasing the risk of dental caries.

  5. Daily oral iron supplementation during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; De-Regil, Luz Maria; Dowswell, Therese; Viteri, Fernando E

    2014-01-01

    Background Iron and folic acid supplementation has been the preferred intervention to improve iron stores and prevent anaemia among pregnant women, and it may also improve other maternal and birth outcomes. Objectives To assess the effects of daily oral iron supplements for pregnant women, either alone or in conjunction with folic acid, or with other vitamins and minerals as a public health intervention. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (2 July 2012). We also searched the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (2 July 2012) and contacted relevant organisations for the identification of ongoing and unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomised or quasi-randomised trials evaluating the effects of oral preventive supplementation with daily iron, iron + folic acid or iron + other vitamins and minerals during pregnancy. Data collection and analysis We assessed the methodological quality of trials using standard Cochrane criteria. Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and conducted checks for accuracy. Main results We included 60 trials. Forty-three trials, involving more than 27,402 women, contributed data and compared the effects of daily oral supplements containing iron versus no iron or placebo. Overall, women taking iron supplements were less likely to have low birthweight newborns (below 2500 g) compared with controls (8.4% versus 10.2%, average risk ratio (RR) 0.81; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68 to 0.97, 11 trials, 8480 women) and mean birthweight was 30.81 g greater for those infants whose mothers received iron during pregnancy (average mean difference (MD) 30.81; 95% CI 5.94 to 55.68, 14 trials, 9385 women). Preventive iron supplementation reduced the risk of maternal anaemia at term by 70% (RR 0.30; 95% CI 0.19 to 0.46, 14 trials, 2199 women) and iron deficiency at term by 57% (RR 0.43; 95% CI 0.27 to 0.66, seven trials, 1256 women

  6. Atmospheric Habitable Zones in Y Dwarf Atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, Jack S.; Palmer, Paul I.; Biller, Beth; Cockell, Charles S.

    2017-01-01

    We use a simple organism lifecycle model to explore the viability of an atmospheric habitable zone (AHZ), with temperatures that could support Earth-centric life, which sits above an environment that does not support life. To illustrate our model, we use a cool Y dwarf atmosphere, such as WISE J085510.83–0714442.5, whose 4.5–5.2 μ m spectrum shows absorption features consistent with water vapor and clouds. We allow organisms to adapt to their atmospheric environment (described by temperature, convection, and gravity) by adopting different growth strategies that maximize their chance of survival and proliferation. We assume a constant upward vertical velocity through the AHZ. We found that the organism growth strategy is most sensitive to the magnitude of the atmospheric convection. Stronger convection supports the evolution of more massive organisms. For a purely radiative environment, we find that evolved organisms have a mass that is an order of magnitude smaller than terrestrial microbes, thereby defining a dynamical constraint on the dimensions of life that an AHZ can support. Based on a previously defined statistical approach, we infer that there are of the order of 10"9 cool Y brown dwarfs in the Milky Way, and likely a few tens of these objects are within 10 pc from Earth. Our work also has implications for exploring life in the atmospheres of temperate gas giants. Consideration of the habitable volumes in planetary atmospheres significantly increases the volume of habitable space in the galaxy.

  7. Atmospheric Habitable Zones in Y Dwarf Atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, Jack S.; Palmer, Paul I. [School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Biller, Beth; Cockell, Charles S., E-mail: j.s.yates@ed.ac.uk [Centre for Exoplanet Science, University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-20

    We use a simple organism lifecycle model to explore the viability of an atmospheric habitable zone (AHZ), with temperatures that could support Earth-centric life, which sits above an environment that does not support life. To illustrate our model, we use a cool Y dwarf atmosphere, such as WISE J085510.83–0714442.5, whose 4.5–5.2 μ m spectrum shows absorption features consistent with water vapor and clouds. We allow organisms to adapt to their atmospheric environment (described by temperature, convection, and gravity) by adopting different growth strategies that maximize their chance of survival and proliferation. We assume a constant upward vertical velocity through the AHZ. We found that the organism growth strategy is most sensitive to the magnitude of the atmospheric convection. Stronger convection supports the evolution of more massive organisms. For a purely radiative environment, we find that evolved organisms have a mass that is an order of magnitude smaller than terrestrial microbes, thereby defining a dynamical constraint on the dimensions of life that an AHZ can support. Based on a previously defined statistical approach, we infer that there are of the order of 10{sup 9} cool Y brown dwarfs in the Milky Way, and likely a few tens of these objects are within 10 pc from Earth. Our work also has implications for exploring life in the atmospheres of temperate gas giants. Consideration of the habitable volumes in planetary atmospheres significantly increases the volume of habitable space in the galaxy.

  8. Botanical supplements: detecting the transition from ingredients to supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methods were developed using flow injection mass spectrometry (FIMS) and chemometrics for the comparison of spectral similarities and differences of 3 botanical ingredients and their supplements: Echinacea purpurea aerial samples and solid and liquid supplements, E. purpurea root samples and solid s...

  9. Intermittent oral iron supplementation during pregnancy (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; De-Regil, Luz Maria; Dowswell, Therese; Viteri, Fernando E

    2014-01-01

    Background Anaemia is a frequent condition during pregnancy, particularly among women from developing countries who have insufficient iron intake to meet increased iron needs of both the mother and the fetus. Traditionally, gestational anaemia has been prevented with the provision of daily iron supplements throughout pregnancy, but adherence to this regimen due to side effects, interrupted supply of the supplements, and concerns about safety among women with an adequate iron intake, have limited the use of this intervention. Intermittent (i.e. one, two or three times a week on non-consecutive days) supplementation with iron alone or in combination with folic acid or other vitamins and minerals has recently been proposed as an alternative to daily supplementation. Objectives To assess the benefits and harms of intermittent supplementation with iron alone or in combination with folic acid or other vitamins and minerals to pregnant women on neonatal and pregnancy outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (23 March 2012). We also searched the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) for ongoing studies and contacted relevant organisations for the identification of ongoing and unpublished studies (23 March 2012). Selection criteria Randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Data collection and analysis We assessed the methodological quality of trials using standard Cochrane criteria. Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and conducted checks for accuracy. Main results This review includes 21 trials from 13 different countries, but only 18 trials (with 4072 women) reported on our outcomes of interest and contributed data to the review. All of these studies compared daily versus intermittent iron supplementation. Three studies provided iron alone, 12 iron+folic acid and three more iron plus multiple vitamins and minerals. Their methodological quality was mixed

  10. Issues with fruit dietary supplements in the US - authentication by anthocyanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current fruit-based dietary supplements in the US marketplace have no obligation to meet any fruit-component concentration requirement. For example, berry supplements might be promoted for their high anthocyanin content, but they actually have no standard or minimum anthocyanin threshold for legal s...

  11. Clinical observations on the effects of elemental diet supplementation during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    A study has been conducted to assess the effects of adding an elemental diet as a supplement to a standard low-roughage diet recommended to a group of patients receiving a fractionated course of abdominal irradiation. The supplement was not found to modify patient experience of radiotherapy-induced complications. (author)

  12. Iron bioavailability from commercially available iron supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christides, Tatiana; Wray, David; McBride, Richard; Fairweather, Rose; Sharp, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a global public health problem. Treatment with the standard of care ferrous iron salts may be poorly tolerated, leading to non-compliance and ineffective correction of IDA. Employing supplements with higher bioavailability might permit lower doses of iron to be used with fewer side effects, thus improving treatment efficacy. Here, we compared the iron bioavailability of ferrous sulphate tablets with alternative commercial iron products, including three liquid-based supplements. Iron bioavailability was measured using Caco-2 cells with ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA followed by either Dunnett's or Tukey's multiple comparisons tests. Spatone Apple(®) (a naturally iron-rich mineral water with added ascorbate) and Iron Vital F(®) (a synthetic liquid iron supplement) had the highest iron bioavailability. There was no statistical difference between iron uptake from ferrous sulphate tablets, Spatone(®) (naturally iron-rich mineral water alone) and Pregnacare Original(®) (a multimineral/multivitamin tablet). In our in vitro model, naturally iron-rich mineral waters and synthetic liquid iron formulations have equivalent or better bioavailability compared with ferrous iron sulphate tablets. If these results are confirmed in vivo, this would mean that at-risk groups of IDA could be offered a greater choice of more bioavailable and potentially better tolerated iron preparations.

  13. Communications standards

    CERN Document Server

    Stokes, A V

    1986-01-01

    Communications Standards deals with the standardization of computer communication networks. This book examines the types of local area networks (LANs) that have been developed and looks at some of the relevant protocols in more detail. The work of Project 802 is briefly discussed, along with a protocol which has developed from one of the LAN standards and is now a de facto standard in one particular area, namely the Manufacturing Automation Protocol (MAP). Factors that affect the usage of networks, such as network management and security, are also considered. This book is divided into three se

  14. Food Components and Supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr

    2012-01-01

    The major part of food consists of chemical compounds that can be used for energy production, biological synthesis, or maintenance of metabolic processes by the host. These components are defined as nutrients, and can be categorized into macronutrients (proteins, carbohydrates, triglycerides......, and alcohol), minerals, and micronutrients. The latter category comprises 13 vitamins and a hand full of trace elements. Many micronutrients are used as food supplements and are ingested at doses exceeding the amounts that can be consumed along with food by a factor of 10–100. Both macro- and micronutrients...... can interact with enzyme systems related to xenobiotic metabolism either by regulation of their expression or direct interference with their enzymatic activity. During food consumption, we consume a wide range of xenobiotics along with the consumable food, either as an original part of the food (e...

  15. Music: Supplemental Material: Chorus, Junior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Maralyn D.

    This document is a supplement to TE 499 767, presented in this issue. The contents are similar to the original document, but the supplement expands on the subject of "Course Procedures, Strategies, and Suggested Learning Activities." Resources for the Pupil and Teacher are listed. A Choral Written Test and a True and False Test conclude…

  16. Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) prescribes several approaches to achieve its goal of doubling the salmon and steelhead runs of the Columbia River. Among those approaches are habitat restoration, improvements in adult and juvenile passage at dams and artificial propagation. Supplementation will be a major part of the new hatchery programs. The purpose of the Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) is to provide an overview of ongoing and planned supplementation activities, to construct a conceptual framework and model for evaluating the potential benefits and risks of supplementation and to develop a plan for better regional coordination of research and monitoring and evaluation of supplementation. RASP has completed its first year of work. Progress toward meeting the first year's objectives and recommendations for future tasks are contained in this report

  17. Nutritional Supplements for Endurance Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Christopher J.

    Athletes engaged in heavy endurance training often seek additional nutritional strategies to help maximize performance. Specific nutritional supplements exist to combat certain factors that limit performance beginning with a sound everyday diet. Research has further demonstrated that safe, effective, legal supplements are in fact available for today's endurance athletes. Several of these supplements are marketed not only to aid performance but also to combat the immunosuppressive effects of intense endurance training. It is imperative for each athlete to research the legality of certain supplements for their specific sport or event. Once the legality has been established, it is often up to each individual athlete to decipher the ethics involved with ingesting nutritional supplements with the sole intent of improving performance.

  18. Supplemental Reading for Ninth Graders: Classic or Young Adult Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Katherine Jane Roney

    2012-01-01

    The project addressed the debate over supplemental literature: young adult or classic selections to better support teaching ninth graders Tennessee's English I curriculum standards. Research supported both classical and contemporary literature for teaching ninth graders, making it difficult to determine which type of literature might produce the…

  19. Utilisation of enzyme supplemented groundnut cake based diets by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 300, twenty weeks old laying hens were used in a feeding trial to evaluate the utilisation of Peanut meal popularly called groundnut cake (GNC) based diets supplemented with enzymes by laying hens. Five dietary treatments were formulated to meet standard nutrient requirements of layers viz: 1. maize- soya ...

  20. Use of hormones and nutritional supplements among gyms′ attendees in Riyadh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman A Alshammari

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Approximately half of the participants who regularly exercised in gyms took nutritional supplements, and most had received their information from nonhealth professionals. There was an association between the duration of exercise and the use of hormones and supplements. Fewer than half of hormone users had obtained a health-care provider′s advice before taking it. The atmosphere in the gym can play an important role in members′ decisions. Educating gym employees and members may have a positive influence on the use of supplements and hormones.

  1. Fair weather atmospheric electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R G

    2011-01-01

    Not long after Franklin's iconic studies, an atmospheric electric field was discovered in 'fair weather' regions, well away from thunderstorms. The origin of the fair weather field was sought by Lord Kelvin, through development of electrostatic instrumentation and early data logging techniques, but was ultimately explained through the global circuit model of C.T.R. Wilson. In Wilson's model, charge exchanged by disturbed weather electrifies the ionosphere, and returns via a small vertical current density in fair weather regions. New insights into the relevance of fair weather atmospheric electricity to terrestrial and planetary atmospheres are now emerging. For example, there is a possible role of the global circuit current density in atmospheric processes, such as cloud formation. Beyond natural atmospheric processes, a novel practical application is the use of early atmospheric electrostatic investigations to provide quantitative information on past urban air pollution.

  2. Pluto's atmosphere near perihelion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trafton, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    A recent stellar occultation has confirmed predictions that Pluto has an atmosphere which is sufficiently thick to uniformly envelope the planet and to extend far above the surface. Pluto's atmosphere consists of methane and perhaps other volatile gases at temperatures below their freezing points; it should regulate the surface temperature of its volatile ices to a globally uniform value. As Pluto approaches and passes through perihelion, a seasonal maximum in the atmospheric bulk and a corresponding minimum in the exposed volatile ice abundance is expected to occur. The lag in maximum atmospheric bulk relative to perihelion will be diagnostic of the surface thermal properties. An estimate of Pluto's atmospheric bulk may result if a global darkening (resulting from the disappearance of the seasonally deposited frosts) occurs before the time of maximum atmospheric bulk. The ice deposited shortly after perihelion may be diagnostic of the composition of Pluto's volatile reservoir

  3. Atmosphere physics and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delmas, R.; Megie, G.; Peuch, V.H.

    2005-10-01

    Since the 1970's, the awareness about the atmospheric pollution threat has led to a spectacular development of the researches on the complex interactions between the chemical composition of the atmosphere and the climate. This book makes a synthesis of the state-of-the-art in this very active domain of research. Content: introduction, atmosphere dynamics and transport, matter-radiation interaction and radiant transfer, physico-chemical processes, atmospheric aerosol and heterogenous chemistry, anthropic and natural emissions and deposition, stratospheric chemical system, tropospheric chemical system, polluted boundary layer, paleo-environments and ice archives, role of atmospheric chemistry in global changes, measurement principles and instruments, numerical modeling, experimental strategy, regulation and management of the atmospheric environment, index. (J.S.)

  4. Drugs, Herbs and Supplements: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/druginformation.html Drugs, Herbs and Supplements To use the sharing features on this page, ... included in drug packages, see DailyMed . Herbs and Supplements Browse dietary supplements and herbal remedies to learn ...

  5. Dietary Supplements: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Home Food Resources for You Consumers Dietary Supplements: What You Need to Know Share Tweet Linkedin ... and nutrients you personally need. What are dietary supplements? Dietary supplements include such ingredients as vitamins, minerals, ...

  6. Achieving Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    competitive, national customs and regional economic organizations are seeking to establish a standardized solution for digital reporting of customs data. However, standardization has proven hard to achieve in the socio-technical e-Customs solution. In this chapter, the authors identify and describe what has......International e-Customs is going through a standardization process. Driven by the need to increase control in the trade process to address security challenges stemming from threats of terrorists, diseases, and counterfeit products, and to lower the administrative burdens on traders to stay...... to be harmonized in order for a global company to perceive e-Customs as standardized. In doing so, they contribute an explanation of the challenges associated with using a standardization mechanism for harmonizing socio-technical information systems....

  7. Achieving Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    competitive, national customs and regional economic organizations are seeking to establish a standardized solution for digital reporting of customs data. However, standardization has proven hard to achieve in the socio-technical e-Customs solution. In this chapter, the authors identify and describe what has......International e-Customs is going through a standardization process. Driven by the need to increase control in the trade process to address security challenges stemming from threats of terrorists, diseases, and counterfeit products, and to lower the administrative burdens on traders to stay...... to be harmonized in order for a global company to perceive e-Customs as standardized. In doing so, they contribute an explanation of the challenges associated with using a standardization mechanism for harmonizing socio-technical information systems....

  8. Training Standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2003-01-01

    The article describes the benefits of and required process and recommendations for implementing the standardization of training in the nuclear power industry in the United States and abroad. Current Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) enable training standardization in the nuclear power industry. The delivery of training through the Internet, Intranet and video over IP will facilitate this standardization and bring multiple benefits to the nuclear power industry worldwide. As the amount of available qualified and experienced professionals decreases because of retirements and fewer nuclear engineering institutions, standardized training will help increase the number of available professionals in the industry. Technology will make it possible to use the experience of retired professionals who may be interested in working part-time from a remote location. Well-planned standardized training will prevent a fragmented approach among utilities, and it will save the industry considerable resources in the long run. It will also ensure cost-effective and safe nuclear power plant operation

  9. Sources of atmospheric ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harriss, R.C.; Michaels, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    The information available on factors that influence emissions from the principal societal sources of ammonia to the atmosphere, namely combustion processes, volatilization of farm animal wastes, and volatilization of fertilizers, is reviewed. Emission factors are established for each major source of atmospheric ammonia. The factors are then multiplied by appropriate source characterization descriptors to obtain calculated fluxes of ammonia to the atmosphere on a state-by-state basis for the United States

  10. Understanding Callisto's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John

    2016-10-01

    We plan to address first-order questions about the nature and origin of the mysterious atmosphere of Callisto, including its composition, longitudinal distribution, formation, and support mechanisms. This investigation is made possible by the remarkable sensitivity of the COS instrument, which has recently detected faint 1304 A and 1356 A O I emission from Callisto's leading / Jupiter-facing quadrant. The emission is probably due to dissociation of O2 molecules in Callisto's atmosphere by photo-electrons, and resonant scattering from an extended atomic O corona. We suspect, from Galileo ionospheric data, that the atmosphere may be much denser, and brighter in emission, on the trailing hemisphere, as expected for a sputter-generated atmosphere, and propose to test the sputter generation hypothesis with 4-orbit COS integrations on the leading and trailing hemispheres. If the trailing side emissions are indeed brighter, the improved SNR there will also allow much improved determination of atmospheric and coronal composition and optical depth. The observations will set the stage for, and aid in planning of, the extensive observations of Callisto's environment planned for the JUICE mission. Because Callisto's atmospheric oxygen emissions are indirectly illuminated by sunlight, which is uniform and quantifiable, it is much easier to understand atmospheric spatial distribution, and thus origin, than on Europa and Ganymede were emissions depend on magnetospheric excitation which is spatially variable and poorly understood. Callisto's atmosphere thus provides a unique chance to better understand the oxygen atmospheres of all the icy Galilean moons.

  11. Designing Dynamic Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinch, Sofie; Højlund, Marie

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the notion of atmospheres from a designerly perspective, and discusses temporal challenges facing interaction designers when acknowledging the dynamic character of it. As atmospheres are created in the relation between body, space, and time, a pragmatic approach seems useful,....... The potentials and implica-­‐ tions are presented through a design case, Kidkit, highlighting temporality as design parametre within interaction design.......This paper addresses the notion of atmospheres from a designerly perspective, and discusses temporal challenges facing interaction designers when acknowledging the dynamic character of it. As atmospheres are created in the relation between body, space, and time, a pragmatic approach seems useful...

  12. Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML) is one of the nation's leading research facilities for understanding aerosols, clouds, and their interactions. The AML...

  13. Io's tenuous atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.V.; Matson, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation is made of observational evidence adduced to date for the various extant models of the Io atmosphere. SO2 and its various photochemical products have been noted to play a major role in the atmosphere; such atomic species as Na and K are present in smaller quantities, and play an important role in the atmosphere's ion chemistry. The vapor pressure equilibrium between condensed SO 2 on the surface and the atmospheric gas is an important factor in the global control of SO 2 gas distribution, but cannot account for the neutral densities at the terminator required for ionospheric models in view of realistic surface temperature distributions

  14. Medicines, injections, and supplements for arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthritis - medications; Arthritis - steroid injections; Arthritis - supplements; Arthritis - hyaluronic acid ... in your joints. These two substances come in supplement form and can be bought over-the-counter. ...

  15. Dietary supplements containing prohibited substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bijl, P; Tutelyan, V A

    2013-01-01

    Dietary supplement use among athletes to enhance performance is proliferating as more individuals strive for obtaining that chemical competitive edge. As a result the concomitant use of dietary supplements containing performance-enhancing substances of those falling in the categories outlined in the current review, can also be expected to rise. This despite ever-increasing sophisticated analytical methodology techniques being used to assay dietary supplement and urine samples in doping laboratories. The reasons for this include that a variety of these chemical entities, many of them on the prohibited drug list of the WADA, are being produced on commercial scales in factories around the world (ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, sibutramine, methylhexaneamine, prohormones, 'classic' anabolic steroids, clenbuterol, peptide hormones etc.), aggressive marketing strategies are being employed by companies and these supplements can be easily ordered via e.g. the internet. It can also be anticipated that there will be an increase in the number of supplements containing 'designer' steroids and other 'newer' molecules. Chromatographic techniques combined with mass spectrometry leading to identification of molecular fragments and productions will assist in determining these substances. To prevent accidental doping, information regarding dietary supplements must be provided to athletes, coaches and sports doctors at all levels of competition. The risks of accidental doping via dietary supplement ingestion can be minimized by using 'safe' products listed on databases, e.g. such as those available in The Netherlands and Germany.

  16. Authentication of Herbal Supplements Using Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Natalia V; Kuzmina, Maria L; Braukmann, Thomas W A; Borisenko, Alex V; Zakharov, Evgeny V

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based testing has been gaining acceptance as a tool for authentication of a wide range of food products; however, its applicability for testing of herbal supplements remains contentious. We utilized Sanger and Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) for taxonomic authentication of fifteen herbal supplements representing three different producers from five medicinal plants: Echinacea purpurea, Valeriana officinalis, Ginkgo biloba, Hypericum perforatum and Trigonella foenum-graecum. Experimental design included three modifications of DNA extraction, two lysate dilutions, Internal Amplification Control, and multiple negative controls to exclude background contamination. Ginkgo supplements were also analyzed using HPLC-MS for the presence of active medicinal components. All supplements yielded DNA from multiple species, rendering Sanger sequencing results for rbcL and ITS2 regions either uninterpretable or non-reproducible between the experimental replicates. Overall, DNA from the manufacturer-listed medicinal plants was successfully detected in seven out of eight dry herb form supplements; however, low or poor DNA recovery due to degradation was observed in most plant extracts (none detected by Sanger; three out of seven-by NGS). NGS also revealed a diverse community of fungi, known to be associated with live plant material and/or the fermentation process used in the production of plant extracts. HPLC-MS testing demonstrated that Ginkgo supplements with degraded DNA contained ten key medicinal components. Quality control of herbal supplements should utilize a synergetic approach targeting both DNA and bioactive components, especially for standardized extracts with degraded DNA. The NGS workflow developed in this study enables reliable detection of plant and fungal DNA and can be utilized by manufacturers for quality assurance of raw plant materials, contamination control during the production process, and the final product. Interpretation of results should involve an

  17. Authentication of Herbal Supplements Using Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V Ivanova

    Full Text Available DNA-based testing has been gaining acceptance as a tool for authentication of a wide range of food products; however, its applicability for testing of herbal supplements remains contentious.We utilized Sanger and Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS for taxonomic authentication of fifteen herbal supplements representing three different producers from five medicinal plants: Echinacea purpurea, Valeriana officinalis, Ginkgo biloba, Hypericum perforatum and Trigonella foenum-graecum. Experimental design included three modifications of DNA extraction, two lysate dilutions, Internal Amplification Control, and multiple negative controls to exclude background contamination. Ginkgo supplements were also analyzed using HPLC-MS for the presence of active medicinal components.All supplements yielded DNA from multiple species, rendering Sanger sequencing results for rbcL and ITS2 regions either uninterpretable or non-reproducible between the experimental replicates. Overall, DNA from the manufacturer-listed medicinal plants was successfully detected in seven out of eight dry herb form supplements; however, low or poor DNA recovery due to degradation was observed in most plant extracts (none detected by Sanger; three out of seven-by NGS. NGS also revealed a diverse community of fungi, known to be associated with live plant material and/or the fermentation process used in the production of plant extracts. HPLC-MS testing demonstrated that Ginkgo supplements with degraded DNA contained ten key medicinal components.Quality control of herbal supplements should utilize a synergetic approach targeting both DNA and bioactive components, especially for standardized extracts with degraded DNA. The NGS workflow developed in this study enables reliable detection of plant and fungal DNA and can be utilized by manufacturers for quality assurance of raw plant materials, contamination control during the production process, and the final product. Interpretation of results should

  18. Urban atmospheric contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldasano Jose, M.

    1997-01-01

    The problems of contamination are not only limited to this century, pale pathology evidences of the effects of the contamination of the air exist in interiors in the health of the old ones; the article mention the elements that configure the problem of the atmospheric contamination, atmospheric pollutants and emission sources, orography condition and effects induced by the urbanization process

  19. The Power of Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2014-01-01

    composed of bubbles of affects – that is, the particles that are charged with power and normativity. References Grtiffero, T. (2014 (2010)). Atmospheres: Aesthetics of Emotional Spaces. Ashgate Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos, A. (2013). Atmospheres of law: Senses, affects, lawscapes, in Emotion, Space...

  20. Atmosphere and Heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ventzel Riis, Nina

    2012-01-01

    -between of the materials. This is what we identify as atmosphere, an enveloping phenomenon that surrounds and affects our sensuous system and well-being when we approach, enter, stay or move in a building. When we leave the building again we carry this atmospheric multi-sensory experience with us without adequate methods...

  1. Solar and atmospheric four-neutrino oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    González-Garciá, M Concepción; Peña-Garay, C

    2001-01-01

    We present an analysis of the neutrino oscillation solutions of the solar and atmospheric neutrino problems in the framework of four--neutrino mixing where a sterile neutrino is added to the three standard ones and the mass spectra presents two separated doublets. Such scenarios allow for simultaneous transitions of solar $\

  2. DOE standard: Radiological control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ''Occupational Radiation Protection''. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835

  3. DOE standard: Radiological control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

  4. Intensifying the Atmospheric

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebst, Lasse Suonperä

    2012-01-01

    understanding of atmospheres as aesthetically ‘radiating’ from the surfaces of space, thinks physiognomically, the article argues for a spatial morphological perspective on atmospheres. Thus, post-phenomeno¬logically, it is argued that the atmospheric given is given by the density of pedestrians, which...... are ‘compressed’ by the spatial morphologies of urban space. In this perspective atmospheres are to be understood as an emergent property that develops when the spatial morphological compression of urban life passes a certain threshold, that is, when the affective rhythm of the urban assemblages becomes...... sufficiently intense. All things considered, the paper should be read as a sociological contribution to theoretically reconstruct the concept of urban atmospheres in the light of spatial morphology....

  5. Titan's Lower Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Caitlin Ann

    2007-09-01

    Saturn's largest moon, Titan, sports an atmosphere 10 times thicker than Earth's. Like Earth, the moon's atmosphere is N2 based and possesses a rich organic chemistry. In addition, similar to the terrestrial hydrological cycle, Titan has a methane cycle, with methane clouds, rain and seas. Presently, there is a revolution in our understanding of the moon, as data flows in and is analyzed from the NASA and ESA Cassini-Huygens mission. For example, seas were detected only this year. Here I will discuss the evolution of our understanding of Titan's atmosphere, its composition, chemistry, dynamics and origin. Current open questions will also be presented. Studies of Titan's atmosphere began and evolved to the present state in less time than that of a single scientist's career. This short interlude of activity demonstrates the rigors of the scientific method, and raises enticing questions about the workings and evolution of an atmosphere.

  6. Helicobacter pylori eradication: sequential therapy and Lactobacillus reuteri supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efrati, Cesare; Nicolini, Giorgia; Cannaviello, Claudio; O'Sed, Nicole Piazza; Valabrega, Stefano

    2012-11-21

    a low incidence of adverse effects in all groups of patients with sequential therapy, probably due to the presence of the L. reuteri supplementation. The sequential treatment regimen achieved a significantly higher eradication rate of H. pylori compared with standard 7-d regimen. L. reuteri supplementation could reduce the frequency and the intensity of antibiotic-associated side-effects.

  7. 16 CFR 1203.53 - Interim safety standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...—CAN/CSA-D113.2-M89, (4) Snell Memorial Foundation (Snell) 1990 Standard for Protective Headgear for Use in Bicycling (designation B-90), ( 5) Snell 1990 Standard for Protective Headgear for Use in Bicycling, including March 9, 1994 Supplement (designation B-90S), (6) Snell 1994 Standard for Protective...

  8. Minimum Standards for Alaska School Buses. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Office of Public Information and Publications.

    A supplement to National School Bus Minimum Standards contains standards that refer to equipment that must be part of the bus body or part of the chassis of a bus used to transport school children to and from school in Alaska. Standards of "activity" buses that are used to transport school children to and from authorized school…

  9. Added Value via SPI supplement

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Supplement that indicates where to find the source data sets on the EPA system. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Bowden, J., K.D. Talgo, T....

  10. Medicare and Medicaid Statistical Supplement

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Office of Enterprise Data and Analytics (OEDA) produced an annual Medicare and Medicaid Statistical Supplement report providing detailed statistical...

  11. Vitamin Supplements: Healthy or Hoax?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to vitamin and mineral success is eating a balanced diet. Before taking vitamin and mineral supplements, talk to ... healthy diet. There’s just no substitute for a balanced, nutritious diet that limits excess calories, saturated fat, trans fat, ...

  12. Herbal Supplements: Cause for Concern?

    OpenAIRE

    Borrione, Paolo; Luigi, Luigi Di; Maffulli, Nicola; Pigozzi, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    More than 1400 herbal products or herbal-derived compounds are commonly commercialised for health uses worldwide (Tyler, 1996). Herbs are considered dietary supplements, and therefore are subjected to a very limited form of regulation, and advertisements normally highlight their potential activities without mentioning any side effect. Also, herbs are generally believed to be 'natural', and hence safe. Many nutritional supplements contains herb compounds usually not present in the diet (e.g. G...

  13. Mineral supplementation for grazing ruminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, L.R.; Conrad, J.H.; Ellis, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    Grazing ruminants to which concentrate feeds cannot be economically fed must rely on self-feeding of mineral supplements. A number of factors affect mineral consumption of free-choice mixtures. Livestock exhibit little nutritional wisdom and will select palatable mixtures in preference to mixtures designed to meet their requirements. Palatability and appetite stimulators are often used to achieve a more uniform herd-wide consumption. It is best to formulate free-choice mixtures on the basis of analyses or other available data. However, when no information on mineral status is known, a free-choice complete mineral supplement is warranted. A 'complete' mineral mixture usually includes salt, a low fluoride P source, Ca, Co, Cu, I, Mn and Zn. Selenium, Mg, K, S, Fe or additional elements can be incorporated into a mineral supplement as new information suggests a need. The detriment to ruminant production caused by providing Ca, Se and Cu in excess can be greater than any benefit derived by providing a mineral supplement. In regions where high forage Mo predominates, three to five times the Cu content in mineral mixtures is needed to counteract Mo toxicity. Supplemental minerals are most critical during the wet season, when cattle are gaining weight rapidly and energy and protein supplies are adequate. Economic return on mineral supplementation is high. (author)

  14. Atmosphere Impact Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Hilke E.; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy

    2018-02-01

    Determining the origin of volatiles on terrestrial planets and quantifying atmospheric loss during planet formation is crucial for understanding the history and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Using geochemical observations of noble gases and major volatiles we determine what the present day inventory of volatiles tells us about the sources, the accretion process and the early differentiation of the Earth. We further quantify the key volatile loss mechanisms and the atmospheric loss history during Earth's formation. Volatiles were accreted throughout the Earth's formation, but Earth's early accretion history was volatile poor. Although nebular Ne and possible H in the deep mantle might be a fingerprint of this early accretion, most of the mantle does not remember this signature implying that volatile loss occurred during accretion. Present day geochemistry of volatiles shows no evidence of hydrodynamic escape as the isotopic compositions of most volatiles are chondritic. This suggests that atmospheric loss generated by impacts played a major role during Earth's formation. While many of the volatiles have chondritic isotopic ratios, their relative abundances are certainly not chondritic again suggesting volatile loss tied to impacts. Geochemical evidence of atmospheric loss comes from the {}3He/{}^{22}Ne, halogen ratios (e.g., F/Cl) and low H/N ratios. In addition, the geochemical ratios indicate that most of the water could have been delivered prior to the Moon forming impact and that the Moon forming impact did not drive off the ocean. Given the importance of impacts in determining the volatile budget of the Earth we examine the contributions to atmospheric loss from both small and large impacts. We find that atmospheric mass loss due to impacts can be characterized into three different regimes: 1) Giant Impacts, that create a strong shock transversing the whole planet and that can lead to atmospheric loss globally. 2) Large enough impactors (m_{cap} ≳ √{2

  15. Dynamics of Massive Atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chemke, Rei; Kaspi, Yohai, E-mail: rei.chemke@weizmann.ac.il [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, 234 Herzl st., 76100, Rehovot (Israel)

    2017-08-10

    The many recently discovered terrestrial exoplanets are expected to hold a wide range of atmospheric masses. Here the dynamic-thermodynamic effects of atmospheric mass on atmospheric circulation are studied using an idealized global circulation model by systematically varying the atmospheric surface pressure. On an Earth analog planet, an increase in atmospheric mass weakens the Hadley circulation and decreases its latitudinal extent. These changes are found to be related to the reduction of the convective fluxes and net radiative cooling (due to the higher atmospheric heat capacity), which, respectively, cool the upper troposphere at mid-low latitudes and warm the troposphere at high latitudes. These together decrease the meridional temperature gradient, tropopause height and static stability. The reduction of these parameters, which play a key role in affecting the flow properties of the tropical circulation, weakens and contracts the Hadley circulation. The reduction of the meridional temperature gradient also decreases the extraction of mean potential energy to the eddy fields and the mean kinetic energy, which weakens the extratropical circulation. The decrease of the eddy kinetic energy decreases the Rhines wavelength, which is found to follow the meridional jet scale. The contraction of the jet scale in the extratropics results in multiple jets and meridional circulation cells as the atmospheric mass increases.

  16. Reference Atmosphere for Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Rosemary M.

    2002-01-01

    We propose that Ar-40 measured in the lunar atmosphere and that in Mercury's atmosphere is due to current diffusion into connected pore space within the crust. Higher temperatures at Mercury, along with more rapid loss from the atmosphere will lead to a smaller column abundance of argon at Mercury than at the Moon, given the same crustal abundance of potassium. Because the noble gas abundance in the Hermean atmosphere represents current effusion, it is a direct measure of the crustal potassium abundance. Ar-40 in the atmospheres of the planets is a measure of potassium abundance in the interiors, since Ar-40 is a product of radiogenic decay of K-40 by electron capture with the subsequent emission of a 1.46 eV gamma-ray. Although the Ar-40 in the Earth's atmosphere is expected to have accumulated since the late bombardment, Ar-40 in the atmospheres of Mercury and the Moon is eroded quickly by photoionization and electron impact ionization. Thus, the argon content in the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury is representative of current effusion rather than accumulation over the lifetime of the planet.

  17. 31 CFR 8.58 - Supplemental charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supplemental charges. 8.58 Section 8... ALCOHOL, TOBACCO AND FIREARMS Disciplinary Proceedings § 8.58 Supplemental charges. If it appears that the... supplemental charges against the respondent. These supplemental charges may be tried with other charges in the...

  18. 7 CFR 1955.22 - State supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true State supplements. 1955.22 Section 1955.22 Agriculture... Real and Chattel Property § 1955.22 State supplements. State Supplements will be prepared with the... supplements will be submitted to the National Office for post approval in accordance with FmHA or its...

  19. Frequency standards

    CERN Document Server

    Riehle, Fritz

    2006-01-01

    Of all measurement units, frequency is the one that may be determined with the highest degree of accuracy. It equally allows precise measurements of other physical and technical quantities, whenever they can be measured in terms of frequency.This volume covers the central methods and techniques relevant for frequency standards developed in physics, electronics, quantum electronics, and statistics. After a review of the basic principles, the book looks at the realisation of commonly used components. It then continues with the description and characterisation of important frequency standards

  20. Wind turbine power and sound in relation to atmospheric stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, G. P.

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric stability cannot, with respect to modem, toll wind turbines, be viewed as a 'small perturbation to a basic neutral state' This can be demonstrated by comparison of measured wind velocity at the height of the rotor with the wind velocity expected in a neutral or 'standard' atmosphere.

  1. Ray tracing and refraction in the modified US1976 atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, SY

    2003-01-01

    A new and flexible ray-tracing procedure for calculating astronomical refraction is outlined and applied to the US1976 standard atmosphere. This atmosphere is generalized to allow for a free choice of the temperature and pressure at sea level, and in this form it has been named the modified US1976

  2. The residence time of water in the atmosphere revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Ent, Ruud J.; Tuinenburg, Obbe A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper revisits the knowledge on the residence time of water in the atmosphere. Based on state-of-the-art data of the hydrological cycle we derive a global average residence time of 8.9 ± 0.4 days (uncertainty given as 1 standard deviation). We use two different atmospheric moisture tracking

  3. [Simulation of polluted atmospheres for animal experimentation: toxic gases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, J; Boudène, C

    1976-09-20

    A process for the generation of standardized polluted atmospheres usable for animal exposure is described. It is based on the diffusion of compressed gases across a silicone membrane. This device has been tested with four gases of particular importance in the field of atmospheric pollution (sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide and ammoniac).

  4. New atmospheric program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Science Foundation's Division of Atmospheric Sciences has established an Upper Atmospheric Facilities program within its Centers and Facilities section. The program will support the operation of and the scientific research that uses the longitudinal chain of incoherent scatter radars. The program also will ensure that the chain is maintained as a state-of-the-art research tool available to all interested and qualified scientists.For additional information, contact Richard A. Behnke, Division of Atmospheric Sciences, National Science Foundation, 1800 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20550 (telephone: 202-357-7390).

  5. Is selenium supplementation in autoimmune thyroid diseases justified?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristian H.; Bonnema, Steen; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review provides an appraisal of recent evidence for or against selenium supplementation in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases, and discusses possible effect mechanisms. RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiological data suggest an increased prevalence of autoimmune thyroid...... diseases under conditions of low dietary selenium intake. Two systematic reviews have evaluated controlled trials among patients with autoimmune thyroiditis and report that selenium supplementation decreases circulating thyroid autoantibodies. The immunomodulatory effects of selenium might involve reducing...... supplementation in the standard treatment of patients with autoimmune thyroiditis or Graves’ disease. However, correction of moderate to severe selenium deficiency may offer benefits in preventing, as well as treating, these disorders. Molecular mechanisms have been proposed, but further studies are needed....

  6. An assessment of different atmospheric stability methods for annual atmospheric dispersion factors at a coastal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagavathsingh, A.; Rakesh, P.T.; Srinivas, C.V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2018-01-01

    The meteorological data is used for routine radiological release consequence analysis, real time consequence assessments of accidental releases of radiological effluents and design basis accidental analysis in a nuclear plant site. For dispersion estimate, it is often required to specify the type of stability and/or turbulence conditions in which diffusion of pollutants would occur. Stability indicates the degree of turbulence and thus the atmospheric mixing. Intensity of turbulence and dispersion of pollutant releases in to the lower atmosphere are strongly dependent on the local winds as well as resistance of atmosphere to vertical mixing which is called atmospheric stability. Three different methods of atmospheric stability based on Standard deviation of wind direction (σθ), temperature gradient and Bulk Richardson (Rib) number are used to compute stability over Kalpakkam site using hourly meteorological data. All the three methods of estimating atmospheric stability are compared with M-O similarity based method. Different atmospheric stability methods were analyzed to estimate the annual average atmospheric dispersion factors at Kalpakkam coastal site for the year 2016

  7. Relevant Standards

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    .86: Ethernet over LAPS. Standard in China and India. G.7041: Generic Framing Procedure (GFP). Supports Ethernet as well as other data formats (e.g., Fibre Channel); Protocol of ... IEEE 802.3x for flow control of incoming Ethernet data ...

  8. Patterns of dietary supplement use among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Harris R; Marriott, Bernadette P; Williams, Christianna; Judelson, Daniel A; Glickman, Ellen L; Geiselman, Paula J; Dotson, Laura; Mahoney, Caroline R

    2015-10-01

    Dietary supplements (DS) are popular in many countries but little data are available on their use by sub-populations such as college students. Since students share a variety of characteristics and similar lifestyles, their DS use may differ from the general population. This study assessed DS use, factors associated with DS use, and reasons for use among U.S. college students. College students (N = 1248) at 5 U.S. universities were surveyed. Survey questions included descriptive demographics, types and frequency of DS used, reasons for use and money spent on supplements. Supplements were classified using standard criteria. Logistic regression analyses examined relationships between demographic and lifestyle factors and DS use. Sixty-six percent of college students surveyed used DS at least once a week, while 12% consumed 5 or more supplements a week. Forty-two percent used multivitamins/multiminerals, 18% vitamin C, 17% protein/amino acids and 13% calcium at least once a week. Factors associated with supplement use included dietary patterns, exercise, and tobacco use. Students used supplements to promote general health (73%), provide more energy (29%), increase muscle strength (20%), and enhance performance (19%). College students appear more likely to use DS than the general population and many use multiple types of supplements weekly. Habits established at a young age persist throughout life. Therefore, longitudinal research should be conducted to determine whether patterns of DS use established early in adulthood are maintained throughout life. Adequate scientific justification for widespread use of DS in healthy, young populations is lacking. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. The origin of atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, Gy.

    1975-01-01

    The evolution of the atmosphere of the Earth is described. Starting from the hot Universe the main steps of the ''cooling-down'' process as the different states of the condensation of the matter are discussed. After this nuclear evolution the chemical evolution could start on the solid Earth's crust. In the reductive primordial atmosphere mainly due to ultraviolet rays the basic molecules for life as sugars and amino acids were formed. The photosynthesis of the plants has later produced the oxygen being present in the recent atmosphere. The question whether the pollution could affect the auto-stabilization loop of the atmosphere is also discussed. Finally the possibility of life on the Mars is studied. (Sz.Z.)

  10. Atmospheric Heavy Metal Pollution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 4. Atmospheric Heavy Metal Pollution - Development of Chronological Records and Geochemical Monitoring. Rohit Shrivastav. General Article Volume 6 Issue 4 April 2001 pp 62-68 ...

  11. The invention of atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Craig

    2015-08-01

    The word "atmosphere" was a neologism Willebrord Snellius created for his Latin translation of Simon Stevin's cosmographical writings. Astronomers and mathematical practitioners, such as Snellius and Christoph Scheiner, applying the techniques of Ibn Mu'ādh and Witelo, were the first to use the term in their calculations of the height of vapors that cause twilight. Their understandings of the atmosphere diverged from Aristotelian divisions of the aerial region. From the early years of the seventeenth century, the term was often associated with atomism or corpuscular matter theory. The concept of the atmosphere changed dramatically with the advent of pneumatic experiments in the middle of the seventeenth century. Pierre Gassendi, Walter Charleton, and Robert Boyle transformed the atmosphere of the mathematicians giving it the characteristics of weight, specific gravity, and fluidity, while disputes about its extent and border remained unresolved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Marketability of food supplements - criteria for the legal assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitweg-Lehmann, Evelyn

    2017-03-01

    To be placed on the market legally, food supplements have to meet national and European food law regulations. This is true for all substances used as well as for the labeling on the packaging of and the advertising for food supplements. The food business operator is responsible for its compliance with all regulations. Therefore, in this article, a concise step-by-step assessment is presented, covering all necessary legal requirements to market food supplements. Additionally, all steps are visualized in a flow chart. All vitamins, minerals and other substances used have to meet the legal conditions. Food business operators have to make sure that their products do not contain medicinal ingredients based on their pharmacologic effect. It is prohibited to place medicinal products as food supplements on the market. Furthermore, food business operators have to make sure that their products are not non-authorized novel foods according to the novel food regulation (EC) no. 258/97. Also, food supplements have to meet the requirements of article 14 of Regulation (EC) No. 178/2002 concerning the safety of foodstuff. Food shall not be placed on the market if it is unsafe. For food supplements that fail the German food-related legal standards but are legally manufactured in another EU member state or are legally put into circulation, the importer requires the so-called general disposition, which must be applied for at the BVL according to § 54 of the German Food and Feed Act. Another possibility for food which fails to meet German food law is to apply for a certificate of exemption according to § 68 of the Food and Feed Act. The food business operator has to meet the harmonized regulations concerning maximum and minimum levels of additives, flavors and enzymes. The packaging has to meet the compulsory labeling as well the voluntary labeling, like health claims. The BVL is also the relevant authority for other tasks concerning food supplements. A figure shows all

  13. Phytochemical Assays of Commercial Botanical Dietary Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Krochmal

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing popularity of botanical dietary supplements (BDS has been accompanied by concerns regarding the quality of commercial products. Health care providers, in particular, have an interest in knowing about product quality, in view of the issues related to herb-drug interactions and potential side effects. This study assessed whether commercial formulations of saw palmetto, kava kava, echinacea, ginseng and St. John's wort had consistent labeling and whether quantities of marker compounds agreed with the amounts stated on the label. We purchased six bottles each of two lots of supplements from nine manufacturers and analyzed the contents using established commercial methodologies at an independent laboratory. Product labels were found to vary in the information provided, such as serving recommendations and information about the herb itself (species, part of the plant, marker compound, etc. With regard to marker compound content, little variability was observed between different lots of the same brand, while the content did vary widely between brands (e.g. total phenolic compounds in Echinacea ranged from 3.9–15.3 mg per serving; total ginsenosides in ginseng ranged from 5.3–18.2 mg per serving. Further, the amounts recommended for daily use also differed between brands, increasing the potential range of a consumer's daily dose. Echinacea and ginseng were the most variable, while St. John's wort and saw palmetto were the least variable. This study highlights some of the key issues in the botanical supplement market, including the importance of standardized manufacturing practices and reliable labeling information. In addition, health care providers should keep themselves informed regarding product quality in order to be able to appropriately advise patients utilizing both conventional and herbal medicines.

  14. Global atmospheric changes.

    OpenAIRE

    Piver, W T

    1991-01-01

    Increasing concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere can be directly related to global warming. In terms of human health, because a major cause of increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 is the increased combustion of fossil fuels, global warming also may result in increases in air pollutants, acid deposition, and exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. To understand better the impacts of global warming phenomena on human health, this review emphasizes the proces...

  15. Proterozoic atmospheric oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2014-01-01

    This article is concerned with the evolution of atmospheric oxygen concentrations through the Proterozoic Eon. In particular, this article will seek to place the history of atmospheric oxygenation through the Proterozoic Eon in the context of the evolving physical environment including the history...... of continental growth and volcanic outgassing, as well as biogeochemical processing of elements within the oceans. The author will seek to explore constraints on the history of oxygenation and understand which processes have regulated oxygen through this eon....

  16. Intensifying the Atmospheric

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebst, Lasse Suonperä

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenological concept of urban atmospheres is more often applied as an aesthetic description of the metropolitan space as such. This conceptualization is supported in this paper; however, I strive to give the concept a post-phenomenological axial turn. While phenomenology, due to its under...... sufficiently intense. All things considered, the paper should be read as a sociological contribution to theoretically reconstruct the concept of urban atmospheres in the light of spatial morphology....

  17. Atmospheric Tides in Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzewich, Scott D,; Newman, C. E; de la Torre Juarez, M.; Wilson, R. J.; Lemmon, M.; Smith, M. D.; Kahanpaa, H.; Harri, A.-M.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric tides are the primary source of daily air pressure variation at the surface of Mars. These tides are forced by solar heating of the atmosphere and modulated by the presence of atmospheric dust, topography, and surface albedo and thermal inertia. This results in a complex mix of sun-synchronous and nonsun- synchronous tides propagating both eastward and westward around the planet in periods that are integer fractions of a solar day. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station on board the Mars Science Laboratory has observed air pressure at a regular cadence for over 1 Mars year and here we analyze and diagnose atmospheric tides in this pressure record. The diurnal tide amplitude varies from 26 to 63 Pa with an average phase of 0424 local true solar time, while the semidiurnal tide amplitude varies from 5 to 20 Pa with an average phase of 0929. We find that both the diurnal and semidiurnal tides in Gale Crater are highly correlated to atmospheric opacity variations at a value of 0.9 and to each other at a value of 0.77, with some key exceptions occurring during regional and local dust storms. We supplement our analysis with MarsWRF general circulation modeling to examine how a local dust storm impacts the diurnal tide in its vicinity. We find that both the diurnal tide amplitude enhancement and regional coverage of notable amplitude enhancement linearly scales with the size of the local dust storm. Our results provide the first long-term record of surface pressure tides near the martian equator.

  18. Dynamics in Atmospheric Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindzen, Richard A.

    2005-08-01

    Motion is manifest in the atmosphere in an almost infinite variety of ways. In Dynamics in Atmospheric Physics, Dr. Richard Lindzen describes the nature of motion in the atmosphere, develops fluid dynamics relevant to the atmosphere, and explores the role of motion in determining the climate and atmospheric composition. The author presents the material in a lecture note style, and the emphasis throughout is on describing phenomena that are at the frontiers of current research, but due attention is given to the methodology of research and to the historical background of these topics. The author's treatment and choice of topics is didactic. Problems at the end of each chapter will help students assimilate the material. In general the discussions emphasize physical concepts, and throughout Dr. Lindzen makes a concerted effort to avoid the notion that dynamic meteorology is simply the derivation of equations and their subsequent solution. His desire is that interested students will delve further into solution details. The book is intended as a text for first year graduate students in the atmospheric sciences. Although the material in the book is self contained, a familiarity with differential equations is assumed; some background in fluid mechanics is helpful.

  19. Atmospheric Models for Aerocapture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta L.; Keller, Vernon W.

    2004-01-01

    There are eight destinations in the solar System with sufficient atmosphere for aerocapture to be a viable aeroassist option - Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and its moon Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. Engineering-level atmospheric models for four of these targets (Earth, Mars, Titan, and Neptune) have been developed for NASA to support systems analysis studies of potential future aerocapture missions. Development of a similar atmospheric model for Venus has recently commenced. An important capability of all of these models is their ability to simulate quasi-random density perturbations for Monte Carlo analyses in developing guidance, navigation and control algorithm, and for thermal systems design. Similarities and differences among these atmospheric models are presented, with emphasis on the recently developed Neptune model and on planned characteristics of the Venus model. Example applications for aerocapture are also presented and illustrated. Recent updates to the Titan atmospheric model are discussed, in anticipation of applications for trajectory and atmospheric reconstruct of Huygens Probe entry at Titan.

  20. Dietary supplements quality analysis tools from the United States Pharmacopeia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Nandakumara; Giancaspro, Gabriel; Venema, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued the dietary supplement (DS) current good manufacturing practice (GMP) regulations in compliance with the mandate from the Dietary Supplements Health and Education Act (DSHEA), with the intention of protecting public health by ensuring the quality of DS. The GMP regulations require manufacturers to establish their own quality specifications for identity, purity, strength, composition, and absence of contaminants. Numerous FDA-conducted GMP inspections found that the private specifications set by these manufacturers are often insufficient to ensure adequate quality of dietary ingredients and DS. Wider use of the public standards developed by the United States Pharmacopeial Convention (USP), in conjunction with GMP compliance, can help ensure quality and consistency of DS as they do for medicines. Public health protection could be enhanced by strengthening the GMP provisions to require conformance with relevant United States Pharmacopeia-National Formulary (USP-NF) standards, or in the absence of USP standards, other public compendial standards. Another serious concern is the presence of synthetic drugs and drug analogues in products marketed as DS. Use of the new USP General Chapter Adulteration of Dietary Supplements with Drugs and Drug Analogs may reduce the exposure of consumers to dangerous drugs disguised as DS. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Prohibited Contaminants in Dietary Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Neilson M

    With the increasing use of unregulated dietary supplements, athletes are at continued risk from adverse medical events and inadvertent doping. A review of Clinical Key, MEDLINE, and PubMed databases from 2012 to 2017 was performed using search terms, including dietary supplement, contamination, doping in athletes, inadvertent doping, and prohibited substances. The references of pertinent articles were reviewed for other relevant sources. Clinical review. Level 3. Poor manufacturing processes and intentional contamination with many banned substances continue to occur in dietary supplements sold in the United States. Certain sectors, such as weight loss and muscle-building supplements, pose a greater threat because they are more likely to be contaminated. Athletes will continue to be at risk for adverse events and failed doping tests due to contaminated dietary supplements until legislation changes how they are regulated. In the interim, there are several steps that can be taken to mitigate this risk, including improved education of medical staff and athletes and use of third party-certified products.

  2. Vitamin C supplementation in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbold, Alice; Ota, Erika; Nagata, Chie; Shahrook, Sadequa; Crowther, Caroline A

    2015-09-29

    Vitamin C supplementation may help reduce the risk of pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction and maternal anaemia. There is a need to evaluate the efficacy and safety of vitamin C supplementation in pregnancy. To evaluate the effects of vitamin C supplementation, alone or in combination with other separate supplements on pregnancy outcomes, adverse events, side effects and use of health resources. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 March 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials evaluating vitamin C supplementation in pregnant women. Interventions using a multivitamin supplement containing vitamin C or where the primary supplement was iron were excluded. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. Twenty-nine trials involving 24,300 women are included in this review. Overall, 11 trials were judged to be of low risk of bias, eight were high risk of bias and for 10 trials it was unclear. No clear differences were seen between women supplemented with vitamin C alone or in combination with other supplements compared with placebo or no control for the risk of stillbirth (risk ratio (RR) 1.15, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.89 to 1.49; 20,038 participants; 11 studies; I² = 0%; moderate quality evidence), neonatal death (RR 0.79, 95% CI 0.58 to 1.08; 19,575 participants; 11 studies; I² = 0%), perinatal death (average RR 1.07, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.49; 17,105 participants; seven studies; I² = 35%), birthweight (mean difference (MD) 26.88 g, 95% CI -18.81 to 72.58; 17,326 participants; 13 studies; I² = 69%), intrauterine growth restriction (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.91 to 1.06; 20,361 participants; 12 studies; I² = 15%; high quality evidence), preterm birth (average RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.90 to 1.10; 22,250 participants; 16 studies; I² = 49%; high quality evidence

  3. Status of conversion of DOE standards to non-Government standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moseley, H.L.

    1992-07-01

    One major goal of the DOE Technical Standards Program is to convert existing DOE standards into non-Government standards (NGS's) where possible. This means that a DOE standard may form the basis for a standards-writing committee to produce a standard in the same subject area using the non-Government standards consensus process. This report is a summary of the activities that have evolved to effect conversion of DOE standards to NGSs, and the status of current conversion activities. In some cases, all requirements in a DOE standard will not be incorporated into the published non-Government standard because these requirements may be considered too restrictive or too specific for broader application by private industry. If requirements in a DOE standard are not incorporated in a non-Government standard and the requirements are considered necessary for DOE program applications, the DOE standard will be revised and issued as a supplement to the non-Government standard. The DOE standard will contain only those necessary requirements not reflected by the non-Government standard. Therefore, while complete conversion of DOE standards may not always be realized, the Department's technical standards policy as stated in Order 1300.2A has been fully supported in attempting to make maximum use of the non-Government standard.

  4. Status of conversion of DOE standards to non-Government standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moseley, H.L.

    1992-07-01

    One major goal of the DOE Technical Standards Program is to convert existing DOE standards into non-Government standards (NGS`s) where possible. This means that a DOE standard may form the basis for a standards-writing committee to produce a standard in the same subject area using the non-Government standards consensus process. This report is a summary of the activities that have evolved to effect conversion of DOE standards to NGSs, and the status of current conversion activities. In some cases, all requirements in a DOE standard will not be incorporated into the published non-Government standard because these requirements may be considered too restrictive or too specific for broader application by private industry. If requirements in a DOE standard are not incorporated in a non-Government standard and the requirements are considered necessary for DOE program applications, the DOE standard will be revised and issued as a supplement to the non-Government standard. The DOE standard will contain only those necessary requirements not reflected by the non-Government standard. Therefore, while complete conversion of DOE standards may not always be realized, the Department`s technical standards policy as stated in Order 1300.2A has been fully supported in attempting to make maximum use of the non-Government standard.

  5. Quality control of plant food supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzini, Elisabetta; Badea, Mihaela; Santos, Ariana Dos; Restani, Patrizia; Sievers, Hartwig

    2011-12-01

    It is essential to guarantee the safety of unprocessed plants and food supplements if consumers' health is to be protected. Although botanicals and their preparations are regulated at EU level, at least in part, there is still considerable discretion at national level, and Member States may choose to classify a product either as a food supplement or as a drug. Accurate data concerning the finished products and the plant used as the starting point are of major importance if risks and safety are to be properly assessed, but in addition standardized criteria for herbal preparation must be laid down and respected by researchers and manufacturers. Physiologically active as well as potentially toxic constituents need to be identified, and suitable analytical methods for their measurement specified, particularly in view of the increasing incidence of economically motivated adulteration of herbal raw materials and extracts. It remains the duty of food operators to keep up with the scientific literature and to provide sufficient information to enable the adaptation of specifications, sampling schemes and analytical methods to a fast-changing environment.

  6. Phytotherapy and Nutritional Supplements on Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Lopes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent type of nonskin malignancy among women worldwide. In general, conventional cancer treatment options (i.e., surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, biological therapy, and hormone therapy are not completely effective. Recurrence and other pathologic situations are still an issue in breast cancer patients due to side effects, toxicity of drugs in normal cells, and aggressive behaviour of the tumours. From this point of view, breast cancer therapy and adjuvant methods represent a promising and challenging field for researchers. In the last few years, the use of some types of complementary medicines by women with a history of breast cancer has significantly increased such as phytotherapeutic products and nutritional supplements. Despite this, the use of such approaches in oncologic processes may be problematic and patient’s health risks can arise such as interference with the efficacy of standard cancer treatment. The present review gives an overview of the most usual phytotherapeutic products and nutritional supplements with application in breast cancer patients as adjuvant approach. Regardless of the contradictory results of scientific evidence, we demonstrated the need to perform additional investigation, mainly well-designed clinical trials in order to establish correlations and allow for further validated outcomes concerning the efficacy, safety, and clinical evidence-based recommendation of these products.

  7. Is vitamin C supplementation beneficial?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen

    2010-01-01

    of the benefit:harm ratio of antioxidant supplements. We have examined the literature on vitamin C intervention with the intention of drawing a conclusion on its possible beneficial or deleterious effect on health and the result is discouraging. One of several important issues is that vitamin C uptake is tightly...... controlled, resulting in a wide-ranging bioavailability depending on the current vitamin C status. Lack of proper selection criteria dominates the currently available literature. Thus, while supplementation with vitamin C is likely to be without effect for the majority of the Western population due...... to saturation through their normal diet, there could be a large subpopulation with a potential health problem that remains uninvestigated. The present review discusses the relevance of the available literature on vitamin C supplementation and proposes guidelines for future randomised intervention trials....

  8. Nutritional Supplements for Strength Power Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilborn, Colin

    Over the last decade research involving nutritional supplementation and sport performance has increased substantially. Strength and power athletes have specific needs to optimize their performance. Nutritional supplementation cannot be viewed as a replacement for a balanced diet but as an important addition to it. However, diet and supplementation are not mutually exclusive, nor does one depend on the other. Strength and power athletes have four general areas of supplementation needs. First, strength athletes need supplements that have a direct effect on performance. The second group of supplements includes those that promote recovery. The third group comprises the supplements that enhance immune function. The last group of supplements includes those that provide energy or have a direct effect on the workout. This chapter reviews the key supplements needed to optimize the performance and training of the strength athlete.

  9. Dietary supplement use among academic pharmacists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy MS

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available United States sales of dietary supplements exceeded $18 billion in 2002, indicating that dietary supplement use is common among the American public. This report describes a survey of academic pharmacists and their use of dietary supplements and herbs. To date, most data comes from retail or community pharmacists, so a survey was developed to collect information regarding dietary supplement and herb usage from academic pharmacists. Academic pharmacists are probably the most knowledgeable group in regards to assessing the clinical value of supplements. Our results showed that 54% of academic pharmacists have used dietary supplements or herbs. However, it is interesting to note that most of the dietary supplements listed were not in the top ten most commonly used supplements. In addition, there was no excessive use of supplements or herbs by this group of pharmacists since the majority of respondents listed multivitamins.

  10. Atmospheric Models for Mars Aerocapture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Keller, Vernon W.

    2005-01-01

    level Mars atmospheric model. Applications include systems design, performance analysis, and operations planning for aerobraking, entry descent and landing, and aerocapture. Typical Mars aerocapture periapsis altitudes (for systems with rigid- aeroshell heat shields) are about 50 km. This altitude is above the 0-40 km height range covered by Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) nadir observations. Recently, TES limb sounding data have been made available, spanning more than two Mars years (more than 200,000 data profiles) with altitude coverage up to about 60 km, well within the height range of interest for aerocapture. Results are presented comparing Mars-GRAM atmospheric density with densities from TES nadir and limb sounding observations. A new Mars-GRAM feature is described which allows individual TES nadir or limb profiles to be extracted from the large TES databases, and to be used as an optional replacement for standard Mars-GRAM background (climatology) conditions. For Monte-Carlo applications such as aerocapture guidance and control studies, Mars-GRAM perturbations are available using these TES profile background conditions.

  11. Standard beam PWC for Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenker, H.

    1983-02-01

    As one of its projects the Fermilab Experimental Areas Department has been designed and tested a relatively small proportional wire chamber for use in the secondary beam lines. It is intended to supplement the variety of detectors known in the vernacular as SWICS that are used to obtain profiles for beam tuning. The new detector, described in this report, operates in the limited proportional mode and allows experimenters to use a standard, lab supported device for associating trajectories of individual beam particles with events triggering their own experiment's apparatus. A completed triple plane module is shown

  12. Compost supplementation with nutrients and microorganisms in composting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Óscar J; Ospina, Diego A; Montoya, Sandra

    2017-11-01

    The composting is an aerobic, microorganism-mediated, solid-state fermentation process by which different organic materials are transformed into more stable compounds. The product obtained is the compost, which contributes to the improvement of physical, chemical and microbiological properties of the soil. However, the compost usage in agriculture is constrained because of its long-time action and reduced supply of nutrients to the crops. To enhance the content of nutrients assimilable by the plants in the compost, its supplementation with nutrients and inoculation with microorganisms have been proposed. The objective of this work was to review the state of the art on compost supplementation with nutrients and the role played by the microorganisms involved (or added) in their transformation during the composting process. The phases of composting are briefly compiled and different strategies for supplementation are analyzed. The utilization of nitrogenous materials and addition of microorganisms fixing nitrogen from the atmosphere or oxidizing ammonia into more assimilable for plants nitrogenous forms are analyzed. Several strategies for nitrogen conservation during composting are presented as well. The supplementation with phosphorus and utilization of microorganisms solubilizing phosphorus and potassium are also discussed. Main groups of microorganisms relevant during the composting process are described as well as most important strategies to identify them. In general, the development of this type of nutrient-enriched bio-inputs requires research and development not only in the supplementation of compost itself, but also in the isolation and identification of microorganisms and genes allowing the degradation and conversion of nitrogenous substances and materials containing potassium and phosphorus present in the feedstocks undergoing the composting process. In this sense, most important research trends and strategies to increase nutrient content in the compost

  13. Exploring a Supplemental Educational Service Math Program: The Math Achievement of Economically Disadvantaged Students and Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caban-Vazquez, Vilma

    2010-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind education act mandates that school districts develop supplemental educational service programs for students not demonstrating mathematical proficiency on state standardized math assessments. Yet there is limited understanding of issues related to supplemental educational service math programs. The purpose of this…

  14. The effect of nutritional supplementation on quality of life in people living with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tesfaye Woldeyohannes, Markos; Kæstel, Pernille; Olsen, Mette Frahm

    2016-01-01

    quality of life score between the early and delayed supplementation groups [β=3.0, 95% confidence interval: -0.4: 6.4]. However, the early supplementation group showed higher scores on the social and spirituality domains than the delayed group. CONCLUSIONS: LNS given during the first 4 months of ART......OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) on the quality of life of people living with HIV (PLHIV) during the first 3 months of antiretroviral treatment (ART), and to investigate the effects of timing of supplementation by comparing with supplementation during...... months or the subsequent months of ART. The outcome was measured in terms of total quality of life scores on the adapted version of the WHOQOL-HIV-BREF assessed at baseline, 3 and 6 months. RESULTS: Of the 282 participants, 186 (66.0%) were women. The mean age (standard deviation SD) was 32.8 (±9...

  15. Atmospheric pollution; Pollution atmospherique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambrozo, J.; Guillossou, G. [EDF-Gas de France, Service des Etudes Medicales, 75 - Paris (France)

    2008-10-15

    The atmosphere is the reservoir of numerous pollutants (nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, carbon oxides, particulates, volatile organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) from natural origin or anthropogenic origin ( industry, transport, agriculture, district heating). With epidemiologic studies the atmospheric pollution is associated with an increase of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. At the european level, the technological progress, the legislation have allowed a reduction of pollutant emissions, however these efforts have to be continued because the sanitary impact of atmospheric pollution must not be underestimated, even if the risks appear less important that these ones in relation with tobacco, inside pollution or others factors of cardiovascular risks. Indeed, on these last factors an individual action is possible for the exposure to air pollution people have no control. (N.C.)

  16. Atmosphere and Ambient Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik

    Atmosphere and Ambient Space This paper explores the relation between atmosphere and ambient space. Atmosphere and ambient space share many salient properties. They are both ontologically indeterminate, constantly varying and formally diffuse and they are both experienced as a subtle, non......-signifying property of a given space. But from a certain point of view, the two concepts also designate quite dissimilar experiences of space. To be ’ambient’ means to surround. Accordingly, ambient space is that space, which surrounds something or somebody. (Gibson 1987: 65) Since space is essentially...... of a surrounding character, all space can thus be described as having a fundamentally ambient character. So what precisely is an ambient space, then? As I will argue in my presentation, ambient space is a sensory effect of spatiality when a space is experienced as being particularly surrounding: a ‘space effect...

  17. Phenomenology of atmospheric neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedynitch Anatoli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of astrophysical neutrinos, certainly a break-through result, introduced new experimental challenges and fundamental questions about acceleration mechanisms of cosmic rays. On one hand IceCube succeeded in finding an unambiguous proof for the existence of a diffuse astrophysical neutrino flux, on the other hand the precise determination of its spectral index and normalization requires a better knowledge about the atmospheric background at hundreds of TeV and PeV energies. Atmospheric neutrinos in this energy range originate mostly from decays of heavy-flavor mesons, which production in the phase space relevant for prompt leptons is uncertain. Current accelerator-based experiments are limited by detector acceptance and not so much by the collision energy. This paper recaps phenomenological aspects of atmospheric leptons and calculation methods, linking recent progress in flux predictions with particle physics at colliders, in particular the Large Hadron Collider.

  18. Examination of fluctuations in atmospheric pressure related to migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuma, Hirohisa; Okuma, Yumiko; Kitagawa, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Japan has four seasons and many chances of low atmospheric pressure or approaches of typhoon, therefore it has been empirically known that the fluctuation of weather induces migraine in people. Generally, its mechanism has been interpreted as follows: physical loading, attributed by atmospheric pressure to human bodies, compresses or dilates human blood vessels, which leads to abnormality in blood flow and induces migraine. We report our examination of the stage in which migraine tends to be induced focusing on the variation of atmospheric pressure. Subjects were 34 patients with migraine, who were treated in our hospital. The patients included 31 females and three males, whose mean age was 32 ± 6.7. 22 patients had migraine with aura and 12 patients had migraine without aura. All of patients with migraine maintained a headache diary to record atmospheric pressures when they developed a migraine. The standard atmospheric pressure was defined as 1013 hPa, and with this value as the criterion, we investigated slight fluctuations in the atmospheric pressure when they developed a migraine. It was found that the atmospheric pressure when the patients developed a migraine was within 1003-1007 hPa in the approach of low atmospheric pressure and that the patients developed a migraine when the atmospheric pressure decreased by 6-10 hPa, slightly less than the standard atmospheric pressure. Small decreases of 6-10 hPa relative to the standard atmospheric pressure of 1013 hPa induced migraine attacks most frequently in patients with migraine.

  19. Composition of Estonian atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punning, J. M.; Karindi, A.

    1996-01-01

    Atmospheric study, particularly that of its chemical composition, has a long tradition in Estonia. Since middle of this century, in addition to meteorological observations, some chemical compounds in precipitations have been regularly measured in many meteorological stations. The main aim was to acquire information about the state and dynamics of the atmosphere. Therefore, main attention was paid to monitoring chemical compounds which have a direct impact on the human environment. As energy production developed intensively and SO 2 and NO x increased drastically in the atmosphere in acidic rock areas, like Scandinavia, the problem of acid rain became the most important environmental problem in Europe and North-America. As a consequence, monitoring the compounds of sulphur in precipitation was organized in Estonia. In the 1970 s, as related to large operating oil shale-based power plants, Estonia became a country , where emissions of sulphur compounds per capita were extremely high. In 1979, Estonia became a participant in the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme - the network created to study transboundary air pollution. The aims of the precipitation chemistry study and the related problems of the formation and transformation of the atmospheric composition have varied over the years. But monitoring of pollutant (in particular, sulphur compound) loads has been a central issue. Over recent years, an attempt was made to estimate the spatial regularities of atmospheric impurities and their impact on the pH of mean monthly precipitations. Furthermore, calculations were provided to find out the origin of atmospheric impurities washed out in Estonia. Until the 1990 s, CO 2 , and some other greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions were not studied in Estonia. The first inventory of GHG for Estonia was provided in 1995 using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) methodology

  20. Photochemistry of Pluto's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.

    1999-01-01

    This work include studies of two problems: (1) Modeling thermal balance, structure. and escape processes in Pluto's upper atmosphere. This study has been completed in full. A new method, of analytic solution for the equation of hydrodynamic flow from in atmosphere been developed. It was found that the ultraviolet absorption by methane which was previously ignored is even more important in Pluto's thermal balance than the extreme ultraviolet absorption by nitrogen. Two basic models of the lower atmosphere have been suggested, with a tropopause and a planetary surface at the bottom of the stellar occultation lightcurve, respectively, Vertical profiles, of temperature, density, gas velocity, and the CH4 mixing ratio have been calculated for these two models at low, mean, and high solar activity (six models). We prove that Pluto' " s atmosphere is restricted to 3060-4500 km, which makes possible a close flyby of future spacecraft. Implication for Pluto's evolution have also been discussed. and (2) Modeling of Pluto's photochemistry. Based on the results of (1), we have made some changes in the basic continuity equation and in the boundary conditions which reflect a unique can of hydrodynamic escape and therefore have not been used in modeling of other planetary atmospheres. We model photochemistry of 44 neutral and 23 ion species. This work required solution of a set of 67 second-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Two models have been developed. Each model consists of the vertical profiles for 67 species, their escape and precipitation rates. These models predict the chemical structure and basic chemical processes in the current atmosphere and possible implication of these processes for evolution. This study has also been completed in full.

  1. Physician-Patient Communication about Dietary Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarn, Derjung M.; Paterniti, Debora A.; Good, Jeffrey S.; Coulter, Ian D.; Galliher, James M.; Kravitz, Richard L.; Karlamangla, Arun; Wenger, Neil S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Describe the content and frequency of provider-patient dietary supplement discussions during primary care office visits. Methods Inductive content analysis of 1477 transcribed audio-recorded office visits to 102 primary care providers was combined with patient and provider surveys. Encounters were collected in Los Angeles, California (2009–2010), geographically-diverse practice settings across the United States (2004–2005), and Sacramento, CA (1998–1999). Results Providers discussed 738 dietary supplements during encounters with 357 patients (24.2% of all encounters in the data). They mentioned: 1) reason for taking the supplement for 46.5% of dietary supplements; 2) how to take the supplement for 28.2%; 3) potential risks for 17.3%; 4) supplement effectiveness for 16.7%; and 5) supplement cost or affordability for 4.2%. Of these five topics, a mean of 1.13 (SD=1.2) topics were discussed for each supplement. More topics were reviewed for non-vitamin non-mineral supplements (mean 1.47 (SD=1.2)) than for vitamin/mineral supplements (mean 0.99 (SD=1.1); psupplements are occurring, it is clear that more discussion might be needed to inform patient decisions about supplement use. Practice Implication Physicians could more frequently address topics that may influence patient dietary supplement use, such as the risks, effectiveness, and costs of supplements. PMID:23466249

  2. Atmospheric transport of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, T.V.

    1978-01-01

    The chairman and contributors are members of the Working Group on Atmospheric Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension. This group examined the mathematical approaches for determining the direct and indirect pathways to man of releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. The dose-to-man limitations promulgated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Energy Research and Development Administration were presented. The present status of research was discussed, and recommendations for future work were made. Particular emphasis was placed on the need for additional experimental work to develop confidence limits leading to acceptable probability statements of critical pathways for determining the dose-to-man

  3. Atmospheric Absorption Cell Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    was adequate for making empty cell measurements and filling the cell with artificial atmospheres. The procedure used in pumping and fillin the cell...carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide. The artificial atmospheres in the cell used for these measurements are summarized in Table IV. Figures...LD_l -_10J J« LUZ . jr-U «—• »r—• «-CD CO — Q- —a CD -j" \\z — OC I — h- \\_IC\\J CM LUD -ÜU T 1 r 00*001 00󈧌 00*09 00*0

  4. Detection of adulterated Ginkgo biloba supplements using chromatographic and spectral fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fingerprints of 18 commercially available Ginkgo biloba supplements, 12 samples of raw Ginkgo biloba leaves, and 3 Ginkgo biloba Standard Reference Materials from the National Institute of Standards and Technology were acquired directly (no chromatography) by ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometry a...

  5. A Supplement for Teaching Beowulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosh, Joseph

    1970-01-01

    Suggests supplementing the teaching of "Beowulf" to high school students with (1) translation and grammatical analysis of parts of the original lines, (2) study of Anglo-Saxon poetic techniques, and (3) students' imitation of old English poetic techniques in New English. (SW)

  6. Media Studies: Texts and Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curriculum Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    The 24 reviews in this article include textbooks on journalism and media studies; multimedia kits on advertising, TV news, reporting, and the "grammar" of media; resources on making ad interpreting films in the classroom; supplements on writing for both print and nonprint media; and professional references on improving visual literacy. (Editor)

  7. Potassium supplementation and heart rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, L.; Molenberg, Famke; Bakker, S.J.L.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Increasing the intake of potassium has been shown to lower blood pressure, but whether it also affects heart rate (HR) is largely unknown. We therefore assessed the effect of potassium supplementation on HR in a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Methods and

  8. Carbohydrase and protease supplementation increased ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2014-09-15

    Sep 15, 2014 ... Department of Animal and Wildlife Sciences, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Science ... control birds was 12% higher than that of the positive control, while diets supplemented with single enzyme ... The inclusion of exogenous proteases in maize-soya-based diets increases protein digestion by.

  9. Laboratory Animal Welfare Supplement IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluckstein, Fritz P., Comp.

    This document is the fourth supplement to a 1984 bibliography on laboratory animal welfare. Items presented were selected because they represent some of the most significant of those providing recent information or because they were considered useful. The period covered is October, 1986 through October, 1987. Monographs, conference proceedings,…

  10. Understanding the Supplemental Instruction Leader

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Adrian; Moore, Lori

    2018-01-01

    This article explored the learning styles and leadership styles of Supplemental Instruction (SI) leaders at Texas A&M University, and the impact of those preferences on recurring attendance to their sessions. The Learning Style Inventory, the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, and a demographic instrument were administered to SI leaders…

  11. Martian Atmospheric Pressure Static Charge Elimination Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    A Martian pressure static charge elimination tool is currently in development in the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory (ESPL) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. In standard Earth atmosphere conditions, static charge can be neutralized from an insulating surface using air ionizers. These air ionizers generate ions through corona breakdown. The Martian atmosphere is 7 Torr of mostly carbon dioxide, which makes it inherently difficult to use similar methods as those used for standard atmosphere static elimination tools. An initial prototype has been developed to show feasibility of static charge elimination at low pressure, using corona discharge. A needle point and thin wire loop are used as the corona generating electrodes. A photo of the test apparatus is shown below. Positive and negative high voltage pulses are sent to the needle point. This creates positive and negative ions that can be used for static charge neutralization. In a preliminary test, a floating metal plate was charged to approximately 600 volts under Martian atmospheric conditions. The static elimination tool was enabled and the voltage on the metal plate dropped rapidly to -100 volts. This test data is displayed below. Optimization is necessary to improve the electrostatic balance of the static elimination tool.

  12. Rosemary supplementation (Rosmarinus oficinallis L. attenuates cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Paola Murino Rafacho

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction (MI is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Dietary intervention on adverse cardiac remodeling after MI has significant clinical relevance. Rosemary leaves are a natural product with antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties, but its effect on morphology and ventricular function after MI is unknown.To determine the effect of the dietary supplementation of rosemary leaves on cardiac remodeling after MI, male Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups after sham procedure or experimental induced MI: 1 Sham group fed standard chow (SR0, n = 23; 2 Sham group fed standard chow supplemented with 0.02% rosemary (R002 (SR002, n = 23; 3 Sham group fed standard chow supplemented with 0.2% rosemary (R02 (SR02, n = 22; 4 group submitted to MI and fed standard chow (IR0, n = 13; 5 group submitted to MI and fed standard chow supplemented with R002 (IR002, n = 8; and 6 group submitted to MI and fed standard chow supplemented with R02 (IR02, n = 9. After 3 months of the treatment, systolic pressure evaluation, echocardiography and euthanasia were performed. Left ventricular samples were evaluated for: fibrosis, cytokine levels, apoptosis, energy metabolism enzymes, and oxidative stress. Rosemary dietary supplementation attenuated cardiac remodeling by improving energy metabolism and decreasing oxidative stress. Rosemary supplementation of 0.02% improved diastolic function and reduced hypertrophy after MI. Regarding rosemary dose, 0.02% and 0.2% for rats are equivalent to 11 mg and 110 mg for humans, respectively.Our findings support further investigations of the rosemary use as adjuvant therapy in adverse cardiac remodeling.

  13. Lead content of calcium supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, E A; Szabo, N J; Tebbett, I R

    2000-09-20

    Substantial quantities of lead have been reported in some over-the-counter calcium supplement preparations, including not only bone-meal and dolomite, but also over-the-counter natural and refined calcium carbonate formulations. Examination of this issue is warranted given recent increases in physician recommendations for calcium supplements for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. To determine the lead content of calcium supplements and to quantify the lead exposure from popular brands of calcium in dosages used for childhood recommended daily allowance, osteoporosis, and phosphate binding in dialysis patients. Analysis of lead content in 21 formulations of nonprescription calcium carbonate (including 7 natural [ie, oyster shell] and 14 refined), 1 brand of prescription-only calcium acetate, and 1 noncalcium synthetic phosphate binder conducted in March 2000. Lead content, assayed using electrothermal atomic absorption, expressed as micrograms of lead per 800 mg/d of elemental calcium, per 1500 mg/d of calcium, and for a range of dosages for patients with renal failure. Six microg/d of lead was considered the absolute dietary limit, with no more than 1 microg/d being the goal for supplements. Four of 7 natural products had measurable lead content, amounting to approximately 1 microg/d for 800 mg/d of calcium, between 1 and 2 microg/d for 1500 mg/d of calcium, and up to 10 microg/d for renal dosages. Four of the 14 refined products had similar lead content, including up to 3 microg/d of lead in osteoporosis calcium dosages and up to 20 microg/d in high renal dosages. No lead was detected in the calcium acetate or polymer products. Lead was present even in some brand name products from major pharmaceutical companies not of natural oyster shell derivation. Despite increasingly stringent limits of lead exposure, many calcium supplement formulations contain lead and thereby may pose an easily avoidable public health concern. JAMA. 2000;284:1425-1429.

  14. MedlinePlus: Herbs and Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/herb_All.html Herbs and Supplements To use the sharing features on this page, ... U V W XYZ 0-9 Browse dietary supplements and herbal remedies to learn about their effectiveness, ...

  15. Anthocyanin analyses of Vaccinium fruit dietary supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinium fruit ingredients within dietary supplements were identified by comparisons with anthocyanin analyses of known Vaccinium profiles (demonstration of anthocyanin fingerprinting). Available Vaccinium supplements were purchased and analyzed; their anthocyanin profiles (based on HPLC separation...

  16. Calcium Supplements: Do Men Need Them Too?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition and healthy eating Should men take calcium supplements? Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. ... healthy men don't need to take calcium supplements. Calcium is important for men for optimal bone ...

  17. Herbal remedies and supplements for weight loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight loss - herbal remedies and supplements; Obesity - herbal remedies; Overweight - herbal remedies ... health care provider. Nearly all over-the-counter supplements with claims of weight-loss properties contain some ...

  18. Muscle Mass and Weight Gain Nutritional Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bill

    There are numerous sports supplements available that claim to increase lean body mass. However, for these sports supplements to exert any favorable changes in lean body mass, they must influence those factors regulating skeletal muscle hypertrophy (i.e., satellite cell activity, gene transcription, protein translation). If a given sports supplement does favorably influence one of these regulatory factors, the result is a positive net protein balance (in which protein synthesis exceeds protein breakdown). Sports supplement categories aimed at eliciting a positive net protein balance include anabolic hormone enhancers, nutrient timing pre- and postexercise workout supplements, anticatabolic supplements, and nitric oxide boosters. Of all the sports supplements available, only a few have been subject to multiple clinical trials with repeated favorable outcomes relative to increasing lean body mass. This chapter focuses on these supplements and others that have a sound theoretical rationale in relation to increasing lean body mass.

  19. Adverse Effects of Nutraceuticals and Dietary Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronis, Martin J J; Pedersen, Kim B; Watt, James

    2018-01-06

    Over 70% of Americans take some form of dietary supplement every day, and the supplement industry is currently big business, with a gross of over $28 billion. However, unlike either foods or drugs, supplements do not need to be registered or approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) prior to production or sales. Under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994, the FDA is restricted to adverse report monitoring postmarketing. Despite widespread consumption, there is limited evidence of health benefits related to nutraceutical or supplement use in well-nourished adults. In contrast, a small number of these products have the potential to produce significant toxicity. In addition, patients often do not disclose supplement use to their physicians. Therefore, the risk of adverse drug-supplement interactions is significant. An overview of the major supplement and nutraceutical classes is presented here, together with known toxic effects and the potential for drug interactions.

  20. Improved atmospheric characterization for hyperspectral exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurst, Nathan P.; Meola, Joseph; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2017-05-01

    Airborne hyperspectral imaging (HSI)has shown utility in material detection and identification. Recent interest in longwave infrared (LWIR) HSI systems operating in the 7-14 micron range has developed due to strong spectral features of minerals, chemicals, and gaseous effluents. LWIR HSI has the advantage over other spectral bands by operating in day or night scenarios because emitted/reflected thermal radiation rather than reflected sunlight is measured. This research seeks to determine the most effective methods to perform model-based atmospheric compensation (AC) of LWIR HSI data using two existing atmospheric radiative transfer (RT) models, MODTRAN and LEEDR. MODTRAN is the more established RT model, but it lacks LEEDRs robust capability to generate realistic atmospheric profiles from probabilistic climatology or observations and forecasts from numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. The advantage of LEEDR's ability to generate atmospheres is tested by using LEEDR atmospheres, a MODTRAN standard model, and radiosonde data to perform AC on an airborne hyperspectral datacube with nadir looking geometry. This work investigates the potential benefit of LEEDR's weather/climatology tools for improving and/or expediting the AC process for LWIR HSI.

  1. Response to subcommittee on environment and atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacCracken, M.C.

    1975-10-01

    The potential effects of chronic release of pollutants on climatic changes are discussed with regard to dose-response characteristics, ambiguities in prediction of climatic effects, ambiguities in measuring climatic effects, research approaches, and approaches to standard setting. A table is presented to show potential atmospheric effects of the following pollutants: CO 2 from fossil fuels, fluorocarbons, nitrogen oxides, 85 K from nuclear power plants, sulfur compounds, dusts, heat and water releases from energy generation processes, and oceanic oil slicks

  2. Atmosphere beyond Poetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2014-01-01

    Physical Presence in Space.” Oase #91, Building Atmosphere, 21-33 Sloterdijk, Peter. (2005) 2008. “The Crystal Palace.” Translated by Michael Darroch. Public 37: Public?, 12-15. Originally published in Peter Sloterdijk. Im Weltinnenraum des Kapitals: Für eine philoso-phische Theorie der Globalisierung, 265...

  3. Astronomy and Atmospheric Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Les; Gaina, Alex

    2011-12-01

    The authors discusse the insuccess of the observation of the Total Eclipse of the Moon from 10 december 2011 in Romania and relate them with meteoconditions. Only a very short part of the last penumbral phase was observed, while the inital part and the totality was not observed due to very dense clouds. The change in color and brightness during this phase was signaled. Meanwhile, there is an area of science where clouds are of great use and interest. This area is Atmospheric optics, while the science which study clouds is meteorology. Clouds in combination with Solar and Moon light could give rise to a variety of strange, rare and unobvious phenomena in the atmosphere (sky), sometimes confused with Unidentified Flying Objects (UFO). The importance of meteorology for astronomy and atmospheric optics is underlined and an invitation to astronomers to use unfavourable days for athmospheric observations was sent. The web address of the site by Les Cowley, designed for atmospheric optics phenomena is contained in the text of the entry.

  4. Results from atmospheric neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. With the announcement of new evidence for muon neutrino disappearance observed by the super-Kamiokande experiment, the more than a decade old atmospheric neutrino anomaly moved from a possible indication for neutrino oscillations to an apparently inescapable fact. The evidence is reviewed, and new ...

  5. Atmospheric Heavy Metal Pollution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    within and below cloud scavenging, whereby the wet aerosol particles are collected by falling raindrops. In occult deposition, wetted particles (fog and mist) are deposited by impaction or turbulent transfer [3]. A high proportion of atmospheric heavy metals entering aquatic systems is in small particulate « IJlm) or soluble ...

  6. Atmospheric Heavy Metal Pollution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    elements which constitute an important class of pollutants. Such ... Hence, the transfer of air borne particles to land or water surfaces ... relative importance of these processes depends primarily on the size of the particles. Anthropogenically added particulates and aerosols in atmosphere show a broad size distribution from.

  7. Seasonal atmospheric extinction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhail, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    Mean monochromatic extinction coefficients at various wavelengths at the Kottamia Observatory site have shown the existence of a seasonal variation of atmospheric extinction. The extinction of aerosol compontnts with wavelengths at winter represent exceedingly good conditions. Spring gives the highest extinction due to aerosol. (orig.)

  8. Atmospheric and aerosol chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeill, V. Faye; Ariya, Parisa A.; McGill Univ. Montreal, QC

    2014-01-01

    This series presents critical reviews of the present position and future trends in modern chemical research. Short and concise reports on chemistry, each written by the world renowned experts. Still valid and useful after 5 or 10 years. More information as well as the electronic version of the whole content available at: springerlink.com. Christian George, Barbara D'Anna, Hartmut Herrmann, Christian Weller, Veronica Vaida, D. J. Donaldson, Thorsten Bartels-Rausch, Markus Ammann Emerging Areas in Atmospheric Photochemistry. Lisa Whalley, Daniel Stone, Dwayne Heard New Insights into the Tropospheric Oxidation of Isoprene: Combining Field Measurements, Laboratory Studies, Chemical Modelling and Quantum Theory. Neil M. Donahue, Allen L. Robinson, Erica R. Trump, Ilona Riipinen, Jesse H. Kroll Volatility and Aging of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol. P. A. Ariya, G. Kos, R. Mortazavi, E. D. Hudson, V. Kanthasamy, N. Eltouny, J. Sun, C. Wilde Bio-Organic Materials in the Atmosphere and Snow: Measurement and Characterization V. Faye McNeill, Neha Sareen, Allison N. Schwier Surface-Active Organics in Atmospheric Aerosols.

  9. Atmospheric and laser propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, A.M.J. van; Stein, K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews three phenomena that affect the propagation of electro-optical radiation through the atmosphere: absorption and scattering, refraction and turbulence. The net effect on imaging or laser systems is a net reduction of the effective range, or a degradation of the information

  10. Climate and atmospheric research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, G.; Schumacher, R.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of the scientific journal of the Humboldt university is dedicated to results of research work carried out to the greatest extent at the meteorological institute in the last two years on the area of climate and atmospheric research. The traditional research areas of the institute are climatology and the dynamics of the atmosphere, in particular the atmospherical boundary layer. Considering the high probability of a global climatic fluctuation due to the anthropogenic change of composition of the atmosphere and other climate-relevant factors imminent in the next century, climatological research today is an important part of global and regional environmental research. From the necessity of determination and evaluation of the effect of climatic fluctuations on nature and society the contours of a new interdisciplinary research area are already visible now. This is suitable as hardly any other area to be the supporting idea of environmental research at universities. The contributions contained in the issue already consider, in addition to results on climate diagnosis, also results on aspects of climate effect research. (orig./KW) [de

  11. Atmospheric and aerosol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeill, V. Faye [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Ariya, Parisa A. (ed.) [McGill Univ. Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; McGill Univ. Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

    2014-09-01

    This series presents critical reviews of the present position and future trends in modern chemical research. Short and concise reports on chemistry, each written by the world renowned experts. Still valid and useful after 5 or 10 years. More information as well as the electronic version of the whole content available at: springerlink.com. Christian George, Barbara D'Anna, Hartmut Herrmann, Christian Weller, Veronica Vaida, D. J. Donaldson, Thorsten Bartels-Rausch, Markus Ammann Emerging Areas in Atmospheric Photochemistry. Lisa Whalley, Daniel Stone, Dwayne Heard New Insights into the Tropospheric Oxidation of Isoprene: Combining Field Measurements, Laboratory Studies, Chemical Modelling and Quantum Theory. Neil M. Donahue, Allen L. Robinson, Erica R. Trump, Ilona Riipinen, Jesse H. Kroll Volatility and Aging of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol. P. A. Ariya, G. Kos, R. Mortazavi, E. D. Hudson, V. Kanthasamy, N. Eltouny, J. Sun, C. Wilde Bio-Organic Materials in the Atmosphere and Snow: Measurement and Characterization V. Faye McNeill, Neha Sareen, Allison N. Schwier Surface-Active Organics in Atmospheric Aerosols.

  12. Atmosphere as colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutsenogij, K.P.; Kutsenogij, P.K.

    2008-01-01

    In the paper review the results of experimental and theoretical investigations on space-time variability of physical, chemical and biological atmospheric characteristics and its influence on climate, ecology and environmental quality under the impact of natural processes and anthropogenic load is submitted

  13. Results from atmospheric neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With the announcement of new evidence for muon neutrino disappearance observed by the super-Kamiokande experiment, the more than a decade old atmospheric neutrino anomaly moved from a possible indication for neutrino oscillations to an apparently inescapable fact. The evidence is reviewed, and new indications ...

  14. Atoms and atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megie, G.

    1994-01-01

    The ozone sources, roles and distribution are reviewed, and the atmosphere dynamic effects on ozone circulation are discussed; chlorine and CFC are the two main perturbative agents of the ozone layer and their effects are described and analyzed; impacts of the limitation of the CFC and chlorine utilization are discussed. 5 figs., 9 tabs

  15. Vitamin E Supplementation in Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    prevent or reverse oxidative stress, c) to collect pilot data on the effect of vitamin E supplementation on lung function and impaired wound healing. We...by vitamin E supplementation, b) to prevent or reverse oxidative stress, c) to collect pilot data on the effect of vitamin E supplementation on lung...We anticipate that vitamin E supplements will prevent vitamin E depletion, reduce oxidative stress, attenuate the development of lung dysfunction

  16. ESA Atmospheric Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeijer, Sander

    2017-04-01

    The ESA Atmospheric Toolbox (BEAT) is one of the ESA Sentinel Toolboxes. It consists of a set of software components to read, analyze, and visualize a wide range of atmospheric data products. In addition to the upcoming Sentinel-5P mission it supports a wide range of other atmospheric data products, including those of previous ESA missions, ESA Third Party missions, Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS), ground based data, etc. The toolbox consists of three main components that are called CODA, HARP and VISAN. CODA provides interfaces for direct reading of data from earth observation data files. These interfaces consist of command line applications, libraries, direct interfaces to scientific applications (IDL and MATLAB), and direct interfaces to programming languages (C, Fortran, Python, and Java). CODA provides a single interface to access data in a wide variety of data formats, including ASCII, binary, XML, netCDF, HDF4, HDF5, CDF, GRIB, RINEX, and SP3. HARP is a toolkit for reading, processing and inter-comparing satellite remote sensing data, model data, in-situ data, and ground based remote sensing data. The main goal of HARP is to assist in the inter-comparison of datasets. By appropriately chaining calls to HARP command line tools one can pre-process datasets such that two datasets that need to be compared end up having the same temporal/spatial grid, same data format/structure, and same physical unit. The toolkit comes with its own data format conventions, the HARP format, which is based on netcdf/HDF. Ingestion routines (based on CODA) allow conversion from a wide variety of atmospheric data products to this common format. In addition, the toolbox provides a wide range of operations to perform conversions on the data such as unit conversions, quantity conversions (e.g. number density to volume mixing ratios), regridding, vertical smoothing using averaging kernels, collocation of two datasets, etc. VISAN is a cross-platform visualization and

  17. 78 FR 55171 - Removal of Standards of Ethical Conduct Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... Ethical Conduct Regulations AGENCY: Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction. ACTION: Final rule... concurrence of the Office of Government Ethics (OGE), issued a final rule for employees of the SIGIR that supplemented the executive-branch-wide Standards of Ethical Conduct (Standards) issued by OGE. With certain...

  18. Chemical Composition and Quality Characteristics of Wheat Bread Supplemented with Leafy Vegetable Powders

    OpenAIRE

    Odunlade, T. V.; Famuwagun, A. A.; Taiwo, K. A.; Gbadamosi, S. O.; Oyedele, D. J.; Adebooye, O. C.

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated the effect of supplementation of the leaf powders of Telfairia occidentalis, Amaranthus viridis, and Solanum macrocarpon on the chemical composition and the quality characteristics of wheat bread. The bread samples were supplemented with each of the vegetable leaf powders at 1%, 2%, and 3% during preparation. The bread samples were assayed for proximate composition, mineral composition, physical, sensory, and antioxidant properties using standard methods. The addition o...

  19. Atmospheric trident production for probing new physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Feng Ge

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose to use atmospheric neutrinos as a powerful probe of new physics beyond the Standard Model via neutrino trident production. The final state with double muon tracks simultaneously produced from the same vertex is a distinctive signal at large Cherenkov detectors. We calculate the expected event numbers of trident production in the Standard Model. To illustrate the potential of this process to probe new physics we obtain the sensitivity on new vector/scalar bosons with coupling to muon and tau neutrinos.

  20. AOAC SMPR 2014.007: Authentication of selected Vaccinium species (Anthocyanins) in dietary ingredients and dietary supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    This AOAC Standard Method Performance Requirements (SMPR) is for authentication of selected Vaccinium species in dietary ingredients and dietary supplements containing a single Vaccinium species using anthocyanin profiles. SMPRs describe the minimum recommended performance characteristics to be used...

  1. Carbon monoxide mixing ratios over Oklahoma between 2002 and 2009 retrieved from Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yurganov

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available CO mixing ratios for the lowermost 2-km atmospheric layer were retrieved from downwelling infrared (IR radiance spectra of the clear sky measured between 2002 and 2009 by a zenith-viewing Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI deployed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP observatory of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM Program near Lamont, Oklahoma. A version of a published earlier retrieval algorithm was improved and validated. Archived temperature and water vapor profiles retrieved from the same AERI spectra through automated ARM processing were used as input data for the CO retrievals. We found the archived water vapor profiles required additional constraint using SGP Microwave Radiometer retrievals of total precipitable water vapor. A correction for scattered solar light was developed as well. The retrieved CO was validated using simultaneous independently measured CO profiles from an aircraft. These tropospheric CO profiles were measured from the surface to altitudes of 4572 m a.s.l. once or twice a week between March 2006 and December 2008. The aircraft measurements were supplemented with ground-based CO measurements using a non-dispersive infrared gas correlation instrument at the SGP and retrievals from the Atmospheric IR Sounder (AIRS above 5 km to create full tropospheric CO profiles. Comparison of the profiles convolved with averaging kernels to the AERI CO retrievals found a squared correlation coefficient of 0.57, a standard deviation of ±11.7 ppbv, a bias of -16 ppbv, and a slope of 0.92. Averaged seasonal and diurnal cycles measured by the AERI are compared with those measured continuously in situ at the SGP in the boundary layer. Monthly mean CO values measured by the AERI between 2002 and 2009 are compared with those measured by the AIRS over North America, the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and over the tropics.

  2. Energy sources in low intake supplements on the productive and reproductive performance of Zebu cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Marcondes de Godoy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the productive and reproductive performance of primiparous zebu cows supplemented on Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu with supplements of low intake composed of different energy sources in the postpartum period. Sixty cow-calf pairs were divided into three treatments, a standard mineral salt supplement, a supplement based on ground corn and another containing protected fat, under the same conditions of pasture. The cows had an average initial age of 36 months and 295.9 ± 20 kg of initial body weight. The evaluation period lasted from November 2006 to May 2007, the 24 days after delivery until weaning of calves to 192 days of age. Cows fed the supplement based on ground corn (351 g day-1 and protected fat (357 g day-1 showed a similar increase in body weight, which was higher in relation cows fed with the mineral mixture (179 g day-1. Mineral mixture supplementation resulted in body condition score loss of cows between 80 and 136 days after calving. Cows fed energy supplements of low consumption produced more milk, weaned heavier calves and showed higher pregnancy rate than those fed only with the mineral mixture. The use of 3% calcium salts of fatty acids in energy supplements of low consumption did not alter the productive and reproductive performance of primiparous Zebu cows.

  3. 31 CFR 10.65 - Supplemental charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supplemental charges. 10.65 Section... INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE Rules Applicable to Disciplinary Proceedings § 10.65 Supplemental charges. (a) In general. The Director of the Office of Professional Responsibility may file supplemental charges, by...

  4. 20 CFR 901.38 - Supplemental charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Supplemental charges. 901.38 Section 901.38... Enrollment § 901.38 Supplemental charges. If it appears to the Executive Director that the respondent in his... charges against the respondent. Such supplemental charges may be tried with other charges in the case...

  5. 22 CFR 71.12 - Dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dietary supplements. 71.12 Section 71.12... Incarcerated Abroad § 71.12 Dietary supplements. (a) Eligibility criteria. A prisoner is considered eligible for the dietary supplement program under the following general criteria: (1) An evaluation by a...

  6. 47 CFR 61.86 - Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Supplements. 61.86 Section 61.86... Rules for Tariff Publications of Dominant and Nondominant Carriers § 61.86 Supplements. A carrier may not file a supplement except to suspend or cancel a tariff publication, or to defer the effective date...

  7. Dietary supplements containing prohibited substances: A review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dietary supplements containing prohibited substances: A review (Part 1). P van der Bijl. Abstract. Dietary supplements and chemical agents have been used for a number of decades among athletes striving to achieve increased strength and performance. This has led to a huge, growing market for the food supplement ...

  8. Weakly distributive modules. Applications to supplement submodules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, we define and study weakly distributive modules as a proper generalization of distributive modules. We prove that, weakly distributive supplemented modules are amply supplemented. In a weakly distributive supplemented module every submodule has a unique coclosure. This generalizes a result of ...

  9. 42 CFR 422.102 - Supplemental benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... supplemental benefits. MA organizations may offer enrollees a group of services as one optional supplemental benefit, offer services individually, or offer a combination of groups and individual services. ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Supplemental benefits. 422.102 Section 422.102...

  10. Calcium absorption response to cholecalciferol supplementation in hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Laura A G; Zena, Mohsen; Lund, Richard; Heaney, Robert P

    2013-06-01

    Recent understanding of extrarenal production of calcitriol has led to the use of more vitamin D supplementation in CKD populations. This paper reports the effect of cholecalciferol supplementation on calcium absorption. Paired calcium absorption tests were done before and after 12-13 weeks of 20,000 IU weekly cholecalciferol supplementation in 30 participants with stage 5 CKD on hemodialysis. The study was conducted from April to December of 2011. Calcium absorption was tested with a standardized meal containing 300 mg calcium carbonate intrinsically labeled with (45)Ca; 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were measured. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D rose from 14.2 ng/ml (11.5-18.5) at baseline to 49.3 ng/ml (42.3-58.1) at the end of the study (P<0.001). 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D rose from 15.1 (10.5-18.8) pg/ml at baseline to 20.5 (17.0-24.7) pg/ml at the end of the study (P<0.001). The median baseline calcium absorption was 12% (7%-17%) and 12% (7%-16%) at the end of study. Patients with stage 5 CKD on hemodialysis had very low calcium absorption values at baseline, and cholecalciferol supplementation that raised 25(OH)D levels to 50 ng/ml had no effect on calcium absorption.

  11. Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM) Overview and Updates: DOLWG Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    What is Earth-GRAM (Global Reference Atmospheric Model): Provides monthly mean and standard deviation for any point in atmosphere - Monthly, Geographic, and Altitude Variation; Earth-GRAM is a C++ software package - Currently distributed as Earth-GRAM 2016; Atmospheric variables included: pressure, density, temperature, horizontal and vertical winds, speed of sound, and atmospheric constituents; Used by engineering community because of ability to create dispersions in atmosphere at a rapid runtime - Often embedded in trajectory simulation software; Not a forecast model; Does not readily capture localized atmospheric effects.

  12. The importance of medical education accreditation standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zanten, Marta; Boulet, John R; Greaves, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative and absolute importance of individual standards used by accreditation agencies throughout the world. We developed a 150-item survey that consisted of all World Federation for Medical Education standards, supplemented with additional standards used around the world. International accreditation experts rated the standards based on the importance of each standard for ensuring the quality of undergraduate medical education. A 3-point scale was employed: 1 = not important, 2 = important but not essential, 3 = essential. Thirteen of 22 chosen experts anonymously completed the survey (59%). The mean values, over raters, across individual standards ranged from 2.32 to 2.87, indicating that most of the 150 standards are at least important, and often essential, for ensuring program quality. Fourteen standards received the highest rating of 3 ("Essential") from all experts, and four standards received mean ratings ≤2.00. Variability in the ratings across the experts for individual standards ranged from 0.00 (unanimous agreement) to 0.76 (moderate disagreement). While there is some global variation in experts' opinions of accreditation standards, certain standards are considered essential. Our summary data are useful for determining best practices for medical education accreditation systems.

  13. Surveillance of the armed forces as a sentinel system for detecting adverse effects of dietary supplements in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Harris R; Austin, Krista G; Farina, Emily K

    2018-04-01

    Half the US population takes dietary supplements, but surveillance systems available to regulatory and public health authorities to determine whether specific dietary supplements present a risk are inadequate and numerous severe injuries and deaths have occurred from their consumption. Uniformed military personnel regularly use dietary supplements and are more likely to use potentially dangerous supplements than civilians. Recently, the supplement 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA) was marketed for physical performance-enhancement and weight loss. However, after over 100 reports of illness attributed to DMAA, including six deaths, the Food and Drug Administration issued a warning to cease its sale. When DMAA was legal (2010-2011), we conducted, using convenience samples, supplement surveys of service members and determined prevalence of use and self-reported symptoms of DMAA use. We surveyed 4374 armed forces personnel using a standardized dietary supplement survey administered by local health-care professionals. Overall, 11 % of survey respondents used dietary supplements labelled as containing DMAA at least once/week. Regular users were over two times more likely to report tachycardia (Psupplements using electronic surveys and medical records. Since armed forces personnel are much more likely than civilians to use potentially dangerous dietary supplements like DMAA, near real-time surveillance of them using electronic surveys and medical records would provide early warning to regulatory agencies and the medical and public health communities when high-risk dietary supplements are introduced.

  14. Particle Suspension Mechanisms - Supplemental Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, M B

    2011-03-03

    This supplemental material provides a brief introduction to particle suspension mechanisms that cause exfoliated skin cells to become and remain airborne. The material presented here provides additional context to the primary manuscript and serves as background for designing possible future studies to assess the impact of skin cells as a source of infectious aerosols. This introduction is not intended to be comprehensive and interested readers are encouraged to consult the references cited.

  15. [Sensory evaluation of enteral nutritional supplements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granell Vidal, Lina; Sánchez Juan, Carlos; Alfonso García, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    Enteral nutrition (EN) is indicated in patients who, although they may not eat enough food, maintain a sufficient function to receive, digest and absorb nutrients digestive system. Oral Nutritional Supplements (SON) are nutritionally complete or incomplete formulas (depending on whether or not provide all the nutrients needed to serve as the sole source of nutrients), which supplement inadequate oral diet. This study aims to evaluate the organoleptic characteristics of hyperproteic, normoproteic and fiber-enriched oral SON. SON test, carried out at the Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition Consortium Hospital General Universitario de Valencia from October 2012 to February 2013. 137 SON were evaluated in total, of which 47 were hyperproteic, 46 normoproteic and 44 enriched in fiber. Of the SON evaluated in the group of hyperproteic the following 3 SON obtained the best scores: Fresenius Prot Energy Drink® (21,27, vanilla flavor), Avant Standard Nut® (20.3 , strawberry flavor) and Resource® Protein (20.01, chocolate flavor) In the group of normoproteic SON the 3 best rated were: Ensure Plus® (22.3, banana flavor), Ensure Plus® (21.9, peach flavor) and Fresubin Energy Drink® (21, strawberry flavor) In the group of fiber-enriched the 3 SON most appreciated were: 2 Kcal Fresubin Fibre Drink® (23.78, vanilla flavor), Ensure Plus® TwoCal (22.9, banana flavor) and Fortimel Compact® (21.5, strawberry flavor) The study aims to guide clinicians on what SON may be more acceptable to the patient, so that the SON serve their purpose and restore or improve nutritional status, as the SON intervention is safe and cost - effective, since they improve both the functionality and quality of life. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. Global atmospheric moisture variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; James, Bonnie F.; Chi, Kay; Huang, Huo-Jin

    1989-01-01

    Research efforts during FY-88 have focused on completion of several projects relating to analysis of FGGE data during SOP-1 and on expanded studies of global atmospheric moisture. In particular, a revised paper on the relationship between diabatic heating and baroclinicity in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) was submitted. A summary of completed studies on diagnostic convective parameterization was presented at the Satellite Meteorology and Oceanography Convergence last February. These investigations of diabatic heating in the SPCZ have demonstrated the requirement for a more quantitative description of atmospheric moisture. As a result, efforts were directed toward use of passive remote microwave measurements from the Nimbus-7 SMMR and the DOD's Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI/I) as critical sources of moisture data. Activities this year are summarized.

  17. Venus Middle Atmosphere Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, F. P.; Sundaram, M.; Slanger, T. G.; Allen, M.; Yung, Y. L.

    2005-08-01

    Venus is the most similar planet to Earth, and years of research have sought to understand their similarities and differences. Yet, it is still not clear what chemical processes maintain the long-term stability of Venus' primarily CO2 atmosphere. CO2 dissociates into CO and O after absorbing photons at wavelengths Express will be reviewed. Recent work evaluating newly proposed mechanisms for producing CO2, which could be important depending on the rates of poorly constrained reactions, will be described. This research was supported by funding from NASA's Planetary Atmospheres program and the Australian Research Council. Part of this work was carried out by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. [1] Nair, et al., Icarus 111, 124 (1994), [2] Trauger and Lunine, Icarus 55, 272 (1983), [3] Pernice, et al., PNAS 101, 14007 (2004)

  18. Atmospheric lepton fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaisser Thomas K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review of atmospheric muons and neutrinos emphasizes the high energy range relevant for backgrounds to high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. After a brief historical introduction, the main distinguishing features of atmospheric νμ and νe are discussed, along with the implications of the muon charge ratio for the νµ / ν̅µ ratio. Methods to account for effects of the knee in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum and the energy-dependence of hadronic interactions on the neutrino fluxes are discussed and illustrated in the context of recent results from IceCube. A simple numerical/analytic method is proposed for systematic investigation of uncertainties in neutrino fluxes arising from uncertainties in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum/composition and hadronic interactions.

  19. Nutritional supplementation for Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Thomas B; Remington, Ruth

    2015-03-01

    Evidence for the benefit of nutrition in Alzheimer's disease continues to accumulate. Many studies with individual vitamins or supplements show marginal, if any, benefit. However, new findings with combinatorial formulations demonstrate improvement in cognitive performance and behavioral difficulties that accompany Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we review some of the most recent clinical advances and summarize supportive preclinical studies. We present novel positive effects on Alzheimer's disease derived from diet, trace elements, vitamins and supplements. We discuss the inherent difficulty in conducting nutritional studies because of the variance in participants' nutritional history, versus pharmacological interventions in which participants are naive to the intervention. We examine the evidence that epigenetics play a role in Alzheimer's disease and how nutritional intervention can modify the key epigenetic events to maintain or improve cognitive performance. Overall consideration of the most recent collective evidence suggests that the optimal approach for Alzheimer's disease would seem to combine early, multicomponent nutritional approaches (a Mediterranean-style diet, multivitamins and key combinatorial supplements), along with lifestyle modifications such as social activity and mental and physical exercise, with ultimate addition of pharmacological agents when warranted.

  20. Why US children use dietary supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Regan L.; Gahche, Jaime J.; Thomas, Paul R.; Dwyer, Johanna T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dietary supplements are used by one-third of children. We examined motivations for supplement use in children, the types of products used by motivations, and the role of physicians and health care practitioners in guiding choices about supplements. Methods: We examined motivations for dietary supplement use reported for children (from birth to 19 y of age; n = 8,245) using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2010. Results: Dietary supplements were used by 31% of children; many different reasons were given as follows: to “improve overall health” (41%), to “maintain health” (37%), for “supplementing the diet” (23%), to “prevent health problems” (20%), and to “boost immunity” (14%). Most children (~90%) who use dietary supplements use a multivitamin–mineral or multivitamin product. Supplement users tend to be non-Hispanic white, have higher family incomes, report more physical activity, and have health insurance. Only a small group of supplements used by children (15%) were based on the recommendation of a physician or other health care provider. Conclusion: Most supplements used by children are not under the recommendation of a health care provider. The most common reasons for use of supplements in children are for health promotion, yet little scientific data support this notion in nutrient-replete children. PMID:24002333

  1. Contaminants in the Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, H.; Bossi, R.; Wåhlin, P.

    This report presents the results of atmospheric monitoring in Nuuk, Greenland. A long series of heavy metals and persistent organic Pollutants (POPs) have been measured and model calculations have been carried out supporting the interpretation of the results. Financially, the Danish Environmental...... Protection Agency supported this work with means from the MIKA/DANCEA funds for Environmental Support to the Arctic Region and the work is part of the Danish contribution to Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme, AMAP...

  2. Atmospheric tides on Neptune

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dement'ev, M.S.; Morozhenko, A.V.

    1989-01-01

    The dependence of the equivalent width of the methane absorption band at 619 nm in the Neptune's spectrum upon the Triton's orbital position is discovered. It is assumed that observed changes of the equivalent width of the band and colour index (J - K) (Belton et al., 1981; Brown et al., 1981; Cruikshank, 1978) are due to atmospheric tides (period 2 d .9375) and Neptune's rotation (period 10 h .14)

  3. Mining the Mars Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, John E.; Sridhar, K. R.

    1997-01-01

    A series of concepts have been developed to mine the atmosphere of Mars and process it to extract or generate compressed carbon dioxide, compressed buffer gas mixtures of nitrogen and argon, water, oxygen, carbon monoxide, and/or carbon. Such products can be of use to science instruments, robotic, and human missions. The products can be for utility purposes, life support, propulsion (both interplanetary and on the planet's surface), and power generation.

  4. Atmospheric Disturbance Environment Definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, William G.

    1994-01-01

    Traditionally, the application of atmospheric disturbance data to airplane design problems has been the domain of the structures engineer. The primary concern in this case is the design of structural components sufficient to handle transient loads induced by the most severe atmospheric "gusts" that might be encountered. The concern has resulted in a considerable body of high altitude gust acceleration data obtained with VGH recorders (airplane velocity, V, vertical acceleration, G, altitude, H) on high-flying airplanes like the U-2 (Ehernberger and Love, 1975). However, the propulsion system designer is less concerned with the accelerations of the airplane than he is with the airflow entering the system's inlet. When the airplane encounters atmospheric turbulence it responds with transient fluctuations in pitch, yaw, and roll angles. These transients, together with fluctuations in the free-stream temperature and pressure will disrupt the total pressure, temperature, Mach number and angularity of the inlet flow. For the mixed compression inlet, the result is a disturbed throat Mach number and/or shock position, and in extreme cases an inlet unstart can occur (cf. Section 2.1). Interest in the effects of inlet unstart on the vehicle dynamics of large, supersonic airplanes is not new. Results published by NASA in 1962 of wind tunnel studies of the problem were used in support of the United States Supersonic Transport program (SST) (White, at aI, 1963). Such studies continued into the late 1970's. However, in spite of such interest, there never was developed an atmospheric disturbance database for inlet unstart analysis to compare with that available for the structures load analysis. Missing were data for the free-stream temperature and pressure disturbances that also contribute to the unStart problem.

  5. DREAMING OF ATMOSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldmann, I. P., E-mail: ingo@star.ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-01

    Here, we introduce the RobERt (Robotic Exoplanet Recognition) algorithm for the classification of exoplanetary emission spectra. Spectral retrieval of exoplanetary atmospheres frequently requires the preselection of molecular/atomic opacities to be defined by the user. In the era of open-source, automated, and self-sufficient retrieval algorithms, manual input should be avoided. User dependent input could, in worst-case scenarios, lead to incomplete models and biases in the retrieval. The RobERt algorithm is based on deep-belief neural (DBN) networks trained to accurately recognize molecular signatures for a wide range of planets, atmospheric thermal profiles, and compositions. Reconstructions of the learned features, also referred to as the “dreams” of the network, indicate good convergence and an accurate representation of molecular features in the DBN. Using these deep neural networks, we work toward retrieval algorithms that themselves understand the nature of the observed spectra, are able to learn from current and past data, and make sensible qualitative preselections of atmospheric opacities to be used for the quantitative stage of the retrieval process.

  6. DREAMING OF ATMOSPHERES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldmann, I. P.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we introduce the RobERt (Robotic Exoplanet Recognition) algorithm for the classification of exoplanetary emission spectra. Spectral retrieval of exoplanetary atmospheres frequently requires the preselection of molecular/atomic opacities to be defined by the user. In the era of open-source, automated, and self-sufficient retrieval algorithms, manual input should be avoided. User dependent input could, in worst-case scenarios, lead to incomplete models and biases in the retrieval. The RobERt algorithm is based on deep-belief neural (DBN) networks trained to accurately recognize molecular signatures for a wide range of planets, atmospheric thermal profiles, and compositions. Reconstructions of the learned features, also referred to as the “dreams” of the network, indicate good convergence and an accurate representation of molecular features in the DBN. Using these deep neural networks, we work toward retrieval algorithms that themselves understand the nature of the observed spectra, are able to learn from current and past data, and make sensible qualitative preselections of atmospheric opacities to be used for the quantitative stage of the retrieval process

  7. Model atmospheres for Betelgeuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, T. D.; Johnson, H. R.

    1973-01-01

    Detailed comparison of a series of stellar atmospheric models at effective temperatures of 3800 and 3500 K with scanner observations of Betelgeuse (alpha Ori, M2 Iab). The atmospheres are hydrostatic, flux-constant, LTE atmospheres which include the opacity of H2O, CO, CN, and atomic line blanketing. To reduce the flux shortward of 6000 A enough to agree with observations requires either strong atomic line blanketing (or a similar opacity source) or significant reddening, or (likely) both. The visual extinction (an estimate of which depends strongly on the line blanketing, especially in the 1- to 2-micron region) lies between 0.4 and 2.0 mag. Comparison of predicted strengths of observed CO and CN features with observations and of predicted column densities of CO, OH, NH, and H2O with published column densities suggests that C/H may be less than its solar value by about a factor of 10 and C/O may be less than 0.6 in Betelgeuse.

  8. Atmospheric radiation monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, M.A. Leigui de; Peixoto, C.J. Todero; Leao, M.S.A.B.; Luzio, V.P. [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), SP (Brazil); Barbosa, A.F.; Lima Junior, H.P.; Vilar, A.B.; Gama, R.G.; Ferraz, V.A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The Atmospheric Radiation Monitor (MonRAt) is a compact telescope designed to detect fluorescence photons generated in the atmosphere by ultra-high energy cosmic rays showers with energies in the interval between 10{sup 17} eV and 10{sup 18} eV. It is composite by a 64 pixels MultiAnodic PhotoMultiplier Tube (MAPMT) placed at the focus of a parabolic mirror mounted in a Newtonian telescope setup and the data acquisition system. In front of the MAPMT photocathode, filters will be positioned to select light with wavelength in the near ultraviolet region (300 nm < {lambda} < 450 nm) where the nitrogen fluorescent emissions occurs. The data acquisition system consists of a set of pre-amplifiers and FPGA-based boards able to record trigger times and waveforms from each channel and send the data to a computer by USB ports. MonRAt will be used to detect fluorescence photons under different atmospheric conditions (pressure, temperature, humidity, local geomagnetic field, etc) and will contribute with a detailed study of the fluorescence radiation yield. The assembly of the telescope is under way and we present in this work the status of the experiment and its first measurements in the laboratory. (author)

  9. Atmospheric radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.A. Leigui de; Peixoto, C.J. Todero; Leao, M.S.A.B.; Luzio, V.P.; Barbosa, A.F.; Lima Junior, H.P.; Vilar, A.B.; Gama, R.G.; Ferraz, V.A.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The Atmospheric Radiation Monitor (MonRAt) is a compact telescope designed to detect fluorescence photons generated in the atmosphere by ultra-high energy cosmic rays showers with energies in the interval between 10 17 eV and 10 18 eV. It is composite by a 64 pixels MultiAnodic PhotoMultiplier Tube (MAPMT) placed at the focus of a parabolic mirror mounted in a Newtonian telescope setup and the data acquisition system. In front of the MAPMT photocathode, filters will be positioned to select light with wavelength in the near ultraviolet region (300 nm < λ < 450 nm) where the nitrogen fluorescent emissions occurs. The data acquisition system consists of a set of pre-amplifiers and FPGA-based boards able to record trigger times and waveforms from each channel and send the data to a computer by USB ports. MonRAt will be used to detect fluorescence photons under different atmospheric conditions (pressure, temperature, humidity, local geomagnetic field, etc) and will contribute with a detailed study of the fluorescence radiation yield. The assembly of the telescope is under way and we present in this work the status of the experiment and its first measurements in the laboratory. (author)

  10. Dreaming of Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, I. P.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we introduce the RobERt (Robotic Exoplanet Recognition) algorithm for the classification of exoplanetary emission spectra. Spectral retrieval of exoplanetary atmospheres frequently requires the preselection of molecular/atomic opacities to be defined by the user. In the era of open-source, automated, and self-sufficient retrieval algorithms, manual input should be avoided. User dependent input could, in worst-case scenarios, lead to incomplete models and biases in the retrieval. The RobERt algorithm is based on deep-belief neural (DBN) networks trained to accurately recognize molecular signatures for a wide range of planets, atmospheric thermal profiles, and compositions. Reconstructions of the learned features, also referred to as the “dreams” of the network, indicate good convergence and an accurate representation of molecular features in the DBN. Using these deep neural networks, we work toward retrieval algorithms that themselves understand the nature of the observed spectra, are able to learn from current and past data, and make sensible qualitative preselections of atmospheric opacities to be used for the quantitative stage of the retrieval process.

  11. Balancing atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goreau, T.J. (Discovery Bay Marine Laboratory, Univ. of the West Indies (JM))

    1990-01-01

    Rising carbon dioxide and global temperatures are causing increasing worldwide concern, and pressure towards an international law of the atmosphere is rapidly escalating, yet widespread misconceptions about the greenhouse effect's inevitability, time scale, and causes have inhibited effective consensus and action. Observations from Antarctic ice cores, Amazonian rain forests, and Carribean coral reefs suggest that the biological effects of climate change may be more severe than climate models predict. Efforts to limit emissions from fossil-fuel combustion alone are incapable of stabilizing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Stabilizing atmospheric carbon dioxide requires coupled measures to balance sources and sinks of the gas, and will only be viable with large-scale investments in increased sustainable productivity on degraded tropical soils, and in long-term research on renewable energy and biomass product development in the developing countries. A mechanism is outlined which directly links fossil-fuel combustion sources of carbon dioxide to removal via increasing biotic productivity and storage. A preliminary cost-benefit analysis suggests that such measures are very affordable, costing far less than inaction. (With 88 refs.).

  12. Advanced Atmospheric Ensemble Modeling Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Chiswell, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kurzeja, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Maze, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Viner, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Werth, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-29

    Ensemble modeling (EM), the creation of multiple atmospheric simulations for a given time period, has become an essential tool for characterizing uncertainties in model predictions. We explore two novel ensemble modeling techniques: (1) perturbation of model parameters (Adaptive Programming, AP), and (2) data assimilation (Ensemble Kalman Filter, EnKF). The current research is an extension to work from last year and examines transport on a small spatial scale (<100 km) in complex terrain, for more rigorous testing of the ensemble technique. Two different release cases were studied, a coastal release (SF6) and an inland release (Freon) which consisted of two release times. Observations of tracer concentration and meteorology are used to judge the ensemble results. In addition, adaptive grid techniques have been developed to reduce required computing resources for transport calculations. Using a 20- member ensemble, the standard approach generated downwind transport that was quantitatively good for both releases; however, the EnKF method produced additional improvement for the coastal release where the spatial and temporal differences due to interior valley heating lead to the inland movement of the plume. The AP technique showed improvements for both release cases, with more improvement shown in the inland release. This research demonstrated that transport accuracy can be improved when models are adapted to a particular location/time or when important local data is assimilated into the simulation and enhances SRNL’s capability in atmospheric transport modeling in support of its current customer base and local site missions, as well as our ability to attract new customers within the intelligence community.

  13. Global Reference Atmospheric Model and Trace Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, C.; Johnson, D.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM-99) is an engineering-level model of the Earth's atmosphere. It provides both mean values and perturbations for density, temperature, pressure, and winds, as well as monthly- and geographically-varying trace constituent concentrations. From 0-27 km, thermodynamics and winds are based on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) climatology. Above 120 km, GRAM is based on the NASA Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET) model. In the intervening altitude region, GRAM is based on Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP) climatology that also forms the basis of the 1986 COSPAR Intemationa1 Reference Atmosphere (CIRA). MAP data in GRAM are augmented by a specially-derived longitude variation climatology. Atmospheric composition is represented in GRAM by concentrations of both major and minor species. Above 120 km, MET provides concentration values for N2, O2, Ar, O, He, and H. Below 120 km, species represented also include H2O, O3, N2O, CO, CH, and CO2. Water vapor in GRAM is based on a combination of GUACA, Air Force Geophysics Laboratory (AFGL), and NASA Langley Research Center climatologies. Other constituents below 120 km are based on a combination of AFGL and h4AP/CIRA climatologies. This report presents results of comparisons between GRAM Constituent concentrations and those provided by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) climatology of Summers (NRL,/MR/7641-93-7416, 1993). GRAM and NRL concentrations were compared for seven species (CH4, CO, CO2, H2O, N2O, O2, and O3) for months January, April, July, and October, over height range 0-115 km, and latitudes -90deg to + 90deg at 10deg increments. Average GRAM-NRL correlations range from 0.878 (for CO) to 0.975 (for O3), with an average over all seven species of 0.936 (standard deviation 0.049).

  14. The nitrogen cycle: Atmosphere interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Atmospheric interactions involving the nitrogen species are varied and complex. These interactions include photochemical reactions, initiated by the absorption of solar photons and chemical kinetic reactions, which involve both homogeneous (gas-to-gas reactions) and heterogeneous (gas-to-particle) reactions. Another important atmospheric interaction is the production of nitrogen oxides by atmospheric lightning. The nitrogen cycle strongly couples the biosphere and atmosphere. Many nitrogen species are produced by biogenic processes. Once in the atmosphere nitrogen oxides are photochemically and chemically transformed to nitrates, which are returned to the biosphere via precipitation, dry deposition and aerosols to close the biosphere-atmosphere nitrogen cycle. The sources, sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of the nitrogen species; atmospheric nitrogen species; souces and sinks of nitrous oxide; sources; sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of ammonia; seasonal variation of the vertical distribution of ammonia in the troposphere; surface and atmospheric sources of the nitrogen species, and seasonal variation of ground level ammonia are summarized.

  15. Variability in strength of red yeast rice supplements purchased from mainstream retailers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Pieter A; Avula, Bharathi; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2017-09-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has introduced manufacturing standards for dietary supplements, including red yeast rice, to assure their identity, purity, strength, and composition. One supplement commonly used to self-treat high cholesterol, red yeast rice, may contain monacolin K, an ingredient identical to prescription lovastatin. We examined whether FDA's manufacturing standards led to standard concentrations of the statin monacolin K in red yeast rice supplements. We analyzed 28 brands of red yeast rice supplements by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry for monacolin K content. Monacolin K was not detected in two brands. In the 26 brands that contained monacolin K, the quantity ranged more than 60-fold from 0.09 to 5.48 mg per 1200 mg of red yeast rice. Following the manufacturers' recommendations for daily servings, the quantity of monacolin K consumed per day would range more than 120-fold from 0.09 to 10.94 mg. Despite FDA manufacturing standards, strength and composition of red yeast rice supplements sold at mainstream retail stores in the United States remains unpredictable.

  16. Atmospheric Climate Experiment Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundahl, K.

    ACE+ is an atmospheric sounding mission using radio occultation techniques and is a combination of the two Earth Explorer missions ACE and WATS earlier proposed to ESA. ACE was highly rated by ESA in the Call for Earth Explorer Opportunity Missions in 1999 and was prioritised as number three and selected as a "hot-stand-by". A phase A study was carried out during 2000 and 2001. ACE will observe atmospheric parameters using radio occultations from an array of 6 micro-satellites which track the L- band signal of GPS satellites to map the detailed refractivity and thermal structure of the global atmosphere from surface to space. Water vapour and wind in Atmospheric Troposphere and Stratosphere WATS was the response to ESA's Call for Ideas for the next Earth Explorer Core Missions in 2001. WATS combines ACE GPS atmospheric occultations and LEO-LEO cross-link occultations. Cross-links strongly enhance the capability of measuring humidity relative to the ACE mission. The Earth Science Advisory Committée at ESA noted that the LEO-GNSS occultation technique is already well established through several missions in recent years and could not recommend WATS for a Phase A study as an Earth Explorer Core Mission. The ESAC was, however, deeply impressed by the LEO-LEO component of the WATS proposal and would regard it as regrettable if this science would be lost and encourages the ACE/WATS team to explore other means to achieve its scientific goal. ACE+ is therefore the response to ESA's 2nd Call for Earth Explorer Opportunity Missions in 2001 and will contribute in a significant manner to ESA's Living Planet Programme. ACE+ will considerably advance our knowledge about atmosphere physics and climate change processes. The mission will demonstrate a highly innovative approach using radio occultations for globally measuring profiles of humidity and temperature throughout the atmosphere and stratosphere. A constellation of 4 small satellites, tracking L-band GPS/GALILEO signals and

  17. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel

    OpenAIRE

    Morcillo, M.; de la Fuente, D.; Díaz, I.; Cano, H.

    2011-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of mild steel is an extensive topic that has been studied by many authors in different regions throughout the world. This compilation paper incorporates relevant publications on the subject, in particular about the nature of atmospheric corrosion products, mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion and kinetics of the atmospheric corrosion process, paying special attention to two matters upon which relatively less information has been published: a) the morphology of steel c...

  18. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel

    OpenAIRE

    Morcillo, Manuel; Fuente, Daniel de la; Díaz, Iván; Cano, H.

    2011-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of mild steel is an extensive topic that has been studied by many authors in different regions throughout the world. This compilation paper incorporates relevant publications on the subject, in particular about the nature of atmospheric corrosion products, mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion and kinetics of the atmospheric corrosion process, paying special attention to two matters upon which relatively less information has been published: a) the morpholog...

  19. Development of the National Bureau of Standards low-energy-photon-emission-rate radioactivity standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, J.M.R.; Mann, W.B.; Mullen, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    The National Bureau of Standards has recently developed point source low-energy-photon-emission-rate standards of 55 Fe, 85 Sr, 109 Cd and 125 I. The standardizations were performed using a defined solid angle, NaI(Tl) spectrometer that can be operated with gas fillings at atmospheric and reduced pressure. The corrections applicable to such a spectrometer have been discussed by W. B. Bambynek

  20. Heat transfer in the atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    1982-01-01

    The atmosphere is almost transparent to solar radiation and almost opaque to terrestrial radiation. This implies that in the mean the atmosphere cools while the earth's surface is heated. Convection in the lower atmosphere must therefore occur. The upward flux of energy associated with it

  1. Middle atmosphere dynamics and composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geller, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper we have adopted the term middle atmosphere to describe that region of the earth's atmosphere that lies above the tropopause but below an altitude of 100 km. In the following then, we will briefly touch on a few aspects of middle atmosphere dynamics and composition concentrating on only those topics that are important at middle and high latitudes. (orig./WL)

  2. The Dynamics of Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsson, Nils; Rasche, Andreas; Seidl, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper suggests that when the phenomenon of standards and standardization is examined from the perspective of organization studies, three aspects stand out: the standardization of organizations, standardization by organizations and standardization as (a form of) organization. Following a comp...

  3. Testing the effect of specific orders to provide oral liquid nutritional supplements to nursing home residents: a quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, E; Ward, K; Simmons, S F; Sarkisian, C A; Moore, A A

    2008-11-01

    To improve nursing home (NH) staff delivery of oral liquid nutritional supplements between meals to residents with a history of weight loss. Pre-Post intervention study. Two skilled nursing homes. Eighteen long term care residents. At baseline all participants had a non-specific physician's order to receive a nutritional supplement. The intervention consisted of specifying the physician's order as follows: "Give 4 oz high protein supplement at 10 am, 2 pm, and 7 pm". Research staff conducted direct observations for two days during and between meals for a total of 4 days, or 12 possible observation periods per participant before and one week following the intervention. Research staff documented NH staff delivery of snacks (including high protein supplements) and amount consumed (fluid ounces) for the high protein supplements using a standardized protocol during each observation period. Before the specific order was written participants were offered any type of snack an average of 1.82 times per day and a high protein supplement 0.59 times per day. After the specific order was written participants were offered any type of snack an average of 1.59 times per day and a high protein supplement 0.91 times per day. There were no statistically significant differences in the average number of times snacks or supplements were offered before and after the specific order was written. The proportion of snacks offered that were high protein supplements did increase after the specific order was written (psupplement was provided, most residents consumed 100% of it. Oral liquid nutritional supplements were not provided consistent with orders in NH practice. The specificity of the order related to type of supplement and time of delivery did not influence when and how often supplements are provided to residents but it did influence the type of nutritional supplement offered.

  4. Use of hormones and nutritional supplements among gyms' attendees in Riyadh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshammari, Sulaiman A; AlShowair, Mishal A; AlRuhaim, Abdulmalik

    2017-01-01

    taking it. The atmosphere in the gym can play an important role in members' decisions. Educating gym employees and members may have a positive influence on the use of supplements and hormones.

  5. Nagra thermochemical data base. II. Supplement data 05/92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, F.J.; Berner, U.; Hummel, W.

    1992-05-01

    Chemical thermodynamic data for aqueous species, minerals, and gases are required by Nagra for geochemical modelling. The Nagra thermochemical data base contains core and supplemental data. Core data for well-characterised entities were individually carefully selected and given by Pearson and Berner (1991). Supplemental data are for less common entities and for elements principally of safety assessment concern. They were selected in groups from other data bases for geochemical modelling and did not receive individual scrutiny. This report gives tables with the Nagra thermochemical data as of 5/92. It includes the core data described in the earlier report with supplemental data for the elements aluminium, silicon, iron, and manganese, the actinides thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium, and elements found as fission or activation products in nuclear waste, including nickel, zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, technetium, palladium, tin, selenium and iodine. Aqueous complexes of four representative organic anions are also included. The sources of these supplemental data are described in the text. Other compilations of data were examined during the selection on the supplemental data. These included the data bases used at the Paul Scherrer Institut with the geochemical programs MINEQL as of 3/91, PHREEQE as of 4/91, and the HATCHES 3.0 data base. This report also gives tables comparing selected data in these three data bases with values from the Nagra data base. This data base has not yet been tested for a full range of nuclear waste management applications, although such work is in progress. It should thus be regarded as a reference fixed point for quality assurance purpose and not critically reviewed standard. (author) tabs., refs

  6. Large-eddy simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer: Influence of unsteady forcing, baroclinicity, inversion strength and stability on the wind profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard

    above the atmospheric surface layer. Continuous and detailed measurements of mean winds and turbulence above the surface layer are expensive and difficult to obtain. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of the atmospheric flow can be an attractive alternative or supplement to field experiments...

  7. Athletes and Supplements: Prevalence and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garthe, Ina; Maughan, Ronald J

    2018-03-01

    In elite sport, where opponents are evenly matched, small factors can determine the outcome of sporting contests. Not all athletes know the value of making wise nutrition choices, but anything that might give a competitive edge, including dietary supplements, can seem attractive. Between 40% and 100% of athletes typically use supplements, depending on the type of sport, level of competition, and the definition of supplements. However, unless the athlete has a nutrient deficiency, supplementation may not improve performance and may have a detrimental effect on both performance and health. Dietary supplements are classified as a subcategory of food, so manufacturers are not required to provide evidence of product safety and efficacy, nor obtain approval from regulatory bodies before marketing supplements. This creates the potential for health risks, and serious adverse effects have been reported from the use of some dietary supplements. Athletes who compete in sports under an anti-doping code must also realize that supplement use exposes them to a risk of ingesting banned substances or precursors of prohibited substances. Government systems of regulations do not include specific laboratory testing for banned substances according to the WADA list, so a separate regulatory framework to evaluate supplements for their risk of provoking a failed doping test is needed. In the high-performance culture typical of elite sport, athletes may use supplements regardless of possible risks. A discussion around medical, physiological, cultural, and ethical questions may be warranted to ensure that the athlete has the information needed to make an informed choice.

  8. Intermittent structures in atmospheric wind fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yueksek, Oersan; Muecke, Tanja; Peinke, Joachim [Wind Center for Wind Energy Research, University of Oldenburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    For design processes and load calculations of wind energy convertors (WEC) realistic synthetic wind fields are needed. The widely used norm is the standard IEC 61400. The IEC standard considers different simulation methods based on Gaussian statistics. However, the analysis of the measured wind fields by means of velocity increment statistics yields that these do not obey Gaussian statistics but are quite intermittent. The intermittent nature of atmospheric wind affects the whole chain of the wind energy conversion process and is assumed to be a major effect for additional loads and fatigue. A recently proposed method based on continuous time random walks (CTRWs) adequately reproduces the intermittency of turbulent atmospheric velocity increments on small time scales and provides wind fields with the desired high order two point statistics. In this work, we analyze highly time-resolved data sets measured in an extensive grid over the whole rotor plane of a WEC. The atmospheric wind fields are characterized statistically and the dependency of the higher order two point statistics on turbulence intensity, mean wind speed and height is shown. With this knowledge we are able to generate synthetic CTRW wind fields with the correct small scale structure.

  9. MOBILE ATMOSPHERIC SENSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric quality dramatically deteriorates over the past decades around themetropolitan areas of China. Due to the coal combustion, industrial air pollution, vehicle waste emission, etc., the public health suffers from exposure to such air pollution as fine particles of particulates, sulfur and carbon dioxide, etc. Many meteorological stations have been built to monitor the condition of air quality over the city. However, they are installed at fixed sites and cover quite a small region. The monitoring results of these stations usually do NOT coincide with the public perception of the air quality. This paper is motivated to mimic the human breathing along the citys transportation network by the mobile sensing vehicle of atmospheric quality. To obtain the quantitative perception of air quality, the Environmental Monitoring Vehicle of Wuhan University (EMV-WHU has been developed to automatically collect the data of air pollutants. The EMV-WHU is equipped with GPS/IMU, sensors of PM2.5, carbon dioxide, anemometer, temperature, humidity, noise, and illumination, as well as the visual and infrared camera. All the devices and sensors are well collaborated with the customized synchronization mechanism. Each sort of atmospheric data is accompanied with the uniform spatial and temporal label of high precision. Different spatial and data-mining techniques, such as spatial correlation analysis, logistic regression, spatial clustering, are employed to provide the periodic report of the roadside air quality. With the EMV-WHU, constant collection of the atmospheric data along the Luoyu Road of Wuhan city has been conducted at the daily peak and non-peak time for half a year. Experimental results demonstrated that the EMV is very efficient and accurate for the perception of air quality. Comparative findings with the meteorological stations also show the intelligence of big data analysis and mining of all sorts of EMV measurement of air quality. It is

  10. Atmospheres of central stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummer, D.G.

    1978-01-01

    The author presents a brief summary of atmospheric models that are of possible relevance to the central stars of planetary nebulae, and then discusses the extent to which these models accord with the observations of both nebulae and central stars. Particular attention is given to the significance of the very high Zanstra temperature implied by the nebulae He II lambda 4686 A line, and to the discrepancy between the Zanstra He II temperature and the considerably lower temperatures suggested by the appearance of the visual spectrum for some of these objects. (Auth.)

  11. Habituating alarming atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie

    This paper proposes embodied rhythmic sound habituation as a possible resource when designing contextualized technologies in critical atmospheres. The main contribution is collating the concept of rhythm as presented by Henri Lefebvre with the concept of sound habituation to help operationalize...... accustomed to the alarming sounds through rhythmic interaction in the waiting room, and bringing the furniture with them afterwards as a secure anchor, when entering the ward. This rhythmic habituation can enable the child to focus her attention on the meeting with the hospitalized relative....

  12. The Viking atmosphere structure experiment - techniques, instruments, and expected accuracies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiff, A.

    1976-01-01

    During high speed entry and descent through the atmosphere of Mars, the two Viking spacecraft will make in situ measurements of the structure of the atmosphere. The profiles of temperature, pressure, and density with altitude will be defined from an altitude of about 100 km to touchdown, from measurements of the atmospherically induced deceleration and directly measured temperatures and pressures, the latter at altitudes below about 20 km. These data will be supplemented by on-board-radar altitudes and, below 8 km, by three component Doppler radar velocities. Winds will be derived from the Doppler velocities and from gyro records of vehicle attitude changes. The planet radius at the landing site, needed to interpret the atmospheric data, will be defined to within a few tenths of a kilometer from the measured acceleration due to gravity after landing. It is expected that temperature will be determined to within about 1 K in the lower atmosphere, and to within a few degrees up to 100 km; pressures to within a few percent; and wind velocities to within about 2 meters/second below 8 km. The design of the sensors is described, with emphasis on acceleration, temperature, and pressure, and the basis for the above error estimates is established. (Auth.)

  13. Optimal trajectory planning for a UAV glider using atmospheric thermals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagabo, Wilson B.

    An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Glider (UAV glider) uses atmospheric energy in its different forms to remain aloft for extended flight durations. This UAV glider's aim is to extract atmospheric thermal energy and use it to supplement its battery energy usage and increase the mission period. Given an infrared camera identified atmospheric thermal of known strength and location; current wind speed and direction; current battery level; altitude and location of the UAV glider; and estimating the expected altitude gain from the thermal, is it possible to make an energy-efficient based motivation to fly to an atmospheric thermal so as to achieve UAV glider extended flight time? For this work, an infrared thermal camera aboard the UAV glider takes continuous forward-looking ground images of "hot spots". Through image processing a candidate atmospheric thermal strength and location is estimated. An Intelligent Decision Model incorporates this information with the current UAV glider status and weather conditions to provide an energy-based recommendation to modify the flight path of the UAV glider. Research, development, and simulation of the Intelligent Decision Model is the primary focus of this work. Three models are developed: (1) Battery Usage Model, (2) Intelligent Decision Model, and (3) Altitude Gain Model. The Battery Usage Model comes from the candidate flight trajectory, wind speed & direction and aircraft dynamic model. Intelligent Decision Model uses a fuzzy logic based approach. The Altitude Gain Model requires the strength and size of the thermal and is found a priori.

  14. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) or lycopene supplementation attenuates ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction through different mechanistic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Bruna L B; Reis, Patrícia P; Severino, Fábio E; Felix, Tainara F; Braz, Mariana G; Nogueira, Flávia R; Silva, Renata A C; Cardoso, Ana C; Lourenço, Maria A M; Figueiredo, Amanda M; Chiuso-Minicucci, Fernanda; Azevedo, Paula S; Polegato, Bertha F; Okoshi, Katashi; Fernandes, Ana A H; Paiva, Sergio A R; Zornoff, Leonardo A M; Minicucci, Marcos F

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of tomato or lycopene supplementation on cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). Male Wistar rats were assigned to four groups: the sham group (animals that underwent simulated surgery) that received a standard chow (S; n=18), the infarcted group that received a standard chow (MI; n=13), the infarcted group supplemented with lycopene (1 mg of lycopene/kg body weight/day) (MIL; n=16) and the infarcted group supplemented with tomato (MIT; n=16). After 3 months, morphological, functional and biochemical analyses were performed. The groups MIL and MIT showed decreased interstitial fibrosis induced by infarction. Tomato supplementation attenuated the hypertrophy induced by MI. In addition, tomato and lycopene improved diastolic dysfunction evaluated by echocardiographic and isolated heart studies, respectively. The MI group showed higher levels of cardiac TNF-α compared to the MIL and MIT groups. Decreased nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 was measured in the MIL group. Lipid hydroperoxide levels were higher in the infarcted groups; however, the MIT group had a lower concentration than did the MI group [S=223±20.8, MI=298±19.5, MIL=277±26.6, MIT=261±28.8 (nmol/g); n=8; Ptomato or lycopene supplementation attenuated the cardiac remodeling process and improved diastolic function after MI. However, the effect of lycopene and tomato supplementation occurred through different mechanistic pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fingerprinting of Materials: Technical Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    This supplement to the Guidelines for Maintaining a Chemical Fingerprinting Program has been developed to assist NASA personnel, contractors, and sub-contractors in defining the technical aspects and basic concepts which can be used in chemical fingerprinting programs. This material is not meant to be totally inclusive to all chemical fingerprinting programs, but merely to present current concepts. Each program will be tailored to meet the needs of the individual organizations using chemical fingerprinting to improve their quality and reliability in the production of aerospace systems.

  16. Gastric Injury From Oral Iron Supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-22

    gastritis is a known complication of oral supplementation but is not well recognized Leaming Objective 2: Recognize that the toxic effect of iron on...pill gastritis is a known complication of oral supplementation but is not well recognized Learning Objective 2: Recognize that the toxic effect of iron...material that stained positive for iron. Patient’s endoscopy findings were most consistent with pill gastritis from an oral iron supplement that had been

  17. Portsmouth Atmospheric Science School (PASS) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Clarence D.; Hathaway, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Portsmouth Atmospheric Science School Project (PASS) Project was granted a one-year no cost extension for 2001-2002. In year three of the project, objectives and strategies were modified based on the previous year-end evaluation. The recommendations were incorporated and the program was replicated within most of the remaining elementary schools in Portsmouth, Virginia and continued in the four middle schools. The Portsmouth Atmospheric Science School Project is a partnership, which includes Norfolk State University, Cooperating Hampton Roads Organizations for Minorities in Engineering (CHROME), NASA Langley Research Center, and the City of Portsmouth, Virginia Public Schools. The project seeks to strengthen the knowledge of Portsmouth Public Schools students in the field of atmospheric sciences and enhance teacher awareness of hands on activities in the atmospheric sciences. The project specifically seeks to: 1) increase the interest and participation of elementary and middle school students in science and mathematics; 2) strengthen existing science programs; and 3) facilitate greater achievement in core subjects, which are necessary for math, science, and technical careers. Emphasis was placed on providing training activities, materials and resources for elementary students (grades 3 - 5) and middle school students (grades 6 - 8), and teachers through a CHROME club structure. The first year of the project focused on introducing elementary students to concepts and activities in atmospheric science. Year two of the project built on the first year's activities and utilizes advanced topics and activities appropriate for middle school students. During the third year of the project, in addition to the approaches used in years one and two, emphasis was placed on activities that enhanced the Virginia Standards of Learning (SOL).

  18. Caustics of atmospheric waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A.

    2015-04-01

    Much like light and sound, acoustic-gravity waves in inhomogeneous atmosphere often have a caustic or caustics, where the ray theory predicts unphysical, divergent values of the wave amplitude and needs to be modified. Increase of the wave magnitude in the vicinity of a caustic makes such vicinities of primary interest in a number of problems, where a signal needs to be separated from a background noise. The value of wave focusing near caustics should be carefully quantified in order to evaluate possible nonlinearities promoted by the focusing. Physical understanding of the wave field in the vicinity of a caustic is also important for understanding of the wave reflection from and transmission (tunneling) through the caustic. To our knowledge, in contrast to caustics of acoustic, electromagnetic, and seismic waves as well as gravity waves in incompressible fluids, asymptotics of acoustic-gravity waves in the vicinity of a caustic have never been studied systematically. In this paper, we fill this gap. Atmospheric waves are considered as linear acoustic-gravity waves in a neutral, horizontally stratified, moving ideal gas of variable composition. Air temperature and wind velocity are assumed to be gradually varying functions of height, and slowness of these variations determines the large parameter of the problem. The scale height of the atmosphere can be large or small compared to the vertical wavelength. It is found that the uniform asymptotics of the wave field in the presence of a simple caustic can be expressed in terms of the Airy function and its derivative. As for the acoustic waves, the argument of the Airy function is expressed in terms of the eikonal calculated in the ray, or WKB, approximation. The geometrical, or Berry, phase, which arises in the consistent WKB approximation for acoustic-gravity waves, plays an important role in the caustic asymptotics. In the uniform asymptotics, the terms with the Airy function and its derivative are weighted by cosine

  19. Virtual Exploitation Environment Demonstration for Atmospheric Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, Stefano; Mantovani, Simone; Hirtl, Marcus; Santillan, Daniel; Triebnig, Gerhard; Fehr, Thorsten; Lopes, Cristiano

    2017-04-01

    The scientific and industrial communities are being confronted with a strong increase of Earth Observation (EO) satellite missions and related data. This is in particular the case for the Atmospheric Sciences communities, with the upcoming Copernicus Sentinel-5 Precursor, Sentinel-4, -5 and -3, and ESA's Earth Explorers scientific satellites ADM-Aeolus and EarthCARE. The challenge is not only to manage the large volume of data generated by each mission / sensor, but to process and analyze the data streams. Creating synergies among the different datasets will be key to exploit the full potential of the available information. As a preparation activity supporting scientific data exploitation for Earth Explorer and Sentinel atmospheric missions, ESA funded the "Technology and Atmospheric Mission Platform" (TAMP) [1] [2] project; a scientific and technological forum (STF) has been set-up involving relevant European entities from different scientific and operational fields to define the platforḿs requirements. Data access, visualization, processing and download services have been developed to satisfy useŕs needs; use cases defined with the STF, such as study of the SO2 emissions for the Holuhraun eruption (2014) by means of two numerical models, two satellite platforms and ground measurements, global Aerosol analyses from long time series of satellite data, and local Aerosol analysis using satellite and LIDAR, have been implemented to ensure acceptance of TAMP by the atmospheric sciences community. The platform pursues the "virtual workspace" concept: all resources (data, processing, visualization, collaboration tools) are provided as "remote services", accessible through a standard web browser, to avoid the download of big data volumes and for allowing utilization of provided infrastructure for computation, analysis and sharing of results. Data access and processing are achieved through standardized protocols (WCS, WPS). As evolution toward a pre

  20. Vitamin D Supplementation in Australia: Implications for the Development of Supplementation Guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Bilinski, Kellie; Talbot, Peter

    2014-01-01

    High rates of vitamin D deficiency and testing have been reported in Australia, yet there are few reports regarding vitamin D supplement use. Australian wholesale sales data was obtained for vitamin D supplements for the period 2000–2011. There has been a threefold increase in supplement sales over the past decade, whereby over A$94 million supplements containing vitamin D in Australia were sold during the year 2010. There were eighty-nine manufacturers that produce a variety o...

  1. Elderly patients compliance and elderly patients and health professional's, views, and attitudes towards prescribed sip- feed supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lad, H; Gott, M; Gariballa, S

    2005-01-01

    Although nutritional supplements are widely prescribed in hospital and community settings compliance with supplements and factors affecting compliance are not well understood. The aims of this study were therefore to examine compliance, factors that influence compliance, views and attitudes of elderly patients and their health professionals on prescribed oral nutritional supplements. Forty medically stable hospitalised elderly patients prescribed nutritional supplements by a hospital dietician after nutritional screening had their compliance with supplement intake measured. Sixteen patients prescribed nutritional supplements and their health professionals had their views and attitudes on the factors that influence compliance with supplements intake explored using qualitative face-to- face interviews and postal questionnaires respectively. Qualitative data analysis adhered to the principles of grounded theory and followed the 'Framework' approach. Quantitative data were entered on to a standard spreadsheet and simple descriptive statistics was examined. A total of 40 hospitalised elderly patient (Age range 60-91 yrs; mean age 78 years; 20 female); 24 doctors, 13 dietician and 33 nurses were recruited. The main finding of this study was that compliance with prescribed nutritional supplements was low in hospital and in the community. Only 43% of the study population consumed more than 80% of the prescribed amount. Factors that affected compliance included flavour, taste, texture and predictability of the supplements as well as personal preferences and life style. Health professionals dealing with elderly patients have wide-range and different views on the criteria used to prescribe nutritional supplements and factors affecting their subsequent intake. Compliance with prescribed nutritional supplements was low in hospital and in the community. Elderly patients and their health professionals have wide-range and different views on factors that influence compliance with

  2. Dietary supplements for preventing postnatal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brendan J; Murray, Linda; Beckmann, Michael M; Kent, Terrence; Macfarlane, Bonnie

    2013-10-24

    Postnatal depression is a medical condition that affects many women and the development of their infants. There is a lack of evidence for treatment and prevention strategies that are safe for mothers and infants. Certain dietary deficiencies in a pregnant or postnatal woman's diet may cause postnatal depression. By correcting these deficiencies postnatal depression could be prevented in some women. Specific examples of dietary supplements aimed at preventing postnatal depression include: omega-3 fatty acids, iron, folate, s-adenosyl-L-methionine, cobalamin, pyridoxine, riboflavin, vitamin D and calcium. To assess the benefits of dietary supplements for preventing postnatal depression either in the antenatal period, postnatal period, or both. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 April 2013). Randomised controlled trials, involving women who were pregnant or who had given birth in the previous six weeks, who were not depressed or taking antidepressants at the commencement of the trials. The trials could use as intervention any dietary supplementation alone or in combination with another treatment compared with any other preventive treatment, or placebo, or standard clinical care. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and assessed the risk of bias for the two included studies. Two review authors extracted data and the data were checked for accuracy. We included two randomised controlled trials.One trial compared oral 100 microgram (µg) selenium yeast tablets with placebo, taken from the first trimester until birth. The trial randomised 179 women but outcome data were only provided for 85 women. Eighty-three women were randomised to each arm of the trial. Sixty-one women completed the selenium arm, 44 of whom completed an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). In the placebo arm, 64 women completed the trial, 41 of whom completed an EPDS. This included study (n = 85) found selenium had an effect

  3. 13. Atmosphere and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mock, G.; Hammond, A.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter reports on past and current trends in the major forms of atmospheric pollution and on the relative contributions of the countries of the world to these emissions. It also reports on emissions of carbon dioxide from industrial processes - principally the combustion of fossil fuels - which is the largest single source of greenhouse gases and an appropriate target for initial efforts to limit emissions. Discussions are presented on the following: urban air pollution - sources, trends and effects (particulates, sulfur dioxide, smog and its precursors, indoor air pollution, carbon monoxide, lead); regional air pollution - sources, trends and effects (acid deposition, ground-level ozone, regional responses and emission trends, acceleration of ozone depletion); solutions (cleaning up stationary sources, corporate responsibility movement, reducing vehicle pollution); global climate treaty talks proceed; greenhouse gas emissions; and targets for limiting emissions

  4. Phytoremediation of Atmospheric Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    greenhouse gases produced by human activity are  carbon   dioxide , methane and  nitrous oxide.  Much attention has been directed toward CO2 mitigation...surface  ocean .   Acidification  and ultimately warming due to CO2 alone must be  addressed by removing CO2 from the atmosphere and prevention of further...as a  carbon  and energy source. One soluble MMO (sMMO)  system is expressed by some methanotrophs under conditions of low copper concentration and

  5. Effects of Standard and/or Glutamine Dipeptide and/or Omega-3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Supplemented Parenteral Nutrition on Neutrophil Functions, Interleukin-8 Level and Length of ... Standard TPN and glutamine and lipid emulsion with omega 3 fatty acids were given to colorectal cancer patients and the effects of these to neutrophil ...

  6. Folate supplementation in people with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Ruchita; Nettem, Sowmya; Madan, Simerjit S; Soe, Htoo Htoo Kyaw; Abas, Adinegara Bl; Vance, Leah D; Stover, Patrick J

    2018-03-16

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a group of disorders that affects haemoglobin, which causes distorted sickle- or crescent-shaped red blood cells. It is characterized by anaemia, increased susceptibility to infections and episodes of pain. The disease is acquired by inheriting abnormal genes from both parents, the combination giving rise to different forms of the disease. Due to increased erythropoiesis in people with SCD, it is hypothesized that they are at an increased risk for folate deficiency. For this reason, children and adults with SCD, particularly those with sickle cell anaemia, commonly take 1 mg of folic acid orally every day on the premise that this will replace depleted folate stores and reduce the symptoms of anaemia. It is thus important to evaluate the role of folate supplementation in treating SCD. To analyse the efficacy and possible adverse effects of folate supplementation (folate occurring naturally in foods, provided as fortified foods or additional supplements such as tablets) in people with SCD. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We also conducted additional searches in both electronic databases and clinical trial registries.Date of last search of the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 17 November 2017. Randomised, placebo-controlled trials of folate supplementation for SCD. Four review authors assessed We used the standard Cochrane-defined methodological procedures.Four review authors independently assessed the eligibility and risk of bias of the included trials and extracted and analysed the data included in the review. The quality of the evidence was assessed using GRADE. One trial, undertaken in 1983, was eligible for inclusion in the review. This was

  7. Atmospheric propagation of THz radiation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanke, Michael Clement; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.

    2005-11-01

    In this investigation, we conduct a literature study of the best experimental and theoretical data available for thin and thick atmospheres on THz radiation propagation from 0.1 to 10 THz. We determined that for thick atmospheres no data exists beyond 450 GHz. For thin atmospheres data exists from 0.35 to 1.2 THz. We were successful in using FASE code with the HITRAN database to simulate the THz transmission spectrum for Mauna Kea from 0.1 to 2 THz. Lastly, we successfully measured the THz transmission spectra of laboratory atmospheres at relative humidities of 18 and 27%. In general, we found that an increase in the water content of the atmosphere led to a decrease in the THz transmission. We identified two potential windows in an Albuquerque atmosphere for THz propagation which were the regions from 1.2 to 1.4 THz and 1.4 to 1.6 THz.

  8. Atmospheric turbulence and diffusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosker, R.P. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (well known in the atmospheric dispersion community as the Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Laboratory, ATDL) is one of several field facilities of NOAAs Air Resources Laboratory, headquartered in Silver Spring, Maryland. The laboratory conducts research on matters of atmospheric diffusion and turbulent exchange, concerning air quality. ATDD focuses attention on the physics of the lower atmosphere, with special emphasis on the processes contributing to atmospheric transport, dispersion, deposition, and air-surface exchange, and on the development of predictive capabilities using the results of this research. Research is directed toward issues of national and global importance related to the missions of DOE, to DOE's Oak Ridge Field Office, and to NOAA. The program is divided into four major projects: plume transport and diffusion in the planetary boundary layer, complex topography, canopy micrometeorology, and air-surface exchange

  9. Measurements of atmospheric electricity aloft

    OpenAIRE

    Nicoll, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the electrical characteristics of the atmosphere above the surface have been made for over 200 years, from a variety of different platforms, including kites, balloons, rockets and aircraft. From these measurements, a great deal of information about the electrical characteristics of the atmosphere has been gained, assisting our understanding of the global atmospheric electric circuit, thunderstorm electrification and lightning generation mechanisms, discovery of transient lumin...

  10. Stochastic background of atmospheric cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilk, G.; Wlodarczyk, Z.

    1993-01-01

    Fluctuations in the atmospheric cascades developing during the propagation of very high energy cosmic rays through the atmosphere are investigated using stochastic branching model of pure birth process with immigration. In particular, we show that the multiplicity distributions of secondaries emerging from gamma families are much narrower than those resulting from hadronic families. We argue that the strong intermittent like behaviour found recently in atmospheric families results from the fluctuations in the cascades themselves and are insensitive to the details of elementary interactions

  11. Pharmacokinetic Interactions between Drugs and Botanical Dietary Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprouse, Alyssa A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of botanical dietary supplements has grown steadily over the last 20 years despite incomplete information regarding active constituents, mechanisms of action, efficacy, and safety. An important but underinvestigated safety concern is the potential for popular botanical dietary supplements to interfere with the absorption, transport, and/or metabolism of pharmaceutical agents. Clinical trials of drug–botanical interactions are the gold standard and are usually carried out only when indicated by unexpected consumer side effects or, preferably, by predictive preclinical studies. For example, phase 1 clinical trials have confirmed preclinical studies and clinical case reports that St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) induces CYP3A4/CYP3A5. However, clinical studies of most botanicals that were predicted to interact with drugs have shown no clinically significant effects. For example, clinical trials did not substantiate preclinical predictions that milk thistle (Silybum marianum) would inhibit CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and/or CYP3A4. Here, we highlight discrepancies between preclinical and clinical data concerning drug–botanical interactions and critically evaluate why some preclinical models perform better than others in predicting the potential for drug–botanical interactions. Gaps in knowledge are also highlighted for the potential of some popular botanical dietary supplements to interact with therapeutic agents with respect to absorption, transport, and metabolism. PMID:26438626

  12. Pharmacokinetic Interactions between Drugs and Botanical Dietary Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprouse, Alyssa A; van Breemen, Richard B

    2016-02-01

    The use of botanical dietary supplements has grown steadily over the last 20 years despite incomplete information regarding active constituents, mechanisms of action, efficacy, and safety. An important but underinvestigated safety concern is the potential for popular botanical dietary supplements to interfere with the absorption, transport, and/or metabolism of pharmaceutical agents. Clinical trials of drug-botanical interactions are the gold standard and are usually carried out only when indicated by unexpected consumer side effects or, preferably, by predictive preclinical studies. For example, phase 1 clinical trials have confirmed preclinical studies and clinical case reports that St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) induces CYP3A4/CYP3A5. However, clinical studies of most botanicals that were predicted to interact with drugs have shown no clinically significant effects. For example, clinical trials did not substantiate preclinical predictions that milk thistle (Silybum marianum) would inhibit CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and/or CYP3A4. Here, we highlight discrepancies between preclinical and clinical data concerning drug-botanical interactions and critically evaluate why some preclinical models perform better than others in predicting the potential for drug-botanical interactions. Gaps in knowledge are also highlighted for the potential of some popular botanical dietary supplements to interact with therapeutic agents with respect to absorption, transport, and metabolism. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  13. Airline policy for passengers requiring supplemental in-flight oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jacqueline; Kelly, Paul T; Beckert, Lutz

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the current Australian/New Zealand airline policy on supplemental in-flight oxygen for passengers with lung disease. Fifty-four commercial airlines servicing international routes were surveyed. Information was gathered from airline call centres and web sites. The survey documented individual airline policy on in-flight oxygen delivery, approval schemes, equipment and cost. Of the 54 airlines contacted, 43 (81%) were able to support passengers requiring in-flight oxygen. The majority (88%) of airlines provided a cylinder for passengers to use. Airline policy for calculating the cost of in-flight oxygen differed considerably between carriers. Six (14%) airlines supplied oxygen to passengers free of charge; however, three of these airlines charged for an extra seat. Fifteen airlines (35%) charged on the basis of oxygen supplied, that is, per cylinder. Fourteen airlines (33%) had a flat rate charge per sector. This study confirmed that most airlines can accommodate passengers requiring supplemental oxygen. However, the findings highlight inconsistencies in airline policies and substantial cost differences for supplemental in-flight oxygen. We advocate an industry standardization of policy and cost of in-flight oxygen.

  14. Influence of Moderate High-Pressure Homogenization on Quality of Bioactive Compounds of Functional Food Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encarna Aguayo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Current interest in health has led to an increase in demand for functional food supplements as well as in industry concern for maintaining the bioactive compounds of such foods via the application of new technologies. In this study, we evaluated the effect of moderate high-pressure homogenization (HPH treatments (80 and 120 MPa versus thermal treatment (80°C, atmospheric pressure on the functional bioactive compounds from four different functional supplements stored under accelerated conditions (40°C  ±  2°C and 75%  ±  5% relative humidity for 6 months. HPH proved to be a better alternative than thermal treatment for functional supplements containing heat-sensitive compounds such as vitamin C, vitamin A, and unsaturated fatty acids (10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid. The proanthocyanidin, cynarin, chlorogenic, and iron contents, however, were not initially affected by HPH treatments. The storage time caused important reductions in the majority of the compounds studied (mainly in vitamins C, B12, and A, although the lowest decrease was found in the HPH samples. The food matrix had an important effect on the final functional composition and required the optimization of HPH treatments for each functional food supplement. HPH is a recommended alternative to thermal treatment for functional food supplements, in particular when they are rich in thermolabile bioactive compounds.

  15. Supplemental report on cost estimates'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have completed an analysis of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 budget request for its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) program. The results were presented to an interagency review group (IAG) of senior-Administration officials for their consideration in the budget process. This analysis included evaluations of the underlying legal requirements and cost estimates on which the ERWM budget request was based. The major conclusions are contained in a separate report entitled, ''Interagency Review of the Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program.'' This Corps supplemental report provides greater detail on the cost analysis

  16. Dietary Supplements: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... product. How can I be a smart supplement shopper? Be a savvy supplement user. Here’s how: • When ... gov/Safety/ReportaProblem/ConsumerComplaintCoordinators • File a safety report online through the Safety Reporting Portal at: http://www. ...

  17. ∗-supplemented subgroups of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    complemented in G. In 1998, Ballester-Bolinches and Pedraza-Aguilera [2] introduced. S-quasinormally embedded ... concept of M-supplemented subgroups and characterized the structure of finite groups by ... A subgroup H of a group G is said to be M∗-supplemented in G if there exists a subgroup. K of G such that G = HK ...

  18. Nutritional supplement intake knowledge among university active ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study is to examine the nutritional supplement intake knowledge among university athletes. Fifty-one university athletes volunteered to participate in this survey study. Results showed the nutritional supplement intake was significantly higher compared to the knowledge that they have about the ...

  19. Attitudes towards nutritional supplement use amongst adult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nutritional supplements refer to a product ingested to increase the nutritional content of a normal diet, to fill a dietary need and/or presumed deficiency. The usage and popularity of nutritional supplements, however, raises concerns from a health benefit and risk perspective. In South Africa, there is currently no ...

  20. 18 CFR 740.13 - Supplemental instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Supplemental instructions. 740.13 Section 740.13 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL STATE WATER MANAGEMENT PLANNING PROGRAM § 740.13 Supplemental instructions. As deemed appropriate, the Council...

  1. Dietary supplements containing prohibited substances: A review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dietary supplements containing prohibited substances: A review (Part 2). P van der Bijl. Abstract. The role of prohormones, 'classic' and 'designer' steroids, clenbuterol, peptide hormones and newer molecules causing concern in dietary supplements is discussed. Apart from their potential adverse effects on athletes' health, ...

  2. Determinants of compliance to iron supplementation among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anemia in pregnancy is highly prevalent among antenatal clinic attendees in Enugu, Nigeria despite the practice of routine iron supplementation in pregnancy. The major problem with iron supplementation in pregnancy is compliance, and this may be a potential driver to the persistent high prevalence of ...

  3. Antioxidant supplements for preventing gastrointestinal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, G; Nikolova, D; Simonetti, R G

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative stress may cause gastrointestinal cancers. The evidence on whether antioxidant supplements are effective in preventing gastrointestinal cancers is contradictory.......Oxidative stress may cause gastrointestinal cancers. The evidence on whether antioxidant supplements are effective in preventing gastrointestinal cancers is contradictory....

  4. Carcass Yield and Composition of Supplementing Hararghe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carcass of lamb fed treatment diets 67FSF aand 100FSF have better maintained pH value within the desirable range. Hence, it can be concluded that feeding FSF to Hararghe highland sheep as a supplement to natural pasture hay based diet with sufficient protein supplement improved carcass yield and pH as compared ...

  5. 30 CFR 256.12 - Supplemental sales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the high bid was forfeited during the calendar year preceding the year of the supplemental sale in which they are reoffered or blocks for which high bids were forfeited in the same calendar year as the... Mexico Planning Areas. (e) The Director may disclose the classification of blocks in supplemental sales...

  6. USDA dietary supplement ingredient database, release 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL),Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center (BHNRC), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), USDA, in collaboration with the Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institutes of Health (ODS/NIH) and other federal agencies has developed a Dietary Supplement Ingredient ...

  7. Should infant girls receive micronutrient supplements?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Christine Stabell; Lund, Sofia; Fisker, Ane

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have proposed the hypothesis that the combination of vitamin A supplementation and diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination may be associated with increased mortality in girls. Recent zinc/folic acid (FA) and iron supplementation trials did not find any beneficial effects...

  8. Common dietary supplements for weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saper, Robert B; Eisenberg, David M; Phillips, Russell S

    2004-11-01

    Over-the-counter dietary supplements to treat obesity appeal to many patients who desire a "magic bullet" for weight loss. Asking overweight patients about their use of weight-loss supplements and understanding the evidence for the efficacy, safety, and quality of these supplements are critical when counseling patients regarding weight loss. A schema for whether physicians should recommend, caution, or discourage use of a particular weight-loss supplement is presented in this article. More than 50 individual dietary supplements and more than 125 commercial combination products are available for weight loss. Currently, no weight-loss supplements meet criteria for recommended use. Although evidence of modest weight loss secondary to ephedra-caffeine ingestion exists, potentially serious adverse effects have led the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to ban the sale of these products. Chromium is a popular weight-loss supplement, but its efficacy and long-term safety are uncertain. Guar gum and chitosan appear to be ineffective; therefore, use of these products should be discouraged. Because of insufficient or conflicting evidence regarding the efficacy of conjugated linoleic acid, ginseng, glucomannan, green tea, hydroxycitric acid, L-carnitine, psyllium, pyruvate, and St. John's wort in weight loss, physicians should caution patients about the use of these supplements and closely monitor those who choose to use these products.

  9. Reproductive performance by dairy cows fed supplemental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical metabolic disorders and clinical puerperal complications were not affected by chromium methionine supplementation. The results of this experiment showed that chromium methionine supplementation in multiparous dairy cows diet may improve their reproductive performance in transition period. Key words: Dairy ...

  10. Compliance Supplement. OMB Circular A-133.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC.

    This document is a supplement to Circular A-133 (1990) from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), which extended the government's "single audit process" for agencies that administer federal financial assistance programs to higher education institutions and non-profit organizations. This supplement is based on the 1996 Amendments …

  11. Methionine supplementation in the productive efficiency, carcass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of dietary methionine supplementation at varying levels on the productive efficiency, carcass characteristics and economics of growing indigenous turkey was investigated. Four Isocaloric and Isonitrogenous diets were formulated. The diets were supplemented with 0.00%, 0.05%, 0.10%, and 0.15% respectively.

  12. [Oral nutritional supplementation in hematologic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñalva, A; San Martín, A; Rosselló, J; Pérez-Portabella, C; Palacios, A; Julià, A; Planas, M

    2009-01-01

    Hematological patients often present anorexia which along with other secondary effects from the chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy treatments compromise their nutritional status. Oral supplementation can aid to fulfill the energy and protein requirements of these patients. Nevertheless, the use of commercial nutritional supplements normally available, is limited by its poor intake. To evaluate the degree of fulfillment of the prescribed supplements and fulfillment of energy requirements, as well as the development of nutritional status in hematological patients hospitalized for treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Prospective, randomized and open study of inpatients at the hematological ward. Patients were randomized sequentially and they were assigned into 3 different nutritional interventions providing: Group 1 (G1), a flavored supplement; Group 2 (G2): a non flavored (neutral) supplement and Group 3 (G3): "kitchen" foods as supplements. Need and amount of nutritional supplements were provided according to the oral intake previously analyzed. Nutritional assessment (at admission and discharge) was based in the Subjective Global Assessment test (SGA), Risk Nutritional Index (RNI) and percentage of lost weight. Both fulfillment of supplement intake and achievement of energetic requirements were analyzed. 125 patients of 51.3 +/- 16.8 years; 45% men and 55% women. 54% lymphoma, 33% leukemia, 8% myeloma and others 4%. Length of stay (LOS): 7.0 +/- 3.6 d. The nutritional assessment done by SGA showed significant negative changes in G2 and G3 (G1: 30% developed malnutrition and 28% improved their nutritional status, p = NS; G2: 50% developed malnutrition against 7% whom improved their nutritional status, p = 0.002; y G3: 37% developed malnutrition against 21% whom improved their nutritional status, p = 0.02). According to RNI, patients evolved negatively from their nutritional state but no significant differences were found within groups (G1, from 81% of

  13. Mineral supplementation in Tunisian smallholder dairy farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekhis, J.; Kouki-Chebbi, K.; Dhaouadi, B.; Khlif, K.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the experiment was to determine the effects of supplementation of di-calcium-phosphate in the form of blocks in late pregnancy (2 months before calving), on production and reproduction parameters of dairy cattle in smallholder farms. The experiment covered 63 animals in 20 smallholder farms, divided into control and supplemented groups. Results showed that mineral supplementation had a significant effect on calf weight, milk fat content and reproduction parameters. Calves born to cattle supplemented with di-calcium-phosphate were heavier by 1.67 kg than those in the control group. Similarly, the average milk fat content in the supplemented group was 5.6 g/L (P 0.05). (author)

  14. Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project. Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) prescribes several approaches to achieve its goal of doubling the salmon and steelhead runs of the Columbia River. Among those approaches are habitat restoration, improvements in adult and juvenile passage at dams and artificial propagation. Supplementation will be a major part of the new hatchery programs. The purpose of the Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) is to provide an overview of ongoing and planned supplementation activities, to construct a conceptual framework and model for evaluating the potential benefits and risks of supplementation and to develop a plan for better regional coordination of research and monitoring and evaluation of supplementation. RASP has completed its first year of work. Progress toward meeting the first year`s objectives and recommendations for future tasks are contained in this report.

  15. Commercially marketed supplements for bodybuilding athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunewald, K K; Bailey, R S

    1993-02-01

    We conducted a survey of 624 commercially available supplements targeted towards bodybuilding athletes. Over 800 performance claims were made for these supplements. Supplements include amino acids, boron, carnitine, choline, chromium, dibencozide, ferulic acid, gamma oryzanol, medium chain triglycerides, weight gain powders, Smilax compounds and yohimbine. Many performance claims advertised were not supported by published research studies. In some instances, we found no research to validate the claims; in other cases, research findings were extrapolated to inappropriate applications. For example, biological functions of some non-essential compounds were interpreted as performance claims for the supplements. Claims for others were based on their ability to enhance hormonal release or activity. We suggest that more research be conducted on this group of athletes and their nutritional needs. Furthermore, the effectiveness and safety of supplements merit further investigation.

  16. Standards for Standardized Logistic Regression Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Standardized coefficients in logistic regression analysis have the same utility as standardized coefficients in linear regression analysis. Although there has been no consensus on the best way to construct standardized logistic regression coefficients, there is now sufficient evidence to suggest a single best approach to the construction of a…

  17. Dietary red palm oil supplementation reduces myocardial infarct size in an isolated perfused rat heart model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterhuyse Adriaan J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Aims Recent studies have shown that dietary red palm oil (RPO supplementation improves functional recovery following ischaemia/reperfusion in isolated hearts. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary RPO supplementation on myocardial infarct size after ischaemia/reperfusion injury. The effects of dietary RPO supplementation on matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2 activation and PKB/Akt phosphorylation were also investigated. Materials and methods Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups and fed a standard rat chow diet (SRC, a SRC supplemented with RPO, or a SRC supplemented with sunflower oil (SFO, for a five week period, respectively. After the feeding period, hearts were excised and perfused on a Langendorff perfusion apparatus. Hearts were subjected to thirty minutes of normothermic global ischaemia and two hours of reperfusion. Infarct size was determined by triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Coronary effluent was collected for the first ten minutes of reperfusion in order to measure MMP2 activity by gelatin zymography. Results Dietary RPO-supplementation decreased myocardial infarct size significantly when compared to the SRC-group and the SFO-supplemented group (9.1 ± 1.0% versus 30.2 ± 3.9% and 27.1 ± 2.4% respectively. Both dietary RPO- and SFO-supplementation were able to decrease MMP2 activity when compared to the SRC fed group. PKB/Akt phosphorylation (Thr 308 was found to be significantly higher in the dietary RPO supplemented group when compared to the SFO supplemented group at 10 minutes into reperfusion. There was, however, no significant changes observed in ERK phosphorylation. Conclusions Dietary RPO-supplementation was found to be more effective than SFO-supplementation in reducing myocardial infarct size after ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Both dietary RPO and SFO were able to reduce MMP2 activity, which suggests that MMP2 activity does not play a major role in

  18. Stellar Atmospheric Modelling for the ACCESS Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Matthew; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Bohlin, Ralph; Kurucz, Robert; ACCESS Team

    2018-01-01

    A goal of the ACCESS program (Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars) is to enable greater discrimination between theoretical astrophysical models and observations, where the comparison is limited by systematic errors associated with the relative flux calibration of the targets. To achieve these goals, ACCESS has been designed as a sub-orbital rocket borne payload and ground calibration program, to establish absolute flux calibration of stellar targets at high resolution spectra in addition to the HST/CALSPEC data, we have generated stellar atmosphere models for ACCESS flight candidates, as well as a selection of A and G stars from the CALSPEC database. Stellar atmosphere models were generated using Atlas 9 and Atlas 12 Kurucz stellar atmosphere software. The effective temperature, log(g), metallicity, and redenning were varied and the chi-squared statistic was minimized to obtain a best-fit model. A comparison of these models and the results from interpolation between grids of existing models will be presented. The impact of the flexibility of the Atlas 12 input parameters (e.g. solar metallicity fraction, abundances, microturbulent velocity) is being explored.

  19. CONVECTION IN CONDENSIBLE-RICH ATMOSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, F. [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Pierrehumbert, R. T., E-mail: fding@uchicago.edu [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-01

    Condensible substances are nearly ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres. For the most familiar case—water vapor in Earth’s present climate—the condensible gas is dilute, in the sense that its concentration is everywhere small relative to the noncondensible background gases. A wide variety of important planetary climate problems involve nondilute condensible substances. These include planets near or undergoing a water vapor runaway and planets near the outer edge of the conventional habitable zone, for which CO{sub 2} is the condensible. Standard representations of convection in climate models rely on several approximations appropriate only to the dilute limit, while nondilute convection differs in fundamental ways from dilute convection. In this paper, a simple parameterization of convection valid in the nondilute as well as dilute limits is derived and used to discuss the basic character of nondilute convection. The energy conservation properties of the scheme are discussed in detail and are verified in radiative-convective simulations. As a further illustration of the behavior of the scheme, results for a runaway greenhouse atmosphere for both steady instellation and seasonally varying instellation corresponding to a highly eccentric orbit are presented. The latter case illustrates that the high thermal inertia associated with latent heat in nondilute atmospheres can damp out the effects of even extreme seasonal forcing.

  20. Hepatitis C and Dietary Supplements: What the Science Says

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digest for health professionals Hepatitis C and Dietary Supplements: What the Science Says Share: May 2016 © Thinkstock ... for Patients: Hepatitis C and Dietary Supplements Dietary Supplements Milk Thistle Milk thistle is known as silymarin, ...