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Sample records for standard antidiabetic drug

  1. [Perioperative handling of antidiabetic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J; Luber, V; Lock, J F; Dietz, U A; Lichthardt, S; Matthes, N; Krajinovic, K; Germer, C-T; Knop, S; Wiegering, A

    2018-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most frequent metabolic disorder in the western world with a prevalence of 3% in adults under 65 years of age and 14.3% in adults over 65 years of age. Due to the increasing age of our population, the number of patients taking oral antidiabetic drugs has increased. Thus, operating physicians must make a risk-adapted decision whether the medication can be continued perioperatively or if certain drugs must be paused, and if so, with what risks. Operative interventions can lead to a number of metabolic shifts, which change the normal glucose metabolism. Hyperglycemia in the perioperative period is a risk factor for postoperative sepsis, dysfunction of the endothelium, cerebral ischemia and poor wound healing. Due to perioperative fasting oral antidiabetic medication can lead to severe hypoglycemia if taken during this period. This leads to an increased morbidity and mortality in the perioperative period and extends the duration of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) as well as the overall hospital stay. Oral antidiabetic medication should be paused on the day of the operation and restarted in line with the gradual postoperative return to solid food. Especially metformin, the most commonly used medication in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, should be paused perioperatively due to the severe side effect of lactate acidosis.

  2. Newer antidiabetic drugs and calorie restriction mimicry

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    Sanjay Kalra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available De-acceleration of aging and delayed development of age-related morbidity accompanies the restriction of calories (without malnutrition in laboratory mice, nematodes, yeast, fish, and dogs. Recent results from long-term longitudinal studies conducted on primates have suggested longevity benefits of a 30% restriction of calories in rhesus monkeys as well. Among calorie restricted rhesus monkeys one of the mechanisms for the improvement in lifespan was the reduction in the development of glucose intolerance and cardiovascular disease. Although there are no comparable human studies, it is likely that metabolic and longevity benefits will accompany a reduction in calories in humans as well. However, considering the difficulties in getting healthy adults to limit food intake science has focused on understanding the biochemical processes that accompany calorie restriction (CR to formulate drugs that would mimic the effects of CR without the need to actually restrict calories. Drugs in this emerging therapeutic field are called CR mimetics. Some of the currently used anti-diabetic agents may have some CR mimetic like effects. This review focuses on the CR mimetic properties of the currently available anti-diabetic agents.

  3. Recommendations on the effect of antidiabetic drugs in bone.

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    Rozas-Moreno, Pedro; Reyes-García, Rebeca; Jódar-Gimeno, Esteban; Varsavsky, Mariela; Luque-Fernández, Inés; Cortés-Berdonces, María; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    To provide recommendations on the effect of antidiabetic drugs on bone fragility to help select the most adequate antidiabetic treatment, especially in diabetic patients with high risk of fracture. Members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology. The GRADE system (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) was used to establish both the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. A systematic search was made in MEDLINE (Pubmed) using the following terms associated to the name of each antidiabetic drug: AND "osteoporosis", "fractures", "bone mineral density", "bone markers", "calciotropic hormones". Papers in English with publication date before 30 April 2016 were reviewed. Recommendations were jointly discussed by the Working Group. The document summaries the data on the potential effects of antidiabetic drugs on bone metabolism and fracture risk. Copyright © 2017 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Transporter-Mediated Drug–Drug Interactions with Oral Antidiabetic Drugs

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    Jörg König

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Uptake transporters (e.g., members of the SLC superfamily of solute carriers and export proteins (e.g., members of the ABC transporter superfamily are important determinants for the pharmacokinetics of drugs. Alterations of drug transport due to concomitantly administered drugs that interfere with drug transport may alter the kinetics of drug substrates. In vitro and in vivo studies indicate that many drugs used for the treatment of metabolic disorders and cardiovascular diseases (e.g., oral antidiabetic drugs, statins are substrates for uptake transporters and export proteins expressed in the intestine, the liver and the kidney. Since most patients with type 2 diabetes receive more than one drug, transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions are important molecular mechanisms leading to alterations in oral antidiabetic drug pharmacokinetics with the risk of adverse drug reactions. This review focuses on uptake transporters of the SLCO/SLC21 (OATP and SLC22 (OCT/OAT family of solute carriers and export pumps of the ABC (ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily (especially P-glycoprotein as well as the export proteins of the SLC47 (MATE family and their role for transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions with oral antidiabetic drugs.

  5. Optimizing weight control in diabetes: antidiabetic drug selection

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    S Kalra

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available S Kalra1, B Kalra1, AG Unnikrishnan2, N Agrawal3, S Kumar41Bharti Hospital, Karnal; 2Amrita Institute of Medical Science, Kochi; 3Medical College, Gwalior; 4Excel Life Sciences, Noida, IndiaDate of preparation: 18th August 2010Conflict of interest: SK has received speaker fees from Novo Nordisk, sanofi-aventis, MSD, Eli Lilly, BMS, and AstraZeneca.Clinical question: Which antidiabetic drugs provide optimal weight control in patients with type 2 diabetes?Results: Metformin reduces weight gain, and may cause weight loss, when given alone or in combination with other drugs. Pioglitazone and rosiglitazone use is associated with weight gain. Use of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 analogs, liraglutide and exenatide, is associated with weight loss. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors are considered weight-neutral. Results with insulin therapy are conflicting. Insulin detemir provides weight control along with glycemic control.Implementation: • Weight gain is considered an inevitable part of good glycemic control using conventional modalities of treatment such as sulfonylureas.• Use of metformin, weight-sparing insulin analogs such as insulin detemir, and liraglutide, should be encouraged as monotherapy, or in combination with other drugs.Keywords: weight control, diabetes

  6. Isolation and Determination of Fomentariol: Novel Potential Antidiabetic Drug from Fungal Material

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    Nevena Maljurić

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the leading world’s public health problems. Therefore, it is of a huge interest to develop new antidiabetic drugs. Apart from traditional therapy of diabetes, nowadays, importance is given to natural substances with antidiabetic potential. Fomes fomentarius is a mushroom widely used for different purposes, due to its range of already confirmed activities. Fomentariol is a constituent of Fomes fomentarius, responsible for its antidiabetic potential. In that respect, it is important to develop a method for isolation and quantification of fomentariol from fungal material, which will be simple and efficient. Multistep, complex extraction applied in the previously reported studies was avoided with ethanol, providing rapid single-step extraction. The presence of fomentariol in ethanolic extract was confirmed by high-resolution mass spectrometry. Semipreparative HPLC method was developed and applied for isolation from ethanol extract and purification of the active compound fomentariol. It was a gradient reversed-phase method with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and 0.1% formic acid in water and total run time of 15 minutes. The amount of 6.5 mg of high-purity fomentariol was determined by quantitative NMR with toluene as internal standard. The isolated and determined amount of substance can be further used for the quantitative estimation of activity of fomentariol.

  7. Clinical usage of hypolipidemic and antidiabetic drugs in the prevention and treatment of cancer.

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    Berstein, Lev M

    2005-06-28

    Factors predisposing hormone-dependent tissues to the development of tumors coincide, at least partly, with hormonal-metabolic promoters (like insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, visceral obesity, etc.) of other main non-communicable diseases. This important knowledge poses the question of whether the same approach which is applied for prevention/treatment of a metabolic syndrome and the associated endocrine disorders might also be used in preventive and therapeutic oncology. Whereas an answer to this question remains controversial and is based mainly on experimental evidence, there is accumulating clinical data suggesting a practical significance of such a strategy, even though it is not to be considered as directly cytostatic. Among the many drugs under discussion, three groups of medicines (statins, antidiabetic biguanides, and thiazolidinediones) are the most attractive. The concept of metabolic rehabilitation is proposed and used practically in an adjuvant setting for the correction of the above-mentioned endocrine-metabolic disorders commonly found in cancer patients. The current use and aim of this approach is to improve the survival of patients and limit cancer progression. Nonetheless, it also appears potentially useful as a neoadjuvant therapy as well as a prophylactic treatment earlier in life for specific groups of people with hormone-associated enhanced oncological risk. It seems possible that certain hypolipidemic and antidiabetic medicines with pleiotropic effects might be combined with traditional antisteroid prevention/therapeutic approaches in routine clinical situations as well as for overcoming resistance to standard cancer hormonal therapies including receptor-negative cases. Characteristic at the end of the 20th and at the beginning of the 21st century is an epidemic of diabetes and obesity, which might further increase the incidence of certain cancers. This makes it timely to apply hypolipidemic and antidiabetic drugs (in combination

  8. Rapid increase in the use of oral antidiabetic drugs in the United States, 1990-2001.

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    Wysowski, Diane K; Armstrong, George; Governale, Laura

    2003-06-01

    To describe the use of oral antidiabetic drugs for management of type 2 diabetes in the U.S. from 1990 through 2001. Data on oral antidiabetic drugs were derived from two pharmaceutical marketing databases from IMS Health, the National Prescription Audit Plus and the National Disease and Therapeutic Index. In 1990, 23.4 million outpatient prescriptions of oral antidiabetic agents were dispensed. By 2001, this number had increased 3.9-fold, to 91.8 million prescriptions. Glipizide and glyburide, two sulfonylurea medications, accounted for approximately 77% of prescriptions of oral antidiabetic drugs in 1990 and 35.5% of prescriptions in 2001. By 2001, the biguanide metformin (approved in 1995) had captured approximately 33% of prescriptions, and the thiazolidinedione insulin sensitizers (rosiglitazone and pioglitazone marketed beginning in 1999) accounted for approximately 17% of market share. Compared with patients treated in 1990, those in 2001 were proportionately younger and they more often used oral antidiabetic drugs and insulin in combination. Internists and general and family practitioners were the primary prescribers of this class of drugs. Consistent with the reported increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, the number of dispensed outpatient prescriptions of oral antidiabetic drugs increased rapidly between 1990 and 2001. This period was marked by an increase in the treatment of younger people and the use of oral antidiabetic drugs in combination. With the approval in the last decade of several new types of oral antidiabetic medications with different mechanisms of action, options for management of type 2 diabetes have expanded.

  9. A stewardship intervention program for safe medication management and use of antidiabetic drugs

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    Zhao RY

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rui-yi Zhao,1 Xiao-wen He,1 Yan-min Shan,1 Ling-ling Zhu,2 Quan Zhou3 1Clinical Nurse Specialist Section, Division of Nursing, 2Geriatric VIP Care Ward, Division of Nursing, 3Department of Pharmacy, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China Background: Diabetes patients are complex due to considerations of polypharmacy, multimorbidities, medication adherence, dietary habits, health literacy, socioeconomic status, and cultural factors. Meanwhile, insulin and oral hypoglycemic agents are high-alert medications. Therefore it is necessary to require a multidisciplinary team’s integrated endeavors to enhance safe medication management and use of antidiabetic drugs.Methods: A 5-year stewardship intervention program, including organizational measures and quality improvement activities in storage, prescription, dispensing, administration, and monitoring, was performed in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, People’s Republic of China, a 3,200-bed hospital with 3.5 million outpatient visits annually.Results: The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University has obtained a 100% implementation rate of standard storage of antidiabetic drugs in the Pharmacy and wards since August 2012. A zero occurrence of dispensing errors related to highly “look-alike” and “sound-alike” NovoMix 30® (biphasic insulin aspart and NovoRapid® (insulin aspart has been achieved since October 2011. Insulin injection accuracy among ward nurses significantly increased from 82% (first quarter 2011 to 96% (fourth quarter 2011 (P<0.05. The number of medication administration errors related to insulin continuously decreased from 20 (2011 to six (2014. The occurrence rate of hypoglycemia in non–endocrinology ward diabetes inpatients during 2011–2013 was significantly less than that in 2010 (5.03%–5.53% versus 8.27% (P<0.01. Percentage of correct management of

  10. Anti-diabetic drugs in the private and public sector in Dar es Salaam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To compare availability, cost, affordability and sources of anti-diabetic drugs between private and public health facilities in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Setting: Diabetic clinics in private and public health facilities in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Subjects: Eighty patients ...

  11. The impact of anti-diabetic drugs on colorectal cancer risk in a large ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to investigate whether an association between anti-diabetic drugs and the risk of colorectal cancer exists in women with diabetes mellitus (DM) in. Taiwan, we designed a population-based cohort study using data from Taiwan National Health Insurance. Database. There were 19,863 women aged 20 or older.

  12. Racial differences in long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy: a longitudinal cohort study

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    Meigs James B

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherence to oral antidiabetic medications is often suboptimal. Adherence differences may contribute to health disparities for black diabetes patients, including higher microvascular event rates, greater complication-related disability, and earlier mortality. Methods In this longitudinal retrospective cohort study, we used 10 years of patient-level claims and electronic medical record data (1/1/1992–12/31/2001 to assess differences in short- and long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic medication among 1906 newly diagnosed adults with diabetes (26% black, 74% white in a managed care setting in which all members have prescription drug coverage. Four main outcome measures included: (1 time from diabetes diagnosis until first prescription of oral antidiabetic medication; (2 primary adherence (time from first prescription to prescription fill; (3 time until discontinuation of oral antidiabetic medication from first prescription; and (4 long-term adherence (amount dispensed versus amount prescribed over a 24-month follow-up from first oral antidiabetic medication prescription. Results Black patients were as likely as whites to initiate oral therapy and fill their first prescription, but experienced higher rates of medication discontinuation (HR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.7 and were less adherent over time. These black-white differences increased over the first six months of therapy but stabilized thereafter for patients who initiated on sulfonylureas. Significant black-white differences in adherence levels were constant throughout follow-up for patients initiated on metformin therapy. Conclusion Racial differences in adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy persist even with equal access to medication. Early and continued emphasis on adherence from initiation of therapy may reduce persistent racial differences in medication use and clinical outcomes.

  13. A study on ethosomes as mode for transdermal delivery of an antidiabetic drug.

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    Bodade, Siddhodhan S; Shaikh, Karimunnisa Sameer; Kamble, Meghana S; Chaudhari, Praveen D

    2013-01-01

    A transdermal delivery system is warranted for repaglinide (RPG) which possesses half-life of 1 h and oral bioavailability of 56%. Ethosomes are useful tools for transdermal drug delivery. To prepare and evaluate ethosomes as mode for transdermal delivery of RPG. Ethosomes loaded with RPG were prepared from dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and ethanol by the cold method. They were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. They were evaluated for vesicle size, entrapment efficiency and ex-vivo skin permeation. Ethosomal composition was optimized using the 3(2) factorial design. Gel containing optimzsed ethosomes was studied for antidiabetic activity in rats. RPG ethosomes possessing the size of 0.171-1.727 µm and entrapment efficiency of 75-92% were obtained. They demonstrated a significantly higher permeation (64-97% of the administered dose) across excised rat skin when compared to free drug and its hydro alcoholic solution. In-vivo, RPG ethosomal system caused sustained antidiabetic effect. The lipid and ethanol concentration affected the physicochemical attributes and performance of ethosomes. The flexible ethosomes permeated the stratum corneum and improvized the availability of RPG for antidiabetic action. They prolonged the antidiabetic effect of RPG over a significantly longer period of time in comparison with the equivalent oral dose. Ethosomal system can successfully deliver RPG transdermally; sustain its effect and thus reduce its dosing frequency. Ethosomes are useful for enhancing the efficacy of RPG in the treatment of diabetes.

  14. Nanotechnology based approaches for anti-diabetic drugs delivery.

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    Kesharwani, Prashant; Gorain, Bapi; Low, Siew Yeng; Tan, Siew Ann; Ling, Emily Chai Siaw; Lim, Yin Khai; Chin, Chuan Ming; Lee, Pei Yee; Lee, Chun Mey; Ooi, Chun Haw; Choudhury, Hira; Pandey, Manisha

    2018-02-01

    Nanotechnology science has been diverged its application in several fields with the advantages to operate with nanometric range of objects. Emerging field of nanotechnology has been also being approached and applied in medical biology for improved efficacy and safety. Increased success in therapeutic field has focused several approaches in the treatment of the common metabolic disorder, diabetes. The development of nanocarriers for improved delivery of different oral hypoglycemic agents compared to conventional therapies includes nanoparticles (NPs), liposomes, dendrimer, niosomes and micelles, which produces great control over the increased blood glucose level and thus becoming an eye catching and most promising technology now-a-days. Besides, embellishment of nanocarriers with several ligands makes it more targeted delivery with the protection of entrapped hypoglycaemic agents against degradation, thereby optimizing prolonged blood glucose lowering effect. Thus, nanocarriers of hypoglycemic agents provide the aim towards improved diabetes management with minimized risk of acute and chronic complications. In this review, we provide an overview on distinctive features of each nano-based drug delivery system for diabetic treatment and current NPs applications in diabetes management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Induced desensitization of the insulinotropic effects of antidiabetic drugs, BTS 67 582 and tolbutamide.

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    McClenaghan, N H; Ball, A J; Flatt, P R

    2000-05-01

    Acute and chronic mechanisms of action of novel insulinotropic antidiabetic drug, BTS 67 582 (1, 1-dimethyl-2-(2-morpholinophenyl)guanidine fumarate), were examined in the stable cultured BRIN-BD11 cell line. BTS 67 582 (100 - 400 microM) stimulated a concentration-dependent increase (PBTS 67 582 in culture time-dependently decreased subsequent responsiveness to acute challenge with 200 microM BTS 67 582 or 200 microM tolbutamide at 12 - 18 h (PBTS 67 582 and tolbutamide. Culture with 100 microM BTS 67 582 or 100 microM tolbutamide did not affect basal insulin secretion, cellular insulin content, or cell viability and exerted no influence on the secretory responsiveness to 200 microM of the imidazoline, efaroxan. While 18 h BTS 67 582 culture did not affect the insulin-releasing actions (PBTS 67 582 shares a common signalling pathway to sulphonylurea but not imidazoline drugs. Desensitization of drug action may provide an important approach to dissect sites of action of novel and established insulinotropic antidiabetic agents.

  16. Induced desensitization of the insulinotropic effects of antidiabetic drugs, BTS 67 582 and tolbutamide

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    McClenaghan, Neville H; Ball, Andrew J; Flatt, Peter R

    2000-01-01

    Acute and chronic mechanisms of action of novel insulinotropic antidiabetic drug, BTS 67 582 (1,1-dimethyl-2-(2-morpholinophenyl)guanidine fumarate), were examined in the stable cultured BRIN-BD11 cell line. BTS 67 582 (100–400 μM) stimulated a concentration-dependent increase (PBTS 67 582 in culture time-dependently decreased subsequent responsiveness to acute challenge with 200 μM BTS 67 582 or 200 μM tolbutamide at 12–18 h (PBTS 67 582 and tolbutamide. Culture with 100 μM BTS 67 582 or 100 μM tolbutamide did not affect basal insulin secretion, cellular insulin content, or cell viability and exerted no influence on the secretory responsiveness to 200 μM of the imidazoline, efaroxan. While 18 h BTS 67 582 culture did not affect the insulin-releasing actions (PBTS 67 582 shares a common signalling pathway to sulphonylurea but not imidazoline drugs. Desensitization of drug action may provide an important approach to dissect sites of action of novel and established insulinotropic antidiabetic agents. PMID:10807689

  17. Antidiabetic drugs for stroke prevention in patients with type-2 diabetes. The neurologist's point of view.

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    Fuentes, Blanca

    2018-04-13

    To date, stroke prevention in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) has been based on the control of other risk factors and comorbidities, as clinical trials aimed at intensive glycemic control have failed to prove the existence of any sort of benefit in reducing macrovascular complications. However, thanks to the FDA's requirement to evaluate the vascular risk of antidiabetic drugs, there has been significant progress in the knowledge of their benefits on the risk of vascular death, acute myocardial infarction and non-fatal stroke in patients with type 2 DM and high vascular risk. This implies the need to incorporate these drugs into the overall vascular prevention strategy in patients with DM who have already suffered a stroke. This manuscript is a critical, non-systematic review on the oral antidiabetics that have demonstrated any sort of effect on stroke risk, interpreting the results of the main clinical trials from the neurologist's point of view. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Strychnos nux-vomica seeds: Pharmacognostical standardization, extraction, and antidiabetic activity

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    Rajesh Bhati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Strychnos nux-vomica, commonly known as kuchla, contains strychnine and brucine as main constituents. Minor alkaloids present in the seeds are protostrychnine, vomicine, n-oxystrychnine, pseudostrychnine, isostrychnine, chlorogenic acid, and a glycoside. Seeds are used traditionally to treat diabetes, asthma, aphrodisiac and to improve appetite. Objective: The present study was aimed to evaluate the various pharmacognostical characters and antidiabetic activity of S. nux-vomica seed. Materials and Methods: Pharmacognostical characters were performed as per the WHO guideline. Extraction was carried out in petroleum ether, chloroform, alcohol, hydroalcoholic, aqueous, and phytochemical constituents present in extracts were detected by different chemical tests. Among these extracts hydroalcoholic, aqueous extracts were evaluated for antidiabetic activity on the basis of extractive yield and phytoconstituents, in alloxan-induced diabetic rats using gliclazide as standard. Results: Various analytical values of S. nux-vomica extract were established. Phytoconstituents present in S. nux-vomica extracts were detected. Conclusion: S. nux-vomica extracts show antihyperglycemic activity in experimental animals.

  19. Micro-Environmental Signature of The Interactions between Druggable Target Protein, Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV, and Anti-Diabetic Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Mallick, Bidyut; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Sharma, Garima; Jagga, Supriya; Doss, C George Priya; Nam, Ju-Suk; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Druggability of a target protein depends on the interacting micro-environment between the target protein and drugs. Therefore, a precise knowledge of the interacting micro-environment between the target protein and drugs is requisite for drug discovery process. To understand such micro-environment, we performed in silico interaction analysis between a human target protein, Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV (DPP-4), and three anti-diabetic drugs (saxagliptin, linagliptin and vildagliptin). ...

  20. Carbon paste- and PVC membrane electrodes as sensitive sensors for the determination of antidiabetic drugs for type 2 diabetic patients.

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    Badawy, Waheed A; El-Ries, Mohammed A; Mahdi, Inas M

    2009-12-01

    Carbon paste- and polyvinyl chloride membrane electrodes are simple, precise, rapid and selective sensors for the determination of antidiabetic drugs for type 2 diabetic patients. These electrodes were successfully used for the potentiometric determination of rosiglitazone, pioglitazone, glimepiride and glyburide in their standard forms and also as pharmaceutical preparations. The preparation of these ion-selective electrodes for the potentiometric determination of the drug is based on the construction of a 10% standard drug-ion pair with reineckate or tungstophosphate imbedded as an electro-active material in the carbon paste or in the polyvinyl chloride membrane. The prepared ion-selective electrodes showed a Nernstian response with a limit of detection amounting to 10(-6) M in a pH range of 3 to 5. A good selectivity coefficient and long term stability could be achieved. The developed potentiometric method based on the CPE and PVC sensors is economic and less time consuming compared to the conventionally used high performance liquid chromatography, HPLC, methods.

  1. Role of the antidiabetic drugs: Glibenclamide and metformin on the contractility of isolated rat uteri.

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    Kelany, Mohamed Elsayed; Alqahtani, Saeed; Alkuriji, Afrah; Al-Omar, SulimanYousef

    2016-01-01

    The current investigation has designed to study the role of two antidiabetics, glibenclamide and metformin on the spontaneous uterine contractions in the non-diabetic non-pregnant female rats. The rat uteri were isolated and allocated to two groups: 1)the glibenclamide group: After recording the normal spontaneous uterine contractions, the vehicle (ethanol) and glibenclamide molar concentrations (10(-7), 10(-6) and 10(-5) M) were analyzed on uterine contractions by recording on smoked paper on a rotating kymograph drum, and 2) the metformin group: After recording the normal spontaneous uterine contractions, the metformin concentrations (10(-7), 10(-6) and 10(-5) M) were analyzed on uterine contractions. Responses to the two drugs and vehicle control (ethanol) were recorded for 30 min. Glibenclamide has not significantly effected on the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous contractions of the isolated rat uteri. Metformin also has no significant effect on the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous contractions of the isolated rat uteri. In conclusion, the two oral antidiabetics glibenclamide and metformin have not changed both the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous uterine contractions in the non-pregnant non-diabetic female rats.

  2. Metformin: a metabolic disruptor and anti-diabetic drug to target human leukemia.

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    Rosilio, Célia; Ben-Sahra, Issam; Bost, Frédéric; Peyron, Jean-François

    2014-05-01

    There is a global and urgent need for expanding our current therapeutical arsenal against leukemia in order to improve their actual cure rates and fight relapse. Targeting the reprogrammed, altered cancer metabolism is an emerging strategy which should profoundly affect cancer cells in their intimate and irrepressible needs and addictions for nutrients uptake and incorporation into the biomass during malignant proliferation. We present here how metformin, an anti-diabetic drug that has attracted a strong interest for its recently discovered anti-cancer properties, can be envisioned as a new adjuvant approach to treat leukemia. Metformin may have a double-edged sword effect (i) by acting on the organism to decrease hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinemia in diabetic patients and (ii) at the cellular level, by inhibiting the mTORC1-cancer supporting pathway through AMPK-dependent and independent mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative efficacy and safety of oral antidiabetic drugs and insulin in treating gestational diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui-ling; Ma, Shu-juan; Xiao, Yan-ni; Tan, Hong-zhuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The safety and efficacy of different drugs in treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) patients who could not maintain normal glucose level only through diet and exercise remains to be debated. We performed this network meta-analysis (NAM) to compare and rank different antidiabetic drugs in glucose level control and pregnancy outcomes in GDM patients. Methods: We searched PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Embase up to December 31, 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) related to different drugs in the treatment of GDM patients were enrolled. We extracted the relevant information and assessed the risk of bias with the Cochrane risk of bias tool. We did pair-wise meta-analyses using the fixed-effects model or random-effects model and then adopted random-effects NAM combining both direct and indirect evidence within a Bayesian framework, to calculate the odds ratio (OR) or standardized mean difference (SMD) and to draw a surface under the cumulative ranking curve of the neonatal and maternal outcomes of different treatments in GDM patients. Results: Thirty-two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in this NAM, including 6 kinds of treatments (metformin, metformin plus insulin, insulin, glyburide, acarbose, and placebo). The results of the NAM showed that regarding the incidence of macrosomia and LGA, metformin had lower incidence than glyburide (OR, 0.5411 and 0.4177). In terms of the incidence of admission to the NICU, insulin had higher incidence compared with glyburide (OR, 1.844). As for the incidence of neonatal hypoglycemia, metformin had lower incidence than insulin and glyburide (OR, 0.6331 and 0.3898), and insulin was lower than glyburide (OR, 0.6236). For mean birth weight, metformin plus insulin was lower than insulin (SMD, -0.5806), glyburide (SMD, -0.7388), and placebo (SMD, -0.6649). Besides, metformin was observed to have lower birth weight than glyburide (SMD, 0.2591). As for weight gain

  4. Pattern of anti-diabetic drugs prescribed in a tertiary care hospital of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zuhayer; Hafez, M A; Bari, M A; Akhter, Jesmin

    2016-01-01

    Globally, diabetes mellitus is a common endocrine disorder. This study was conducted for collecting the demographic details of diabetic patients and determining the pattern of drugs prescribed among them in outpatient department of a tertiary healthcare center. A descriptive type of cross-sectional study was carried out at the outpatient department of Endocrinology, Dhaka Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh from 1 May to 31 July, 2015. Diabetic patients receiving the management for at least 6 months were enrolled and interviewed by the researchers after getting informed written consent. Structured case record form was used for demographic data & prescription details. Data were analysed using computer in SPSS 22 and Microsoft Excel 2010. Altogether 105 patients, 40 males (38.1%) and 65 females (61.9%) were enrolled with urban predominance (69.5%) where 51 (48.6%) were in the age group 47-61 years with a mean of 53.4 (SD±10.6) years. 70 (66.7%) had diabetic history of less than 5 years and 66 (62.9%) had at least one concurrent illness. Hypertension accounted for majority (34.3%) of complications. On an average, 5.62 (SD±3.16) drugs were advised per prescription for diabetes as well as associated co-morbidities and majority (23.8%) had 4 drugs. The majority of drugs (74.3%) were from local manufacturers. Most patients (62.9%) were prescribed with oral drugs singly. Metformin alone predominated in 41% prescriptions followed by the combination of Metformin and Sitagliptin (31.4%). The findings can serve as a guide to choose the formulation and combination of anti-diabetic drugs in this part of the world before developing & marketing any new drug.

  5. C18-attached membrane funnel-based spray ionization mass spectrometry for quantification of anti-diabetic drug from human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wan; Chen, Xiangfeng; Wong, Y-L Elaine; Hung, Y-L Winnie; Wang, Ze; Deng, Liulin; Dominic Chan, T-W

    2016-08-24

    In this work, sorbent-attached membrane funnel-based spray ionization mass spectrometry was explored for quantitative analysis of anti-diabetic drugs spiked in human plasma. C18-attached membrane funnel was fabricated for in situ extraction and clean-up to alleviate matrix suppression effect in the ionization process. Repaglinide was used as a target analyte of anti-diabetic drugs. Under optimal working conditions, good linearity (R(2) > 0.99) was obtained in the concentration range of 1-100 ng mL(-1). The method detection limit of target drugs spiked in the human plasma was around 0.30 ng mL(-1). Through the application of an isotope-labeled internal standard, the signal fluctuation caused by residual background matrices was largely alleviated and the precision of measurement (RSD) was below 15%. The recovery of repaglinide for 5, 25, and 100 ng mL(-1) of spiked human plasma matrixes ranged from 87% to 112%. The developed method was successfully applied to determine repaglinide in plasma volunteers who orally received a dose of drug association. Our results demonstrated that membrane funnel-based spray is a simple and sensitive method for rapid screening analysis of complex biological samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Micro-Environmental Signature of The Interactions between Druggable Target Protein, Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV, and Anti-Diabetic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Mallick, Bidyut; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Sharma, Garima; Jagga, Supriya; Doss, C George Priya; Nam, Ju-Suk; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Druggability of a target protein depends on the interacting micro-environment between the target protein and drugs. Therefore, a precise knowledge of the interacting micro-environment between the target protein and drugs is requisite for drug discovery process. To understand such micro-environment, we performed in silico interaction analysis between a human target protein, Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV (DPP-4), and three anti-diabetic drugs (saxagliptin, linagliptin and vildagliptin). During the theoretical and bioinformatics analysis of micro-environmental properties, we performed drug-likeness study, protein active site predictions, docking analysis and residual interactions with the protein-drug interface. Micro-environmental landscape properties were evaluated through various parameters such as binding energy, intermolecular energy, electrostatic energy, van der Waals'+H-bond+desolvo energy (E VHD ) and ligand efficiency (LE) using different in silico methods. For this study, we have used several servers and software, such as Molsoft prediction server, CASTp server, AutoDock software and LIGPLOT server. Through micro-environmental study, highest log P value was observed for linagliptin (1.07). Lowest binding energy was also observed for linagliptin with DPP-4 in the binding plot. We also identified the number of H-bonds and residues involved in the hydrophobic interactions between the DPP-4 and the anti-diabetic drugs. During interaction, two H-bonds and nine residues, two H-bonds and eleven residues as well as four H-bonds and nine residues were found between the saxagliptin, linagliptin as well as vildagliptin cases and DPP-4, respectively. Our in silico data obtained for drug-target interactions and micro-environmental signature demonstrates linagliptin as the most stable interacting drug among the tested anti-diabetic medicines.

  7. Adherence to anti-diabetic drugs among patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania- A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rwegerera, Godfrey Mutashambara

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to diabetes mellitus treatment regimens among Type 2 diabetes patients in Tanzania has not been well documented. This study sought to assess adherence to antidiabetic drugs and associated factors among patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. A cross-sectional study was conducted among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who were attending the Diabetic clinic of Muhimbili National hospital between May 2009 and February 2010. Assement of adherence to antidiabetic medications was based on patients' self-reported recall of skipped days without taking medications, over the past one week and three months. Data were entered and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Inc. Chicago, Illinois version 16). The crude and adjusted odds ratio (COR/ AOR) and 95% Confidence Interval (CI) were performed to determine factors associated with anti-diabetic medications adherence and a p-value of 0.05 or less was considered statistically significant. Adherence rates to antidiabetic drugs were found to be 60.2% and 71.2% at one week and three months respectively. High cost of medication was significantly associated with anti-diabetic non-adherence. Adherence to anti-diabetic drugs significantly increased with an increase in number of non-diabetic medications. Adherence to antidiabetic drugs was found to be suboptimal. Patients with other medical conditions in addition to diabetes mellitus are more likely to adhere to anti-diabetic medications. There is a need for the responsible authorities to set policies that subsidize cost of anti-diabetic drugs to improve adherence and reduce associated complications.

  8. Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy as a Result of Mild Hypercaloric Challenge in Absence of Signs of Diabetes: Modulation by Antidiabetic Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Assi, Ola; Ghali, Rana; Mroueh, Ali; Kaplan, Abdullah; Mougharbil, Nahed; Eid, Ali H.; Zouein, Fouad A.; El-Yazbi, Ahmed F.

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is an early cardiovascular complication of diabetes occurring before metabolic derangement is evident. The cause of CAN remains elusive and cannot be directly linked to hyperglycemia. Recent clinical data report cardioprotective effects of some antidiabetic drugs independent of their hypoglycemic action. Here, we used a rat model receiving limited daily increase in calories from fat (HC diet) to assess whether mild metabolic challenge led to CAN in absence o...

  9. Adherence to oral anti-diabetic drugs among patients attending a Ghanaian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce SP

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The burden of diabetes mellitus, especially Type-2, continues to increase across the world. Medication adherence is considered an integral component in its management. Poor glycemic controls due to medication nonadherence accelerates the development of long-term complications which consequently leads to increased hospitalization and mortality. Objective: This study examined the level of adherence to oral antidiabetic drugs among patients who visited the teaching hospital and explored the probable contributory factors to non-adherence. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study using systematic sampling to collect quantitative data was undertaken. Questionnaires were administered to out-patients of the medical department of a teaching hospital in Ghana. Logistic regression was performed with statistical significance determined at p<0.05. Results: A total of 200 diabetic patients participated in the study. Using the Morisky Medication Adherence scale, the level of adherence determined was 38.5%. There were significant correlations between level of adherence and educational level [(OR=1.508; (CI 0.805- 2.825, P=0.019, and mode of payment [(OR=1.631; (CI 0.997- 2.669, P=0.05. Conclusion: Adherence in diabetic patients was low among respondents and this can be improved through education, counseling and reinforcement of self-care. There were several possible factors that contributed to the low adherence rate which could benefit from further studies.

  10. Noninsulin Antidiabetic Drugs for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Are We Respecting Their Contraindications?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Ruiz-Tamayo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess prescribing practices of noninsulin antidiabetic drugs (NIADs in T2DM with several major contraindications according to prescribing information or clinical guidelines: renal failure, heart failure, liver dysfunction, or history of bladder cancer. Methods. Cross-sectional, descriptive, multicenter study. Electronic medical records were retrieved from all T2DM subjects who attended primary care centers pertaining to the Catalan Health Institute in Catalonia in 2013 and were pharmacologically treated with any NIAD alone or in combination. Results. Records were retrieved from a total of 255,499 pharmacologically treated patients. 78% of patients with some degree of renal impairment (glomerular filtration rate (GFR < 60 mL/min were treated with metformin and 31.2% with sulfonylureas. Even in the event of severe renal failure (GFR < 30 mL/min, 35.3% and 22.5% of patients were on metformin or sulfonylureas, respectively. Moreover, metformin was prescribed to more than 60% of patients with moderate or severe heart failure. Conclusion. Some NIADs, and in particular metformin, were frequently used in patients at high risk of complications when they were contraindicated. There is a need to increase awareness of potential inappropriate prescribing and to monitor the quality of prescribing patterns in order to help physicians and policymakers to yield better clinical outcomes in T2DM.

  11. Cardiovascular mortality and oral antidiabetic drugs: protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyat, Rashmi; Thornton, James Douglas; Tan, Xi; Kelley, George A

    2017-12-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among individuals with diabetes. Despite the beneficial effects of antidiabetic drugs (ADDs) in terms of lowering haemoglobin A1c, several ADDs have been shown to increase the risk of cardiovascular events. Given the high prevalence of cardiovascular disease among individuals with diabetes, it is important to weigh the benefits of ADDs against their cardiovascular safety. Therefore, the objective of the current study is to conduct a systematic review with network meta-analysis to compare the effects of different oral pharmacological classes of ADDs on cardiovascular safety. Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) and observational studies published in English up to 31 January 2017, and which include direct and/or indirect evidence, will be included. Studies will be retrieved by searching four electronic databases and cross-referencing. Dual selection and abstraction of data will occur. The primary outcome will be cardiovascular mortality. Secondary outcomes will include all-cause mortality, new event of acute myocardial infarction, stroke (haemorrhagic and ischaemic), hospitalisation for acute coronary syndrome and urgent revascularisation procedures. Risk of bias will be assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias assessment instrument for RCTs and the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology instrument for observational studies. Network meta-analysis will be performed using multivariate random-effects meta-regression models. The surface under the cumulative ranking curve will be used to provide a hierarchy of ADDs that increase cardiovascular mortality. The results of this study will be presented at a professional conference and submitted to a peer-reviewed journal. CRD42017051220. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Adherence to anti-diabetic drugs among patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania- A cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Rwegerera, Godfrey Mutashambara

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to diabetes mellitus treatment regimens among Type 2 diabetes patients in Tanzania has not been well documented. This study sought to assess adherence to antidiabetic drugs and associated factors among patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who were attending the Diabetic clinic of Muhimbili National hospital between May 2009 and February 2010. Assement ofadherence to antidiabetic med...

  13. C18-attached membrane funnel-based spray ionization mass spectrometry for quantification of anti-diabetic drug from human plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wan; Chen, Xiangfeng; Wong, Y.-L. Elaine; Hung, Y.-L. Winnie; Wang, Ze; Deng, Liulin; Dominic Chan, T.-W.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, sorbent-attached membrane funnel-based spray ionization mass spectrometry was explored for quantitative analysis of anti-diabetic drugs spiked in human plasma. C 18 -attached membrane funnel was fabricated for in situ extraction and clean-up to alleviate matrix suppression effect in the ionization process. Repaglinide was used as a target analyte of anti-diabetic drugs. Under optimal working conditions, good linearity (R 2  > 0.99) was obtained in the concentration range of 1–100 ng mL −1 . The method detection limit of target drugs spiked in the human plasma was around 0.30 ng mL −1 . Through the application of an isotope-labeled internal standard, the signal fluctuation caused by residual background matrices was largely alleviated and the precision of measurement (RSD) was below 15%. The recovery of repaglinide for 5, 25, and 100 ng mL −1 of spiked human plasma matrixes ranged from 87% to 112%. The developed method was successfully applied to determine repaglinide in plasma volunteers who orally received a dose of drug association. Our results demonstrated that membrane funnel-based spray is a simple and sensitive method for rapid screening analysis of complex biological samples. - Highlights: • Sorbent attached membrane funnel based spray platform was used for drug determination in human plasma. • The matrix suppression effect of human plasma was largely eliminated. • The method was applied to determine repaglinide in plasma volunteers. • Membrane funnel-based spray is promising for analysis of biological samples.

  14. An experimental evaluation of the antidiabetic and antilipidemic properties of a standardized Momordica charantia fruit extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Nafisa PC; Lagishetty, Chakradhar V; Panda, Vandana S; Naik, Suresh R

    2007-01-01

    Background The MCE, Momordica charantia fruit extract Linn. (Cucurbitaceae) have been documented to elicit hypoglycemic activity on various occasions. However, due to lack of standardization of these extracts, their efficacy remains questionable. The present study was undertaken by selecting a well standardised MCE. This study reports hypoglycemic and antilipidemic activities of MCE employing relevant animal models and in vitro methods. Methods Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats by a s.c., subcutaneous injection of alloxan monohydrate (100 mg/kg) in acetate buffer (pH 4.5). MCE and glibenclamide were administered orally to alloxan diabetic rats at doses of 150 mg/kg, 300 mg/kg & 600 mg/kg, and 4 mg/kg respectively for 30 days, blood was withdrawn for glucose determination on 0, 7, 14, 21 and 30th days. On the 31st day, overnight fasted rats were sacrificed and blood was collected for various biochemical estimations including glycosylated haemoglobin, mean blood glucose, serum insulin, cholesterol, triglcerides, protein and glycogen content of liver. The hemidiaphragms and livers were also isolated, carefully excised and placed immediately in ice cooled perfusion solution and processed to study the glucose uptake/transfer processes. Hypolipidemic activity in old obese rats was evaluated by treating two groups with MCE (150 mg/kg & 300 mg/kg) orally for 30 days and determining total cholesterol, triglyceride and HDL-CH, LDL-CH and VLDL-CH levels from serum samples. Results Subchronic study of MCE in alloxan induced diabetic rats showed significant antihyperglycemic activity by lowering blood glucose and GHb%, percent glycosylated haemoglobin. Pattern of glucose tolerance curve was also altered significantly. MCE treatment enhanced uptake of glucose by hemidiaphragm and inhibited glycogenolysis in liver slices in vitro. A significant reduction in the serum cholesterol and glyceride levels of obese rats following MCE treatment was also observed. Conclusion Our

  15. An experimental evaluation of the antidiabetic and antilipidemic properties of a standardized Momordica charantia fruit extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Nafisa P C; Lagishetty, Chakradhar V; Panda, Vandana S; Naik, Suresh R

    2007-09-24

    The MCE, Momordica charantia fruit extract Linn. (Cucurbitaceae) have been documented to elicit hypoglycemic activity on various occasions. However, due to lack of standardization of these extracts, their efficacy remains questionable. The present study was undertaken by selecting a well standardised MCE. This study reports hypoglycemic and antilipidemic activities of MCE employing relevant animal models and in vitro methods. Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats by a s.c., subcutaneous injection of alloxan monohydrate (100 mg/kg) in acetate buffer (pH 4.5). MCE and glibenclamide were administered orally to alloxan diabetic rats at doses of 150 mg/kg, 300 mg/kg & 600 mg/kg, and 4 mg/kg respectively for 30 days, blood was withdrawn for glucose determination on 0, 7, 14, 21 and 30th days. On the 31st day, overnight fasted rats were sacrificed and blood was collected for various biochemical estimations including glycosylated haemoglobin, mean blood glucose, serum insulin, cholesterol, triglcerides, protein and glycogen content of liver. The hemidiaphragms and livers were also isolated, carefully excised and placed immediately in ice cooled perfusion solution and processed to study the glucose uptake/transfer processes. Hypolipidemic activity in old obese rats was evaluated by treating two groups with MCE (150 mg/kg & 300 mg/kg) orally for 30 days and determining total cholesterol, triglyceride and HDL-CH, LDL-CH and VLDL-CH levels from serum samples. Subchronic study of MCE in alloxan induced diabetic rats showed significant antihyperglycemic activity by lowering blood glucose and GHb%, percent glycosylated haemoglobin. Pattern of glucose tolerance curve was also altered significantly. MCE treatment enhanced uptake of glucose by hemidiaphragm and inhibited glycogenolysis in liver slices in vitro. A significant reduction in the serum cholesterol and glyceride levels of obese rats following MCE treatment was also observed. Our experimental findings with respect to the

  16. An experimental evaluation of the antidiabetic and antilipidemic properties of a standardized Momordica charantia fruit extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naik Suresh R

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MCE, Momordica charantia fruit extract Linn. (Cucurbitaceae have been documented to elicit hypoglycemic activity on various occasions. However, due to lack of standardization of these extracts, their efficacy remains questionable. The present study was undertaken by selecting a well standardised MCE. This study reports hypoglycemic and antilipidemic activities of MCE employing relevant animal models and in vitro methods. Methods Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats by a s.c., subcutaneous injection of alloxan monohydrate (100 mg/kg in acetate buffer (pH 4.5. MCE and glibenclamide were administered orally to alloxan diabetic rats at doses of 150 mg/kg, 300 mg/kg & 600 mg/kg, and 4 mg/kg respectively for 30 days, blood was withdrawn for glucose determination on 0, 7, 14, 21 and 30th days. On the 31st day, overnight fasted rats were sacrificed and blood was collected for various biochemical estimations including glycosylated haemoglobin, mean blood glucose, serum insulin, cholesterol, triglcerides, protein and glycogen content of liver. The hemidiaphragms and livers were also isolated, carefully excised and placed immediately in ice cooled perfusion solution and processed to study the glucose uptake/transfer processes. Hypolipidemic activity in old obese rats was evaluated by treating two groups with MCE (150 mg/kg & 300 mg/kg orally for 30 days and determining total cholesterol, triglyceride and HDL-CH, LDL-CH and VLDL-CH levels from serum samples. Results Subchronic study of MCE in alloxan induced diabetic rats showed significant antihyperglycemic activity by lowering blood glucose and GHb%, percent glycosylated haemoglobin. Pattern of glucose tolerance curve was also altered significantly. MCE treatment enhanced uptake of glucose by hemidiaphragm and inhibited glycogenolysis in liver slices in vitro. A significant reduction in the serum cholesterol and glyceride levels of obese rats following MCE treatment was also

  17. Comparative effectiveness of oral antidiabetic drugs in preventing cardiovascular mortality and morbidity: A network meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyeongsil Lee

    Full Text Available In the Guidance for Industry from the Food and Drug Administration in 2008, excess cardiovascular risk should be ruled out in trials of all new antidiabetic drugs; however, relatively few studies have focused on cardiovascular safety with antidiabetic drug use. We aimed to examine mortality and cardiovascular risk using a network meta-analysis. We searched the Medline, Embase, Cochrane, and ClinicalTrials.gov registry databases in March 2016 to identify randomized controlled trials reporting cardiovascular risk with the following oral antidiabetic drugs: metformin, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinedione (TZD, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4 inhibitors, and sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2 inhibitors. We assessed the differences in the risks of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular-related mortality, acute coronary syndrome (ACS, and myocardial infarction (MI among antidiabetic drugs with fixed effect models for direct pairwise comparisons and Bayesian network meta-analyses to integrate direct and indirect comparisons. Of the 101,183 patients in 73 randomized controlled trials, 3,434 (3.4% died. The relative risks of all-cause mortality with SGLT2 inhibitor use were 0.68 (95% credible interval: 0.57-0.80, 0.74 (0.49-1.10, 0.63 (0.46-0.87, 0.71 (0.55-0.90, and 0.65 (0.54-0.78, compared with placebo, metformin, sulfonylurea, TZD, and DPP4 inhibitor, respectively. The relative risks of cardiovascular-related mortality with SGLT2 inhibitor use were 0.61 (0.50-0.76, 0.81(0.36-1.90, 0.52(0.31-0.88, 0.66(0.49-0.91, and 0.61(0.48-0.77, compared with placebo, metformin, sulfonylurea, TZD, and DPP4 inhibitor, respectively. The relative risks of ACS with SGLT2 inhibitor use was consistent with that of all-cause mortality. SGLT2 inhibitor use was associated with a lower risk of ACS than the other OADs and placebo. The relative risks of MI with SGLT2 inhibitor use were 0.77 (0.63-0.93 and 0.75 (0.60-0.94, compared with placebo and DPP4 inhibitor, respectively. The

  18. Validation of an LC-MS/MS method for analysis of anti-diabetic drugs in botanical dietary supplements labeled for blood sugar management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Pawar, Rahul S; Grundel, Erich

    2018-03-01

    We developed and validated a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to detect and quantitate 14 anti-diabetic, 2 anti-obesity, and 3 cholesterol-lowering drugs in botanical dietary supplements marketed for blood sugar management. Many botanical dietary supplements which carry label statements related to blood sugar management are available over the Internet. Potential adulteration of such dietary supplements with anti-diabetic and other prescription drugs, some of which have been removed from the market due to adverse events, is of concern. No significant matrix effects were observed and mean recoveries of all 19 analytes from a single product matrix were 88 to 113% at spiking concentrations from 500 to 2000 μg/g. Mean recoveries of metformin, phenformin, and sibutramine from matrices prepared from multiple product composites ranged from 93 to 115% at a spiking concentration of 100 μg/g. The relative standard deviations (RSD) (%) of intra-day analyses ranged from 0.2 to 13 for all recovery studies. Eighty dietary supplements obtained in the USA and carrying label statements related to blood sugar management were analyzed using this method and none were found to be adulterated with the above 19 drugs. Two products obtained outside of the USA and known to be adulterated were also analyzed by this method and found to contain phenformin, glibenclamide, and sibutramine. This method provided satisfactory selectivity, linearity, accuracy, precision, and sensitivity for rapid determination of 19 drugs and has broad applicability for the analysis of dietary supplements for possible adulteration with these compounds. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. The antidiabetic drug metformin decreases mitochondrial respiration and tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in cultured primary rat astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohnholt, Michaela C; Blumrich, Eva-Maria; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-01-01

    cycling ratio in metformin-treated astrocytes. Finally, the oxygen consumption of mitochondria isolated from metformin-treated astrocytes was drastically reduced in the presence of complex I substrates, but not of complex II substrates. These data demonstrate that exposure to metformin strongly impairs......Metformin is an antidiabetic drug that is used daily by millions of patients worldwide. Metformin is able to cross the blood-brain barrier and has recently been shown to increase glucose consumption and lactate release in cultured astrocytes. However, potential effects of metformin on mitochondrial...

  20. Berberine, a natural antidiabetes drug, attenuates glucose neurotoxicity and promotes Nrf2-related neurite outgrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Ya-Yun [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Yu-Ting [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Lo, Yi-Ching, E-mail: yichlo@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-01

    Reactive oxygen intermediates production and apoptotic damage induced by high glucose are major causes of neuronal damage in diabetic neuropathy. Berberine (BBR), a natural antidiabetes drug with PI3K-activating activity, holds promise for diabetes because of its dual antioxidant and anti-apoptotic activities. We have previously reported that BBR attenuated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} neurotoxicity via activating the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2-dependent pathway. In this study, we further explored the novel protective mechanism of BBR on high glucose-induced apoptotic death and neurite damage of SH-SY5Y cells. Results indicated BBR (0.1–10 nM) significantly attenuated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, nucleus condensation, and apoptotic death in high glucose-treated cells. However, AG1024, an inhibitor of insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) receptor, significantly abolished BBR protection against high glucose-induced neuronal death. BBR also increased Bcl-2 expression and decreased cytochrome c release. High glucose down-regulated IGF-1 receptor and phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3β, the effects of which were attenuated by BBR treatment. BBR also activated nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the key antioxidative transcription factor, which is accompanied with up-regulation of hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1). Furthermore, BBR markedly enhanced nerve growth factor (NGF) expression and promoted neurite outgrowth in high glucose-treated cells. To further determine the role of the Nrf2 in BBR neuroprotection, RNA interference directed against Nrf2 was used. Results indicated Nrf2 siRNA abolished BBR-induced HO-1, NGF, neurite outgrowth and ROS decrease. In conclusion, BBR attenuated high glucose-induced neurotoxicity, and we are the first to reveal this novel mechanism of BBR as an Nrf2 activator against glucose neurotoxicity, providing another potential therapeutic use of BBR on the treatment of diabetic complications. - Highlights: • BBR attenuates high glucose-induced ROS

  1. Oral antidiabetic therapy in a large Italian sample: drug supply and compliance for different therapeutic regimens

    CERN Document Server

    Vittorino Gaddi, A; Capello, F; Di Pietro, C; Cinconze, E; Rossi, E; De Sando, V; Cevenini, M; D'Alò, G

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To define the main features of patients treated with oral antidiabetics, evaluating monotherapy (MT), loose-dose combination therapy (LDCT) and fixed-dose combination therapy (FDCT); to describe medication adherence to the different therapies; and to evaluate the differences in compliance with the prescribed therapy regimen among prevalent and incident patient cohorts. Study design: This study was a retrospective cohort analysis based on the ARNO database, a national record that tracks reimbursable prescription claims submitted from selected pharmacies to the Italian national health system. In total, 169,375 subjects, from an overall population of 4,040,624 were included in this study. The patients represented 12 different local health units. Each patient had at least one oral antidiabetic prescription claim (A10B ATC code). Methods: Patients were divided into four groups according to their treatment regimen during the recruitment period (1 January 2008-31 December 2008): MT, FDCT, LDCT and swi...

  2. Generic substitution of antidiabetic drugs in the elderly does not affect adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Trotta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The possibility that variation in packaging and pill appearance may reduce adherence is a reason for concern, especially for chronic diseases. The objectives of the study were to quantify the extent of switches between generic antidiabetics and to verify whether switching between different products of the same substance affects adherence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All elderly residents of the Umbria Region who received at least 2 prescriptions of antidiabetics in 2010 and 2011 were included in the study. Switching was defined as the dispensing of two different products of the same substance in a series of two prescriptions. Single and multiple switchers were identified according to the number of switches during 2011. Switching relevant to the three off-patent substances with generic use ≥ 5% (metformin, gliclazide and repaglinide was quantified. The effect of switching on adherence, defined as the proportion of days in 2011 covered by prescriptions (Medication Possession Ratio, MPR, was estimated. RESULTS: Among the 15 964 patients receiving antidiabetics (14.4% of the elderly population 9211 were prescribed at least one of the generic substances. Of these patients, 23.3% experienced a single switch and 15.7% were multiple switchers (61.0% never switched. The proportion of multiple switchers increased with the number of prescriptions, reaching 26% among patients with ≥ 11 prescriptions. MPR was 62%, 62% and 72%, respectively among non-switchers, single and multiple switchers. CONCLUSIONS: In elderly patients treated with antidiabetics, the substitution between branded and unbranded products (as well as between generics of the same substance, did not negatively affect adherence.

  3. Treating Diet-Induced Diabetes and Obesity with Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Progenitor Cells and Antidiabetic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Bruin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived pancreatic progenitor cells effectively reverse hyperglycemia in rodent models of type 1 diabetes, but their capacity to treat type 2 diabetes has not been reported. An immunodeficient model of type 2 diabetes was generated by high-fat diet (HFD feeding in SCID-beige mice. Exposure to HFDs did not impact the maturation of macroencapsulated pancreatic progenitor cells into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells following transplantation, and the cell therapy improved glucose tolerance in HFD-fed transplant recipients after 24 weeks. However, since diet-induced hyperglycemia and obesity were not fully ameliorated by transplantation alone, a second cohort of HFD-fed mice was treated with pancreatic progenitor cells combined with one of three antidiabetic drugs. All combination therapies rapidly improved body weight and co-treatment with either sitagliptin or metformin improved hyperglycemia after only 12 weeks. Therefore, a stem cell-based therapy may be effective for treating type 2 diabetes, particularly in combination with antidiabetic drugs.

  4. Nutrient-deprivation autophagy factor-1 (NAF-1: biochemical properties of a novel cellular target for anti-diabetic drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagi Tamir

    Full Text Available Nutrient-deprivation autophagy factor-1 (NAF-1 (synonyms: Cisd2, Eris, Miner1, and Noxp70 is a [2Fe-2S] cluster protein immune-detected both in endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondrial outer membrane. It was implicated in human pathology (Wolfram Syndrome 2 and in BCL-2 mediated antagonization of Beclin 1-dependent autophagy and depression of ER calcium stores. To gain insights about NAF-1 functions, we investigated the biochemical properties of its 2Fe-2S cluster and sensitivity of those properties to small molecules. The structure of the soluble domain of NAF-1 shows that it forms a homodimer with each protomer containing a [2Fe-2S] cluster bound by 3 Cys and one His. NAF-1 has shown the unusual abilities to transfer its 2Fe-2S cluster to an apo-acceptor protein (followed in vitro by spectrophotometry and by native PAGE electrophoresis and to transfer iron to intact mitochondria in cell models (monitored by fluorescence imaging with iron fluorescent sensors targeted to mitochondria. Importantly, the drug pioglitazone abrogates NAF-1's ability to transfer the cluster to acceptor proteins and iron to mitochondria. Similar effects were found for the anti-diabetes and longevity-promoting antioxidant resveratrol. These results reveal NAF-1 as a previously unidentified cell target of anti-diabetes thiazolidinedione drugs like pioglitazone and of the natural product resveratrol, both of which interact with the protein and stabilize its labile [2Fe-2S] cluster.

  5. Glycemic control and antidiabetic drugs in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with renal complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huri HZ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hasniza Zaman Huri,1,2 Lay Peng Lim,1 Soo Kun Lim3 1Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 2Clinical Investigation Centre, University Malaya Medical Centre, 3Renal Unit, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Good glycemic control can delay the progression of kidney diseases in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients with renal complications. To date, the association between antidiabetic agents and glycemic control in this specific patient population is not well established.Purpose: This study aimed to identify antidiabetic regimens as well as other factors that associated with glycemic control in T2DM patients with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD.Patients and methods: This retrospective, cross-sectional study involved 242 T2DM inpatients and outpatients with renal complications from January 2009 to March 2014 and was conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital in Malaysia. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C was used as main parameter to assess patients’ glycemic status. Patients were classified to have good (A1C <7% or poor glycemic control (A1C ≥7% based on the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association.Results: Majority of the patients presented with CKD stage 4 (43.4%. Approximately 55.4% of patients were categorized to have poor glycemic control. Insulin (57.9% was the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic medication, followed by sulfonylureas (43%. Of all antidiabetic regimens, sulfonylureas monotherapy (P<0.001, insulin therapy (P=0.005, and combination of biguanides with insulin (P=0.038 were found to be significantly associated with glycemic control. Other factors including duration of T2DM (P=0.004, comorbidities such as anemia (P=0.024 and retinopathy (P=0.033, concurrent medications such as erythropoietin therapy (P=0.047, a-blockers (P=0.033, and antigouts (P=0.003 were also correlated with A1C.Conclusion: Identification of

  6. Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural and thermal characterizations of vanadyl(IV) adenine complex prospective as antidiabetic drug agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M; Hamza, Reham Z; Refat, Moamen S

    2015-01-25

    The vanadyl(IV) adenine complex; [VO(Adn)2]⋅SO4; was synthesized and characterized. The molar conductivity of this complex was measured in DMSO solution that showed an electrolyte nature. Spectroscopic investigation of the green solid complex studied here indicate that the adenine acts as a bidentate ligand, coordinated to vanadyl(IV) ions through the nitrogen atoms N7 and nitrogen atom of amino group. Thus, from the results presented the vanadyl(IV) complex has square pyramid geometry. Further characterizations using thermal analyses and scanning electron techniques was useful. The aim of this paper was to introduce a new drug model for the diabetic complications by synthesized a novel mononuclear vanadyl(IV) adenine complex to mimic insulin action and reducing blood sugar level. The antidiabetic ability of this complex was investigated in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The results suggested that VO(IV)/adenine complex has antidiabetic activity, it improved the lipid profile, it improved liver and kidney functions, also it ameliorated insulin hormone and blood glucose levels. The vanadyl(IV) complex possesses an antioxidant activity and this was clear through studying SOD, CAT, MDA, GSH and methionine synthase. The current results support the therapeutic potentiality of vanadyl(IV)/adenine complex for the management and treatment of diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural and thermal characterizations of vanadyl(IV) adenine complex prospective as antidiabetic drug agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Hamza, Reham Z.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2015-01-01

    The vanadyl(IV) adenine complex; [VO(Adn)2]ṡSO4; was synthesized and characterized. The molar conductivity of this complex was measured in DMSO solution that showed an electrolyte nature. Spectroscopic investigation of the green solid complex studied here indicate that the adenine acts as a bidentate ligand, coordinated to vanadyl(IV) ions through the nitrogen atoms N7 and nitrogen atom of amino group. Thus, from the results presented the vanadyl(IV) complex has square pyramid geometry. Further characterizations using thermal analyses and scanning electron techniques was useful. The aim of this paper was to introduce a new drug model for the diabetic complications by synthesized a novel mononuclear vanadyl(IV) adenine complex to mimic insulin action and reducing blood sugar level. The antidiabetic ability of this complex was investigated in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The results suggested that VO(IV)/adenine complex has antidiabetic activity, it improved the lipid profile, it improved liver and kidney functions, also it ameliorated insulin hormone and blood glucose levels. The vanadyl(IV) complex possesses an antioxidant activity and this was clear through studying SOD, CAT, MDA, GSH and methionine synthase. The current results support the therapeutic potentiality of vanadyl(IV)/adenine complex for the management and treatment of diabetes.

  8. Antidiabetic Effect of Galantamine: Novel Effect for a Known Centrally Acting Drug.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mennatallah A Ali

    Full Text Available The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is one of the putative biochemical pathways that link diabetes with Alzheimer disease. Hence, we aimed to verify the potential antidiabetic effect of galantamine, unveil the possible mechanisms and evaluate its interaction with vildagliptin. The n5-STZ rat model was adopted and the diabetic animals were treated with galantamine and/or vildagliptin for 4 weeks. Galantamine lowered the n5-STZ-induced elevation in body weight, food/water intake, serum levels of glucose, fructosamine, and ALT/AST, as well as AChE in the tested organs. Moreover, it modulated successfully the lipid profile assessed in serum, liver, and muscle, and increased serum insulin level, as well as % β-cell function, in a pattern similar to that of vildagliptin. Additionally, galantamine confirmed its antioxidant (Nrf2, TAC, MDA, anti-inflammatory (NF-κB, TNF-α, visfatin, adiponectin and anti-apoptotic (caspase-3, cytochrome c capabilities by altering the n5-STZ effect on all the aforementioned parameters. On the molecular level, galantamine/vildagliptin have improved the insulin (p-insulin receptor, p-Akt, GLUT4/GLUT2 and Wnt/β-catenin (p-GSK-3β, β-catenin signaling pathways. On almost all parameters, the galantamine effects surpassed that of vildagliptin, while the combination regimen showed the best effects. The present results clearly proved that galantamine modulated glucose/lipid profile possibly through its anti-oxidant, -apoptotic, -inflammatory and -cholinesterase properties. These effects could be attributed partly to the enhancement of insulin and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. Galantamine can be strongly considered as a potential antidiabetic agent and as an add-on therapy with other oral antidiabetics.

  9. Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Apocynaceae) as a potential anti-diabetic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Aline C; Pereira, Ana Bárbara D; Moreira, Carolina C L; Botion, Leida M; Lemos, Virgínia S; Braga, Fernão C; Cortes, Steyner F

    2015-02-23

    The leaves of Hancornia speciosa Gomes are traditionally used to treat diabetes in Brazil. The aim of the study is to evaluate the potential anti-diabetic effect of Hancornia speciosa extract and derived fractions. The ethanolic extract from Hancornia speciosa leaves and chromatographic fractions thereof were evaluated on α-glucosidase assay, on hyperglycemic effect and glucose uptake. The chemical composition of the extract and its most active fraction was investigated by ESI-LC-MS. The ethanolic extract and derived fractions inhibited α-glucosidase in vitro. However, only the crude extract and the dichloromethane fraction inhibited the hyperglycemic effect induced by starch or glucose. Both the extract and dichloromethane fraction were also able to increase glucose uptake in adipocytes. Bornesitol, quinic acid, and chorogenic acid were identified in the extract, along with flavonoid glycosides, whereas the dichloromethane fraction is majorly composed by esters of lupeol and/or α/β-amirin. Hancornia speciosa has a potential anti-diabetic effect through a mechanism dependent on inhibition of α-glucosidase and increase on glucose uptake. These results give support to the use on traditional medicine of this medicinal plant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effectiveness and content analysis of interventions to enhance oral antidiabetic drug adherence in adults with type 2 diabetes: systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vignon Zomahoun, H.T.; de Bruin, M.; Guillaumie, L.; Moisan, J.; Grégoire, J.P.; Pérez, N.; Vézina-Im, L.A.; Guénette, L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the pooled effect size of oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) adherence-enhancing interventions and to explore which of the behavior change techniques (BCTs) applied in the intervention groups modified this pooled intervention effect size. Methods We searched relevant studies

  11. Impact of the use of anti-diabetic drugs on survival of diabetic dialysis patients: a 5-year retrospective cohort study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Po-Jen; Wu, Kun-Lin; Chiu, Szu-Han; Chan, Jenq-Shyong; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Wu, Chung-Ze; Wu, Chia-Chao; Kao, SenYeong; Fang, Te-Chao; Lin, Shih-Hua; Chen, Jin-Shuen

    2017-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and associated complications are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and can increase morbidity and mortality. A longitudinal 5-year observational study was conducted to investigate whether the use of anti-diabetic medications or not affected survival rates of diabetic dialysis patients. Using a data sample of a million patients from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Database, a retrospective cohort study surveyed patients with type 2 DM who began dialysis between 2002 and 2007. The study population was classified into groups using or not using anti-diabetic drugs. The group using anti-diabetic drugs was then categorized into 3 subgroups, including use of only oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs), only insulin, and OHAs-combined insulin groups. Subjects of these four groups were followed 5 years or to date of death. Three major areas were analyzed: (1) demographic data and medical history; (2) survival prognosis and causes of death; and (3) effects on survival prognosis of different classes of OHAs. A total of 912 patients fitting inclusion criteria were enrolled and followed-up for 5 years or to date of death. A total 465 patients died, and those not using anti-diabetic drugs (67.34 %) had a higher mortality rate than those using anti-diabetic drugs (46.42 %). After the multivariate analysis, group of OHAs-combined insulin had the lowest risk of death (HR 0.36, 95 % CI 0.27-0.47), followed by OHAs alone (HR 0.49, 95 % CI 0.38-0.63) and then insulin alone (HR 0.67, 95 % CI 0.51-0.88). To clarify four classes of OHAs (sulfonylurea, α-glucosidase inhibitors, meglitinide, and thiazolidinedione) are used in Taiwan for uremia patient with type 2 DM, and in our study, there were no significant differences in survival prognosis for the four drugs. Finally, the most common cause of death was infectious disease and there were no significant differences among the four groups. This 5-year observational study results suggested

  12. A Narrative Review of Potential Future Antidiabetic Drugs: Should We Expect More?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikara, Gaurav; Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Dwivedi, Pradeep; Charan, Jaykaran; Ambwani, Sneha; Singh, Surjit

    2018-04-01

    Prevalence of diabetes mellitus, a chronic metabolic disease characterized by hyperglycemia, is growing worldwide. The majority of the cases belong to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Globally, India ranks second in terms of diabetes prevalence among adults. Currently available classes of therapeutic agents are used alone or in combinations but seldom achieve treatment targets. Diverse pathophysiology and the need of therapeutic agents with more favourable pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamics profile make newer drug discoveries in the field of T2DM essential. A large number of molecules, some with novel mechanisms, are in pipeline. The essence of this review is to track and discuss these potential agents, based on their developmental stages, especially those in phase 3 or phase 2. Unique molecules are being developed for existing drug classes like insulins, DPP-4 inhibitors, GLP-1 analogues; and under newer classes like dual/pan PPAR agonists, dual SGLT1/SGLT2 inhibitors, glimins, anti-inflammatory agents, glucokinase activators, G-protein coupled receptor agonists, hybrid peptide agonists, apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) inhibitors, glucagon receptor antagonists etc. The heterogeneous clinical presentation and therapeutic outcomes in phenotypically similar patients is a clue to think beyond the standard treatment strategy.

  13. The Antidiabetic Drug Metformin Inhibits the Proliferation of Bladder Cancer Cells in Vitro and in Vivo

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    Tao Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that metformin, a widely used antidiabetic agent, may reduce cancer risk and improve prognosis of certain malignancies. However, the mechanisms for the anti-cancer effects of metformin remain uncertain. In this study, we investigated the effects of metformin on human bladder cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms. Metformin significantly inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of 5637 and T24 cells in vitro; specifically, metformin induced an apparent cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phases, accompanied by a strong decrease of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4, E2F1 and an increase of p21waf-1. Further experiments revealed that metformin activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and suppressed mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, the central regulator of protein synthesis and cell growth. Moreover, daily treatment of metformin led to a substantial inhibition of tumor growth in a xenograft model with concomitant decrease in the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, cyclin D1 and p-mTOR. The in vitro and in vivo results demonstrate that metformin efficiently suppresses the proliferation of bladder cancer cells and suggest that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of bladder cancer.

  14. Efficacy and risk profile of anti-diabetic therapies: Conventional vs traditional drugs-A mechanistic revisit to understand their mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Prachi; Bala, Manju; Gupta, Sanjeev; Dua, Anita; Dabur, Rajesh; Injeti, Elisha; Mittal, Ashwani

    2016-11-01

    An increasing array of anti-diabetic drugs are available today, yet Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) - remains a life threatening disease, causing high mortality and morbidity in developing and developed countries. As of now, no effective therapy is available for the complete eradication/cure of diabetes and its associated complications. Therefore, it is time to re-think and revisit molecular pathways and targets of each existing drug in order to identify multiple targets from different signaling pathways that may be manipulated simultaneously to treat or manage T2DM effectively. Bearing this goal in mind, the article reviews the mechanisms of action of available anti-diabetic drugs with in-depth mechanistic analysis of each therapy. The conventional and herbal strategies are analysed and compared for their benefits and the associated possible side effects. This critical information is necessary not only for the development of better, novel and potent anti-diabetic therapy in future but also for best possible combinational therapies and strategies with the available drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Connectivity maps for biosimilar drug discovery in venoms: the case of Gila monster venom and the anti-diabetes drug Byetta®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramadhaka, Lavakumar Reddy; Prorock, Alyson; Dragulev, Bojan; Bao, Yongde; Fox, Jay W

    2013-07-01

    instances and negative correlation with 868 instances. Interestingly, the Gila monster venom and Byetta(®) both showed positive correlation with the anti-diabetic drugs troglitazone, of the thiazolidinedione class, and metformin, of the biguanide class, although Byetta(®) as a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist functions in a different manner than either of these two classes of anti-diabetic drugs. In summary, despite the fact that Gila monster venom contains a mixture of biologically active molecules, similarities in terms of perturbation of gene expression profiles on MCF7 cells were observed between the venom and the drug Byetta(®). Furthermore, using Connectivity Mapping the Gila monster venom was demonstrated to have nodes of positive correlation to several anti-diabetic drugs two of which were the same as observed with Byetta(®). Therefore, this study suggests that by using this approach novel drug activities heretofore unconsidered may be discovered in venoms using informatic tools and Connectivity Mapping. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cardiovascular outcomes associated with canagliflozin versus other non-gliflozin antidiabetic drugs: population based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patorno, Elisabetta; Goldfine, Allison B; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Everett, Brendan M; Glynn, Robert J; Liu, Jun; Kim, Seoyoung C

    2018-02-06

    To evaluate the cardiovascular safety of canagliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, in direct comparisons with DPP-4 inhibitors (DPP-4i), GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RA), or sulfonylureas, as used in routine practice. Population based retrospective cohort study. Nationwide sample of patients with type 2 diabetes from a large de-identified US commercial healthcare database (Optum Clinformatics Datamart). Three pairwise 1:1 propensity score matched cohorts of patients with type 2 diabetes 18 years and older who initiated canagliflozin or a comparator non-gliflozin antidiabetic agent (ie, a DPP-4i, a GLP-1RA, or a sulfonylurea) between April 2013 and September 2015. The primary outcomes were heart failure admission to hospital and a composite cardiovascular endpoint (comprised of being admitted to hospital for acute myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or hemorrhagic stroke). Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated in each propensity score matched cohort controlling for more than 100 baseline characteristics. During a 30 month period, the hazard ratio for heart failure admission to hospital associated with canagliflozin was 0.70 (95% confidence interval 0.54 to 0.92) versus a DPP-4i (n=17 667 pairs), 0.61 (0.47 to 0.78) versus a GLP-1RA (20 539), and 0.51 (0.38 to 0.67) versus a sulfonylurea (17 354 ). The hazard ratio for the composite cardiovascular endpoint associated with canagliflozin was 0.89 (0.68 to 1.17) versus a DPP-4i, 1.03 (0.79 to 1.35) versus a GLP-1RA, and 0.86 (0.65 to 1.13) versus a sulfonylurea. Results were similar in sensitivity analyses further adjusting for baseline hemoglobin A1c levels and in subgroups of patients with and without prior cardiovascular disease or heart failure. In this large cohort study, canagliflozin was associated with a lower risk of heart failure admission to hospital and with a similar risk of myocardial infarction or stroke in

  17. Hybrid drug combination: Combination of ferulic acid and metformin as anti-diabetic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nankar, Rakesh; Prabhakar, P K; Doble, Mukesh

    2017-12-15

    Ferulic acid, an anti-oxidant phytochemical present in several dietary components, is known to produce wide range of pharmacological effects. It is approved for use in food industry as a preservative and in sports food. Previous reports from our lab have shown synergistic interaction of ferulic acid with metformin in cell lines and diabetic rats. The purpose of this review is to compile information about anti-diabetic activity of ferulic acid in in vitro and in vivo models with special emphasis on activity of ferulic acid when combined with metformin. The mechanism of synergistic interaction between ferulic acid and metformin is also proposed after carefully studying effects of these compounds on molecules involved in glucose metabolism. Scientific literature for the purpose of this review was collected using online search engines and databases such as ScienceDirect, Scopus, PubMed and Google scholar. Ferulic acid forms resonance stabilized phenoxyl radical which scavenges free radicals and reduce oxidative stress. It improves glucose and lipid profile in diabetic rats by enhancing activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase in the pancreatic tissue. Combining ferulic acid with metformin improves both, in vitro glucose uptake activity and in vivo hypoglycemic activity of the latter. It is possible to reduce the dose of metformin by four folds (from 50 to 12.5 mg/kg body weight) by combining it with 10 mg of ferulic acid/kg body weight in diabetic rats. Ferulic acid improves glucose uptake through PI3-K pathway whereas metformin activates AMPK pathway to improve glucose uptake. The synergistic interaction of ferulic acid and metformin is due their action on parallel pathways which are involved in glucose uptake. Due to synergistic nature of their interaction, it is possible to reduce the dose of metformin (by combining with ferulic acid) required to achieve normoglycemia. Since the dose of metformin is reduced, the dose associated side

  18. Effects of antidiabetic drugs on the incidence of macrovascular complications and mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a new perspective on sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahelić, Dario; Javor, Eugen; Lucijanić, Tomo; Skelin, Marko

    2017-02-01

    Elevated hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) values correlate with microvascular and macrovascular complications. Thus, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at an increased risk of developing macrovascular events. Treatment of T2DM should be based on a multifactorial approach because of its evidence regarding reduction of macrovascular complications and mortality in T2DM. It is well known that intensive glucose control reduces the risk of microvascular complications in T2DM, but the effects of antidiabetic drugs on macrovascular complications and mortality in T2DM are less clear. The results of recent trials have demonstrated clear evidence that empagliflozin and liraglutide reduce cardiovascular (CV) and all-cause mortality in T2DM, an effect that is absent in other members of antidiabetic drugs. Empagliflozin is a member of a novel class of antidiabetic drugs, the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. Two ongoing randomized clinical trials involving other SGLT2 inhibitors, canagliflozin and dapagliflozin, will provide additional evidence of the beneficial effects of SGLT2 inhibitors in T2DM population. The aim of this paper is to systematically present the latest evidence regarding the usage of antidiabetic drugs, and the reduction of macrovascular complications and mortality. A special emphasis is put on the novel class of antidiabetic drugs, of SGLT2 inhibitors. Key messages Macrovascular complications and mortality are best clinical trial endpoints for evaluating the efficacy of antidiabetic drugs. The first antidiabetic drug that demonstrated a reduction in mortality in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was empagliflozin, a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor. SGLT2 inhibitors are novel class of antidiabetic drugs that play a promising role in the treatment of T2DM.

  19. Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy as a Result of Mild Hypercaloric Challenge in Absence of Signs of Diabetes: Modulation by Antidiabetic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Al-Assi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN is an early cardiovascular complication of diabetes occurring before metabolic derangement is evident. The cause of CAN remains elusive and cannot be directly linked to hyperglycemia. Recent clinical data report cardioprotective effects of some antidiabetic drugs independent of their hypoglycemic action. Here, we used a rat model receiving limited daily increase in calories from fat (HC diet to assess whether mild metabolic challenge led to CAN in absence of interfering effects of hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, or obesity. Rats receiving HC diet for 12 weeks showed reduction in baroreceptor sensitivity and heart rate variability despite lack of change in baseline hemodynamic and cardiovascular structural parameters. Impairment of cardiac autonomic control was accompanied with perivascular adipose inflammation observed as an increased inflammatory cytokine expression, together with increased cardiac oxidative stress, and signaling derangement characteristic of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Two-week treatment with metformin or pioglitazone rectified the autonomic derangement and corrected the molecular changes. Switching rats to normal chow but not to isocaloric amounts of HC for two weeks reversed CAN. As such, we conclude that adipose inflammation due to increased fat intake might underlie development of CAN and, hence, the beneficial effects of metformin and pioglitazone.

  20. Association of PAX4 genetic variants with oral antidiabetic drugs efficacy in Chinese type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M; Hu, C; Zhang, R; Jiang, F; Wang, J; Peng, D; Tang, S; Sun, X; Yan, J; Luo, Y; Bao, Y; Jia, W

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of PAX4 variants with therapeutic effect of oral antidiabetic drugs in Chinese type 2 diabtes mellitus (T2DM) patients. A total of 209 newly diagnosed T2DM patients were randomly assigned to treatment with repaglinide or rosiglitazone for 48 weeks, and the therapeutic effects were compared. In the rosiglitazone cohort, rs6467136 GA+AA carriers showed greater decrease in 2-h glucose levels (P=0.0063) and higher cumulative attainment rates of target 2-h glucose levels (Plog rank=0.0093) than GG homozygotes. In the subgroup with defective β-cell function, rs6467136 GA+AA carriers exhibited greater decrements of 2-h glucose level and improvement of homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (P=0.0143). Moreover, GA+AA carriers were more likely to attain the target fasting and 2-h glucose level (Plog rank=0.0091 and 0.007, respectively). However, these single-nucleotide polymorphisms showed no effect on repaglinide efficacy. In conclusion, PAX4 variant rs6467136 was associated with the therapeutic effect of rosiglitazone in Chinese T2DM patients.

  1. Epifluorescent imaging study of the effect of anti-diabetic drug metformin on colorectal cancer cell lines in vitro

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    Venkatasubramani P

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metformin, a widely used anti-diabetic drug, has recently been associated with inhibition of cell proliferation in multiple cancers. However, it is not clear if the reduction in proliferation on treatment with metformin is a result of cell death or slowdown in the rate of growth of cancer cells, because cell viability assays measure only the number of cells at the beginning and end of the experiment. The aim of this study is to utilize a fluorescent imaging technique to directly follow cell death overtime in order to investigate the effect of metformin on colorectal cancer cells HCT116 and SW480. Epifluorescent imaging analysis carried out using ImageXpress Micro XLS High-Content Imaging System show that there is no significant change in cell death observed in the cancer cell lines, as compared to the control, over multiple closely spaced time points, suggesting that metformin in pharmacological doses may not be an effective inducer of cell death in these colon cancer cell lines.

  2. Immunomodulatory effects of oral antidiabetic drugs in lymphocyte cultures from patients with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Mello, Karina Faccio; Lunardelli, Adroaldo; Donadio, Márcio Vinícius Fagundes; Caberlon, Eduardo; Oliveira, Carmen Silvana Araújo de; Bastos, Carolina Maria Alves; Pires, Melissa Guerra Simões; Nunes, Fernanda Bordignon; Oliveira, Jarbas Rodrigues de

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: It has been suggested that type 2 diabetes is an inflammatory response manifestation. The main drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes are sulphonylureas and biguanides. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the modulatory effects of oral hypoglycemic drugs (chlorpropamide and metformin) on lymphocyte proliferation in vitro and ex vivo. METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from human blood by gradient centrifugation. T-lymphocytes were stimulate...

  3. Rapid on-site TLC-SERS detection of four antidiabetes drugs used as adulterants in botanical dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qingxia; Cao, Yongbing; Cao, Yingying; Chai, Yifeng; Lu, Feng

    2014-03-01

    A novel facile method has been established for rapid on-site detection of antidiabetes chemicals used to adulterate botanical dietary supplements (BDS) for diabetes. Analytes and components of pharmaceutical matrices were separated by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) then surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was used for qualitative identification of trace substances on the HPTLC plate. Optimization and standardization of the experimental conditions, for example the method used for preparation of silver colloids, the mobile phase, and the concentration of colloidal silver, resulted in a very robust and highly sensitive method which enabled successful detection when the amount of adulteration was as low as 0.001 % (w/w). The method was also highly selective, enabling successful identification of some chemicals in extremely complex herbal matrices. The established TLC-SERS method was used for analysis of real BDS used to treat diabetes, and the results obtained were verified by liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). The study showed that TLC-SERS could be used for effective separation and detection of four chemicals used to adulterate BDS, and would have good prospects for on-site qualitative screening of BDS for adulterants.

  4. Microencapsulation as a novel delivery method for the potential antidiabetic drug, Probucol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooranian, Armin; Negrulj, Rebecca; Chen-Tan, Nigel; Al-Sallami, Hesham S; Fang, Zhongxiang; Mukkur, T K; Mikov, Momir; Golocorbin-Kon, Svetlana; Fakhoury, Marc; Watts, Gerald F; Matthews, Vance; Arfuso, Frank; Al-Salami, Hani

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we successfully designed complex multicompartmental microcapsules as a platform for the oral targeted delivery of lipophilic drugs in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Probucol (PB) is an antihyperlipidemic and antioxidant drug with the potential to show benefits in T2D. We aimed to create a novel microencapsulated formulation of PB and to examine the shape, size, and chemical, thermal, and rheological properties of these microcapsules in vitro. Microencapsulation was carried out using the Büchi-based microencapsulating system developed in our laboratory. Using the polymer, sodium alginate (SA), empty (control, SA) and loaded (test, PB-SA) microcapsules were prepared at a constant ratio (1:30). Complete characterizations of microcapsules, in terms of morphology, thermal profiles, dispersity, and spectral studies, were carried out in triplicate. PB-SA microcapsules displayed uniform and homogeneous characteristics with an average diameter of 1 mm. The microcapsules exhibited pseudoplastic-thixotropic characteristics and showed no chemical interactions between the ingredients. These data were further supported by differential scanning calorimetric analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectral studies, suggesting microcapsule stability. The new PB-SA microcapsules have good structural properties and may be suitable for the oral delivery of PB in T2D. Further studies are required to examine the clinical efficacy and safety of PB in T2D.

  5. Efficacy and safety of oral antidiabetic drugs in comparison to insulin in treating gestational diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalinee Poolsup

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy and safety of oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM in comparison to insulin. METHODS: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was conducted. The efficacy and safety of OADs in comparison to insulin in GDM patients were explored. Studies were identified by conducting a literature search using the electronic databases of Medline, CENTRAL, CINAHL, LILACS, Scopus and Web of Science in addition to conducting hand search of relevant journals from inception until October 2013. RESULTS: Thirteen studies involving 2,151 patients met the inclusion criteria. These studies were randomized controlled trials of metformin and glyburide in comparison to insulin therapy. Our results indicated a significant increase in the risk for preterm births (RR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.04-2.19, p = 0.03 with metformin compared to insulin. However, a significant decrease in the risk for gestational hypertension (RR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.31-0.91, p = 0.02 was found. Postprandial glucose levels also decreased significantly in patients receiving metformin (MD, -2.47 mg/dL; 95% CI, -4.00, -0.94, p = 0.002. There was no significant difference between the two groups for the remaining outcomes. There were significant increases in the risks of macrosomia (RR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.18-4.63, p = 0.03 and neonatal hypoglycemia (RR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.27-3.34, p = 0.005 in the glyburide group compared to insulin whereas results for the other analyzed outcomes remained non-significant. CONCLUSION: The available evidence suggests favorable effects of metformin in treating GDM patients. Metformin seems to be an efficacious alternative to insulin and a better choice than glyburide especially those with mild form of disease.

  6. Microencapsulation as a novel delivery method for the potential antidiabetic drug, Probucol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mooranian A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Armin Mooranian,1 Rebecca Negrulj,1 Nigel Chen-Tan,2 Hesham S Al-Sallami,3 Zhongxiang Fang,4 TK Mukkur,5 Momir Mikov,6,7 Svetlana Golocorbin-Kon,6,7 Marc Fakhoury,8 Gerald F Watts,9 Vance Matthews,10 Frank Arfuso,5 Hani Al-Salami1 1Biotechnology and Drug Development Research Laboratory School of Pharmacy, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Biosciences Research Precinct, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; 2Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; 3School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; 4School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; 5Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Biosciences Research Precinct, School of Biomedical Science, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; 6Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Clinical Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Novi Sad, Serbia; 7Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Novi Sad, Serbia; 8Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; 9School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Royal Perth Hospital, University of Western Australia; 10Laboratory for Metabolic Dysfunction, UWA Centre for Medical Research, Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research, Perth, Western Australia, Australia Introduction: In previous studies, we successfully designed complex multicompartmental microcapsules as a platform for the oral targeted delivery of lipophilic drugs in type 2 diabetes (T2D. Probucol (PB is an antihyperlipidemic and antioxidant drug with the potential to show benefits in T2D. We aimed to create a novel microencapsulated formulation of PB and to examine the shape, size, and chemical, thermal, and rheological properties of these microcapsules in vitro. Method: Microencapsulation was carried out using the Büchi-based microencapsulating system developed in our laboratory. Using the polymer, sodium

  7. Synthesis of a new insulin-mimetic anti-diabetic drug containing vitamin A and vanadium(IV) salt: Chemico-biological characterizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Abdel Majid A; Naglah, Ahmed M; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Refat, Moamen S

    2017-09-01

    Diabetes patients suffer from chronic disorders in the metabolism due to high blood sugar caused by anomalies in insulin excretion. Recently, vanadium compounds have been prepared and functionalized to decrease the level of hyperglycemia. Vitamin A boosts beta cell activity; therefore, the lack of this vitamin plays a role in the development of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this article focused on the synthesis of a new anti-diabetic drug formed from the complexation of a vanadium(IV) salt with vitamin A. Vitamin A acts as a unidentate chelate through the oxygen of its -OH group. The vanadium(IV) compound is surrounded by two vitamin A molecules. The [VO(vitamin A) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ] compound was synthesized in a binary solvent system consisting of MeOH/H 2 O (1:1 ratio) in alkaline media at pH = 8. This compound was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), electronic spectra (UV-vis), effective magnetic moment, electron spin resonance (ESR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermal analysis (thermogravimetry (TG)-differential thermal analysis (DTA)). Anti-diabetic efficiency for the vanadium(IV) compound was assessed in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The results of the animal studies demonstrate the ability of the vanadium(IV) complex to act as an anti-diabetic agent, as measured by improvements of lipid profile, antioxidant activity (superoxide dismutase), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione, methionine synthase, and kidney and liver functions.

  8. Pancreatic Aquaporin-7: A Novel Target for Anti-diabetic Drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Giménez, Leire; Ezquerro, Silvia; da Silva, Inês V; Soveral, Graça; Frühbeck, Gema; Rodríguez, Amaia

    2018-01-01

    of aquaporins in the physiology and pathophysiology of the pancreas, highlighting the role of pancreatic AQP7 as a novel player in the control of β-cell function and a potential anti-diabetic-drug.

  9. Occurrence and fate of the antidiabetic drug metformin and its metabolite guanylurea in the environment and during drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheurer, Marco; Michel, Amandine; Brauch, Heinz-Jürgen; Ruck, Wolfgang; Sacher, Frank

    2012-10-01

    Metformin, an antidiabetic drug with one of the highest consumption rates of all pharmaceuticals worldwide, is biologically degraded to guanylurea in wastewater treatment plants. Due to high metformin influent concentrations of up to 100 μg/L and its high but incomplete degradation both compounds are released in considerable amounts of up to several tens of μg/L into recipient rivers. This is the first systematic study on their environmental fate and the effectiveness of treatment techniques applied in waterworks to remove metformin and guanylurea from surface water influenced raw waters. The concentrations in surface waters depend strongly on the respective wastewater burden of rivers and creeks and are typically in the range of about 1 μg/L for metformin and several μg/L for guanylurea but can reach elevated average concentrations of more than 3 and 20 μg/L, respectively. Treatment techniques applied in waterworks were investigated by an extended monitoring program in three facilities and accompanied by laboratory-scale batch tests. Flocculation and activated carbon filtration proved to be ineffective for removal of metformin and guanylurea. During ozonation and chlorination experiments with waterworks-relevant ozone and chlorine doses they were partly transformed to yet unknown compounds. The effectiveness of the treatment steps under investigation can be ordered chlorination > ozonation > activated carbon filtration > flocculation. However, most effective for removal of both compounds at the three full-scale waterworks studied proved to be an underground passage (riverbank filtration or artificial groundwater recharge). A biological degradation is most likely as sorption can be neglected. This is based on laboratory batch tests conducted with three different soil materials according to OECD guideline 106. Since such treatment steps were implemented in all three drinking water treatment plants, even traces of metformin and its metabolite guanylurea

  10. Cardiovascular Mortality of Oral Antidiabetic Drugs Approved Before and After the 2008 US FDA Guidance for Industry: A Systemic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyat, Rashmi; Rai, Pragya; Chang, Jongwha; Ponte, Charles D; Tan, Xi

    2018-03-21

    Both diabetes and antidiabetic drugs (ADDs) increase the risk for cardiovascular (CV) diseases. Due to the increasing concern about CV safety associated with ADDs, the US FDA revised regulatory guidelines in 2008 to include CV safety as an endpoint. The objective of the current study was to conduct a systematic review with meta-analysis to compare CV mortality of oral ADDs approved before and after the FDA's 2008 guidance. Three electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, and the Clinical Trial Registry) were searched to retrieve studies published up to 24 February 2017. Randomized clinical trials were included in this study if they (1) were published in the English language; (2) included adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus with or without CV risk factors, who were taking at least one oral antidiabetic drug; and (3) had at least one study outcome as CV mortality. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effects model. Small-study effects were accessed using funnel plot symmetry. The primary outcome was CV mortality. We found that there was no significant increase in CV mortality for drugs approved before and after 2008. The overall odds ratio (OR) and the upper bound of the two-sided 95% confidence interval (CI) for all drugs approved after 2008 (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.52-1.07) were lower than the overall OR for all drugs approved before 2008 (OR 1.03, 95% CI 0.89-1.19). In addition, the upper bounds of the two-sided 95% CI for both groups of drugs before and after 2008 were below 1.3. Empagliflozin, which was approved after the guidance, was significantly associated with a reduction in CV mortality. The 2008 FDA guidance appears to have a positive impact on CV risk assessment of recently marketed drugs for the management of diabetes.

  11. Magnetic solid-phase extraction based on mesoporous silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles for analysis of oral antidiabetic drugs in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Karynne Cristina; Andrade, Gracielle Ferreira; Vasconcelos, Ingrid; de Oliveira Viana, Iara Maíra; Fernandes, Christian; de Sousa, Edésia Martins Barros

    2014-07-01

    In the present work, magnetic nanoparticles embedded into mesoporous silica were prepared in two steps: first, magnetite was synthesized by oxidation-precipitation method, and next, the magnetic nanoparticles were coated with mesoporous silica by using nonionic block copolymer surfactants as structure-directing agents. The mesoporous SiO2-coated Fe3O4 samples were functionalized using octadecyltrimethoxysilane as silanizing agent. The pure and functionalized silica nanoparticles were physicochemically and morphologically characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), N2 adsorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The resultant magnetic silica nanoparticles were applied as sorbents for magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of oral antidiabetic drugs in human plasma. Our results revealed that the magnetite nanoparticles were completely coated by well-ordered mesoporous silica with free pores and stable pore walls, and that the structural and magnetic properties of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles were preserved in the applied synthesis route. Indeed, the sorbent material was capable of extracting the antidiabetic drugs from human plasma, being useful for the sample preparation in biological matrices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of sitagliptin on blood glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who are treatment naive or poorly responsive to existing antidiabetic drugs: the JAMP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakura, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Naotake; Sasamoto, Kazuo; Ohashi, Hiroshi; Hasumi, Sumiko; Ujihara, Noriko; Kasahara, Tadasu; Tomonaga, Osamu; Nunome, Hideo; Honda, Masashi; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the ameliorating effect of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, on blood glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were previously untreated with or who have a poor responsive to existing antidiabetic drugs. Sitagliptin (50 mg/day) was added on to the pre-existing therapy for type 2 diabetes and changes in the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level after 3 months of treatment were compared with the baseline and performed exploratory analysis. HbA1c levels were significantly decreased after 1 month of treatment compared to baseline, with a mean change in HbA1c level from baseline of -0.73% (range, -0.80 to -0.67) in the entire study population at 3 months. Patients who received a medium dose of glimepiride showed the least improvement in HbA1c levels. The percentage of patients who achieved an HbA1c level of blood glucose level of type 2 diabetes mellitus who were previously untreated with, or poorly responsive to, existing antidiabetic drugs. Thus, sitagliptin is expected to be useful in this patient group. However, the additional administration of sitagliptin in patients treated with medium-dose glimepiride only slightly improved blood glucose control when corrected for baseline HbA1c level.

  13. Magnetic solid-phase extraction based on mesoporous silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles for analysis of oral antidiabetic drugs in human plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Karynne Cristina de; Andrade, Gracielle Ferreira [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, CDTN/CNEN, Rua Professor Mário Werneck, s/n. Campus Universitário, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP 30.123-970 (Brazil); Vasconcelos, Ingrid; Oliveira Viana, Iara Maíra de; Fernandes, Christian [Departamento de Produtos Farmacêuticos, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Martins Barros de Sousa, Edésia, E-mail: sousaem@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, CDTN/CNEN, Rua Professor Mário Werneck, s/n. Campus Universitário, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP 30.123-970 (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    In the present work, magnetic nanoparticles embedded into mesoporous silica were prepared in two steps: first, magnetite was synthesized by oxidation–precipitation method, and next, the magnetic nanoparticles were coated with mesoporous silica by using nonionic block copolymer surfactants as structure-directing agents. The mesoporous SiO{sub 2}-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} samples were functionalized using octadecyltrimethoxysilane as silanizing agent. The pure and functionalized silica nanoparticles were physicochemically and morphologically characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), N{sub 2} adsorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The resultant magnetic silica nanoparticles were applied as sorbents for magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of oral antidiabetic drugs in human plasma. Our results revealed that the magnetite nanoparticles were completely coated by well-ordered mesoporous silica with free pores and stable pore walls, and that the structural and magnetic properties of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were preserved in the applied synthesis route. Indeed, the sorbent material was capable of extracting the antidiabetic drugs from human plasma, being useful for the sample preparation in biological matrices. - Highlights: • SBA-15/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was synthesized and functionalized with octadecyltrimethoxysilane. • Magnetite nanoparticles were completely coated by well-ordered mesoporous silica. • The samples were used as sorbent for magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE). • The sorbent material was capable of extracting drugs from human plasma. • The extraction ability makes the material a candidate to be employed as MSPE.

  14. Antidiabetic and cardiovascular drug utilisation in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus over the age of 80 years: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Shota; Gulliford, Martin C

    2015-07-01

    there is a lack of evidence to inform treatment recommendations for very old people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). to evaluate trends in antidiabetic and cardiovascular drug utilisation for patients developing T2DM over 80 years of age. a population-based cohort was sampled from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink between 1990 and 2013. Eligible patients were those with T2DM diagnosed after the age of 80 years and prescribed antidiabetic drugs. twelve thousand eight hundred and eighty-one patients, with 61% of females, were included. From 1990 to 2013, use of sulphonylureas declined from 94 to 29%, while metformin use increased from 22 to 86%. Prescribing of antihypertensive drugs increased substantially from 46 to 77%, lipid-lowering drugs from 1 to 64%, antiplatelets from 34 to 47% and oral anticoagulants from 5 to 19%. Women were more frequently prescribed antihypertensive drugs (odds ratio 1.26, 95% confidence interval 1.17 to 1.37) but less prescribed antiplatelets (0.83, 0.78 to 0.89). Compared with those diagnosed with T2DM from 80 to 89 years (n = 11,467, 89%), patients diagnosed after the age of 90 years (n = 1,414, 11%) were less likely to be prescribed insulin (0.37, 0.24 to 0.58), metformin (0.67, 0.60 to 0.75), antihypertensive drugs (0.42, 0.38 to 0.48), lipid-lowering drugs (0.26, 0.23 to 0.30) and anticoagulants (0.55, 0.44 to 0.68). there have been major increases in the intensity of pharmacological management of patients diagnosed with T2DM over 80 years of age, but the effectiveness and safety of these interventions in very old people require further evaluation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Antidiabetic Evaluation of Momordica charantia L Fruit Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahira, S; Hussain, F

    2014-01-01

    To investigate hypoglycaemic, hypolipidaemic and pancreatic beta cell regeneration activities of Momordica charantia L fruits (MC). Alloxan-induced diabetic rabbits were treated with methanolic and ethanolic MC extract. Effects of plant extracts and the drug glibenclamide on serum glucose, lipid profile and pancreatic beta cell were determined after two weeks of treatment. Serum glucose and lipid profiles were assayed by kit methods. Pancreatic tissue histopathology was performed to study pancreatic beta cell regeneration. Momordica charantia extracts produced significant hypoglycaemic effects (p Momordica charantia supplementations were unable to normalize glucose and lipid profiles. Glibenclamide, a standard drug, not only lowered hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia but also restored the normal levels. Regeneration of pancreatic beta cells by MC extracts was minimal, with fractional improvement produced by glibenclamide. The most significant finding of the present study was a 28% reduction in hyperglycaemia by MC ethanol extracts. To determine reliable antidiabetic potentials of MC, identification of the relevant antidiabetic components and underlying mechanisms is warranted. PMID:25429471

  16. Standardization Study of Antifertility Drug - Pippalyadiyoga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Shaila

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the standardization study of pippalyadiyoga powder. It is used as a long acting contraceptive. The standardization of compound drug has been achieved by physico-chemical analysis and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC fingerprint studies. Quantitative evaluation of borax in pippalyadiyoga showed 19.08% as sodium borate. RP-HPLC was performed using methanol and water as mobile phase. The detection and quantification was performed at a wavelength of 345 nm. Linearity of detector response for piperine was between the concentrations 0.005% to 0.1%. The correlation coefficient obtained for the linearity was 0.998. The recovery value of standard piperine was 99.4%. Low value of standard deviation and coefficient of variation are indicative of high precision of the method. Quantitative evaluation of piperine in pippalyadiyoga was found to be 0.339%.

  17. PLANTS WITH ANTIDIABETIC ACTIVITIES AND THEIR MEDICINAL VALUES

    OpenAIRE

    B. V. Raman; A. Naga Vamsi Krishna; B. Narasimha Rao; M. Pardha Saradhi; M. V. Basaveswara Rao

    2012-01-01

    The anti-diabetic drugs from plants in current clinical use and their similar mechanism of action of herbal components are preferred mainly due to lesser side effects and low cost. So many medicinal plants with anti-diabetic activity related beneficial effects and of herbal drugs used in diabetes is pressurized. The present review focused on the some of the herbal plants and their medicinal uses have shown experimental or clinical anti-diabetic activity. The essential values of some plants ha...

  18. Study on the interactions of sulfonylurea antidiabetic drugs with normal and glycated human serum albumin by capillary electrophoresis-frontal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalcová, Lenka; Glatz, Zdeněk

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes is one of the most widespread diseases characterized by a deficiency in the production of insulin or its ineffectiveness. As a result, the increased concentrations of glucose in the blood lead not only to damage to many of the body's systems but also cause the nonenzymatic glycation of plasma proteins affecting their drug binding. Since the binding ability influences its pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, this is a very important issue in the development of new drugs and personalized medicine. In this study, capillary electrophoresis-frontal analysis was used to evaluate the affinities between human serum albumin or its glycated form and the first generation of sulfonylurea antidiabetics, since their inadequate concentration may induce hypoglycaemia or on the contrary hyperglycaemia. The binding constants decrease in the sequence acetohexamide > tolbutamide > chlorpropamide > carbutamide both for normal and glycated human serum albumins, with glycated giving lower values. These results provide a more quantitative picture of how these drugs bind with normal and modified human serum albumin and indicate capillary electrophoresis-frontal analysis to be another tool for examining the changes arising from modifications of albumin, or any other protein, with all its benefits like short analysis time, small sample requirement, and automation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Liraglutide versus Sitagliptin in a 24-week, Multicenter, Open-label, Randomized, Parallel-group Study in Japanese Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients Responding Inadequately to a Sulfonylurea and/or One or Two Other Oral Antidiabetic Drugs (JDDM 33

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Yokoyama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Liraglutide (glucagon-like peptide-1 [GLP-1] receptor agonist and sitagliptin (dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor are approved in Japan for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. We compared the efficacy and safety of adding liraglutide or sitagliptin to a sulfonylurea in Japanese T2DM patients. Methods Patients aged 18 to <80 years with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c; National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program [NGSP] of 6.9–9.4%, body mass index ≤35 kg/m 2 , and treatment with a sulfonylurea and/or one or two non-sulfonylurea oral antidiabetic drugs for greater than or equal to eight weeks before enrollment were eligible. Patients were randomized in an open-label manner to either 0.9 mg/day liraglutide ( n = 50 or 50–100 mg/day sitagliptin ( n = 49 and were treated for 24 weeks. Non-sulfonylureas were discontinued before randomization. Patients using other oral antidiabetic drugs started sulfonylurea treatment. The primary endpoint was the change in HbA1c from baseline to Week 24. Results HbA1c decreased in both groups, and the reduction was significantly greater throughout in the liraglutide group except for Week 24 (0.59 ± 0.80 vs. 0.24 ± 0.94%; P = 0.0525. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG decreased significantly in the liraglutide group compared with the sitagliptin group (-21.15 ± 31.22 vs. +0.46 ± 39.39 mg/dL; P = 0.0014. Homeostasis model assessment of β cell function and C-peptide increased significantly in the liraglutide group but not in the sitagliptin group. Hypoglycemic symptoms and adverse events occurred in four and nine patients, respectively, in the liraglutide group, and in two and five patients, respectively, in the sitagliptin group. Conclusion Treatment with liraglutide or sitagliptin together with a sulfonylurea improved HbA1c in Japanese T2DM patients in primary care. Both drugs were associated with low rates of adverse events and hypoglycemia. The improvement in β cell function probably contributed to the

  20. Patients' Adherence to Anti-Diabetic Medications in a Hospital at Ajman, UAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifulla, Mohammed; John, Lisha Jenny; Sreedharan, Jayadevan; Muttappallymyalil, Jayakumary; Basha, Sheikh Altaf

    2014-01-01

    Anti-diabetic medications are integral for glycemic control in diabetes. Non-adherence to drugs can alter blood glucose levels, resulting in complications. Adherence to anti-diabetic medications reported by patients and the factors associated with medication adherence among adult patients with diabetes mellitus were explored. This cross-sectional study was carried out among patients with type II diabetes mellitus attending the Internal Medicine Department of a hospital in the United Arab Emirates. Consecutive patients were selected, and data regarding their medication adherence were collected using a questionnaire. Data analysis was carried out using SPSS-20. The chi-square test was performed to examine the associations between categorical variables; a two-sided P Value patients participated in the study (63 males; 69 females). The mean age (standard deviation) of the respondents was 54 years (SD 10.2). The self-reported adherence rate to anti-diabetic drugs was 84%. The most common reason for non-adherence was forgetfulness, and the adherence rate was similar in both genders. Patients with Bachelor's and Master's degree reported greater adherence rate to anti-diabetic medication in comparison to the secondary school educated. The self-reported adherence rate to anti-diabetic medications was 84%, and forgetfulness was the most common reason for non-adherence. Future studies on strategies to improve adherence rate should be considered.

  1. Oxidative stress and expression of insulin signaling proteins in the brain of diabetic rats: Role of Nigella sativa oil and antidiabetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbaa, Mahmoud; Abdulmalek, Shaymaa A; Khalil, Sofia

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance of the brain is a specific form of type2-diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the active insulin-signaling pathway plays a neuroprotective role against damaging conditions and Alzheimer's progression. The present study identifies the mediated emerging effects of the Nigella sativa oil (NSO) on the memory enhancing process, its anti-oxidative, acetylcholinestrase (AChE) inhibition, anti-brain insulin resistance and anti-amyloidogenic activities. In addition, the possible role of some anti-diabetic drugs in the neuro-protection processes and their effect in combination with NSO and/or the insulin receptor inhibitor IOMe-AG538 were investigated. T2DM-induced rats were orally and daily administrated 2.0 ml NSO, 100 mg metformin (MT), 0.8 mg glimepiride (GI) and different combinations (100 mg MT & 2.0 ml NSO, 0.8 mg GI & 2.0 ml NSO and 2.0 ml NSO & intraperitoneal injection of 1/100 LD50 of IOMe-AG538) per kg body weight for 21 days. A significant increase in the brain lipid peroxidation and decrease in the antioxidant status with peripheral and central production of pro-inflammatory mediators were observed in diabetes-induced rats. The brain AChE was activated and associated with diminished brain glucose level and cholinergic function. In addition, the brain insulin resistance and the attenuated insulin signaling pathway (p-IRS/ p-AKT/p-GSK-3β) were accompanied by an augmentation in GSK-3β level, which in turn may contribute in the extensive alterations of Tau phosphorylation along with changes in PP2A level. Furthermore, neuronal loss and elevation in Aβ-42 plaque formation were observed due to a low IDE formation and an increased expression of p53, BACE1 and APP with diminished ADAM10, SIRT1 and BDNF levels. The expression profile of AD-related miRNAs in sera and brain tissues displayed its neuro-protection role. The treatment of diabetes-induced rats with NSO and the anti-diabetic drugs alone and/or in combination have the potential to suppress the

  2. Oxidative stress and expression of insulin signaling proteins in the brain of diabetic rats: Role of Nigella sativa oil and antidiabetic drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Balbaa

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance of the brain is a specific form of type2-diabetes mellitus (T2DM and the active insulin-signaling pathway plays a neuroprotective role against damaging conditions and Alzheimer's progression. The present study identifies the mediated emerging effects of the Nigella sativa oil (NSO on the memory enhancing process, its anti-oxidative, acetylcholinestrase (AChE inhibition, anti-brain insulin resistance and anti-amyloidogenic activities. In addition, the possible role of some anti-diabetic drugs in the neuro-protection processes and their effect in combination with NSO and/or the insulin receptor inhibitor IOMe-AG538 were investigated.T2DM-induced rats were orally and daily administrated 2.0 ml NSO, 100 mg metformin (MT, 0.8 mg glimepiride (GI and different combinations (100 mg MT & 2.0 ml NSO, 0.8 mg GI & 2.0 ml NSO and 2.0 ml NSO & intraperitoneal injection of 1/100 LD50 of IOMe-AG538 per kg body weight for 21 days.A significant increase in the brain lipid peroxidation and decrease in the antioxidant status with peripheral and central production of pro-inflammatory mediators were observed in diabetes-induced rats. The brain AChE was activated and associated with diminished brain glucose level and cholinergic function. In addition, the brain insulin resistance and the attenuated insulin signaling pathway (p-IRS/ p-AKT/p-GSK-3β were accompanied by an augmentation in GSK-3β level, which in turn may contribute in the extensive alterations of Tau phosphorylation along with changes in PP2A level. Furthermore, neuronal loss and elevation in Aβ-42 plaque formation were observed due to a low IDE formation and an increased expression of p53, BACE1 and APP with diminished ADAM10, SIRT1 and BDNF levels. The expression profile of AD-related miRNAs in sera and brain tissues displayed its neuro-protection role. The treatment of diabetes-induced rats with NSO and the anti-diabetic drugs alone and/or in combination have the potential to

  3. Honey - A Novel Antidiabetic Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erejuwa, Omotayo O.; Sulaiman, Siti A.; Wahab, Mohd S. Ab

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus remains a burden worldwide in spite of the availability of numerous antidiabetic drugs. Honey is a natural substance produced by bees from nectar. Several evidence-based health benefits have been ascribed to honey in the recent years. In this review article, we highlight findings which demonstrate the beneficial or potential effects of honey in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), on the gut microbiota, in the liver, in the pancreas and how these effects could improve glycemic control and metabolic derangements. In healthy subjects or patients with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes mellitus, various studies revealed that honey reduced blood glucose or was more tolerable than most common sugars or sweeteners. Pre-clinical studies provided more convincing evidence in support of honey as a potential antidiabetic agent than clinical studies did. The not-too-impressive clinical data could mainly be attributed to poor study designs or due to the fact that the clinical studies were preliminary. Based on the key constituents of honey, the possible mechanisms of action of antidiabetic effect of honey are proposed. The paper also highlights the potential impacts and future perspectives on the use of honey as an antidiabetic agent. It makes recommendations for further clinical studies on the potential antidiabetic effect of honey. This review provides insight on the potential use of honey, especially as a complementary agent, in the management of diabetes mellitus. Hence, it is very important to have well-designed, randomized controlled clinical trials that investigate the reproducibility (or otherwise) of these experimental data in diabetic human subjects. PMID:22811614

  4. Investigation of pharmacological responses to anti-diabetic drugs in female Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) fatty rats, a new nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriniwa, Yasufumi; Saito, Tomoyuki; Miyajima, Katsuhiro; Ishii, Yukihito; Uno, Kinuko; Maekawa, Tatsuya; Matsui, Tohru; Kume, Shinichi; Yamada, Takahisa; Ohta, Takeshi

    2018-04-10

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a progressive liver disease, and some patients develop hepatic cirrhosis/carcinoma. Animal models play key roles in the development of new therapies for NASH. In this study, the pharmacological effects of metformin and pioglitazone were investigated in female Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) fatty rats to verify the utility of this model. The anti-diabetic drugs were administered to SDT fatty rats fed a cholesterol-enriched diet from 4 to 25 weeks, and changes in food intake, body weight, and blood chemistry parameters were evaluated every 4 weeks. The hepatic lipid content, mRNA expression in relation to lipid synthesis, inflammation, and fibrosis, and histopathological analyses were performed at 25 weeks. Pioglitazone improved hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and abnormalities in hepatic parameters. The insulin levels were lower than those in the control rats before 16 weeks. Plasma glucose levels in the metformin-treated rats were lower than those in the control rats, and plasma triglyceride and alanine aminotransferase levels temporarily decreased. The lipid content and some mRNA expression in relation to fibrosis in the liver decreased with pioglitazone treatment, and the mRNA expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein increased. Hepatic fibrosis observed in the SDT fatty rats improved with pioglitazone treatment; however, the effect with metformin treatment was partial. These results in both drugs are in line with results in the human study, suggesting that the SDT fatty rat is useful for developing new anti-NASH drugs that show potential to regulate glucose/lipid metabolism.

  5. Dietary Intake as a Link between Obesity, Systemic Inflammation, and the Assumption of Multiple Cardiovascular and Antidiabetic Drugs in Renal Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Guida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated dietary intake and nutritional-inflammation status in ninety-six renal transplant recipients, years after transplantation. Patients were classified as normoweight (NW, overweight (OW, and obese (OB, if their body mass index was between 18.5 and 24.9, 25.0 and 29.9, and ≥30 kg/m2, respectively. Food composition tables were used to estimate nutrient intakes. The values obtained were compared with those recommended in current nutritional guidelines. 52% of the patients were NW, 29% were OW, and 19% were OB. Total energy, fat, and dietary n-6 PUFAs intake was higher in OB than in NW. IL-6 and hs-CRP were higher in OB than in NW. The prevalence of multidrug regimen was higher in OB. In all patients, total energy, protein, saturated fatty acids, and sodium intake were higher than guideline recommendations. On the contrary, the intake of unsaturated and n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and fiber was lower than recommended. In conclusion, the prevalence of obesity was high in our patients, and it was associated with inflammation and the assumption of multiple cardiovascular and antidiabetic drugs. Dietary intake did not meet nutritional recommendations in all patients, especially in obese ones, highlighting the need of a long-term nutritional support in renal transplant recipients.

  6. Sitagliptin, An Anti-diabetic Drug, Suppresses Estrogen Deficiency-Induced OsteoporosisIn Vivo and Inhibits RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Formation and Bone Resorption In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuandong Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a disease characterized by excessive osteoclastic bone resorption. Some anti-diabetic drugs were demonstrated for anti-osteoclastic bone-loss effects. The present study investigated the skeletal effects of chronic administration of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV inhibitor that is increasingly used for type 2 diabetes treatments, in an estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis and elucidated the associated mechanisms. This study indicated that sitagliptin effectively prevented ovariectomy-induced bone loss and reduced osteoclast numbers in vivo. It was also indicated that sitagliptin suppressed receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation, bone resorption, and F-actin ring formation in a manner of dose-dependence. In addition, sitagliptin significantly reduced the expression of osteoclast-specific markers in mouse bone-marrow-derived macrophages, including calcitonin receptor (Calcr, dendrite cell-specific transmembrane protein (Dc-stamp, c-Fos, and nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1 (Nfatc1. Further study indicated that sitagliptin inhibited osteoclastogenesis by suppressing AKT and ERK signaling pathways, scavenging ROS activity, and suppressing the Ca2+ oscillation that consequently affects the expression and/or activity of the osteoclast-specific transcription factors, c-Fos and NFATc1. Collectively, these findings suggest that sitagliptin possesses beneficial effects on bone and the suppression of osteoclast number implies that the effect is exerted directly on osteoclastogenesis.

  7. Sitagliptin, An Anti-diabetic Drug, Suppresses Estrogen Deficiency-Induced OsteoporosisIn Vivo and Inhibits RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Formation and Bone Resorption In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuandong; Xiao, Fei; Qu, Xinhua; Zhai, Zanjing; Hu, Guoli; Chen, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2017-01-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a disease characterized by excessive osteoclastic bone resorption. Some anti-diabetic drugs were demonstrated for anti-osteoclastic bone-loss effects. The present study investigated the skeletal effects of chronic administration of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) inhibitor that is increasingly used for type 2 diabetes treatments, in an estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis and elucidated the associated mechanisms. This study indicated that sitagliptin effectively prevented ovariectomy-induced bone loss and reduced osteoclast numbers in vivo . It was also indicated that sitagliptin suppressed receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclast differentiation, bone resorption, and F-actin ring formation in a manner of dose-dependence. In addition, sitagliptin significantly reduced the expression of osteoclast-specific markers in mouse bone-marrow-derived macrophages, including calcitonin receptor ( Calcr ), dendrite cell-specific transmembrane protein ( Dc-stamp ), c-Fos , and nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1 ( Nfatc1 ). Further study indicated that sitagliptin inhibited osteoclastogenesis by suppressing AKT and ERK signaling pathways, scavenging ROS activity, and suppressing the Ca 2+ oscillation that consequently affects the expression and/or activity of the osteoclast-specific transcription factors, c-Fos and NFATc1. Collectively, these findings suggest that sitagliptin possesses beneficial effects on bone and the suppression of osteoclast number implies that the effect is exerted directly on osteoclastogenesis.

  8. Drug: D00595 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00595 Drug Buformin (USAN/INN) ... C6H15N5 D00595.gif ... Antidiabetic agent ... DG01685... ... Insulin sensitizer ... DG01684 ... Biguanide antidiabetic Unclassified ... DG02044 ... Hypoglycemics ... DG01684 ... Biguanide antidiabetic

  9. Drug: D04966 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D04966 Drug Metformin (USAN/INN) ... C4H11N5 D04966.gif ... Antidiabetic agent ... DG0168...5 ... Insulin sensitizer ... DG01684 ... Biguanide antidiabetic Unclassified ... DG02044 ... Hypoglycemics ... DG01684 ... Biguanide antidiabetic

  10. The anti-diabetic drug metformin suppresses self-renewal and proliferation of trastuzumab-resistant tumor-initiating breast cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Del Barco, Sonia; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Menendez, Javier A

    2011-04-01

    We here demonstrate that the anti-diabetic drug metformin interacts synergistically with the anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Tzb; Herceptin™) to eliminate stem/progenitor cell populations in HER2-gene-amplified breast carcinoma cells. When using the mammosphere culture technique, graded concentrations of single-agent metformin (range 50-1,000 μmol/l) were found to dose-dependently reduce the number of mammospheres formed by SKBR3 (a Tzb-naïve model), SKBR3 TzbR (a model of acquired auto-resistance to Tzb) and JIMT-1 (a model of refractoriness to Tzb and other HER2-targeted therapies ab initio) HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. Single-agent Tzb likewise reduced mammosphere-forming efficiency (MSFE) in Tzb-naïve SKBR3 cells, but it failed to significantly decrease MSFE in Tzb-resistant SKBR3 TzbR and JIMT-1 cells. Of note, CD44-overexpressing Tzb-refractory SKBR3 TzbR and JIMT-1 cells retained an exquisite sensitivity to single-agent metformin. Concurrent combination of metformin with Tzb synergistically reduced MSFE as well as the size of mammospheres in Tzb-refractory SKBR3 TzbR and JIMT-1 cells. Flow cytometry analyses confirmed that metformin and Tzb functioned synergistically to down-regulate the percentage of Tzb-refractory JIMT-1 cells displaying the CD44(pos)/CD24(neg/low) stem/progenitor immunophenotype. Given that MSFE and mammosphere size are indicators of stem self-renewal and progenitor cell proliferation, respectively, our current findings reveal for the first time that: (a) Tzb refractoriness in HER2 overexpressors can be explained in terms of Tzb-resistant/CD44-overexpressing/tumor-initiating stem cells; (b) metformin synergistically interacts with Tzb to suppress self-renewal and proliferation of cancer stem/progenitor cells in HER2-positive carcinomas.

  11. Carbon dots for fluorescent detection of α-glucosidase activity using enzyme activated inner filter effect and its application to anti-diabetic drug discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Weiheng [Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Wu, Di [School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Xia, Lian [Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Chen, Xuefeng [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xian 710021 (China); Li, Guoliang, E-mail: 61254368@163.com [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xian 710021 (China); Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, China National Centre for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing 100021 (China); Qiu, Nannan [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, China National Centre for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing 100021 (China); Chen, Guang; Sun, Zhiwei; You, Jinmao [Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Wu, Yongning, E-mail: wuyongning@cfsa.net.cn [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, China National Centre for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing 100021 (China)

    2017-06-22

    Recently, α-glucosidase inhibitor has been widely used in clinic for diabetic therapy. In the present study, a facile and sensitive fluorescent assay based on enzyme activated inner filter effect (IFE) on nitrogen-doped carbon dots (CDs) was first developed for the detection of α-glucosidase. The N-doped CDs with green emission were prepared by a one-step hydrothermal synthesis and gave the fluorescence quantum yield of 30%, which were used as the signal output. Through α-glucosidase catalysis, 4-nitrophenol was released from 4-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (NGP). Interestingly, the absorption of 4-nitrophenol and the excitation of CDs were completely overlapping. Due to its great molar absorptivity, 4-nitrophenol was capable of acting as a powerful absorber to affect the fluorescent signal of CDs (i.e. IFE). By converting the absorption signals into fluorescence signals, the facile fluorescence assay strategy could be realized for α-glucosidase activity sensing, which effectively avoided the complex modification of the surface of CDs or construction of the nanoprobes. The established IFE-based sensing platform offered a low detection limit of 0.01 U/mL (S/N = 3). This proposed sensing approach has also been expanded to the inhibitor screening and showed excellent applicability. As a typical α-glucosidase inhibitor, acarbose was investigated with a low detection limit of 10{sup −8} M. This developed method enjoyed many merits including simplicity, lost cost, high sensitivity, good reproducibility and excellent selectivity, which also provided a new insight on the application of CDs to develop the facile and sensitive biosensor. - Highlights: • Green N-doped CDs were first prepared by a facile synthesis process. • IFE-based sensor without covalent linking or surface modifications was developed. • The method was successfully applied to α-glucosidase detection. • The method can be employed for sensitive screening of anti-diabetes drugs.

  12. Clinical and Economic Outcomes Associated With the Timing of Initiation of Basal Insulin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Previously Treated With Oral Antidiabetes Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Philip; Zhou, Steve; Durden, Emily; Farr, Amanda M; Gill, Jasvinder; Wei, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) not achieving glycemic targets using oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs), studies suggest that timely insulin initiation has clinical benefits. Insulin initiation at the early versus late stage of disease progression has not been explored in detail. This retrospective database analysis investigated clinical and economic outcomes associated with the timing of insulin initiation in patients with T2DM treated with ≥1 OAD in a real-world US setting. This study linked data from the Truven Health MarketScan(®) Commercial database, Medicare Supplemental database, and Quintiles Electronic Medical Records database. A total of 1830 patients with T2DM were included. Patients were grouped according to their OAD use before basal insulin initiation (1, 2, or ≥3 OADs) as a proxy for the timing of insulin initiation. Clinical and economic outcomes were evaluated over 1 year of follow-up. During follow-up the 1 OAD group, compared with the 2 and ≥3 OADs groups, had a greater reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (-1.7% vs -1.0% vs -0.9%, respectively; P health care costs ($21,167 vs $21,060 vs $20,133, respectively). This study shows that early insulin initiation (represented by the 1 OAD group) may be clinically beneficial to patients with T2DM not controlled with OADs, without adding to costs. This supports the call for timely initiation of individualized insulin therapy in this population. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Solid self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for oral delivery of polypeptide-k: Formulation, optimization, in-vitro and in-vivo antidiabetic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Varun; Kaur, Puneet; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Kumar, Bimlesh; Bawa, Palak; Gulati, Monica; Yadav, Ankit Kumar

    2017-11-15

    Development of self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) of polypeptide-k (PPK) is reported with the aim to achieve its oral delivery. Box-Behnken design (BBD) was adopted to develop and optimize the composition of SNEDDS. Oleoyl polyoxyl-6 glycerides (A), Tween 80 (B), and diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (C) were used as oil, surfactant and co-surfactant, respectively as independent variables. The effect of variation in their composition was observed on the mean droplet size (y1), polydispersity index (PDI) (y2), % drug loading (y3) and zeta potential (y4). As per the optimal design, seventeen SNEDDS prototypes were prepared. The optimized composition of SNEDDS formulation was 25% v/v Oleoyl polyoxyl-6 glycerides, 37% v/v Tween 80, 38% v/v diethylene glycol monoethyl ether, and 3% w/v PPK. The optimized formulation revealed values of y1, y2, y3, and y4 as 31.89nm, 0.16, 73.15%, and -15.65mV, respectively. Further the optimized liquid SNEDDS were solidified through spray drying using various hydrophilic and hydrophobic carriers. Among the various carriers, Aerosil 200 was found to provide desirable flow, compression, disintegration and dissolution properties. Both, liquid and solid-SNEDDS have shown release of >90% within 10min. The formulation was found stable with change in pH, dilution, temperature variation and freeze thaw cycles in terms of droplet size, zeta potential, drug precipitation and phase separation. Crystalline PPK was observed in amorphous state in solid SNEDDS when characterized through DSC and PXRD studies. The biochemical, hematological and histopathological results of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats shown promising antidiabetic potential of PPK loaded in SNEDDS at its both the doses (i.e. 400mg/kg and 800mg/kg) as compared to its naïve form at both the doses. The study revealed successful formulation of SNEDDS for oral delivery of PPK. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Antidiabetic Activity of Self Nanoemulsifying Drug Delivery System from Bay Leaves (Eugenia polyantha Wight) Ethyl Acetate Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prihapsara, F.; Harini, M.; Widiyani, T.; Artanti, A. N.; Ani, I. L.

    2017-02-01

    Insulin resistance is caused by inability of target tissues to insulin response. Bay leaves (Eugenia polyantha Wight) fraction or extract have been used for the treatment of antidibetic mellitus type-2 resistance insulin (ADMRI) but it has low solubility and bioavailability. To overcome these problems, ethyl acetate fraction of bay leaves was formulated into self nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) using Virgin Coconut Oil (VCO) as a carrier oil. This study aims to produce nanoherbal medicine, determine effect of nanoherbal preparation derived from bay leaves as an anti-ADMRI. The results showed that the optimum SNEDDS formula was tween 80 : PEG 400 : Virgin Coconut Oil (30% : 60% : 10%) in 5 mL. It has emulsification time 13.00 seconds with the average of droplet size value 84.5 nanometer and zeta potential value ± 0.2 mV. Morphological observation showed the nanoemulsion particles has spherical shaped and stable in different pH media. Hypoglycaemic effect of single dose metformin, SNEDDS, combination a-half dose of SNEEDS with metformin value is 28.3%; 15.6%; 34.6% respectively.

  15. FGF21 as a mediator of adaptive responses to stress and metabolic benefits of anti-diabetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kook Hwan; Lee, Myung-Shik

    2015-07-01

    Most hormones secreted from specific organs of the body in response to diverse stimuli contribute to the homeostasis of the whole organism. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a hormone induced by a variety of environmental or metabolic stimuli, plays a crucial role in the adaptive response to these stressful conditions. In addition to its role as a stress hormone, FGF21 appears to function as a mediator of the therapeutic effects of currently available drugs and those under development for treatment of metabolic diseases. In this review, we highlight molecular mechanisms and the functional importance of FGF21 induction in response to diverse stress conditions such as changes of nutritional status, cold exposure, and exercise. In addition, we describe recent findings regarding the role of FGF21 in the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes associated with obesity, liver diseases, pancreatitis, muscle atrophy, atherosclerosis, cardiac hypertrophy, and diabetic nephropathy. Finally, we discuss the current understanding of the actions of FGF21 as a crucial regulator mediating beneficial metabolic effects of therapeutic agents such as metformin, glucagon/glucagon-like peptide 1 analogues, thiazolidinedione, sirtuin 1 activators, and lipoic acid. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  16. Nanomaterials potentiating standard chemotherapy drugs' effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantsev, S. O.; Korovin, M. S.

    2017-09-01

    Application of antitumor chemotherapeutic drugs is hindered by a number of barriers, multidrug resistance that makes effective drug deposition inside cancer cells difficult is among them. Recent research shows that potential efficiency of anticancer drugs can be increased with nanoparticles. This review is devoted to the application of nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Various types of nanoparticles currently used in medicine are reviewed. The nanoparticles that have been used for cancer therapy and targeted drug delivery to damaged sites of organism are described. Also, the possibility of nanoparticles application for cancer diagnosis that could help early detection of tumors is discussed. Our investigations of antitumor activity of low-dimensional nanostructures based on aluminum oxides and hydroxides are briefly reviewed.

  17. The complete control of glucose level utilizing the composition of ketogenic diet with the gluconeogenesis inhibitor, the anti-diabetic drug metformin, as a potential anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleksyszyn, Józef

    2011-08-01

    In the animal models of glucose dependent cancer growth, the growth is decreased 15-30% through the use of low-carbohydrate, calorically restricted and/or ketogenic diet. The remaining growth depends on glucose formed by the liver-kidney gluconeogenesis as is the case in the cancer cachexia. It is hypothesized that a new treatment for cancer diseases should be explored which includes the ketogenic diet combined with the inhibition of gluconeogenesis by the anti-diabetic drug metformin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative efficacy and safety of antidiabetic drug regimens added to metformin monotherapy in patients with type 2 diabetes: a network meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth S Mearns

    Full Text Available When first line therapy with metformin is insufficient for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D, the optimal adjunctive therapy is unclear. We assessed the efficacy and safety of adjunctive antidiabetic agents in patients with inadequately controlled T2D on metformin alone.A search of MEDLINE and CENTRAL, clinicaltrials.gov, regulatory websites was performed. We included randomized controlled trials of 3-12 months duration, evaluating Food and Drug Administration or European Union approved agents (noninsulin and long acting, once daily basal insulins in patients experiencing inadequate glycemic control with metformin monotherapy (≥ 1500 mg daily or maximally tolerated dose for ≥ 4 weeks. Random-effects network meta-analyses were used to compare the weighted mean difference for changes from baseline in HbA1c, body weight (BW and systolic blood pressure (SBP, and the risk of developing hypoglycemia, urinary (UTI and genital tract infection (GTI.Sixty-two trials evaluating 25 agents were included. All agents significantly reduced HbA1c vs. placebo; albeit not to the same extent (range, 0.43% for miglitol to 1.29% for glibenclamide. Glargine, sulfonylureas (SUs and nateglinide were associated with increased hypoglycemia risk vs. placebo (range, 4.00-11.67. Sodium glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2 inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs, miglitol and empagliflozin/linagliptin significantly reduced BW (range, 1.15-2.26 kg whereas SUs, thiazolindinediones, glargine and alogliptin/pioglitazone caused weight gain (range, 1.19-2.44 kg. SGLT2 inhibitors, empagliflozin/linagliptin, liraglutide and sitagliptin decreased SBP (range, 1.88-5.43 mmHg. No therapy increased UTI risk vs. placebo; however, SGLT2 inhibitors were associated with an increased risk of GTI (range, 2.16-8.03.Adding different AHAs to metformin was associated with varying effects on HbA1c, BW, SBP, hypoglycemia, UTI and GTI which should impact clinician choice when selecting adjunctive

  19. Albiglutide, a weekly GLP-1 receptor agonist, improves glycemic parameters in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes over 1 year when added to single oral antidiabetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Inaha; Wilson, Timothy H; Yue, Lin; Nakajima, Hiromu; Carr, Molly C; Tsuboi, Maho; Nino, Antonio; Seino, Yutaka

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of once weekly albiglutide added to a single oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) in Japanese patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In this phase 3, 1 year study (NCT01777282), patients (N = 374) received albiglutide 30 mg plus a single OAD (sulfonylurea [n = 120], biguanide [n = 67)], glinide [n = 65], thiazolidinedione [n = 61], or α-glucosidase inhibitor [n = 61]). Albiglutide could be increased to 50 mg after Week 4, based on glycemic criteria. Primary endpoints were the incidence of adverse events (AEs) and hypoglycemia; secondary endpoints were changes from baseline at Week 52 in HbA 1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG), proportion of patients achieving HbA 1c ≤7.0%, and withdrawals due to hyperglycemia. On-therapy AEs occurred in 78.6% of patients and serious AEs in 2.1%. Common AEs were nasopharyngitis (32.6%), constipation (7.2%), and diabetic retinopathy (5.3%). No serious AEs occurred more than once or were reported in >1 patient. Hypoglycemia occurred in 6.4% of patients, mostly in the albiglutide + sulfonylurea (14.2%) and the albiglutide + glinide (6.2%) groups. Albiglutide was uptitrated in 53.2% of patients. Mean baseline HbA 1c was 8.1%. Mean decreases from baseline in HbA 1c were observed with the addition of albiglutide to thiazolidinediones (-1.42%), α-glucosidase inhibitors (-1.39%), sulfonylureas (-1.04%), glinides (-0.95%), and biguanides (-0.94%). HbA 1c of 50% of patients and mean reductions in FPG were achieved in all groups. Mean changes from baseline in body weight ranged from +0.52 kg (albiglutide + thiazolidinedione) to -0.33 kg (albiglutide + biguanide). Limitations of the study included open label treatment that was not randomized. When combined with a single OAD in Japanese patients with inadequately controlled T2DM, albiglutide led to favorable changes in all glycemic parameters, with minor changes in body weight

  20. The anti-diabetic drug miglitol is protective against anginal ischaemia through a mechanism independent of regional myocardial blood flow in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yoshihiro; Minatoguchi, Shinya; Arai, Masazumi; Wang, Ningyuan; Chen, Xue-Hai; Hashimoto, Kazuaki; Lu, Cuanjiang; Takemura, Genzou; Fujiwara, Hisayoshi

    2005-10-01

    1. In the present study, we attempted to clarify whether the antidiabetic drug miglitol, an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, has a protective effect against anginal ischaemia. We had reported previously that miglitol reduces myocardial infarct size through inhibition of glycogenolysis during ischaemia in rabbits. However, the effect of miglitol on anginal ischaemia remains unknown. 2. In open-chest beagle dogs with a severely stenosed left anterior descending coronary artery, an epicardial electrode was attached to the surface of the risk area of the left ventricle and a microdialysis probe was implanted into the myocardium to measure ST segment changes and interstitial lactate accumulation. The first episode of anginal ischaemia was induced by atrial pacing and phenylephrine infusion (50-100 microg/min) for 10 min. The second episode of anginal ischaemia was induced 210 min after the first episode. Miglitol (10 mg/kg, i.v.) was administered to the miglitol group (n = 10) 30 min before the second episode of anginal ischaemia, whereas saline was administered to the control group (n = 10). Regional myocardial blood flow was measured using coloured microspheres. 3. There was no significant difference in regional myocardial blood flow in the risk and non-risk areas between the first and second episodes of anginal ischaemia and between the miglitol and control groups. During the first and second episodes of anginal ischaemia, the ST segment was decreased to a similar extent in the control group. Although ST segment depression during the first episode of anginal ischaemia was similar in both groups, ST segment depression during the second episode of anginal ischaemia was significantly attenuated in the miglitol-treated group compared with the control group (1.3 +/- 0.4 vs 2.2 +/- 0.4 mV, respectively). Miglitol significantly attenuated myocardial interstitial lactate accumulation in the risk area. 4. In conclusion, in the present study miglitol improved ST segment depression

  1. A comparison of biphasic insulin aspart and insulin glargine administered with oral antidiabetic drugs in type 2 diabetes mellitus--a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rys, P; Wojciechowski, P; Siejka, S; Małecki, P; Hak, L; Malecki, M T

    2014-03-01

    It is uncertain whether the addition of biphasic insulin analogues to oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) is as effective and safe as basal insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We performed a systematic review to compare glycaemic control and selected clinical outcomes in T2DM patients inadequately controlled with OADs whose treatment was intensified by adding biphasic insulin aspart (BIAsp 30) or insulin glargine (IGlar). The analysis included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) identified by a systematic literature search in medical databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library and other sources) up to March 2013. Studies met the inclusion criteria if they compared BIAsp 30 vs. IGlar added to at least one OAD in T2DM patients. Trials applying different OADs in both treatment arms were also included. Results were presented as weighted mean difference (WMD) or odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Five trials, including a total number of 1758 patients followed up from 24 to 28 weeks, were identified. Quantitative synthesis demonstrated that BIAsp 30 reduced HbA1c level more efficiently than IGlar [5 RCTs; WMD (95% CI): -0.21% (-0.35%, -0.08%)]. Differences were observed in favour of BIAsp for lower mean prandial glucose increment [3 RCTs; WMD (95% CI): -14.70 mg/dl (-20.09, -9.31)]; no difference was observed for fasting plasma glucose [3 RCTs; WMD (95% CI): 7.09 mg/dl (-15.76, 29.94)]. We found no evidence for higher risk of overall [2 RCTs; 63% vs. 51%; OR = 1.77 (0.91; 3.44)] and severe hypoglycaemic episodes [4 RCTs; 0.98% vs. 1.12%; OR (95% CI) = 0.88 (0.31, 2.53)] in the BIAsp 30 group as compared with IGlar group. Twice-daily administration of BIAsp 30 resulted in larger weight gain [2 RCTs; WMD (95% CI) = 1.78 kg (1.04; 2.52)]. BIAsp 30 added to OAD therapy results in a better glycaemic control as compared with IGlar in T2DM patients. BIAsp 30 use is associated with slightly larger weight gain but no rise in risk

  2. Antidiabetic Effects of Tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Yue Fu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a chronic endocrine disease resulted from insulin secretory defect or insulin resistance and it is a leading cause of death around the world. The care of DM patients consumes a huge budget due to the high frequency of consultations and long hospitalizations, making DM a serious threat to both human health and global economies. Tea contains abundant polyphenols and caffeine which showed antidiabetic activity, so the development of antidiabetic medications from tea and its extracts is increasingly receiving attention. However, the results claiming an association between tea consumption and reduced DM risk are inconsistent. The advances in the epidemiologic evidence and the underlying antidiabetic mechanisms of tea are reviewed in this paper. The inconsistent results and the possible causes behind them are also discussed.

  3. Antidiabetic Effects of Tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiu-Yue; Li, Qing-Sheng; Lin, Xiao-Ming; Qiao, Ru-Ying; Yang, Rui; Li, Xu-Min; Dong, Zhan-Bo; Xiang, Li-Ping; Zheng, Xin-Qiang; Lu, Jian-Liang; Yuan, Cong-Bo; Ye, Jian-Hui; Liang, Yue-Rong

    2017-05-20

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic endocrine disease resulted from insulin secretory defect or insulin resistance and it is a leading cause of death around the world. The care of DM patients consumes a huge budget due to the high frequency of consultations and long hospitalizations, making DM a serious threat to both human health and global economies. Tea contains abundant polyphenols and caffeine which showed antidiabetic activity, so the development of antidiabetic medications from tea and its extracts is increasingly receiving attention. However, the results claiming an association between tea consumption and reduced DM risk are inconsistent. The advances in the epidemiologic evidence and the underlying antidiabetic mechanisms of tea are reviewed in this paper. The inconsistent results and the possible causes behind them are also discussed.

  4. Application of Raman spectroscopy in type 2 diabetes screening in blood using leucine and isoleucine amino-acids as biomarkers and in comparative anti-diabetic drugs efficacy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birech, Zephania; Mwangi, Peter Waweru; Bukachi, Fredrick; Mandela, Keith Makori

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is an irreversible condition characterized by elevated blood glucose levels. Currently, there are no predictive biomarkers for this disease and the existing ones such as hemoglobin A1c and fasting blood glucose are used only when diabetes symptoms are noticed. The objective of this work was first to explore the potential of leucine and isoleucine amino acids as diabetes type 2 biomarkers using their Raman spectroscopic signatures. Secondly, we wanted to explore whether Raman spectroscopy can be applied in comparative efficacy studies between commercially available anti-diabetic drug pioglitazone and the locally used anti-diabetic herbal extract Momordica spinosa (Gilg.)Chiov. Sprague Dawley (SD) rat's blood was used and were pipetted onto Raman substrates prepared from conductive silver paste smeared glass slides. Prominent Raman bands associated with glucose (926, 1302, 1125 cm-1), leucine (1106, 1248, 1302, 1395 cm-1) and isolecucine (1108, 1248, 1437 and 1585 cm-1) were observed. The Raman bands centered at 1125 cm-1, 1395 cm-1 and 1437 cm-1 associated respectively to glucose, leucine and isoleucine were chosen as biomarker Raman peaks for diabetes type 2. These Raman bands displayed decreased intensities in blood from diabetic SD rats administered antidiabetic drugs pioglitazone and herbal extract Momordica spinosa (Gilg.)Chiov. The intensity decrease indicated reduced concentration levels of the respective biomarker molecules: glucose (1125 cm-1), leucine (1395 cm-1) and isoleucine (1437 cm-1) in blood. The results displayed the power and potential of Raman spectroscopy in rapid (10 seconds) diabetes and pre-diabetes screening in blood (human or rat's) with not only glucose acting as a biomarker but also leucine and isoleucine amino-acids where intensities of respectively assigned bands act as references. It also showed that using Raman spectroscopic signatures of the chosen biomarkers, the method can be an alternative for performing comparative

  5. Application of Raman spectroscopy in type 2 diabetes screening in blood using leucine and isoleucine amino-acids as biomarkers and in comparative anti-diabetic drugs efficacy studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zephania Birech

    Full Text Available Diabetes is an irreversible condition characterized by elevated blood glucose levels. Currently, there are no predictive biomarkers for this disease and the existing ones such as hemoglobin A1c and fasting blood glucose are used only when diabetes symptoms are noticed. The objective of this work was first to explore the potential of leucine and isoleucine amino acids as diabetes type 2 biomarkers using their Raman spectroscopic signatures. Secondly, we wanted to explore whether Raman spectroscopy can be applied in comparative efficacy studies between commercially available anti-diabetic drug pioglitazone and the locally used anti-diabetic herbal extract Momordica spinosa (Gilg.Chiov. Sprague Dawley (SD rat's blood was used and were pipetted onto Raman substrates prepared from conductive silver paste smeared glass slides. Prominent Raman bands associated with glucose (926, 1302, 1125 cm-1, leucine (1106, 1248, 1302, 1395 cm-1 and isolecucine (1108, 1248, 1437 and 1585 cm-1 were observed. The Raman bands centered at 1125 cm-1, 1395 cm-1 and 1437 cm-1 associated respectively to glucose, leucine and isoleucine were chosen as biomarker Raman peaks for diabetes type 2. These Raman bands displayed decreased intensities in blood from diabetic SD rats administered antidiabetic drugs pioglitazone and herbal extract Momordica spinosa (Gilg.Chiov. The intensity decrease indicated reduced concentration levels of the respective biomarker molecules: glucose (1125 cm-1, leucine (1395 cm-1 and isoleucine (1437 cm-1 in blood. The results displayed the power and potential of Raman spectroscopy in rapid (10 seconds diabetes and pre-diabetes screening in blood (human or rat's with not only glucose acting as a biomarker but also leucine and isoleucine amino-acids where intensities of respectively assigned bands act as references. It also showed that using Raman spectroscopic signatures of the chosen biomarkers, the method can be an alternative for performing

  6. Antidiabetic Plants of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashrafeddin Goushegir

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available To identify the antidiabetic plants of Iran, a systematic review of the published literature on the efficacy of Iranian medicinal plant for glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus was conducted. We performed an electronic literature search of MEDLINE, Science Direct, Scopus, Proquest, Ebsco, Googlescholar, SID, Cochrane Library Database, from 1966 up to June 2010. The search terms were complementary and alternative medicine (CAM, diabetes mellitus, plant (herb, Iran, patient, glycemic control, clinical trial, RCT, natural or herbal medicine, hypoglycemic plants, and individual herb names from popular sources, or combination of these key words. Available Randomized Controlled Trials (RCT published in English or Persian language examined effects of an herb (limited to Iran on glycemic indexes in type 2 diabetic patients were included. Among all of the articles identified in the initial database search, 23 trials were RCT, examining herbs as potential therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The key outcome for antidiabetic effect was changes in blood glucose or HbA1 c, as well as improves in insulin sensitivity or resistance. Available data suggest that several antidiabetic plants of Iran need further study. Among the RCT studies, the best evidence in glycemic control was found in Citrullus colocynthus, Ipomoea betatas, Silybum marianum and Trigonella foenum graecum.

  7. Antidiabetic activity of Pongamia pinnata leaf extracts in alloxan-induced diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikarwar, Mukesh S.; Patil, M.B.

    2010-01-01

    The antidiabetic activity of Pongamia pinnata ( Family: Leguminosae) leaf extracts was investigated in alloxan-induced diabetic albino rats. A comparison was made between the action of different extracts of P. pinnata and a known antidiabetic drug glibenclamide (600 μg/kg b. wt.). An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was also performed in experimental diabetic rats. The petroleum ether, chloroform, alcohol and aqueous extracts of P. pinnata were obtained by simple maceration method and were subjected to standardization using pharmacognostical and phytochemical screening methods. Dose selection was made on the basis of acute oral toxicity study (50-5000 mg/kg b. w.) as per OECD guidelines. P. pinnata ethanolic extract (PPEE) and aqueous extract (PPAE) showed significant (P < 0.001) antidiabetic activity. In alloxan-induced model, blood glucose levels of these extracts on 7th day of the study were 155.83 ± 11.211mg/dl (PPEE) and 132.00 ± 4.955mg/dl (PPAE) in comparison of diabetic control (413.50 ± 4.752mg/dl) and chloroform extract (210.83 ± 14.912mg/dl). In glucose loaded rats, PPEE exhibited glucose level of 164.50 ± 6.350mg/dl after 30 min and 156.50 ± 4.089mg/dl after 90 min, whereas the levels in PPAE treated animals were 176 ± 3.724mg/dl after 30 min and 110.33 ± 6.687mg/dl after 90 min. These extracts also prevented body weight loss in diabetic rats. The drug has the potential to act as an antidiabetic drug. PMID:21455444

  8. [The mortality of patients with diabetes mellitus using oral antidiabetic drugs in the Czech Republic decreased over the decade of 2003-2013 and came closer to the population average].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brož, Jan; Honěk, Petr; Dušek, Ladislav; Pavlík, Tomáš; Kvapil, Milan

    2015-11-01

    Every year official data is published which describes the care of patients with diabetes mellitus in the Czech Republic. An overall number of individuals with diabetes, the number of newly reported cases and the number of patient deaths is always specified. However this data does not allow us to identify the differences in mortality between the individual cohorts of diabetic patients in relation to therapy. Comparison of the mortality development in the periods of 2002-2006 and 2010-2013 in a representative sample of the patient population with type 2 diabetes mellitus using oral antidiabetic drugs, kept in the database of the General Health Insurance Company of the Czech Republic (VZP) which provided health care coverage for 63% of Czech population in 2013. A retrospective epidemiologic analysis. We identified all individuals in the VZP database who had a record of DM diagnosis (E10-E16 based on ICD 10) or who had any antidiabetic therapy prescribed (ATC group A10) in the periods of 2002-2008 and 2009-2013. We only selected those patients for the analysis who were treated with oral antidiabetic medicines (in the given year or the preceding years they had a record of treatment with at least one medicine from A10B group, while having no record of treatment with medicines from A10A group within both years). 237,665 individuals met the selected criteria in 2003 and 315,418 individuals in 2013. Mortality rates dropped for all age groups (from 2003-2013): for 50-59 year olds by 1.2%-0.7%; in 60-69 year olds by 2.6%-1.6%; for 70-79 year olds by 5.8%-3.5%. In 2013 mortality rates came close to the general population where for the same age groups they reached 0.6%, 1.5% and 3.4% respectively. When expressed in relative terms, the mortality among 50-59 year olds declined by 42% (Czechia by 25%), among 60-69 year olds by 39% (Czechia by 17%) and among 70-79 year olds by 40% (Czechia by 28%) from the year 2003. The decline in mortality among the patients with DM treated with

  9. Pharmacognostic standardization of Homoeopathic drug: Juniperus virginiana L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Padma Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Juniperus virginiana L., commonly known as ′red cedar′ in English is a well-known evergreen tree belonging to the family Cupressaceae. The leaves and young aerial shoots are used for preparation of medicine in Homoeopathy. Objective: Standardization is the quintessential aspect which ensures purity and quality of drugs. Hence, the pharmacognostic and physico-chemical studies are carried out to facilitate the use of authentic and correct species of raw drug plant material with established parametric standards for manufacturing the drug. Materials and Methods: Pharmacognostic studies on leaves and young aerial parts of authentic samples of J. virginiana L. have been carried out; physico-chemical parameters of raw drug viz., extractive values, ash values, formulation, besides weight per mL, total solids, alcohol content along with High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC and ultraviolet visible studies have been worked out for mother tincture. Results: The leaves are needles, narrow and sharp at tips; stems are round with greyish white to brown bark possessing small lenticels and covered by imbricate leaves. Epidermal cells in the surface have polygonal linear sides with pitted walls containing crystals and starch. Stomata exclusively occur on the adaxial surface in linear rows. Hypodermis of leaf in T.S. is marked with 1-2 layered lignified sclerenchyma. 2-4 secretory canals are present with one conspicuously beneath midvein bundle. The young terminal axis is sheathed by two closely surrounding leaves while the mature stem possess four leaf bases attached. Vascular tissue of stem possesses predominant xylem surrounded by phloem containing sphaeraphides, prismatic crystals and starch grains. Uniseriate rays occur in the xylem. Mature stem possess shrivelled cork, followed by the cortex. Physicochemical properties and HPTLC values of the drug are standardized and presented. Conclusion: The powder microscopic features and

  10. Harnessing the potential clinical use of medicinal plants as anti-diabetic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell-Tofte JI

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Joan IA Campbell-Tofte,1 Per Mølgaard,2 Kaj Winther11Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark; 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder arising from complex interactions between multiple genetic and/or environmental factors. The characteristic high blood sugar levels result from either lack of the hormone insulin (type 1 diabetes, T1D, or because body tissues do not respond to the hormone (type 2 diabetes, T2D. T1D patients currently need exogenous insulin for life, while for T2D patients who do not respond to diet and exercise regimes, oral anti-diabetic drugs (OADs and sometimes insulin are administered to help keep their blood glucose as normal as possible. As neither the administration of insulin nor OADs is curative, many patients develop tissue degenerative processes that result in life-threatening diabetes comorbidities. Several surveys of medicinal plants used as anti-diabetic agents amongst different peoples have been published. Some of this interest is driven by the ongoing diabetes pandemic coupled with the inadequacies associated with the current state of-the-art care and management of the syndrome. However, there is a huge cleft between traditional medicine and modern (Western medicine, with the latter understandably demanding meaningful and scientific validation of anecdotal evidence for acceptance of the former. The main problems for clinical evaluation of medicinal plants with promising anti-diabetic properties reside both with the complexity of components of the plant materials and with the lack of full understanding of the diabetes disease etiology. This review is therefore focused on why research activities involving an integration of Systems Biology-based technologies of pharmacogenomics, metabolomics, and bioinformatics with standard clinical data

  11. Antidiabetic II drug metformin in plants: uptake and translocation to edible parts of cereals, oily seeds, beans, tomato, squash, carrots, and potatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggen, Trine; Lillo, Cathrine

    2012-07-18

    Residues of pharmaceuticals present in wastewater and sewage sludge are of concern due to their transfer to aquatic and terrestrial food chains and possible adverse effects on nontargeted organisms. In the present work, uptake and translocation of metformin, an antidiabetic II medicine, by edible plant species cultivated in agricultural soil have been investigated in greenhouse experiment. Metformin demonstrated a high uptake and translocation to oily seeds of rape ( Brassica napus cv. Sheik and Brassica rapa cv. Valo); expressed as an average bioconcentration factor (BCF, plant concentration over initial concentration in soil, both in dry weight), BCF values as high as 21.72 were measured. In comparison, BCFs for grains of the cereals wheat, barley, and oat were in the range of 0.29-1.35. Uptake and translocation to fruits and vegetables of tomato (BCFs 0.02-0.06), squash (BCFs 0.12-0.18), and bean (BCF 0.88) were also low compared to rape. BCFs for carrot, potato, and leaf forage B. napus cv. Sola were similar (BCF 1-4). Guanylurea, a known degradation product of metformin by microorganisms in activated sludge, was found in barley grains, bean pods, potato peel, and small potatoes. The mechanisms for transport of metformin and guanidine in plants are still unknown, whereas organic cation transporters (OCTs) in mammals are known to actively transport such compounds and may guide the way for further understanding of mechanisms also in plants.

  12. Association between antidiabetic drugs and psoriasis risk in diabetic patients: results from a nationwide nested case-control study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-Ying; Shieh, Jeng-Jer; Shen, Jui-Lung; Liu, Yi-Ya; Chang, Yun-Ting; Chen, Yi-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The risk of psoriasis in diabetic patients has rarely been explored. We sought to investigate the association between antidiabetic therapies and psoriasis. The incidence of psoriasis was compared between a representative diabetic cohort and a matched nondiabetic cohort. We next conducted a nationwide cohort study with 1,659,727 diabetic patients using the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan 1997 through 2011. Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used for nested case-control analyses. Incidence rates of psoriasis among diabetic patients and nondiabetic matched control subjects were 70.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 59.5-80.9) and 42.3 (95% CI 39.5-45.5) per 100,000 person-years, respectively (P diabetic patients without history of insulin use, frequent use of thiazolidinedione was associated with lower risk of psoriasis (adjusted odds ratio 0.87, 95% CI 0.77-0.99). The National Health Insurance Research Database did not contain information regarding disease severity, diet, body mass index, lifestyle, or family history. Among diabetic patients, regular insulin use is associated with psoriasis development. Frequent use of thiazolidinedione may be associated with modest reduction in psoriasis risk. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pharmacognostic and physicochemical standardization of homoeopathic drug: Rumex crispus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Palani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rumex crispus L., commonly called as "yellow dock" in English, "patience frisee" in French, and "Ampfer" in German, and ′aceda de culebra′ in Spanish is a well-known herb belonging to Polygonaceae. Roots of the herb are used as medicine in homoeopathy. Objective: The pharmacognostic and physicochemical studies on roots have been carried out to enable the use of correct species and standardize the raw material. Materials and Methods: Pharmacognostic studies on roots of authentic raw drug have been carried out; physicochemical parameters, namely, extractive value, ash values, formulation besides weight per mL, total solids, alcohol content along with high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC and ultraviolet studies for mother tincture have been worked out. Results: Roots are blackish-brown, wiry, rounded with irregular striations, tortuous; internally, it is softwood, light-yellow, and fracture fibrous. Phellem is 8-10 layered, discontinuous, and tanniniferous. Phellogen is two-layered and contains inulin crystals in few. Outer phelloderm is 12-16 layered often containing spherocrystals and associated with stone cells. Secondary phloem is up to 25 layered. Xylem is in the form of strips. The physicochemical properties and HPTLC values of the drug are standardized and presented. Conclusion: The powder microscopic features and organoleptic characters along with anatomical and physicochemical studies are diagnostic to establish standards for the drug.

  14. Manual of Standard Operating Procedures for Veterinary Drug Residue Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Laboratories are crucial to national veterinary drug residue monitoring programmes. However, one of the main challenges laboratories encounter is obtaining access to relevant methods of analysis. Thus, in addition to training, providing technical advice and transferring technology, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture has resolved to develop clear and practical manuals to support Member State laboratories. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Radiometric and Allied Analytical Methods to Strengthen Residue Control Programs for Antibiotic and Anthelmintic Veterinary Drug Residues has developed a number of analytical methods as standard operating procedures (SOPs), which are now compiled here. This publication contains SOPs on chromatographic and spectrometric techniques, as well as radioimmunoassay and associated screening techniques, for various anthelmintic and antimicrobial veterinary drug residue analysis. Some analytical method validation protocols are also included. The publication is primarily aimed at food and environmental safety laboratories involved in testing veterinary drug residues, including under organized national residue monitoring programmes. It is expected to enhance laboratory capacity building and competence through the use of radiometric and complementary tools and techniques. The publication is also relevant for applied research on residues of veterinary drugs in food and environmental samples

  15. Antidiabetic activity of extracts ofAnacardium occidentaleLinn. leaves onn-streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Y S; Tatke, P A; Gabhe, S Y; Vaidya, A B

    2017-10-01

    Anacardium occidentale L. (Anacardiaceae) is used in South Cameroon as well as in other tropical countries by traditional practitioners as a folk remedy for treatment of diabetes mellitus. We demonstrated the antidiabetic potential of the plant extracts in n -streptozotocin diabetic rats. The aim of the current study was to investigate the antidiabetic effects of ethanol extract of leaves of A. occidentale on neonatal streptozotocin diabetic rats. Two day old neonates were injected with 100 mg/kg of streptozotocin. At the end of the experimental period of 30 days, reduction in the fasting blood glucose levels, serum insulin, glycated hemoglobin levels, serum lipid parameters, and renal function biomarkers were estimated in the control and treated rats. Histopathological examination of liver, kidney and pancreas were also carried out. On administration of 100 mg/kg of plant extract, blood glucose levels of the rats showed 8.01% and 19.25% decrease in the fasting blood glucose levels on day 15 and day 30, respectively. The administration of extract showed that the effects of extract treatment are comparable to treatment with the standard drug Pioglitazone. These results demonstrate significant antidiabetic potential of the ethanol extract of leaves of A. occidentale , justifying the use of plant in the indigenous system of medicine. Further studies for investigating the specific compound(s) responsible for such beneficial role in diabetes would open new outlook in the therapy of type 2 diabetes.

  16. 49 CFR 219.701 - Standards for drug and alcohol testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for drug and alcohol testing. 219.701... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Drug and Alcohol Testing Procedures § 219.701 Standards for drug and alcohol testing. (a) Drug testing required or authorized by subparts B...

  17. Antidiabetic activity of ethanolic leaf extract of Croton zambesicus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antidiabetic activity of ethanolic leaf extract of Croton zambesicus Muell. Arg. was evaluated using alloxan-induced (150mg/kg) hyperglycaemic rats. The activity of the ethanolic leaf extract was compared with that of a reference drug Chlorpropamide. The Blood Glucose Levels were measured using glucometer. The extract ...

  18. 78 FR 36711 - Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Title VII-Drug Supply Chain; Standards for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Chapter I [Docket Nos. FDA-2013-N-0683, FDA-2013-N-0684, and FDA-2013-N-0685] Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Title VII--Drug Supply Chain; Standards for Admission of Imported Drugs, Registration of...

  19. Impact of regulatory spin of pioglitazone on prescription of antidiabetic drugs among physicians in India: A multicentre questionnaire-based observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Goyal

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Majority of the physicians though were aware of the regulatory changes with regard to pioglitazone, but their prescribing patterns were not changed for this drug. However, it was being used at lower than the recommended dose. There is a need for generating more evidence through improved pharmacovigilance activities and large-scale population-based prospective studies regarding the safety issues of pioglitazone, so as to make effectual risk-benefit analysis for its continual use in T2DM.

  20. Myopic and Forward Looking Behavior in Branded Oral Anti-Diabetic Medication Consumption: An Example from Medicare Part D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Naomi C; Burgess, James F; Cabral, Howard J; Pizer, Steven D

    2017-06-01

    We evaluate consumption responses to the non-linear Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit. We compare propensity-matched older patients with diabetes and Part D Standard or low-income-subsidy (LIS) coverage. We evaluate monthly adherence to branded oral anti-diabetics, with high end-of-year donut hole prices (>$200) for Standard patients and consistent, low (≤$6) prices for LIS. As an additional control, we examine adherence to generic anti-diabetics, with relatively low, consistent prices for Standard patients. If Standard patients are forward looking, they will reduce branded adherence in January, and LIS-Standard differences will be constant through the year. Contrary to this expectation, branded adherence is lower for Standard patients in January and diverges from LIS as the coverage year progresses. Standard-LIS generic adherence differences are minimal. Our findings suggest that seniors with chronic conditions respond myopically to the nonlinear Part D benefit, reducing consumption in response to high deductible, initial coverage and gap prices. Thus, when the gap is fully phased out in 2020, cost-related nonadherence will likely remain in the face of higher spot prices for more costly branded medications. These results contribute to studies of Part D plan choice and medication adherence that suggest that seniors may not make optimal healthcare decisions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Drug: D08351 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08351 Drug Phenformin (BAN) ... C10H15N5 D08351.gif ... Antidiabetic agent ... DG01685 ... ...Insulin sensitizer ... DG01684 ... Biguanide antidiabetic Cyp substrate ... DG01644 ... CYP2D6 substrate Unclassified ... ...DG02044 ... Hypoglycemics ... DG01684 ... Biguanide antidiabetic Same as: C07673 ATC code: A10BA01 Chemical group: D

  2. Drug: D09779 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D09779 Drug Emiglitate (JAN/INN) ... C17H25NO7 D09779.gif ... Antidiabetic agent ... DG01...663 ... alpha-Glucosidase inhibitor ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor Unclassified ... DG02044 ... Hypoglycemics ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor ... GAA [HSA:2548] [KO:K12316]; GANC [HS

  3. Drug: D08352 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08352 Drug Phenformin hydrochloride; Debei (TN) ... C10H15N5. HCl D08352.gif ... Antidiabetic... agent ... DG01685 ... Insulin sensitizer ... DG01684 ... Biguanide antidiabetic Cyp substrate ... DG01644 ... CYP2D6... substrate Unclassified ... DG02044 ... Hypoglycemics ... DG01684 ... Biguanide antidiabetic ATC code: A10BA01 Chemical

  4. Drug: D01665 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D01665 Drug Voglibose (JP17/USAN/INN); Basen (TN) ... C10H21NO7 D01665.gif ... Antidiabetic... agent ... DG01663 ... alpha-Glucosidase inhibitor ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor Uncla...ssified ... DG02044 ... Hypoglycemics ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor Therapeutic category: 3

  5. Drug: D02206 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D02206 Drug Buformin hydrochloride (JP17); Dibetos-B (TN) ... C6H15N5. HCl D02206.gif ... Antidiabetic... agent ... DG01685 ... Insulin sensitizer ... DG01684 ... Biguanide antidiabetic Unclassified ... DG02044 ... Hypoglycemics ... DG01684 ... Biguanide antidiabetic Therapeutic category: 3962 ATC code: A10BA03 Chemical group

  6. Drug: D00944 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00944 Drug Metformin hydrochloride (JP17/USP); Glucophage (TN) ... C4H11N5. HCl D00944.gif ... Antidiabetic... agent ... DG01685 ... Insulin sensitizer ... DG01684 ... Biguanide antidiabetic Unclassified ... DG...02044 ... Hypoglycemics ... DG01684 ... Biguanide antidiabetic Therapeutic category: 3962 ATC code: A10BA02 Chemical

  7. Drug: D00625 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00625 Drug Miglitol (JP17/USAN/INN); Glyset (TN) ... C8H17NO5 D00625.gif ... Antidiabetic... agent ... DG01663 ... alpha-Glucosidase inhibitor ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor Unclas...sified ... DG02044 ... Hypoglycemics ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor Same as: C07708 Therapeu

  8. Drug: D04103 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D04103 Drug Etoformin hydrochloride (USAN) ... C8H19N5. HCl D04103.gif ... Antidiabetic... agent ... DG01685 ... Insulin sensitizer ... DG01684 ... Biguanide antidiabetic Unclassified ... DG02044 ... Hypoglycemics ... ... DG01684 ... Biguanide antidiabetic ... Biganides ... CAS: 53597-26-5 PubChem: 47206055 ChEMBL: CHEMBL2106592 LigandBox: D04103 NIKKAJI: J244.891B ...

  9. 75 FR 34452 - Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Data Standards Plan; Availability for Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Data Standards Plan... development of a comprehensive data standards program in the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER... Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability for public comment of the draft document entitled ``CDER Data...

  10. Patrones de prescripción de antidiabéticos en un grupo de pacientes colombianos Antidiabetic drugs prescription patterns among a group of patients in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Enrique Machado Alba

    2007-08-01

    prescribed from two to four. The medications prescribed were: biguanides (67.5%, sulphonylureas (64.9%, insulin (23.5%, and thiazolidinediones (0.1%. The most common oral combination-therapies were: glibenclamide and metformin (n = 2 847, metformin and insulin (n = 510, glibenclamide and insulin (n = 148, and metformin, insulin, and glibenclamide (n = 288. Of the total, 94.3% had comorbid conditions for which they had been prescribed medication: antihypertensive drugs (in 74.4% of the cases, anti-inflammatories (61.5%, hypolipemiants (45.5%, antiulcer medications (21.0%, psychoactive drugs (16.8%, antimicrobials (14.4%, asthma medication (5.3%, and salicylic acid (2.8%. Prescriptions for comorbid conditions were more common among women than men (95.6% vs. 92.7%, P < 0.001. Undertreatment with certain medications (metformin, thiazolidinediones, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, and salicylic acid, and overtreatment with others (antiulcer drugs, probably exist. CONCLUSIONS: There are significant differences in oral therapies prescribed for diabetes across the 19 cities studied, but overall, prescription patterns are appropriate. Educational strategies should be developed to address those prescribing practices that are not appropriate, and the clinical results of the medications studied should be explored.

  11. Assessment of Knowledge of Self Blood Glucose Monitoring and Extent of Self Titration of Anti-Diabetic Drugs among Diabetes Mellitus Patients - A Cross Sectional, Community Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, V; Thirunavukkarasu, J

    2016-03-01

    Self blood glucose monitoring is an important context of self care in the management of diabetes mellitus. All the guidelines must be followed while performing self blood glucose monitoring and tracking of values is essential to facilitate the physician while titrating the drugs and /or doses of anti diabetes medication. Self titration by patients following self monitoring must be discouraged. To assess the knowledge and practice of self blood glucose monitoring among diabetes patients and extent of self titration of anti diabetes medicines among diabetes patients based on self blood glucose monitoring. This pilot, cross-sectional, observational study was conducted using a validated questionnaire among adult male and female diabetes patients performing self blood glucose monitoring at home. Diabetes patients with complications and juvenile diabetes patients were excluded. Out of 153 patients surveyed, only 37 (24.1%) (20 males, 17 females) patients were aware and have been following self blood glucose monitoring appropriately. About 116 (75.8%) (64 males, 52 females) of patients were devoid of adequate knowledge and did not practice self blood glucose monitoring in a proper way. Ninety eight (64.05%) accepted that they self titrate their anti diabetic medicines based on self monitoring. Self monitoring of blood glucose should be encouraged and patients should be taught importance of following correct steps and tracking of self monitoring by physician or diabetes educator.

  12. Chemometrics: A new scenario in herbal drug standardization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Bansal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chromatography and spectroscopy techniques are the most commonly used methods in standardization of herbal medicines but the herbal system is not easy to analyze because of their complexity of chemical composition. Many cutting-edge analytical technologies have been introduced to evaluate the quality of medicinal plants and significant amount of measurement data has been produced. Chemometric techniques provide a good opportunity for mining more useful chemical information from the original data. Then, the application of chemometrics in the field of medicinal plants is spontaneous and necessary. Comprehensive methods and hyphenated techniques associated with chemometrics used for extracting useful information and supplying various methods of data processing are now more and more widely used in medicinal plants, among which chemometrics resolution methods and principal component analysis (PCA are most commonly used techniques. This review focuses on the recent various important analytical techniques, important chemometrics tools and interpretation of results by PCA, and applications of chemometrics in quality evaluation of medicinal plants in the authenticity, efficacy and consistency. Key words: Chemometrics, HELP, Herbal drugs, PCA, OPA

  13. 33 CFR 95.020 - Standard for under the influence of alcohol or a dangerous drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of alcohol or a dangerous drug. 95.020 Section 95.020 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... ALCOHOL OR A DANGEROUS DRUG § 95.020 Standard for under the influence of alcohol or a dangerous drug. An individual is under the influence of alcohol or a dangerous drug when: (a) The individual is operating a...

  14. Are the effects of drugs to prevent and to treat heart failure always concordant? The statin paradox and its implications for understanding the actions of antidiabetic medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Milton

    2018-03-22

    Most treatments for chronic heart failure are effective both in preventing its onset and reducing its progression. However, statins prevent the development of heart failure, but they do not decrease morbidity and mortality in those with established heart failure. This apparent discordance cannot be explained by an effect to prevent interval myocardial infarctions. Instead, it seems that the disease that statins were preventing in trials of patients with a metabolic disorder was different from the disease that they were treating in trials of chronic heart failure. The most common phenotype of heart failure in patients with obesity and diabetes is heart failure with a preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). In this disorder, the anti-inflammatory effects of statins might ameliorate myocardial fibrosis and cardiac filling abnormalities, but these actions may have little relevance to patients with heart failure and a reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), whose primary derangement is cardiomyocyte loss and stretch. These distinctions may explain why statins were ineffective in trials that focused on HFrEF, but have been reported to produce with favourable effects in observational studies of HFpEF. Similarly, selective cytokine antagonists were ineffective in HFrEF, but have been associated with benefits in HFpEF. These observations may have important implications for our understanding of the effects of antihyperglycaemic medications. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists have had neutral effects on heart failure events in people at risk for HFpEF, but have exerted deleterious actions in HFrEF. Similarly, sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors, which exert anti-inflammatory effects and reduce heart failure events in patients who are prone to HFpEF, may not be effective in HFrEF. The distinctions between HFrEF and HFpEF may explain why the effects of drugs on heart failure events in diabetes trials may not be relevant to their use in patients with systolic dysfunction

  15. Thiazolidinediones are associated with a decreased risk of atrial fibrillation compared with other antidiabetic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallisgaard, Jannik Langtved; Lindhardt, Tommi Bo; Staerk, Laila

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between thiazolidinediones (TZDs) vs. other antidiabetic drugs and risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) in diabetic patients. METHOD AND RESULTS: Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) increases the risk of AF by approximately 34%. TZD is an insulin...... drugs. The decreased risk of AF remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.76 (0.57-1.00), P = 0.047 associated with TZD treatment compared with other antidiabetic drugs. CONCLUSION: Use of a TZD to treat diabetes was associated with reduced...... sensitizer that also has anti-inflammatory effects, which might decrease the risk of AF compared with other antidiabetic drugs. We used data from the Danish nationwide registries to study 108 624 patients with diabetes and without prior AF who were treated with metformin or sulfonylurea as first-line drugs...

  16. Experimental strategy of animal trial for the approval of anti-diabetic agents prior to their use in pre-human clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek K. Bajpai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Although several naturally available drugs have been historically used for the treatment of diabetes mellitus throughout the world, few of them have been validated by scientific criteria. Before approval of any drug developed it should pass through animal trial prior to clinical human trial, which should followed by some standard ethical rules. Recently, a large diversity of animal models have been developed to better understand the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, and new drugs have been introduced in the market to treat this autoimmune disease. In the present article, we demonstrated some standard handling procedure of animal trial for the approval of anti-diabetic drug, which could be helpful for both academics and industrial scientific community to conduct the animal experiments. This research also contributes in the field of ethnopharmacology to design new strategies for the development of novel drugs to treat this serious condition of diabetes mellitus that constitutes a global public health.

  17. Antidiabetic potentials of Momordica charantia: multiple mechanisms behind the effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Padmaja

    2012-02-01

    Momordica charantia fruits are used as a vegetable in many countries. From time immemorial, it has also been used for management of diabetes in the Ayurvedic and Chinese systems of medicine. Information regarding the standardization of this vegetable for its usage as an antidiabetic drug is scanty. There are many reports on its effects on glucose and lipid levels in diabetic animals and some in clinical trials. Reports regarding its mechanism of action are limited. So in the present review all the information is considered to produce some concrete findings on the mechanism behind its hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects. Studies have shown that M. charantia repairs damaged β-cells, increases insulin levels, and also enhance the sensitivity of insulin. It inhibits the absorption of glucose by inhibiting glucosidase and also suppresses the activity of disaccharidases in the intestine. It stimulates the synthesis and release of thyroid hormones and adiponectin and enhances the activity of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Effects of M. charantia like transport of glucose in the cells, transport of fatty acids in the mitochondria, modulation of insulin secretion, and elevation of levels of uncoupling proteins in adipose and skeletal muscles are similar to those of AMPK and thyroxine. Therefore it is proposed that effects of M. charantia on carbohydrate and fat metabolism are through thyroxine and AMPK.

  18. A Systematic Literature Review and Network Meta-Analysis Comparing Once-Weekly Semaglutide with Other GLP-1 Receptor Agonists in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Previously Receiving 1-2 Oral Anti-Diabetic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Michal; Wilkinson, Lars; Webb, Neil; Weids, Alan; Glah, Divina; Vrazic, Hrvoje

    2018-04-19

    Once-weekly semaglutide is a new glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue administered at a 1.0 or 0.5 mg dose. As head-to-head trials assessing once-weekly semaglutide as an add-on to 1-2 oral anti-diabetic drugs (OADs) vs other GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) are limited, a network meta-analysis (NMA) was performed. The objective was to assess the relative efficacy and safety of once-weekly semaglutide vs GLP-1 RAs in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) inadequately controlled on 1-2 OADs. A systematic literature review (SLR) was conducted in order to identify trials of GLP-1 RAs in patients inadequately controlled on 1-2 OADs. Data at 24 ± 4 weeks were extracted for efficacy and safety outcomes (feasible for analysis in a NMA), which included the key outcomes of change from baseline in glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and weight, as well as discontinuation due to adverse events (AEs). Data were synthesized using a NMA and a Bayesian framework. In total, 26 studies were included across the base case analyses. Once-weekly semaglutide 1.0 mg was associated with significantly greater reductions in HbA 1c and weight vs all GLP-1 RA comparators. Once-weekly semaglutide 0.5 mg also achieved significantly greater reductions in HbA 1c and weight compared with the majority of other GLP-1 RAs. Both doses of once-weekly semaglutide were associated with similar odds of discontinuation due to AEs compared with other GLP-1 RAs. Overall, once-weekly semaglutide 1.0 mg as an add-on to 1-2 OADs is the most efficacious GLP-1 RA in terms of the reduction of HbA 1c and weight from baseline after 6 months of treatment. In addition, the analysis suggests that once-weekly semaglutide is well tolerated and not associated with an increase in discontinuations due to AEs compared with other GLP-1 RAs. Novo Nordisk.

  19. Antidiabetic therapy in real practice: indicators for adherence and treatment cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo GL

    2012-09-01

    specialist examinations was lower in the fixed-combination group (30.1 versus 35.1. Patients on monotherapy showed a better percentage of adherence for glimepiride (70.5% and pioglitazone (70.4%, whereas the best adherence in the fixed-combination therapy group was recorded for metformin + pioglitazone (75.5%. The average annual cost per diabetic patient was €2388, with differences between the monotherapy (€2321, fixed-combination (€2270, and dual therapy (€2465 groups. Fixed combination therapy involved a lower mean expenditure for insulin, other drugs, and specialist and diagnostic care. Thiazolidinediones (such as pioglitazone showed the lowest average annual cost per patient among the monotherapies, with a marked decrease in costs for hospitalization, specialist care, and diagnostics.Conclusion: The results of our study should be extended to other regional/national reference local health care units in order to define and compare average standard costs per pathology throughout the wide sample considered in this research work. Appropriate drug prescribing is of critical importance in order to achieve therapeutic objectives and to optimize the use of resources in modern health care systems.Keywords: type 2 diabetes, oral antidiabetic drugs, pharmacoeconomics, health care costs, adherence, medication possession ratio

  20. Oral antidiabetic drugs and cardiac remodeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, Meimei

    2012-01-01

    Medicijnen tegen diabetes kunnen het risico op hartfalen mogelijk verkleinen, ook bij patiënten die niet aan diabetes lijden. Diabetes en hartfalen zijn veelvoorkomende ziekten die invloed op elkaar hebben. Patiënten met diabetes hebben een hoog risico op hart- en vaatziekten en daaropvolgend

  1. Evaluation of Antidiabetic Prescriptions from Medical Reimbursement Applications at Banaras Hindu University Health Care Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dev Priya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes is on rapid increase in third world countries undergoing rapid transition in terms of development particularly in India, which is often being referred as Diabetic capital. It is a disease more prevalent at latter part of life of human beings when finances dwindle and social care gets neglected. The medication continues till the whole life on a regular basis. In present study, the objective has been to provide pharmacoeconomic medication to the diabetic pensioners in the backdrop as mentioned in above background.Methods: The data was collected at the medical reimbursement section of pensioners of the University. The data was examined to answer issues of therapeutic decisions in the light of the pharmacoeconomic considerations. In this paper essentially data on choice of prescriptions with the angle of pharmacoeconomic prudence were included. The dichotomy of specialist versus non specialist prescribers at the tertiary center (i.e. medical college hospital was compared. Effort was made to define merit of the prescription based on comprehensive considerations of patient profile, disease profile and therapeutic choice.Results: Total 72 prescriptions were analyzed for the study in which 475 drugs were prescribed to the patients.  Total antidiabetic drugs prescribed to the patients were 169. Out of 72 cases 39 were males and 33 were females with mean age 66.04 ± 5.80 (Mean ± SEM. The average number of drugs per prescription was 6.59 which was very high as per guidelines. Most commonly prescribed antidiabetic drug was Metformin (63.89% followed by Glimepiride (31.95%.Conclusion: This study reflects that there is need to make available the standard therapeutic optionat University Health Care Facility based upon pharmacoeconomic considerations.

  2. ORGANIZATION OF AVAILABILITY OF THE CIRCULATION OF ANTIDIABETIC MEDICINES BASED ON PHARMACEUTICAL LAW IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbrozhek SI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In recent years as the global problem of healthcare in many countries acts diabetes, number of patients with this disease is growing and is already 4-6% of the population in developed countries. These indicators enable WHO experts include diabetes to one of the four priority non-infectious diseases and non-infectious epidemic of the 21st century. Because of chronic disease of diabetes decreases the quality of life of citizens, develops related diseases such as stroke, heart attack, blindness, kidney failure, amputation of the lower extremities causing deaths. Therefore, programs to combat diabetes and its prevention is a priority for national healthcare systems without exception countries. Materials and methods. Circulation of the registered antidiabetic medicines in Ukraine during pricing and delivery (example; forensic and pharmaceutical practice of the complaints and appeals on the availability for them of the antidiabetic medicines; pricing characteristics of the antidiabetic medicines over the period of 2012–2015. Methods: normative and legal, documentary, bibliographic, statistical, comparative, forensic and pharmaceutical, graphical analysis. Results and discussion. The study of organization of circulation of the antidiabetic medicines requires a systematic approach from the organizational, legal and forensic and pharmaceutical research. Today in Ukraine the arsenal of drugs for the treatment of diabetes presented with more than 85 registered antidiabetic drugs for trade names, of which 60% – insulin, and the remaining 40% – oral hypoglycemic drugs offered in a 210 release forms. Given forensic and pharmaceutical example shows that the barrier, which reduces the availability of antidiabetic medicines for diabetics at discounted prescription is mandatory registration of wholesale prices, because that price mechanism of registration by the Ministry of Healthcare of Ukraine interferes with the right of privileged

  3. ANTI-DIABETIC EFFECTS OF TURMERIC IN ALLOXAN INDUCE D DIABETIC RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Jeevangi; Manjunath; Deepak D; Prakash G; Prashant; Chetan

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE AND BACKGROUND: Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is one of the common constituents of our daily food. The present study wa s undertaken to evaluate the anti-diabetic effects of ethanolic extract of Rhizomes of curcuma longa in alloxan induced diabetic rats and compared with of Pioglitazone, which is the standard anti-diabetic agent. METHODS: Alloxan monohydrate is used to induce diabetes mellitus in albino rats in the dose of 120mg/kg i.p. and ...

  4. Estimation of trace elements in some anti-diabetic medicinal plants using PIXE technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naga Raju, G.J.; Sarita, P.; Ramana Murty, G.A.V.; Ravi Kumar, M.; Seetharami Reddy, B.; John Charles, M.; Lakshminarayana, S.; Seshi Reddy, T.; Reddy, S. Bhuloka; Vijayan, V.

    2006-01-01

    Trace elemental analysis was carried out in various parts of some anti-diabetic medicinal plants using PIXE technique. A 3 MeV proton beam was used to excite the samples. The elements Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb and Sr were identified and their concentrations were estimated. The results of the present study provide justification for the usage of these medicinal plants in the treatment of diabetes mellitus (DM) since they are found to contain appreciable amounts of the elements K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Cu, and Zn, which are responsible for potentiating insulin action. Our results show that the analyzed medicinal plants can be considered as potential sources for providing a reasonable amount of the required elements other than diet to the patients of DM. Moreover, these results can be used to set new standards for prescribing the dosage of the herbal drugs prepared from these plant materials

  5. Change of initial oral antidiabetic therapy in type 2 diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Plat (Arian); F.J.A. Penning-Van Beest (Fernie); S. Kessabi (Sophia); M.T. Groot (Martijn); R.M.C. Herings (Ron)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractObjective To explore the 'real-life' therapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs). Methods From the PHARMO Record Linkage System comprising linked drug dispensing and clinical laboratory data from approximately 2.5 million individuals in the Netherlands, among

  6. Identification of PPARgamma partial agonists of natural origin (II: in silico prediction in natural extracts with known antidiabetic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Guasch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Natural extracts have played an important role in the prevention and treatment of diseases and are important sources for drug discovery. However, to be effectively used in these processes, natural extracts must be characterized through the identification of their active compounds and their modes of action. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: From an initial set of 29,779 natural products that are annotated with their natural source and using a previously developed virtual screening procedure (carefully validated experimentally, we have predicted as potential peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ partial agonists 12 molecules from 11 extracts known to have antidiabetic activity. Six of these molecules are similar to molecules with described antidiabetic activity but whose mechanism of action is unknown. Therefore, it is plausible that these 12 molecules could be the bioactive molecules responsible, at least in part, for the antidiabetic activity of the extracts containing them. In addition, we have also identified as potential PPARγ partial agonists 10 molecules from 16 plants with undescribed antidiabetic activity but that are related (i.e., they are from the same genus to plants with known antidiabetic properties. None of the 22 molecules that we predict as PPARγ partial agonists show chemical similarity with a group of 211 known PPARγ partial agonists obtained from the literature. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide a new hypothesis about the active molecules of natural extracts with antidiabetic properties and their mode of action. We also suggest plants with undescribed antidiabetic activity that may contain PPARγ partial agonists. These plants represent a new source of potential antidiabetic extracts. Consequently, our work opens the door to the discovery of new antidiabetic extracts and molecules that can be of use, for instance, in the design of new antidiabetic drugs or functional foods focused

  7. 21 CFR 70.10 - Color additives in standardized foods and new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Color additives in standardized foods and new... SERVICES GENERAL COLOR ADDITIVES General Provisions § 70.10 Color additives in standardized foods and new... proposes the inclusion of a color additive in the standardized food, the provisions of the regulations in...

  8. Potential of Lichen Compounds as Antidiabetic Agents with Antioxidative Properties: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaratne, Veranja

    2017-01-01

    The advancement in the knowledge of potent antioxidants has uncovered the way for greater insight in the treatment of diabetic complications. Lichens are a rich resource of novel bioactive compounds and their antioxidant potential is well documented. Herein we review the antidiabetic potential of lichens which have received considerable attention, in the recent past. We have correlated the antidiabetic and the antioxidant potential of lichen compounds. The study shows a good accordance between antioxidant and antidiabetic activity of lichens and points out the need to look into gathering the scarce and scattered data on biological activities for effective utilization. The review establishes that the lichen extracts, especially of Parmotrema sp. and Ramalina sp. have shown promising potential in both antidiabetic and antioxidant assays. Ubiquitous compounds, namely, zeorin, methylorsellinate, methyl-β-orcinol carboxylate, methyl haematommate, lecanoric acid, salazinic acid, sekikaic acid, usnic acid, gyrophoric acid, and lobaric acid have shown promising potential in both antidiabetic as well as antioxidant assays highlighting their potential for effective treatment of diabetic mellitus and its associated complications. The available compilation of this data provides the future perspectives and highlight the need for further studies of this potent herbal source to harvest more beneficial therapeutic antidiabetic drugs. PMID:28491237

  9. Uso de anti-hipertensivos e antidiabéticos por idosos: inquérito em Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil Use of anti-hypertensive and anti-diabetic drugs by the elderly: a survey in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica de Fátima Gontijo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A preocupação com efeitos prejudiciais do uso de medicamentos por idosos tem motivado estudos com o objetivo de identificar problemas nessa utilização. Realizou-se um inquérito domiciliar entre aposentados, com idade > 60 anos, residentes em Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil (2003, que declararam ter diabetes ou hipertensão arterial. A qualidade do uso de medicamentos anti-hipertensivos e antidiabéticos foi avaliada com base em redundância, associações medicamentosas e fármacos inapropriados. Entre os 283 (89% idosos autodeclarados hipertensos, em uso de farmacoterapia, 68,2% utilizavam diuréticos, e 37,8% utilizavam IECA. Entre os 22 (64,7% autodeclarados diabéticos sob farmacoterapia, 45,5% utilizavam insulina, e 77,3%, antidiabéticos orais. Entre os 89 autodeclarados diabéticos hipertensos, 80 (90% utilizavam anti-hipertensivos, e 51 (57,3%, antidiabéticos. Observou-se o uso de associações medicamentosas, medicamentos redundantes ou inadequados, o que indica a necessidade de seguimento de protocolos terapêuticos e maior atenção à saúde dos pacientes idosos.Concern over the harmful effects of drug use by the elderly has motivated studies aimed at identifying problems in such utilization. This was a household survey with retirees aged > 60 years living in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, in 2003, who reported having a diagnosis of diabetes and/or hypertension. Quality of anti-hypertensive and anti-diabetic medication was measured by redundancy, combinations of drugs, and inappropriate drugs. Among 283 elderly patients (89% with self-reported hypertension and use of anti-hypertensive pharmacotherapy, 68.2% were using diuretics and 37.8% ACE inhibitors. Among the 22 (64.7% self-reported diabetic patients under pharmacotherapy, 45.5% were using insulin and 77.3% oral anti-diabetic agents. Among the 89 self-reported diabetic and hypertensive patients, 80 (90% were using anti-hypertensive drugs and 51 (57.3% anti-diabetic

  10. Drug Combinations as the New Standard for Melanoma Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkowska, Marta; Czepielewska, Edyta; Kozłowska-Wojciechowska, Małgorzata

    2016-12-01

    Advanced melanoma is related to a very grim prognosis and fast progression. Until recently, there has been no indicated treatment that would affect the disease's outcome. However, the progress in immunotherapy and molecular therapy has significantly changed the unfavourable prognosis of melanoma progression and its short survival rate. Both approaches have improved patients' outcomes and provided renewed hope for successful treatment. Moreover, in order to further enhance patients' outcomes and to avoid mechanisms of tumour resistance, investigators attempted a combined approach. Targeted therapy combinations allowed a better response rate and progression-free survival than monotherapy with one of the agents. Another promising combination, but with limiting toxicities, is a concurrent immuno- and molecular-targeted therapy. It is suspected that complimentary usage of these drugs may lead to synergism, providing robust and quick tumour responses as well as long-lasting effects. Results of currently ongoing clinical trials that investigate combination strategies in melanoma are expected to provide more mature data about the effectiveness and the safety profile of those therapies. Until more robust results of these studies occur, the best management of advanced and metastatic melanoma is immunotherapy with anti-PD1 drugs or targeted therapy with concomitant BRAF and MEK inhibitor. However, which of these two options should be used first is still under discussion.

  11. Antidiabetic dietary materials and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sunan; Zhu, Fan

    2016-07-01

    The ever-increasing occurrence of diabetes worldwide demands cost-effective anti-diabetic strategies. Food-based materials have great potential as efficient anti-diabetic agents. Focusing on the literatures of the recent 5years, this review summarizes the methods, findings, and limitations of each research involving non-medicinal foods (individual and mixed) and diabetic animal models. Various types of fruits, vegetables, legumes, cereals, spices, beverages, oilseeds, and edible oils showed antidiabetic effects in different animal models. Animal feeding trials rarely had identical designs in food doses, feeding schedules, and routes of administration, as well as biochemical markers for antidiabetic evaluation. Various possible cellular and metabolic targets were speculated for the anti-hyperglycemic effects of the dietary materials, and the molecular mechanisms of action remain to be better explored. Short-term (maximum 16weeks) antidiabetic studies have been established. Limited safety/tolerability data are available for antidiabetic dietary materials. Findings from current animal studies present a generic antidiabetic dietary pattern associated with plant-based whole foods, which agrees well with the findings of epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Different mathematical processing of absorption, ratio and derivative spectra for quantification of mixtures containing minor component: An application to the analysis of the recently co-formulated antidiabetic drugs; canagliflozin and metformin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfy, Hayam M.; Mohamed, Dalia; Elshahed, Mona S.

    2018-01-01

    In the presented work several spectrophotometric methods were performed for the quantification of canagliflozin (CGZ) and metformin hydrochloride (MTF) simultaneously in their binary mixture. Two of these methods; response correlation (RC) and advanced balance point-spectrum subtraction (ABP-SS) were developed and introduced for the first time in this work, where the latter method (ABP-SS) was performed on both the zero order and the first derivative spectra of the drugs. Besides, two recently established methods; advanced amplitude modulation (AAM) and advanced absorbance subtraction (AAS) were also accomplished. All the proposed methods were validated in accordance to the ICH guidelines, where all methods were proved to be accurate and precise. Additionally, the linearity range, limit of detection and limit of quantification were determined and the selectivity was examined through the analysis of laboratory prepared mixtures and the combined dosage form of the drugs. The proposed methods were capable of determining the two drugs in the ratio present in the pharmaceutical formulation CGZ:MTF (1:17) without the requirement of any preliminary separation, further dilution or standard spiking. The results obtained by the proposed methods were in compliance with the reported chromatographic method when compared statistically, proving the absence of any significant difference in accuracy and precision between the proposed and reported methods.

  13. Chemometrics: A new scenario in herbal drug standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ankit; Chhabra, Vikas; Rawal, Ravindra K; Sharma, Simant

    2014-08-01

    Chromatography and spectroscopy techniques are the most commonly used methods in standardization of herbal medicines but the herbal system is not easy to analyze because of their complexity of chemical composition. Many cutting-edge analytical technologies have been introduced to evaluate the quality of medicinal plants and significant amount of measurement data has been produced. Chemometric techniques provide a good opportunity for mining more useful chemical information from the original data. Then, the application of chemometrics in the field of medicinal plants is spontaneous and necessary. Comprehensive methods and hyphenated techniques associated with chemometrics used for extracting useful information and supplying various methods of data processing are now more and more widely used in medicinal plants, among which chemometrics resolution methods and principal component analysis (PCA) are most commonly used techniques. This review focuses on the recent various important analytical techniques, important chemometrics tools and interpretation of results by PCA, and applications of chemometrics in quality evaluation of medicinal plants in the authenticity, efficacy and consistency.

  14. Experimental Validation of Antidiabetic and Antioxidant Potential ofCassia tora(L.): An Indigenous Medicinal Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vishnu; Singh, Ranjana; Mahdi, Farzana; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2017-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of Cassia tora ( C. tora ) seeds extract against streptozotocin induced diabetes in experimental rats to scientifically validate its use against diabetes. Ethanolic extract of C. tora seeds extract and standard drug (glibenclamide) prepared in aqueous gum acacia (2 %, w/v) suspension and fed orally to streptozotocin induced male adult diabetic rats of Charles Foster strain for 15 days. Biochemical parameters in normal, diabetic control, standard (600 μg/kg bw p.o.) and treated (500 mg/kg bw p.o.) animal groups were quantified and compared. Treatment of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats with ethanolic seeds extract caused significant ( p  tora seeds which could help in prevention of diabeticdyslipidemia and related complications.

  15. Anti-diabetic medications: How to make a choice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, Amir; Al Dubayee, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is the third commonest chronic illness in children following asthma and epilepsy. More recently the overall prevalence of diabetes in children and adults continued to increase dramatically. In children, this has partially been contributed to by the pandemic of obesity. Understandably, this posed an economic burden on health authorities and countries dealing with significant morbidity of the disease with potentially serious complications. In parallel to this, more therapeutic discoveries expanded the list of choice for available medications. We hypothesize that specialist clinicians are requested by an authority to submit a report of prioritization for anti-diabetic drugs. The authority new policy is to purchase for only three of anti-diabetic medications among a long list of old and new drugs. We gave a recommendation here in response to this request based on different properties of these medications and also based on the largest known clinical trials in the field. Some may have a different choice for a third medication besides insulin and metformin and physicians in many clinical settings may have a choice of more than three at a time. However, we, at least, provide here a thorough review of these drugs, their mechanistic of action, benefits and side effects to facilitate a better choice for individual patients according to underlying pathophysiological cause, other medical needs and tolerance to different medications. Paediatricians are increasingly managing adolescents with type 2 diabetes these days. Hence, we wrote this review as a quick reference guide to anti-diabetic medications to which they might be less familiar.

  16. Isolation of Antidiabetic Principle from Bougainvillea spectabilis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rhamnopyranoside were isolated from the stem bark of B. spectabilis Willd. Conclusion: An antidiabetic principle, pinitol, was successfully isolated from the stem bark of B. spectabilis Willd. Keywords: Bougainvillea spectabilis, Column chromatography, ...

  17. Antidiabetic activity of Terminalia catappa Linn fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagappa, A N; Thakurdesai, P A; Venkat Rao, N; Singh, Jiwan

    2003-09-01

    In view of alleged antidiabetic potential, effect of the petroleum ether, methanol, and aqueous extracts of Terminalia catappa Linn (combretaceae) fruit, on fasting blood sugar levels and serum biochemical analysis in alloxan-induced diabetic rats were investigated. All the three extracts of Terminalia catappa produced a significant antidiabetic activity at dose levels 1/5 of their lethal doses. Concurrent histological studies of the pancreas of these animals showed comparable regeneration by methanolic and aqueous extracts which were earlier, necrosed by alloxan.

  18. Drug: D03342 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03342 Drug Camiglibose (USAN) ... (C13H25NO9)2. 3H2O D03342.gif ... Antidiabetic agen...t ... DG01663 ... alpha-Glucosidase inhibitor ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor Unclassified ... D...G02044 ... Hypoglycemics ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor ... CAS: 132438-21-2 PubChem: 17397492 LigandBox: D03342 ...

  19. Systematic derivation of an Australian standard for Tall Man lettering to distinguish similar drug names.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerton, Lynne; Rizk, Mariam F S; Bedford, Graham; Lalor, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Confusion between similar drug names can cause harmful medication errors. Similar drug names can be visually differentiated using a typographical technique known as Tall Man lettering. While international conventions exist to derive Tall Man representation for drug names, there has been no national standard developed in Australia. This paper describes the derivation of a risk-based, standardized approach for use of Tall Man lettering in Australia, and known as National Tall Man Lettering. A three-stage approach was applied. An Australian list of similar drug names was systematically compiled from the literature and clinical error reports. Secondly, drug name pairs were prioritized using a risk matrix based on the likelihood of name confusion (a four-component score) vs. consensus ratings of the potential severity of the confusion by 31 expert reviewers. The mid-type Tall Man convention was then applied to derive the typography for the highest priority drug pair names. Of 250 pairs of confusable Australian drug names, comprising 341 discrete names, 35 pairs were identified by the matrix as an 'extreme' risk if confused. The mid-type Tall Man convention was successfully applied to the majority of the prioritized drugs; some adaption of the convention was required. This systematic process for identification of confusable drug names and associated risk, followed by application of a convention for Tall Man lettering, has produced a standard now endorsed for use in clinical settings in Australia. Periodic updating is recommended to accommodate new drug names and error reports. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Are vanadium compounds drugable? Structures and effects of antidiabetic vanadium compounds: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scior, Thomas; Guevara-García, Antonio; Bernard, Philippe; Do, Quoc-Tuan; Domeyer, David; Laufer, Stefan

    2005-11-01

    Vanadate can be bioequivalent to phosphate and replace it in cellular metabolism. The detection of insulin-like activity has spurred interest in the development of oral anti-diabetic drugs containing vanadium. We collected and evaluated a vast toxicity data set and discussed molecular aspects related to insulin-mimetic effects of vanadium complexes.

  1. Cafestol, a Bioactive Substance in Coffee, Has Antidiabetic Properties in KKAy Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellbye, Fredrik Brustad; Jeppesen, Per Bendix; Shokouh, Pedram

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Daily coffee consumption is inversely associated with risk of type-2 diabetes (T2D). Cafestol, a bioactive substance in coffee, increases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vitro and increases glucose uptake in human skeletal muscle cells. We hypothesized that cafestol can postpone...... in coffee consumers and has a potential role as an antidiabetic drug....

  2. Antidiabetic and Antihyperlipidemic Activity of Cucurbita maxima Duchense (Pumpkin) Seeds on Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ashish K. Sharma; Ashok Sharma

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic effect of petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and alcohol extract of seeds of Cucurbita maxima for its purported use in diabetes. The antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic activity of different extracts of Cucurbita maxima seeds was evaluated in wistar albino rats against streptozotocin (50 mg/kg i.p.) at dose of 200 mg/kg p.o. for 21 days. Glibenclamide (500µg/kg) was used as reference drug. Fasting blood g...

  3. Stereospermum tetragonam as an antidiabetic agent by activating PPARγ and GLUT4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bino Kingsley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Present study evaluates the anti-diabetic activity of S. tetragonam LC-MSMS experiments showed the presence of two novel molecules C1 and C2, which were further taken for in silico study against PPARγ. Cell culture studies with A431 cells in the presence of crude aqueous extract showed the elevated level of PPARγ and GLUT4 and also confirmed using in silico studies. Thus, the present study proves the mecode of action of S. tetragonam as an antidiabetic drug.

  4. Antidiabetic and antioxidant potentials of Euphorbia hirta leaves extract studied in streptozotocin-induced experimental diabetes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Sorimuthu P; Bhuvaneshwari, Subramanian; Prasath, Gopalan S

    2011-09-01

    Euphorbia hirta, commonly known as asthma weed, is a popular folk remedy for the treatment of various ailments. Recent studies have indicated that plant has potent antioxidant properties. As part of an ongoing programme to validate the use of some reputed herbs in Indian traditional medicines, the present study was aimed to evaluate the antidiabetic and antioxidant potentials of E. hirta leaves in streptozotocin-induced experimental diabetes in rats. Oral administration of E. hirta leaves extract (300 mg/kg b.w./rat/day) for a period of 30 days indicated the antidiabetic nature of the leaves extract. Determination of the lipid peroxides, hydroperoxides, and both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants evidenced the antioxidant potential of the leaves extract. Assay of enzymes such as serum aspartate transaminase (AST), serum alanine transaminase (ALT) and serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) revealed the non-toxic nature of E. hirta leaves. The hypoglycemic activity of the leaves extract was comparable with gliclazide, a standard reference drug.

  5. Marine Organisms with Anti-Diabetes Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Lauritano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic degenerative metabolic disease with high morbidity and mortality rates caused by its complications. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in looking for new bioactive compounds to treat this disease, including metabolites of marine origin. Several aquatic organisms have been screened to evaluate their possible anti-diabetes activities, such as bacteria, microalgae, macroalgae, seagrasses, sponges, corals, sea anemones, fish, salmon skin, a shark fusion protein as well as fish and shellfish wastes. Both in vitro and in vivo screenings have been used to test anti-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of marine organisms. This review summarizes recent discoveries in anti-diabetes properties of several marine organisms as well as marine wastes, existing patents and possible future research directions in this field.

  6. Drug: D00216 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available etic agent ... DG01663 ... alpha-Glucosidase inhibitor ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glu...cosidase inhibitor Unclassified ... DG02044 ... Hypoglycemics ... DG01803 ... Antidiabetic, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor... D00216 Drug Acarbose (JAN/USAN/INN); Precose (TN) ... C25H43NO18 D00216.gif ... Actinoplanes [TAX:1865] Antidiab

  7. Antidiabetic effect of Chloroxylon swietenia bark extracts on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jayaprasad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes has been increasing at an alarming rate around the world, and experts have relied on remedies from the utilization of ancient drugs that are essentially derived from plants. The present study aimed to evaluate the antidiabetic potential of Chloroxylon swietenia bark extracts on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in male albino Wistar rats by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ (50 mg/kg b.w.. The diabetic rats were administered orally with C. swietenia bark (CSB methanolic (CSBMEt and aqueous (CSBAEt (250 mg/kg b.w. extracts and glibenclamide (600 µg/kg b.w. by intragastric intubation for 45 days. The result showed a heavy loss in weight, increase in blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin level, and decline in plasma insulin and total hemoglobin content. Furthermore, glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bis phosphatase were found to be increased whereas hexokinase and glycogen contents were decreased in STZ induced diabetic rats. CSBAEt, CSBMEt and glibenclamide treated diabetic rats showed moderate reduction in blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels; in addition, plasma insulin and hemoglobin levels were elevated. The altered activities of carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes and liver glycogen were improved remarkably. CSBMEt results were comparable to the standard drug glibenclamide. The present findings support the usage of the plant extracts for the traditional treatment of diabetes.

  8. Drug evaluation and the permissive principle: continuities and contradictions between standards and practices in antidepressant regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, John; Davis, Courtney

    2009-08-01

    Pharmaceuticals are not permitted on to the market unless they are granted regulatory approval. The regulatory process is, therefore, crucial in whether or not a drug is widely prescribed. Regulatory agencies have developed standards of performance that pharmaceuticals are supposed to meet before entering the market. Regulation of technologies is often discussed by reference to the precautionary principle. In contrast, this paper develops the concept of the 'permissive principle' as a way of understanding the departure of regulators' practices from standards of drug efficacy to which regulatory agencies themselves subscribe. By taking a case study of antidepressant regulation in the UK and the USA, the mechanisms of permissive regulatory practices are examined. An STS methodology of both spatial (international) and temporal comparisons of regulatory practices with regulatory standards is employed to identify the nature and extent of the permissive regulation. It is found that the permissive principle was adopted by drug regulators in the UK and the USA, but more so by the former than the latter. Evidently, permissive regulation, which favours the commercial interests of the drug manufacturer, but is contrary to the interests of patients, may penetrate to the heart of regulatory science. On the other hand, permissive regulation of specific drugs should not be regarded as an inevitable result of marketing strategies and concomitant networks deployed by powerful pharmaceutical companies, because the extent of permissive regulation may vary according to the intra-institutional normative commitments of regulators to uphold their technical standards against the commercial interests of the manufacturer. Likely sociological factors that can account for such permissive regulatory practices are 'corporate bias', secrecy and excessive regulatory trust in the pharmaceutical industry in the UK, political expediency and ideological capture in the USA, combined in both countries

  9. Identification of novel human dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitors of natural origin (Part II: in silico prediction in antidiabetic extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Guasch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Natural extracts play an important role in traditional medicines for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and are also an essential resource for new drug discovery. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV inhibitors are potential candidates for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and the effectiveness of certain antidiabetic extracts of natural origin could be, at least partially, explained by the inhibition of DPP-IV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an initial set of 29,779 natural products that are annotated with their natural source and an experimentally validated virtual screening procedure previously developed in our lab (Guasch et al.; 2012 [1], we have predicted 12 potential DPP-IV inhibitors from 12 different plant extracts that are known to have antidiabetic activity. Seven of these molecules are identical or similar to molecules with described antidiabetic activity (although their role as DPP-IV inhibitors has not been suggested as an explanation for their bioactivity. Therefore, it is plausible that these 12 molecules could be responsible, at least in part, for the antidiabetic activity of these extracts through their inhibitory effect on DPP-IV. In addition, we also identified as potential DPP-IV inhibitors 6 molecules from 6 different plants with no described antidiabetic activity but that share the same genus as plants with known antidiabetic properties. Moreover, none of the 18 molecules that we predicted as DPP-IV inhibitors exhibits chemical similarity with a group of 2,342 known DPP-IV inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study identified 18 potential DPP-IV inhibitors in 18 different plant extracts (12 of these plants have known antidiabetic properties, whereas, for the remaining 6, antidiabetic activity has been reported for other plant species from the same genus. Moreover, none of the 18 molecules exhibits chemical similarity with a large group of known DPP-IV inhibitors.

  10. Accuracy and completeness of drug information in Wikipedia: a comparison with standard textbooks of pharmacology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jona Kräenbring

    Full Text Available The online resource Wikipedia is increasingly used by students for knowledge acquisition and learning. However, the lack of a formal editorial review and the heterogeneous expertise of contributors often results in skepticism by educators whether Wikipedia should be recommended to students as an information source. In this study we systematically analyzed the accuracy and completeness of drug information in the German and English language versions of Wikipedia in comparison to standard textbooks of pharmacology. In addition, references, revision history and readability were evaluated. Analysis of readability was performed using the Amstad readability index and the Erste Wiener Sachtextformel. The data on indication, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, adverse effects and contraindications for 100 curricular drugs were retrieved from standard German textbooks of general pharmacology and compared with the corresponding articles in the German language version of Wikipedia. Quantitative analysis revealed that accuracy of drug information in Wikipedia was 99.7% ± 0.2% when compared to the textbook data. The overall completeness of drug information in Wikipedia was 83.8 ± 1.5% (p < 0.001. Completeness varied in-between categories, and was lowest in the category "pharmacokinetics" (68.0% ± 4.2%; p < 0.001 and highest in the category "indication" (91.3% ± 2.0% when compared to the textbook data overlap. Similar results were obtained for the English language version of Wikipedia. Of the drug information missing in Wikipedia, 62.5% was rated as didactically non-relevant in a qualitative re-evaluation study. Drug articles in Wikipedia had an average of 14.6 ± 1.6 references and 262.8 ± 37.4 edits performed by 142.7 ± 17.6 editors. Both Wikipedia and textbooks samples had comparable, low readability. Our study suggests that Wikipedia is an accurate and comprehensive source of drug-related information for undergraduate medical education.

  11. Accuracy and Completeness of Drug Information in Wikipedia: A Comparison with Standard Textbooks of Pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, Joanna; Muehlich, Susanne; Zolk, Oliver; Wojnowski, Leszek; Maas, Renke; Engelhardt, Stefan; Sarikas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The online resource Wikipedia is increasingly used by students for knowledge acquisition and learning. However, the lack of a formal editorial review and the heterogeneous expertise of contributors often results in skepticism by educators whether Wikipedia should be recommended to students as an information source. In this study we systematically analyzed the accuracy and completeness of drug information in the German and English language versions of Wikipedia in comparison to standard textbooks of pharmacology. In addition, references, revision history and readability were evaluated. Analysis of readability was performed using the Amstad readability index and the Erste Wiener Sachtextformel. The data on indication, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, adverse effects and contraindications for 100 curricular drugs were retrieved from standard German textbooks of general pharmacology and compared with the corresponding articles in the German language version of Wikipedia. Quantitative analysis revealed that accuracy of drug information in Wikipedia was 99.7%±0.2% when compared to the textbook data. The overall completeness of drug information in Wikipedia was 83.8±1.5% (ptextbook data overlap. Similar results were obtained for the English language version of Wikipedia. Of the drug information missing in Wikipedia, 62.5% was rated as didactically non-relevant in a qualitative re-evaluation study. Drug articles in Wikipedia had an average of 14.6±1.6 references and 262.8±37.4 edits performed by 142.7±17.6 editors. Both Wikipedia and textbooks samples had comparable, low readability. Our study suggests that Wikipedia is an accurate and comprehensive source of drug-related information for undergraduate medical education. PMID:25250889

  12. Antidiabetic, Antihyperlipidemic and Antioxidant Activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Those with blood glucose levels > 190 ± 8 mg/dl were administered the methanol leaf extract of. Buchanania lanzan ... blood glucose level, serum lipid profile, and significantly (p < 0.05) increased antioxidant activity as ... Conclusion: MEBL exhibits antidiabetic, antihyperlipidemic and antioxidant activities in diabetic rat and.

  13. Antidiabetic potential of Brachylaena discolor | Mellem | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The traditional African herbal medicinal system has many reports of anti-diabetic food plants with no known side effects. Such plants and their products have been widely prescribed for diabetic treatment with little known mechanistic basis of their functioning. Therefore, these natural products need to be ...

  14. Preparation and antidiabetic activity of polysaccharide from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extraction parameters of polysaccharide from Portulaca oleracea L. (POP) and antidiabetic activity of POP on alloxan induced diabetic mice were studied. Better extraction parameters of POP were obtained by the single factor test, as follows: extraction temperature 95°C, extraction time 5 h, and ratio of solvent to raw ...

  15. Detection of systemic hypersensitivity to drugs using standard guinea pig assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, James L; Staten, David; Swann, Joslyn; Armstrong, George; Bates, Melissa; Hastings, Kenneth L

    2003-12-01

    The most commonly used assays designed to detect either skin or systemic immune-based hypersensitivity reactions are those using guinea pigs (GP). We obtained data from various FDA records to evaluate the correlation between GP assay results and reported post-marketing systemic hypersensitivity reactions. We examined the new drug application (NDA) reviews of approved drugs for the results of GP assays. Post-marketing human data were extracted from the FDA adverse event reporting system (AERS). Drug usage data were obtained from a commercial database maintained by IMS Health Inc. We found 83 (21%) of 396 drugs approved between 1978 and 1998 had reported GP test results. Among these 83 drugs, 14 (17%) were found to have positive results in at least one GP assay. Simple reporting index (RI) values for systemic hypersensitivity reactions were calculated from AERS data and usage to produce the index of adverse event reports per million shipping units of drug. A variety of definitions of positive human response were examined. A statistically significant association was seen for rash between post-marketing and clinical trials adverse event reports. No statistically significant associations between human data and GP test results were observed. These data suggest that standard GP assays have limited ability to predict human systemic hypersensitivity potential for pharmaceuticals.

  16. Strategies of bringing drug product marketing applications to meet current regulatory standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Freed, Anita; Lavrich, David; Raghavachari, Ramesh; Huynh-Ba, Kim; Shah, Ketan; Alasandro, Mark

    2015-08-01

    In the past decade, many guidance documents have been issued through collaboration of global organizations and regulatory authorities. Most of these are applicable to new products, but there is a risk that currently marketed products will not meet the new compliance standards during audits and inspections while companies continue to make changes through the product life cycle for continuous improvement or market demands. This discussion presents different strategies to bringing drug product marketing applications to meet current and emerging standards. It also discusses stability and method designs to meet process validation and global development efforts.

  17. Assessment of Sexual Dysfunction Symptoms in Female Drug Users: Standardized vs. Unstandardized Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Alessandra; Rassool, G Hussein; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Pillon, Sandra Cristina; Laranjeira, Ronaldo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate whether there is a difference in the identified prevalence between the assessment of symptoms of sexual dysfunction in female drug users using a standardized scale and by means of a nonstandardized set of questions about sexual dysfunctions. A cross-sectional study was conducted with two groups of substance-dependent women using the Drug Abuse Screening Test, the Short Alcohol Dependence Data questionnaire, the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence for the evaluation of the severity of dependence, and the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale. In both groups, the severity of dependence and the prevalence of symptoms of sexual dysfunctions in women were similar. The use of standardized and nonstandardized instruments to assess sexual dysfunction symptoms is an essential resource for the provision of good-quality care to this clientele.

  18. Determine equilibrium dissociation constant of drug-membrane receptor affinity using the cell membrane chromatography relative standard method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weina; Yang, Liu; Lv, Yanni; Fu, Jia; Zhang, Yanmin; He, Langchong

    2017-06-23

    The equilibrium dissociation constant (K D ) of drug-membrane receptor affinity is the basic parameter that reflects the strength of interaction. The cell membrane chromatography (CMC) method is an effective technique to study the characteristics of drug-membrane receptor affinity. In this study, the K D value of CMC relative standard method for the determination of drug-membrane receptor affinity was established to analyze the relative K D values of drugs binding to the membrane receptors (Epidermal growth factor receptor and angiotensin II receptor). The K D values obtained by the CMC relative standard method had a strong correlation with those obtained by the frontal analysis method. Additionally, the K D values obtained by CMC relative standard method correlated with pharmacological activity of the drug being evaluated. The CMC relative standard method is a convenient and effective method to evaluate drug-membrane receptor affinity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Methodological Study to Develop Standard Operational Protocol on Oral Drug Administration for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijarania, Sunil Kumar; Saini, Sushma Kumari; Verma, Sanjay; Kaur, Sukhwinder

    2017-05-01

    To develop standard operational protocol (SOP) on oral drug administration and checklist to assess the implementation of the developed SOP. In this prospective methodological study, SOPs were developed in five phases. In the first phase, the preliminary draft of SOPs and checklists were prepared based on literature review, assessment of current practices and focus group discussion (FGD) with bedside working nurses. In the second phase, content validity was checked with the help of Delphi technique (12 experts). Total four drafts were prepared in stages and necessary modifications were made as per suggestions after each Delphi round. Fourth Delphi round was performed after conducting a pilot study. In the fourth phase, all bedside nurses were trained as per SOPs and asked to practice accordingly and observation of thirty oral drug administrations in children was done to check reliability of checklists for implementation of SOPs. In Phase-V, 7 FGDs were conducted with bedside nurses to assess the effectiveness of SOPs. The Content Validity Index (CVI) of SOP and checklists was 99.77%. Overall standardized Cronbach's alpha was calculated as 0.94. All the nurses felt that the SOP is useful. Valid and feasible SOP for drug administration to children through oral route along with valid and reliable checklist were developed. It is recommended to use this document for drug administration to children.

  20. Manual of Standard Operating Procedures for Veterinary Drug Residue Analysis (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Laboratories are crucial to national veterinary drug residue monitoring programmes. However, one of the main challenges laboratories encounter is obtaining access to relevant methods of analysis. Thus, in addition to training, providing technical advice and transferring technology, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture has resolved to develop clear and practical manuals to support Member State laboratories. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Radiometric and Allied Analytical Methods to Strengthen Residue Control Programs for Antibiotic and Anthelmintic Veterinary Drug Residues has developed a number of analytical methods as standard operating procedures (SOPs), which are now compiled here. This publication contains SOPs on chromatographic and spectrometric techniques, as well as radioimmunoassay and associated screening techniques, for various anthelmintic and antimicrobial veterinary drug residue analysis. Some analytical method validation protocols are also included. The publication is primarily aimed at food and environmental safety laboratories involved in testing veterinary drug residues, including under organized national residue monitoring programmes. It is expected to enhance laboratory capacity building and competence through the use of radiometric and complementary tools and techniques. The publication is also relevant for applied research on residues of veterinary drugs in food and environmental samples

  1. Manual of Standard Operating Procedures for Veterinary Drug Residue Analysis (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Laboratories are crucial to national veterinary drug residue monitoring programmes. However, one of the main challenges laboratories encounter is obtaining access to relevant methods of analysis. Thus, in addition to training, providing technical advice and transferring technology, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture has resolved to develop clear and practical manuals to support Member State laboratories. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Radiometric and Allied Analytical Methods to Strengthen Residue Control Programs for Antibiotic and Anthelmintic Veterinary Drug Residues has developed a number of analytical methods as standard operating procedures (SOPs), which are now compiled here. This publication contains SOPs on chromatographic and spectrometric techniques, as well as radioimmunoassay and associated screening techniques, for various anthelmintic and antimicrobial veterinary drug residue analysis. Some analytical method validation protocols are also included. The publication is primarily aimed at food and environmental safety laboratories involved in testing veterinary drug residues, including under organized national residue monitoring programmes. It is expected to enhance laboratory capacity building and competence through the use of radiometric and complementary tools and techniques. The publication is also relevant for applied research on residues of veterinary drugs in food and environmental samples

  2. Immunomodulatory effects of oral antidiabetic drugs in lymphocyte cultures from patients with type 2 diabetes Efeito imunomodulador de hipoglicemiantes orais em cultura de linfócitos de pacientes com diabetes tipo 2

    OpenAIRE

    Karina Faccio Mello; Adroaldo Lunardelli; Márcio Vinícius Fagundes Donadio; Eduardo Caberlon; Carmen Silvana Araújo de Oliveira; Carolina Maria Alves Bastos; Melissa Guerra Simões Pires; Fernanda Bordignon Nunes; Jarbas Rodrigues de Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: It has been suggested that type 2 diabetes is an inflammatory response manifestation. The main drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes are sulphonylureas and biguanides. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the modulatory effects of oral hypoglycemic drugs (chlorpropamide and metformin) on lymphocyte proliferation in vitro and ex vivo. METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from human blood by gradient centrifugation. T-lymphocytes were stimulate...

  3. Antidiabetic Effects of Resveratrol: The Way Forward in Its Clinical Utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omolola R. Oyenihi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in the understanding and management of diabetes mellitus, the prevalence of the disease is increasing unabatedly with resulting disabling and life-reducing consequences to the global human population. The limitations and side effects associated with current antidiabetic therapies have necessitated the search for novel therapeutic agents. Due to the multipathogenicity of diabetes mellitus, plant-derived compounds with proven multiple pharmacological actions have been postulated to “hold the key” in the search for an affordable, efficacious, and safer therapeutic agent in the treatment of the disease and associated complications. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin present in few plant species, has demonstrated beneficial antidiabetic effects in animals and humans through diverse mechanisms and multiple molecular targets. However, despite the enthusiasm and widespread successes achieved with the use of resveratrol in animal models of diabetes mellitus, there are extremely limited clinical data to confirm the antidiabetic qualities of resveratrol. This review presents an update on the mechanisms of action and protection of resveratrol in diabetes mellitus, highlights challenges in its clinical utility, and suggests the way forward in translating the promising preclinical data to a possible antidiabetic drug in the near future.

  4. Long-term safety and efficacy of a novel once-weekly oral trelagliptin as monotherapy or in combination with an existing oral antidiabetic drug in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A 52-week open-label, phase 3 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Nobuya; Sano, Hiroki; Seki, Yoshifumi; Kuroda, Shingo; Kaku, Kohei

    2016-09-01

    Trelagliptin is a novel once-weekly oral dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor for type 2 diabetes mellitus that was first approved in Japan. We evaluated long-term safety and efficacy of trelagliptin in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This was a phase 3, multicenter, open-label study to evaluate long-term safety and efficacy of trelagliptin. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled despite diet/exercise or treatment with one of the existing oral antidiabetic drugs along with diet/exercise received trelagliptin 100 mg orally once weekly for 52 weeks as monotherapy or combination therapies. The primary end-points were the safety variables, and the secondary end-points were glycosylated hemoglobin and fasting plasma glucose. A total of 680 patients received the following antidiabetic therapies: trelagliptin monotherapy (n = 248), combination with a sulfonylurea (n = 158), a glinide (n = 67), an α-glucosidase inhibitor (n = 65), a biguanide (n = 70), or a thiazolidinedione (n = 72). During the study, 79.8% of the patients experienced at least one adverse event for monotherapy, 87.3% for combination with a sulfonylurea, 77.6% for a glinide, 81.5% for an α-glucosidase inhibitor, 64.3% for a biguanide, and 84.7% for a thiazolidinedione, respectively. Most of the adverse events were mild or moderate. The change in glycosylated hemoglobin from baseline at the end of the treatment period was -0.74 to -0.25% for each therapy. Once-weekly oral trelagliptin provides well-tolerated long-term safety and efficacy in both monotherapy and combination therapies in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Comparison of antioxidant, anticholinesterase, and antidiabetic activities of three curcuminoids isolated from Curcuma longa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaycıoğlu, Zeynep; Gazioğlu, Işıl; Erim, F Bedia

    2017-12-01

    Antioxidant, anticholinesterase and antidiabetic activities of three curcuminoids isolated from the Curcuma longa were simultaneously tested and compared in this study. The highest antioxidant power was detected for curcumin with the applied methods. The drug potentials of curcuminoids for Alzheimer's disease were controlled. Bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) showed substantial inhibitory activity. The activity of demethoxycurcumin (DMC) followed BDMC, whereas curcumin showed very little acetylcholinesterase inhibition activity. Antidiabetic activity of curcuminoids was evaluated by their α-glucosidase inhibitory activities. All curcuminoids show activities with decreasing order as BDMC > curcumin > DMC. The significant activities of BDMC compared to its isomers and examination of chemical structures of isomers might be a starting point in designing new drugs for Alzheimer's and Diabetes Mellitus.

  6. Oral Antidiabetic Agents and Cardiovascular Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareek, Manan; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2018-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with type 2 diabetes; however, a direct protective effect of tight glycemic control remains unproven. In fact, until 2008, when concerns related to rosiglitazone prompted regulatory agencies to mandate assessment...... of cardiovascular safety of new antidiabetic agents, little was known about how these medications affected cardiovascular outcomes. Since then, there has been a considerable increase in the number of cardiovascular trials, which employ a noninferiority design and focus on high-risk populations to establish safety...... in the shortest time possible. In this article, we summarize the 4 major cardiovascular outcome trials of oral antidiabetic agents, completed so far. These include 3 dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (saxagliptin, alogliptin, and sitagliptin) and 1 sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor (empagliflozin). We...

  7. Drug: D03803 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03803 Drug Lidorestat (USAN) ... C18H11F3N2O2S. H2O D03803.gif ... Antidiabetic agent... ... DG01882 ... Aldose reductase inhibitor ... Treatment of diabetic complications, including neuropathy, retinopa

  8. A review on the status of quality control and standardization of herbal drugs in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Dhiman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most of the herbal medicines in the world originate from the developing countries. There are ample opportunities for these countries to expand their global export. The world market for botanical medicines including drug products and raw materials has been estimated to have an annual growth rate between 5% and 15%. Total global botanical drug market is estimated at US$62 billion and is expected to grow to the tune of US$5 trillion by the year 2050. In the USA alone, the usage of botanicals has been increased by 380% between the years 1990 and 1997. Materials and Methods: Ayurveda, the Indian system of medicine, is one of the ancient, yet living traditions that face a typical Western bias. Widespread and growing use of botanicals has created public health challenges globally in terms of quality, safety, and efficacy. Results and Discussion: The development of parameters for standardization and quality control of botanicals is a challenging task. Various regulatory authorities, research organizations, and botanical drug manufacturers have contributed in developing guiding principles and addressing issues related to the quality, safety, and efficacy. Conclusions: The present review describes the regulatory aspects of herbal drugs in India and various other countries.

  9. Quantitative analysis of metformin in antidiabetic tablets by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, U.; Ornelas-Soto, N.; Meneses-Nava, M. A.; Barbosa-García, O.; López-de-Alba, P. L.; López-Martínez, L.

    2011-09-01

    Nowadays the production of counterfeit and low quality drugs affects human health and generates losses to pharmaceutical industries and tax revenue losses to government. Currently there are several methods for pharmaceutical product analysis; nevertheless, most of them depend on complex and time consuming steps such as sample preparation. In contrast to conventional methods, Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is evaluated as a potential analytical technique for the rapid screening and quality control of anti-diabetic solid formulations. In this paper authors propose a simple method to analyze qualitatively and quantitatively Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs) such as Metformin hydrochloride. The authors used ten nanosecond duration pulses (FWHM) from a Nd:YAG laser produces the induced breakdown for the analysis. Light is collected and focused into a Cerny-Turner spectrograph and dispersed into an ICCD camera for its detection. We used atomic emissions from Chlorine atoms present only in APIs as analyte signal. The analysis was improved using Bromine as internal standard. Linear calibration curves from synthetic samples were prepared achieving linearity higher than 99%. Our results were compared with HPLC results and validation was performed by statistical methods. The validation analysis suggests that both methods have no significant differences i.e., the proposed method can be implemented for monitoring the pharmaceutical production process in-situ in real time or for inspection and recognition of authenticity.

  10. Approaches to Increasing Ethical Compliance in China with Drug Trial Standards of Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    researchers, and strong reinforcement by Chinese journal editors not to publish studies with these flaws, then research ethics and publication standards will probably improve. Other solutions to foster ethical practice of drug trials are discussed including Chinese initiatives directed at managing conflict......Zeng et al.'s Ethics Review highlights some of the challenges associated with clinical research in China. They found that only a minority of published clinical trials of anti-dementia drugs reported that they fulfilled the basic ethical principles as outlined in the Declaration of Helsinki....... With recent reports of scientific misconduct from China, there is an urgent need to find approaches to compel researchers to adhere to ethical research practices. This problem does not call for a simple solution, but if forces are joined with governmental regulations, education in ethics issues for medical...

  11. Immunomodulatory effects of oral antidiabetic drugs in lymphocyte cultures from patients with type 2 diabetes Efeito imunomodulador de hipoglicemiantes orais em cultura de linfócitos de pacientes com diabetes tipo 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Faccio Mello

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: It has been suggested that type 2 diabetes is an inflammatory response manifestation. The main drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes are sulphonylureas and biguanides. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the modulatory effects of oral hypoglycemic drugs (chlorpropamide and metformin on lymphocyte proliferation in vitro and ex vivo. METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from human blood by gradient centrifugation. T-lymphocytes were stimulated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA and oral hypoglycemic drugs. RESULTS: In both in vitro and ex vivo experiments, there was a reduction in cell proliferation after treatment with oral hypoglycemic drugs. When both drugs were used in combination, a high level of cytotoxicity was observed, which made analysis of immunomodulatory effects unfeasible. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that diabetes itself may reduce cell proliferation significantly when stimulated by PHA, which may indicate that diabetic patients have difficulties in promoting an efficient inflammatory response. Moreover, the use of oral hypoglycemic drugs may aggravate this situation.INTRODUÇÃO E OBJETIVOS: Tem sido sugerido que o diabetes mellitus tipo 2 (DM2 é uma manifestação da resposta inflamatória. As principais drogas utilizadas no tratamento do DM2 são as sulfonilureias e as biguanidas. O objetivo deste trabalho é demonstrar os efeitos moduladores na proliferação de linfócitos causada pelos hipoglicemiantes orais (clorpropamida e metformina, in vitro e ex vivo. MÉTODOS: Células mononucleares de sangue periférico foram isoladas de seres humanos por gradiente de centrifugação. Os linfócitos T foram estimulados com fito-hemaglutinina (PHA e hipoglicemiantes. RESULTADOS: Nos experimentos in vitro e ex vivo, mostramos a redução da proliferação celular quando do tratamento com drogas hipoglicemiantes orais. Quando as drogas foram utilizadas em combinação, foi

  12. Food and drug administration. Radiation protection standards and recommendations for electronic products: the development process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration is responsible for maintaining a national program to protect the public health from unnecessary and harmful radiation emitted by radiation products. This program involves the promulgation and implementation of mandatory and voluntary standards to promote safe and effective design and use of such products. This paper describes the process by which electronic product radiation safety standards and recommendations are developed. To assist the agency in the development effort and to achieve a sound technological and scientific basis and risk/benefit assessment, it is important that knowledgeable professionals, industrial representatives, and consumers participate in that process. This paper is designed to provide useful information to aid anyone wishing to participate more effectively. (author)

  13. Factors related to patient adherence to antidiabetic drug therapy Factores relacionados a la adhesión del paciente diabético a la terapéutica medicamentosa Fatores relacionados à adesão do paciente diabético à terapêutica medicamentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Turcatto Gimenes

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to assess patient adherence to antidiabetic drug therapy and its association with factors related to the patient, patient-provider relationship, therapeutic regimen and the disease itself. The study comprised 46 diabetic patients enrolled in a research and extension education center in the State of Sao Paulo, southeastern Brazil, in 2007. Data was collected through interviews using a questionnaire and the Treatment Adherence Measure (TAM. The patient adherence level to antidiabetic drug therapy was 78.3%. In conclusion, since prevalence of adherence is below that recommended in the literature, and in the light of poor blood glucose control and alleged failure of therapeutic regimen, health providers are urged to measure diabetic patient treatment adherence, because it is key to adequate diabetes management with drugs.Este estudio tuvo el objetivo de determinar la adhesión del paciente diabético a la terapéutica medicamentosa y verificar la asociación de la adhesión con factores relacionados al paciente, a la relación profesional-paciente, al esquema terapéutico y a la enfermedad. Participaron 46 diabéticos registrados en un centro de investigación y extensión universitaria en el interior del Estado de San Pablo, en 2007. Los datos fueron obtenidos mediante entrevista, utilizándose un cuestionario y la prueba de Medida de Adhesión al Tratamiento - MAT. Los resultados mostraron que la adhesión del paciente diabético al tratamiento medicamentoso para tratamiento de la diabetes fue de 78,3%. Se concluye que, al considerar que la prevalencia de la adhesión obtenida en el presente estudio estuvo por debajo de la recomendada en la literatura y frente a la vigencia del mal control de la glucemia y de la supuesta falencia en el esquema terapéutico, se urgente que los profesionales de la salud reconozcan la importancia de evaluar la adhesión de los pacientes diabéticos, al tratamiento medicamentoso

  14. Metal based biologically active compounds: Design, synthesis, DNA binding and antidiabetic activity of 6-methyl-3-formyl chromone derived hydrazones and their metal (II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Jessica Elizabeth; Shahid, Muhammad; Prathapachandra Kurup, M R; Velayudhan, Mohanan Puzhavoorparambil

    2017-10-01

    Two chromone hydrazone ligands HL 1 and HL 2 were synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1 H NMR & 13 C NMR, electronic absorption and mass spectra. The reactions of the chromone hydrazones with transition metals such as Ni, Cu, and Zn (II) salts of acetate afforded mononuclear metal complexes. Characterization and structure elucidation of the prepared chromone hydrazone metal (II) complexes were done by elemental, IR, electronic, EPR spectra and thermo gravimetric analyses as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The spectroscopic data showed that the ligand acts as a mono basic bidentate with coordination sites are azomethine nitrogen and hydrazonic oxygen, and they exhibited distorted geometry. The biological studies involved antidiabetic activity i.e. enzyme inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase, Calf Thymus - DNA (CT-DNA) interaction and molecular docking. Potential capacity of synthesized compounds to inhibit the α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity was assayed whereas DNA interaction studies were carried out with the help UV-Vis absorption titration and viscosity method. The docking studies of chromone hydrazones show that they are minor groove binders. Complexes were found to be good DNA - intercalates. Chromone hydrazones and its transition metal complexes have shown comparable antidiabetic activity with a standard drug acarbose. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of salinity medium on antioxidant and antidiabetic activity marine endophytic fungus of asperegillus elegans ptf 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyani, Hani; Artanti, Nina; Fitria, Irni; Filailla, Euis; Kandace, Yoice Sri; Udin, Linar Zalinar

    2017-11-01

    Our previous studies on screening of antioxidant activities from various endophytic fungi isolated from marine bioata showed that A. elegans PTF9 isolated from sea weed is one of the fungus that has good antioxidant activity. In current study we reported the effect of medium salinity (0, 3 and 10% salt in PDB medium) on antioxidant and antidiabetes activity of mycelium and filtrate ethyl acetate extracts of A. elegans Ptf 9. The antioxidant assay was conducted using DPPH free radical scavenging activity method. The antidiabetes assay was conducted using a-glucosidase inhibitory activity method. The results showed that the best antioxidant activity was obtained from filtrate extract of fungus cultures with 0% salt (IC50=1.56 ppm), whereas the best antidiabetes activity was obtained from filtrate extract of fungus culture with 10% salt (IC50= 3.64 ppm). Addition of salt reduced the antioxidant activity, but not the antidiabetes activity. The results suggest that A. elegans PTF9 showed potential for further studies on isolation of antioxidant and antidiabetes lead compounds that could be use for further development of new drugs.

  16. Integrity, standards, and QC-related issues with big data in pre-clinical drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, John F; Ung, Matthew; Escalante-Chong, Renan; Ross, Jermaine; Zhang, Jenny; Cha, Yoonjeong; Lysaght, Andrew; Funt, Jason; Kusko, Rebecca

    2018-03-15

    The tremendous expansion of data analytics and public and private big datasets presents an important opportunity for pre-clinical drug discovery and development. In the field of life sciences, the growth of genetic, genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data is partly driven by a rapid decline in experimental costs as biotechnology improves throughput, scalability, and speed. Yet far too many researchers tend to underestimate the challenges and consequences involving data integrity and quality standards. Given the effect of data integrity on scientific interpretation, these issues have significant implications during preclinical drug development. We describe standardized approaches for maximizing the utility of publicly available or privately generated biological data and address some of the common pitfalls. We also discuss the increasing interest to integrate and interpret cross-platform data. Principles outlined here should serve as a useful broad guide for existing analytical practices and pipelines and as a tool for developing additional insights into therapeutics using big data. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. On the creation of a clinical gold standard corpus in Spanish: Mining adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oronoz, Maite; Gojenola, Koldo; Pérez, Alicia; de Ilarraza, Arantza Díaz; Casillas, Arantza

    2015-08-01

    The advances achieved in Natural Language Processing make it possible to automatically mine information from electronically created documents. Many Natural Language Processing methods that extract information from texts make use of annotated corpora, but these are scarce in the clinical domain due to legal and ethical issues. In this paper we present the creation of the IxaMed-GS gold standard composed of real electronic health records written in Spanish and manually annotated by experts in pharmacology and pharmacovigilance. The experts mainly annotated entities related to diseases and drugs, but also relationships between entities indicating adverse drug reaction events. To help the experts in the annotation task, we adapted a general corpus linguistic analyzer to the medical domain. The quality of the annotation process in the IxaMed-GS corpus has been assessed by measuring the inter-annotator agreement, which was 90.53% for entities and 82.86% for events. In addition, the corpus has been used for the automatic extraction of adverse drug reaction events using machine learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical Drug-Drug Pharmacokinetic Interaction Potential of Sucralfate with Other Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulochana, Suresh P; Syed, Muzeeb; Chandrasekar, Devaraj V

    2016-01-01

    of drugs. This review covers several category of drugs such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, fluoroquinolones, histamine H2-receptor blockers, macrolides, anti-fungals, anti-diabetics, salicylic acid derivatives, steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and provides pharmacokinetic data summary along...

  19. Blood pressure and cardiovascular effects of new and emerging antidiabetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, Pelbreton C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Ferdinand, Keith C

    2014-08-01

    Despite remarkable declines in US cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality over the last several decades, the prevalence of risk factors such as type 2 diabetes and hypertension remains high, associated with increasing obesity rates. Although optimal glycemic control remains a primary focus to decrease the disease burden, the FDA has issued guidance recommendations for documenting cardiovascular disease-related safety with research trials on new antidiabetic agents with more demanding requirements compared to past approval of existing therapies. This review will discuss the public health impact of type 2 diabetes, specifically with comorbid hypertension; mechanisms of action of the newest antidiabetic drug classes; and preliminary findings and potential clinical significance of the favorable blood pressure and body weight effects of the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists; and additionally discuss two recent large cardiovascular outcome trials with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors.

  20. Standards of the Network of Colleges and Universities Committed to the Elimination of Drug and Alcohol Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

    The background, goals and standards of the Network of Colleges and Universities Committed to the Elimination of Drug and Alcohol Abuse are described. The network was formed in 1987 at the instigation of the Office of Educational Research and Improvement, U.S. Department of Education. A planning group met to establish the standards for…

  1. Antioxidant, hypoglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of Ziziphus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antioxidant, hypoglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of Ziziphus spina-christi (L) Willd (Rhamnacae) leaf extract. Amal AM Al-Ghamdi, Abdelaaty A Shahat. Abstract. Purpose: To investigate the antioxidant, hypoglycemic and antidiabetic activities as well as the phenolic composition of Ziziphus spina-christi (ZSC) Methods: ...

  2. Synthesis, characterization and evaluation of antidiabetic activity of novel indoline derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhineshkumar Manoharan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Series of indoline derivatives were synthesized using N-(4-aminophenylindoline-1-carbothiamide as a precursor. The confirmation of synthesized compounds was done by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, LC-MS (ESI and FT-IR. In vitro antidiabetic activity of synthesized indoline derivatives were examined by standard α-amylase inhibition assay. The compounds 4a (IC50 = 52.1 µg/mL and 4b (IC50 = 57.7 µg/mL showed potent α-amylase inhibition activity. The compounds 3a (IC50 = 62.2 µg/mL and 3b (IC50 = 60.7 µg/mL showed moderate antidiabetic activity.

  3. Anti-Diabetic Potential of the Leaves of Anisomeles malabarica in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peddanna Kotha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Diabetes mellitus is a pandemic metabolic disorder that is affecting a majority of populations in recent years. There is a requirement for new drugs that are safer and cheaper due to the side effects associated with the available medications. Methods: We investigated the anti-diabetic activity of leaves of Anisomeles malabarica following bioactivity guided fractionation. The different solvent (hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water extracts of A. malabarica leaves were used in acute treatment studies to evaluate and identify the active fraction. The ethyl acetate extract was subjected to further fractionation using silica gel column chromatography and the compounds were identified by LC-SRM/MS and GC-MS. Additional chronic treatment studies were carried out using this active fraction (AMAF for 30 days in experimental diabetic rats. Fasting blood glucose (FBG, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, plasma insulin levels and glucose tolerance were measured along with insulin resistance/sensitivity indicators (HOMA-IR, HOMA-β and QUICKI to assess the beneficial effects of A. malabarica in the management of diabetes mellitus. Results: Among the different solvent extracts tested, ethyl acetate extract showed maximum (66% anti-hyperglycemic activity. The hexane and ethyl acetate (1: 1 fraction that has maximum anti-diabetic activity was identified as active fraction of A. malabarica (AMAF. The FBG, HbA1c, plasma insulin levels and insulin sensitivity/resistance indicators such as glucose tolerance, HOMA-IR, HOMA-β and QUICKI were significantly improved to near normal in diabetic rats treated with AMAF. Further, we identified key flavonoids and fatty acids as the anti-diabetic active principles from the AMAF of A. malabarica leaves. Conclusion: The results of our study suggest that Anisomeles malabarica has potential anti-diabetic activity in STZ induced diabetic rats.

  4. Using standardized methods for research on HIV and injecting drug use in developing/transitional countries: case study from the WHO Drug Injection Study Phase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stimson Gerry V

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful cross-national research requires methods that are both standardized across sites and adaptable to local conditions. We report on the development and implementation of the methodology underlying the survey component of the WHO Drug Injection Study Phase II – a multi-site study of risk behavior and HIV seroprevalence among Injecting Drug Users (IDUs. Methods Standardized operational guidelines were developed by the Survey Coordinating Center in collaboration with the WHO Project Officer and participating site Investigators. Throughout the duration of the study, survey implementation at the local level was monitored by the Coordinating Center. Surveys were conducted in 12 different cities. Prior rapid assessment conducted in 10 cities provided insight into local context and guided survey implementation. Where possible, subjects were recruited both from drug abuse treatment centers and via street outreach. While emphasis was on IDUs, non-injectors were also recruited in cities with substantial non-injecting use of injectable drugs. A structured interview and HIV counseling/testing were administered. Results Over 5,000 subjects were recruited. Subjects were recruited from both drug treatment and street outreach in 10 cities. Non-injectors were recruited in nine cities. Prior rapid assessment identified suitable recruitment areas, reduced drug users' distrust of survey staff, and revealed site-specific risk behaviors. Centralized survey coordination facilitated local questionnaire modification within a core structure, standardized data collection protocols, uniform database structure, and cross-site analyses. Major site-specific problems included: questionnaire translation difficulties; locating affordable HIV-testing facilities; recruitment from drug treatment due to limited/selective treatment infrastructure; access to specific sub-groups of drug users in the community, particularly females or higher income groups

  5. Biomolecular Characterization of Putative Antidiabetic Herbal Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadlbauer, Verena; Haselgrübler, Renate; Lanzerstorfer, Peter; Plochberger, Birgit; Borgmann, Daniela; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Winkler, Stephan M.; Schröder, Klaus; Höglinger, Otmar; Weghuber, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Induction of GLUT4 translocation in the absence of insulin is considered a key concept to decrease elevated blood glucose levels in diabetics. Due to the lack of pharmaceuticals that specifically increase the uptake of glucose from the blood circuit, application of natural compounds might be an alternative strategy. However, the effects and mechanisms of action remain unknown for many of those substances. For this study we investigated extracts prepared from seven different plants, which have been reported to exhibit anti-diabetic effects, for their GLUT4 translocation inducing properties. Quantitation of GLUT4 translocation was determined by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy in insulin sensitive CHO-K1 cells and adipocytes. Two extracts prepared from purslane (Portulaca oleracea) and tindora (Coccinia grandis) were found to induce GLUT4 translocation, accompanied by an increase of intracellular glucose concentrations. Our results indicate that the PI3K pathway is mainly responsible for the respective translocation process. Atomic force microscopy was used to prove complete plasma membrane insertion. Furthermore, this approach suggested a compound mediated distribution of GLUT4 molecules in the plasma membrane similar to insulin stimulated conditions. Utilizing a fluorescent actin marker, TIRF measurements indicated an impact of purslane and tindora on actin remodeling as observed in insulin treated cells. Finally, in-ovo experiments suggested a significant reduction of blood glucose levels under tindora and purslane treated conditions in a living organism. In conclusion, this study confirms the anti-diabetic properties of tindora and purslane, which stimulate GLUT4 translocation in an insulin-like manner. PMID:26820984

  6. Bis(allixinato)oxovanadium(IV) complex is a potent antidiabetic agent: studies on structure-activity relationship for a series of hydroxypyrone-vanadium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yusuke; Yoshida, Jiro; Kodera, Yukihiro; Katoh, Akira; Takada, Jitsuya; Sakurai, Hiromu

    2006-06-01

    There is an urgent medical need for orally effective drugs to replace insulin injections for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Vanadium complexes with insulin-mimetic activities have recently been proposed as candidates as new antidiabetic drugs. Following in vitro and in vivo studies on a group of bis(3-hydroxy-4-pyronato)oxovanadium(IV) (1) complexes with VO(O4) coordination mode, bis(allixinato)oxovanadium(IV) (3) which contains allixin, a garlic component, was found to be the most potent antidiabetic agent among them. Complex 3 with a high in vitro insulin-mimetic activity in terms of both free fatty acid (FFA)-release inhibitory and glucose-uptake enhancing activities in isolated rat adipocytes exhibited a high hypoglycemic effect in type 1 diabetic model mice by both intraperitoneal injections and oral administrations. Complex 3 is thus proposed to be one of the most effective candidates for antidiabetic therapy.

  7. Duration of diabetes and effectiveness of insulin in the management of insulin-naïve Korean patients uncontrolled on oral antidiabetic drugs: a sub-analysis of the MOdaliTy of Insulin treatment eValuation (MOTIV) registry results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, In Joo; Kim, Yong Ki; Yoon, Kun Ho; Son, Ho Young; Park, Sung Woo; Sung, Yeon Ah; Baek, Hong Sun; Ha, Kyoung Soo

    2014-08-01

    To investigate whether duration of diabetes has an impact on the effectiveness of insulinization in diabetes management. This open-label, noninterventional, observational registry was conducted at >500 centers in Korea. Patients with diabetes, on oral antidiabetic drugs, with HbA1c ≥7 % (53 mmol/mol) in the preceding 3 months, being considered for initiation of basal insulin by their physicians, were included. Data were collected at baseline and at 3 and 6 months. Of 6,616 patients evaluated, 62.5 % had diabetes for <10 years, while only 6.5 % patients had diabetes for ≥20 years. At the end of study, average HbA1c in patients with diabetes for <10 years, for 10 to <20 years, and for ≥20 years was 7.3 ± 1.0 % (56 ± 10.9 mmol/mol), 7.4 ± 1.0 % (57 ± 10.9 mmol/mol), and 7.6 ± 1.1 % (60 ± 12.0 mmol/mol), respectively. Over half the patients (50.7 %) with diabetes <10 years achieved HbA1c <7 % (53 mmol/mol) by the end of study, while only 42.1 and 35.1 % patients with diabetes for 10 to <20 and ≥20 years, respectively, achieved their target. The average insulin dosage required for per unit HbA1c reduction was significantly different among the groups according to duration of type 2 diabetes mellitus (p < 0.05). Among patients who achieved HbA1c <7 %, proportion of patients with hypoglycemia in the ≥20 years group was higher than that in the <10 years, 10 to <20 years groups. Early insulin administration provided a better glycemic control with less insulin dosage and lower frequency of hypoglycemic events. Thus, early insulinization might hold the key to better management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Human experimental pain models: A review of standardized methods in drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sunil kumar Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human experimental pain models are essential in understanding the pain mechanisms and appear to be ideally suited to test analgesic compounds. The challenge that confronts both the clinician and the scientist is to match specific treatments to different pain-generating mechanisms and hence reach a pain treatment tailored to each individual patient. Experimental pain models offer the possibility to explore the pain system under controlled settings. Standardized stimuli of different modalities (i.e., mechanical, thermal, electrical, or chemical can be applied to the skin, muscles, and viscera for a differentiated and comprehensive assessment of various pain pathways and mechanisms. Using a multimodel-multistructure testing, the nociception arising from different body structures can be explored and modulation of specific biomarkers by new and existing analgesic drugs can be profiled. The value of human experimental pain models is to link animal and clinical pain studies, providing new possibilities for designing successful clinical trials. Spontaneous pain, the main compliant of the neuropathic patients, but currently there is no human model available that would mimic chronic pain. Therefore, current human pain models cannot replace patient studies for studying efficacy of analgesic compounds, although being helpful for proof-of-concept studies and dose finding.

  9. 78 FR 6762 - Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Proposed Rules To Establish Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notification of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public meeting to discuss the proposed rules to establish... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 1, 16, 106, 110...

  10. 78 FR 10107 - Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Proposed Rules To Establish Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notification of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is providing public meeting registration information for two FSMA related... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 1, 16, 106, 110...

  11. 77 FR 57055 - Regulatory New Drug Review: Solutions for Study Data Exchange Standards; Notice of Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Chapter I Regulatory New Drug Review: Solutions for..., 2012 (77 FR 48491). The document announced a meeting entitled ``Regulatory New Drug Review: Solutions...

  12. Characterization and comparison of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors: Part 2. Antidiabetic effects in type 2 diabetic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuo Tahara

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Previously we investigated the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacologic properties of all six sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT 2 inhibitors commercially available in Japan using normal and diabetic mice. We classified the SGLT2 inhibitors with respect to duration of action as either long-acting (ipragliflozin and dapagliflozin or intermediate-acting (tofogliflozin, canagliflozin, empagliflozin, and luseogliflozin. In the present study, antidiabetic effects of repeated administration of these SGLT2 inhibitors in type 2 diabetic mice were investigated. When repeatedly administered for 4 weeks, all SGLT2 inhibitors significantly exhibited antihyperglycemic, antihyperinsulinemic, and pancreas-protective effects, as well as insulin resistance-improving effects. When compared at doses producing comparable reduction in hyperglycemia across all drugs, the antidiabetic effects of ipragliflozin and dapagliflozin were more potent than those of the other four drugs, but these differences among the six drugs were not statistically significant. Further, an oral glucose tolerance test performed after repeated administration demonstrated significant improvement in glucose tolerance only with ipragliflozin and dapagliflozin, implying improved insulin resistance and secretion. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that, although all SGLT2 inhibitors exert antidiabetic effects in type 2 diabetic mice, these pharmacologic effects might be slightly superior with the long-acting drugs, which are able to provide favorable blood glucose control throughout the day.

  13. Anticoagulant effects of an antidiabetic drug on monocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, C E; Hellum, M; Haug, K B F; Aass, H C; Joø, G B; Øvstebø, R; Trøseid, A M; Klingenberg, O; Kierulf, P

    2011-11-01

    Monocyte- and microparticle (MP)-associated tissue factor (TF) is upregulated in diabetes. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces expression of TF and alternatively spliced TF (asTF) and increases MP release from monocytes. Using LPS-stimulated TF-bearing human monocytes, we examined whether glibenclamide, a sulfonylurea used to treat diabetes type 2, might possess anticoagulant properties. We studied the effects of glibenclamide on cell- and supernatant-associated procoagulant activity (Factor Xa-generating assay and clot formation assay), on expression of TF and asTF (flow cytometry, RT-qPCR, western blot) and on cell viability and MP release (flow cytometry). Glibenclamide dose-dependently decreased procoagulant activity of cells and supernatants. The reduction in cellular procoagulant activity coincided with reduced expression of TF and asTF in cells, whereas cell viability remained almost unchanged. The glibenclamide-induced reduction in procoagulant activity of supernatants appeared to be associated with a decreased number of released MPs. Reduction of monocyte- and supernatant-associated procoagulant activity by glibenclamide is associated with decreased expression of TF and asTF and possibly with a reduced MP number. Our data indicate that glibenclamide reduces the prothrombotic state in LPS-stimulated monocytes in vitro. Glibenclamide might therefore also have an anticoagulant effect in vivo, but this needs to be further evaluated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Design, synthesis and antidiabetic evaluation of oxazolone derivatives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    one derivatives were syn- thesized and assayed in vivo to investigate their antidiabetic activities by streptozotocin-induced model in rat. These derivatives showed considerable biological efficacy when compared to rosiglitazone, a potent and ...

  15. Everolimus treatment for patients with autoimmune hepatitis and poor response to standard therapy and drug alternatives in use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, Henriette; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2015-01-01

    here report the efficacy of everolimus treatment of patients with AIH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven patients (six female, mean age 47 years, range 22-62 years) in whom disease control could not be achieved with standard therapy or the alternative drugs in use were included. RESULTS: Treatment...

  16. Standard drug concentrations and smart-pump technology reduce continuous-medication-infusion errors in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Gitte Y; Parker, Howard B; Cash, Jared; O'Connell, Mary; Grant, MaryJo C

    2005-07-01

    To determine if combining standard drug concentrations with "smart-pump" technology reduces reported medication-infusion errors. Preintervention and postintervention comparison of reported medication errors related to infusion therapies during the calendar years 2002 and 2003. A 242-bed university-affiliated tertiary pediatric hospital. Change in continuous-medication-infusion process, comprising the adoption of (1) standard drug concentrations, (2) "smart" syringe pumps, and (3) human-engineered medication labels. Comparison of reported continuous-medication-infusion errors before and after the intervention. The number of reported errors dropped by 73% for an absolute risk reduction of 3.1 to 0.8 per 1000 doses. Preparation errors that occurred in the pharmacy decreased from 0.66 to 0.16 per 1000 doses; the number of 10-fold errors in dosage decreased from 0.41 to 0.08 per 1000 doses. The use of standard drug concentrations, smart syringe pumps, and user-friendly labels reduces reported errors associated with continuous medication infusions. Standard drug concentrations can be chosen to allow most neonates to receive needed medications without concerns related to excess fluid administration.

  17. Antidiabetics and diuretics show phototoxicity in HaCaT cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaag, Edgar; Petersen, Anita B.; Gniadecki, Robert; Thorn, Tine; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2001-10-01

    The antidiabetics tolbutamide, glibenclamide, and glipizide, and the diuretics bendroflumethiazide, butizide, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide, and trichlormethiazide were investigated for potential phototoxicity in the HaCaT cell line. The cells were incubated with the drugs and then exposed to UVA1 irradiation. The effects of the antioxidants L-ascorbic acid, and (alpha) -tocopherol on oxidative DNA damage were assessed. Bendroflumethiazide, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide, trichlormethiazide, or tolbutamide induced dose-dependent phototoxicity. Cells incubated with bendroflumethiazide, tolbutamide, and glibenclamide, and irradiated with UVA1 demonstrated an increased oxidative DNA damage. Pre-treatment with L-ascorbic acid, or (alpha) -tocopherol, suppressed the UVA-induced DNA damage in cells incubated with 1 mM of bendroflumethiazide, furosemide, glibenclamide, glipizide, tolbutamide, and trichloromethiazide, further implying the involvement of reactive oxygen species in the phototoxic DNA damage. These results may indicate a link between phototoxic and photocancerogenic potential of the sulfonamide-derived oral antidiabetic and diuretic drugs, as it has previously been recognized for psoralen, chlorpromazine, and fluoroquinolones. Excessive exposure to UV light may be deleterious for patients treated with these drugs.

  18. Rapid identification of illegal synthetic adulterants in herbal anti-diabetic medicines using near infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yanchun; Lei, Deqing; Hu, Changqin

    We created a rapid detection procedure for identifying herbal medicines illegally adulterated with synthetic drugs using near infrared spectroscopy. This procedure includes a reverse correlation coefficient method (RCCM) and comparison of characteristic peaks. Moreover, we made improvements to the RCCM based on new strategies for threshold settings. Any tested herbal medicine must meet two criteria to be identified with our procedure as adulterated. First, the correlation coefficient between the tested sample and the reference must be greater than the RCCM threshold. Next, the NIR spectrum of the tested sample must contain the same characteristic peaks as the reference. In this study, four pure synthetic anti-diabetic drugs (i.e., metformin, gliclazide, glibenclamide and glimepiride), 174 batches of laboratory samples and 127 batches of herbal anti-diabetic medicines were used to construct and validate the procedure. The accuracy of this procedure was greater than 80%. Our data suggest that this protocol is a rapid screening tool to identify synthetic drug adulterants in herbal medicines on the market.

  19. Antidiabetic Activity of Polyherbal Formulation in Streptozotocin – Nicotinamide Induced Diabetic Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendran Ramesh Petchi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Glycosmis pentaphylla, Tridax procumbens, and Mangifera indica are well-known plants available throughout India and they are commonly used for the treatment of various diseases including diabetes mellitus. The antidiabetic activity of the individual plant parts is well known, but the synergistic or combined effects are unclear. The concept of polyherbalism has been highlighted in Sharangdhar Samhita, an Ayurvedic literature dating back to 1300 AD. Polyherbal formulations enhance the therapeutic action and reduce the concentrations of single herbs, thereby reducing adverse events. The aim of the present study is to formulate a polyherbal formulation and evaluate its antidiabetic potential in animals. The polyherbal formulation was formulated using the ethanol extracts of the stem bark of G. pentaphylla, whole plant of T. procumbens, and leaves of M. indica. The polyherbal formulation contains the ethanol extracts of G. pentaphylla, T. procumbens, and M. indica in the ratio of 2:2:1. The quality of the finished product was evaluated as per the World Health Organization’s guidelines for the quality control of herbal materials. The quality testing parameters of the polyherbal formulation were within the limits. Fingerprint analysis of the polyherbal formulation showed effective separation at 366 nm, and it revealed that the active compound present in the polyherbal formulation and the active compounds present in all the three extracts were the same. The acute toxicity studies of the polyherbal formulation did not show any toxic symptoms in doses up to 2000 mg/kg over 14 days. The oral antidiabetic activity of the polyherbal formulation (250 and 500 mg/kg was screened against streptozotocin (50 mg/kg; i.p.+nicotinamide (120 mg/kg; i.p. induced diabetes mellitus in rats. The investigational drug was administered for 21 consecutive days, and the effect of the polyherbal formulation on blood glucose levels was studied at regular intervals. At

  20. Effects of culture medium compositions on antidiabetic activity and anticancer activity of marine endophitic bacteria isolated from sponge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryani, Faiza; Mulyani, Hani; Artanti, Nina; Udin, Linar Zalinar; Dewi, Rizna Triana; Hanafi, Muhammad; Murniasih, Tutik

    2017-01-01

    High diversity of Indonesia marine spesies and their ability in producing secondary metabolite that can be used as a drug candidate cause this fascinating topic need to explore. Most of marine organisms explored to discover drug is macroorganism whereas microorganism (such as Indonesia marine bacteria) is very limited. Therefore, in this report, antidiabetic and anticancer activity of Indonesia marine bacteria isolated from Sponges's extract have been studied. Bacteria strain 8.9 which are collection of Research Center for Oseanography, Indonesian Institute of Sciences were from Barrang Lompo Island, Makasar, Indonesia. Bacteria were cultured in different culture medium compositions (such as: different pH, source of glucose and water) for 48 hours on a shaker, then they were extracted with ethyl asetate. Extracts of bacteria were tested by DPPH method (antioxidant activity), alpha glucosidase inhibitory activity method (antidiabetic activity), and Alamar Blue assay (anticancer activity) at 200 ppm. According to result, extract of bacteria in pH 8.0 exhibited the greatest antioxidant (19.27% inhibition), antidiabetic (63.95% inhibition) and anticancer activity of T47D cell line (44.62% cell viability) compared to other extracts. However, effect of addition of sugar sources (such as: glucose, sucrose, and soluble starch) and effect of addition of water/sea water exhibited less influence on their bioactivities. In conclusion, Indonesia marine bacteria isolated from sponge have potential a source of bioactive compound in drug discovery field.

  1. POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS OF SOS-GFP BIOSENSOR TO IN VITRO RAPID SCREENING OF CYTOTOXIC AND GENOTOXIC EFFECT OF ANTICANCER AND ANTIDIABETIC PHARMACIST RESIDUES IN SURFACE WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Matejczyk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli K-12 GFP-based bacterial biosensors allowed the detection of cytotoxic and genotoxic effect of anticancer drug– cyclophosphamide and antidiabetic drug – metformin in PBS buffer and surface water. Experimental data indicated that recA::gfpmut2 genetic system was sensitive to drugs and drugs mixture applied in experiment. RecA promoter was a good bioindicator in cytotoxic and genotoxic effect screening of cyclophosphamide, metformin and the mixture of the both drugs in PBS buffer and surface water. The results indicated that E. coli K-12 recA::gfp mut2 strain could be potentially useful for first-step screening of cytotoxic and genotoxic effect of anticancer and antidiabetic pharmacist residues in water. Next steps in research will include more experimental analysis to validate recA::gfpmut2 genetic system in E. coli K-12 on different anticancer drugs.

  2. Development of polyherbal antidiabetic formulation encapsulated in the phospholipids vesicle system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Kumar Gauttam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multifactorial metabolic diseases, for instance diabetes develop several complications like hyperlipidemia, hepatic toxicity, immunodeficiency etc., Hence, instead of mono-drug therapy the management of the disease requires the combination of herbs. Marketed herbal drugs comprise of irrational combinations, which makes their quality control more difficult. Phytoconstituents, despite having excellent bioactivity in vitro demonstrate less or no in vivo actions due to their poor lipid solubility, resulting in high therapeutic dose regimen; phospholipids encapsulation can overcome this problem. Hence, present study was designed to develop a phospholipids encapsulated polyherbal anti-diabetic formulation. In the present study, polyherbal formulation comprises of lyophilized hydro-alcoholic (50% v/v extracts of Momordica charantia, Trigonella foenum-graecum and Withania somnifera 2:2:1, respectively, named HA, optimized based on oral glucose tolerance test model in normal Wistar rats. The optimized formulation (HA entrapped in the phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol (8:2 vesicle system is named HA lipids (HAL. The vesicles were characterized for shape, morphology, entrapment efficiency, polar-dispersity index and release profile in the gastric pH. The antidiabetic potential of HA, marketed polyherbal formulation (D-fit and HAL was compared in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model of 21 days study. The parameters evaluated were behavioral changes, body weight, serum glucose level, lipid profile and oxidative stress. The antidiabetic potential of HA (1000 mg/kg was at par with the D-fit (1000 mg/kg. However, the potential was enhanced by phospholipids encapsulation; as HAL (500 mg/kg has shown more significant (P < 0.05 potential in comparison to HA (1000 mg/kg and at par with metformin (500 mg/kg.

  3. NN2211: a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 derivative with anti-diabetic effects in glucose-intolerant pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribel, Ulla; Larsen, Marianne O; Rolin, Bidda

    2002-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an effective anti-diabetic agent, but its metabolic instability makes it therapeutically unsuitable. This study investigated the pharmacodynamics of a long-acting GLP-1 derivative (NN2211: (Arg(34)Lys(26)-(N- epsilon -(gamma-Glu(N-alpha-hexadecanoyl)))-GLP-1...... a hyperglycaemic glucose clamp and chronic treatment results in better daily metabolic control. Therefore, NN2211, a GLP-1 derivative that can be administered once daily, holds promise as a new anti-diabetic drug with a minimal risk of hypoglycaemia....

  4. Purely in silico BCS classification: science based quality standards for the world's drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Wolk, Omri; Kim, Young Hoon; Ramachandran, Chandrasekharan; Crippen, Gordon M; Takagi, Toshihide; Bermejo, Marival; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-11-04

    BCS classification is a vital tool in the development of both generic and innovative drug products. The purpose of this work was to provisionally classify the world's top selling oral drugs according to the BCS, using in silico methods. Three different in silico methods were examined: the well-established group contribution (CLogP) and atom contribution (ALogP) methods, and a new method based solely on the molecular formula and element contribution (KLogP). Metoprolol was used as the benchmark for the low/high permeability class boundary. Solubility was estimated in silico using a thermodynamic equation that relies on the partition coefficient and melting point. The validity of each method was affirmed by comparison to reference data and literature. We then used each method to provisionally classify the orally administered, IR drug products found in the WHO Model list of Essential Medicines, and the top-selling oral drug products in the United States (US), Great Britain (GB), Spain (ES), Israel (IL), Japan (JP), and South Korea (KR). A combined list of 363 drugs was compiled from the various lists, and 257 drugs were classified using the different in silico permeability methods and literature solubility data, as well as BDDCS classification. Lastly, we calculated the solubility values for 185 drugs from the combined set using in silico approach. Permeability classification with the different in silico methods was correct for 69-72.4% of the 29 reference drugs with known human jejunal permeability, and for 84.6-92.9% of the 14 FDA reference drugs in the set. The correlations (r(2)) between experimental log P values of 154 drugs and their CLogP, ALogP and KLogP were 0.97, 0.82 and 0.71, respectively. The different in silico permeability methods produced comparable results: 30-34% of the US, GB, ES and IL top selling drugs were class 1, 27-36.4% were class 2, 22-25.5% were class 3, and 5.46-14% were class 4 drugs, while ∼8% could not be classified. The WHO list

  5. Methodological Study to Develop Standard Operational Protocol on Intramuscular (IM, Intradermal (ID and Subcutaneous Drug Administration for Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Bijarania

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medicine administration is a major role played by registered nurses. Medicines are prescribed by the physician and dispensed by the pharmacist but responsibility for meticulous administration rests with the registered nurse. It becomes even more important when drugs are to be administered to children. Drug administration via Intramuscular (IM, Intradermal (ID and Subcutaneous route is a complex process. Errors are associated with medicine administration. Aim: The objective of this study was to develop Standard Operational Protocol (SOP for IM, ID and Subcutaneous drug administration and checklist to assess the implementation of the developed SOP. Materials and Methods: A methodological research design adapted to carry out the present study to develop standard operational protocol for IM, ID and subcutaneous drug administration for children, admitted in Advanced Paediatric Centre, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India. The study included 58 bedside nurses and 90 observations of medicine administration procedure. Results: The Content Validity Index (CVI was prepared to assess the validity of content (items of SOPs and checklists. Over all Cronbach's-alpha values was calculated to assess the internal consistency of Items in SOPs and checklists. CVI of SOP and checklists were 98.51%, 97.83% and 99.03%. Over all Cronbach'salpha values were calculated 0.96, 0.82 and 0.95. All the nurses felt that SOPs are useful. Conclusion: Valid and feasible SOPs for drug administration in children along with valid and reliable checklists were developed. It is recommended to use this document for drug administration in children to prevent any possible error during drug administration to children.

  6. 78 FR 42084 - Electronic Study Data Submission; Data Standard Support; Availability of the Center for Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... commitment to the development, implementation, and maintenance of a comprehensive data standards program to facilitate the efficient and effective review of regulatory submissions so that safe and effective products... Innovation Act. The CDER Data Standards Strategy supersedes version 1.1 of the CDER Data Standards Plan...

  7. Anti-diabetic potential of Catharanthus roseus Linn. and its effect on the glucose transport gene (GLUT-2 and GLUT-4) in streptozotocin induced diabetic wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shaqha, Waleed M; Khan, Mohsin; Salam, Nasir; Azzi, Arezki; Chaudhary, Anis Ahmad

    2015-10-21

    Catharanthus roseus is an important Ayurvedic medication in traditional medicine. It is potentially used in countries like India, South Africa, China and Malaysia for the healing of diabetes mellitus. Although, the molecular mechanisms behind this effect are yet to be exclusively explored. Due to the great antidiabetic and hyperlipidemic potential of c. roseus, we hypothesized that the insulin mimetic effect of ethanolic extract of c. roseus might add to glucose uptake through improvement in the expression of genes of the glucose transporter (GLUT) family messenger RNA (mRNA) in liver. STZ-induced diabetic rats treated by ethanolic extract of c. roseus 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg; and one group treated with Metformin (100 mg/kg). After final administration of treatment of 4 weeks, blood samples were collected under fasting conditions, and the body weights (BWs) were measured. Total RNA from liver was extracted with the Qiagen RNEasy Micro kit (GERMANY) as described in the manufacturer's instructions. First-strand complementary DNA (cDNA) was synthesized at 40 °C by priming with oligo-dT12-18 (Invitrogen, USA) and using Super ScriptII reverse transcriptase according to the protocol provided by the manufacturer (Invitrogen, USA). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifications for GLUT-4 (gene ID: 25139) were conducted using Light-Cycler 480 (Roche, USA) with the SyBr® I nucleic acid stain (Invitrogen, USA) according to the manufacturer's instructions. Polymerase chain reaction products of β-actin primer gene were used as an internal standard. The proposed study was framed to look at the antidiabetic efficacy of ethanolic extract of c. roseus and an expression of GLUT-2 and GLUT-4 gene in streptozotocin induced diabetic wistar rats. The doses were administered orally at a rate of 100 and 200 mg/kg and detrain the glucose transport system in liver for 4 weeks. The observed results showed a good positive correlation between intracellular calcium and insulin

  8. GC-MS analysis and screening of antidiabetic, antioxidant and hypolipidemic potential of Cinnamomum tamala oil in streptozotocin induced diabetes mellitus in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Suresh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim of the study This study was made to investigate the antidiabetic, antioxidant and hypolipidemic potential of Cinnamomum tamala, (Buch.-Ham. Nees & Eberm (Tejpat oil (CTO in streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetes in rats along with evaluation of chemical constituents. Materials and methods The GC-MS (Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis of the oil showed 31 constituents of which cinnamaldehyde was found the major component (44.898%. CTO and cinnamaldehyde was orally administered to diabetic rats to study its effect in both acute and chronic antihyperglycemic models. The body weight, oral glucose tolerance test and biochemical parameters viz. glucose level, insulin level, liver glycogen content, glycosylated hemoglobin, total plasma cholesterol, triglyceride and antioxidant parameters were estimated for all treated groups and compared against diabetic control group. Results CTO (100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg, cinnamaldehyde (20 mg/kg and glibenclamide (0.6 mg/kg in respective groups of diabetic animals administered for 28 days reduced the blood glucose level in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. There was significant increase in body weight, liver glycogen content, plasma insulin level and decrease in the blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin and total plasma cholesterol in test groups as compared to control group. The results of CTO and cinnamaldehyde were found comparable with standard drug glibenclamide. In vitro antioxidant studies on CTO using various models showed significant antioxidant activity. In vivo antioxidant studies on STZ induced diabetic rats revealed decreased malondialdehyde (MDA and increased reduced glutathione (GSH. Conclusion Thus the investigation results that CTO has significant antidiabetic, antioxidant and hypolipidemic activity.

  9. Physicochemical and elemental studies of Hydrocotyle javanica Thunb. for standardization as herbal drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manab Mandal

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: Hence the present physicochemical and elements studies reveals that the plant Hydrocotyle javanica Thunb. could be a potent source of herbal preparation as well as a safe and novel synthetic antibacterial drug.

  10. Standard-based comprehensive detection of adverse drug reaction signals from nursing statements and laboratory results in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suehyun; Choi, Jiyeob; Kim, Hun-Sung; Kim, Grace Juyun; Lee, Kye Hwa; Park, Chan Hee; Han, Jongsoo; Yoon, Dukyong; Park, Man Young; Park, Rae Woong; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Ju Han

    2017-07-01

    We propose 2 Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities-enabled pharmacovigilance algorithms, MetaLAB and MetaNurse, powered by a per-year meta-analysis technique and improved subject sampling strategy. This study developed 2 novel algorithms, MetaLAB for laboratory abnormalities and MetaNurse for standard nursing statements, as significantly improved versions of our previous electronic health record (EHR)-based pharmacovigilance method, called CLEAR. Adverse drug reaction (ADR) signals from 117 laboratory abnormalities and 1357 standard nursing statements for all precautionary drugs ( n   = 101) were comprehensively detected and validated against SIDER (Side Effect Resource) by MetaLAB and MetaNurse against 11 817 and 76 457 drug-ADR pairs, respectively. We demonstrate that MetaLAB (area under the curve, AUC = 0.61 ± 0.18) outperformed CLEAR (AUC = 0.55 ± 0.06) when we applied the same 470 drug-event pairs as the gold standard, as in our previous research. Receiver operating characteristic curves for 101 precautionary terms in the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities Preferred Terms were obtained for MetaLAB and MetaNurse (0.69 ± 0.11; 0.62 ± 0.07), which complemented each other in terms of ADR signal coverage. Novel ADR signals discovered by MetaLAB and MetaNurse were successfully validated against spontaneous reports in the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System database. The present study demonstrates the symbiosis of laboratory test results and nursing statements for ADR signal detection in terms of their system organ class coverage and performance profiles. Systematic discovery and evaluation of the wide spectrum of ADR signals using standard-based observational electronic health record data across many institutions will affect drug development and use, as well as postmarketing surveillance and regulation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Antidiabetic Evaluation of Selected Culinary-Medicinal Mushrooms (Agaricomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Varinder; Bedi, Gurleen Kaur; Shri, Richa

    2017-01-01

    Management of type 2 diabetes by delaying or preventing glucose absorption using natural products is gaining significant attention. Edible mushrooms are well documented for their nutritional and medicinal properties. This investigation was designed to evaluate the antidiabetic activity of aqueous extracts of selected culinary-medicinal mushrooms, namely, Pleurotus ostreatus, Calocybe indica, and Volvariella volvacea, using in vitro models (α-amylase inhibition assay, glucose uptake by yeast cells, and glucose adsorption capacity). The most active extract was subsequently examined in vivo using the oral starch tolerance test in mice. All prepared extracts showed dose-dependent inhibition of α-amylase and an increase in glucose transport across yeast cells. C. indica extract was the most active α-amylase inhibitor (half-maximal inhibitory concentration, 18.07 ± 0.75 mg/mL) and exhibited maximum glucose uptake by yeast cells (77.53 ± 0.97% at 35 mg/mL). All extracts demonstrated weak glucose adsorption ability. The positive in vitro tests for C. indica paved the way for in vivo studies. C. indica extract (200 and 400 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced postprandial blood glucose peaks in mice challenged with starch. The extract (400 mg/kg) and acarbose normalized blood glucose levels at 180 minutes, when they were statistically similar to values in normal mice. Thus, it may be concluded that the antidiabetic effect of C. indica is mediated by inhibition of starch metabolism (α-amylase inhibition), increased glucose uptake by peripheral cells (promotion of glucose uptake by yeast cells), and mild entrapment (adsorption) of glucose. Hence, C. indica can be developed as antidiabetic drug after detailed pharmacological studies.

  12. Clinical trials information in drug development and regulation : existing systems and standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenhoef, Gert van; Tervonen, Tommi; Brock, Bert de; Hillege, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Clinical trials provide pivotal evidence on drug efficacy and safety. The evidence, information from clinical trials, is currently used by regulatory decision makers in marketing authorization decisions, but only in an implicit manner. For clinical trials information to be used in a transparent and

  13. 77 FR 48491 - Regulatory New Drug Review: Solutions for Study Data Exchange Standards; Notice of Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... many years, it is not an extensible modern technology. Moreover, it is not supported and maintained by..., structured documents and Clinical Data Architecture) be a viable study data exchange standard? Please explain...

  14. [Actuality investigation on general crude drugs and its quality standard of Tibetan medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guoyue; Zhou, Fucheng; Shi, Shangmei; Zhou, Huarong; Yu, Jiangyong; Ping, A; Liu, Haiqing; Dawa, Zhuoma

    2012-08-01

    To provide a reference for the standardization of Tibetan medicine. Investigating the hospital preparations , Tibetan formulated products, and the literature recorded preparations in the Tibetan, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan and Yunnan Provinces. Moreover, the varieties, original bases and standard conditions of these preparations were analyzed. According to Chinese Pharmacopoeia, Tibetan medicine part of ministerial standard, Tibetan medicine standards and related monographs and literatures of Tibetan medicine. About 502 various of herbs were used in 711 hospital preparations from 40 medical institutions, Tibetan formulated products from Tibetan pharmaceutical factories, and 439 literature recorded preparations. About 154 herbs were used in more than 10 preparations, while most of them were Tibetan endemic species. About 416 medicinal varieties have the original documented basis, including 287 botanicals, 78 animal medicines, 51 mineral medicines, involving a total of 94 families, 261 genus and 643 species of botanical origin (including species of the next grade), 35 families, 52 genera and 61 species of the animal origin (including species of the next grade). About 122 varieties of herbs were cross-used in the traditional Chinese medicine and Tibetan medicine, about 80% of Tibetan medicinal varieties are produced in the Tibetan Areas of Tibet Plateau. About 293 medicinal varieties were contained in the above standards. Most of the herb's standards only contains character, indentification, and examination, except for 8 varieties which were recorded in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia (2010) as Tibetan medicine. This study of quality standard of Tibetan medicine should have an emphasis on the general varieties, especially the study on the arrangement research and the efficacious material basis of the varieties and the original, as well as term standardization of the National Medicine.

  15. Comprehensive Evidence-Based Assessment and Prioritization of Potential Antidiabetic Medicinal Plants: A Case Study from Canadian Eastern James Bay Cree Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre S. Haddad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Canadian Aboriginals, like others globally, suffer from disproportionately high rates of diabetes. A comprehensive evidence-based approach was therefore developed to study potential antidiabetic medicinal plants stemming from Canadian Aboriginal Traditional Medicine to provide culturally adapted complementary and alternative treatment options. Key elements of pathophysiology of diabetes and of related contemporary drug therapy are presented to highlight relevant cellular and molecular targets for medicinal plants. Potential antidiabetic plants were identified using a novel ethnobotanical method based on a set of diabetes symptoms. The most promising species were screened for primary (glucose-lowering and secondary (toxicity, drug interactions, complications antidiabetic activity by using a comprehensive platform of in vitro cell-based and cell-free bioassays. The most active species were studied further for their mechanism of action and their active principles identified though bioassay-guided fractionation. Biological activity of key species was confirmed in animal models of diabetes. These in vitro and in vivo findings are the basis for evidence-based prioritization of antidiabetic plants. In parallel, plants were also prioritized by Cree Elders and healers according to their Traditional Medicine paradigm. This case study highlights the convergence of modern science and Traditional Medicine while providing a model that can be adapted to other Aboriginal realities worldwide.

  16. Antioxidant and antidiabetic profiles of two African medicinal plants: Picralima nitida (Apocynaceae) and Sonchus oleraceus (Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teugwa, Clautilde Mofor; Mejiato, Pascaline Chouadeu; Zofou, Denis; Tchinda, Bruno Tugnoua; Boyom, Fabrice Fekam

    2013-07-15

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease characterized by chronic hyperglycaemia generally associated with oxidative stress. The present study aims at evaluating the antioxidant and antidiabetic potential of methanol and hydroethanol extracts of the stem bark and leaves of Pricralima nitida and the Sonchus oleraceus whole plant respectively. The in vitro antioxidant activity was assessed using 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrilhydrazyl (DPPH) for free radical-scavenging properties of the extracts, and the Folin-Ciocalteu method in determining their phenol contents. The antidiabetic activity was tested in mice following streptozotocin diabetes induction, and selected oxidative stress markers (Malondialdehyde, Hydrogen peroxides and Catalase) were measured in order to evaluate the level of oxidative stress in treated animals. The in vitro antioxidant activity using DPPH showed IC50 ranging from 0.19 ± 0.08 to 1.00 ± 0.06 mg/mL. The highest activity was obtained with the hydroethanol extracts of S. oleraceus (0.19 mg/mL and P. nitida (0.24 mg/mL). Polyphenol contents ranged from 182.25 ± 16.76 to 684.62 ± 46.66 μg Eq Cat/g. The methanol extract of P. nitida showed the highest activity, followed by the hydroethanol extract of S. oleraceus (616.89 ± 19.20 μEq Cat/g). The hydroethanol extract of whole plants (150 mg/Kg) and methanol leave extract of P. nitida (300 mg/Kg) exhibited significant antidiabetic activities with 39.40% and 38.48% glycaemia reduction, respectively. The measurement of stress markers in plasma, liver and kidney after administration of both extracts showed significant reduction in MDA and hydrogen peroxide levels, coupled with a substantial increase in catalase activity. These findings suggest that S. oleraceus whole plant and P. nitida leaves possess both antidiabetic and antioxidant properties, and therefore could be used as starting point for the development of herbal medicines and/or source of new drug molecules against

  17. Isolated flavonoids from Ficus racemosa stem bark possess antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and protective effects in albino Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshari, Amit K; Kumar, Ghanendra; Kushwaha, Priya S; Bhardwaj, Monika; Kumar, Pranesh; Rawat, Atul; Kumar, Dinesh; Prakash, Anand; Ghosh, Balaram; Saha, Sudipta

    2016-04-02

    to diabetic control at the same time. Docking studies revealed that isolated flavonoids showed their antidiabetic potential via binding to PPARγ and GLUT1 receptors. The isolated four flavonoids demonstrated good antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and antioxidant properties in STZ diabetic rats which supported the use of FR stem bark as useful supplementary drug for future antidiabetic therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Enzyme inhibitory and radical scavenging effects of some antidiabetic plants of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilüfer Orhan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Ethnopharmacological field surveys demonstrated that many plants, such as Gentiana olivieri, Helichrysum graveolens, Helichrysum plicatum ssp. plicatum, Juniperus oxycedrus ssp. oxycedrus, Juniperus  communis var. saxatilis, Viscum album (ssp. album, ssp. austriacum, are used as traditional medicine for diabetes in different regions of Anatolia. The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antidiabetic effects of some selected plants, tested in animal models recently. Materials and Methods: α-glucosidase and α-amylase enzyme inhibitory effects of the plant extracts were investigated and Acarbose was used as a reference drug. Additionally, radical scavenging capacities were determined using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid ABTS radical cation scavenging assay and total phenolic content of the extracts were evaluated using Folin Ciocalteu method. Results: H. graveolens ethanol extract exhibited the highest inhibitory activity (55.7 % ± 2.2 on α-amylase enzyme. Additionally, J. oxycedrus hydro-alcoholic leaf extract had potent α-amylase inhibitory effect, while the hydro-alcoholic extract of J. communis fruit showed the highest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (IC50: 4.4 μg/ml. Conclusion:Results indicated that, antidiabetic effect of hydro-alcoholic extracts of H. graveolens capitulums, J. communis fruit and J. oxycedrus leaf might arise from inhibition of digestive enzymes.

  19. Synthesis, pharmacological evaluation and molecular docking studies of pyrimidinedione based DPP-4 inhibitors as antidiabetic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Vibhu; Bhadoriya, Kamlendra Singh

    2018-04-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are a class of newly developed antidiabetic drugs that bock DPP-4. DPP-4 is responsible for degradation of incretins harmones such as GLP-1 (Glucagon like Peptide) and GIP (Gastric inhibitory polypeptide) that maintain blood-glucose level. Pyrimidinedione based compounds were designed and synthesized for DPP-4 inhibitory activity. These heterocycles were designed by taking Alogliptin as a reference DPP-4 inhibitors and synthesized as N-methylated and N-benzylated pyrimidinediones. These compounds were subjected to DPP-4 assay, five out of nine synthesized compounds have shown in vitro DPP-4 inhibitory activity in significant range. Further, molecular docking studies of these compounds were performed on DPP-4 subunit and compared with natural DPP-4 inhibitors like Flavone, Resveratrol, Quercetin, Diprotin A. Docking studies have led to the conclusion that there are some identical amino acid interactions as Tyr 666 and Tyr 662, seen in both synthesized compounds and natural DPP-4 inhibitors. This study completely gives a good scope for further derivatisation and optimization of synthesized compounds to get clinical candidate as DPP-4 inhibitor for antidiabetic activity.

  20. Anti-Diabetic Effect of Portulaca oleracea L. Polysaccharideandits Mechanism in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Bai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a metabolic syndrome caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Traditional Chinese medicine preparations have shown a comprehensive and function-regulating characteristic. Purslane (Portulaca oleracea L. is an annual succulent herb. Currently, there have been some related reports on the treatment of diabetes with purslane. The current study was designed to separate and purify the polysaccharide, a systematic study of its physical and chemical properties, antioxidant activity, and anti-diabetic mechanism, in order to provide a theoretical basis for the development of drugs of purslane. A crude water soluble polysaccharide extracted from purslane was named CPOP (crude Portulaca oleracea L. polysaccharide. Effects of CPOP on bodyweight, glucose tolerance test (GTT, fasting blood glucose (FBG, fasting serum insulin (FINS, insulin sensitivity index (ISI, interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA, and superoxygen dehydrogenises (SOD were investigated. The results indicate that the oral administration of CPOP could significantly increase the body weight and significantly improve the glucose tolerance in diabetic rats. Meanwhile, CPOP could significantly reduce the FBG level, and elevate the FINS level and ISI value in diabetic rats. In addition, CPOP could significantly reduce TNF-α and IL-6 levels in diabetic rats; CPOP could also reduce MDA and SOD activities in the liver tissue of diabetic rats. These results suggest that the anti-diabetic effect of CPOP may be associated with its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

  1. Anti-Diabetic Effect of Portulaca oleracea L. Polysaccharideandits Mechanism in Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yu; Zang, Xueli; Ma, Jinshu; Xu, Guangyu

    2016-07-25

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic syndrome caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Traditional Chinese medicine preparations have shown a comprehensive and function-regulating characteristic. Purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) is an annual succulent herb. Currently, there have been some related reports on the treatment of diabetes with purslane. The current study was designed to separate and purify the polysaccharide, a systematic study of its physical and chemical properties, antioxidant activity, and anti-diabetic mechanism, in order to provide a theoretical basis for the development of drugs of purslane. A crude water soluble polysaccharide extracted from purslane was named CPOP (crude Portulaca oleracea L. polysaccharide). Effects of CPOP on bodyweight, glucose tolerance test (GTT), fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting serum insulin (FINS), insulin sensitivity index (ISI), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA), and superoxygen dehydrogenises (SOD) were investigated. The results indicate that the oral administration of CPOP could significantly increase the body weight and significantly improve the glucose tolerance in diabetic rats. Meanwhile, CPOP could significantly reduce the FBG level, and elevate the FINS level and ISI value in diabetic rats. In addition, CPOP could significantly reduce TNF-α and IL-6 levels in diabetic rats; CPOP could also reduce MDA and SOD activities in the liver tissue of diabetic rats. These results suggest that the anti-diabetic effect of CPOP may be associated with its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

  2. Chemical composition and anti-diabetic properties of Jatropha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates the chemical composition and anti-diabetic properties of fresh and shade dried Jatropha curcas aqueous leaves extracts (JCLE) on alloxan induced diabetic female wistar rats. Seven (7) kg of J. curcas leaves were pulverized and aqueous extracts produced. Thirty five (35) mature female rats were ...

  3. Antidiabetic activity of water extract of Solanum trilobatum (Linn.) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... changes in body weight, serum lipid profiles and liver glycogen levels assessed in the extract treated diabetic rats ... of medicine. Key words: Antidiabetic activity, alloxan monohydrate, Gliben clamide, rats, Solanum trilobatum. .... either six weighing 150 - 200 g bred in Animal Tissue Culture Lab,. Karpagam ...

  4. Antidiabetic and haematinic effects of Parquetina nigrescens on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antidiabetic and haematinic effects of Parquetina nigrescens on alloxan induced type-1 diabetes and normocytic normochromic anaemia in Wistar rats. ... Background: The plant, Parquetina nigrescens is used in folklore medicine to treat diabetes mellitus and its complications in several parts of West Africa. Objective: To ...

  5. Studies on in vitro evaluation of antidiabetic potentials of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among various therapeutic approaches implemented to prevent diabetes is to regulate the blood glucose levels by various mechanisms. This is being assessed by in vitro antidiabetic assays such as inhibition of carbohydrate digesting enzymes and non-enzymatic glycosylation of haemoglobin. Inhibition of alpha-amylase ...

  6. Antidiabetic Efficacy of Aqueous Fruit Extract of Amla ( Emblica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the antidiabetic potential of Emblica officinalis, Gaertn on diabetic rats. Methods: The study investigated the anti-hyperglycemic potential of the aqueous fruit extract of amla (E. officianalis, for eleven weeks in streptozotocin-induced diabetic obese rats. The study utilized forty eight rats divided into four ...

  7. Antidiabetic And Toxicological Evaluation Of Aqueous Ethanol Leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Secamone afzelii Rhoem is used in ethnomedicine for hepatic diseases, diabetes, venereal diseases, amenorrhoea and toothaches. This present study was aimed at evaluating the antidiabetic activity and to establish the toxicological profile of the plant to confirm its traditional application and justify continuous usage.

  8. Factors Associated with Treatment Response to Antidiabetic Agents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors Associated with Treatment Response to. Antidiabetic Agents in Compliant Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Patients: A Brief Summary of 5-Year Data. Hasniza Zaman Huri1,2* and Lee Tze Xiang2. 1Clinical Investigation Centre, Faculty of Medicine,13th Floor Main Tower, University Malaya Medical Centre, 59100 Lembah.

  9. Investigation into the prescribing patterns and cost of antidiabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and soluble insulin aspartame and protamine) together accounted for 63% of all the insulin prescribed, and 67% of the total cost of prescribed insulin. Almost 39% (n = 62 717) of the “combination therapy” prescriptions were for a sulfonylurea in combination with a biguanide plus at least one other antidiabetic product.

  10. Antidiabetic properties of the methanolic extract of Bridelia grandis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-03-28

    Mar 28, 2011 ... Bridelia grandis is used in most parts of tropical Africa for the treatment of diabetes. The anti-diabetic properties of the methanolic stem bark extract of this plant was studied in ob/ob and db/db mice. The plant extract induced hypoglycaemic effects of long duration in the ob/ob mice, while its effects were.

  11. Hydroxycarbamine: from an Old Drug Used in Malignant Hemopathies to a Current Standard in Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannas, Giovanna; Poutrel, Solène; Thomas, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    While hydroxycarbamide (hydroxyurea, HU) has less and fewer indications in malignant hemopathies, it represents the only widely used drug which modifies sickle cell disease pathogenesis. Clinical experience with HU for patients with sickle cell disease has been accumulated over the past 25 years in Western countries. The review of the literature provides increasing support for safety and efficacy in both children and adults for reducing acute vaso-occlusive events including pain episodes and acute chest syndrome. No increased incidence of leukemia and teratogenicity was demonstrated. HU has become the standard-of-care for sickle cell anemia but remains underused. Barriers to its use should be identified and overcome. PMID:28293403

  12. HYDROXYCARBAMINE: FROM AN OLD DRUG USED IN MALIGNANT HEMOPATHIES TO A CURRENT STANDARD IN SICKLE CELL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Cannas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available While hydroxycarbamine (hydroxyurea, HU has less and less indications in malignant hemopathies, it represents the only widely used drug which modifies sickle cell disease pathogenesis. Clinical experience with HU for patients with sickle cell disease has been accumulated over the past 25 years in Western countries. The review of the literature provides increasing support of safety and efficacy in both children and adults for reducing acute vaso-occlusive events including pain episodes and acute chest syndrome. HU has become the standard-of-care for sickle cell anemia, but remains underused. Barriers to its use should be identified and overcome.

  13. Studies on the Antidiabetic Activities of Cordyceps militaris Extract in Diet-Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to substantial morbidity and high complications, diabetes mellitus is considered as the third “killer” in the world. A search for alternative antidiabetic drugs from herbs or fungi is highly demanded. Our present study aims to investigate the antidiabetic activities of Cordyceps militaris on diet-streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus in rats. Diabetic rats were orally administered with water extract or alcohol extract at 0.05 g/kg and 2 g/kg for 3 weeks, and then, the factors levels related to blood glucose, lipid, free radicals, and even nephropathy were determined. Pathological alterations on liver and kidney were examined. Data showed that, similar to metformin, Cordyceps militaris extracts displayed a significant reduction in blood glucose levels by promoting glucose metabolism and strongly suppressed total cholesterol and triglycerides concentration in serum. Cordyceps militaris extracts exhibit antioxidative effects indicated by normalized superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase levels. The inhibitory effects on blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, uric acid, and protein revealed the protection of Cordyceps militaris extracts against diabetic nephropathy, which was confirmed by pathological morphology reversion. Collectively, Cordyceps militaris extract, a safe pharmaceutical agent, presents excellent antidiabetic and antinephropathic activities and thus has great potential as a new source for diabetes treatment.

  14. Studies on the antidiabetic activities of Cordyceps militaris extract in diet-streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuan; Jing, Tianjiao; Meng, Qingfan; Liu, Chungang; Hu, Shuang; Ma, Yihang; Liu, Yan; Lu, Jiahui; Cheng, Yingkun; Wang, Di; Teng, Lirong

    2014-01-01

    Due to substantial morbidity and high complications, diabetes mellitus is considered as the third "killer" in the world. A search for alternative antidiabetic drugs from herbs or fungi is highly demanded. Our present study aims to investigate the antidiabetic activities of Cordyceps militaris on diet-streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus in rats. Diabetic rats were orally administered with water extract or alcohol extract at 0.05 g/kg and 2 g/kg for 3 weeks, and then, the factors levels related to blood glucose, lipid, free radicals, and even nephropathy were determined. Pathological alterations on liver and kidney were examined. Data showed that, similar to metformin, Cordyceps militaris extracts displayed a significant reduction in blood glucose levels by promoting glucose metabolism and strongly suppressed total cholesterol and triglycerides concentration in serum. Cordyceps militaris extracts exhibit antioxidative effects indicated by normalized superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase levels. The inhibitory effects on blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, uric acid, and protein revealed the protection of Cordyceps militaris extracts against diabetic nephropathy, which was confirmed by pathological morphology reversion. Collectively, Cordyceps militaris extract, a safe pharmaceutical agent, presents excellent antidiabetic and antinephropathic activities and thus has great potential as a new source for diabetes treatment.

  15. Predicting a single HIV drug resistance measure from three international interpretation gold standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashik, Singh; Maurice, Mars

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the possibility of combining the interpretation of three gold standard interpretation algorithms using weighted heuristics in order to produce a single resistance measure. The outputs of HIVdb, Rega, ANRS were combined to obtain a single resistance profile using the equally weighted voting algorithm, accuracy based weighing voting algorithm and the Bayesian based weighted voting algorithm techniques. The Bayesian based voting combination increased the accuracy of the resistance profile prediction compared to phenotype, from 58% to 69%. The equal weighted voting algorithm and the accuracy based algorithm both increased the prediction accuracy to 60%. From the result obtained it is evident that combining the gold standard interpretation algorithms may increase the predictive ability of the individual interpretation algorithms. Copyright © 2012 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Isolation of Antidiabetic Principle from Fruit Rinds of Punica granatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vishal; Viswanatha, G. L.; Manohar, D.; Shivaprasad, H. N.

    2012-01-01

    Present study was aimed to isolate and evaluate the antidiabetic activity of phytoconstituents from fruit rinds of Punica granatum. With the above objectives Valoneic acid dilactone (VAD) was isolated from methanolic fruit rind extracts of Punica granatum (MEPG) and confirmed by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and mass spectral data. Antidiabetic activity was evaluated by Aldose reductase, α-amylase and PTP1B inhibition assays in in vitro and Alloxan-induced diabetes in rats was used as an in vivo model. In bioactivity studies, MEPG and VAD have showed potent antidiabetic activity in α-amylase, aldose reductase, and PTP1B inhibition assays with IC50 values of 1.02, 2.050, 26.25 μg/mL and 0.284, 0.788, 12.41 μg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, in alloxan-induced diabetes model MEPG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) and VAD (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg, p.o.) have showed significant and dose dependent antidiabetic activity by maintaining the blood glucose levels within the normal limits. Inline with the biochemical findings histopathology of MEPG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.), VAD (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg, p.o.), and glibenclamide (10 mg/kg, p.o.) treated animals showed significant protection against alloxan-induced pancreatic tissue damage. These findings suggest that MEPG and VAD possess significant antidiabetic activity in both in vitro and in vivo models. PMID:22919408

  17. Isolation of Antidiabetic Principle from Fruit Rinds of Punica granatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Present study was aimed to isolate and evaluate the antidiabetic activity of phytoconstituents from fruit rinds of Punica granatum. With the above objectives Valoneic acid dilactone (VAD was isolated from methanolic fruit rind extracts of Punica granatum (MEPG and confirmed by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and mass spectral data. Antidiabetic activity was evaluated by Aldose reductase, α-amylase and PTP1B inhibition assays in in vitro and Alloxan-induced diabetes in rats was used as an in vivo model. In bioactivity studies, MEPG and VAD have showed potent antidiabetic activity in α-amylase, aldose reductase, and PTP1B inhibition assays with IC50 values of 1.02, 2.050, 26.25 μg/mL and 0.284, 0.788, 12.41 μg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, in alloxan-induced diabetes model MEPG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o. and VAD (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg, p.o. have showed significant and dose dependent antidiabetic activity by maintaining the blood glucose levels within the normal limits. Inline with the biochemical findings histopathology of MEPG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o., VAD (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg, p.o., and glibenclamide (10 mg/kg, p.o. treated animals showed significant protection against alloxan-induced pancreatic tissue damage. These findings suggest that MEPG and VAD possess significant antidiabetic activity in both in vitro and in vivo models.

  18. Presenting a New Standard Drug Model for Turmeric and Its Prized Extract, Curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Cavaleri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Various parts of the turmeric plant have been used as medicinal treatment for various conditions from ulcers and arthritis to cardiovascular disease and neuroinflammation. The rhizome’s curcumin extract is the most studied active constituent, which exhibits an expansive polypharmacology with influence on many key inflammatory markers. Despite the expansive reports of curcucmin’s therapeutic value, clinical reliability and research repeatability with curcumin treatment are still poor. The pharmacology must be better understood and reliably mapped if curcumin is to be accepted and used in modern medical applications. Although the polypharmacology of this extract has been considered, in mainstream medicine, to be a drawback, a perspective change reveals a comprehensive and even synergistic shaping of the NF-kB pathway, including transactivation. Much of the inconsistent research data and unreliable clinical outcomes may be due to a lack of standardization which also pervades research standard samples. The possibility of other well-known curcumin by-products contributing in the polypharmacology is also discussed. A new flowchart of crosstalk in transduction pathways that lead to shaping of nuclear NF-kB transactivation is generated and a new calibration or standardization protocol for the extract is proposed which could lead to more consistent data extraction and improved reliability in therapy.

  19. Presenting a New Standard Drug Model for Turmeric and Its Prized Extract, Curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaleri, Franco

    2018-01-01

    Various parts of the turmeric plant have been used as medicinal treatment for various conditions from ulcers and arthritis to cardiovascular disease and neuroinflammation. The rhizome's curcumin extract is the most studied active constituent, which exhibits an expansive polypharmacology with influence on many key inflammatory markers. Despite the expansive reports of curcucmin's therapeutic value, clinical reliability and research repeatability with curcumin treatment are still poor. The pharmacology must be better understood and reliably mapped if curcumin is to be accepted and used in modern medical applications. Although the polypharmacology of this extract has been considered, in mainstream medicine, to be a drawback, a perspective change reveals a comprehensive and even synergistic shaping of the NF-kB pathway, including transactivation. Much of the inconsistent research data and unreliable clinical outcomes may be due to a lack of standardization which also pervades research standard samples. The possibility of other well-known curcumin by-products contributing in the polypharmacology is also discussed. A new flowchart of crosstalk in transduction pathways that lead to shaping of nuclear NF-kB transactivation is generated and a new calibration or standardization protocol for the extract is proposed which could lead to more consistent data extraction and improved reliability in therapy.

  20. Nonadherence and factors affecting adherence of diabetic patients to anti-diabetic medication in Assela General Hospital, Oromia Region, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashebir Kassahun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is a major global health problem covering approximately 347 million persons worldwide. Glycemic control has a main role in its management which mainly depends upon patient adherence to the treatment plan. Accurate assessment of medication adherence is necessary for effective management of diabetes. Objective: To assess nonadherence and factors affecting adherence of diabetic patients to anti-diabetic medication in Assela General Hospital (AGH, Oromia Region, Ethiopia. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on patients seeking anti-diabetic drug treatment and follow-up at AGH using structured questionnaire and reviewing the patient record card using check list from January 24, 2014 to February 7, 2014. Descriptive analysis was used to describe the percentages and number of distributions of the variables in the study; and association was identified for categorical data. P ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Result: Of all respondents, 149 (52.3% and 136 (47.7% were female and male, respectively. The majority of the study participants 189 (66.3% were in the age group of 30–60 years. Two-hundred nineteen (76.8% of respondents were married currently. The majority, 237 (83.2% of respondents did not have blood glucose self-monitoring equipment (glucometer. A total of 196 (68.8% respondents were adhered to anti-diabetic medication. There was a significant association between adherence to the medication and side effect, level of education, monthly income and presence of glucometer at home (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The participants in the area of study were moderately adherent to their anti-diabetic medications with nonadherence rate of 31.2%. Different factors of medication nonadherence were identified such as side effect and complexity of regimen, failure to remember, and sociodemographic factors such as educational level and monthly income.

  1. HPLC Fingerprinting of Sennosides in Laxative Drugs with Isolation of Standard Substances from Some Senna Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Omur Demirezer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Senna leaves are one of the oldest medicinal herbs and they are used as laxative. Herbal teas which contain senna leaves are most commonly used to promote weight loss. The quality control of slimming teas which contain Senna leaves and also pharmaceutical preparations including Senna extract enriched by sennoside B was achieved by HPLC fingerprinting method. While the presence of sennoside A and B in laxative drugs was proved, it was seen to be devoid of sennosides in slimming teas. Kaempferol 3-O-β-D-gentiobioside (1, aloe-emodine 8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (2, rhein 8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3, torachrysone 8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (4, isorhamnetine 3-O-β-D-gentiobioside (5 were also isolated from Senna leaves.

  2. Industry Perspective on Standardizing Food-Effect Studies for New Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroum, Patrick J; Nuthalapati, Silpa; Parikh, Apurvasena; Shebley, Mohamad; Hoffman, David; Zha, Jiuhong; Khatri, Amit; Awni, Walid M

    2018-02-19

    Investigating the effect of food on bioavailability during the development of an oral drug product is of prime importance because it has major implications on the study design of the clinical trials and dosing and administration recommendations. For modified-release formulations that exhibit dose dumping when administered with food, this may result in clinical concerns around safety and efficacy. In this article, we provide an overview of the various considerations in our opinion that impact the design and conduct of food-effect studies. We summarize the various recommendations from the different regulatory agencies and provide specific suggestions on study conduct in terms of statistical design, timing of studies, subject selection, and type and caloric content of the meal. We also discuss the role of modeling and simulation. Finally, we present an interpretation of the results of food-effect studies in addition to dosing and labeling recommendations in relation to regulatory guidance documents.

  3. Automated identification of drug and food allergies entered using non-standard terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Richard H; St Jacques, Paul; Stockin, Michael; Rothman, Brian; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Denny, Joshua C

    2013-01-01

    An accurate computable representation of food and drug allergy is essential for safe healthcare. Our goal was to develop a high-performance, easily maintained algorithm to identify medication and food allergies and sensitivities from unstructured allergy entries in electronic health record (EHR) systems. An algorithm was developed in Transact-SQL to identify ingredients to which patients had allergies in a perioperative information management system. The algorithm used RxNorm and natural language processing techniques developed on a training set of 24 599 entries from 9445 records. Accuracy, specificity, precision, recall, and F-measure were determined for the training dataset and repeated for the testing dataset (24 857 entries from 9430 records). Accuracy, precision, recall, and F-measure for medication allergy matches were all above 98% in the training dataset and above 97% in the testing dataset for all allergy entries. Corresponding values for food allergy matches were above 97% and above 93%, respectively. Specificities of the algorithm were 90.3% and 85.0% for drug matches and 100% and 88.9% for food matches in the training and testing datasets, respectively. The algorithm had high performance for identification of medication and food allergies. Maintenance is practical, as updates are managed through upload of new RxNorm versions and additions to companion database tables. However, direct entry of codified allergy information by providers (through autocompleters or drop lists) is still preferred to post-hoc encoding of the data. Data tables used in the algorithm are available for download. A high performing, easily maintained algorithm can successfully identify medication and food allergies from free text entries in EHR systems.

  4. Persistence with injectable antidiabetic agents in members with type 2 diabetes in a commercial managed care organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Catherine E; Lee, Helen Y; Tong, Yvette P; Haines, Stuart T

    2010-01-01

    While many patients with type 2 diabetes require insulin to achieve glycemic goals, little is known about patients' persistence with insulin or other injectable antidiabetic therapies. The objective of this study was to evaluate persistence with injectable antidiabetic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes who were naïve to these treatments. The study cohort was obtained using administrative and pharmacy claims data from a commercial managed care organization of approximately 1.2 million members with pharmacy benefits. The inclusion criteria were members with type 2 diabetes who had at least one pharmacy claim for insulin glargine, insulin detemir, exenatide, or isophane insulin human (NPH insulin) from January 1, 2006 through June 30, 2006. The first claim for any of these injectable therapies was considered the index prescription. Members were excluded if they filled a prescription (a) for any injectable antidiabetic medication from July 2005 through December 2005; or (b) for short/rapid-acting or mixed insulins during 2006, either prior to the index date or within 30 days following the index date. The primary outcome was persistence with the index drug, defined as number of months between the initiation of therapy (i.e., index date) and either the end of therapy (date of last fill plus days supply) or study period of 12 months. The secondary outcome was the percentage of patients with claims for new antidiabetic agents added after index date. Multivariate regression with life data (survival analysis) was performed with number of months of persistence as the dependent variable. The cohort consisted of 1769 members with a mean (SD) age of 53.2 (12.5) years and 47.4% were men. Mean (SD) months of persistence for members on insulin glargine, insulin detemir and exenatide were similar at 7.8 (4.1), 7.8 (4.4), and 7.6 (4.4), respectively. Members taking NPH insulin had statistically lower persistence at 5.6 (4.5) months (P index prescription. Members in the

  5. Drug: D03747 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03747 Drug Ibrolipim (USAN/INN) ... C19H20BrN2O4P D03747.gif ... Antiatherogenic, Antiobesity, Antidyslipi...demia, Anticachexia, And antidiabetes/syndrome X LPL [HSA:4023] [KO:K01059] ... CAS:

  6. Drug: D03807 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03807 Drug Zenarestat (USAN/INN) ... C17H11BrClFN2O4 D03807.gif ... Antidiabetic agen...t ... DG01882 ... Aldose reductase inhibitor ... Treatment of diabetic neuropathy AKR1B1 [HSA:231] [KO:K00011] ... CA

  7. Impact of antiepileptic drugs on thrombocytopenia in glioblastoma patients treated with standard chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, Marta; Velasco, Roser; Graus, Francesc; Verger, Eugenia; Gil, Miguel; Pineda, Estela; Blasco, Jaume; Bruna, Jordi

    2012-07-01

    Epilepsy in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients is common. Hematological toxicity is a potential side effect of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and a frequent limiting-dose effect of temozolomide (TMZ). The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of AEDs on thrombocytopenia in GBM patients treated with radiotherapy and TMZ. A cohort of 101 newly diagnosed GBM patients treated with radiotherapy and TMZ was reviewed. Clinical data, presence of seizures, AEDs use, platelet count, and accumulated TMZ dose were analyzed at each cycle. Thrombocytopenia was operationalized as a continuous platelet count and a dichotomic variable (cut-off <100.000/mm(3)). This cut-off represents the threshold beyond which TMZ treatment is modified. A linear and a probit pooled cross-sectional regression analysis were used to study the impact of age, gender, AEDs, and accumulated TMZ on thrombocytopenia. Impact of AEDs on survival was also analyzed. Thirty-five patients (35%) presented seizures at onset and 18 (27%) during follow-up. Seven (13%) needed two or more AEDs for seizure control. Grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia was found in 8%. Decrease in platelet count was related to accumulated TMZ (p < 0.001), age (p < 0.001), and valproate (p = 0.004). Platelet count <100.000/mm(3) was only associated with accumulated TMZ (p = 0.001). Recursive Partitioning Analysis prognostic class was the only variable with significant impact on survival. Valproate and age had an independent negative effect on total platelet count, although neither had an effect on critical thrombocytopenia (<100.000/mm(3)). Therefore, the systematic withhold of valproate in GBM patients might not be justified. Nevertheless, this negative effect may be taken into account especially in elderly patients.

  8. A Study on Drug Safety Monitoring Program in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, A.; Patel, Isha; Sanyal, Sudeepa; Balkrishnan, R.; Mohanta, G. P.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance is useful in assuring the safety of medicines and protecting the consumers from their harmful effects. A number of single drugs as well as fixed dose combinations have been banned from manufacturing, marketing and distribution in India. An important issue about the availability of banned drugs over the counter in India is that sufficient adverse drug reactions data about these drugs have not been reported. The most common categories of drugs withdrawn in the last decade were nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (28%), antidiabetics (14.28%), antiobesity (14.28%), antihistamines (14.28%), gastroprokinetic drugs (7.14%), breast cancer and infertility drugs (7.14%), irritable bowel syndrome and constipation drugs (7.14%) and antibiotics (7.14%). Drug withdrawals from market were made mainly due to safety issues involving cardiovascular events (57.14%) and liver damage (14.28%). Majority of drugs have been banned since 3-5 years in other countries but are still available for sale in India. The present study compares the drug safety monitoring systems in the developed countries such as the USA and UK and provides implications for developing a system that can ensure the safety and efficacy of drugs in India. Absence of a gold standard for a drug safety surveillance system, variations in culture and clinical practice across countries makes it difficult for India to completely adopt another country's practices. There should be a multidisciplinary approach towards drug safety that should be implemented throughout the entire duration spanning from drug discovery to usage by consumers. PMID:25425751

  9. Combining insulins with oral antidiabetic agents: effect on hyperglycemic control, markers of cardiovascular risk and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjeld Hermansen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Kjeld Hermansen, Lene Sundahl Mortensen, Marie-Louise HermansenDepartment of Endocrinology and Metabolism C, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus, DenmarkAbstract: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Unfortunately, several potential barriers exist for CVD risk management in diabetes, including the need for significant lifestyle changes, potential problems with hypoglycemia, weight gain, injection tolerability, treatment complexity with current diabetes therapies and other, unmodifiable factors. Improving glycemic control may impact CVD risk. Treatment of T2DM usually starts with lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise. When these become insufficient, pharmacotherapy is required. Various oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs are available that reduce hyperglycemia. The first line of therapy is usually metformin, since it does not increase weight and seems to have a beneficial effect on CVD mortality and risk factors. As T2DM progresses, insulin treatment becomes necessary for the majority of patients. The last few years have seen the development of long-acting, rapid-acting, and premixed insulin analog formulations. The treat-to-target algorithms of recent studies combining OADs plus insulin analogs have demonstrated that patients can reach glycemic treatment targets with low risk of hypoglycemia, greater convenience, and – with some analogs – limited weight gain vs conventional insulins. These factors may possibly have a positive influence on CVD risk. Future studies will hopefully elucidate the benefits of this approach.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hyperglycemia, insulin, oral antidiabetic drugs

  10. Antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic activity of Piper longum root aqueous extract in STZ induced diabetic rats

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    Nabi Shaik Abdul

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The available drugs for diabetes, Insulin or Oral hypoglycemic agents have one or more side effects. Search for new antidiabetic drugs with minimal or no side effects from medicinal plants is a challenge according to WHO recommendations. In this aspect, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects of Piper longum root aqueous extract (PlrAqe in streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats. Methods Diabetes was induced in male Wister albino rats by intraperitoneal administration of STZ (50 mg/kg.b.w. Fasting blood glucose (FBG levels were measured by glucose-oxidase & peroxidase reactive strips. Serum biochemical parameters such as glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL, low density lipoprotein (LDL and high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol were estimated. The activities of liver and kidney functional markers were measured. The statistical analysis of results was carried out using Student t-test and one-way analysis (ANOVA followed by DMRT. Results During the short term study the aqueous extract at a dosage of 200 mg/kg.b.w was found to possess significant antidiabetic activity after 6 h of the treatment. The administration of aqueous extract at the same dose for 30 days in STZ induced diabetic rats resulted in a significant decrease in FBG levels with the corrections of diabetic dyslipidemia compared to untreated diabetic rats. There was a significant decrease in the activities of liver and renal functional markers in diabetic treated rats compared to untreated diabetic rats indicating the protective role of the aqueous extract against liver and kidney damage and its non-toxic property. Conclusions From the above results it is concluded that the plant extract is capable of managing hyperglycemia and complications of diabetes in STZ induced diabetic rats. Hence this plant may be considered as one of the

  11. Hypoglycemic effect of plants used in Mexico as antidiabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román Ramos, R; Alarcón-Aguilar, F; Lara-Lemus, A; Flores-Saenz, J L

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the hypoglycemic effect of 12 "antidiabetic" plants used in Mexico. The studies were performed using 27 healthy rabbits with the gastric administration of water, tolbutamide or decoction of the "antidiabetic" plant before the induction of temporary hyperglycemia by subcutaneous injection of 50% dextrose solution (4 ml/kg of weight) at the beginning of the experiment and after 60 min. Blood glucose was determined every 60 min for a period of 5 h. Tolbutamide and eight of the studied plants decreased significantly the hyperglycemia as compared with control test (water) (p Marrubium vulgare, Crataegus pubescens, Cynodon dactylon, Calea zacatechichi, Buddleia americana, Bauhinia divaricata and Coix lachryma. The decrease of hyperglycemia caused by Physalis phyladelphyca, Pavonia schiedeana and Eucaliptus globulus was not significant (p > 0.05). Urtica dioica increased glycemia slightly.

  12. Ficus Deltoidea: A potential source for new oral antidiabetic agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainah Adam; Juliana Mahamad Napiah; Shafii Khamis; Muhajir Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Ficus deltoidea or locally known as Mas Cotek is one of the common medicinal plant used in Malaysia. Ethno botanical approaches showed that this plant possess antidiabetic property. Previous study had shown that F. deltoidea reduced hyperglycemia in type I diabetic rats at different prandial state. This study was done to elucidate the possible antihyperglycemic mechanisms of F. deltoidea. The results showed that F. deltoidea significantly stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells with the highest magnitude of stimulation was 7.31-fold (p 50 value was 4.15±0.25 mg/ml. Kinetic analysis of the enzyme activity revealed the F. deltoidea exhibited a mixed-type inhibition mechanism against sucrase activity. Such observations showed that F. deltoidea has the potential to be developed as new oral antidiabetic agent for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. (author)

  13. Prescribing of Antidiabetic Medicines before, during and after Pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlton, Rachel A.; Klungsøyr, Kari; Neville, Amanda J.

    2016-01-01

    and 88.8% in the Netherlands received an insulin analogue alone or in combination with human insulin, this proportion increasing over time. Oral products were mainly metformin and prescribing was highest in the 3 months before pregnancy. Metformin use during pregnancy increased in some countries......Aim: To explore antidiabetic medicine prescribing to women before, during and after pregnancy in different regions of Europe. Methods: A common protocol was implemented across seven databases in Denmark, Norway, The Netherlands, Italy (Emilia Romagna/Tuscany), Wales and the rest of the UK. Women...... with a pregnancy starting and ending between 2004 and 2010, (Denmark, 2004–2009; Norway, 2005–2010; Emilia Romagna, 2008–2010), which ended in a live or stillbirth, were identified. Prescriptions for antidiabetic medicines issued (UK) or dispensed (non-UK) during pregnancy and/or the year before or year after...

  14. Synthesis and antidiabetic activity of β-acetamido ketones

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    Xing-hua Zhang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the use of trifluoroacetic acid as a catalyst in the Dakin–West reaction for the synthesis of β-acetamido ketones. The method has several advantages such as requiring only mild conditions and a low concentration of catalyst. Screening of 19 β-acetamido ketones for antidiabetic activity in vitro showed that their activity as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR agonists and as dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-IV inhibitors was fairly weak.

  15. Antidiabetic Properties of Germinated Brown Rice: A Systematic Review

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    Mustapha Umar Imam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diet is an important variable in the course of type 2 diabetes, which has generated interest in dietary options like germinated brown rice (GBR for effective management of the disease among rice-consuming populations. In vitro data and animal experiments show that GBR has potentials as a functional diet for managing this disease, and short-term clinical studies indicate encouraging results. Mechanisms for antidiabetic effects of GBR due to bioactive compounds like γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, γ-oryzanol, dietary fibre, phenolics, vitamins, acylated steryl β-glucoside, and minerals include antihyperglycemia, low insulin index, antioxidative effect, antithrombosis, antihypertensive effect, hypocholesterolemia, and neuroprotective effects. The evidence so far suggests that there may be enormous benefits for diabetics in rice-consuming populations if white rice is replaced with GBR. However, long-term clinical studies are still needed to verify these findings on antidiabetic effects of GBR. Thus, we present a review on the antidiabetic properties of GBR from relevant preclinical and clinical studies, in order to provide detailed information on this subject for researchers to review the potential of GBR in combating this disease.

  16. Antidiabetic and anticancer activities of Mangifera indica cv. Okrong leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganogpichayagrai, Aunyachulee; Palanuvej, Chanida; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes and cancer are a major global public health problem. Plant-derived agents with undesirable side-effects were required. This study aimed to evaluate antidiabetic and anticancer activities of the ethanolic leaf extract of Mangifera indica cv. Okrong and its active phytochemical compound, mangiferin. Antidiabetic activities against yeast α-glucosidase and rat intestinal α-glucosidase were determined using 1 mM of p-nitro phenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside as substrate. Inhibitory activity against porcine pancreatic α-amylase was performed using 1 mM of 2-chloro-4 nitrophenol-α-D-maltotroside-3 as substrate. Nitrophenol product was spectrophotometrically measured at 405 nm. Anticancer activity was evaluated against five human cancer cell lines compared to two human normal cell lines using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Mango leaf extract and mangiferin exhibited dose-dependent inhibition against yeast α-glucosidase with the IC50 of 0.0503 and 0.5813 mg/ml, respectively, against rat α-glucosidase with the IC50 of 1.4528 and 0.4333 mg/ml, respectively, compared to acarbose with the IC50 of 11.9285 and 0.4493 mg/ml, respectively. For anticancer activity, mango leaf extract, at ≥200 μg/ml showed cytotoxic potential against all tested cancer cell lines. In conclusion, mango leaf possessed antidiabetic and anticancer potential in vitro. PMID:28217550

  17. Antidiabetic Flavonol Glycosides from Eryngium caeruleum

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    Attiq Ur Rehman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical investigation of the aerial parts of Eryngium caeruleum led to the isolation of two new source flavone glycosides (1 and 2. The structures of these compounds were determined with the help of one- and two-dimensional (1D- and 2D- NMR techniques including 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, HMQC, HMBC, 1H- 1H COSY, and NOESY experiments. The compounds were studied for their in vitro aldose reductase (ALR1 and ALR2 and glucosidase (α and β inhibitory activities, and antiglycation potential. Both the compounds showed higher inhibition potential against ALR1 than ALR2. Compound 2 showed three fold higher potency against ALR2 than the reference drug Sorbinil. In silico studies were performed to understand the binding mechanism of these compounds to aldose reductase .

  18. Metabolic effects of various antidiabetic and hypolipidaemic agents on a high-fat diet and multiple low-dose streptozocin (MLDS) mouse model of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulmozhi, Dakshinamoorty Kandasamy; Kurian, Rubin; Bodhankar, Subodh L; Veeranjaneyulu, Addepalli

    2008-09-01

    Insulin resistance and subsequent insulin secretory defect are two main features of type 2 diabetes and associated metabolic disorders. The animal models of type 2 diabetes are very complex and are as heterogeneous as the disease. We have evaluated the effect of various antidiabetic and lipid lowering agents (fenofibrate, rosiglitazone, glimepiride, metformin and simvastatin) on the metabolic abnormalities induced by combining a high-fat diet and multiple low-dose streptozocin (MLDS) in mice. Male Swiss albino mice were orally treated with the above agents and fed with a diet containing high fat for 28 days. On day 15 the animals were injected intraperitoneally with low-dose streptozocin (40 mg kg(-1)), which was administered for five consecutive days. At the end of the 28-day treatment plasma metabolic parameters (glucose, triglyceride and immunoreactive insulin) were estimated. The antidiabetic and hypolipidaemic agents exhibited differential effects on these metabolic parameters. With the exception of fenofibrate all these agents reduced the plasma glucose levels, and the effects of metformin and rosiglitazone on glucose were found to be statistically significant. Although the effect of the test drugs on cholesterol was modest, a significant decrease in triglyceride levels was observed with sub-chronic treatment with these agents. Interestingly, glimepiride mildly elevated the insulin levels while the other antidiabetics and hypolipidaemics reduced the insulin levels, with metformin and rosiglitazone exhibiting statistically significant effects on insulin. To our knowledge this is the first report on the effect of various peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor modulators and newer antidiabetics on the metabolic effects induced by the combined high-fat diet and MLDS model of type 2 diabetes in Swiss albino mice. The results suggested the complexity of the hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia and hypertriglyceridaemia induced by the high-fat diet and MLDS mouse

  19. Simultaneous Quantification of Antidiabetic Agents in Human Plasma by a UPLC-QToF-MS Method.

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    Mariana Millan Fachi

    Full Text Available An ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantification of chlorpropamide, glibenclamide, gliclazide, glimepiride, metformin, nateglinide, pioglitazone, rosiglitazone, and vildagliptin in human plasma was developed and validated, using isoniazid and sulfaquinoxaline as internal standards. Following plasma protein precipitation using acetonitrile with 1% formic acid, chromatographic separation was performed on a cyano column using gradient elution with water and acetonitrile, both containing 0.1% formic acid. Detection was performed in a quadrupole time-of-flight analyzer, using electrospray ionization operated in the positive mode. Data from validation studies demonstrated that the new method is highly sensitive, selective, precise (RSD 0.99, free of matrix and has no residual effects. The developed method was successfully applied to volunteers' plasma samples. Hence, this method was demonstrated to be appropriate for clinical monitoring of antidiabetic agents.

  20. Antidiabetic and Free Radicals Scavenging Potential of Euphorbia hirta Flower Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Malhotra, R; Kumar, D

    2010-07-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate antidiabetic and in vitro free radicals scavenging effects of flower extract of Euphorbia hirta. The ethanolic and petroleum ether extracts (250 and 500 mg/kg) were orally tested for 21 days in alloxan induced diabetic mice and blood glucose level was measured with glucometer. Administration of extract resulted in significant reduction in serum cholesterol, triglycerides, creatinine, urea, alkaline phosphatase levels but high density lipoprotein levels and total proteins were found to be increased after treatments. Free radicals scavenging effect of ethanolic extract was also evaluated by various antioxidant assays, including 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl free radical scavenging activity, superoxide anion radical scavenging, nitric oxide scavenging, and reducing power assay. It was compared with standard antioxidants compounds such as butylated hydroxyl anisole and ascorbic acid. All the extracts showed antioxidant activity in all the tested methods.

  1. Diabetic Complications and Insight into Antidiabetic Potentialities of Ethno-medicinal Plants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Muhammad; Iqbal, Muhammad Sarfaraz; Shah, Syed Bilal; Rasheed, Tahir; Iqbal, Hafiz M N

    2018-02-21

    The naturally inspired treatment options for several disease conditions and human-health related disorders such as diabetes mellitus have gained considerable research interest. In this context, naturally occurring plants and herbs with medicinal functionalities have gained special place than ever before in the current medicinal world. The objective of this review is to extend the current knowledge in the clinical field related to the diabetic complications. A special focus has also been given to the anti-diabetic potentialities of ethnomedicinal plants. Herein, we reviewed and compiled salient information from the authentic bibliographic databases including PubMed, Scopus, Elsevier, Springer, Bentham Science and other scientific databases. The patents were searched and reviewed from http://www.freepatentsonline.com. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disorders associated with the endocrine system that resulted in hyperglycemic conditions. Metabolic disorders can cause many complications such as neuropathy, retinopathy, nephropathy, ischemic heart disease, stroke, and microangiopathy. Traditional botanical therapies have been used around the world to treat diabetes. Among several medications and different medicines, various herbs are known to cure and control diabetes; also have no side effects. History has shown that medicinal plants have long been used for traditional healing around the world to treat diabetes. More than 800 plants around the world are shown by ethnobotanical information as traditional remedies for the treatment of diabetes. Several parts of these plants have been evaluated and appreciated for hypoglycemic activity. Medicinal plants have been found to be more effective than conventional drug compounds with no/fewer side effects and relatively inexpensive. In this review paper, we have reviewed plants with anti-diabetic and related beneficial medicinal effects. This review may be helpful for researchers, diabetic patient and decision makers

  2. An antidiabetic polyherbal phytomedicine confers stress resistance and extends lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathor, Laxmi; Pant, Aakanksha; Awasthi, Harshika; Mani, Dayanandan; Pandey, Rakesh

    2017-02-01

    An Ayurvedic polyherbal extract (PHE) comprising six herbs viz. Berberis aristata, Cyperus rotundus, Cedrus deodara, Emblica officinalis, Terminalia chebula and Terminalia bellirica is mentioned as an effective anti-hyperglycemic agent in 'Charaka Samhita', the classical text of Ayurveda. Previously, antidiabetic drug metformin was found to elicit antiaging effects and PHE was also found to exhibit antidiabetic effects in humans. Therefore, we screened it for its in vivo antioxidant antiaging effect on stress and lifespan using human homologous Caenorhabditis elegans model system. The effect on aging is evaluated by studying effect of PHE on mean survival in worms. The stress modulatory potential was assessed by quantification of intracellular ROS level, autofluorescent age pigment lipofuscin, oxidative and thermal stress assays. Additionally, stress response was quantified using gene reporter assays. The 0.01 µg/ml dose of PHE was able to enhance mean lifespan by 16.09% (P elegans. Furthermore, PHE treated worms demonstrated oxidative stress resistance in both wild type and stress hypersensitive mev-1 mutant along with upregulation of stress response genes sod-3 and gst-4. The delayed aging under stress can be attributed to its direct reactive oxygen species-scavenging activity and regulation of some age associated genes like daf-2, daf-16, skn-1, sod-3 and gst-4 in wild-type worms. Additonally, PHE delayed age related paralysis phenotype in CL4176 transgenic worms. Altogether, our results suggest PHE significantly improves the oxidative stress and life span in C. elegans. Overall the present study suggests this polyherbal formulation might play important role in regultaing aging and related complications like diabetes.

  3. Optimization and development of antidiabetic phytosomes by the Box-Behnken design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathee, Sushila; Kamboj, Anjoo

    2018-06-01

    Researchers have extensively reviewed on herbs and natural products for their marked clinical efficacy in some recent years, however, maximum of the newly discovered bioactive constituents offer poor bioavailability due to their large size molecules or to their poor miscibility with oils and lipids, thereby limiting their ability to pass across the lipid-rich outer membranes of the enterocytes of the small intestine. Phytosomes are more bioavailable as compared to herbal extracts owing to their enhanced capacity to cross the bio-membranes and thus reaching the systemic circulation. This study was aimed to investigate the development and optimization of antidiabetic phytosomes using a three-factor, three-level the Box-Behnken design (17 batches). The fruits of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Momordica balsamina and Momordica dioica were extracted using Soxhlet's apparatus. The phytochemical fingerprint profile of the combined methanolic extracts was done by using high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC). The polynomial quadratic equation analysis was designed to study the response (entrapment efficiency (EE), % yield) of independent significant factors at different levels. Phytosomes were characterized in terms of drug content, particle size, EE, zeta potential and in vitro dissolution. TEM analysis revealed good stability and a spherical, self-closed structure of phytosomes in complex formulations. Average particle size was found to 450 nm. Total flavonoid content was found to be 10.0 ± 0.002 μg/g. Optimized formulation was selected and was prepared using A (1:3), B (60 °C) and C (2.5 h) to give maximum yield and entrapment efficiencies (72% and 92.1 ± 5.1%). Phytosomes were found to have antidiabetic activity comparable to metformin in low dose. HPTLC showed the presence of the phyto-constituent quercetin.

  4. Comparison of Antidiabetic Medications during the Treatment of Atherosclerosis in T2DM Patients

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    Xiaojie Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is often associated with arterial atherosclerosis in large blood vessels. We set out to elucidate whether commonly used antidiabetic drugs metformin, sitagliptin, and pioglitazone will reduce atherosclerosis in T2DM patients. We enrolled 176 individuals with type 2 diabetes, which were divided into four treatment groups according to different oral drugs: metformin alone, sitagliptin alone, pioglitazone alone, or combination of metformin and sitagliptin. We assessed changes in glycometabolism, lipid metabolism, cytokine released, and carotid artery intima-media thickness as the readout for improvement in atherosclerosis. HbA1c levels were significantly decreased in all treatment groups (p<0.05, and FBG levels were also decreased in metformin and combined groups (p<0.05. In addition, we found IL-6 levels significantly decreased in all treatment groups (p<0.05. Treatment with pioglitazone showed a significant increase in BMI, HDL, and ADPN levels (p<0.05. We also observed a significant decrease in NHDL levels in the combined treatment group (p<0.05. Our data revealed that in addition to hypoglycemic properties of metformin, sitagliptin, and pioglitazone, these drugs also have the potential to promote an anti-inflammatory response. Therefore, combination therapy may be more beneficial for reducing atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes. The clinical trial is registered with ChiCTR-ORC-17010835.

  5. Antidiabetic effects of natural plant extracts via inhibition of carbohydrate hydrolysis enzymes with emphasis on pancreatic alpha amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etxeberria, Usune; de la Garza, Ana Laura; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo; Milagro, Fermín I

    2012-03-01

    The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and the negative clinical outcomes observed with the commercially available anti-diabetic drugs have led to the investigation of new therapeutic approaches focused on controlling postprandrial glucose levels. The use of carbohydrate digestive enzyme inhibitors from natural resources could be a possible strategy to block dietary carbohydrate absorption with less adverse effects than synthetic drugs. This review covers the latest evidence regarding in vitro and in vivo studies in relation to pancreatic alpha-amylase inhibitors of plant origin, and presents bioactive compounds of phenolic nature that exhibit anti-amylase activity. Pancreatic alpha-amylase inhibitors from traditional plant extracts are a promising tool for diabetes treatment. Many studies have confirmed the alpha-amylase inhibitory activity of plants and their bioactive compounds in vitro, but few studies corroborate these findings in rodents and very few in humans. Thus, despite some encouraging results, more research is required for developing a valuable anti-diabetic therapy using pancreatic alpha-amylase inhibitors of plant origin.

  6. Evidence based herbal drug standardization approach in coping with challenges of holistic management of diabetes: a dreadful lifestyle disorder of 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Raman; Thakur, Pallavi; Chowdhry, Ayush; Jaiswal, Sarita; Sharma, Anamika; Goel, Rajeev; Sharma, Jyoti; Priyadarshi, Smruti Sagar; Kumar, Vinod; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Arora, Rajesh

    2013-07-04

    Plants by virtue of its composition of containing multiple constituents developed during its growth under various environmental stresses providing a plethora of chemical families with medicinal utility. Researchers are exploring this wealth and trying to decode its utility for enhancing health standards of human beings. Diabetes is dreadful lifestyle disorder of 21st century caused due to lack of insulin production or insulin physiological unresponsiveness. The chronic impact of untreated diabetes significantly affects vital organs. The allopathic medicines have five classes of drugs, or otherwise insulin in Type I diabetes, targeting insulin secretion, decreasing effect of glucagon, sensitization of receptors for enhanced glucose uptake etc. In addition, diet management, increased food fiber intake, Resistant Starch intake and routine exercise aid in managing such dangerous metabolic disorder. One of the key factors that limit commercial utility of herbal drugs is standardization. Standardization poses numerous challenges related to marker identification, active principle(s), lack of defined regulations, non-availability of universally acceptable technical standards for testing and implementation of quality control/safety standard (toxicological testing). The present study proposed an integrated herbal drug development & standardization model which is an amalgamation of Classical Approach of Ayurvedic Therapeutics, Reverse Pharmacological Approach based on Observational Therapeutics, Technical Standards for complete product cycle, Chemi-informatics, Herbal Qualitative Structure Activity Relationship and Pharmacophore modeling and, Post-Launch Market Analysis. Further studies are warranted to ensure that an effective herbal drug standardization methodology will be developed, backed by a regulatory standard guide the future research endeavors in more focused manner.

  7. Determination of in vitro antidiabetic effects of Zingiber officinale Roscoe

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    Naila Abdul Sattar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous extracts of Zingiber officinale rhizomes were studied to evaluate their antidiabetic effects on protein glycation and on the diffusion of glucose in vitro in the present study. Zingiber officinale rhizome aqueous extract were examined at concentrations of 5, 10, 20 and 40 g/L. The antidiabetic effects were found to be dose-dependent. Antidiabetic potential of Zingiber officinale was mainly through inhibition of the glucose diffusion and to a limited extent by reducing the glycation. However, further studies are needed to determine in vitro effects of therapeutic potential by restraining postprandial glucose absorptions and plasma protein glycations in diabetic subjects.Extratos aquosos de rizomas Zingiber officinale foram estudados para avaliar os seus efeitos antidiabéticos em glicação de proteínas e sobre a difusão de glicose in vitro, no presente estudo. Extratos aquosos de Zingiber officinale foram examinados nas concentrações de 5, 10, 20 e 40 g extrato de planta/L. Os efeitos antidiabéticos observados eram dependentes da dose. O potencial antidiabético de Zingiber officinale se verificou, principalmente, através da inibição da difusão de glicose e, em menor extensão, através da redução da glicação. Estudos adicionais são necessários para elucidar se efeitos in vitro representam potencial terapêutico, restringindo a absorção de glicose pós-prandial e a glicação de proteínas plasmáticas em indivíduos diabéticos.

  8. BRAF plus MEK-targeted drugs: a new standard of treatment for BRAF-mutant advanced melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queirolo, Paola; Spagnolo, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    BRAF plus MEK-targeted drugs have out-performed BRAF inhibitor monotherapy in three randomized phase 3 studies, and such combinations have become a new standard of treatment for BRAF-mutant advanced melanoma. With an overall response rate of about 70%, no other therapy in melanoma has shown a better response rate in late-phase clinical trials than combined BRAF and MEK inhibitors; the rapid kinetics of response make them the ideal front-line treatment for symptomatic, BRAF-mutant advanced melanoma patients. Nevertheless, the development of mechanisms of resistance limits the duration of response to such treatment in the majority of cases, with only about 20% of patients treated with the combination being progression-free at 3 years. The aim of this review is to report the efficacy and safety outcomes of the combination of BRAF plus MEK inhibitors compared with BRAF inhibitor monotherapy and immunotherapy, as well as to discuss future perspectives to improve outcomes based on current clinical and translational research studies.

  9. The Most Prevalnet Organism in Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Its Drug Sensitivity and Resistance to Different Standard Antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nageen, A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To find the most prevalent organism in diabetic foot ulcers and its drug sensitivity and resistance to different standard antibiotics. Study Design: Adescriptive and cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Ward 7, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Center, Karachi, from December 2010 to December 2012. Methodology: Ninety-five diabetic patients with infected foot wounds of Wegener grade 2 - 5 who had not received any previous antibiotics were included in the study by consecutive sampling. Pus culture specimen from wounds was taken and the organism isolated was identified. Also the most sensitive group of antibiotics and the most resistant one to that organism was noted. Results: Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent organism constituting 23.16% (n=22) of the organisms isolated; Escherichia coli with 17.89% (n=17) and Klebsiella with 12.63% (n=12) followed. Males presented more with diabetic foot (n=52) out of 95 patients. The most common age group affected was 41 - 60 years (73 patients). The organisms were most sensitive to Meropenem, effective in 90 (95%) patients and most resistant to Cotrimoxazole (80, 84% patients). Out of the 95 patients, 39 (41%) patients were hypertensive, 30 (31.5%) were obese and 14 (15%) were smokers. Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent organism overall irrespective to gender, age groups and co-morbidity of the patients. Conclusion: Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent organism in diabetic foot ulcers; the most effective antibiotic is Meropenem and least effective is Cotrimoxazole. (author)

  10. Individualized versus standardized risk assessment in patients at high risk for adverse drug reactions (IDrug) - study protocol for a pragmatic randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stingl, Julia Carolin; Kaumanns, Katharina Luise; Claus, Katrin; Lehmann, Marie-Louise; Kastenmüller, Kathrin; Bleckwenn, Markus; Hartmann, Gunther; Steffens, Michael; Wirtz, Dorothee; Leuchs, Ann-Kristin; Benda, Norbert; Meier, Florian; Schöffski, Oliver; Holdenrieder, Stefan; Coch, Christoph; Weckbecker, Klaus

    2016-04-26

    Elderly patients are particularly vulnerable to adverse drug reactions, especially if they are affected by additional risk factors such as multimorbidity, polypharmacy, impaired renal function and intake of drugs with high risk potential. Apart from these clinical parameters, drug safety and efficacy can be influenced by pharmacogenetic factors. Evidence-based recommendations concerning drug-gene-combinations have been issued by international consortia and in drug labels. However, clinical benefit of providing information on individual patient factors in a comprehensive risk assessment aiming to reduce the occurrence and severity of adverse drug reactions is not evident. Purpose of this randomized controlled trial is to compare the effect of a concise individual risk information leaflet with standard information on risk factors for side effects. The trial was designed as a prospective, two-arm, randomized, controlled, multicenter, pragmatic study. 960 elderly, multimorbid outpatients in general medicine are included if they take at least one high risk and one other long-term drug (polymedication). As high risk "index drugs" oral anticoagulants and antiplatelets were chosen because of their specific, objectively assessable side effects. Following randomization, test group patients receive an individualized risk assessment leaflet evaluating their personal data concerning bleeding- and thromboembolic-risk-scores, potential drug-drug-interactions, age, renal function and pharmacogenetic factors. Control group patients obtain a standardized leaflet only containing general information on these criteria. Follow-up period is 9 months for each patient. Primary endpoint is the occurrence of a thromboembolic/bleeding event or death. Secondary endpoints are other adverse drug reactions, hospital admissions, specialist referrals and medication changes due to adverse drug reactions, the patients' adherence to medication regimen as well as health related quality of life

  11. Nonadherence and factors affecting adherence of diabetic patients to anti-diabetic medication in Assela General Hospital, Oromia Region, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassahun, Ashebir; Gashe, Fanta; Mulisa, Eshetu; Rike, Wote Amelo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major global health problem covering approximately 347 million persons worldwide. Glycemic control has a main role in its management which mainly depends upon patient adherence to the treatment plan. Accurate assessment of medication adherence is necessary for effective management of diabetes. To assess nonadherence and factors affecting adherence of diabetic patients to anti-diabetic medication in Assela General Hospital (AGH), Oromia Region, Ethiopia. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on patients seeking anti-diabetic drug treatment and follow-up at AGH using structured questionnaire and reviewing the patient record card using check list from January 24, 2014 to February 7, 2014. Descriptive analysis was used to describe the percentages and number of distributions of the variables in the study; and association was identified for categorical data. P ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Of all respondents, 149 (52.3%) and 136 (47.7%) were female and male, respectively. The majority of the study participants 189 (66.3%) were in the age group of 30-60 years. Two-hundred nineteen (76.8%) of respondents were married currently. The majority, 237 (83.2%) of respondents did not have blood glucose self-monitoring equipment (glucometer). A total of 196 (68.8%) respondents were adhered to anti-diabetic medication. There was a significant association between adherence to the medication and side effect, level of education, monthly income and presence of glucometer at home (P diabetic medications with nonadherence rate of 31.2%. Different factors of medication nonadherence were identified such as side effect and complexity of regimen, failure to remember, and sociodemographic factors such as educational level and monthly income.

  12. Rediscovering medicinal plants' potential with OMICS: microsatellite survey in expressed sequence tags of eleven traditional plants with potent antidiabetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Jagajjit; Sen, Priyabrata; Choudhury, Manabendra Dutta; Dehury, Budheswar; Barooah, Madhumita; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Talukdar, Anupam Das

    2014-05-01

    Herbal medicines and traditionally used medicinal plants present an untapped potential for novel molecular target discovery using systems science and OMICS biotechnology driven strategies. Since up to 40% of the world's poor people have no access to government health services, traditional and folk medicines are often the only therapeutics available to them. In this vein, North East (NE) India is recognized for its rich bioresources. As part of the Indo-Burma hotspot, it is regarded as an epicenter of biodiversity for several plants having myriad traditional uses, including medicinal use. However, the improvement of these valuable bioresources through molecular breeding strategies, for example, using genic microsatellites or Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) or Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs)-derived SSRs has not been fully utilized in large scale to date. In this study, we identified a total of 47,700 microsatellites from 109,609 ESTs of 11 medicinal plants (pineapple, papaya, noyontara, bitter orange, bermuda brass, ratalu, barbados nut, mango, mulberry, lotus, and guduchi) having proven antidiabetic properties. A total of 58,159 primer pairs were designed for the non-redundant 8060 SSR-positive ESTs and putative functions were assigned to 4483 unique contigs. Among the identified microsatellites, excluding mononucleotide repeats, di-/trinucleotides are predominant, among which repeat motifs of AG/CT and AAG/CTT were most abundant. Similarity search of SSR containing ESTs and antidiabetic gene sequences revealed 11 microsatellites linked to antidiabetic genes in five plants. GO term enrichment analysis revealed a total of 80 enriched GO terms widely distributed in 53 biological processes, 17 molecular functions, and 10 cellular components associated with the 11 markers. The present study therefore provides concrete insights into the frequency and distribution of SSRs in important medicinal resources. The microsatellite markers reported here markedly add to the genetic

  13. Anti-diabetic properties of Momordica charantia L. polysaccharide in alloxan-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Shan, Bin; Liao, Cai-Hu; Xie, Jian-Hua; Wen, Ping-Wei; Shi, Jia-Yi

    2015-11-01

    A water-soluble polysaccharide (MCP) was isolated from the fruits of Momordica charantia L., and the hypoglycemic effects of MCP were investigated in both normal healthy and alloxan-induced diabetic mice. MCP was orally administered once a day after 3 days of alloxan-induction at 100, 200 and 300mg/kg body weight for 28 day. Results showed that fasting blood glucose level (BGL) was significantly decreased, whereas the glucose tolerance was marked improvement in alloxan-induced diabetic mice, and loss in body weight was also prevented in diabetic mice compared to the diabetic control group. The dosage of 300mg/kg body weight exhibited the best effects. In addition, MCP did not exhibit any toxic symptoms in the limited toxicity evaluation in mice. The results suggest that MCP possess significantly dose-dependent anti-diabetic activity on alloxan-induced diabetic mice. Hence, MCP can be incorporated as a supplement in health-care food, drugs and/or combined with other hypoglycemic drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Anti-Diabetic Effects of Madecassic Acid and Rotundic Acid

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    Yuan-Man Hsu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Anti-diabetic effects of madecassic acid (MEA and rotundic acid (RA were examined. MEA or RA at 0.05% or 0.1% was supplied to diabetic mice for six weeks. The intake of MEA, not RA, dose-dependently lowered plasma glucose level and increased plasma insulin level. MEA, not RA, intake dose-dependently reduced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and fibrinogen level; as well as restored antithrombin-III and protein C activities in plasma of diabetic mice. MEA or RA intake decreased triglyceride and cholesterol levels in plasma and liver. Histological data agreed that MEA or RA intake lowered hepatic lipid droplets, determined by ORO stain. MEA intake dose-dependently declined reactive oxygen species (ROS and oxidized glutathione levels, increased glutathione content and maintained the activity of glutathione reductase and catalase in the heart and kidneys of diabetic mice. MEA intake dose-dependently reduced interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels in the heart and kidneys of diabetic mice. RA intake at 0.1% declined cardiac and renal levels of these inflammatory factors. These data indicated that MEA improved glycemic control and hemostatic imbalance, lowered lipid accumulation, and attenuated oxidative and inflammatory stress in diabetic mice. Thus, madecassic acid could be considered as an anti-diabetic agent.

  15. Characterization of the Antidiabetic Role of Parkinsonia aculeata (Caesalpineaceae

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    Ana Catarina Rezende Leite

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the characterization of the antidiabetic role of a hydroethanolic extract from Parkinsonia aerial parts (HEPA, in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats, treated with HEPA (125 and 250 mg/kg; p.o.. Oral glucose tolerance test, acute oral toxicity test and preliminary phytochemical analyses were performed. The diabetic rats treated with HEPA showed a significant reduction in serum and urinary glucose, urinary urea and triglyceride levels, as compared to the diabetic untreated group. However, in the normal treated groups, a significant reduction was found only in serum triglyceride levels. In all treated diabetic groups, an improvement in hepatic glycogen was observed, as well as a decrease in liquid intake and urinary volume, and an enhancement in the weight of skeletal muscles (soleus and extensor digitorum longus, kidneys and epididymal adipose tissue. Nevertheless, body and liver weights were ameliorated only in the diabetic group treated with HEPA (250 mg/kg. Moreover, oral glucose tolerance was higher in animals treated with HEPA, while results also showed that HEPA could be considered toxicologically safe. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of tanins, flavonoids and steroids in HEPA. In conclusion, P. aculeata presents an antidiabetic activity and other beneficial effects that ameliorate diabetes and associated complications.

  16. Trigonelline and vildagliptin antidiabetic effect: improvement of insulin signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldakinah, Amat-Alrazaq A; Al-Shorbagy, Muhammad Y; Abdallah, Dalaal M; El-Abhar, Hanan S

    2017-07-01

    Trigonelline (TRG) is known to have an antidiabetic efficacy; however, its mechanism is not entirely elucidated. Hence, its effect on insulin signaling, besides its effectiveness in combination with vildagliptin (VLD) in a Type 2 diabetes model has been tested. TRG (50 mg/kg; p.o) lowered serum glucose, fructosamine, insulin, and HOMA-IR index and increased insulin sensitivity in soleus muscle via augmenting insulin receptor autophosphorylation (IR-PH), pT308-Akt, and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). Additionally, it reduced muscle advanced glycation end products and lipid peroxides with increased glutathione. TRG showed an anti-lipidemic effect lowering serum and/or muscle total cholesterol, triglycerides, and FFAs to decrease body weight, and visceral/epididymal indices. Furthermore, VLD (3 and 10 mg/kg, p.o) increased IR-PH, pT308-Akt, and GLUT4 to improve insulin signaling. The combined effect of TRG with the low dose of VLD was mostly confined to the reduction of the aberrant lipid profile. The beneficial effect of TRG on insulin sensitivity and glucose/ lipid homeostasis is mediated by the enhancement of the insulin signaling and antioxidant property. Moreover, the positive impact of VLD on pT308-Akt is an integral part in insulin signaling, and hence its antidiabetic effect. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  17. Biospectroscopy for studying the influences of anti-diabetic metals (V, Cr, Mo, and W) to the insulin signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safitri, Anna; Levina, Aviva; Lee, Joonsup; Carter, Elizabeth A.; Lay, Peter A.

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of diabetes, particularly with respect to type 2 diabetes, has reached epidemic proportions and continues to grow worldwide. One of the potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of type 2 diabetes involves the role of protein tyrosine phosphatases in the negative regulation of insulin signaling. The complexes of V(V/IV), Cr(III), W(VI), and Mo(VI), have all been proposed as possible drugs in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Anti-diabetic activities of V(V/IV), Cr(III), Mo(VI), and W(VI) compounds are likely to be based on similar mechanisms, which involve phosphorylation/dephosphorylation reactions in the glucose uptake and metabolism. In order to clearly understand biological activities and phosphorylation/dephosphorylation reactions involved in anti-diabetic actions of Cr(III), V(V/IV), Mo(VI), and W(VI) complexes, the current research involves the use of cultured insulin-sensitive cells treated with these compounds. These reactions were investigated through vibrational spectroscopy. Protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation induced conformational changes in secondary protein structure from α-helix to β-sheet, and these changes were detected by the IR spectra, which showed changes in the wavenumber and intensities of signals within the composite protein amide I band.

  18. Antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and hepatoprotective effects of Arctium lappa root’s hydro-alcoholic extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin induced type 2 model of diabetes in male mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Heidari, Hamid; Oroojan, Ali Akbar; Mirzavandi, Farhang; Nasr Esfehani, Khalil; Dehghan Mohammadi, Zeinab

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Arctium lappa (burdock), (A. lappa) root has hypoglycemic and antioxidative effects, and has been used for treatment of diabetes in tradition medicine. This study was conducted to evaluate the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic properties of A. lappa root extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin (NA-STZ)-induced type2 diabetes in mice. Materials and Methods: In this investigation, 70 adult male NMRI mice (30-35g) randomly divided into 7 groups (n=10) as follow: 1-control, 2-type 2 diabetic mice, 3-diabetic mice that received glibenclamide (0.25 mg/kg) as an anti-diabetic drug, 4, 5, 6 and 7- diabetic and normal animals that were pre-treated with 200 and 300 mg/kg A. lappa root extract, respectively, for 28 days. Diabetes has been induced by intraperitoneal injection of NA and STZ. Finally, the blood sample was taken and insulin, glucose, SGOT, SGPT, alkaline phosphatase, leptin and lipid levels was evaluated. Results: Induction of diabetes decreased the level of insulin, leptin and high density lipoprotein (HDL) and increased the level of other lipids, glucose, and hepatic enzymes significantly (plappa root extract, at specific doses, has an anti-diabetic effect through its hypolipidemic and insulinotropic properties. Hence, this plant extract may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetes. PMID:28348972

  19. Antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and hepatoprotective effects ofArctium lapparoot's hydro-alcoholic extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin induced type 2 model of diabetes in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Heidari, Hamid; Oroojan, Ali Akbar; Mirzavandi, Farhang; Nasr Esfehani, Khalil; Dehghan Mohammadi, Zeinab

    2017-01-01

    Arctium lappa (burdock), (A. lappa) root has hypoglycemic and antioxidative effects, and has been used for treatment of diabetes in tradition medicine. This study was conducted to evaluate the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic properties of A. lappa root extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin (NA-STZ)-induced type2 diabetes in mice. In this investigation, 70 adult male NMRI mice (30-35g) randomly divided into 7 groups (n=10) as follow: 1-control, 2-type 2 diabetic mice, 3-diabetic mice that received glibenclamide (0.25 mg/kg) as an anti-diabetic drug, 4, 5, 6 and 7- diabetic and normal animals that were pre-treated with 200 and 300 mg/kg A. lappa root extract, respectively, for 28 days. Diabetes has been induced by intraperitoneal injection of NA and STZ. Finally, the blood sample was taken and insulin, glucose, SGOT, SGPT, alkaline phosphatase, leptin and lipid levels was evaluated. Induction of diabetes decreased the level of insulin, leptin and high density lipoprotein (HDL) and increased the level of other lipids, glucose, and hepatic enzymes significantly (plappa root extract, at specific doses, has an anti-diabetic effect through its hypolipidemic and insulinotropic properties. Hence, this plant extract may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetes.

  20. Anti Diabetic Drug Utilization by Elderly Patients in a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The range, 2-3 drugs per prescription was mostly encountered for patients aged 50-59 years, while 4-5 drugs per prescription was most common among patients older than 65 years. Metformin was the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic medication for the patients followed by glimepiride (52.8%) (highest within age ...

  1. Anti-diabetic effect of methanolic leaf extract of Pongamia pinnata on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraju Kavipriya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the anti-diabetic effect of methanolic leaf extract of Pongamia pinnata (P. pinnata on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Methods: Anti-diabetic activity of P. pinnata leaf extract at dosage of 500 mg/kg and 1 g/kg body weight was evaluated. Results: The levels of glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase were significantly increased in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats when compared to that of the normal rats. After supplemented with plant extract, significant lower blood glucose level was recorded. Conclusions: The methanolic leaf extract of P. pinnata has been potent anti-diabetic effect in male albino rats.

  2. Arylalkylamine vanadium salts as new anti-diabetic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzano, Antonio; Palacín, Manuel; Marti, Luc; García-Vicente, Silvia

    2009-04-01

    Vanadium compounds show insulin-like effects in vivo and in vitro. Several clinical studies have shown the efficacy of vanadium compounds in type 2 diabetic subjects. However, a major concern is safety, which calls for the development of more potent vanadium compounds. For that reason different laboratories develop strategies to decrease the therapeutic dose of vanadate. One of these strategies use substrates of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO)/vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1), a bifunctional protein with amine oxidase activity and adhesive properties implicated in lymphocyte homing at inflammation sites. Substrates of SSAO combined with low concentrations of vanadate strongly stimulate glucose transport and GLUT4 glucose transporter recruitment to the plasma membrane in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and in rat adipocytes. This combination also shows anti-diabetic effects in various animal models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Benzylamine/vanadate administration generates peroxovanadium locally in pancreatic islets, which stimulates insulin secretion, and also produces peroxovanadium in adipose tissue, thereby activating glucose metabolism in adipocytes and in neighboring muscle. This opens up the possibility of using the SSAO/VAP-1 activity as a local generator of protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors in anti-diabetic therapy. More recently a novel class of arylalkylaminevanadium salts have shown potent insulin-mimetic effects downstream of the insulin receptor. Administration of these compounds lowers glycemia and normalizes the plasma lipid profile in type 1 and type 2 models of diabetes. The combination of different approaches to decrease vanadium doses, among them chelating agents and SSAO substrates, should permit to develop safe and efficient vanadium based agents safe for diabetes treatment.

  3. Antidiabetic Medicinal Plants Used by the Basotho Tribe of Eastern Free State: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatai Oladunni Balogun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM belongs to the group of five leading important diseases causing death globally and remains a major health problem in Africa. A number of factors such as poverty, poor eating habit, and hormonal imbalance are responsible for the occurrence of the disease. It poses a major health challenge in Africa continent today and the prevalence continues to increase at an alarming rate. Various treatment options particularly the usage of herbs have been effective against diabetes because they have no adverse effects. Interestingly, South Africa, especially the Basotho tribe, is blessed with numerous medicinal plants whose usage in the treatment of DM has been effective since the conventional drugs are expensive and often unaffordable. The present study attempted to update the various scientific evidence on the twenty-three (23 plants originating from different parts of the world but widely used by the Sotho people in the management of DM. Asteraceae topped the list of sixteen (16 plant families and remained the most investigated according to this review. Although limited information was obtained on the antidiabetic activities of these plants, it is however anticipated that government parastatals and scientific communities will pay more attention to these plants in future research.

  4. In vitro antidiabetic activity of various crude extracts of Boletus variipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniandy, Sutha; Fazry, Shazrul; Daud, Fauzi; Senafi, Sahidan

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disease that progressively spread worldwide and difficult to treat due to various physical and metabolic complications. Current treatment using synthetic drugs has lead to various undesirable side effects. Here we determined the effect of Boletus variipes extracts on diabetes related enzymes. In this study, hot water, cold water and methanol extracts of B. variipes were utilized in order to assess their in vitro antidiabetic activity by measuring the effect on α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzyme. Hot water extract possessed the highest inhibition activity of α-amylase and α-glucosidase in a concentration dependent manner with the IC50 value 87 mg/mL and 89 mg/mL respectively. The methanol extract also showed inhibition activity of α-amylase and α-glucosidase but significantly lower than the hot water extract. Whereas cold water extract did not show any inhibition activity towards both the enzymes. Therefore, it is hypothesized that the hot water extract of Boletus variipes contains bioactive compound that can inhibit alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase enzyme activity. At the request of all authors of the paper an updated version was published on 11 May 2016. The original version identified the species of mushroom as Boletus variipes, but new findings have proved the species of mushroom to be Boletus qriseipurpureus. The species name has been updated throughout the revised version of this paper.

  5. Anti-diabetic rosiglitazone remodels the adipocyte transcriptome by redistributing transcription to PPARγ-driven enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Step, Sonia E; Lim, Hee-Woong; Marinis, Jill M; Prokesch, Andreas; Steger, David J; You, Seo-Hee; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2014-05-01

    Rosiglitazone (rosi) is a powerful insulin sensitizer, but serious toxicities have curtailed its widespread clinical use. Rosi functions as a high-affinity ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), the adipocyte-predominant nuclear receptor (NR). The classic model, involving binding of ligand to the NR on DNA, explains positive regulation of gene expression, but ligand-dependent repression is not well understood. We addressed this issue by studying the direct effects of rosi on gene transcription using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq). Rosi-induced changes in gene body transcription were pronounced after 10 min and correlated with steady-state mRNA levels as well as with transcription at nearby enhancers (enhancer RNAs [eRNAs]). Up-regulated eRNAs occurred almost exclusively at PPARγ-binding sites, to which rosi treatment recruited coactivators, including MED1, p300, and CBP. In contrast, transcriptional repression by rosi involved a loss of coactivators from eRNA sites devoid of PPARγ and enriched for other transcription factors, including AP-1 factors and C/EBPs. Thus, rosi activates and represses transcription by fundamentally different mechanisms that could inform the future development of anti-diabetic drugs.

  6. Trends and Determinants of Oral Anti-Diabetic Initiation in Youth with Suspected Type 2 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Cai

    Full Text Available To evaluate trends and identify predictors of treatment initiation of oral anti-diabetic drugs (OAD in youth.We identified a select population of children, ages 8-18 years, with at least 13 months of continuous health plan coverage within the years 2001-2012 in a large US commercial insurance claims database. New use of an OAD was defined as the first claim for an outpatient dispensing following a 12-month wash out period. Treatment incidence was estimated monthly over the study period, and stratified by age, gender, geographic region, and provider specialty.The median size of the source population during the study period was 2.2 million children. A total of 13,824 initiators (mean monthly incidence of 4.6 (95% CI = 3.6, 5.5 per 100,000 youths were identified. Initiators were more likely to be females, age 15-18, from the southern region, and have visited a family practitioner (versus a general pediatrician prior to initiation. Time trends demonstrate a 43% increase in initiation from 2002-2012, with a gradual decrease starting from early 2008.Incidence of filled OAD medications in youth increased over time, especially for patients treated by family practitioners. Additional research is needed into factors influencing prescribing by family practitioners and pediatricians.

  7. Bioactivity screening of microalgae for antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, anti-diabetes and antibacterial activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eLauritano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Marine microalgae are considered a potentially new and valuable source of biologically active molecules for applications in the food industry as well as in the pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and cosmetic sectors. They can be easily cultured, have short generation times and enable an environmentally-friendly approach to drug discovery by overcoming problems associated with the over-utilization of marine resources and the use of destructive collection practices. In this study, 21 diatoms, 7 dinoflagellates and 4 flagellate species were grown in three different culturing conditions and the corresponding extracts were tested for possible antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, anti-diabetes, antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities. In addition, for two diatoms we also tested two different clones to disclose diversity in clone bioactivity. Six diatom species displayed specific anti-inflammatory, anticancer (blocking human melanoma cell proliferation and anti-biofilm (against the bacteria Staphylococcus epidermidis activities whereas, none of the other microalgae were bioactive against the conditions tested for. Furthermore, none of the 6 diatom species tested were toxic on normal human cells. Culturing conditions (i.e. nutrient starvation conditions greatly influenced bioactivity of the majority of the clones/species tested. This study denotes the potential of diatoms as sources of promising bioactives for the treatment of human pathologies.

  8. PIXE analysis of some anti-diabetic medicinal plants in Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olabanji, S.O. [ICTP Fellow on sabbatical leave from Centre for Energy Research and Development, Obafemi Awolowo University, lIe-lfe (Nigeria); Omobuwajo, O.R.; Adebajo, A.C. [Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Obafemi Awolowo University, lIe-lfe (Nigeria); Ceccato, D. [Dipartmento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Buoso, M.C.; Moschini, G., E-mail: skayode2002@yahoo.co.uk [lstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), Padova (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: Diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disease characterized by high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) due to defects in insulin secretion, or action, or both. It is a dangerous disease leading to death of many people in the world. Some of the medicinal plants implicated in the herbal recipes for the treatment of diabetes in Nigeria have been reported{sup 1}. Additional medicinal plants used for the treatment of diabetes in Nigeria are presented in this work. These medicinal plants are becoming increasingly important and relevant as herbal drugs due to their use as antioxidants, neutraceuticals, food additives and supplements in combating diabetes. Elemental compositions of these anti-diabetic medicinal plants were determined using PIXE technique. The 1.8 MV collimated proton beam from the 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerator at Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) Legnaro (Padova) Italy was employed for the work. The results show the presence of twenty two elements at various concentrations in the medicinal plants. The leaves of Murraya, P amarus, O. gratissimum, O.subscopodica, P pellucida and the whole plant of B. diffusa, B. pinnalum and C. occidenlalis could be taken as vegetables, food additives, neutraceuticals and supplements in the management of diabetes. [1] S.O. Olabanji, OR Omobuwajo, D. Ceccato, A.C. Adebajo, M.C. Buoso, G. Moschini. Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. Sect. B 266 (2008) 2387 - 2390. (author)

  9. PIXE analysis of some anti-diabetic medicinal plants in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olabanji, S.O.; Omobuwajo, O.R.; Adebajo, A.C.; Ceccato, D.; Buoso, M.C.; Moschini, G.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disease characterized by high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) due to defects in insulin secretion, or action, or both. It is a dangerous disease leading to death of many people in the world. Some of the medicinal plants implicated in the herbal recipes for the treatment of diabetes in Nigeria have been reported 1 . Additional medicinal plants used for the treatment of diabetes in Nigeria are presented in this work. These medicinal plants are becoming increasingly important and relevant as herbal drugs due to their use as antioxidants, neutraceuticals, food additives and supplements in combating diabetes. Elemental compositions of these anti-diabetic medicinal plants were determined using PIXE technique. The 1.8 MV collimated proton beam from the 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerator at Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) Legnaro (Padova) Italy was employed for the work. The results show the presence of twenty two elements at various concentrations in the medicinal plants. The leaves of Murraya, P amarus, O. gratissimum, O.subscopodica, P pellucida and the whole plant of B. diffusa, B. pinnalum and C. occidenlalis could be taken as vegetables, food additives, neutraceuticals and supplements in the management of diabetes. [1] S.O. Olabanji, OR Omobuwajo, D. Ceccato, A.C. Adebajo, M.C. Buoso, G. Moschini. Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. Sect. B 266 (2008) 2387 - 2390. (author)

  10. Re-Training of Type 2 Diabetic Patients for Better Adherence to Diabetes Care Plan in Oral Anti-Diabetics and Plus Insulin Treatment Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner Cander

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This prospective observational single-centre study was designed to evaluate the effect of patient re-training for better adherence to regular self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG, standard diabetic diet and exercise program in ambulatory patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM receiving oral anti-diabetic (OAD and OAD plus insulin treatments. Material and Method: In this study, we enrolled a total of 61 patients with T2DM in whom ongoing therapy with OAD (n=34 and OAD+insulin (n=27 failed to achieve adequate glycemic control. The patients were educated for lifestyle behavior, adherence to diet and exercise therapy, close monitoring with SMBG without change in their ongoing drugs and dosing. Changes in glycemic parameters, serum lipids and anthropometrics at the end of 3rd month were compared between the treatment groups. Results: During the course of the study, a significant decrease in the body weight and fat were observed in OAD (p<0.001 and p=0.002 and OAD+insulin groups (p=0.044 and p=0.008, respectively. A significant decrease in the HbA1c % (6.1%; 8.2% to 7.6% was observed in the overall population (p<0.001 as well as in OAD (p=0.011 and OAD+insulin (p=0.001 groups. A significant decrease was noted in the post-prandial capillary blood glucose levels in only OAD+insulin group. Discussion: Re-training approach with close follow-up and frequent SMBG seems to be important factors for the maintenance of achieved glycemic control. In our study, the effect of diabetes education on postprandial capillary blood glucose levels was more pronounced in OAD+insulin group. Turk Jem 2015; 19: 49-54

  11. Impact of body weight on antidiabetic treatment and predictors of weight control under real-world conditions: a 2-year follow-up of DiaRegis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, B; Bramlage, P; Schneider, S; Tschöpe, D; Gitt, A K

    2015-12-01

    Treatment strategies for obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus aim to increase physical activity, reduce body weight, and improve glucose control using weight-beneficial antidiabetic drugs. The objective of this study was to determine whether these strategies are implemented, and to identify factors predictive of glucose control and body weight management in a large, real-world patient population. The prospective DiaRegis cohort study included 3807 patients with type 2 diabetes in whom the treating physician decided to intensify and optimize treatment because of insufficient glucose control. Antidiabetic treatment of overweight and obese patients was compared with that of normal-weight patients over a 2-years follow-up period, and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of body weight loss. Among the 3807 participants, 92.5 % were overweight or obese. Normal-weight participants were more often treated with sulfonylureas or insulin, and overweight and obese patients with metformin or glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 analogues. Predictors of weight loss were body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m(2) and any reported physical activity. DiaRegis study shows that under real-world conditions, antidiabetic drug therapy is performed dependent on body weight. This strategy results in adequate glucose control and moderate weight reductions in overweight and obese patients. Weight loss is affected by treatment with weight-beneficial drugs, but also by any reported physical activity. However, only a small subgroup of patients perform physical activity. Initiation and maintenance of a physically active lifestyle remains a significant challenge for physicians, and patients with type 2 diabetes.

  12. Fracture risk in patients with type 2 diabetes under different antidiabetic treatment regimens: a retrospective database analysis in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pscherer S

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available S Pscherer,1 K Kostev,2 FW Dippel,3 W Rathmann4 1Department of Diabetology, Klinikum Traunstein, Kliniken Südostbayern AG, Traunstein, 2Epidemiology Department, IMS Health, Frankfurt, 3Sanofi-Aventis Deutschland GmbH, Berlin, 4German Diabetes Center, Institute for Biometrics and Epidemiology, Leibniz Center for Diabetes Research at Heinrich Heine University, Düsseldorf, Germany Aim: Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of fractures. There are a few studies on the effects of diabetes treatment on fracture risk. The aim was to investigate the fracture risk related to various types of insulin therapy in primary care practices. Methods: Data from 105,960 type 2 diabetes patients from 1,072 general and internal medicine practices in Germany were retrospectively analyzed (Disease Analyzer database; 01/2000–12/2013. Fracture risk of the following therapies was compared using multivariate logistic regression models adjusting for age, sex, diabetes care, comorbidity, and glycemic control (HbAlc: 1 incident insulin therapy versus oral antidiabetic drugs, 2 basal-supported oral therapy versus supplementary insulin therapy versus conventional insulin therapy, and 3 insulin glargine versus insulin detemir versus NPH insulin. Results: There was a lower odds of having incident fractures in the oral antidiabetic drug group compared to incident insulin users, although not significant (odds ratio [OR]; 95% confidence interval: 0.87; 0.72–1.06. There were increased odds for conventional insulin therapy (OR: 1.59; 95% CI [confidence interval] 0.89–2.84 and supplementary insulin therapy (OR: 1.20; 0.63–2.27 compared to basal-supported oral therapy, which was not significant as well. Overall, there was no significant difference in fracture risk for basal insulins (glargine, detemir, NPH insulin. After a treatment duration ≥2 years, insulin glargine showed a lower odds of having ≥1 fracture compared to NPH users (OR: 0.78; 0.65–0

  13. Targeted proteins for diabetes drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan Trang Nguyen, Ngoc; Thi Le, Ly

    2012-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolism disorder characterized by high glucose in the bloodstream, especially in the case of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. Nowadays, it is very common in middle-aged people and involves such dangerous symptoms as increasing risk of stroke, obesity and heart failure. In Vietnam, besides the common treatment of insulin injection, some herbal medication is used but no unified optimum remedy for the disease yet exists and there is no production of antidiabetic drugs in the domestic market yet. In the development of nanomedicine at the present time, drug design is considered as an innovative tool for researchers to study the mechanisms of diseases at the molecular level. The aim of this article is to review some common protein targets involved in type 2 diabetes, offering a new idea for designing new drug candidates to produce antidiabetic drugs against type 2 diabetes for Vietnamese people.

  14. Targeted proteins for diabetes drug design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trang Nguyen, Ngoc Doan; Le, Ly Thi

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolism disorder characterized by high glucose in the bloodstream, especially in the case of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. Nowadays, it is very common in middle-aged people and involves such dangerous symptoms as increasing risk of stroke, obesity and heart failure. In Vietnam, besides the common treatment of insulin injection, some herbal medication is used but no unified optimum remedy for the disease yet exists and there is no production of antidiabetic drugs in the domestic market yet. In the development of nanomedicine at the present time, drug design is considered as an innovative tool for researchers to study the mechanisms of diseases at the molecular level. The aim of this article is to review some common protein targets involved in type 2 diabetes, offering a new idea for designing new drug candidates to produce antidiabetic drugs against type 2 diabetes for Vietnamese people. (review)

  15. Who benefits from additional drug counseling among prescription opioid-dependent patients receiving buprenorphine-naloxone and standard medical management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Roger D; Griffin, Margaret L; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Dodd, Dorian R; Dreifuss, Jessica A; Connery, Hilary S; Carroll, Kathleen M

    2014-07-01

    In the multi-site Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS), conducted within the National Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network, participants randomly assigned to receive individual drug counseling in addition to buprenorphine-naloxone and medical management did not have superior opioid use outcomes. However, research with other substance-dependent populations shows that subgroups of participants may benefit from a treatment although the entire population does not. We conducted a secondary analysis of POATS data to determine whether a subgroup of participants benefited from drug counseling in addition to buprenorphine-naloxone and medical management, either due to greater problem severity or more exposure to counseling as a result of greater treatment adherence. Problem severity was measured by a history of heroin use, higher Addiction Severity Index drug composite score, and chronic pain. Adequate treatment adherence was defined a priori as attending at least 60% of all offered sessions. Patients who had ever used heroin and received drug counseling were more likely to be successful (i.e., abstinent or nearly abstinent from opioids) than heroin users who received medical management alone, but only if they were adherent to treatment and thus received adequate exposure to counseling (OR=3.7, 95% CI=1.1-11.8, p=0.03). The association between severity and outcome did not vary by treatment condition for chronic pain or ASI drug severity score. These findings emphasize the importance of treatment adherence, and suggest that patients with prescription opioid dependence are a heterogeneous group, with different optimal treatment strategies for different subgroups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Intentional Weight Loss and Dose Reductions of Anti-Diabetic Medications – A Retrospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Anita Ashok; Palamaner Subash Shantha, Ghanshyam; Kahan, Scott; Samson, Rohit Joshua; Boddu, Nelson David; Cheskin, Lawrence Jay

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Intentional weight loss, primarily by improving insulin resistance, is known to decrease the need for anti-diabetic medications. In this study, we assess the magnitude of weight loss that resulted in dose reductions or discontinuation of anti-diabetic medications in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes (DM) undergoing weight loss treatment. METHODS: Case records of 50 overweight or obese patients with DM who successfully decreased dosage or discontinued diabet...

  17. Phyto-metals screening of selected anti-diabetic herbs and infused concoctions

    OpenAIRE

    Olanrewaju O. Olujimi; Olusegun N. Onifade; Adeleke T. Towolawi; Temilade F. Akinhanmi; Adeniyi A. Afolabi; Kabir A. Olanite

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the levels of some selected heavy metals in both the selected anti-diabetic herbal plants and infused concoctions for diabetes treatment. Methods: Ten anti-diabetic plant samples: pawpaw leaves (Carica papaya), bitter melon leaves (Momordica charantia), holy basil leaves (Ocimum sanctum), bitter leaf (Vernonia amygdalina), ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale), garlic (Allium sativum), African red pepper fruits (Capsicum frutescens), negro pepper grain (Xylopia aethi...

  18. Barriers and facilitators to adherence to anti-diabetic medications: Ethiopian patients’ perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Bruck M. Habte; Tedla Kebede; Teferi G. Fenta; Heather Boon

    2017-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the experiences of Ethiopian patients with type 2 diabetes related to adherence to their anti-diabetic medications. This may limit attempts to develop and implement patient-centred approaches that consider Ethiopian contexts.Objectives: To conduct an exploratory study with a focus on identifying barriers and facilitators to anti-diabetic medications adherence in Ethiopian patients with type 2 diabetes.Methods: Qualitative methods were used to conduct semi-str...

  19. Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) is a cornucopia of health: a review of its credited antidiabetic, anti-HIV, and antitumor properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, E F; Ng, T B

    2011-07-01

    Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia, BG) is both a nutritious and healthy food with a distinctive bitter flavor, and it is also widely exploited in folklore medicine. This review focuses on the efficacies and molecular mechanisms of BG-induced anti-diabetic, anti-HIV, and antitumor activities contributed by over twenty active components. The intent of this review is to provide comprehensive and valuable information for medicinal researchers, drug investigators, clinicians, and even patients with an interest in BG. In conclusion, BG is a cornucopia of health and it deserves in-depth investigations for clinical application in the future.

  20. Drug safety and the impact of drug warnings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostenkamp, G.; Fischer, K. E.; Borch-Johnsen, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyse the impact of drug safety warnings from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) on drug utilisation and their interaction with information released through national reimbursement bodies. Methods Insurance claims data on anti-diabetic drug prescriptions in primary care in Germany...... and Denmark were analysed using interrupted time series analysis, with EMA drug warnings for thiazolidinediones (TZDs) in 2007 and 2011 as the intervention. Monthly drug utilisation data per substance in defined daily dosages (DDD) consumed per 1000 insurees were retrieved from the Danish national drug...... prescriptions register and one large statutory sickness fund in Germany. Results TZDs were generally reimbursed in Germany but restricted to individual reimbursement in Denmark. Consequently, utilisation of TZDs was much higher in Germany in 2007 compared with Denmark. For rosiglitazone, the drug warning had...

  1. PIXE analysis of some Nigerian anti-diabetic medicinal plants (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olabanji, S.O.; Adebajo, A.C.; Omobuwajo, O.R.; Ceccato, D.; Buoso, M.C.; Moschini, G.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disease characterized by high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) due to defects in insulin secretion, or action, or both, is a debilitating disease leading to other complications and death of many people in the world. Some of the medicinal plants implicated in the herbal recipes for the treatment of diabetes in Nigeria have been reported. Additional medicinal plants used for the treatment of diabetes in Nigeria are presented in this work. These medicinal plants are becoming increasingly important and relevant as herbal drugs due to their use as antioxidants, nutraceuticals, food additives and supplements in combating diabetes. Elemental compositions of these anti-diabetic medicinal plants were determined using PIXE technique. The 1.8 MV collimated proton beam from the 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerator at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) Legnaro (Padova) Italy was employed for the work. The results show the detection of twenty-one elements which include Mg, P, Ca, K, Mn, Cu, Zn, S, Cr, Co, Ni and V that are implicated in the regulation of insulin and the control of the blood-sugar levels in the human body. The entire plant of Boerhavia diffusa, Securidaca longipedunculata stem, leaves of Peperomia pellucida, Macrosphyra longistyla, Olax subscorpioidea, Phyllanthus muerillanus, Jatropha gossypifolia, Cassia occidentalis, Phyllanthus amarus, and leaf and stem of Murraya koenigii, which have high concentrations of these elements could be recommended as vegetables, nutraceuticals, food additives, supplements and drugs in the control and management of diabetes, if toxicity profiles indicate that they are safe. However, significantly high contents of Al and Si in the entire plant of Bryophyllum pinnatum, and As, Cr, and Cu in Ocimum gratissimum leaf suggest that these plants should be avoided by diabetic patients to prevent complications

  2. PIXE analysis of some Nigerian anti-diabetic medicinal plants (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabanji, S. O.; Adebajo, A. C.; Omobuwajo, O. R.; Ceccato, D.; Buoso, M. C.; Moschini, G.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disease characterized by high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) due to defects in insulin secretion, or action, or both, is a debilitating disease leading to other complications and death of many people in the world. Some of the medicinal plants implicated in the herbal recipes for the treatment of diabetes in Nigeria have been reported. Additional medicinal plants used for the treatment of diabetes in Nigeria are presented in this work. These medicinal plants are becoming increasingly important and relevant as herbal drugs due to their use as antioxidants, nutraceuticals, food additives and supplements in combating diabetes. Elemental compositions of these anti-diabetic medicinal plants were determined using PIXE technique. The 1.8 MV collimated proton beam from the 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerator at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) Legnaro (Padova) Italy was employed for the work. The results show the detection of twenty-one elements which include Mg, P, Ca, K, Mn, Cu, Zn, S, Cr, Co, Ni and V that are implicated in the regulation of insulin and the control of the blood-sugar levels in the human body. The entire plant of Boerhavia diffusa, Securidaca longipedunculata stem, leaves of Peperomia pellucida, Macrosphyra longistyla, Olax subscorpioidea, Phyllanthus muerillanus, Jatropha gossypifolia, Cassia occidentalis, Phyllanthus amarus, and leaf and stem of Murraya koenigii, which have high concentrations of these elements could be recommended as vegetables, nutraceuticals, food additives, supplements and drugs in the control and management of diabetes, if toxicity profiles indicate that they are safe. However, significantly high contents of Al and Si in the entire plant of Bryophyllum pinnatum, and As, Cr, and Cu in Ocimum gratissimum leaf suggest that these plants should be avoided by diabetic patients to prevent complications.

  3. [Developing and standardizing experimental protocols using human iPS-derived cells to predict adverse drug reactions in pre-clinical safety studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekino, Yuko; Sato, Kaoru; Kanda, Yasunari; Ishida, Seiichi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have standardized experimental protocols to evaluate the possibility of using cells differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) in the pre-clinical studies for the drug approval processes. Cells differentiated from hiPSC, especially cardiomyocytes, neurons and hepatocytes, are expected to be used as new pharmacological and toxicological assay tools. Current preclinical test methods have limitations for predicting clinical adverse drug reactions. This is because of the so-called 'problem of species difference'. Drug-induced arrhythmia, cognitive impairment and hepatotoxicity which can't be predicted in pre-clinical studies are major causes of the high rate attrition of new-drug candidates in clinical studies and of withdrawal of products from the market. The development of new pre-clinical test methods using cells differentiated from hiPSCs would resolve these problems, in addition to solving the issue of "the replacement, refinement and reduction (3Rs)" of animal experiments. From 2010 to 2011, we surveyed companies belonging to the Japan Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association (JPMA) and academic researchers about the usage of differentiated cells in their laboratories. We found that studies were performed using differentiated cells from different cell lines of hiPSC with laboratory-specific differentiation methods. The cells were cultured in various conditions and their activities were measured using different methods. This resulted in a variety of pharmacological responses of the cells. It is therefore impossible to compare reproducibility and ensure reliability of experiments using these cells. To utilize the cells in the drug approval processes, we need robust, standardized test methods to accurately reproduce these methods in all laboratories. We will then be able to compare and analyze the obtained results. Based on the survey, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare funded our study. In our study, we standardize

  4. Something old, something new and something very old: drugs for treating type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, D; Oetjen, E

    2014-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus belongs to the most rapidly increasing diseases worldwide. Approximately 90-95% of these patients suffer from type 2 diabetes mellitus, which is characterized by peripheral insulin resistance and the progressive loss of beta-cell function and mass. Considering the complications of this chronic disease, a reliable anti-diabetic treatment is indispensable. An ideal oral anti-diabetic drug should not only correct glucose homeostasis but also preserve or even augment beta-cell function and mass, ameliorate the subclinical inflammation present under insulin-resistant conditions and prevent the macro- and microvascular consequences of diabetes in order to reduce the mortality. Despite the many anti-diabetic drugs already in use, there is an ongoing research for additional drugs, guided by different concepts of the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. This review will briefly summarize current oral anti-diabetic drugs. In addition, emerging strategies for the treatment of diabetes will be described, among them the inhibition of glucagon action and anti-inflammatory drugs. Their suitability as 'ideal anti-diabetic drugs' will be discussed. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Contribution to the standardization of the chromatographic conditions for the lipophilicity assessment of neutral and basic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giaginis, Costas [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografou, Athens 15771 (Greece); Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Street, Athens 11527 (Greece); Theocharis, Stamatios [Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Street, Athens 11527 (Greece); Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografou, Athens 15771 (Greece)]. E-mail: tsantili@pharm.uoa.gr

    2006-07-28

    The chromatographic conditions aiming to a better simulation of n-octanol-water partitioning using a base deactivated silica (BDS) column as stationary phase were investigated for structurally diverse basic and neutral drugs. Extrapolated retention factors log k{sub w}, determined using different methanol fractions as organic modifier, were considered as lipophilicity indices. The effect of n-decylamine and n-octanol as mobile phase additives was examined and the appropriateness of the final retention outcome to reproduce lipophilicity data was evaluated. Moreover, the influence of n-octanol on the linearity of the log k/methanol fraction relationship and on the uniformity of the retention mechanism was investigated. 1:1 correlation between log k{sub w} values and the logarithm of the distribution coefficient (log D) was established for basic drugs in presence of both n-decylamine and n-octanol as mobile phase additives. However, for neutral drugs n-decylamine proved to be a sufficient and more important factor than n-octanol.

  6. Antidiabetic Effects of Aronia melanocarpa and Its Other Therapeutic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Banjari

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a global pandemic which warrants urgent attention due to its rising prevalence and economic burden. Thus, many alternative therapies are being researched for antidiabetic properties, given the inefficacy of current medicinal treatments. From this perspective, Aronia melanocarpa or black chokeberry has been investigated for its therapeutic properties in many studies, especially for its ability to combat hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and the macrovascular complications of diabetes including cardiovascular disease. Though A. melanocarpa is native to the eastern areas of North America, it has been planted extensively in Europe and Asia as well. Several in vivo studies have displayed the antioxidant properties of A. melanocarpa berry juice and plant extract in rat models where oxidative stress markers were observed to have significant reductions. Some of the potent bioactive compounds present in the fruits and other parts of the plant were identified as (−-epicatechin, chlorogenic acid, neochlorogenic acid, and cyanidin-3-galactoside. Overall, A. melanocarpa could be considered a good source of antioxidants which is effective in combating hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress.

  7. Antidiabetic Indian Plants: A Good Source of Potent Amylase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menakshi Bhat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is known as a multifactorial disease. The treatment of diabetes (Type II is complicated due to the inherent patho-physiological factors related to this disease. One of the complications of diabetes is post-prandial hyperglycemia (PPHG. Glucosidase inhibitors, particularly α-amylase inhibitors are a class of compounds that helps in managing PPHG. Six ethno-botanically known plants having antidiabetic property namely, Azadirachta indica Adr. Juss.; Murraya koenigii (L. Sprengel; Ocimum tenuflorum (L. (syn: Sanctum; Syzygium cumini (L. Skeels (syn: Eugenia jambolana; Linum usitatissimum (L. and Bougainvillea spectabilis were tested for their ability to inhibit glucosidase activity. The chloroform, methanol and aqueous extracts were prepared sequentially from either leaves or seeds of these plants. It was observed that the chloroform extract of O. tenuflorum; B. spectabilis; M. koenigii and S. cumini have significant α-amylase inhibitory property. Plants extracts were further tested against murine pancreatic, liver and small intestinal crude enzyme preparations for glucosidase inhibitory activity. The three extracts of O. tenuflorum and chloroform extract of M. koenigi showed good inhibition of murine pancreatic and intestinal glucosidases as compared with acarbose, a known glucosidase inhibitor.

  8. Ex vivo susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Dakar, Senegal, to seven standard anti-malarial drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradines Bruno

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a result of widespread chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT (which includes artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine has been recommended as a first-line anti-malarial regimen in Senegal since 2006. Since then, there have been very few reports on the ex vivo susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs. To examine whether parasite susceptibility has been affected by the widespread use of ACT, the ex vivo susceptibility of local isolates was assessed at the military hospital of Dakar. Methods The ex vivo susceptibility of 93 P. falciparum isolates from Dakar was successfully determined using the Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH ELISA for the following drugs: chloroquine (CQ, quinine (QN, mefloquine (MQ, monodesethylamodiaquine (MDAQ, lumefantrine (LMF, dihydroartemisinin (DHA and doxycycline (DOX. Results After transformation of the isolate IC50 in ratio of IC50 according to the susceptibility of the 3D7 reference strain (isolate IC50/3D7 IC50, the prevalence of the in vitro resistant isolates with reduced susceptibility was 50% for MQ, 22% for CQ, 12% for DOX, 6% for both QN and MDAQ and 1% for the drugs LMF and DHA. The highest significant positive correlations were shown between responses to CQ and MDAQ (r = 0.569; P r = 0.511; P r = 0.428; P = 0.0001, LMF and MQ (r = 0.413; P = 0.0002, QN and DHA (r = 0.402; P = 0.0003 and QN and MQ (r = 0.421; P = 0.0001. Conclusions The introduction of ACT in 2002 has not induced a decrease in P. falciparum susceptibility to the drugs DHA, MDAQ and LMF, which are common ACT components. However, the prevalence of P. falciparum isolates with reduced susceptibility has increased for both MQ and DOX. Taken together, these data suggest that intensive surveillance of the P. falciparum in vitro susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs in Senegal is required.

  9. Leveling the playing field: bringing development of biomarkers and molecular diagnostics up to the standards for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poste, George; Carbone, David P; Parkinson, David R; Verweij, Jaap; Hewitt, Stephen M; Jessup, J Milburn

    2012-03-15

    Molecular diagnostics are becoming increasingly important in clinical research to stratify or identify molecularly profiled patient cohorts for targeted therapies, to modify the dose of a therapeutic, and to assess early response to therapy or monitor patients. Molecular diagnostics can also be used to identify the pharmacogenetic risk of adverse drug reactions. The articles in this CCR Focus section on molecular diagnosis describe the development and use of markers to guide medical decisions regarding cancer patients. They define sources of preanalytic variability that need to be minimized, as well as the regulatory and financial challenges involved in developing diagnostics and integrating them into clinical practice. They also outline a National Cancer Institute program to assist diagnostic development. Molecular diagnostic clinical tests require rigor in their development and clinical validation, with sensitivity, specificity, and validity comparable to those required for the development of therapeutics. These diagnostics must be offered at a realistic cost that reflects both their clinical value and the costs associated with their development. When genome-sequencing technologies move into the clinic, they must be integrated with and traceable to current technology because they may identify more efficient and accurate approaches to drug development. In addition, regulators may define progressive drug approval for companion diagnostics that requires further evidence regarding efficacy and safety before full approval can be achieved. One way to accomplish this is to emphasize phase IV postmarketing, hypothesis-driven clinical trials with biological characterization that would permit an accurate definition of the association of low-prevalence gene alterations with toxicity or response in large cohorts.

  10. Dosing anticancer drugs in infants: Current approach and recommendations from the Children's Oncology Group's Chemotherapy Standardization Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balis, Frank M; Womer, Richard B; Berg, Stacey; Winick, Naomi; Adamson, Peter C; Fox, Elizabeth

    2017-11-01

    An analysis of dose modifications for infants in 29 Children's Oncology Group protocols across 10 cancer types revealed 11 sets of criteria defining the infant population using age, weight, body surface area (BSA), or a combination of these parameters and eight dose modification methods. A new method of dosing anticancer drugs in infants was developed based on the rationale that prior modifications were implemented to reduce toxicity, which is not cancer-specific. The new method uses BSA dose banding in dosing tables for infants and children with a BSA <0.6 m 2 and gradually transitions from body weight based to BSA-based dosing. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A cross-sectional study of tuberculosis drug resistance among previously treated patients in a tertiary hospital in Accra, Ghana: public health implications of standardized regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forson, Audrey; Kwara, Awewura; Kudzawu, Samuel; Omari, Michael; Otu, Jacob; Gehre, Florian; de Jong, Bouke; Antonio, Martin

    2018-04-02

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance is a major challenge to the use of standardized regimens for tuberculosis (TB) therapy, especially among previously treated patients. We aimed to investigate the frequency and pattern of drug resistance among previously treated patients with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital Chest Clinic, Accra. This was a cross-sectional survey of mycobacterial isolates from previously treated patients referred to the Chest Clinic Laboratory between October 2010 and October 2013. The Bactec MGIT 960 system for mycobactrerial culture and drug sensitivity testing (DST) was used for sputum culture of AFB smear-positive patients with relapse, treatment failure, failure of smear conversion, or default. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize patient characteristics, and frequency and patterns of drug resistance. A total of 112 isolates were studied out of 155 from previously treated patients. Twenty contaminated (12.9%) and 23 non-viable isolates (14.8%) were excluded. Of the 112 studied isolates, 53 (47.3%) were pan-sensitive to all first-line drugs tested Any resistance (mono and poly resistance) to isoniazid was found in 44 isolates (39.3%) and any resistance to streptomycin in 43 (38.4%). Thirty-one (27.7%) were MDR-TB. Eleven (35.5%) out of 31 MDR-TB isolates were pre-XDR. MDR-TB isolates were more likely than non-MDR isolates to have streptomycin and ethambutol resistance. The main findings of this study were the high prevalence of MDR-TB and streptomycin resistance among previously treated TB patients, as well as a high prevalence of pre-XDR-TB among the MDR-TB patients, which suggest that first-line and second-line DST is essential to aid the design of effective regimens for these groups of patients in Ghana.

  12. Diabetes Drugs and Cardiovascular Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Cheol Bae

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a well-known risk factor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and the beneficial effect of improved glycemic control on cardiovascular complications has been well established. However, the rosiglitazone experience aroused awareness of potential cardiovascular risk associated with diabetes drugs and prompted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to issue new guidelines about cardiovascular risk. Through postmarketing cardiovascular safety trials, some drugs demonstrated cardiovascular benefits, while some antidiabetic drugs raised concern about a possible increased cardiovascular risk associated with drug use. With the development of new classes of drugs, treatment options became wider and the complexity of glycemic management in type 2 diabetes has increased. When choosing the appropriate treatment strategy for patients with type 2 diabetes at high cardiovascular risk, not only the glucose-lowering effects, but also overall benefits and risks for cardiovascular disease should be taken into consideration.

  13. Psychological insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes patients regarding oral antidiabetes treatment, subcutaneous insulin injections, or inhaled insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrak, Frank; Herpertz, Stephan; Stridde, Elmar; Pfützner, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    "Psychological insulin resistance" (PIR) is an obstacle to insulin treatment in type 2 diabetes, and patients' expectations regarding alternative ways of insulin delivery are poorly understood. PIR and beliefs regarding treatment alternatives were analyzed in patients with type 2 diabetes (n=532; mean glycated hemoglobin, 68±12 mmol/mol [8.34±1.5%]) comparing oral antidiabetes treatment, subcutaneous insulin injections, or inhaled insulin. Questionnaires were used to assess barriers to insulin treatment (BIT), generic and diabetes-specific quality of life (Short Form 36 and Problem Areas in Diabetes, German version), diabetes knowledge, locus of control (Questionnaire for the Assessment of Diabetes-Specific Locus of Control, in German), coping styles (Freiburg Questionnaire of Illness Coping, 15-Items Short Form), self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, German version), and mental disorders (Patient Health Questionnaire, German version). Patients discussed treatment optimization options with a physician and were asked to make a choice about future diabetes therapy options in a two-step treatment choice scenario. Step 1 included oral antidiabetes drugs or subcutaneous insulin injection (SCI). Step 2 included an additional treatment alternative of inhaled insulin (INH). Subgroups were analyzed according to their treatment choice. Most patients perceived their own diabetes-related behavior as active, problem-focused, internally controlled, and oriented toward their doctors' recommendations, although their diabetes knowledge was limited. In Step 1, rejection of the recommended insulin was 82%, and in Step 2, it was 57%. Fear of hypoglycemia was the most important barrier to insulin treatment. Patients choosing INH (versus SCI) scored higher regarding fear of injection, expected hardship from insulin therapy, and BIT-Sumscore. The acceptance of insulin is very low in type 2 diabetes patients. The option to inhale insulin increases the acceptability for some but

  14. Navel orange peel hydroethanolic extract, naringin and naringenin have anti-diabetic potentials in type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Osama M; Hassan, Mohamed A; Abdel-Twab, Sanaa M; Abdel Azeem, Manal N

    2017-10-01

    The therapy of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) stays a challenging issue. During the last decade, there has been an interest in the expansion of anti-diabetic drugs especially those of natural sources. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the anti-hyperglycemic and the anti-hyperlipidemic effects as well as the anti-oxidant activities of navel orange hydroethanolic extract and its constituting flavonoids naringin and naringenin on nicotineamide (NA)/streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 2 diabetic rats. To induce T2DM, 16h-fasted rats were intraperitoneally injected with STZ at dose of 50mg/kg body weight (b. w.), 15min after the intraperitoneal administration of NA (120mg/kg b. w.). The NA/STZ-induced type 2 diabetic rats were orally treated with navel orange peel hydroethanolic extract, naringin and narengenin at dose level of 100mg/kg b. w./day for 4 weeks. The treatments with navel orange peel hydroethanolic extract, naringin and narengenin potentially alleviated the lowered serum insulin and C-peptide levels, the depleted liver glycogen content, the elevated liver glucose-6-phosphatase and glycogen phosphorylase activities, the deteriorated serum lipid profile, and the suppressed liver antioxidant defense system of NA/STZ-induced type 2 diabetic rats. The treatments also enhanced the mRNA expression of insulin receptor β-subunit, GLUT4 and adiponectin in adipose tissue of STZ/NA-induced type 2 diabetic rats. In conclusion, the navel orange peel hydroethanolic extract, naringin and naringenin have potent anti-diabetic effects in NA/STZ-induced type 2 diabetic rats via their insulinotropic effects and insulin improving action which in turn may be mediated through enhancing insulin receptor, GLUT4 and adiponectin expression in adipose tissue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Gedunin and Azadiradione: Human Pancreatic Alpha-Amylase Inhibiting Limonoids from Neem (Azadirachta indica as Anti-Diabetic Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Ponnusamy

    Full Text Available Human pancreatic α-amylase (HPA inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower postprandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. Limonoids from Azadirachta indica known for their therapeutic potential were screened for pancreatic α-amylase inhibition, a known anti-diabetic target. Studies were carried out to reveal their mode of action so as to justify their hypoglycemic potential. Of the nine limonoids isolated/semi-synthesized from A.indica and screened for α-amylase inhibition, azadiradione and exhibited potential inhibition with an IC50 value of 74.17 and 68.38 μM, respectively against HPA under in vitro conditions. Further screening on AR42J α-amylase secretory cell line for cytotoxicity and bioactivity revealed that azadiradione and gedunin exhibited cytotoxicity with IC50 of 11.1 and 13.4μM. Maximal secreted α-amylase inhibition of 41.8% and 53.4% was seen at 3.5 and 3.3μM, respectively. Michaelis-Menten kinetics suggested a mixed mode of inhibition with maltopentaose (Ki 42.2, 18.6 μM and starch (Ki' 75.8, 37.4 μM as substrate with a stiochiometry of 1:1 for both azadiradione and gedunin, respectively. The molecular docking simulation indicated plausible π-alkyl and alkyl-alkyl interactions between the aromatic amino acids and inhibitors. Fluorescence and CD confirmed the involvement of tryptophan and tyrosine in ligand binding to HPA. Thermodynamic parameters suggested that binding is enthalpically and entropically driven with ΔG° of -21.25 kJ mol-1 and -21.16 kJ mol-1 for azadiradione and gedunin, respectively. Thus, the limonoids azadiradione and gedunin could bind and inactivate HPA (anti-diabetic target and may prove to be lead drug candidates to reduce/control post-prandial hyperglycemia.

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of Endovascular Femoropopliteal Intervention Using Drug-Coated Balloons Versus Standard Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty: Results From the IN.PACT SFA II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Adam C; Li, Haiyan; Vilain, Katherine R; Jaff, Michael R; Schneider, Peter A; Laird, John R; Cohen, David J

    2016-11-28

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of drug-coated balloon (DCB) angioplasty versus standard percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). Recent trials have reported lower rates of target lesion revascularization with DCB angioplasty versus standard PTA. However, the cost-effectiveness of DCB angioplasty is unknown. A prospective economic study was performed alongside the IN.PACT SFA II (IN.PACT Admiral Drug-Coated Balloon vs. Standard Balloon Angioplasty for the Treatment of Superficial Femoral Artery [SFA] and Proximal Popliteal Artery [PPA]) trial, which randomized 181 patients with femoropopliteal disease to the IN.PACT DCB versus standard PTA. Resource use data were collected over 2-year follow-up, and costs were assigned using resource-based accounting and billing data. Health utilities were assessed using the EuroQol 5-dimensions questionnaire. Cost-effectiveness was assessed as cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained using a decision-analytic model on the basis of empirical data from the trial assuming identical long-term mortality. Initial costs were $1,129 per patient higher with DCB angioplasty than standard PTA, driven by higher costs for the DCB itself. Between discharge and 24 months, target limb-related costs were $1,212 per patient lower with DCB angioplasty such that discounted 2-year costs were similar for the 2 groups ($11,277 vs. $11,359, p = 0.97), whereas QALYs tended to be greater among patients treated with DCBs (1.53 ± 0.44 vs. 1.47 ± 0.42, p = 0.40). The probability that DCB angioplasty is cost-effective compared with standard PTA was 70% using a threshold of $50,000 per QALY gained and 79% at a threshold of $150,000 per QALY gained. For patients with femoropopliteal disease, DCB angioplasty is associated with better 2-year outcomes and similar target limb-related costs compared with standard PTA. Formal cost-effectiveness analysis on the basis of these results suggests that use of the DCB angioplasty

  17. Treatment with antiparkinson and antidepressant drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt-Christensen, Mette; Kvist, Kajsa; Nilsson, Flemming Mørkeberg

    2007-01-01

    Depressive symptoms and major depression are frequent in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, a systematic knowledge about the treatment with antidepressant drugs among PD patients is missing. We estimated the frequency of antidepressant drug treatment in a national sample of persons......,029,737 persons were included. Persons who got APDs had significantly increased rate ratios (RR) of subsequent antidepressant drug treatment compared with an unexposed control group (RR: 2.10 (95% CI: 2.04-2.16)) and with persons who got anti-diabetic drugs [RR: 1.58 (95% CI: 1.51-1.65)]. Persons treated...... and depression....

  18. Antidiabetic activities of polysaccharides from Anoectochilus roxburghii and Anoectochilus formosanus in STZ-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tingting; Duan, Xiaoyu; Ke, Yu; Zhang, Lan; Shen, Yingbin; Hu, Bin; Liu, Aiping; Chen, Hong; Li, Cheng; Wu, Wenjuan; Shen, Li; Liu, Yuntao

    2018-02-10

    Six polysaccharides were extracted from different parts (whole plants, roots and leaves) of Anoectochilus roxburghii and Anoectochilus formosanus (ARPs, ARPs-1, ARPs-2, AFPs, AFPs-1 and AFPs-2). Their primary characteristics were identified and their antidiabetic activities were evaluated in STZ-induced diabetic mice. Root polysaccharides (ARPs-1and AFPs-1) and leaf polysaccharides (ARPs-2 and AFPs-2) were distinct from each other in terms of the Mws, monosaccharide compositions and functional groups. Notably, the primary structures of ARPs and AFPs were similar to those of ARPs-1and AFPs-1, respectively. In animal experiment, after feeding with polysaccharides samples, the body weight, blood glucose, glycogen, insulin, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), malondiadehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzyme activities in liver and kidney of mice were tested to investigate the antidiabetic activities. All polysaccharides exhibited varying antidiabetic activities (antihyperglycemic, antioxidant and antihyperlipidemic activities), which were closely related to their primary characteristics. Furthermore, root polysaccharides with higher Mws and glucose content in both A. roxburghii and A. formosanus, exhibited better antidiabetic activities than leaf polysaccharides, and ARPs which showed the best antidiabetic activities had the potential to be used as functional food or medicine for diabetes treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Antidiabetic Activities and Identification of Chemical Compound from Samama (Anthocephalus macrophyllus (Roxb Havil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laela Nur Anisah

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Samama (Anthocephalus macrophyllus is one of a pioneer indigenous fast growing species in Indonesia which have been used as traditional medicine for various diseases. The objectives were to determine the yield extract, to analyze their antidiabetic activity by inhibition assay for α-glucosidase enzyme activity and chemical analysis with GCMS. Extraction of leaves, bark and wood samples were done by using ethanol 95%. Fractionation the most active  ethanol extract was conducted by using n-hexane and ethyl acetate. The yield of ethanol extracts in leaves, bark and wood were 13.90%, 12.87%, and 2.18% respectively. Based on antidiabetic activity assay, the bark ethanol extract was the most active extract by the IC50 value of 5.86 μg mL-1. Phytochemical analysis on bark ethanol extracts showed that they contained flavonoid, quinon, triterpenoid, saponin and tannin which were assumed have high contribution in antidiabetic activities. The result of fractionation ethanol extract bark showed that the ethyl acetate fraction was the most active fraction (IC50 6.82 μg mL-1. GCMS analysis indicated the presence of dominant phenolic compounds such as pyrocatechol, antiarol, isopropyl myristate and phenol in which were suspected have antidiabetic activity. These results strongly suggested that ethyl acetate fraction of Samama bark was a potential natural source for antidiabetic agents.

  20. Evaluation of Antidiabetic and Antioxidant Properties of Brucea javanica Seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulwali Ablat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ethanol extract of B. javanica seed was fractionated with solvents of different polarities and tested for antioxidant activities by several assays including DPPH radical scavenging activity, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP, ferrous ion chelating activity (FCA, and nitric oxide radical scavenging activity (NORSA along with their polyphenolic contents. Antidiabetic activity was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using a glycogen phosphorylase α (GPα inhibition assay and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT in nondiabetic rats. The ethyl acetate fraction (EAF, rich in tannin, exhibited the strongest antioxidant activities to DPPH, FRAP, and NORSA, except for FCA. The EAF also exerted a dose-depended inhibition of GPα (IC50 = 0.75 mg/ml. Further evaluation of hypoglycemic effect on OGGT indicated that rats treated with EAF (125 mg/kg bw showed a 39.91% decrease (P < 0.05 in blood glucose levels at 30 min, and continuous fall (P < 0.05 of 28.89% and 20.29% was observed in the following hours (60 and 90 min compared to the normal control during OGTT. The EAF was applied to polyamide column chromatography, and the resulting tannin-free fraction was tested for both GPα inhibition and antioxidant (DPPH only activity. The GPα inhibitory activity was retained, while antioxidant activity was lost (4.6-fold after tannin removal. These results concluded that the GPα inhibitory activity initially detected was primarily due to the compounds other than tannins, whereas antioxidant activity was mainly due to the tannins.

  1. Hepatoprotective and antidiabetic effects of Pistacia lentiscus leaf and fruit extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chafiaâ Mehenni

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pistacia lentiscus (Anacardiaceae is commonly used in folk medicine to treat various diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective and antioxidant activities of extracts of P. lentiscus leaves (PL and fruits (PF against experimentally induced liver damage. Furthermore, characterization of extracts was attempted by a spectroscopic methodology (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection analysis. A hepatoprotective potential against paracetamol [165 mg/kg body weight (b.w.] toxicity was noticed in mice pretreated with the same dose of PL or PF extract (125 mg/kg b.w. or a combination of both (PL/PF 63/63 mg/kg b.w., as revealed by an analysis of biochemical parameters (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase activities and total bilirubin. These results were confirmed by histological examination of the liver, which revealed significant protection against paracetamol-induced hepatic necrosis. Furthermore, PF extract exhibited a promising antidiabetic activity in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, similar to the reference drug glibenclamide (0.91 g/L, a result confirmed by in vitro inhibition of α-amylase. We demonstrated that the leaf crude extract showed the best effect in all tested methods, compared to its fruit counterpart, probably due to the presence of higher amounts of phenolic compounds, as determined by phytochemical and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses. Moreover, high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection led to the identification of six compounds for each part of the plant. Gallic acid, a characteristic compound of Pistacia species, was most abundant in leaves and fruits, while luteolin was detected for the first time in fruits. Obtained activities of P. lentiscus extracts may well be due, at least in part, to the presence of the above compounds.

  2. Insulin-releasing action of the novel antidiabetic agent BTS 67 582.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenaghan, N H; Flatt, P R; Bailey, C J

    1998-02-01

    1. BTS 67582 (1,1-dimethyl-2-(2-morpholinophenyl)guanidine fumarate) is a novel antidiabetic agent with a short-acting insulin-releasing effect. This study examined its mode of action in the clonal B-cell line BRIN-BD11. 2. BTS 67582 increased insulin release from BRIN-BD11 cells in a concentration-dependent manner (10[-8] to 10[-4] M) at both non-stimulating (1.1 mM) and stimulating (16.7 mM) concentrations of glucose. 3. BTS 67582 (10[-4] M) potentiated the insulin-releasing effect of a depolarizing concentration of K+ (30 mM), whereas the K+ channel openers pinacidil (400 microM) and diazoxide (300 microM) inhibited BTS 67582-induced release. 4. Suppression of Ca+ channel activity with verapamil (20 microM) reduced the insulin-releasing effect of BTS 67582 (10[-4] M). 5. BTS 67582 (10[-4] M) potentiated insulin release induced by amino acids (10 mM), and enhanced the combined stimulant effects of glucose plus either the fatty acid palmitate (10 mM), or agents which raise intracellular cyclic AMP concentrations (25 microM forskolin and 1 mM isobutylmethylxanthine), or the cholinoceptor agonist carbachol (100 microM). 6. Inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin release by adrenaline or noradrenaline (10 microM) was partially reversed by BTS 67582 (10[-4] M). 7. These data suggest that the insulin-releasing effect of BTS 67582 involves regulation of ATP-sensitive K+ channel activity and Ca2+ influx, and that the drug augments the stimulant effects of nutrient insulin secretagogues and agents which enhance adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C. BTS 67582 may also exert insulin-releasing effects independently of ATP-sensitive K+ channel activity.

  3. Stevia rebaudiana loaded titanium oxide nanomaterials as an antidiabetic agent in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Langle

    Full Text Available Abstract Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni Bertoni, Asteraceae, is a plant with hypoglycemic and antihyperlipidemic properties. S. rebaudiana (SrB has become a lead candidate for the treatment of the diabetes mellitus. However, chronic administrations of S. rebaudiana are required to cause the normoglycemic effect. Importantly, nanomaterials in general and titanium dioxide (TiO2 in particular have become effective tools for drug delivery. In this work, we obtained TiO2 nanomaterials with SrB at different concentrations (10, 20 and 30 µM by sol–gel method. After this nanomaterials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Where it was demonstrated, the presence of the S. rebaudiana in TiO2 nanomaterials, which were observed as hemispherical agglomerated particles of different sizes. The nanomaterials were evaluated in male rats whose diabetes mellitus-phenotype was induced by alloxan (200 mg/kg, i.p.. The co-administration of TiO2-SrB (20 and 30 µM induced a significant and permanent decrease in the glucose concentration since 4 h, until 30 days post-administration. Likewise, the concentrations of insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin, cholesterol, and triacylglycerides showed a significant recovery to basal levels. The major finding of the study was that the TiO2-SrB (20 and 30 µM has a potent and prolonged activity antidiabetic. TiO2 can be considered like an appropriated vehicle in the continuous freeing of active substances to treat of diabetes mellitus.

  4. Drug Therapy Problems in Patients on Antihypertensives and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drug therapy problems (DTPs), with the associated risks inherent in antihypertensive and antidiabetic therapy require utmost attention. This present study was aimed at assessing the DTPs observed in the management of hypertension and diabetes mellitus (DM) in two tertiary health facilities in Niger Delta region. In this ...

  5. West African Journal of Pharmacology and Drug Research - Vol 27 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Understanding the Role and Mechanism of Metformin in Obesity Treatment: Different Aspect of the Well Known Antidiabetic Drug · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ... Is Prior Statin Therapy Associated with Increased Hemorrhagic Stroke? EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  6. Diabetes mellitus: Exploring the challenges in the drug development process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Julius A; Patnaik, Ashis

    2012-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions and continues to be a major burden on society globally. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimated the global burden of diabetes to be 366 million in 2011 and predicted that by 2030 this will have risen to 552 million. In spite of newer and effective treatment options, newer delivery and diagnostic devices, stricter glycaemic targets, better treatment guidelines and increased awareness of the disease, baseline glycosylated hemoglobin remains relatively high in subjects diagnosed and treated with type 2 diabetes. The search continues for an ideal anti diabetic drug that will not only normalize blood glucose but also provide beta cell rest and possibly restoration of beta cell function. The development of anti diabetic drugs is riddled with fundamental challenges. The concept of beta cell rest and restoration is yet to be completely understood and proven on a long term. The ideal therapeutic approach to treating type 2 diabetes is not yet determined. Our understanding of drug safety in early clinical development is primarily limited to "Type A" reactions. Until marketing authorization most drugs are approved based on the principle of confirming non-inferiority with an existing gold standard or determining superiority to a placebo. The need to obtain robust pharmaco-economic data prior to marketing authorization in order to determine appropriate pricing of a new drug remains a major challenge. The present review outlines some of the challenges in drug development of anti-diabetic drugs citing examples of pulmonary insulin, insulin analogues, thiazolidinediones and the GLP1 analogues.

  7. Diabetes mellitus: Exploring the challenges in the drug development process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius A Vaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions and continues to be a major burden on society globally. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF estimated the global burden of diabetes to be 366 million in 2011 and predicted that by 2030 this will have risen to 552 million. In spite of newer and effective treatment options, newer delivery and diagnostic devices, stricter glycaemic targets, better treatment guidelines and increased awareness of the disease, baseline glycosylated hemoglobin remains relatively high in subjects diagnosed and treated with type 2 diabetes. The search continues for an ideal anti diabetic drug that will not only normalize blood glucose but also provide beta cell rest and possibly restoration of beta cell function. The development of anti diabetic drugs is riddled with fundamental challenges. The concept of beta cell rest and restoration is yet to be completely understood and proven on a long term. The ideal therapeutic approach to treating type 2 diabetes is not yet determined. Our understanding of drug safety in early clinical development is primarily limited to "Type A" reactions. Until marketing authorization most drugs are approved based on the principle of confirming non-inferiority with an existing gold standard or determining superiority to a placebo. The need to obtain robust pharmaco-economic data prior to marketing authorization in order to determine appropriate pricing of a new drug remains a major challenge. The present review outlines some of the challenges in drug development of anti-diabetic drugs citing examples of pulmonary insulin, insulin analogues, thiazolidinediones and the GLP1 analogues.

  8. Canada’s highest court unchains injection drug users; implications for harm reduction as standard of healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Small Dan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract North America’s only supervised injection facility, Insite, opened its doors in September of 2003 with a federal exemption as a three-year scientific study. The results of the study, evaluated by an independent research team, showed it to be successful in engaging the target group in healthcare, preventing overdose death and HIV infections while increasing uptake and retention in detox and treatment. The research, published in peer-reviewed medical and scientific journals, also showed that the program did not increase public disorder, crime or drug use. Despite the substantial evidence showing the effectiveness of the program, the future of Insite came under threat with the election of a conservative federal government in 2006. As a result, the PHS Community Services Society (PHS, the non-profit organization that operates Insite, launched a legal case to protect the program. On 30 September 2011, Supreme Court of Canada ruled in favour of Insite and underscored the rights of people with addictions to the security of their person under section 7 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms (Charter of Rights. The decision clears the ground for other jurisdictions in Canada, and perhaps North America, to implement supervised injection and harm reduction where it is epidemiologically indicated. The legal case validates the personhood of people with addictions while metaphorically unchaining them from the criminal justice system.

  9. Assessment of the antidiabetic potential of Cassia grandis using an in vivo model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandesh R Lodha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous and ethanolic extracts of C. grandis (Family: Leguminosae were evaluated for antidiabetic activity by a glucose tolerance test, in normal rats and alloxan-induced diabetic rats. The aqueous and ethanolic extracts showed that they significantly lowered the blood glucose levels to normal in the glucose tolerance test. In alloxan-induced diabetic rats the maximum reduction in blood glucose was observed after three hours, at a dose level of 150 mg/kg of body weight. The percentage of protection given by the aqueous and ethanolic extracts was 32.72 and 46.42%, respectively. In the long-term treatment of alloxan-induced diabetic rats, the degree of protection was determined by measuring the blood glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides on the tenth day. Both the extracts showed a significant antidiabetic activity comparable to that of glibenclamide. These results showed that the Cassia grandis possessed significant antidiabetic activity.

  10. Antidiabetic effect of taurine in cultured rat skeletal l6 myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Sun Hee; Chang, Kyung Ja

    2013-01-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a sulfur-containing β-amino acid, is found in all animal cells at millimolar concentrations and has been reported to show various health promoting activities including antidiabetic properties. The beneficial effects of taurine in diabetes mellitus have been known. However, the exact mechanism of hypoglycemic action of taurine is not properly defined. In this study, we investigated antidiabetic effect of taurine in the cell culture system using rat skeletal muscle cells. In cultured rat skeletal L6 myotubes, we studied the effect of taurine (0-100 μM) on glucose uptake to plasma membrane from the aspects of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling. Taurine stimulated glucose uptake in a dose-dependent manner by activating AMPK signaling. From these results, it may suggest that taurine show antidiabetic effect by stimulating insulin-independent glucose uptake in rat skeletal muscle.

  11. Antidiabetic Activity of Cocor Bebek Leaves (Kalanchoe pinnata Lam.Pers. Ethanolic Extract from Various Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indah Dwiatmi Dewiyanti

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Antidiabetic activity of Cocor Bebek leaves (Kalanchoe pinnata Lam.Pers. ethanolic extract from Bogor city, kabupaten Bogor and south of Tangerang city has been studied. The study was conducted in vitro using α glucosidase inhibitor method. The results of the study showed that IC50 of the extract from Bogor city, kabupaten Bogor, and Tangerang Selatan city is 40.94 ppm, 33.58 ppm and 16.12 ppm respectively. Meanwhile, IC50 of quersetin which has antidiabetic activity is 10.22 ppm. The results showed that Cocor Bebek leaves (Kalanchoe pinnata Lam.Pers. ethanolic extract had antidiabetic activity with IC50 less than 100 ppm. However, the activity is lesser than quercetin.

  12. Adverse Drug Reaction reports for cardiometabolic drugs from sub-Saharan Africa : a study in VigiBase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berhe, Derbew Fikadu; Juhlin, Kristina; Star, Kristina; Beyene, Kidanemariam G. M.; Dheda, Mukesh; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Taxis, Katja; Mol, Peter G. M.

    OBJECTIVE: Identifying key features of cardiometabolic ADR reports in sub Saharan Africa (SSA) compared with reports from the rest of the world (RoW). METHODS: Reports on suspected ADRs of cardiometabolic drugs (ATC: A10[antidiabetic], B01[antithrombotics] and C[cardiovascular]) were extracted from

  13. Validation of the antidiabetic effects of Vernonia amygdalina delile leaf fractions in fortified diet-fed streptozotocin-treated rat model of type-2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Irobekhian Reuben Okoduwa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vernonia amygdalina (VA is used in the traditional management of diabetes in Nigeria. Previous scientific verification of VA is on Type-1 diabetes model, in spite of the continuous increase in Type-2 diabetes (T2D among adults. This study aimed to validate the antidiabetic effects of VA leaf fraction (VALF in a unique T2D rat model. Materials and Methods: Methanol crude extract of VA leaf was fractionated with solvents of increasing order of polarity (n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl-acetate, n- butanol and water. The antidiabetic activities of the fractions were evaluated in vivo in T2D model rats. Albino Wistar rats were induced with T2D and treated with the VALF. Several T2D-related parameters were measured. Results: T2D rats showed significant increase in serum levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG, liver and kidney biomarkers. At 28-day post-oral treatment with the VALF, FBG levels were significantly (P < 0.05 reduced (n- hexane [29.3%], chloroform [66.7%], ethyl acetate [36.2%], n- butanol [45.59%] and aqueous [39.3%]. The glucose tolerance ability was significantly improved in the chloroform fraction (Vernonia amygdalina chloroform fraction [VAc]-treated groups compared to the other fractions-treated group and diabetic control group. Furthermore, the VAc was found to be most effective as it ameliorates most of the alterations caused in the studied parameters in diabetic rats when compared with n- hexane, ethyl acetate, n- butanol and aqueous fractions. Conclusion: The study validates the anti-diabetic effects of VALF in fortified diet-fed streptozotocin-treated rat model of T2D, and suggests that the VAc is a potential candidate for development of a more effective drug for the management of T2D.

  14. Piracetam Facilitates the Anti-Amnesic but not Anti-Diabetic Activity of Metformin in Experimentally Induced Type-2 Diabetic Encephalopathic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Shruti; Garabadu, Debapriya

    2017-07-01

    Piracetam exhibits anti-amnesic activity in several animal models of dementia. However, its anti-amnesic potential has yet to be evaluated in type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)-induced encephalopathy. Therefore, in the present study, piracetam (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg) was screened for anti-amnesic and anti-diabetic activity in T2DM-induced encephalopathic male rats. Subsequently, anti-amnesic and anti-diabetic activities were evaluated for piracetam, metformin and their combination in T2DM-induced encephalopathic animals. Rats received streptozotocin (45 mg/kg) and nicotinamide (110 mg/kg) injections on day-1 (D-1) of the experimental schedule and were kept undisturbed for 35 days to exhibit T2DM-induced encephalopathy. All drug treatments were continued from D-7 to D-35 in both experiments. Piracetam (100 mg/kg) attenuated loss in learning and memory in terms of increase in escape latency on D-4 (D-34) and decrease in time spent in the target quadrant on D-5 (D-35) of Morris water maze test protocol, and spatial memory in terms of reduced spontaneous alternation behavior in Y-maze test of encephalopathic rats. Additionally, piracetam attenuated altered levels of fasting plasma glucose and insulin, HOMA-IR and HOMA-B in encephalopathic animals, comparatively lesser than metformin. In the next experiment, combination of piracetam and metformin exhibited better anti-amnesic but not anti-diabetic activity than respective monotherapies in encephalopathic rats. Further, the combination attenuated reduced acetylcholine level and increased acetylcholinesterase activity, increased glycogen synthase kinase-3β level and decreased brain-derived neurotropic factor level in hippocampus and pre-frontal cortex of encephalopathic animals. Thus, piracetam could be used as an adjuvant to metformin in the management of dementia in T2DM-induced encephalopathy.

  15. Design, synthesis and antidiabetic evaluation of oxazolone derivatives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    presently available to reduce hyperglycaemia in dia- betes mellitus. These drugs have side effects and thus searching for a new class of compounds is essential to overcome this problems.11 Nevertheless, there is con- tinuous search for alternative drugs; management of diabetes without any side effects is still a challenge ...

  16. Drug-Coated Balloon Versus Standard Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty for the Treatment of Superficial Femoral and Popliteal Peripheral Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepe, Gunnar; Schneider, Peter; Brodmann, Marianne; Krishnan, Prakash; Micari, Antonio; Metzger, Christopher; Scheinert, Dierk; Zeller, Thomas; Cohen, David J.; Snead, David B.; Alexander, Beaux; Landini, Mario; Jaff, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Background— Drug-coated balloons (DCBs) have shown promise in improving the outcomes for patients with peripheral artery disease. We compared a paclitaxel-coated balloon with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) for the treatment of symptomatic superficial femoral and popliteal artery disease. Methods and Results— The IN.PACT SFA Trial is a prospective, multicenter, single-blinded, randomized trial in which 331 patients with intermittent claudication or ischemic rest pain attributable to superficial femoral and popliteal peripheral artery disease were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to treatment with DCB or PTA. The primary efficacy end point was primary patency, defined as freedom from restenosis or clinically driven target lesion revascularization at 12 months. Baseline characteristics were similar between the 2 groups. Mean lesion length and the percentage of total occlusions for the DCB and PTA arms were 8.94±4.89 and 8.81±5.12 cm (P=0.82) and 25.8% and 19.5% (P=0.22), respectively. DCB resulted in higher primary patency versus PTA (82.2% versus 52.4%; P<0.001). The rate of clinically driven target lesion revascularization was 2.4% in the DCB arm in comparison with 20.6% in the PTA arm (P<0.001). There was a low rate of vessel thrombosis in both arms (1.4% after DCB and 3.7% after PTA [P=0.10]). There were no device- or procedure-related deaths and no major amputations. Conclusions— In this prospective, multicenter, randomized trial, DCB was superior to PTA and had a favorable safety profile for the treatment of patients with symptomatic femoropopliteal peripheral artery disease. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique Identifiers: NCT01175850 and NCT01566461. PMID:25472980

  17. Antioxidant, anti-diabetic and renal protective properties of Stevia rebaudiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivanna, Naveen; Naika, Mahadev; Khanum, Farhath; Kaul, Vijay K

    2013-01-01

    Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni has been used for the treatment of diabetes in, for example, Brazil, although a positive effect on antidiabetic and its complications has not been unequivocally demonstrated. This herb also has numerous therapeutic properties which have been proven safe and effective over hundreds of years. Streptozotocin is a potential source of oxidative stress that induces genotoxicity. We studied the effects of stevia leaves and its extracted polyphenols and fiber on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. We hypothesize that supplementation of polyphenols extract from stevia to the diet causes a reduction in diabetes and its complications. Eighty Wistar rats were randomly divided into 8 groups; a standard control diet was supplemented with either stevia whole leaves powder (4.0%) or polyphenols or fiber extracted from stevia separately and fed for one month. Streptozotocin (60 mg/kg body weight, i.p) was injected to the diabetic groups on the 31st day. Several indices were analyzed to assess the modulation of the streptozotocin induced oxidative stress, toxicity and blood glucose levels by stevia. The results showed a reduction of blood glucose, ALT and AST, and increment of insulin level in the stevia whole leaves powder and extracted polyphenols fed rats compared to control diabetic group. Its feeding also reduced the MDA concentration in liver and improved its antioxidant status through antioxidant enzymes. Glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were improved by their feeding. Streptozotocin was also found to induce kidney damage as evidenced by decreased glomerular filtration rate; this change was however alleviated in the stevia leaves and extracted polyphenol fed groups. The results suggested that stevia leaves do have a significant role in alleviating liver and kidney damage in the STZ-diabetic rats besides its hypoglycemic effect. It might be adequate to conclude that stevia leaves could protect rats against streptozotocin induced diabetes

  18. Compositional Studies: Antioxidant and Antidiabetic Activities of Capparis decidua (Forsk. Edgew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zia-Ul-Haq

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Capparis decidua is one of the traditional remedies used for various medicinal treatments in Pakistan. This study presents the determination of proximate composition, amino acids, fatty acids, tocopherols, sterols, glucosinolate and phenolic content in extracts obtained from different aerial parts of C. decidua, as well as their antidiabetic and antioxidant activity. All examined extracts were prominently rich in phenolics and glucosinates, and they showed potent antidiabetic and antihemolytic activity. The present study could be helpful in developing medicinal preparations for the treatment of diabetes and related symptoms.

  19. Developing Calibration Weights and Standard-Error Estimates for a Survey of Drug-Related Emergency-Department Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kott Phillip S.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a two-step calibration-weighting scheme for a stratified simple random sample of hospital emergency departments. The first step adjusts for unit nonresponse. The second increases the statistical efficiency of most estimators of interest. Both use a measure of emergency-department size and other useful auxiliary variables contained in the sampling frame. Although many survey variables are roughly a linear function of the measure of size, response is better modeled as a function of the log of that measure. Consequently the log of size is a calibration variable in the nonresponse-adjustment step, while the measure of size itself is a calibration variable in the second calibration step. Nonlinear calibration procedures are employed in both steps. We show with 2010 DAWN data that estimating variances as if a one-step calibration weighting routine had been used when there were in fact two steps can, after appropriately adjusting the finite-population correct in some sense, produce standard-error estimates that tend to be slightly conservative.

  20. SMS for Life: a pilot project to improve anti-malarial drug supply management in rural Tanzania using standard technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    restricted availability of anti-malarial drugs or other medicines in rural or under-resourced areas. PMID:20979633

  1. Enteric-coated and highly standardized cranberry extract reduces antibiotic and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use for urinary tract infections during radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonetta A

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Alberto Bonetta,1 Giandomenico Roviello,2,3 Daniele Generali,3,4 Laura Zanotti,3 Maria Rosa Cappelletti,3 Chiara Pacifico,5 Francesco Di Pierro6 1Oncological Radiotherapy Operative Unit, ASST, Cremona, 2Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia, 3Molecular Therapy and Pharmacogenomics Unit, ASST, Cremona, 4Department of Medical, Surgery and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Trieste, 5Department of Medical, Surgical and Neurological Sciences, University Hospital of Siena, Siena, 6Velleja Research Scientific Department, Milan, Italy Introduction: Worldwide, bacterial resistance to antibiotic therapy is a major concern for the medical community. Antibiotic resistance mainly affects Gram-negative bacteria that are an important cause of lower urinary tract infections (LUTIs. Pelvic irradiation for prostate cancer is a risk factor for LUTIs. Cranberry extract is reported to reduce the incidence of LUTIs. The prophylactic role of an enteric-coated, highly standardized cranberry extract (VO370® in reducing LUTI episodes, urinary discomfort, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID and antibiotic use during radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma was evaluated. Methods: A total of 924 patients with prostate carcinoma treated by radiotherapy to the prostatic and pelvic areas were randomized to receive (n=489 or not (n=435 the enteric-coated, highly standardized cranberry extract for 6–7 weeks concurrently with irradiation. Outcomes were analyzed by using Mann–Whitney U test and Pearson’s X2 test. Primary endpoint was the number of patients with LUTI; secondary endpoints were incidence of recurrence, days of treatment with antibiotics and number of subjects treated with NSAIDs, and incidence of dysuria. Results: The treatment was very well tolerated, and there were no serious side effects. All enrolled patients completed the study. Urinary infections were detected in 53 of the 489 patients (10

  2. Japanese external quality assessment program to standardize HIV-1 drug-resistance testing (JEQS2010 program) using in vitro transcribed RNA as reference material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shigeru; Hattori, Junko; Matsuda, Masakazu; Okada, Kiyomi; Kazuyama, Yukumasa; Hashimoto, Osamu; Ibe, Shiro; Fujisawa, Shin-ichi; Chiba, Hitoshi; Tatsumi, Masashi; Kato, Shingo; Sugiura, Wataru

    2015-03-01

    To design appropriate antiretroviral therapy regimens and avoid the emergence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 variants with reduced susceptibility to antiretroviral drugs, genotypic drug-resistance testing (HIV genotyping) is strongly recommended. To monitor the quality of HIV genotyping in Japan, we performed an external quality assessment (EQA), named the Japanese external quality assessment program, to standardize HIV genotyping (JEQS). To accurately evaluate the quality of HIV genotyping, we employed as reference material (RM) a well-characterized sample, in vitro transcribed RNA (trRNA) that includes the HIV gag-pol sequence, and created a JEQS2010 panel consisting of three single variant and three mixed trRNA samples. All 11 participating laboratories showed high concordance rates (>96%) for the single variant samples. Eight laboratories also showed good rates of detecting minor variants, but three laboratories failed to detect the variants comprising one-half of the sample. These three laboratories used a common primer that had four internal mismatches to the minor trRNA clone. This program showed the usefulness of trRNA as RM, the high quality of HIV genotyping, and extensive interlaboratory variation in the ability to detect minor variants. These results suggest that improving the quality of HIV genotyping in Japan requires regularly implementing the EQA program and improving the HIV genotyping protocol in each laboratory.

  3. Drug prescribing during the last year of life in very old people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Shota; Gulliford, Martin C

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate primary care drug utilisation during the last year of life, focusing on antidiabetic and cardiovascular drugs, in patients of advanced age with diabetes. Population-based cohort study. Primary care database in the UK. Patients with type 2 diabetes who died at over 80 years of age between 2011 and 13. Main outcome measures included proportions of patients prescribed different classes of drugs, comparing the first (Q1) and the fourth quarters (Q4) of the last year of life. The study included 5,324 patients, with the median age 86 years and 50% female. Three-fourths of the patients received five or more drugs, and the total number of drugs prescribed was almost stable at 6.2 ± 3.1 (mean ± SD) during the last year of life. Substantial proportions of patients were treated with antidiabetic drugs (78%), antihypertensive drugs (76%), statins (62%) and low-dose aspirin (46%) in Q1. Prescribing of these drugs slightly decreased by 3–8% in Q4. There were increases in prescribing of anti-infectives (35% in Q1 to 50% in Q4), drugs for nervous system (63% to 73%), drugs for respiratory system (24% to 33%) and systemic hormonal drugs (22% to 27%). Patients of advanced age with type 2 diabetes were often treated with antidiabetic and cardiovascular drugs even when approaching death. More research is needed to generate evidence to guide optimal drug utilisation for older people with a limited life expectancy.

  4. Antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and hepatoprotective effects of Arctium lappa root’s hydro-alcoholic extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin induced type 2 model of diabetes in male mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Ahangarpour

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Arctium lappa (burdock, (A. lappa root has hypoglycemic and antioxidative effects, and has been used for treatment of diabetes in tradition medicine. This study was conducted to evaluate the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic properties of A. lappa root extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin (NA-STZ-induced type2 diabetes in mice.Materials and Methods: In this investigation, 70 adult male NMRI mice (30-35g randomly divided into 7 groups (n=10 as follow: 1-control, 2-type 2 diabetic mice, 3-diabetic mice that received glibenclamide (0.25 mg/kg as an anti-diabetic drug, 4, 5, 6 and 7- diabetic and normal animals that were pre-treated with 200 and 300 mg/kg A. lappa root extract, respectively, for 28 days. Diabetes has been induced by intraperitoneal injection of NA and STZ. Finally, the blood sample was taken and insulin, glucose, SGOT, SGPT, alkaline phosphatase, leptin and lipid levels was evaluated.Results: Induction of diabetes decreased the level of insulin, leptin and high density lipoprotein (HDL and increased the level of other lipids, glucose, and hepatic enzymes significantly (p

  5. Phenolics composition and antidiabetic property of Brachystegia eurycoma seed flur in high-fat diet, low-dose streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetes in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Anyachukwu Irondi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To quantify some major pharmacologically important flavonoids and phenolic acids in Brachystegia eurycoma seed flour (BESF and evaluate its antidiabetic activity in type 2 diabetic rats. Method: Flavonoids and phenolic acids were quantified using a reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatrography coupled with diode array detection. Type 2 diabetes was induced in rats using high-fat diet, low-dose streptozotocin (HFD/STZ model, by feeding the rats with HFD for 2 weeks followed by single dose administration of STZ (40 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally. The diabetic rats were later fed BESF-supplemented (10% and 20% diets, or administered with metformin (25 mg/kg b.w. for 21 days; the control rats were fed basal diet during this period. After the dietary regimen, the rats were sacrificed, and their blood, liver and pancreas samples were collected for biochemical assays. Results: The flavonoids (catechin, rutin, quercitrin, quercetin and kaempferol and phenolic acids (gallic acid, caffeic, chlorogenic and ellagic acid were abundant in BESF. BESFsupplemented diets (BESF-SD significantly (P 0.05 with metformin administration in some of the biomarkers. Conclusion: The flavonoids and phenolic acids in BESF may have acted synergistically to produce the observed antidiabetic effects. BESF could therefore be an effective and affordable dietary therapy for the management of T2DM; and an excellent source for drug discovery.

  6. Antidiabetic Activity of Pterospermum acerifolium Flowers and Glucose Uptake Potential of Bioactive Fraction in L6 Muscle Cell Lines with Its HPLC Fingerprint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathinavelusamy Paramaguru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to estimate the detailed antidiabetic activity of Pterospermum acerifolium (L. Willd flowers. In vitro alpha amylase inhibition study was carried out on 50% ethanol extract of flowers (PAFEE and its various fractions. The active ethyl acetate fraction (PAFEF was subfractionated into three subfractions (PAFE1, PAFE2, and PAFE3 and subjected to acute toxicity studies followed by antidiabetic screening in vivo by streptozotocin-nicotinamide induced type II diabetes. Diabetic animals treated with PAFE2 (30 mg/kg reduced the levels of fasting blood glucose, significantly (P<0.001 compared to that of diabetic control animals. Histological studies on drug treated groups did not show remarkable positive changes in β-cells. PAFE2 showed 32.6±1.93% glucose uptake over control and, in the presence of PI3K inhibitor wortmannin, declined to 13.7±2.51%. HPLC analysis of PAFE2 reveals the presence of quercetin and apigenin as major constituents and both are inhibiting the glycogen phosphorylase enzyme in molecular modelling studies. The study evidenced strongly that the probable glucose lowering mechanism of action of active subfraction PAFE2 is by increasing the glucose uptake in peripheral tissues and by inhibition of gluconeogenesis.

  7. Anti-Diabetic Activities of Jiaotaiwan in db/db Mice by Augmentation of AMPK Protein Activity and Upregulation of GLUT4 Expression

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    Na Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Jiaotaiwan (JTW, which is composed of Coptis chinensis (CC and cinnamon (CIN, is one of the most well-known traditional Chinese medicines. In this study, we investigated the antidiabetic effects and mechanism of JTW in db/db mice. Results showed that JTW significantly decreased the level of fasting blood glucose and improved glucose and insulin tolerance better than CC or CIN alone. JTW also effectively protected the pancreatic islet shape, augmented the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in the liver, and increased the expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 protein in skeletal muscle and white fat. AMPK and GLUT4 contributed to glucose metabolism regulation and had an essential function in the development of diabetes mellitus (DM. Therefore, the mechanisms of JTW may be related to suppressing gluconeogenesis by activating AMPK in the liver and affecting glucose uptake in surrounding tissues through the upregulation of GLUT4 protein expression. These findings provided a new insight into the antidiabetic clinical applications of JTW and demonstrated the potential of JTW as a new drug candidate for DM treatment.

  8. Antidiabetic and Antinephritic Activities of Aqueous Extract of Cordyceps militaris Fruit Body in Diet-Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Sprague Dawley Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chungang; Song, Jingjing; Teng, Meiyu; Zheng, Xiaoyi; Li, Xiangmei; Tian, Yue; Pan, Minlian; Li, Yuhuan; Lee, Robert J; Wang, Di

    2016-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris has long been used as a crude drug and folk tonic food in East Asia. The present study aims to evaluate the antidiabetic and antinephritic effects of the aqueous extract of the Cordyceps militaris fruit body (CM) in diet-streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats. During four weeks of continuous oral administration of CM at doses of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g/kg and metformin at 100 mg/kg, the fasting blood glucose and bodyweight of each rat were monitored. Hypoglycemic effects of CM on diabetic rats were indicated by decreases in plasma glucose, food and water intake, and urine output. The hypolipidemic activity of CM was confirmed by the normalization of total cholesterol, triglycerides, and low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in diabetic rats. Inhibitory effects on albuminuria, creatinine, urea nitrogen, and n-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase verified CM's renal protective activity in diabetic rats. Furthermore, CM exerted beneficial modulation of inflammatory factors and oxidative enzymes. Compared with untreated diabetic rats, CM decreased the expression of phosphor-AKT and phosphor-GSK-3β in the kidneys. Altogether, via attenuating oxidative stress, CM displayed antidiabetic and antinephritic activities in diet-STZ-induced diabetic rats.

  9. Antidiabetic and Antinephritic Activities of Aqueous Extract of Cordyceps militaris Fruit Body in Diet-Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Sprague Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chungang Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordyceps militaris has long been used as a crude drug and folk tonic food in East Asia. The present study aims to evaluate the antidiabetic and antinephritic effects of the aqueous extract of the Cordyceps militaris fruit body (CM in diet-streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic rats. During four weeks of continuous oral administration of CM at doses of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g/kg and metformin at 100 mg/kg, the fasting blood glucose and bodyweight of each rat were monitored. Hypoglycemic effects of CM on diabetic rats were indicated by decreases in plasma glucose, food and water intake, and urine output. The hypolipidemic activity of CM was confirmed by the normalization of total cholesterol, triglycerides, and low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in diabetic rats. Inhibitory effects on albuminuria, creatinine, urea nitrogen, and n-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase verified CM’s renal protective activity in diabetic rats. Furthermore, CM exerted beneficial modulation of inflammatory factors and oxidative enzymes. Compared with untreated diabetic rats, CM decreased the expression of phosphor-AKT and phosphor-GSK-3β in the kidneys. Altogether, via attenuating oxidative stress, CM displayed antidiabetic and antinephritic activities in diet-STZ-induced diabetic rats.

  10. Anti-diabetic drugs in the private and public sector in Dar es Salaam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M Justin-Temu, R.S.O Nondo, K Wiedenmayer, K.L Ramaiya, A Teuscher ... The cost of chlorpropamide was five times higher in private facilities compared to public facilities. Insulin was also available in all the facilities. The price of animal insulin in private health facilities was ten times that in public health facilities. Human ...

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Process-Related Impurities of Antidiabetic Drug Linagliptin

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    Yiwen Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Linagliptin, a xanthine derivative, is a highly potent, selective, long-acting and orally bioavailable DPP-4 inhibitor for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. During the process development of linagliptin, five new process-related impurities were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. All these impurities were identified, synthesized, and subsequently characterized by their respective spectral data (MS, HRMS, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and IR as described in this article. The identification of these impurities should be useful for quality control and the validation of the analytical method in the manufacture of linagliptin.

  12. Voltammetric and capillary electrophoretic study of scavenger kinetics of methylglyoxal by antidiabetic biguanide drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Langmaier, Jan; Samec, Zdeněk; Samcová, E.; Tůma, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 777, SEP 2016 (2016), s. 26-32 ISSN 1572-6657 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-03139S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : ion transfer voltammetry * capillary electrophoresis * biguanide Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.012, year: 2016

  13. Chemical and Biological Aspects of Extracts from Medicinal Plants with Antidiabetic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushiken, Lucas F; Beserra, Fernando P; Rozza, Ariane L; Bérgamo, Patrícia L; Bérgamo, Danilo A; Pellizzon, Cláudia H

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease and a leading cause of death in western countries. Despite advancements in the clinical management of the disease, it is not possible to control the late complications of diabetes. The main characteristic feature of diabetes is hyperglycemia, which reflects the deterioration in the use of glucose due to a faulty or poor response to insulin secretion. Alloxan and streptozotocin (STZ) are the chemical tools that are most commonly used to study the disease in rodents. Many plant species have been used in ethnopharmacology or to treat experimentally symptoms of this disease. When evaluated pharmacologically, most of the plants employed as antidiabetic substances have been shown to exhibit hypoglycemic and antihyperglycemic activities, and to contain chemical constituents that may be used as new antidiabetic agents. There are many substances extracted from plants that offer antidiabetic potential, whereas others may result in hypoglycemia as a side effect due to their toxicity, particularly their hepatotoxicity. In this article we present an updated overview of the studies on extracts from medicinal plants, relating the mechanisms of action by which these substances act and the natural principles of antidiabetic activity.

  14. Black bean anthocyanin-rich extracts as food colorants: Physicochemical stability and antidiabetes potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black beans contain anthocyanins that could be used as colorants in foods with associated health benefits. The objective was to optimize anthocyanins extraction from black bean coats and evaluate their physicochemical stability and antidiabetes potential. Optimal extraction conditions were 24% ethan...

  15. Anti-diabetic Potential of the Aqueous Leaf Extracts of Ocimum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-diabetic potential of aqueous extracts of leaves of both Ocimum gratissimum and Vernonia amygdalina were investigated in rabbits. Ten female rabbits were grouped into five groups (1-5) of two rabbits each. Group 1 is the control. Groups (2-5) was alloxan induced diabetic. Group 3 was then treated with 200mg/kg ...

  16. Nano-preparation of Andrographis paniculata extract by casein micelle for antidiabetic agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbianti, Rita; Dewi, Veronica; Imansari, Farisa; Hermansyah, Heri; Sahlan, Muhamad

    2017-02-01

    Side effects caused by oral medications for person with diabetic are the background of the development of alternative treatments by traditional medicine, herbs. Andrographis paniculata (AP) is one of the herbs that is potent to be anti-diabetic agent. The active compound of AP, andrographolide have been examined to have anti-diabetic activity as α-glucosidase enzyme inhibitor. This research aims to encapsulate sambiloto's extract with casein micelle and produce nanoparticles which have anti-diabetic activity as α-glucosidase inhibitor. Extract of AP is encapsulated by casein micelle and made into nano size using sonicator. The dominant active compounds in AP extract coated by casein are andrographolide, neoandrographolide, 14-deoxy-11,12didehydroandrographolide with encapsulation efficiency of 68.83%, 89.15% and 81.69%, the average diameter of the particles is about 120.57 nm and its loading capacity is 28.85%. AP's extract has antidiabetic activity as α-glucosidase inhibitor with percent inhibition of 95%. The morphology of nanoencapsulated AP's extract analyzed by FE-SEM, were similar with casein micelle.

  17. Barriers and facilitators to adherence to anti-diabetic medications: Ethiopian patients' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habte, Bruck M; Kebede, Tedla; Fenta, Teferi G; Boon, Heather

    2017-10-17

    Little is known about the experiences of Ethiopian patients with type 2 diabetes related to adherence to their anti-diabetic medications. This may limit attempts to develop and implement patient-centred approaches that consider Ethiopian contexts. To conduct an exploratory study with a focus on identifying barriers and facilitators to anti-diabetic medications adherence in Ethiopian patients with type 2 diabetes. Qualitative methods were used to conduct semi-structured interviews with 39 purposively selected participants attending clinic in three public hospitals in central Ethiopia. Open coding was used to analyse the data to identify key themes. A number of factors were identified as barriers and facilitators to participants' adherence to their anti-diabetic medications. The most common factors were perceptions related to their illness including symptoms, consequences and curability; perceptions of medications including safety concerns, convenience and their necessity; religious healing practices and beliefs; perceptions about and experiences with their healthcare providers and the healthcare system including the availability of medications and diabetes education; and finally perceived self-efficacy and social support. The findings of this study provide guidance to strengthen diabetes education programmes so that they reflect local patient contexts focusing among other things on the illness itself and the anti-diabetic medications.

  18. Antidiabetic Activity of Different Extracts of Myrtus Communis in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

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    Panjeshahin Mohammad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Hydroalcoholic (70° extract of leaves of Myrtus communis has been shown to have antidiabetic effect in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats in our previous study. In this study, we intended to determine the components of the mentioned extract and identify the mechanism for its action.

  19. Anti-diabetic activity-guided screening of aqueous-ethanol Moringa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To explore the anti-diabetic effects of Moringa oleifera extracts and fractions, and to identify their active/marker compounds. Methods: Five different aqueous ethanol extracts (95, 75, 50, 25 %v/v and 100 % water) of Moringa oleifera were given orally to normal rats to assess their hypoglycemic activities and effect ...

  20. Antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of seed extract from Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit

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    Pichaya Chowtivannakul

    2016-09-01

    These results indicated that seed extract from L. leucocephala has antidiabetic and antioxidant activities. The antioxidant activity is likely due to the phenolic content. An application of this extract should be considered as it can affect renal function by reducing the levels of albumin, ALP and total protein.

  1. Anti-diabetic potential of aerial parts of Galium tricornutum (Dandy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the anti-diabetic potential of methanol extract of the aerial parts of Galium tricornutum (Dandy) in diabetic rats. Methods: The methanol extract of the aerial parts of Galium tricornutum was first subjected to acute toxicity studies. Thereafter, the effect of the extract on oral glucose tolerance was determined ...

  2. Phyto-metals screening of selected anti-diabetic herbs and infused concoctions

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    Olanrewaju O. Olujimi

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: The study thus shows that the herbs and concoctions are safe from the heavy metals considered. However, right dosage of the anti-diabetic concoctions should always be considered to prevent possible chronic side effects from bio-accumulation of heavy metals.

  3. Antidiabetic and antiplatelet aggregation study of various methanol fractions of Nymphaea stellata Willd. leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Mohan Maruga

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nymphaea stellata Willd. (Nymphaeaceae is traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes. Alcohol extract of N. stellata leaves has been reported for hypoglycaemic activity. Objective: The aim of this study was to further investigate the different methanol fractions of N. stellata leaves for anti-diabetic activity and anti-platelet aggregation activity. Methods: Methanol extract was fractioned in to unsaponified petroleum ether fraction of methanol extract (UPFME, chloroform fraction of methanol extract (CFME and residual fraction of methanol extract (RFME. All fractions were evaluated for in vivo anti-diabetic activity (STZ-NAD-induced rat model, in vitro anti-diabetic activity (PTP1B inhibition study and anti-platelet aggregation activity. Results: UPFME showed significant changes in all studied parameters, compared to the diabetic control. UPFME also showed an IC50 value of 19.30±1.1 mg/ml and 13.11±0.7 μg/ml in PTP1B inhibition study and anti-platelet aggregation study, respectively. Conclusion: The study indicates that UPFME of N. stellata leaves exhibit anti-diabetic and anti-platelet aggregation activity.

  4. Anti-diabetic potential of aerial parts of Galium tricornutum (Dandy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It also led to significant increases in body weight and HDL-cholesterol, and significant reductions in serum LDL, triglycerides and transaminases (p < 0.05). Conclusion: These results indicate that the aerial parts of G. tricornutum possess significant antidiabetic potential. Keywords: Diabetes, Galium tricornutum, ...

  5. Antidiabetic and antioxidant potentials of spent turmeric oleoresin, a by-product from curcumin production industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh V Nampoothiri

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the antidiabetic and antioxidant activity of spent turmeric oleoresin (STO. Methods: Antidiabetic activity of STO evaluated by α - amylase and α - glucosidase enzyme inhibition assays. The antioxidant capacity studied by DPPH. , ABTS., superoxide radical scavenging and metal chelating activity methods. Results: The STO showed good antidiabetic activity by inhibiting key enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes, viz α -glucosidase and α -amylase with an IC50values of 0.71 and 0.16毺 g/mL respectively. The IC50 values for DPPH. and ABTS. assay were 58.1 and 33 毺 g/mL respectively. STO effectively scavenged the superoxide free radical with an IC50 value of 61.5毺 g/mL and showed a moderate iron chelation property. Conclusions: The above study reveals that the spent turmeric oleoresin being wasted at present can be used as antioxidant and antidiabetic agent in food and neutraceutical products.

  6. Anti-diabetic effect of ethanol leaf extract of Combretum micranthum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was aimed to investigate the anti-diabetic effects of ethanol leaf extract of Combretum micranthum on blood glucose levels and oxidative stress biomarkers such as malondaldehyde, superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase on alloxan induced Diab tes in Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced ...

  7. Prescribing of Antidiabetic Medicines before, during and after Pregnancy : A Study in Seven European Regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charlton, Rachel A.; Klungsoyr, Kari; Neville, Amanda J.; Jordan, Sue; Pierini, Anna; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; Bos, H. Jens; Puccini, Aurora; Engeland, Anders; Gini, Rosa; Davies, Gareth; Thayer, Daniel; Hansen, Anne V.; Morgan, Margery; Wang, Hao; McGrogan, Anita; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Dolk, Helen; Garne, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Aim To explore antidiabetic medicine prescribing to women before, during and after pregnancy in different regions of Europe. Methods A common protocol was implemented across seven databases in Denmark, Norway, The Netherlands, Italy (Emilia Romagna/Tuscany), Wales and the rest of the UK. Women with

  8. Effects of central nervous system drugs on driving: speed variability versus standard deviation of lateral position as outcome measure of the on-the-road driving test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verster, Joris C; Roth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The on-the-road driving test in normal traffic is used to examine the impact of drugs on driving performance. This paper compares the sensitivity of standard deviation of lateral position (SDLP) and SD speed in detecting driving impairment. A literature search was conducted to identify studies applying the on-the-road driving test, examining the effects of anxiolytics, antidepressants, antihistamines, and hypnotics. The proportion of comparisons (treatment versus placebo) where a significant impairment was detected with SDLP and SD speed was compared. About 40% of 53 relevant papers did not report data on SD speed and/or SDLP. After placebo administration, the correlation between SDLP and SD speed was significant but did not explain much variance (r = 0.253, p = 0.0001). A significant correlation was found between ΔSDLP and ΔSD speed (treatment-placebo), explaining 48% of variance. When using SDLP as outcome measure, 67 significant treatment-placebo comparisons were found. Only 17 (25.4%) were significant when SD speed was used as outcome measure. Alternatively, for five treatment-placebo comparisons, a significant difference was found for SD speed but not for SDLP. Standard deviation of lateral position is a more sensitive outcome measure to detect driving impairment than speed variability.

  9. Antidiabetic and antiulcer effects of extract of Eugenia jambolana seed in mild diabetic rats: study on gastric mucosal offensive acid-pepsin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Aditi; Bhawani, G; Agarwal, P K; Goel, Shalini; Singh, A; Goel, R K

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes has been reported to increase propensity to peptic ulceration through its effect both on offensive and defensive mucosal factors. Seeds of Eugenia jambolana (EJ) have been reported to have both antidiabetic as well as ulcer protective effects. The present study evaluates the antidiabetic effects of ethanolic extract of dried seed kernel of Eugenia jambolana (EJE) and its comparative effect on gastric ulceration and acid-pepsin secretion with standard antisecretory FL-blocker. Ranitidine and antidiabetic glibenclamide with a premise that Eugenia jambolana may show better ulcer healing effects by promoting defensive or reducing offensive mucosal factors in mild diabetes (MD) rats. MD was produced in adult rats by administration of streptozotocin (45 mg/kg, ip). EJE was given orally in the doses of 100-400 mg/kg for 10 days and in the dose of 200 mg/kg for 30 days respectively to study its dose- and time-dependent effects on various diabetic parameters like blood glucose, serum cholesterol and triglycerides, insulin level and glycosylated hemoglobin. For ulcer protective and gastric secretion studies, EJE (200 mg/kg) was given orally for 10 days against 2 h cold restraint stress (CRS)-, 4 h pylorus ligation (PL), aspirin (ASP, 200 mg/kg, 4 h)--and 95% ethanol (EtOH, 1 ml/200 g, 1 h)-induced gastric ulcers and offensive acid-pepsin secretion after 4 h PL with co-occurring MD in rats. EJE showed dose-dependent decrease in blood glucose level in MD rats. Blood glucose level remained stable in mild diabetic rats from 3rd day onwards after streptozotocin administration (taken as 1st day for treatment) and EJE (200 mg/kg) showed anti-hyperglycemic effect on 10th day of its administration. Further, EJE in the above dose also decreased cholesterol level with little or no effect on triglycerides level and reversed the decrease and increase in insulin and glycosylated hemoglobin level near to the normal level as observed alter 30 days treatment in MD rats. MD rats

  10. Evidence based study of antidiabetic potential of C. maxima seeds - In vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushawaha, Devesh Kumar; Yadav, Manjulika; Chatterji, Sanjukta; Srivastava, Amrita Kumari; Watal, Geeta

    2017-10-01

    In vitro antidiabetic efficacy of Cucurbita maxima seed extract (CMSE) has already been studied in our previous findings. Thus, in order to validate these findings in biological system, in vivo antidiabetic activity of aqueous extract was investigated in normal as well as diabetic experimental models. Variable doses of extract were administered orally to normal and STZ induced mild diabetic rats during fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glucose tolerance test (GTT) studies. In order to determine the extract's antidiabetic potential long-term FBG and post prandial glucose (PPG) studies were also carried out. Most effective dose of 200 mg kg -1 of CMSE decreases the blood glucose level (BGL) in normal rats by 29.02% at 6 h during FBG studies and 23.23% at 3 h during GTT. However, the maximum reduction observed in BGL of mild diabetic rats during GTT the same interval of time was 26.15%. Moreover, in case of severely diabetic rats a significant reduction of 39.33% was observed in FBG levels whereas, in case of positive control, rats treated with 2.5 mg kg -1 of glipizide, a fall of 42.9% in FBG levels was observed after 28 days. Results of PPG level also showed a fall of 33.20% in severely diabetic rats as compared to the positive control showing a fall of 44.2% at the end of the 28 days. Thus, the present study validate the hypoglycemic and antidiabetic effect of CMSE and hence this extract could be explored further for developing as a novel antidiabetic agent.

  11. Plants used as antidiabetics in popular medicine in Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojan-Rodrigues, M; Alves, T L S; Soares, G L G; Ritter, M R

    2012-01-06

    Plants are widely as antidiabetics. The study of these plants is essential because many of them may have undesirable effects, such as acute or chronic toxicity; or their use may even delay or discourage the adoption of the proper and effective treatment. The present study surveyed the plant species that are popularly used to treat diabetes mellitus in the state of Rio Grande do Sul in southern Brazil. Sixteen ethnobotanical surveys performed in the state were consulted, and the species used to treat diabetes were listed. For species cited in at least two of the studies, scientific data related to antidiabetic activity were searched in the ISI Knowledge database. The scientific binomial of each species was used as keywords, and data found in review papers were also included. A total of 81 species in 42 families were mentioned; the most important families were Asteraceae and Myrtaceae. Twenty eight species were cited at least twice as being used to treat diabetes in the state. For 11 of these, no scientific data regarding antidiabetic activity could be located. The species most frequently mentioned for use with diabetes were Syzygium cumini (Myrtaceae) and Bauhinia forficata (Fabaceae), in 12 studies each, followed by Sphagneticola trilobata (Asteraceae), in six studies; and Baccharis trimera (Asteraceae), Bidens pilosa (Asteraceae), Cynara scolymus (Asteraceae), and Leandra australis (Melastomataceae) in four studies each. Bauhinia forficata and Syzygium cumini have been studied in more detail for antidiabetic activity. A considerable number of plant species are traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes melitus in the Rio Grande do Sul State. The majority of those plants that have been studied for antidiabetic activity showed promising results, mainly for Bauhinia forficata and Syzygium cumini. However, for most of the plants mentioned, the studies are not sufficient to guarantee the efficacy and safety in the use of these plants in the treatment against

  12. Anti-diabetic and spermatogenic activity of Cocculus hirsutus (L) Diels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    blood glucose levels. After STZ-induced diabetes, it was observed that both standard drug (glibenclamide) and methanolic extract of C. hirsutus were significantly superior to control in reducing blood sugar on long treatment (15 days). The data suggested that C. hirsutus could be of benefit in diabetes mellitus in controlling ...

  13. Evaluation of increased adherence and cost savings of an employer value-based benefits program targeting generic antihyperlipidemic and antidiabetic medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Bobby; DuChane, Janeen; Hou, John; Rubinstein, Elan; McMurray, Jennifer; Duncan, Ian

    2014-02-01

    A major employer implemented a change to its employee health benefits program to allow beneficiaries with diabetes or high cholesterol to obtain preselected generic antidiabetic or generic antihyperlipidemic medications with a zero dollar copayment. To receive this benefit, plan beneficiaries were required to participate in a contracted vendor's case management and/or wellness program.  To assess changes in medication adherence and the costs for generic antidiabetic and generic antihyperlipidemic medications resulting from participation in a zero copay (ZCP) program.   This was a retrospective pre-post comparison group study, evaluating adherence and cost. Participants using an antihyperlipidemic and/or antidiabetic medication during the study identification period and post-implementation period for the program were considered eligible for the study. Eligible beneficiaries who enrolled in the ZCP program during the post-implementation period were considered participants, while those who did not enroll during this period were considered nonparticipants. ZCP program participants and nonparticipants were matched via a 1-to-1 propensity scoring method using age, gender, comorbidity count, medication type (antihyperlipidemic, antidiabetic, or both), and baseline adherence as matching criteria. The proportion of days covered (PDC) metric expressed as a mean percentage was used to assess adherence to medication therapy, while payer cost was examined using prescription drug utilization expressed as per member per year (PMPY) and cost change per 30 days of medication expressed in dollars.   Among participants who were users of antidiabetic medications, the mean adherence rate was sustained from pre- to post-implementation (81.8% vs. 81.9%); however, it decreased in the matched nonparticipant group (81.9% vs. 73.1%). This difference in mean adherence over time between the participants and nonparticipants was statistically significant (0.1% vs. -8.8%, P  less than  0

  14. Discovery of p1736, a novel antidiabetic compound that improves peripheral insulin sensitivity in mice models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessy Anthony

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Currently used thiazolidinedione (TZD insulin sensitizers although effective, have adverse side effects of weight gain, fluid retention and heart failure. Using fat cell-based phenotypic drug discovery approach we identified P1736, a novel antidiabetic molecule that has completed Phase II clinical trials. The present study evaluated the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties of P1736. P1736 is a non-TZD and it did not activate human PPAR(Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma receptors. P1736 caused dose dependent increase in glucose uptake (EC50-400 nM in the insulin resistant 3T3 adipocytes. The compound (10 µM induced translocation of GLUT-4 (Glucose Transporter type 4 transporters in these adipocytes while metformin (1.0mM was inactive. In diabetic db/db mice, P1736 (150 mg/kg was more efficacious than metformin in lowering plasma glucose (35% vs 25% and triglyceride levels (38% vs 31%. P1736 tested at 5mg/kg, twice daily doses, reduced glucose by 41% and triglycerides by 32%, in db/db mice. These effects were not associated with adverse effects on body weight or liver function. Rosiglitazone (5mg/kg, twice daily caused 60% and 40 % decreases in glucose and triglyceride levels, respectively. However, rosiglitazone induced 13% weight gain (p<0.05 in db/db mice. P1736 was also efficacious in ob/ob mice wherein 30-35% decrease in glucose and significant improvement in hyperinsulinemia were observed. Administration of P1736 to ob/ob mice resulted in 70% increase in glucose uptake in soleus muscles while metformin caused 38% increase. P1736 exhibited excellent safety profile and was weight neutral in all preclinical models of diabetes. Thus, P1736 with its unique pharmacology coupled with PPAR- independent mode of action could represent an alternative option in the

  15. Discovery of p1736, a novel antidiabetic compound that improves peripheral insulin sensitivity in mice models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Jessy; Kelkar, Aditya; Wilankar, Chandan; Ranjith, Vijayalakshmi; Bhumra, Sujit Kaur; Mutt, Shivaprakash Jagalur; Mutt, Shivaprakash; Deka, Nabajyoti; Sivaramakrishnan, Hariharan; Sharma, Somesh; Marita, Adaikalasamy Rosalind

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Currently used thiazolidinedione (TZD) insulin sensitizers although effective, have adverse side effects of weight gain, fluid retention and heart failure. Using fat cell-based phenotypic drug discovery approach we identified P1736, a novel antidiabetic molecule that has completed Phase II clinical trials. The present study evaluated the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties of P1736. P1736 is a non-TZD and it did not activate human PPAR(Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma )receptors. P1736 caused dose dependent increase in glucose uptake (EC50-400 nM) in the insulin resistant 3T3 adipocytes. The compound (10 µM) induced translocation of GLUT-4 (Glucose Transporter type 4) transporters in these adipocytes while metformin (1.0mM) was inactive. In diabetic db/db mice, P1736 (150 mg/kg) was more efficacious than metformin in lowering plasma glucose (35% vs 25%) and triglyceride levels (38% vs 31%). P1736 tested at 5mg/kg, twice daily doses, reduced glucose by 41% and triglycerides by 32%, in db/db mice. These effects were not associated with adverse effects on body weight or liver function. Rosiglitazone (5mg/kg, twice daily) caused 60% and 40 % decreases in glucose and triglyceride levels, respectively. However, rosiglitazone induced 13% weight gain (p<0.05) in db/db mice. P1736 was also efficacious in ob/ob mice wherein 30-35% decrease in glucose and significant improvement in hyperinsulinemia were observed. Administration of P1736 to ob/ob mice resulted in 70% increase in glucose uptake in soleus muscles while metformin caused 38% increase. P1736 exhibited excellent safety profile and was weight neutral in all preclinical models of diabetes. Thus, P1736 with its unique pharmacology coupled with PPAR- independent mode of action could represent an alternative option in the management of

  16. Factors Associated with Treatment Response to Antidiabetic Agents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the response to diabetic medications and factors influencing drug response in compliant type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Methods: A cross-sectional, retrospective study was performed on 100 T2DM patients at the University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) who were prescribed with at least ...

  17. Patterns and obstacles to oral antidiabetic medications adherence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data concerning adherence to drugs was assessed using measure treatment adherence scale (MTA). Results: a total of 372 (55.59 % males and 44.41% females) patients with type-2 diabetes fulfilled the inclusion criteria and included in the study. Among the participants, 26.1% were found to have good adherence, 47.9% ...

  18. Drug-eluting balloon versus standard balloon angioplasty for infrapopliteal arterial revascularization in critical limb ischemia: 12-month results from the IN.PACT DEEP randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Thomas; Baumgartner, Iris; Scheinert, Dierk; Brodmann, Marianne; Bosiers, Marc; Micari, Antonio; Peeters, Patrick; Vermassen, Frank; Landini, Mario; Snead, David B; Kent, K Craig; Rocha-Singh, Krishna J

    2014-10-14

    Drug-eluting balloons (DEB) may reduce infrapopliteal restenosis and reintervention rates versus percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and improve wound healing/limb preservation. The goal of this clinical trial was to assess the efficacy and safety of IN.PACT Amphirion drug-eluting balloons (IA-DEB) compared to PTA for infrapopliteal arterial revascularization in patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). Within a prospective, multicenter, randomized, controlled trial with independent clinical event adjudication and angiographic and wound core laboratories 358 CLI patients were randomized 2:1 to IA-DEB or PTA. The 2 coprimary efficacy endpoints through 12 months were clinically driven target lesion revascularization (CD-TLR) and late lumen loss (LLL). The primary safety endpoint through 6 months was a composite of all-cause mortality, major amputation, and CD-TLR. Clinical characteristics were similar between the 2 groups. Significant baseline differences between the IA-DEB and PTA arms included mean lesion length (10.2 cm vs. 12.9 cm; p = 0.002), impaired inflow (40.7% vs. 28.8%; p = 0.035), and previous target limb revascularization (32.2% vs. 21.8%; p = 0.047). Primary efficacy results of IA-DEB versus PTA were CD-TLR of 9.2% versus 13.1% (p = 0.291) and LLL of 0.61 ± 0.78 mm versus 0.62 ± 0.78 mm (p = 0.950). Primary safety endpoints were 17.7% versus 15.8% (p = 0.021) and met the noninferiority hypothesis. A safety signal driven by major amputations through 12 months was observed in the IA-DEB arm versus the PTA arm (8.8% vs. 3.6%; p = 0.080). In patients with CLI, IA-DEB had comparable efficacy to PTA. While primary safety was met, there was a trend towards an increased major amputation rate through 12 months compared to PTA. (Study of IN.PACT Amphirion™ Drug Eluting Balloon vs. Standard PTA for the Treatment of Below the Knee Critical Limb Ischemia [INPACT-DEEP]; NCT00941733). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published

  19. Accelerator-based analytical technique in the study of some anti-diabetic medicinal plants of Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olabanji, S.O.; Omobuwajo, O.R.; Ceccato, D.; Adebajo, A.C.; Buoso, M.C.; Moschini, G.

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, a clinical syndrome characterized by hyperglycemia due to deficiency of insulin, is a disease involving the endocrine pancreas and causes considerable morbidity and mortality in the world. In Nigeria, many plants, especially those implicated in herbal recipes for the treatment of diabetes, have not been screened for their elemental constituents while information on phytochemistry of some of them is not available. There is therefore the need to document these constituents as some of these plants are becoming increasingly important as herbal drugs or food additives. The accelerator-based technique PIXE, using the 1.8 MeV collimated proton beam from the 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerator at INFN, LNL, Legnaro (Padova) Italy, was employed in the determination of the elemental constituents of these anti-diabetic medicinal plants. Leaves of Gardenia ternifolia, Caesalpina pulcherrima, Solemostenon monostachys, whole plant of Momordica charantia and leaf and stem bark of Hunteria umbellata could be taken as vegetables, neutraceuticals, food additives and supplements in the management of diabetes. However, Hexabolus monopetalus root should be used under prescription

  20. Evaluation for antidiabetic activity in selected medicinal plants used in Malaysian traditional medicine for the treatment of diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafii Khamis; Siti Harjieh Ibrahim; Noorul Azliana Jamaludin; Muhammad Hanafi Mohamad Mokhtar; Nor Azizah Marsiddi

    2006-01-01

    Aqueous extracts of three medicinal plants used in Malaysian traditional medicine for the treatment of diabetes were investigated. The nuts of Areca cathecu, leaves of Lagerstroemia speciosa and Ficus deltoidea were each extracted by boiling in distilled water. The aqueous extracts were filtered and the filtrates were then spray dried. Their biological evaluation was conducted to determine their blood glucose lowering effect in normoglycaemic and alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Commercially available antidiabetic drug, glybenclamide was used as positive control. Toxicity of the extracts was carried out using the brine shrimp lethality assay and in vivo acute toxicity test in rats. Aqueous extracts of all the plants studied showed significant reduction in blood glucose level up to 50% in rats over a period of 3 to 4 weeks. The largest reduction in blood glucose levels was exhibited by the aqueous extracts of the Lagestroemia speciosa, followed by the Ficus deltoidea and Areca cathecu. There was no evidence of toxicity of the extracts against the brine shrimp (up to 4,000 μg/ml) and in rats (up to 0.2% body weight). (Author)

  1. Accelerator-based analytical technique in the study of some anti-diabetic medicinal plants of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabanji, S. O.; Omobuwajo, O. R.; Ceccato, D.; Adebajo, A. C.; Buoso, M. C.; Moschini, G.

    2008-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus, a clinical syndrome characterized by hyperglycemia due to deficiency of insulin, is a disease involving the endocrine pancreas and causes considerable morbidity and mortality in the world. In Nigeria, many plants, especially those implicated in herbal recipes for the treatment of diabetes, have not been screened for their elemental constituents while information on phytochemistry of some of them is not available. There is therefore the need to document these constituents as some of these plants are becoming increasingly important as herbal drugs or food additives. The accelerator-based technique PIXE, using the 1.8 MeV collimated proton beam from the 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerator at INFN, LNL, Legnaro (Padova) Italy, was employed in the determination of the elemental constituents of these anti-diabetic medicinal plants. Leaves of Gardenia ternifolia, Caesalpina pulcherrima, Solemostenon monostachys, whole plant of Momordica charantia and leaf and stem bark of Hunteria umbellata could be taken as vegetables, neutraceuticals, food additives and supplements in the management of diabetes. However, Hexabolus monopetalus root should be used under prescription.

  2. Antidiabetic and Synergistic Effects of Anthocyanin Fraction from Berberis integerrima Fruit on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sabahi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a complex endocrine disorder. There is a serious attempt to identify antidiabetic compounds from natural sources to use with other drugs for reduction of diabetes complications. Present study is based on the investigation of antihyperglycemic effect of anthocyanin fraction of Berberis integerrima Bunge (AFBI fruits on some physiological parameters (glucose level, glycogen content, and body weight in normal and streptozotocin-induced (STZ-induced diabetic rats and evaluation of synergic effect of this fraction with metformin and glibenclamide. Male Sprague dawley rats were divided into nine groups: healthy control group, diabetic control group, diabetic groups treated with anthocyanin fraction (200, 400 and 1000 mg/kg, respectively; diabetic groups treated with glibenclamide and metformin separately, diabetic groups treated with glibenclamide + anthocyanin fraction (1000 mg/kg, metformin + anthocyanin fraction (1000 mg/kg. Treatment of diabetic rats with AFBI (400, 1000mg/kg significantly decreased blood glucose as compared with control. Moreover, AFBI (400, 1000mg/kg significantly increased liver glycogen and body weight compared to control. Nevertheless, there were no synergistic effects between anthocyanin fraction and metformin or glibenclamide on blood glucose, liver glycogen, and body weight. The results of this study indicate that AFBI possesses hypoglycemic effects and may be considered for evaluation in future diabetes clinical studies.

  3. Accelerator-based analytical technique in the study of some anti-diabetic medicinal plants of Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olabanji, S.O. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy)], E-mail: skayode2002@yahoo.co.uk; Omobuwajo, O.R. [Department of Pharmacognosy, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife (Nigeria); Ceccato, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Dipartmento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Adebajo, A.C. [Department of Pharmacognosy, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife (Nigeria); Buoso, M.C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Moschini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Dipartmento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    Diabetes mellitus, a clinical syndrome characterized by hyperglycemia due to deficiency of insulin, is a disease involving the endocrine pancreas and causes considerable morbidity and mortality in the world. In Nigeria, many plants, especially those implicated in herbal recipes for the treatment of diabetes, have not been screened for their elemental constituents while information on phytochemistry of some of them is not available. There is therefore the need to document these constituents as some of these plants are becoming increasingly important as herbal drugs or food additives. The accelerator-based technique PIXE, using the 1.8 MeV collimated proton beam from the 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerator at INFN, LNL, Legnaro (Padova) Italy, was employed in the determination of the elemental constituents of these anti-diabetic medicinal plants. Leaves of Gardenia ternifolia, Caesalpina pulcherrima, Solemostenon monostachys, whole plant of Momordica charantia and leaf and stem bark of Hunteria umbellata could be taken as vegetables, neutraceuticals, food additives and supplements in the management of diabetes. However, Hexabolus monopetalus root should be used under prescription.

  4. Dapagliflozin, a novel oral antidiabetic with an uncertain future

    OpenAIRE

    Belén Escudero Vilaplana; María José Almodóvar Carretón; Silvia Herrero Hernández

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) is one of the main sociosanitary problems; there are many treatments for it. Recently, it has been approved the first drug of a new family of oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA): dapagliflozin. We aimed to review the available scientific evidence on dapagliflozin, in order to analyze its effectiveness, safety and cost and to estimate its role in the current pharmacotherapy of DM2. Methods: Effectiveness and safety of dapagliflozin were analyzed by an evalu...

  5. Intentional weight loss and dose reductions of anti-diabetic medications--a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anita Ashok; Palamaner Subash Shantha, Ghanshyam; Kahan, Scott; Samson, Rohit Joshua; Boddu, Nelson David; Cheskin, Lawrence Jay

    2012-01-01

    Intentional weight loss, primarily by improving insulin resistance, is known to decrease the need for anti-diabetic medications. In this study, we assess the magnitude of weight loss that resulted in dose reductions or discontinuation of anti-diabetic medications in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes (DM) undergoing weight loss treatment. Case records of 50 overweight or obese patients with DM who successfully decreased dosage or discontinued diabetes medications after losing weight via attendance at two University-based, outpatient weight management centers were analyzed. Follow-up visits, weight reduction interventions, and decisions for dose reductions or discontinuation of medications were individualized to patient needs by the treating physician. Mean starting BMI was 35 kg/m(2), mean age 53.4 years, and 58% were male. All 50 used at least one anti-diabetic medication (30 metformin, 39 sulfonylureas, 31 insulin, 21 sitagliptin) to manage blood sugar. Mean duration of follow-up was 30.2 months. Mean weight loss was 10.8 ± 4.1 kgs (11.1% of initial body weight ± 4.7%). 22/50 patients (44%) discontinued anti-diabetes medications (14 sulfonylureas [36%], 7 insulin [23%], 4 sitagliptin [19%]). The mean percentage weight loss achieved at the point of successful discontinuation of medication was 11.2% ± 3.5% (14% for sulphonylureas, 11% for insulin, and 7.1% for sitagliptin). Mean percentage weight loss of 5.6% ± 2.8% (5.1% for sulphonylureas, 4.3% for insulin, and 7.1% for sitagliptin) was required for initial dose reduction. For every 5% weight loss, predicted dose reductions were sulphonylureas, 39%; insulin, 42%; and any anti-diabetic medications, 49%. Among overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes, intentional weight loss of 7-14% was typically required for full discontinuation of at least one anti-diabetic medication. Discontinuation of insulin was achieved at a mean weight reduction of 11% of initial body weight.

  6. A new flavone glucoside together with known ellagitannins and flavones with anti-diabetic and anti-obesity activities from the flowers of pomegranate (Punica granatum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng; Tian, Li

    2018-03-03

    A new flavone glucoside tricetin 4'-O-β-glucopyranoside (1) and four known ellagitannins and flavones tricetin (2), luteolin (3), ellagic acid (4), and granatin B (5) were isolated from the flowers of Punica granatum L. (Lythraceae). Their structures were established by 1D and 2D NMR as well as mass spectrometry analyses. Among all tested compounds, tricetin (2) exhibited the strongest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity that was comparable to the anti-diabetic drug acarbose. Comparative structure-function analysis of tri-, tetra-, and pentahydroxy flavones [apigenin, luteolin (3), and tricetin (2), respectively] suggested that a greater number of hydroxyl groups on the flavone molecule enhanced its suppression of α-glucosidase, α-amylase, and lipase activities.

  7. Analysis of the regional pharmaceutical market of hypoglycemic drugs of oral administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlova T.S.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the regional pharmaceutical market of oral antidiabetic drugs for 2013-2016 according to the example of the pharmacy network of "Yuniver" (Arkhangelsk, not realizing the program of preferential home. Material and Methods. The study was conducted on the basis of reports on the movement of goods in "Yuniver OOO "for the period from 2013 to 2016 were analyzed range of oral antidiabetic drugs on international nonproprietary names, and trade names, dynamic oral antidiabetic drugs sales (number of dispensed packages. Results. On the basis of data on the movement of goods showed an annual expansion of assortment of oral antidiabetic drugs in the pharmacy network, not realizing the program of preferential home. Conclusion. The assortment of oral hypoglycemic preparations on the example of a pharmacy network that does not realize a program of preferential leave for people with diabetes mellitus testifies to the use of modern medicines that prevent the occurrence of microcirculatory disorders of target organs included in the list of vital and essential drugs and in accordance with clinical recommendations on therapy this pathology.

  8. Association Between Incretin-Based Drugs and the Risk of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, Laurent; Filion, Kristian B; Platt, Robert W; Dahl, Matthew; Dormuth, Colin R; Clemens, Kristin K; Durand, Madeleine; Hu, Nianping; Juurlink, David N; Paterson, J Michael; Targownik, Laura E; Turin, Tanvir C; Ernst, Pierre; Suissa, Samy; Dormuth, Colin R; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Teare, Gary F; Caetano, Patricia; Chateau, Dan; Henry, David A; Paterson, J Michael; LeLorier, Jacques; Levy, Adrian R; Ernst, Pierre; Platt, Robert W; Sketris, Ingrid S

    2016-10-01

    The association between incretin-based drugs, such as dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) agonists, and acute pancreatitis is controversial. To determine whether the use of incretin-based drugs, compared with the use of 2 or more other oral antidiabetic drugs, is associated with an increased risk of acute pancreatitis. A large, international, multicenter, population-based cohort study was conducted using combined health records from 7 participating sites in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom. An overall cohort of 1 532 513 patients with type 2 diabetes initiating the use of antidiabetic drugs between January 1, 2007, and June 30, 2013, was included, with follow-up until June 30, 2014. Current use of incretin-based drugs compared with current use of at least 2 oral antidiabetic drugs. Nested case-control analyses were conducted including hospitalized patients with acute pancreatitis matched with up to 20 controls on sex, age, cohort entry date, duration of treated diabetes, and follow-up duration. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for hospitalized acute pancreatitis were estimated and compared current use of incretin-based drugs with current use of 2 or more oral antidiabetic drugs. Secondary analyses were performed to assess whether the risk varied by class of drug (DPP-4 inhibitors and GLP-1 agonists) or by duration of use. Site-specific HRs were pooled using random-effects models. Of 1 532 513 patients included in the analysis, 781 567 (51.0%) were male; mean age was 56.6 years. During 3 464 659 person-years of follow-up, 5165 patients were hospitalized for acute pancreatitis (incidence rate, 1.49 per 1000 person-years). Compared with current use of 2 or more oral antidiabetic drugs, current use of incretin-based drugs was not associated with an increased risk of acute pancreatitis (pooled adjusted HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.87-1.22). Similarly, the risk did not vary by drug class (DPP-4 inhibitors

  9. Drug treatment in elderly diabetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, A O

    2007-12-01

    Diabetes causes greater decline in physical and functional status in elderly diabetic than in a younger one. Also the rise of MI, stroke and hypertension is also higher. In elderly diabetics management is always on challenging task due to atypical disease presentation, classical symptoms often absent, presence of other coexisting conditions delays the diagnosis, dietary advice not followed properly and due to non-compliance of drug therapy. The antidiabetic drugs which are often used are: sulfonylureas, metformin, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, insulin. Advantages and disadvantages of these drugs are discussed in a nutshell. Moreover control of hypertension, CAD risk reduction and practice pearls eg, lifestyle changes and goals setting for HbA(1c) are important.

  10. Toward the establishment of standardized in vitro tests for lipid-based formulations. 2. The effect of bile salt concentration and drug loading on the performance of type I, II, IIIA, IIIB, and IV formulations during in vitro digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Hywel D; Anby, Mette U; Sassene, Philip; Kleberg, Karen; Bakala-N'Goma, Jean-Claude; Calderone, Marilyn; Jannin, Vincent; Igonin, Annabel; Partheil, Anette; Marchaud, Delphine; Jule, Eduardo; Vertommen, Jan; Maio, Mario; Blundell, Ross; Benameur, Hassan; Carrière, Frédéric; Müllertz, Anette; Pouton, Colin W; Porter, Christopher J H

    2012-11-05

    The LFCS Consortium was established to develop standardized in vitro tests for lipid-based formulations (LBFs) and to examine the utility of these tests to probe the fundamental mechanisms that underlie LBF performance. In this publication, the impact of bile salt (sodium taurodeoxycholate, NaTDC) concentration and drug loading on the ability of a range of representative LBFs to generate and sustain drug solubilization and supersaturation during in vitro digestion testing has been explored and a common driver of the potential for drug precipitation identified. Danazol was used as a model poorly water-soluble drug throughout. In general, increasing NaTDC concentrations increased the digestion of the most lipophilic LBFs and promoted lipid (and drug) trafficking from poorly dispersed oil phases to the aqueous colloidal phase (AP(DIGEST)). High NaTDC concentrations showed some capacity to reduce drug precipitation, although, at NaTDC concentrations ≥3 mM, NaTDC effects on either digestion or drug solubilization were modest. In contrast, increasing drug load had a marked impact on drug solubilization. For LBFs containing long-chain lipids, drug precipitation was limited even at drug loads approaching saturation in the formulation and concentrations of solubilized drug in AP(DIGEST) increased with increased drug load. For LBFs containing medium-chain lipids, however, significant precipitation was evident, especially at higher drug loads. Across all formulations a remarkably consistent trend emerged such that the likelihood of precipitation was almost entirely dependent on the maximum supersaturation ratio (SR(M)) attained on initiation of digestion. SR(M) defines the supersaturation "pressure" in the system and is calculated from the maximum attainable concentration in the AP(DIGEST) (assuming zero precipitation), divided by the solubility of the drug in the colloidal phases formed post digestion. For LBFs where phase separation of oil phases did not occur, a

  11. [Effects of anti-diabetic therapy on cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avogaro, Angelo

    2013-12-01

    It is debatable whether metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes is followed by a commensurate reduction in cardiovascular risk. Large clinical outcome trials have shown that lowering glucose is a poor predictor of cardiovascular outcome; rather a too tight metabolic control exposes patients, particularly those at risk for hypoglycemia, and with renal failure, to severe adverse events. This article reviews the specific effects of the most commonly used glucose-lowering agents on the cardiovascular system, and specifies which drug is best suited for a given clinical condition related to cardiovascular disease.

  12. Antidiabetic and antioxidant effects and phytochemicals of mulberry fruit (Morus alba L. polyphenol enhanced extract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihai Wang

    Full Text Available The antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of the ethyl acetate-soluble extract (MFE of mulberry fruit (Morus alba L. were investigated. In vitro, MFE showed potent α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and radical-scavenging activities against DPPH and superoxide anion radicals. In vivo, MFE could significantly decrease fasting blood glucose (FBG and glycosylated serum protein (GSP, and increase antioxidant enzymatic activities (SOD, CAT, GSH-Px in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic mice. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the MFE led to the isolation of 25 phenolic compounds, and their structures were identified on the basis of MS and NMR data. All the 25 compounds were isolated from mulberry fruit for the first time. Also, the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and antioxidant activity of the phenolics were evaluated. Potent α-glucosidase inhibitory and radical-scavenging activities of these phenolics suggested that they may be partially responsible for the antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of mulberry fruit.

  13. Review of Antidiabetic Fruits, Vegetables, Beverages, Oils and Spices commonly consumed in the Diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beidokhti, Maliheh Najari; Jäger, Anna K

    2017-01-01

    of the fruits, vegetables, beverages, oils and spices and the words 'antidiabetic', 'hypoglycemic', 'anti-hyperglycemic', 'type 2 diabetes' were used as keywords for search. RESULTS: Certain fruits and vegetables are functional foods and their consumption reduces the incidence of type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemic......-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of some dietary fruits, vegetables, beverages, oils and spices and their active hypoglycemic constituents. Including such plant species in the diet might improve management of type 2 diabetes....... for patients with type 2 diabetes. The ethnopharmacological use of herbal medicines, many of them part of our diet as spices, vegetables and fruits, has been developed for the treatment of diabetes due to inexpensiveness, easy availability and few side effects. AIM OF THE STUDY: Our aim is to present a review...

  14. Antidiabetic and antioxidant effects and phytochemicals of mulberry fruit (Morus alba L.) polyphenol enhanced extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yihai; Xiang, Limin; Wang, Chunhua; Tang, Chao; He, Xiangjiu

    2013-01-01

    The antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of the ethyl acetate-soluble extract (MFE) of mulberry fruit (Morus alba L.) were investigated. In vitro, MFE showed potent α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and radical-scavenging activities against DPPH and superoxide anion radicals. In vivo, MFE could significantly decrease fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glycosylated serum protein (GSP), and increase antioxidant enzymatic activities (SOD, CAT, GSH-Px) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the MFE led to the isolation of 25 phenolic compounds, and their structures were identified on the basis of MS and NMR data. All the 25 compounds were isolated from mulberry fruit for the first time. Also, the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and antioxidant activity of the phenolics were evaluated. Potent α-glucosidase inhibitory and radical-scavenging activities of these phenolics suggested that they may be partially responsible for the antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of mulberry fruit.

  15. Plant foods in the management of diabetes mellitus: spices as beneficial antidiabetic food adjuncts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, K

    2005-09-01

    Diet has been recognized as a corner stone in the management of diabetes mellitus. Spices are the common dietary adjuncts that contribute to the taste and flavour of foods. Besides, spices are also known to exert several beneficial physiological effects including the antidiabetic influence. This review considers all the available information from animal experimentation as well as clinical trials where spices, their extracts or their active principles were examined for treatment of diabetes. Among the spices, fenugreek seeds (Trigonella foenumgraecum), garlic (Allium sativum), onion (Allium cepa), and turmeric (Curcuma longa) have been experimentally documented to possess antidiabetic potential. In a limited number of studies, cumin seeds (Cuminum cyminum), ginger (Zingiber officinale), mustard (Brassica nigra), curry leaves (Murraya koenigii) and coriander (Coriandrum sativum) have been reported to be hypoglycaemic.

  16. Anti-diabetic and hypoglycaemic effects of Momordica charantia (bitter melon): a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Lawrence; Birtwhistle, Richard; Kotecha, Jyoti; Hannah, Susan; Cuthbertson, Sharon

    2009-12-01

    It has been estimated that up to one-third of patients with diabetes mellitus use some form of complementary and alternative medicine. Momordica charantia (bitter melon) is a popular fruit used for the treatment of diabetes and related conditions amongst the indigenous populations of Asia, South America, India and East Africa. Abundant pre-clinical studies have documented the anti-diabetic and hypoglycaemic effects of M. charantia through various postulated mechanisms. However, clinical trial data with human subjects are limited and flawed by poor study design and low statistical power. The present article reviews the clinical data regarding the anti-diabetic potentials of M. charantia and calls for better-designed clinical trials to further elucidate its possible therapeutic effects.

  17. Glitazones and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors as the second-line oral anti-diabetic agents added to metformin reduce cardiovascular risk in Type 2 diabetes patients: a nationwide cohort observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cheng-Wei; Yu, Chu-Leng; Lin, Jiunn-Cherng; Hsieh, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Che-Chen; Hung, Chen-Ying; Li, Cheng-Hung; Liao, Ying-Chieh; Lo, Chu-Pin; Huang, Jin-Long; Lin, Ching-Heng; Wu, Tsu-Juey

    2018-01-24

    Metformin is the standard first-line drug for patients with Type 2 diabetes (T2DM). However, the optimal second-line oral anti-diabetic agent (ADA) remains unclear. We investigated the cardiovascular risk of various ADAs used as add-on medication to metformin in T2DM patients from a nationwide cohort. T2DM patients using different add-on oral ADAs after an initial metformin therapy of > 90 days were identified from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database. Five classes of ADAs, including sulphonylureas (SU), glinides, thiazolidinediones (TZD), alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (AGI), and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4I) were selected for analysis. The reference group was the SU added to metformin. Patients were excluded if aged cardiovascular event (MACE) including ACS, ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke, and death. A Cox regression model was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for MACE. A total of 26,742 patients receiving their add-on drug to metformin of either SU (n = 24,277), glinides (n = 962), TZD (n = 581), AGI (n = 808), or DPP-4I (n = 114) were analyzed. After a mean follow-up duration of 6.6 ± 3.4 years, a total of 4775 MACEs occurred. Compared with the SU+metformin group (reference), the TZD+metformin (adjusted HR: 0.66; 95% CI 0.50-0.88, p = 0.004) and AGI+metformin (adjusted HR: 0.74; 95% CI 0.59-0.94, p = 0.01) groups showed a significantly lower risk of MACE. Both TZD and AGI, when used as an add-on drug to metformin were associated with lower MACE risk when compared with SU added to metformin in this retrospective cohort study. Trial registration CE13152B-3. Registered 7 Mar, 2013, retrospectively registered.

  18. Improved stability and antidiabetic potential of insulin containing folic acid functionalized polymer stabilized multilayered liposomes following oral administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrawal, Ashish Kumar; Harde, Harshad; Thanki, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    hypoglycemia and approximately 20% relative bioavailability in comparison with subcutaneously administered standard insulin solution. Overall the proposed strategy is expected to contribute significantly in the field of designing ligand-anchored, polyelectrolyte-based stable systems in drug delivery....

  19. Anti-diabetic medications and risk of primary liver cancer in persons with type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, K W; McGlynn, K A; Sahasrabuddhe, V V; Jick, S

    2014-10-28

    Type II diabetes increases liver cancer risk but the risk may be mitigated by anti-diabetic medications. However, choice of medications is correlated with diabetes duration and severity, leading to confounding by indication. To address this association, we conducted a nested case-control study among persons with type II diabetes in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Cases had primary liver cancer and controls were matched on age, sex, practice, calendar time, and number of years in the database. Exposure was classified by type and combination of anti-diabetic prescribed and compared to non-use. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using conditional logistic regression. In 305 cases of liver cancer and 1151 controls, there was no association between liver cancer and anti-diabetic medication use compared to non-use (OR=0.74 (95% CI=0.45-1.20) for metformin-only, 1.10 (95% CI=0.66-1.84) for other oral hypoglycaemic (OH)-only, 0.89 (95% CI=0.58-1.37) for metformin+other OH, 1.11 (95% CI=0.60-2.05) for metformin+insulin, 0.81 (95% CI=0.23-2.85) for other OH+insulin, and 0.72 (95% CI=0.18-2.84) for insulin-only). Stratification by duration of diabetes did not alter the results. Use of any anti-diabetic medications in patients with type II diabetes was not associated with liver cancer, though there was a suggestion of a small protective effect for metformin.

  20. Update of Cardiovascular Effects of Older and Newer Anti-diabetic Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriadou, Ioanna; Grigoropoulou, Pinelopi; Liberopoulos, Evangelos; Liatis, Stavros; Kokkinos, Alexandros; Tentolouris, Nikolaos

    2017-05-29

    It is known that cardiovascular (CV) disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Over the last years one of the most discussed topics is the CV safety of anti-diabetic medications. Regarding CV safety of older anti-diabetic agents the data are less clear and conclusions about their CV safety is based mostly on randomized controlled trials designed to assess their glucose lowering efficacy. In this review we summarize current knowledge about the CV safety of older and newer anti-diabetic medications. According to the published literature metformin is the first line agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and seems to have cardio-protective effects. The choice of the second line agent when metformin monotherapy fails to achieve HbA1c targets is less clear. In the light of the findings of the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial and the recently published LEADER trial, empagliflozin and liraglutide seem reasonable options as second line agents for patients with CV disease. Sulfonylureas on the other hand, with the exception of gliclazide, should be avoided in those patients, although CV safety trials are still lacking. In individuals without CV disease any of the other classes of anti-diabetic medication can be selected on a patient-centered approach. Saxagliptin, alogliptin, sitagliptin and lixisenatide have been evaluated in CV safety trials and have neutral effects on CV outcomes, while pioglitazone may have some CV benefits. Saxagliptine and alogliptine, however, should be avoided in patients with heart failure, while pioglitazone is contraindicated in this population. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Antidiabetic effects of Momordica charantia (bitter melon) and its medicinal potency

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Baby; Jini, D

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is among the most common disorder in developed and developing countries, and the disease is increasing rapidly in most parts of the world. It has been estimated that up to one-third of patients with diabetes mellitus use some form of complementary and alternative medicine. One plant that has received the most attention for its anti-diabetic properties is bitter melon, Momordica charantia (M. charantia), commonly referred to as bitter gourd, karela and balsam p...

  2. Dapagliflozin, a novel oral antidiabetic with an uncertain future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Escudero Vilaplana

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2 is one of the main sociosanitary problems; there are many treatments for it. Recently, it has been approved the first drug of a new family of oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA: dapagliflozin. We aimed to review the available scientific evidence on dapagliflozin, in order to analyze its effectiveness, safety and cost and to estimate its role in the current pharmacotherapy of DM2. Methods: Effectiveness and safety of dapagliflozin were analyzed by an evaluation of the scientific evidence. The cost of different OHA was calculated based on the defined daily dose (DDD and their ex-factory prices. Results: Seven randomized clinical trials were identified: 2 monotherapy (840 patients and 5 in combination with other hypoglycemic agents (3184 patients. In the seven trials, dapagliflozin reduced HbA1c; all were compared with placebo, unless in a trial of combination therapy in which was compared with an active drug (glipizide. The most common side effects were genitourinary infections and hypotension, although it should be taken into consideration the increase of the bladder cancer. Besides the DPP-4 inhibitors, dapagliflozin is one of the OHA more expensive (annual cost of DDD= 729.3 euros. Conclusions: Dapagliflozin does not provide advantages over pharmacotherapy for DM2. Its lack of experience of use, the absence of significant clinical benefits and its high cost make it necessary to restrict its use

  3. [Dapagliflozin, a novel oral antidiabetic with an uncertain future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero Vilaplana, Belén; Almodóvar Carretón, María José; Herrero Hernández, Silvia

    2014-11-03

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) is one of the main sociosanitary problems; there are many treatments for it. Recently, it has been approved the first drug of a new family of oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA): dapagliflozin. We aimed to review the available scientific evidence on dapagliflozin, in order to analyze its effectiveness, safety and cost and to estimate its role in the current pharmacotherapy of DM2. Effectiveness and safety of dapagliflozin were analyzed by an evaluation of the scientific evidence. The cost of different OHA was calculated based on the defined daily dose (DDD) and their ex-factory prices. Seven randomized clinical trials were identified: 2 monotherapy (840 patients) and 5 in combination with other hypoglycemic agents (3184 patients). In the seven trials, dapagliflozin reduced HbA1c; all were compared with placebo, unless in a trial of combination therapy in which was compared with an active drug (glipizide). The most common side effects were genitourinary infections and hypotension, although it should be taken into consideration the increase of the bladder cancer. Besides the DPP-4 inhibitors, dapagliflozin is one of the OHA more expensive (annual cost of DDD= 729.3 euros). Dapagliflozin does not provide advantages over pharmacotherapy for DM2. Its lack of experience of use, the absence of significant clinical benefits and its high cost make it necessary to restrict its use. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  4. Antidiabetic effects of Momordica charantia (bitter melon) and its medicinal potency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Baby; Jini, D

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is among the most common disorder in developed and developing countries, and the disease is increasing rapidly in most parts of the world. It has been estimated that up to one-third of patients with diabetes mellitus use some form of complementary and alternative medicine. One plant that has received the most attention for its anti-diabetic properties is bitter melon, Momordica charantia (M. charantia), commonly referred to as bitter gourd, karela and balsam pear. Its fruit is also used for the treatment of diabetes and related conditions amongst the indigenous populations of Asia, South America, India and East Africa. Abundant pre-clinical studies have documented in the anti-diabetic and hypoglycaemic effects of M. charantia through various postulated mechanisms. However, clinical trial data with human subjects are limited and flawed by poor study design and low statistical power. The present review is an attempt to highlight the antidiabetic activity as well as phytochemical and pharmacological reports on M. charantia and calls for better-designed clinical trials to further elucidate its possible therapeutic effects on diabetes.

  5. Antidiabetic effects of Momordica charantia (bitter melon and its medicinal potency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baby Joseph

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is among the most common disorder in developed and developing countries, and the disease is increasing rapidly in most parts of the world. It has been estimated that up to one-third of patients with diabetes mellitus use some form of complementary and alternative medicine. One plant that has received the most attention for its anti-diabetic properties is bitter melon, Momordica charantia (M. charantia, commonly referred to as bitter gourd, karela and balsam pear. Its fruit is also used for the treatment of diabetes and related conditions amongst the indigenous populations of Asia, South America, India and East Africa. Abundant pre-clinical studies have documented in the anti-diabetic and hypoglycaemic effects of M. charantia through various postulated mechanisms. However, clinical trial data with human subjects are limited and flawed by poor study design and low statistical power. The present review is an attempt to highlight the antidiabetic activity as well as phytochemical and pharmacological reports on M. charantia and calls for better-designed clinical trials to further elucidate its possible therapeutic effects on diabetes.

  6. ANTIDIABETIC ACTIVITY FROM ETHANOL EXTRACT OF KLUWIH’S LEAF (Artocarpus camansi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Marianne

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Research on antidiabetic activity of ethanol leaf extracts Kluwih (Artocarpus camansi has been carried out to determine the antidiabetic activity of ethanol extract of leaves kluwih (EELK of mice using glucose tolerance test. The study began by dividing the mice into 6 groups. Group 1 was given 1% CMC, group 2 to group 4, given EELK 50, 100, 200, 400 mg / kg bw, respectively, and group 6  administered with glibenclamide 0.45 mg/kg bw. Thirty minutes later each group was given glucose 30 mg/kg bw. After 30 min of glucose loading, blood glucose levels of mice were measured, and measured again at minute 60, 90, 120 and 150 minutes. The results showed that the glucose tolerance test EELK a significant effect in lowering blood glucose levels compared to controls at 30 and 60 minutes after administration of glucose. At minute 90 to 150, the effect of blood glucose levels EELK restore back to normal. EELK demonstrated ability to reduce blood glucose levels, and EELK doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg bw showed antidiabetic effects better than a dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg bw. Increasing doses showed antagonistic effects: the ability to increase blood glucose levels.

  7. In vitro evaluation of anti-diabetic activity and cytotoxicity of chemically analysed Ocimum basilicum extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadan, Sleman; Saad, Bashar; Sasson, Yoel; Zaid, Hilal

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) in the anti-diabetic effects of methanol, hexane and dichloromethane extracts of the aerial parts of Ocimum basilicum (OB) and to analyze their phytochemical composition. Phytochemical analysis of the three extracts by GC/MS using the silylation derivatization technique revealed 53 compounds, 17 of them were found for the first time in OB. Cytotoxic and anti-diabetic properties of the extracts were evaluated using L6-GLUT4myc muscle cells stably expressing myc epitope at the exofacial loop (GLUT4). No cytotoxic effects were observed in treated cells up to 0.25 mg/ml extract as measured with MTT and LDH-leakage assays. GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane was elevated by 3.5 and 7 folds (-/+ insulin) after treatment with OB extracts for 20 h. Our findings suggest that the observed anti-diabetic properties of OB extracts are possibly mediated in part through one or more of the 17 new identified compound. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antidiabetic Activity of Artemisia amygdalina Decne in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Ghazanfar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Artemisia species have been extensively used for the management of diabetes in folklore medicine. The current study was designed to investigate the antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic effects of Artemisia amygdalina. Petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, methanol, and hydroethanolic extracts of Artemisia amygdalina were tested for their antidiabetic potentials in diabetic rats. The effect of extracts was observed by checking the biochemical, physiological, and histopathological parameters in diabetic rats. The hydroethanolic and methanolic extracts each at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg b. w significantly reduced glucose levels in diabetic rats. The other biochemical parameters like cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoproteins (LDL, serum creatinine, serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT, serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT, and alkaline phosphatise (ALP, were found to be reduced by the hydroethanolic and methanolic extracts. The extracts also showed reduction in the feed and water consumption of diabetic rats when compared with the diabetic control. The histopathological results of treated groups showed the regenerative/protective effect on β-cells of pancreas in diabetic rats. The current study revealed the antidiabetic potential of Artemisia amygdalina being effective in hyperglycemia and that it can effectively protect against other metabolic aberrations caused by diabetes in rats, which seems to validate its therapeutic traditional use.

  9. Anti-diabetic effects of brown algae derived phlorotannins, marine polyphenols through diverse mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hong; Jeon, You-Jin

    2013-04-01

    Marine algae are popular and abundant food ingredients mainly in Asian countries, and also well known for their health beneficial effects due to the presence of biologically active components. The marine algae have been studied for biologically active components and phlorotannins, marine polyphenols are among them. Among marine algae, brown algae have extensively studied for their potential anti-diabetic activities. Majority of the investigations on phlorotannins derived from brown algae have exhibited their various anti-diabetic mechanisms such as α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory effect, glucose uptake effect in skeletal muscle, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP 1B) enzyme inhibition, improvement of insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetic db/db mice, and protective effect against diabetes complication. In this review, we have made an attempt to discuss the various anti-diabetic mechanisms associated with phlorotannins from brown algae that are confined to in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Antioxidant and antidiabetic properties of tartary buckwheat rice flavonoids after in vitro digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Tao; Wang, Ye; Li, Yu-Ting; Gowd, Vemana; Niu, Xin-He; Yang, Hai-Ying; Chen, Li-Shui; Chen, Wei; Sun, Chong-de

    Oxidative stress and diabetes have a tendency to alter protein, lipid, and DNA moieties. One of the strategic methods used to reduce diabetes-associated oxidative stress is to inhibit the carbohydrate-digesting enzymes, thereby decreasing gastrointestinal glucose production. Plant-derived natural antioxidant molecules are considered a therapeutic tool in the treatment of oxidative stress and diabetes. The objective of this study was to identify tartary buckwheat rice flavonoids and evaluate the effect of in vitro digestion on their antioxidant and antidiabetic properties. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated the presence of rutin as a major component and quercitrin as a minor component of both digested and non-digested flavonoids. Both extracts showed a significant antioxidant capacity, but digested flavonoids showed reduced activity compared to non-digested. There were some decreases of the antioxidant activities (2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazy (DPPH) radical, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP)) of digested tartary buckwheat rice flavonoids compared with non-digested. Flavonoids from both groups significantly inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and α-glucosidase activity. Both digested and non-digested flavonoids markedly increased glucose consumption and glycogen content in HepG2 cells. Tartary buckwheat rice flavonoids showed appreciable antioxidant and antidiabetic properties, even after digestion. Tartary buckwheat rice appears to be a promising functional food with potent antioxidant and antidiabetic properties.

  11. In Vitro Antidiabetic Activities of Extract and Isolated Flavonoid Compounds from Artocarpus altilis (Parkinson Fosberg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puspa Dewi Narrij Lotulung

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The antidiabetic activity test through a mechanism of inhibition of α-glucosidase enzyme was studied against ethanol, n-hexane, ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions of ethanol extract of Artocarpus altilis (Parkinson Fosberg (Moraceae leaves and four flavonoid compounds isolated from ethyl acetate extracts of A. altilis. Ethyl acetate fraction has strongest antidiabetic activity compared to ethanol, n-hexane, and n-butanol fractions with IC50values5.98,6.79, 440.18and14.42μg/mL, respectively. Four flavonoid compounds (1-(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl-3-[8-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(4-methyl-3-pentenyl-2H-1-benzopyran-5-yl]-1-propanone (AC-31, 2-geranyl-2',3,4,4'-tetrahydroxy dihydrochalcone (AC-51, 8-geranyl-4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone (AC-33 andcyclocommunol (AA-3, have been isolated from ethylacetate fraction. AC-31 was the strongest antidiabetic compound compared to AC-51, AC-33 and cyclocommunolwithIC50values are 15.73, 24.41,49.49,and72.20μg/mL. Kineticstudies of AC-31 using Lineweaver-Burk method showed that inhibition mechanism of enzymeα-glucosidase was anon-competitivetype.

  12. Application of a Fast Separation Method for Anti-diabetics in Pharmaceuticals Using Monolithic Column: Comparative Study With Silica Based C-18 Particle Packed Column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemdan, A; Abdel-Aziz, Omar

    2018-04-01

    Run time is a predominant factor in HPLC for quality control laboratories especially if there is large number of samples have to be analyzed. Working at high flow rates cannot be attained with silica based particle packed column due to elevated backpressure issues. The use of monolithic column as an alternative to traditional C-18 column was tested for fast separation of pharmaceuticals, where the results were very competitive. The performance comparison of both columns was tested for separation of anti-diabetic combination containing Metformin, Pioglitazone and Glimepiride using Gliclazide as an internal standard. Working at high flow rates with less significant backpressure was obtained with the monolithic column where the run time was reduced from 6 min in traditional column to only 1 min in monolithic column with accepted resolution. The structure of the monolith contains many pores which can adapt the high flow rate of the mobile phase. Moreover, peak symmetry and equilibration time were more efficient with monolithic column.

  13. The legal standards for the radioactive or non radioactive drugs research and approval in the European Community and in Germany after the thalidomide catastrophe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsch, Michael; Otte, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The drug thalidomide was contained in the blockbuster Contergan, which has been used as a non- prescription sedative drug and a potent treatment for occurring morning sickness in pregnant women during the 1950s and the early 1960s. This therapeutic use has led to one of the most prominent disasters in the history of drug development due to peripheral neuritis and malformations, e.g. phocomelia, in babies whose mothers had taken thalidomide within their pregnancies. Moreover, this catastrophe initiated a change of paradigm in Germany as well as in Europe with regard to drug safety and the regulatory setting. This article describes the history of the use of thalidomide and the regulatory framework of drug approval at that time as well as changes after the Contergan disaster including considerations to radiopharmaceuticals. Additionally, aspects of drug safety in the different development phases of pharmaceuticals as well as radiopharmaceuticals, i.e. pre-clinical and clinical phases, are characterised. However, many drugs have been withdrawn from the market after approval due to changes with regard of their risk-benefit balance after the occurrence of adverse drug reactions. Thus, pharmacovigilance activities are also mentioned in this review article. Last, obstacles and future perspectives in the arena of drug research and development also considering the use of radiopharmaceuticals are delineated.

  14. Validation in daily clinical situations of Diascope®, a software developed to help healthcare professionals individualize antidiabetic treatment in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampudia-Blasco, Francisco Javier; García-Soidán, Francisco Javier; Rubio Sánchez, Manuela; Phan, Tra-Mi

    2017-03-01

    DiaScope ® is a software to help in individualized prescription of antidiabetic treatment in type 2 diabetes. This study assessed its value and acceptability by different professionals. DiaScope ® was developed based on the ADA-EASD 2012 algorithm and on the recommendation of 12 international diabetes experts using the RAND/UCLA appropriateness method. The current study was performed at a single session. In the first phase, 5 clinical scenarios were evaluated, selecting the most appropriated therapeutic option among 4 possibilities (initial test). In a second phase, the same clinical cases were evaluated with DiaScope ® (final test).Opinion surveys on DiaScope ® were also performed (questionnaire). DiaScope ® changed the selected option 1 or more times in 70.5% of cases. Among 275 evaluated questionnaires, 54.0% strongly agree that DiaScope ® allowed finding easily a similar therapeutic scenario to the corresponding patient, and 52.5 among the obtained answers were clinically plausible. Up to 58.3% will recommend it to a colleague. In particular, primary care physicians with >20 years of professional dedication found with DiaScope ® the most appropriate option for a particular situation against specialists or those with less professional dedication (p<.05). DiaScope ® is an easy to use tool for antidiabetic drug prescription that provides plausible solutions and is especially useful for primary care physicians with more years of professional practice. Copyright © 2017 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Distribution and persistence of the anti sea-lice drug teflubenzuron in wild fauna and sediments around a salmon farm, following a standard treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsen, Ole B. [Institute of Marine Research, P.O. Box 1870 Nordnes, N-5817 Bergen (Norway); Lunestad, Bjørn T.; Hannisdal, Rita [National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research, P.O. Box 2029 Nordnes, N-5817 Bergen (Norway); Bannister, Raymond; Olsen, Siri [Institute of Marine Research, P.O. Box 1870 Nordnes, N-5817 Bergen (Norway); Tjensvoll, Tore [National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research, P.O. Box 2029 Nordnes, N-5817 Bergen (Norway); Farestveit, Eva; Ervik, Arne [Institute of Marine Research, P.O. Box 1870 Nordnes, N-5817 Bergen (Norway)

    2015-03-01

    The salmon louse (Lepeoptheirus salmonis) is a challenge in the farming of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). To treat an infestation, different insecticides are used like the orally administered chitin synthetase inhibitor teflubenzuron. The concentrations and distribution of teflubenzuron were measured in water, organic particles, marine sediment and biota caught in the vicinity of a fish farm following a standard medication. Low concentrations were found in water samples whereas the organic waste from the farm, collected by sediment traps had concentrations higher than the medicated feed. Most of the organic waste was distributed to the bottom close to the farm but organic particles containing teflubenzuron were collected 1100 m from the farm. The sediment under the farm consisted of 5 to 10% organic material and therefore the concentration of teflubenzuron was much lower than in the organic waste. Teflubenzuron was persistent in the sediment with a stipulated halflife of 170 days. Sediment consuming polychaetes had high but decreasing concentrations of teflubenzuron throughout the experimental period, reflecting the decrease of teflubenzuron in the sediment. During medication most wild fauna contained teflubenzuron residues and where polychaetes and saith had highest concentrations. Eight months later only polychaetes and some crustaceans contained drug residues. What dosages that induce mortality in various crustaceans following short or long-term exposure is not known but the results indicate that the concentrations in defined individuals of king crab, shrimp, squat lobster and Norway lobster were high enough shortly after medication to induce mortality if moulting was imminent. Considering food safety, saith and the brown meat of crustaceans contained at first sampling concentrations of teflubenzuron higher than the MRL-value set for Atlantic salmon. The concentrations were, however, moderate and the amount of saith fillet or brown meat of crustaceans to be

  16. A Systematic Review of Interventions Addressing Adherence to Anti-Diabetic Medications in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes--Components of Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Sujata; Brien, Jo-Anne E; Greenfield, Jerry R; Aslani, Parisa

    2015-01-01

    Poor adherence to anti-diabetic medications contributes to suboptimal glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). A range of interventions have been developed to promote anti-diabetic medication adherence. However, there has been very little focus on the characteristics of these interventions and how effectively they address factors that predict non-adherence. In this systematic review we assessed the characteristics of interventions that aimed to promote adherence to anti-diabetic medications. Using appropriate search terms in Medline, Embase, CINAHL, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA), PUBmed, and PsychINFO (years 2000-2013), we identified 52 studies which met the inclusion criteria. Forty-nine studies consisted of patient-level interventions, two provider-level interventions, and one consisted of both. Interventions were classified as educational (n = 7), behavioural (n = 3), affective, economic (n = 3) or multifaceted (a combination of the above; n = 40). One study consisted of two interventions. The review found that multifaceted interventions, addressing several non-adherence factors, were comparatively more effective in improving medication adherence and glycaemic target in patients with T2D than single strategies. However, interventions with similar components and those addressing similar non-adherence factors demonstrated mixed results, making it difficult to conclude on effective intervention strategies to promote adherence. Educational strategies have remained the most popular intervention strategy, followed by behavioural, with affective components becoming more common in recent years. Most of the interventions addressed patient-related (n = 35), condition-related (n = 31), and therapy-related (n = 20) factors as defined by the World Health Organization, while fewer addressed health care system (n = 5) and socio-economic-related factors (n = 13). There is a noticeable shift in the literature from using single to multifaceted

  17. Assessing the effect of treatment duration on the association between anti-diabetic medication and cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna But

    Full Text Available Most studies that have evaluated the association between anti-diabetic medication and cancer risk have suffered from methodological drawbacks. To avoid time-related biases, we evaluated the effect of treatment duration on the cancer risk among naive users of anti-diabetic medication as compared to non-users. In addition, we addressed the influence of common risk factors such as smoking and BMI. The study population comprised 23,394 participants of FINRISK surveys. Data on cancer and anti-diabetic medication were linked with the study cohorts. We applied Lexis tabulation to the data and analyzed split records by using Poisson regression. Changes in cancer incidence in relation to treatment duration were examined by modeling the rate ratio (RR. After a median follow-up of 9 years, 53 cancer cases among users of anti-diabetic medication and 1,028 among non-users were diagnosed. No significant difference in cancer risk between users and non-users was observed after adjustment. The RR for all medication regardless of its duration was 1.01 [95% CI 0.75-1.33], and 1.37 [0.94-1.94] for period of 1-4 years. The results were similar for metformin, sulfonylurea, and insulin. This study demonstrates that evaluation of the variation in cancer risk in relation to treatment duration is of particular importance for enhancing the accuracy of conclusions on the link between exposure to anti-diabetic medication and cancer risk.

  18. Assessing the effect of treatment duration on the association between anti-diabetic medication and cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    But, Anna; Wang, Haining; Männistö, Satu; Pukkala, Eero; Haukka, Jari

    2014-01-01

    Most studies that have evaluated the association between anti-diabetic medication and cancer risk have suffered from methodological drawbacks. To avoid time-related biases, we evaluated the effect of treatment duration on the cancer risk among naive users of anti-diabetic medication as compared to non-users. In addition, we addressed the influence of common risk factors such as smoking and BMI. The study population comprised 23,394 participants of FINRISK surveys. Data on cancer and anti-diabetic medication were linked with the study cohorts. We applied Lexis tabulation to the data and analyzed split records by using Poisson regression. Changes in cancer incidence in relation to treatment duration were examined by modeling the rate ratio (RR). After a median follow-up of 9 years, 53 cancer cases among users of anti-diabetic medication and 1,028 among non-users were diagnosed. No significant difference in cancer risk between users and non-users was observed after adjustment. The RR for all medication regardless of its duration was 1.01 [95% CI 0.75-1.33], and 1.37 [0.94-1.94] for period of 1-4 years. The results were similar for metformin, sulfonylurea, and insulin. This study demonstrates that evaluation of the variation in cancer risk in relation to treatment duration is of particular importance for enhancing the accuracy of conclusions on the link between exposure to anti-diabetic medication and cancer risk.

  19. Ocimum basilicum extract exhibits antidiabetic effects via inhibition of hepatic glucose mobilization and carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeani, Chinelo; Ezenyi, Ifeoma; Okoye, Theophine; Okoli, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Ocimum basilicum L (Lamiaceae) is used as a traditional remedy for different ailments, including diabetes mellitus. This study investigated the antidiabetic effects of an extract of aerial parts of O. basilicum . Antihyperglycemic effect of the extract was determined by its effects on α-amylase and α-glucosidase in vitro , while antidiabetic properties were studied in alloxan induced diabetic rats treated for 28 days with extract and compared to those treated with oral metformin (150 mg/kg). The study and analysis was conducted between 2014 and 2015. The treatment with 100 and 200 mg/kg extract significantly ( P < 0.05) reduced fasting blood glucose concentration and slightly increased mean body weight in treated groups. Oral glucose tolerance was also significantly ( P < 0.05, 0.001) improved in 100 and 400 mg/kg extract-treated groups. The extract caused a dose-dependent increase in liver glycogen content, while it decreased alanine transferase (18.9-30.56%) and aspartate transferase (6.48-34.3%) levels in a non-dose-dependent manner. A dose of 100 mg/kg also reduced serum cholesterol and triglycerides by 19.3 and 39.54%, compared to a 2.6% reduction of cholesterol seen in the metformin-treated group. The extract was observed to produce significant ( P < 0.001) concentration-dependent inhibition of α-glucosidase (35.71-100%) and also α-amylase (23.55-81.52%), with estimated inhibitory concentration values of 1.62 and 3.86 mg/mL, respectively. The antidiabetic properties of the extract may be due to its ability to suppress endogenous glucose release, inhibit glycogenolysis and/or stimulate glycogenesis.

  20. Prognostic significance of anti-diabetic medications in pancreatic cancer: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dong-Chu; Gong, Hui; Tan, Chong-Qing; Luo, Jian-Quan

    2017-09-22

    The role of anti-diabetic medications in pancreatic cancer remains conflicting. We carried out a systematic search of Pubmed and Embase databases for studies published before August 2016, which assessed the associations between anti-diabetic medications (metformin, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones and insulin) intake and pancreatic cancer prognosis. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using the random-effects model. The primary outcomes of interest were overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Fourteen studies enrolling 94778 participants were eligible for inclusion, with 12 cohort studies and 2 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Significant association between metformin (adjusted HR=0.77, 95% CI=0.68-0.87) use and OS was found in cohort studies, whereas no significant association between metformin use and PFS (HR=1.22; 95% CI=0.76-1.95) or OS (HR=1.20, 95% CI=0.84-1.72) in RCTs. No significant survival benefits were identified for insulin (HR=1.18, 95% CI=0.83-1.69), sulfonylureas (HR=1.03, 95% CI=0.81-1.30), or thiazolidinediones (HR=0.84, 95% CI=0.58-1.22). The trim-and-fill method and subgroup analyses stratified by the study characteristics confirmed the robustness of the results. Our findings provide strong evidence that metformin is associated with improved OS in pancreatic cancer patients in cohort studies. However, the effect of other anti-diabetic medications should be interpreted with caution owing to the limited number of studies.

  1. Nepalese patients' anti-diabetic medication taking behaviour: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Sujata; Brien, Jo-Anne E; Aslani, Parisa

    2017-02-25

    To explore anti-diabetic medication taking behaviour in Nepalese patients with type 2 diabetes and investigate the factors impacting medication taking in this population. Face-to-face interviews (n = 48) were conducted with Nepalese patients with type 2 diabetes in Sydney (Australia) and Kathmandu (Nepal). All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Participants' medication adherence was also assessed quantitatively using the summary of diabetes self-care activity (SDSCA) questionnaire. The medication taking behaviour of Nepalese participants aligned with the Stages of Change Model, with some notable patterns of behaviour. Most participants initiated and implemented anti-diabetic medications soon after obtaining their prescription. However, a few, delayed initiation and/or ceased medications after initiation to recommence later. Nonetheless, upon recommencement, participants persisted fairly well with their medications. The self-reported medication adherence was high (97.3%). Although some participants expressed adherence as a challenge at the start of therapy, medication taking on a day-to-day basis was not reported as difficult. Factors such as participants' reluctance towards using medications and preference for natural methods of treatment, together with inadequate understanding about diabetes and treatment resulted in the delay in initiating therapy, and contributed to cessation of therapy. On the other hand, ooccasional non-adherence in daily medication taking was mostly related to inconsistency in meal practices and forgetfulness. Encouragement from doctors and increased awareness about the disease and treatment facilitated medication adherence, including initiation of therapy. This study demonstrates that Nepalese patients are likely to delay or cease anti-diabetic medications until they fully accept and acknowledge the benefits and necessity of medications for effective diabetes management. Thus, educating

  2. Prescribing of Antidiabetic Medicines before, during and after Pregnancy: A Study in Seven European Regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A Charlton

    Full Text Available To explore antidiabetic medicine prescribing to women before, during and after pregnancy in different regions of Europe.A common protocol was implemented across seven databases in Denmark, Norway, The Netherlands, Italy (Emilia Romagna/Tuscany, Wales and the rest of the UK. Women with a pregnancy starting and ending between 2004 and 2010, (Denmark, 2004-2009; Norway, 2005-2010; Emilia Romagna, 2008-2010, which ended in a live or stillbirth, were identified. Prescriptions for antidiabetic medicines issued (UK or dispensed (non-UK during pregnancy and/or the year before or year after pregnancy were identified. Prescribing patterns were compared across databases and over calendar time.1,082,673 live/stillbirths were identified. Pregestational insulin prescribing during the year before pregnancy ranged from 0.27% (CI95 0.25-0.30 in Tuscany to 0.45% (CI95 0.43-0.47 in Norway, and increased between 2004 and 2009 in all countries. During pregnancy, insulin prescribing peaked during the third trimester and increased over time; third trimester prescribing was highest in Tuscany (2.2% and lowest in Denmark (0.5%. Of those prescribed an insulin during pregnancy, between 50.5% in Denmark and 88.8% in the Netherlands received an insulin analogue alone or in combination with human insulin, this proportion increasing over time. Oral products were mainly metformin and prescribing was highest in the 3 months before pregnancy. Metformin use during pregnancy increased in some countries.Pregestational diabetes is increasing in many areas of Europe. There is considerable variation between and within countries in the choice of medication for treating pregestational diabetes in pregnancy, including choice of insulin analogues and oral antidiabetics, and very large variation in the treatment of gestational diabetes despite international guidelines.

  3. Levels of trace elements in medicinal plants with anti-diabetic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, D.K.; Jena, S.

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal plants with anti-diabetic potential have been characterized by Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique. Trace elements such as Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr and Pb are found to be present in these studied medicinal plant samples. The concentrations of elements like K and Ca are quantified in percentage level whereas other elements are found to be in parts per million levels. Elemental analysis of ten different medicinal plant samples commonly used for management and cure of diabetes, shows variation in concentrations. These elements either directly or indirectly may play some role to control diabetes. (author)

  4. [Weight change, cardiometabolic risk and the impact of antidiabetic medications in type 2 diabetic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchin, N; Eschwège, E; Bekka, S; Krempf, M

    2010-08-01

    In the first part of this review article, the prognostic impact of weight and weight changes in terms of clinical outcomes and metabolic control is reviewed, through the analysis of the results of several large cohorts and prospective studies of diabetic patients followed in "real world" settings. The second part of the review focuses on the impact of antidiabetic medications on weight, emphasising the importance of a comprehensive approach, taking into account weight, in the management of diabetic patients. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  5. Anti-diabetic activity of crude Pistacia lentiscus in alloxan-induced diabetes in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Saad Ur Rehman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-diabetic effect of crude Pistacia lentiscus gum (mastic gum in alloxan-treated diabetic rat model. The crude P. lentiscus (100 mg/kg showed significant (p<0.001 reduction in blood glucose as compared to control. Liver function test also showed significant changes (p<0.001 as compared to alloxan-treated group. The results of this study showed that crude P. lentiscus gum have considerable efficacy in curing diabetes and have hepatoprotective effect.

  6. Evaluation of the antidiabetic property of aqueous leaves extract of Zanthoxylum armatum DC. using in vivo and in vitro approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey Vana Rynjah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the antidiabetic potential of the aqueous leaves extract of Zanthoxylum armatum DC. leaves using in vivo and in vitro approaches. For in vivo studies, blood glucose level was monitored at different intervals after administration of varying doses of the extract for its hypoglycemic (100–6000 mg/kg b.w. and antihyperglycemic (250 mg/kg b.w. effect in normoglycemic and diabetic mice. In vitro enzymatic inhibition activity was tested against α-amylase, α- and β-glucosidase and lipase. Additionally hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide scavenging assay and phytochemical screening were also performed. Element analysis of the plant was studied by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES. The plant extract showed significant hypoglycemic and antihyperglycemic effect in normoglycemic and diabetic mice. The IC50 values of extract for α-amylase, β-glucosidase, lipase, hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity were 7.40 mg/ml, 0.30 mg/ml, 8.35 mg/ml, 3.25 mg/ml, 9.62 mg/ml respectively and the percentage of inhibition for α-glucosidase was 79.82% at 0.8 mg/ml. In vitro studies were compared with their respective standards. Elemental analysis revealed the presence of essential elements such as Mg, V, Fe, Cr, Zn, Cu, Mo, Mn, K, Ca, P and Sr which are all known to play a role in regulating blood glucose. The results demonstrate that Z. armatum aqueous leaves extract possess antidiabetic property in both in vivo and in vitro condition.

  7. Comparison of the Chemical Profiles and Antioxidant and Antidiabetic Activities of Extracts from Two Ganoderma Species (Agaricomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoqing; Cai, Weixi; Xu, Baojun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the mycochemical profiles, antioxidant activities, and antidiabetic effects of 2 species of genus Ganoderma, the red lingzhi (G. lucidum) and purple lingzhi (G. sinense) mushrooms. In Chinese medicinal practice, hot water and ethanol are used as solvents to extract samples. In this study, a total of 4 extracts (ethanol and hot water extracts from G. lucidum and G. sinense) were prepared for further assays. Hot water extracts presented much higher values for total phenolic content and ferric-reducing antioxidant power than the ethanol extracts. Ethanol (70%) extract of G. lucidum had the strongest α-glycosidase inhibitory capacity, but the lingzhi polysaccharides showed no inhibitory effect. It also had the largest amount of total ganoderic acids. The results indicated that ethanol extracts from both G. lucidum and G. sinense showed better antidiabetic effects than the hot water extracts. Ganoderic acids, rather than polysaccharides, may contribute the antidiabetic effects of both the Ganoderma species.

  8. Triglyceride/HDL ratio as a screening tool for predicting success at reducing anti-diabetic medications following weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamaner Subash Shantha, Ghanshyam; Kumar, Anita Ashok; Kahan, Scott; Irukulla, Pavan Kumar; Cheskin, Lawrence Jay

    2013-01-01

    Intentional weight loss, by reducing insulin resistance, results in both better glycemic control and decreased need for anti-diabetic medications. However, not everyone who is successful with weight loss is able to reduce anti-diabetic medication use. In this retrospective cohort study, we assessed the predictive accuracy of baseline triglyceride (TGL)/HDL ratio, a marker of insulin resistance, to screen patients for success in reducing anti-diabetic medication use with weight loss. Case records of 121 overweight and obese attendees at two outpatient weight management centers were analyzed. The weight loss intervention consisted of a calorie-restricted diet (~1000Kcal/day deficit), a behavior modification plan, and a plan for increasing physical activity. Mean period of follow-up was 12.5 ± 3.5 months. By study exit, mean weight loss and mean HbA1c% reduction were 15.4 ± 5.5 kgs and 0.5 ± 0.2% respectively. 81 (67%) in the study cohort achieved at least 1 dose reduction of any anti-diabetic medication. Tests for predictive accuracy of baseline TGL/HDL ratio ≤ 3 to determine success with dose reductions of anti-diabetic medications showed a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, area under the curve, likelihood ratio (LR) + and LR-of 81, 83, 90, 70, 78, 4.8 and 0.2, respectively. Reproducibility of TGL/HDL ratio was acceptable. TGL/HDL ratio shows promise as an effective screening tool to determine success with dose reductions of anti-diabetic medications. The results of our study may inform the conduct of a systematic review using data from prior weight loss trials.

  9. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use and Other People Drug ... Unborn Children Drug Use and Your Health Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug ...

  10. Compositional analysis and in vivo anti-diabetic activity of wild Algerian Marrubium vulgare L. infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjelal, Amel; Henchiri, Cherifa; Siracusa, Laura; Sari, Madani; Ruberto, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    Marrubium vulgare (Lamiaceae) is a plant traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes in Algeria. Compositional analysis of the aqueous infusion revealed the presence of fifteen metabolites, all belonging to the class of polyphenols. Particularly, seven flavonoids have been detected, together with 5-caffeoylquinic (chlorogenic) acid in small amounts; the extract is dominated by the presence of a series of complex molecules, characterized as verbascoside (acteoside) derivatives. Concerning the anti-diabetic effectiveness a series of in vivo experiments were carried out on albinos Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced in the animals by intra-peritoneal injection of alloxane; they were treated twice a day with aqueous extract from aerial part infusion (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight) and glibenclamide (5mg/kg body weight) for 15 days. Oral administration of 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight of aqueous extract the Marrubium vulgare induced an significant effect antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic (dose-dependent effect). A decrease in blood glucose by 50% for the dose 100 mg/kg and more than 60% for doses 200 and 300 mg/kg, as well as a significant lowering of total lipids, triglycerides, and total cholesterol levels in treated animals, compared with diabetic controls group (p<0.001), have been observed. Glibenclamide was used as reference and showed similar effects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Transport in Caco-2 cell monolayers of antidiabetic cucurbitane triterpenoids from Momordica charantia fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shi-Biao; Yue, Grace G L; To, Ming-Ho; Keller, Amy C; Lau, Clara B S; Kennelly, Edward J

    2014-07-01

    Bitter melon, the fruit of Momordica charantia L. (Cucurbitaceae), is a widely-used treatment for diabetes in traditional medicine systems throughout the world. Various compounds have been shown to be responsible for this reputed activity, and, in particular, cucurbitane triterpenoids are thought to play a significant role. The objective of this study was to investigate the gastrointestinal transport of a triterpenoid-enriched n-butanol extract of M. charantia using a two-compartment transwell human intestinal epithelial cell Caco-2 monolayer system, simulating the intestinal barrier. Eleven triterpenoids in this extract were transported from the apical to basolateral direction across Caco-2 cell monolayers, and were identified or tentatively identified by HPLC-TOF-MS. Cucurbitane triterpenoids permeated to the basolateral side with apparent permeability coefficient (P app) values for 3-β-7-β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23(E)-dien-19-al and momordicines I and II at 9.02 × 10(-6), 8.12 × 10(-6), and 1.68 × 10(-6)cm/s, respectively. Also, small amounts of these triterpenoids were absorbed inside the Caco-2 cells. This is the first report of the transport of the reputed antidiabetic cucurbitane triterpenoids in human intestinal epithelial cell monolayers. Our findings, therefore, further support the hypothesis that cucurbitane triterpenoids from bitter melon may explain, at least in part, the antidiabetic activity of this plant in vivo. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Evidence of Immunosuppressive and Th2 Immune Polarizing Effects of Antidiabetic Momordica charantia Fruit Juice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoussa, Abdou Madjid; Adjagba, Marius; Lagnika, Latifou; Lalèyè, Anatole

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of action of the antidiabetic capacity of Momordica charantia is still under investigation. Here, we assessed phytochemical compositions, antioxidant activity, and effects of total and filtered fruit and leafy stem juices of Momordica charantia on human T cell proliferation and differentiation through quantification of Th1/Th2 cytokines. In the absence of stimulation, total fruit and leafy stem juices induced significant T cell proliferation. Under PHA stimulation, both juices potentiated plant-induced T cell proliferation. However, the filtered fruit and leafy stem juices significantly inhibited PHA-stimulated T cell proliferation, while neither juice influenced T cell proliferation. Moreover, total and filtered fruit juice increased IL-4 secretion, while total and filtered leafy stem juice enhanced IFN-γ production. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of tannins, flavonoids, anthocyans, steroids, and triterpenoids in both juices. Alkaloids, quinone derivatives, cardenolides, and cyanogenic derivatives were undetectable. The saponins present in total juices were undetectable after filtration. Moreover, both juices had appreciable antioxidant capacity. Our study supports the type 1 antidiabetic effect of filtered fruit juice of M. charantia which may be related to its immunosuppressive and T-helper 2 cell inducing capacities. Due to their immune-stimulatory activities and their ability to increase T-helper 1 cell cytokines, total fruit and leafy stem juices may serve in the treatment of immunodeficiency and certain infections. PMID:28812026

  13. Black bean anthocyanin-rich extracts as food colorants: Physicochemical stability and antidiabetes potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, Luis; Berhow, Mark; Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira

    2017-08-15

    Black beans contain anthocyanins that could be used as colorants in foods with associated health benefits. The objective was to optimize anthocyanins extraction from black bean coats and evaluate their physicochemical stability and antidiabetes potential. Optimal extraction conditions were 24% ethanol, 1:40 solid-to-liquid ratio and 29°C (Panthocyanins were identified by MS ions, delphinidin-3-O-glucoside (465.1m/z), petunidin-3-O-glucoside (479.1m/z) and malvidin-3-O-glucoside (493.1m/z). A total of 32mg of anthocyanins were quantified per gram of dry extract. Bean anthocyanins were stable at pH 2.5 and low-temperature 4°C (89.6%), with an extrapolated half-life of 277days. Anthocyanin-rich extracts inhibited α-glucosidase (37.8%), α-amylase (35.6%), dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (34.4%), reactive oxygen species (81.6%), and decreased glucose uptake. Black bean coats are a good source of anthocyanins and other phenolics with the potential to be used as natural-source food colorants with exceptional antidiabetes potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. In vitro evaluation of antioxidant and antidiabetic activities of Syzygium densiflrum fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopinath Krishnasamy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To provide experimental support for the traditional knowledge of Syzygium densiflorum (S. densiflorum fruits. Methods: Powered S. densiflorum dried fruits were subjected to successive extraction with n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and ethanol using a Soxhlet extractor. Further, preliminary phytochemical screening was carried out with a series of tests. In vitro free radical scavenging was evaluated using total antioxidant estimation, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical, superoxide radical scavenging, and hydroxyl radical scavenging assays. Antidiabetic activity was estimated using α-amylase inhibition assay. Results: Preliminary phytochemical estimation confirmed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, sterols, terpenoids, anthocyanin, phenols, carbohydrates, fixed oils, and fats in fruits of S. densiflorum. Ethyl acetate and n-hexane extracts showed less free radical scavenging and α-amylase inhibition activity than ethanol extract. IC50 values of ethanol extracts for 2,2- diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical, superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical, lipid peroxidation, and α-amylase inhibition assays were found to be 0.01, 0.16, 0.66, 0.46, and 0.46 mg/mL respectively. Conclusions: In vitro evaluations confirmed the antioxidant and antidiabetic potential of S. densiflorum fruits. Ethanol extract of S. densiflorum fruits showed higher activity with statistical significance vs. ethyl acetate and n-hexane extracts.

  15. Combretum lanceolatum flowers extract shows antidiabetic activity through activation of AMPK by quercetin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Porto Dechandt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the antidiabetic activity of the Combretum lanceolatum Pohl ex Eichler, Combretaceae, flowers extract (ClEtOH in diabetic rats. Streptozotocin-diabetic rats were divided into four groups: diabetic control, diabetic treated with 500 mg/kg of metformin and diabetic treated with 250 or 500 mg/kg of ClEtOH for 21 days. The treatment of diabetic rats with 500 mg/kg of ClEtOH promoted an increase in the weight of liver, white adipose tissues and skeletal muscles, improving body weight gain. Diabetic rats treated with 500 mg/kg of ClEtOH also presented reduction in glycemia, glycosuria and urinary urea levels, and increase in liver glycogen content. HPLC chromatogram showed that quercetin is the major compound in the extract. The phosphorylation levels of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase were increased in liver slices incubated in vitro with 50 µg/mL of ClEtOH, similarly to the incubation with metformin (50 µg/mL or quercetin (10 µg/mL. The antihyperglycemic effect of ClEtOH was similar to that of metformin and appears to be through inhibition of gluconeogenesis, since urinary urea was reduced and skeletal muscle mass was increased. These data indicate that the antidiabetic activity of the Combretum lanceolatum extract could be mediated, at least in part, through activation of adenosine monophosphateactivated protein kinase by quercetin.

  16. Acute Hypoglycemic and Antidiabetic Effect of Teuhetenone A Isolated from Turnera diffusa

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    Aída Parra-Naranjo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a chronic degenerative disease that causes long-term complications and represents a serious public health problem. Turnera diffusa (damiana is a shrub that grows throughout Mexico and is traditionally used for many illnesses including diabetes. Although a large number of plant metabolites are known, there are no reports indicating which of these are responsible for this activity, and this identification was the objective of the present work. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of a methanolic extract obtained from the aerial part of T. diffusa, teuhetenone A was isolated and identified as the main metabolite responsible for the plant’s hypoglycemic activity. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity and cytotoxicity of this metabolite were determined. Hypoglycemic and antidiabetic activities were evaluated in a murine model of diabetes in vivo, by monitoring glucose levels for six hours and comparing them with levels after administering various controls. Teuhetenone A was not cytotoxic at the tested concentrations, and did not show inhibitory activity in the glucosidase test, and the in vivo assays showed a gradual reduction in glucose levels in normoglycemic and diabetic mice. Considering these results, we suggest that teuhetenone A has potential as an antidiabetic compound, which could be further submitted to preclinical assays.

  17. Invitro Antidiabetic Activities of Agar, Agarosa, and Agaropectin from Gracilaria gigas Seaweed

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    Hardoko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Some types of seaweed are reported to have antidiabet activity in vivo or in vitro, but the activity antidiabet fractions of polysaccharides from seaweed has not been widely reported. Gracilaria gigas is one type of red seaweed that can produce agar and it has two factions, namely agarose and agaropectin. The aim of this study was to obtain an agar extract, agarose fraction, agaropektin fraction of Gracilaria gigas and to determine the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of extracts and the fractions. Extraction of agar that used an ethanol solution, and to fractionate agarose and agaropektin used dimetilsulfoxide solution. The results showed that the fraction of the agarose having lower sulfate content (0.28% compared with agar (5.91% and agaropektin (6.07%. Types of samples (agar, agarose, and agaropektin and sample doses significantly in inhibiting α-glucosidase enzyme activity. Agarose fraction has IC50 value against α-glucosidase lowest (96.86 ± 4.61 ppm, followed by the extract agar (116.63 ± 5.61 ppm, then the fraction agaropektin (158.34 ± 1.77 ppm.

  18. Anti-Diabetic Potential of Noni: The Yin and the Yang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratibha V. Nerurkar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Escalating trends of chronic diseases such as type-2 diabetes (T2D have sparked a renewed interest in complementary and alternative medicine, including herbal products. Morinda citrifolia (noni has been used for centuries by Pacific Islanders to treat various ailments. Commercial noni fruit juice has been marketed as a dietary supplement since 1996. In 2003, the European Commission approved Tahitian noni juice as a novel food by the Health and Consumer Protection Directorate General. Among noni’s several health benefits, others and we have demonstrated the anti-diabetic effects of fermented noni fruit juice in animal models. Unfortunately, noni’s exciting journey from Polynesian medicine to the research bench does not reach its final destination of successful clinical outcomes when translated into commercial products. Noni products are perceived to be safe due to their “natural” origin. However, inadequate evidence regarding bioactive compounds, molecular targets, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, long-term safety, effective dosages, and/or unanticipated side effects are major roadblocks to successful translation “from bench side to bedside”. In this review we summarize the anti-diabetic potential of noni, differences between traditional and modern use of noni, along with beneficial clinical studies of noni products and challenges in clinical translation of noni’s health benefits.

  19. Molecular Modeling Studies of Thiophenyl C-Aryl Glucoside SGLT2 Inhibitors as Potential Antidiabetic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh C. Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A QSAR study on thiophenyl derivatives as SGLT2 inhibitors as potential antidiabetic agents was performed with thirty-three compounds. Comparison of the obtained results indicated the superiority of the genetic algorithm over the simulated annealing and stepwise forward-backward variable method for feature selection. The best 2D QSAR model showed satisfactory statistical parameters for the data set (r2=0.8499, q2=0.8267, and pred_r2=0.7729 with four descriptors describing the nature of substituent groups and the environment of the substitution site. Evaluation of the model implied that electron-rich substitution position improves the inhibitory activity. The good predictive 3D-QSAR models by k-nearest neighbor (kNN method for molecular field analysis (MFA have cross-validated coefficient q2 value of 0.7663 and predicted r2 value of 0.7386. The results have showed that thiophenyl groups are necessary for activity and halogen, bulky, and less bulky groups in thiophenyl nucleus enhanced the biological activity. These studies are promising for the development of novel SGLT2 inhibitor, which may have potent antidiabetic activity.

  20. Development of Quality Control Method for Glucofarmaka Antidiabetic Jamu by HPLC Fingerprint Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanifullah Habibie

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicines become increasingly popular all over the world for preventive and therapeutic purposes. Quality control of herbal medicines is important to make sure their safety and efficacy. Chromatographic fingerprinting has been accepted by the World Health Organization as one reliable strategy for quality control method in herbal medicines. In this study, high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprint analysis was developed as a quality control method for glucofarmaka antidiabetic jamu. The optimum fingerprint chromatogram were obtained using C18 as the stationary phase and linear gradient elution using 10–95% acetonitrile:water as the mobile phase within 60 minutes of elution and detection at 210 nm. About 20 peaks were detected and could be used as fingerprint of glucofarmaka jamu. To evaluate the analytical performance of the method, we determined the precision, reproducibility, and stability. The result of the analytical performance showed reliable results. The proposed method could be used as a quality control method for glucofarmaka antidiabetic jamu and also for its raw materials.

  1. Combretum lanceolatum flowers extract shows antidiabetic activity through activation of AMPK by quercetin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Porto Dechandt

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the antidiabetic activity of the Combretum lanceolatum Pohl ex Eichler, Combretaceae, flowers extract (ClEtOH in diabetic rats. Streptozotocin-diabetic rats were divided into four groups: diabetic control, diabetic treated with 500 mg/kg of metformin and diabetic treated with 250 or 500 mg/kg of ClEtOH for 21 days. The treatment of diabetic rats with 500 mg/kg of ClEtOH promoted an increase in the weight of liver, white adipose tissues and skeletal muscles, improving body weight gain. Diabetic rats treated with 500 mg/kg of ClEtOH also presented reduction in glycemia, glycosuria and urinary urea levels, and increase in liver glycogen content. HPLC chromatogram showed that quercetin is the major compound in the extract. The phosphorylation levels of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase were increased in liver slices incubated in vitro with 50 µg/mL of ClEtOH, similarly to the incubation with metformin (50 µg/mL or quercetin (10 µg/mL. The antihyperglycemic effect of ClEtOH was similar to that of metformin and appears to be through inhibition of gluconeogenesis, since urinary urea was reduced and skeletal muscle mass was increased. These data indicate that the antidiabetic activity of the Combretum lanceolatum extract could be mediated, at least in part, through activation of adenosine monophosphateactivated protein kinase by quercetin.

  2. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Triterpene Analogues of Ursolic Acid as Potential Antidiabetic Agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panpan Wu

    Full Text Available Ursolic acid (UA is a naturally bioactive compound that possesses potential anti-diabetic activity. The relatively safe and effective molecule intrigued us to further explore and to improve its anti-diabetic activity. In the present study, a series of novel UA analogues was synthesized and their structures were characterized. Their bioactivities against the α-glucosidase from baker's yeast were determined in vitro. The results suggested that most of the analogues exhibited significant inhibitory activity, especially analogues 8b and 9b with the IC50 values of 1.27 ± 0.27 μM (8b and 1.28 ± 0.27 μM (9b, which were lower than the other analogues and the positive control. The molecular docking and 2D-QSAR studies were carried out to prove that the C-3 hydroxyl could interact with the hydrophobic region of the active pocket and form hydrogen bonds to increase the binding affinity of ligand and the homology modelling protein. Thus, these results will be helpful for understanding the relationship between binding mode and bioactivity and for designing better inhibitors from UA analogues.

  3. Medicinal Chemistry of the Anti-Diabetic Effects of Momordica Charantia: Active Constituents and Modes of Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaipaul; Cumming, Emmanuel; Manoharan, Gunasekar; Kalasz, Huba; Adeghate, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    medicinal chemistry and use(s) of M. charantia and its various extracts and compounds, their biochemical properties and how they act as anti-diabetic (hypoglycemic) drugs and the various mechanisms by which they exert their beneficial effects in controlling and treating DM. PMID:21966327

  4. Medicinal chemistry of the anti-diabetic effects of momordica charantia: active constituents and modes of actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaipaul; Cumming, Emmanuel; Manoharan, Gunasekar; Kalasz, Huba; Adeghate, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    chemistry and use(s) of M. charantia and its various extracts and compounds, their biochemical properties and how they act as anti-diabetic (hypoglycemic) drugs and the various mechanisms by which they exert their beneficial effects in controlling and treating DM.

  5. Clinical Drug-Drug Pharmacokinetic Interaction Potential of Sucralfate with Other Drugs: Review and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulochana, Suresh P; Syed, Muzeeb; Chandrasekar, Devaraj V; Mullangi, Ramesh; Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-10-01

    Sucralfate, a complex of aluminium hydroxide with sulfated sucrose, forms a strong gastrointestinal tract (GIT) mucosal barrier with excellent anti-ulcer property. Because sucralfate does not undergo any significant oral absorption, sucralfate resides in the GIT for a considerable length of time. The unabsorbed sucralfate may alter the pharmacokinetics of the oral drugs by impeding its absorption and reducing the oral bioavailability. Because of the increased use of sucralfate, it was important to provide a reappraisal of the published clinical drug-drug interaction studies of sucralfate with scores of drugs. This review covers several category of drugs such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, fluoroquinolones, histamine H2-receptor blockers, macrolides, anti-fungals, anti-diabetics, salicylic acid derivatives, steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and provides pharmacokinetic data summary along with study design, objectives and key remarks. While the loss of oral bioavailability was significant for the fluoroquinolone class, it generally varied for other classes of drugs, suggesting that impact of the co-administration of sucralfate is manageable in clinical situations. Given the technology advancement in formulation development, it may be in order feasible to develop appropriate formulation strategies to either avoid or minimize the absorption-related issues when co-administered with sucralfate. It is recommended that consideration of both in vitro and preclinical studies may be in order to gauge the level of interaction of a drug with sucralfate. Such data may aid in the development of appropriate strategies to navigate the co-administration of sucralfate with other drugs in this age of polypharmacy.

  6. Drug treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altabas, Velimir

    2013-08-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases including: abdominal obesity, a decreased ability to metabolize glucose (increased blood glucose levels and/or presence of insulin resistance), dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Patients who have developed this syndrome have been shown to be at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes. Genetic factors and the environment both are important in the development of the metabolic syndrome, influencing all single components of this syndrome. The goals of therapy are to treat the underlying cause of the syndrome, to reduce morbidity, and to prevent complications, including premature death. Lifestyle modification is the preferred first-step treatment of the metabolic syndrome. There is no single effective drug treatment affecting all components of the syndrome equally known yet. However, each component of metabolic syndrome has independent goals to be achieved, so miscellaneous types of drugs are used in the treatment of this syndrome, including weight losing drugs, antidiabetics, antihypertensives, antilipemic and anticlothing drugs etc. This article provides a brief insight into contemporary drug treatment of components the metabolic syndrome.

  7. Antidiabetic and antioxidant properties of Ficus deltoidea fruit extracts and fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misbah, Hasni; Aziz, Azlina Abdul; Aminudin, Norhaniza

    2013-05-29

    Diabetes is a serious metabolic disorder affecting the metabolism of carbohydrate, protein and fat. A number of studies have shown that diabetes mellitus is associated with oxidative stress, leading to an increased production of reactive oxygen species. Ficus deltoidea is traditionally used in Malaysia for regulating blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol levels. The use of F. deltoidea as an alternative medicinal herb is increasingly gaining popularity with the sale of F. deltoidea tea bags and capsules in the local market. The present study was undertaken to investigate the antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of the fruits from different varieties of F. deltoidea, employing in vitro methods. Two fruit varieties of F. deltoidea (var. angustifolia (SF) and var. kunstleri (BF)) were extracted separately using double-distilled water. The resulting aqueous extracts were partitioned using ethyl acetate to obtain the ethyl acetate and water fractions. The crude aqueous extracts and the corresponding fractions were evaluated for their phenolic, flavonoid, sugar and protein contents. Protein profiling of the extracts and fractions were also carried out by means of SDS-PAGE and SELDI-TOF MS. Antidiabetic activities were assessed based on the ability of the samples to inhibit yeast and mammalian α-glucosidase as well as α-amylase. Antioxidant capacities were examined by measuring the ability of the samples to reduce ferric ions and to scavenge DPPH, superoxide anion, ABTS and nitric oxide radicals. The crude extracts and fractions of SF and BF inhibited both yeast and rat intestinal α-glucosidases in a dose-dependent manner, but did not inhibit porcine pancreatic α-amylase. The water fraction of BF showed the highest percentage of α-glucosidase inhibition while having the highest amount of protein (73.33 ± 4.99 μg/mg fraction). All the extracts and fractions exhibited antioxidant activities, with SF crude extract showing the highest antioxidant activity and

  8. Antidiabetic Effect of Salvianolic Acid A on Diabetic Animal Models via AMPK Activation and Mitochondrial Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guifen Qiang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Diabetes mellitus (DM characterized by hyperglycemia contributes to macrovascular and microvascular complications. Salvianolic acid A (SalA is a polyphenolic compound isolated from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, which is a traditional Chinese medicine widely used to treat cardiovascular diseases. However, little is known about its antidiabetic effect. Our study aimed to investigate the in vivo and in vitro antidiabetic effect of SalA and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Alloxan-induced type 1 diabetic mice and high-fat diet (HFD and low-dose streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 2 diabetic rats received SalA treatment. Blood glucose, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, 24-h food and water intake were monitored. In vitro, glucose consumption and uptake were measured in HepG2 cells and L6 myotubes. Mitochondrial function was detected in hepatic and skeletal muscle mitochondria. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and Akt were analyzed by western blot. Results: In both type 1 and type 2 diabetic animals, SalA lowered fasting blood glucose (FBG and fed blood glucose in dose-dependent manner, as well as reduced 24-h food and water intake. In vitro, SalA caused dose-dependent increase in glucose consumption and enhanced glucose uptake. SalA significantly increased ATP production from 10 min to 12 h in HepG2 cells and L6 myotubes. Interestingly, SalA decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, SalA improved hepatic and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function, increased ATP production, and concurrently decreased MMP. In particularly, SalA activated AMPK phosphorylation through Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ/AMPK signaling pathway, independent of liver kinase 1 (LKB1/AMPK pathway. However, SalA didn't show any effect on insulin secretagogue and activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Conclusion: SalA exhibits the antidiabetic effects in diabetic animal models through

  9. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Get Addicted to Drugs? Does Addiction Run in Families? Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? ... Drug Use and Other People Drug Use and Families Drug Use and Kids Drug Use and Unborn ...

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  12. Trends in the prescription of anti-diabetic medications in the United Kingdom: a population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filion, Kristian B; Joseph, Lawrence; Boivin, Jean-François; Suissa, Samy; Brophy, James M

    2009-10-01

    Over the last decade, guidelines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes have increasingly favored tighter glycemic control, necessitating the use of more aggressive pharmacological therapy. The objective of this study was to describe trends in the prescription of anti-diabetic medications among patients with type 2 diabetes in the United Kingdom (UK). Using the General Practice Research Database, we constructed a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes was defined as the presence of a diagnosis of diabetes, HbA1c > or = 7%, or > or = 2 prescriptions for anti-diabetic medications. Analyses were conducted for the full cohort as well as a sub-cohort with incident diabetes. Our full cohort involved 67 981 patients and a total of 320 089 patient-years, and our sub-cohort involved 30 234 patients with incident diabetes and 111 890 patient-years. From 2000 to 2006, there was a substantial increase in the prescription rate of anti-diabetic medications. Overall, there were 9.6 prescriptions/patient-year in 2000, and this had increased to 14.8 prescriptions/patient-year in 2006. The greatest relative increase occurred in the prescription of thiazolidinediones. The greatest absolute increase occurred in the prescription of metformin, which surpassed sulfonylureas as the most commonly prescribed anti-diabetic medication among patients with type 2 diabetes in 2002. Among those with incident diabetes, overall prescription rates were 4.6 prescriptions/patient-year in 2000 and 13.6 prescriptions/patient-year in 2006. There was a substantial increase between 2000 and 2006 in the UK in the prescription of anti-diabetic medications. This increasingly aggressive pharmacological management is consistent with recent practice guidelines. 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. HEXANE EXTRACT OFDacryodes edulisFRUITS POSSESSES ANTI-DIABETIC AND HYPOLIPIDAEMIC POTENTIALS IN ALLOXAN DIABETES OF RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okolo, Chidinma A; Ejere, Vincent C; Chukwuka, Christian O; Ezeigbo, Ihechiluru I; Nwibo, Daniel D; Okorie, Augustine N

    2016-01-01

    The fruit extract of Dacryodes edulis (D. edulis) , the African pear or plum, a tree indigenous to the humid tropics has been used for managing wounds, skin diseases, sickle cell anaemia, dysentery and fever in some African nations. In South Eastern Nigeria, 'herbal doctors' include its marshed fruit in decoctions administered to diabetic patients. However no scientific substantiation of their claim and use exist in literature. Hence, the need to evaluate the antidiabetic and hypolipidaemic activity of hexane extracts of D. edulis fruit in alloxanised animal model. Sub-toxic doses between 400 and 1600mg/kg were orally administered sub-chronically to alloxan-induced diabetic rats for 15 days and compared to glibenclamide (2.5mg/kg). The glycaemia levels, body weights, lipid profile, blood urea, creatinine and liver enzyme levels were measured. Basic histology of the pancreatic tissue was also performed to examine the effects on the pancreas as possible mechanistic lead. Oral acute dosing of D. edulis hexane extract decreased blood glucose levels, while sub-chronic treatment of the extract down-regulated significantly hyperglycaemia, total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-C, ALT and ALP levels. However, the HDL-C levels increased significantly. Histopathological examination of the pancreatic tissues after sub-chronic treatment showed that glibenclamide and the highest dose of the extract 1600mg/kg restored the afore-damaged pancreatic β-cell architecture. Our findings portend that D. edulis hexane fruit extract possesses hypoglycaemic and hypolipidaemic activities as well as restoration of the pancreatic architecture without any obvious untoward hepatic damages, suggesting that its use in the management of the diabetes may be valid. List of Non-standard abbreviations: D. edulis = dacryode edulis , DEnH = Dacryodes edulis n-hexane fruit extract, B.wt. = Body weight, Per os = Oral administration, NC = normal control, DC =Diabetic control, SC = Standard control, LDL

  14. Coactivators in assay design for nuclear hormone receptor drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Taosheng; Xie, Wen; Agler, Michele; Banks, Martyn

    2003-12-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) represent one of the most important drug targets in terms of therapeutic applications. The NHR superfamily consists of a family of DNA binding transcription factors whose function can be controlled by small molecules (steroids or organic acids). Therefore, NHRs are suitable protein targets for the therapies of human diseases. Some of the current marketed drugs, including several anticancer and antidiabetic drugs, are known to target NHRs. Examples include the anticancer and retinoid X receptor-targeting Targretin and the antidiabetic and peroxisome proliferative-activated receptor-gamma-targeting thiaozolidinediones. More NHR-targeting drugs are expected in the coming years. Identification of specific NHR modulators, as well as identification of ligands for orphan NHRs, will lead to new therapies for many human diseases. Many pharmaceutical companies are investing in NHR-targeted drugs, which are estimated to be 10-15% of the US dollars 400 billion global pharmaceutical market. This minireview discusses various aspects of NHR drug discovery, with a focus on the application of NHR coactivators in assay design for NHR ligand identification.

  15. The optimal extraction parameters and anti-diabetic activity of flavonoids from Ipomoea batatas leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fenglin; Li, Qingwang; Gao, Dawei; Peng, Yong

    2009-03-07

    Extraction parameters of flavonoids from Ipomoea batatas leaf (FIBL) and anti-diabetic activity of FIBL on alloxan induced diabetic mice were studied. The optimal extraction parameters of FIBL were obtained by single factor test and orthogonal test, as follows: ethanol concentration 60 %, ratio of solvent to raw material 30, extraction temperature 75 degrees and extraction time 1.5 h, while extraction yield of FIBL was 5.94 %. FIBL treatment (50, 100, and 150 mg/ kg body weight) for 28 days resulted in a significant decrease in the concentration of fasting blood glucose (FBG), total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) in diabetes mellitus mice. Furthermore, FIBL significantly increased body weight (bw) and serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) level. The data demonstrated FIBL at the dose of 100 mg/kg bw exhibited the optimal effect. The above results suggest that FIBL can control blood glucose and modulate the metabolism of blood lipid in diabetes mellitus mice.

  16. New arylalkanones from Horsfieldia macrobotrys, effective antidiabetic agents concomitantly inhibiting α-glucosidase and free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhan, Rico; Phuwapraisirisan, Preecha

    2015-10-15

    In search of effective antidiabetic agents having therapeutic effect by inhibiting α-glucosidase and preventive effect by scavenging free radicals, Horsfieldia macrobotrys showed promising bioactivity required for the proposed criteria. Bioassay-guided isolation of the stem bark extract resulted in two new arylalkanones named horsfieldone A (1) and maingayone D (2), together with a new flavanone C-glucoside named 8-C-β-d-glucopyranosylpinocembrin (3). Their structures and stereochemistry were determined by spectroscopic techniques as well as Mosher's method. Of isolated compounds, maingayone D (2) was the most potent inhibitors against both α-glucosidases and free radicals. The presence of additional phenolic moieties in 2 clearly indicated their critical roles in inhibitory effects. Further investigation on mechanism underlying α-glucosidase inhibition indicated that maingayone D (2) could retard the enzyme function by both competitive and noncompetitive manners. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Inventory of antidiabetic plants in selected districts of Lagos State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbolade, Adebayo A

    2009-01-12

    This study reports an ethnobotanical survey by means of semi-structured questionnaire of medicinal plants in five districts of Lagos State of Nigeria reputed for the treatment of diabetes. 100 respondents from the predominantly Yoruba tribe mostly males (76%) were knowledgeable in traditional treatment of diabetes. About half of the respondents with 20-30 years experience in treating diabetes used mainly herbs (96%) and have developed effective and easily recognised diagnostic tools. 92% of diabetic patients were usually out-patients aged 21-60 years. Diabetes trado-specialists (80%) rarely referred their patients but usually treated referred cases (96%). Fifty multi-component herbal recipes covered in the survey were mainly liquid preparations often administered without serious side effects (92%). The principal antidiabetic plants included Vernonia amygdalina, Bidens pilosa, Carica papaya, Citrus aurantiifolia, Ocimum gratissimum, Momordica charantia and Morinda lucida. Dietary recommendations also accompanied therapy.

  18. The spectrum of antidiabetic actions of GLP-1 in patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina; Holst, Jens J; Knop, Filip K

    2009-01-01

    This article focusses on the antidiabetic therapeutic potential of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). T2DM is characterised by insulin resistance, impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion and inappropriately...... regulated glucagon secretion, which in combination eventually result in hyperglycaemia and, in the longer term, microvascular and macrovascular diabetic complications. Traditional treatment modalities - even multidrug approaches - for T2DM are often unsatisfactory in making patients reach glycaemic goals...... effects. Therefore, the actions of GLP-1, which include the potentation of meal-induced insulin secretion and trophic effects on the beta-cell, have attracted a lot of interest. GLP-1 also inhibits glucagon secretion and suppresses food intake and appetite....

  19. Qualitative variation of anti-diabetic compounds in different tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus L.) cytotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenman, Sasha W.; Poulev, Alexander; Struwe, Lena; Raskin, Ilya; Ribnicky, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Ethanolic extracts of diploid Artemisia dracunculus L. (wild tarragon) from populations in the U.S., and polyploid tarragon from a variety of sources, were screened for the anti-diabetic compounds davidigenin; sakuranetin; 2′,4′-dihydroxy-4-methoxydihydrochalcone; 4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid; 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid and 6-demethoxycapillarisin using LC-MS. Only decaploid plants contained all six target compounds and were the only plants that contained davidigenin and 2,4-dihydroxy-4-methoxydihydrochalcone. These results exhibit the importance of germplasm selection and provenance when studying plants for medicinal activity. Relying only on the “right species” for consistent medicinal activities may not be sufficient, as intraspecific variation may be highly significant. PMID:21798321

  20. Studies on dynamic dissociation constant of 99Mo-insulin complex as anti-diabetic agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, Swadesh; Nayak, Dalia

    2009-01-01

    The anti-diabetic effects of group VI metals have already been found. This is due to the fact that the oxo-anions of Group VI metals may replace phosphate group in the active centre of enzymes and thus enhancing the insulin signaling. In order to find out an appropriate ligand which may be used as a vehicle of 99 Mo we report the complexation of 99 Mo with insulin protein. The dynamic dissociation constant of the 99 Mo-Insulin complex was studied through dialysis technique against triple distilled water. The K d value of 99 Mo-Insulin complex against triple distilled water is 0.18 h -1 at pH 6.5. The half life of this complex calculated from K d value is 3.85 h against triple distilled water. (author)

  1. Pharmacological and Phytochemical Appraisal of Selected Medicinal Plants from Jordan with Claimed Antidiabetic Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Fatma U.; Kasabri, Violet

    2013-01-01

    Plant species have long been regarded as possessing the principal ingredients used in widely disseminated ethnomedical practices. Different surveys showed that medicinal plant species used by the inhabitants of Jordan for the traditional treatment of diabetes are inadequately screened for their therapeutic/preventive potential and phytochemical findings. In this review, traditional herbal medicine pursued indigenously with its methods of preparation and its active constituents are listed. Studies of random screening for selective antidiabetic bioactivity and plausible mechanisms of action of local species, domesticated greens, or wild plants are briefly discussed. Recommended future directives incurring the design and conduct of comprehensive trials are pointed out to validate the usefulness of these active plants or bioactive secondary metabolites either alone or in combination with existing conventional therapies. PMID:24482764

  2. Antidiabetic phospholipid-nuclear receptor complex reveals the mechanism for phospholipid-driven gene regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musille, Paul M; Pathak, Manish C; Lauer, Janelle L; Hudson, William H; Griffin, Patrick R; Ortlund, Eric A [Emory-MED; (Scripps)

    2013-01-31

    The human nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) has an important role in controlling lipid and cholesterol homeostasis and is a potential target for the treatment of diabetes and hepatic diseases. LRH-1 is known to bind phospholipids, but the role of phospholipids in controlling LRH-1 activation remains highly debated. Here we describe the structure of both apo LRH-1 and LRH-1 in complex with the antidiabetic phospholipid dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC). Together with hydrogen-deuterium exchange MS and functional data, our studies show that DLPC binding is a dynamic process that alters co-regulator selectivity. We show that the lipid-free receptor undergoes previously unrecognized structural fluctuations, allowing it to interact with widely expressed co-repressors. These observations enhance our understanding of LRH-1 regulation and highlight its importance as a new therapeutic target for controlling diabetes.

  3. Antidiabetic activity of Momordica charantia seeds on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, D Sathish; Sivagnanam, K; Subramanian, S

    2005-05-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the hypoglycemic efficacy in an aqueous extract of seeds of two varieties, namely a country and a hybrid variety of Momordica charantia (MCSEt1 and MCSEt2) respectively in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. STZ-induced diabetic rats were treated with aqueous extracts of MCSEt1 and t2 for a period of 30 days. MCSEt1 and t2 extract treatment to diabetic rats resulted in a significant reduction in blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, lactate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and glycogen phosphorylase, and a concomitant increase in the levels of hemoglobin, glycogen and activities of hexokinase and glycogen synthase. These results clearly show the antidiabetic properties of Momordica charantia. Both the varieties showed safe and significant hypoglycemic effects which were more pronounced in MCSEt1 compared to MCSEt2 and glibenclamide.

  4. Capparis spinosa L. aqueous extract evokes antidiabetic effect in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Eddouks

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: As the aqueous extract of Capparis spinosa (CS possess antidiabetic effect, he present study aims to reveal the possible  mechanism of action of CS in diabetic mice.Materials and Methods: Both single and repeated oral administrations of aqueous extract of CS were performed in multi-low dose streptozotocin-induced (MLDS diabetic mice. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp was used in association with the endogenous glucose production (perfusion rate of 3-3H glucose to evaluate the effect of CS aqueous extract on insulin sensitivity.Results: Our study showed that aqueous extract of CS possess a potent hypoglycaemic activity in MLDS diabetic mice. Furthermore, the analysis perfusion of 3-3H glucose demonstrated  the parallel decrease of basal endogenous glucose production (EGP with the hypoglycaemic activity. EGP was lower in CS-Treated group when compared to the control group (p

  5. Studies on the antidiabetic activities of Momordica charantia fruit juice in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mona F; El Ashry, Fatma El Zahraa Z; El Maraghy, Nabila N; Fahmy, Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    Momordica charantia Linn (Cucurbitaceae) (MC) is used in folk medicine to treat various diseases including diabetes mellitus. This study investigates the antidiabetic activities of Momordica charantia (bitter gourd) on streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus in rats. Male Wister rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups. Group I, Normal control; Group II, STZ diabetic; Group III and IV, Momordica charantia fruit juice was orally administered to diabetic rats (10 mL/kg/day either as prophylaxis for 14 days before induction of diabetes then 21 days treatment, or as treatment given for 21 days after induction of diabetes). The effects of MC juice were studied both in vivo and in vitro by studying the glucose uptake of isolated rat diaphragm muscles in the presence and absence of insulin. Histopathological examination of pancreas was also performed. This study showed that MC caused a significant reduction of serum glucose (135.99 ± 6.27 and 149.79 ± 1.90 vs. 253.40* ± 8.18) for prophylaxis and treatment respectively, fructosamine (0.99 ± 0.01 and 1.01 ± 0.04 vs. 3.04 ± 0.07), total cholesterol, triglycerides levels, insulin resistance index (1.13 ± 0.08 and 1.19 ± 0.05 vs. 1.48 ± 1.47) and pancreatic malondialdehyde content (p Momordica charantia presents excellent antidiabetic and antioxidant activities and thus has great potential as a new source for diabetes treatment whether it is used for prophylaxis or treatment.

  6. Anti-diabetic effects including diabetic nephropathy of anti-osteoporotic trace minerals on diabetic mice.

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    Maehira, Fusako; Ishimine, Nau; Miyagi, Ikuko; Eguchi, Yukinori; Shimada, Katsumasa; Kawaguchi, Daisuke; Oshiro, Yoshihide

    2011-04-01

    In our previous study to evaluate the effects of soluble silicon (Si) on bone metabolism, Si and coral sand (CS) as a natural Si-containing material suppressed peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), which regulates both glucose and bone metabolism and increases adipogenesis at the expense of osteogenesis, leading to bone loss. In this study, we investigated the anti-diabetic effects of bone-seeking elements, Si and stable strontium (Sr), and CS as a natural material containing these elements using obese diabetic KKAy mice. Weanling male mice were fed diets containing 1% Ca supplemented with CaCO(3) as the control and CS, and diets supplemented with 50 ppm Si or 750 ppm Sr to control diet for 56 d. The mRNA expressions related to energy expenditure in the pancreas and kidney were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. At the end of feeding, plasma glucose, insulin, leptin, and adiponectin levels decreased significantly in three test groups, while pancreatic PPARγ and adiponectin mRNA expression levels increased significantly toward the normal level, improving the glucose sensitivity of β-cells and inducing a significant decrease in insulin expression. The renal PPARγ, PPARα, and adiponectin expression levels, histologic indices of diabetic glomerulopathy, and plasma indices of renal function were also improved significantly in the test groups. Taken together, anti-osteoporotic trace minerals, Si and Sr, and CS containing them showed novel anti-diabetic effects of lowering blood glucose level, improving the tolerance to insulin, leptin, and adiponectin, and reducing the risk of glomerulopathy through modulation of related gene expression in the pancreas and kidney. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-term antidiabetic activity of vanadyl after treatment withdrawal: restoration of insulin secretion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, G H; Cam, M C; Serrano, J J; Ribes, G; McNeill, J H

    In its vanadate (V5+) or vanadyl (V4+) forms, vanadium has been demonstrated to possess antidiabetic activity. Oral treatment of streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic animals with either form is associated with correction of hyperglycemia, and prevention of diabetes-induced complications, although weight gain is unaffected. Vanadium treatment of non-diabetic animals lowers plasma insulin levels by reducing insulin demand, as these animals remain normoglycemic. These results suggest that vanadium has in vivo insulin-mimetic or insulin-enhancing effects, in agreement with several in vitro observations. Chronic treatment with vanadium has also been shown to result in sustained antidiabetic effects in STZ-diabetic animals long after treatment has ceased. Thus, at 13 weeks after withdrawal from treatment, corrected animals had normalized glucose and weight gain, and improved basal insulin levels. In addition, near-normal glucose tolerance was found despite an insignificant insulin response. Since vanadium accumulates in several tissue sites (e.g. bone, kidney) when pharmacological doses are administered, it is possible that stored vanadium may be important in maintaining near-normal glucose tolerance at least in the short-term following withdrawal from treatment. Recently, following withdrawal of vanadyl treatment up to 30 weeks, diabetic animals which had remained normoglycemic and had normalized glucose tolerance showed improvements in plasma insulin levels both in the basal state and in response to oral glucose, as compared to those which had reverted to hyperglycemia. The observed significant improvements in insulin capacity over the long-term ( > 3 months) suggests that a restored and/or preserved insulin secretion may be essential for maintained reversal of the diabetic state over a prolonged period after treatment is withdrawn.

  8. Review of antidiabetic fruits, vegetables, beverages, oils and spices commonly consumed in the diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidokhti, Maliheh Najari; Jäger, Anna K

    2017-04-06

    Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes and its prevalence is rapidly increasing throughout the world. Modifications of lifestyle such as suitable diet and exercise programs along with pharmacotherapy and education of patients are beneficial therapies for patients with type 2 diabetes. The ethnopharmacological use of herbal medicines, many of them part of our diet as spices, vegetables and fruits, has been developed for the treatment of diabetes due to inexpensiveness, easy availability and few side effects. Our aim is to present a review for researchers who are interested in the biologically active dietary plants traditionally utilized in the treatment of diabetes. Information was obtained from a literature search of electronic databases such as Google Scholar, Pubmed, Sci Finder and Cochrane. Common and scientific name of the fruits, vegetables, beverages, oils and spices and the words 'antidiabetic', 'hypoglycemic', 'anti-hyperglycemic', 'type 2 diabetes' were used as keywords for search. Certain fruits and vegetables are functional foods and their consumption reduces the incidence of type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemic effects of fruits and vegetables may be due to their inducing nature on pancreatic β-cells for insulin secretion, or bioactive compounds such as flavonoids, alkaloids and anthocyanins, which act as insulin-like molecules or insulin secretagogues. This write-up covers hypoglycemic, anti-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of some dietary fruits, vegetables, beverages, oils and spices and their active hypoglycemic constituents. Including such plant species in the diet might improve management of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Structural and redox requirements for the action of anti-diabetic vanadium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Sakurai, Hiromu; Crans, Debbie C; Micera, Giovanni; Garribba, Eugenio

    2014-05-21

    This study presents the first systematic investigation of the anti-diabetic properties of non-oxido V(IV) complexes. In particular, the insulin-mimetic activity of [V(IV)(taci)2](4+), [V(IV)(inoH-3)2](2-), [V(IV)(dhab)2], [V(IV)(hyph(Ph))2], [V(IV)(cat)3](2-) and [V(IV)(pdbh)2]--where taci is 1,3,5-triamino-1,3,5-trideoxy-cis-inositol, ino is cis-inositol, H2dhab is 2,2'-dihydroxyazobenzene, H2hyph(Ph) is 3,5-bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole, H2cat is catechol and H2pdbh is pentan-2,4-dione benzoylhydrazone--was evaluated in terms of free fatty acid (FFA) release. Among the six compounds examined, only [V(IV)(pdbh)2], [V(IV)(cat)3](2-) and [V(IV)(hyph(Ph))2], which at the physiological pH convert to the corresponding V(IV)O complexes, were found to exhibit a significant insulin-mimetic activity compared to VOSO4. In contrast, [V(taci)2](4+), [V(inoH-3)2](2-) and [V(dhab)2], which at pH 7.4 keep their 'bare' non-oxido structure, did not cause any inhibition of FFA. The results, therefore, suggest that a V(IV)O functionality is necessary for vanadium complexes to exhibit anti-diabetic effects. This agrees with the notion that the biotransformations of V compounds in the organism are more important than the nature of the species.

  10. Antidiabetic and antioxidant effects of Annona muricata (Annonaceae), aqueous extract on streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florence, Ngueguim Tsofack; Benoit, Massa Zibi; Jonas, Kouamouo; Alexandra, Tchuidjang; Désiré, Dzeufiet Djomeni Paul; Pierre, Kamtchouing; Théophile, Dimo

    2014-02-03

    The leaves of Annona muricata are used in Cameroon to manage diabetes and its complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antidiabetic, antioxidant activities and the potential toxicity of aqueous extract of Annona muricata in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Oral administration of Annona muricata aqueous extract (100mg/kg or 200mg/kg) was studied in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In long term treatment, 2 weeks after streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, animals received plant extract during 28 consecutive days. For a protective effect, extract was administered 3 days prior to streptozotocin exposure and animals were observed 2 weeks without treatment. The plant extract was not effective in normal rats. In diabetic rats, single administration of the extract significantly reduced blood glucose levels by 75% and 58.22% respectively at the dose of 100mg/kg and 200mg/kg as compared to the initial value. Treatment of normal rats 3 days prior to diabetes induction showed that, Annona muricata extract has no effect within 72h following STZ injection. However, after 14 days post-treatment, the extract at the dose of 100mg/kg significantly reduced blood glucose levels as compared with initial value and diabetic control rats. Immunohistochemical staining of pancreatic β-cells of diabetic rats treated with the dose of 100mg/kg expressed strong staining for β-cell compared to diabetic control. In a long-term study daily administration of Annona muricata aqueous extract for 28 days to diabetic rats, reduced blood glucose levels, serum creatinine, MDA, AST, ALT activity, and nitrite levels LDL-cholesterol. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, SOD, and CAT activity contents were restored. These different results show that the antidiabetic activity of Annona muricata aqueous extract can be explained by its hypolipidaemic effect, its antioxidant and protective action on pancreatic β-cells, which in turn improve glucose metabolism. © 2013

  11. The efficacy of Prosopis glandulosa as antidiabetic treatment in rat models of diabetes and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, C; Lochner, A; Huisamen, B

    2011-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is rampantly increasing and the need for therapeutics is crucial. In recognition of this, untested antidiabetic agents are flooding the market. Diavite™ which is a product consisting solely of the dried and ground pods of Prosopis glandulosa (Torr.) [Fabaceae] is currently marketed as a food supplement with glucose stabilizing properties. However, these are anecdotal claims lacking scientific evidence. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of Prosopis glandulosa as an antidiabetic agent. Male Wistar rats were rendered (a) type 1 diabetic after an intraperitoneal injection of STZ (40 mg/kg) and (b) insulin resistant after a 16-week high caloric diet (DIO). Zucker fa/fa ZDF rats were used in a pilot study. Half of each group of animals was placed on Prosopis glandulosa treatment (100mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks and the remaining animals served as age-matched controls. At the time of sacrifice, blood was collected for glucose and insulin level determination, the pancreata of the STZ rats were harvested for histological analysis and cardiomyocytes prepared from the DIO and Zucker fa/fa hearts for determination of insulin sensitivity. Type 1 diabetic model: Prosopis glandulosa treatment resulted in significant increased insulin levels (pProsopis glandulosa treatment resulted in increased small β-cells (pProsopis glandulosa treatment partially preventing this. Zucker fa/fa rats: Prosopis glandulosa treatment significantly reduced fasting glucose levels (pProsopis glandulosa treatment resulted in an increased basal (pProsopis glandulosa treatment moderately lowers glucose levels in different animal models of diabetes, stimulates insulin secretion, leads to the formation of small β-cells and improves insulin sensitivity of isolated cardiomyocytes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Antidiabetic property of Symplocos cochinchinensis is mediated by inhibition of alpha glucosidase and enhanced insulin sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalathookunnel Antony Antu

    Full Text Available The study is designed to find out the biochemical basis of antidiabetic property of Symplocos cochinchinensis (SC, the main ingredient of 'Nisakathakadi' an Ayurvedic decoction for diabetes. Since diabetes is a multifactorial disease, ethanolic extract of the bark (SCE and its fractions (hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and 90% ethanol were evaluated by in vitro methods against multiple targets relevant to diabetes such as the alpha glucosidase inhibition, glucose uptake, adipogenic potential, oxidative stress, pancreatic beta cell proliferation, inhibition of protein glycation, protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP-1B and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV. Among the extracts, SCE exhibited comparatively better activity like alpha glucosidase inhibition (IC50 value-82.07 ± 2.10 µg/mL, insulin dependent glucose uptake (3 fold increase in L6 myotubes, pancreatic beta cell regeneration in RIN-m5F (3.5 fold increase and reduced triglyceride accumulation (22% decrease in 3T3L1 cells, protection from hyperglycemia induced generation of reactive oxygen species in HepG2 cells (59.57% decrease with moderate antiglycation and PTP-1B inhibition. Chemical characterization by HPLC revealed the superiority of SCE over other extracts due to presence and quantity of bioactives (beta-sitosterol, phloretin 2'glucoside, oleanolic acid in addition to minerals like magnesium, calcium, potassium, sodium, zinc and manganese. So SCE has been subjected to oral sucrose tolerance test to evaluate its antihyperglycemic property in mild diabetic and diabetic animal models. SCE showed significant antihyperglycemic activity in in vivo diabetic models. We conclude that SC mediates the antidiabetic activity mainly via alpha glucosidase inhibition, improved insulin sensitivity, with moderate antiglycation and antioxidant activity.

  13. The impact of a brief motivational intervention on unprotected sex and sex while high among drug-positive emergency department patients who receive STI/HIV VC/T and drug treatment referral as standard of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Edward; Ashong, Desiree; Heeren, Timothy; Winter, Michael; Bliss, Caleb; Madico, Guillermo; Bernstein, Judith

    2012-07-01

    This randomized, controlled trial, conducted among out-of-treatment heroin/cocaine users at an emergency department visit, tests the impact on sexual risk of adding brief motivational intervention (B-MI) to point-of-service testing, counseling and drug treatment referral. 1,030 enrollees aged 18-54 received either voluntary counseling/testing (VC/T) with drug treatment referral, or VC/T, referral, and B-MI, delivered by an outreach worker. We measured number and proportion of non-protected sex acts (last 30 days) at 6 and 12 months (n = 802). At baseline, 70% of past-30-days sex acts were non-protected; 35% of sex acts occurred while high; 64% of sexual acts involved main, 24% casual and 12% transactional sex partners; 1.7% tested positive for an STI, and 8.8% for HIV. At six or 12 month follow-up, 20 enrollees tested positive for Chlamydia and/or Gonorrhea, and 6 enrollees HIV sero-converted. Self-reported high-risk behaviors declined in both groups with no significant between-group differences in behaviors or STI/HIV incidence.

  14. Novel phthalazinone and benzoxazinone containing thiazolidinediones as antidiabetic and hypolipidemic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, G R; Chakrabarti, R; Kumar, S K; Misra, P; Mamidi, R N; Balraju, V; Kasiram, K; Babu, R K; Suresh, J; Lohray, B B; Lohrayb, V B; Iqbal, J; Rajagopalan, R

    2001-01-01