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Sample records for standard antidepressant treatment

  1. Antidepressant treatment for postnatal depression.

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    Molyneaux, Emma; Howard, Louise M; McGeown, Helen R; Karia, Amar M; Trevillion, Kylee

    2014-09-11

    Postnatal depression is a common disorder that can have adverse short- and long-term effects on maternal morbidity, the new infant and the family as a whole. Treatment is often largely by social support and psychological interventions. It is not known whether antidepressants are an effective and safe choice for treatment of this disorder. This review was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of different antidepressants and to compare their effectiveness with other forms of treatment, placebo or treatment as usual. It is an update of a review first published in 2001. To assess the effectiveness of antidepressant drugs in comparison with any other treatment (psychological, psychosocial or pharmacological), placebo or treatment as usual for postnatal depression. We searched the Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Group's Specialized Register (CCDANCTR) to 11 July 2014. This register contains reports of relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from the following bibliographic databases: The Cochrane Library (all years), MEDLINE (1950 to date), EMBASE, (1974 to date) and PsycINFO (1967 to date). We also searched international trial registries and contacted pharmaceutical companies and experts in the field. We included RCTs of women with depression with onset up to six months postpartum that compared antidepressant treatment (alone or in combination with another treatment) with any other treatment, placebo or treatment as usual. Two review authors independently extracted data from the trial reports. We requested missing information from investigators wherever possible. We sought data to allow an intention-to-treat analysis. Random effects meta-analyses were conducted to pool data where sufficient comparable studies were identified. We included six trials with 596 participants in this review. All studies had a randomised controlled parallel group design, with two conducted in the UK, three in the US and one in Israel. Meta-analyses were performed to pool

  2. Anti-inflammatory treatment for major depressive disorder: implications for patients with an elevated immune profile and non-responders to standard antidepressant therapy

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    Kopschina Feltes, Paula; Doorduin, Janine; Klein, Hans C; Juárez-Orozco, Luis Eduardo; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Moriguchi-Jeckel, Cristina M; de Vries, Erik FJ

    2017-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a prevalent and disabling psychiatric disease with rates of non-responsiveness to antidepressants ranging from 30–50%. Historically, the monoamine depletion hypothesis has dominated the view on the pathophysiology of depression. However, the lack of responsiveness to antidepressants and treatment resistance suggests that additional mechanisms might play a role. Evidence has shown that a subgroup of depressive patients may have an underlying immune deregulation that could explain the lack of therapeutic benefit from antidepressants. Stimuli like inflammation and infection can trigger the activation of microglia to release pro-inflammatory cytokines, acting on two main pathways: (1) activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary adrenal axis, generating an imbalance in the serotonergic and noradrenergic circuits; (2) increased activity of the enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase, resulting in depletion of serotonin levels and the production of quinolinic acid. If this hypothesis is proven true, the subgroup of MDD patients with increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, mainly IL-6, TNF-α and IL-1β, might benefit from an anti-inflammatory intervention. Here, we discuss the pre-clinical and clinical studies that have provided support for treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in depressed patients with inflammatory comorbidities or an elevated immune profile, as well as evidences for anti-inflammatory properties of standard antidepressants. PMID:28653857

  3. A comparison of cognitive-behavioral therapy, antidepressants, their combination and standard treatment for Chinese patients with moderate-severe major depressive disorders.

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    Zu, Si; Xiang, Yu-Tao; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Gang; Ma, Xin; Kilbourne, Amy M; Ungvari, Gabor S; Chiu, Helen F K; Lai, Kelly Y C; Wong, Samuel Y S; Yu, Doris S F; Li, Zhan-Jiang

    2014-01-01

    No study has examined the effect of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) on moderate-severe major depressive disorders (MDD) in China. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of CBT, antidepressants alone (MED), combined CBT and antidepressants (COMB) and standard treatment (ST; i.e., receiving psycho-educational intervention and/or medication treatment determined by treating psychiatrists) on depressive symptoms and social functioning in Chinese patients with moderate-severe MDD. A total of 180 patients diagnosed with MDD according to ICD-10 were randomly allocated to one of the four treatment regimens for a period of 6 months. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD) and the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report (C-QIDS-SR). Remission threshold was defined as a C-QIDS-SR total score of combined CBT-antidepressant treatment in controlling the remission. The study provided important knowledge to inform the mental health care planning in China. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment of Fibromyalgia with Antidepressants

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    O'Malley, Patrick G; Balden, Erin; Tomkins, Glen; Santoro, James; Kroenke, Kurt; Jackson, Jeffrey L

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fibromyalgia is a common, poorly understood musculoskeletal pain syndrome with limited therapeutic options. OBJECTIVE To systematically review the efficacy of antidepressants in the treatment of fibromyalgia and examine whether this effect was independent of depression. DESIGN Meta-analysis of English-language, randomized, placebo-controlled trials. Studies were obtained from searching medline, embase, and psyclit(1966-1999), the Cochrane Library, unpublished literature, and bibliographies. We performed independent duplicate review of each study for both inclusion and data extraction. MAIN RESULTS Sixteen randomized, placebo-controlled trials were identified, of which 13 were appropriate for data extraction. There were 3 classes of antidepressants evaluated: tricyclics (9 trials), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (3 trials), and S-adenosylmethionine (2 trials). Overall, the quality of the studies was good (mean score 5.6, scale 0-8). The odds ratio for improvement with therapy was 4.2 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 2.6 to 6.8). The pooled risk difference for these studies was 0.25 (95% CI, 0.16 to 0.34), which calculates to 4 (95% CI, 2.9 to 6.3) individuals needing treatment for 1 patient to experience symptom improvement. When the effect on individual symptoms was combined, antidepressants improved sleep, fatigue, pain, and well-being, but not trigger points. In the 5 studies where there was adequate assessment for an effect independent of depression, only 1 study found a correlation between symptom improvement and depression scores. Outcomes were not affected by class of agent or quality score using meta-regression. CONCLUSION Antidepressants are efficacious in treating many of the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Patients were more than 4 times as likely to report overall improvement, and reported moderate reductions in individual symptoms, particularly pain. Whether this effect is independent of depression needs further study. PMID:11029681

  5. Ketamine: stimulating antidepressant treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Gin S; Byrow, Yulisha; Cassidy, Frederick; Cipriani, Andrea; Demyttenaere, Koen; Frye, Mark A; Gitlin, Michael; Kennedy, Sidney H; Ketter, Terence A; Lam, Raymond W; McShane, Rupert; Mitchell, Alex J; Ostacher, Michael J; Rizvi, Sakina J; Thase, Michael E; Tohen, Mauricio

    2016-05-01

    SmithKline, and Sunovion Pharmaceuticals; royalties from American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc. Also, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP provided publication support to Parexel for preparation of a manuscript. Spouse employee and stockholder of Janssen Pharmaceuticals. R.W.L. Honoraria for speaking/advising/consulting, and/or received research funds: AstraZeneca, Brain Canada, Bristol Myers Squibb, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canadian Depression Research and Intervention Network, Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments, Canadian Psychiatric Association, Coast Capital Savings, Johnson and Johnson, Lundbeck, Lundbeck Institute, Pfizer, Servier, St. Jude Medical, Takeda University, Health Network Foundation, and Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute. R.M. Investigator Janssen trials of esketamine; 'paid-for' ketamine clinic operated by Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust - fees used to support the Trust. M.J.O. Consultant: Sunovion and Acadia Pharmaceuticals. Full-time employee of U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. M.E.T. Advisory/Consultant: Alkermes, Allergan, AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Cerecor inc., Eli Lilly & Co., Forest Laboratories, Gerson Lehrman Group, Fabre-Kramer Pharmaceuticals, Inc., GlaxoSmithKline, Guidepoint Global, H. Lundbeck A/S, MedAvante Inc., Merck and Co. Inc. (formerly Schering Plough and Organon), Moksha8, Naurex Inc., Neuronetics Inc., Novartis, Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceuticals (Johnson & Johnson; Janssen), Otsuka, Pamlab, L.L.C. (Nestle), Pfizer (formerly Wyeth Ayerst Pharmaceuticals), Shire US Inc., Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc., Trius Therapeutical Inc. and Takeda. Grant support: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Alkermes, AssureRx, Avanir, Forest Pharmaceuticals, Janssen, National Institute of Mental Health, and Otsuka Pharmaceuticals. Speakers Bureau: None since June, 2010. Equity Holdings: MedAvante, Inc. Royalties: American Psychiatric Foundation, Guilford Publications, Herald House, W.W. Norton & Company

  6. Placebo and antidepressant treatment for major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Esben

    2010-01-01

    Antidepressant medication is generally considered the primary treatment for major depressive disorders (MDD), but antidepressant treatment has recently approached a crisis with shrinking specific effects and growing placebo responses in current trials. The aim of the paper is to review the placebo...... problem within antidepressant treatment for MDD, and to draw lines to similar problems within the field of psychotherapy. Although clinicians might profit from the large placebo response in their treatment of MDD, the small differences between active treatment and placebo groups found in controlled...

  7. Treatment with antiparkinson and antidepressant drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt-Christensen, Mette; Kvist, Kajsa; Nilsson, Flemming Mørkeberg

    2007-01-01

    Depressive symptoms and major depression are frequent in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, a systematic knowledge about the treatment with antidepressant drugs among PD patients is missing. We estimated the frequency of antidepressant drug treatment in a national sample of persons......,029,737 persons were included. Persons who got APDs had significantly increased rate ratios (RR) of subsequent antidepressant drug treatment compared with an unexposed control group (RR: 2.10 (95% CI: 2.04-2.16)) and with persons who got anti-diabetic drugs [RR: 1.58 (95% CI: 1.51-1.65)]. Persons treated...... and depression....

  8. Antidepressants in the treatment of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, Søren H.; Otto, Marit; Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2005-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is due to lesion or dysfunction of the peripheral or central nervous system. Tricyclic antidepressants and anticonvulsants have long been the mainstay of treatment of this type of pain. Tricyclic antidepressants may relieve neuropathic pain by their unique ability to inhibit...... presynaptic reuptake of the biogenic amines serotonin and noradrenaline, but other mechanisms such as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and ion channel blockade probably also play a role in their pain-relieving effect. The effect of tricyclic antidepressants in neuropathic pain in man has been demonstrated...... in numerous randomised, controlled trials, and a few trials have shown that serotonin noradrenaline and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants also relieve neuropathic pain although with lower efficacy. Tricyclic antidepressants will relieve one in every 2-3 patients with peripheral...

  9. Use of Antidepressants During Pregnancy?: What to Consider when Weighing Treatment with Antidepressants Against Untreated Depression.

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    Muzik, Maria; Hamilton, Susan E

    2016-11-01

    Introduction Mood disorders impact many pregnant women, particularly those who have experienced symptoms prior to conception, and there are significant barriers, including stigma and access, to seeking and receiving appropriate treatments. Antidepressants are a helpful option in treating perinatal depression, but research on risks and benefits of antidepressant use in pregnancy is difficult given lack of "gold standard" comparative trials. Methods This paper summarizes current state of knowledge on the safety of antidepressants during pregnancy by providing a summary of the literature published in the past 3 years (January 2013-October 2015). We identified 21 reviews and meta-analyses that were included in this summary report. This report is meant to provide a user-friendly, yet comprehensive guide summarizing the abundant, and in part contradicting, literature on risks and benefits of antidepressants during pregnancy, in order to assist busy primary care prescribers in educating their patients. Our goal is also to contrast the risks/benefits of untreated depression in pregnancy versus treatment with antidepressant medication in pregnancy, and in such support prescribers in their decision-making. Results The past 3 years have yielded an abundance of publications on the topic, in part, with conflicting findings adding to confusion and concern among providers, patients, and their families. Many reported studies have methodological problems limiting their impact. Data on adverse effects of medications on pregnancy and fetal outcomes have to be weighed against the impact of untreated illness and poor health habits associated with untreated illness on the same outcomes. Discussion Medical-decision making is often complex and seldom free of risks. Obviously, as providers we cannot guarantee that fetal exposure to antidepressants is totally free of risk, yet this is true for any medicine taken in pregnancy. However, to date, perinatal psychiatry has collected enough

  10. Poisoining with Tricyclic Antidepressants and Current Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muge Gulen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Poisoning with tricyclic antidepressants is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality compared to all the antidepressants. Main toxic effects are on the cardiovascular system and central nervous system and manifests itself as anticholinergic symptoms. There is no antidote known to be used in the treatment. But sodium bicarbonate treatment is effective in preventing ventricular arrhythmias and hypotension, and resolving metabolic acidosis. There are some treatments that has been used for relief of symptoms and some of them still are in research stage. The drugs that are used can be customized according to the patients symptoms. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(4.000: 608-621

  11. Physiological Bases of Bulimia, and Antidepressant Treatment.

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    Getzfeld, Andrew R.

    This paper reviews the literature on the physiological causes of bulimia and investigates the rationale behind the usage of antidepressant medication in the treatment of bulimia nervosa. No definite conclusions can be stated regarding the physiology of bulimia, but a number of hypotheses are suggested. It appears that the hypothalamus is involved…

  12. [Depression and treatment. Apoptosis, neuroplasticity and antidepressants].

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    Arantes-Gonçalves, Filipe; Coelho, Rui

    2006-01-01

    Depression's neurobiology begins to be better understood. The last decade data considers neuroplasticity and stress as implicated factors on the pathophisiology of depression. Because antidepressants have a lag-time on their action it is possible that inhibition of neurotransmitters recaptation is not sufficient to explain long term changes. For that purpose, neurogenesis increase, nervous fibers sprouting, new synapses and stabilization of the old ones can be responsible for those changes. AMPc-MAPcinases-CREB-BDNF cellular cascade can play a significant role in the mechanisms of dendritic restructuration, hippocampal neurogenesis increase and nervous cells survival. The aim of this article is to discuss if apoptosis could play a key role as an ethiopathogenic factor on the patogenesis of depression. It was done a medline search for references with apoptosis, stress, neuroplasticity, depression and antidepressants key-words. It were found 101 original or review references about these subjects. Stress plays a key role in the etiopathogeny of depression. Its deletery effects on apoptosis and neuroplasticity can be changed by antidepressants. Neurogenesis' increase is necessary for their action. This increase is reached with chronic antidepressant treatment and not with other psychotropic drugs which means some pharmacological specificity of antidepressants. AMPc, CREB, BDNF and Bcl-2 can be considered as target genes in antidepressant synthesis. At the level of this neurotrophic factors apoptosis might be included in the neuroplastic model of depression and play a prominent role in etiopathogeny of depression. To confirm that, we need more research on the field to know which are the mechanisms that trigger apoptosis and its biological significance. In relation to the last one, we can say that is possible to be physiological apoptosis in deteriorated neurons death which cannot make strong connections and pathological apoptosis because of stress via, namely, HPA axis.

  13. Antidepressants for the treatment of depression in people with cancer.

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    Ostuzzi, Giovanni; Matcham, Faith; Dauchy, Sarah; Barbui, Corrado; Hotopf, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    review. The two authors compared the data extracted and then entered data into RevMan 5 with a double-entry procedure. Information extracted included study and participant characteristics, intervention details, outcome measures for each time point of interest, cost analysis and sponsorship by a drug company. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We retrieved a total of nine studies (861 participants), with seven studies contributing to the meta-analysis for the primary outcome. Four of these compared antidepressants and placebo, two compared two antidepressants and one-three armed study compared two antidepressants and a placebo arm. For the acute phase treatment response (6 to 12 weeks), we found very low quality evidence for the effect of antidepressants as a class on symptoms of depression compared with placebo when measured as a continuous outcome (standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.01 to 0.11, five RCTs, 266 participants) or as a proportion of people who had depression (risk ratio (RR) 0.82, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.08, five RCTs, 417 participants). No trials reported data on the follow-up response (more than 12 weeks). In head-to-head comparisons we only retrieved data for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) versus tricyclic antidepressants, providing very low quality evidence for the difference between these two classes (SMD -0.08, 95% CI -0.34 to 0.18, three RCTs, 237 participants). No clear evidence of an effect of antidepressants versus either placebo or other antidepressants emerged from the analyses of the secondary efficacy outcomes (dichotomous outcome, response at 6 to 12 weeks, very low quality evidence). We found very low quality evidence for the effect of antidepressants as a class in terms of dropouts due to any cause compared with placebo (RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.49 to 1.53, six RCTs, 455 participants), as well as between SSRIs and tricyclic antidepressants (RR 0

  14. Continued antidepressant treatment and suicide in patients with depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergård, Lars; Lopez, Ana Garcia; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2007-01-01

    1995 to 2000, we investigated the relation between continued treatment with antidepressants and suicide in a population of all patients discharged from hospital psychiatry with a diagnosis of depressive disorder. Patients discharged from hospital psychiatry with a diagnosis of depressive disorder had...... of prescriptions. On individualized data from a cohort of patients with a known history of depressive disorder, continued antidepressant treatment was associated with reduced risk of suicide.......Antidepressant use in Denmark, as in many developed countries, has substantially increased during recent years, coinciding with a decreasing suicide rate. In a nationwide observational cohort study with linkage of registers of all prescribed antidepressants and recorded suicides in Denmark from...

  15. Extracorporeal treatment for tricyclic antidepressant poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yates, Christopher; Galvao, Tais; Sowinski, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    methodology, the subgroup responsible for this poison reviewed the articles, extracted the data, summarized findings, and proposed structured voting statements following a predetermined format. A two-round modified Delphi method was chosen to reach a consensus on voting statements and RAND......The Extracorporeal Treatments In Poisoning (EXTRIP) workgroup was formed to provide recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatments (ECTR) in poisoning. Here, the workgroup presents its results for tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). After an extensive literature search, using a predefined...... yielding a very low quality of evidence for all recommendations. Data on 108 patients, including 12 fatalities, were abstracted. The workgroup concluded that TCAs are not dialyzable and made the following recommendation: ECTR is not recommended in severe TCA poisoning (1D). The workgroup considers...

  16. Antidepressants for the acute treatment of bipolar depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Sidor, Michelle M; Macqueen, Glenda M

    2011-02-01

    The role of antidepressants in the acute treatment of bipolar depression remains a contentious issue. A previous meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) concluded that antidepressants were effective and safe for bipolar depression. Several trials published since then suggest that antidepressants may not be as beneficial as previously concluded. The current systematic review and meta-analyses reexamine the efficacy and safety of antidepressant use for the acute treatment of bipolar depression. EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched for double-blind RCTs published from 2003 to 2009 using the following diagnostic medical subject heading (MESH) terms: bipolar disorder, bipolar depression, bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, bipolar III disorder, bipolar mania, cyclothymia, manic depressive psychosis, mixed mania and depression, and rapid cycling and bipolar disorder. Databases of trial registries were also searched for unpublished RCTs. These searches were supplemented by hand searches of relevant articles and review articles. Trials that compared acute (antidepressant treatment with either an active drug or a placebo comparator in adult bipolar patients, depressive phase were eligible for inclusion. Main outcome measures were clinical response, remission, and affective switch. Six RCTs (N = 1,034) were identified since publication in 2004 of the first meta-analysis that assessed antidepressant use in the acute treatment of bipolar depression. These studies were combined with earlier studies for a total of 15 studies containing 2,373 patients. Antidepressants were not statistically superior to placebo or other current standard treatment for bipolar depression. Antidepressants were not associated with an increased risk of switch. Studies that employed more sensitive criteria to define switch did report elevated switch rates for antidepressants. Although antidepressants were

  17. The role of dopamine and norepinephrine in depression and antidepressant treatment.

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    Nutt, David J

    2006-01-01

    Most antidepressants in use today are descendants of the monoamine oxidase inhibitor iproniazid and the tricyclic agent imipramine. These agents were both originally developed for other indications but then were serendipitously determined to have antidepressant effects. Elucidation of the mechanisms of action of these first antidepressants, along with those of reserpine and amphetamine, led to the monoamine theories of depression. Through the past several decades, approaches undertaken to clarify the roles of the neurotransmitters norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin in depression have included animal studies, human biological and postmortem studies, inferences drawn from antidepressant drug actions, and challenge or depletion studies; most recently, brain imaging studies have proved to be especially informative. This research has identified novel potential targets, with the goal of developing new antidepressant drugs with better efficacy and faster onset of action than current "gold-standard" treatments.

  18. Mechanisms Underlying the Antidepressant Response and Treatment Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Rose Levinstein

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a complex and heterogeneous disorder affecting millions of Americans. There are several different medications and other treatments that are available and effective for many patients with depression. However, a substantial percentage of patients fail to achieve remission with these currently available interventions, and relapse rates are high. Therefore, it is necessary to determine both the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant response and the differences between responders and non-responders to treatment. Delineation of these mechanisms largely relies on experiments that utilize animal models. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the various mouse models that are currently used to assess the antidepressant response, such as chronic mild stress, social defeat, and chronic corticosterone. We discuss how these mouse models can be used to advance our understanding of the differences between responders and non-responders to antidepressant treatment. We also provide an overview of experimental treatment modalities that are used for treatment-resistant depression, such as deep brain stimulation and ketamine administration. We will then review the various genetic polymorphisms and transgenic mice that display resistance to antidepressant treatment. Finally, we synthesize the published data to describe a potential neural circuit underlying the antidepressant response and treatment resistance.

  19. Antidepressant Treatment for Acute Bipolar Depression: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben H. Amit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While studies in the past have focused more on treatment of the manic phase of bipolar disorder (BD, recent findings demonstrate the depressive phase to be at least as debilitating. However, in contrast to unipolar depression, depression in bipolar patients exhibits a varying response to antidepressants, raising questions regarding their efficacy and tolerability. Methods. We conducted a MEDLINE and Cochrane Collaboration Library search for papers published between 2005 and 2011 on the subject of antidepressant treatment of bipolar depression. Sixty-eight articles were included in the present review. Results. While a few studies did advocate the use of antidepressants, most well-controlled studies failed to show a robust effect of antidepressants in bipolar depression, regardless of antidepressant class or bipolar subtype. There was no significant increase in the rate of manic/hypomanic switch, especially with concurrent use of mood stabilizers. Prescribing guidelines published in recent years rely more on atypical antipsychotics, especially quetiapine, as a first-line therapy. Conclusions. Antidepressants probably have no substantial role in acute bipolar depression. However, in light of conflicting results between studies, more well-designed trials are warranted.

  20. Are antipsychotics or antidepressants needed for psychotic depression? A systematic review and meta-analysis of trials comparing antidepressant or antipsychotic monotherapy with combination treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Arusha; Correll, Christoph U

    2012-04-01

    To perform a meta-analysis of antidepressant-antipsychotic cotreatment versus antidepressant or antipsychotic monotherapy for psychotic depression. We performed an electronic search (from inception of databases until February 28, 2011) in PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO, without language or time restrictions. Search terms were (psychosis OR psychotic OR hallucinations OR hallucinating OR delusions OR delusional) AND (depression OR depressed OR major depressive disorder) AND (random OR randomized OR randomly). Eight randomized, placebo-controlled acute-phase studies in adults (N = 762) with standardized criteria-defined psychotic depression (including Research Diagnostic Criteria, DSM-III, DSM-IV, or ICD-10) were meta-analyzed, yielding 10 comparisons. Antidepressant-antipsychotic cotreatment was compared in 5 trials with 6 treatment arms (n = 337) with antidepressant monotherapy and in 4 trials with 4 treatment arms (n = 447) with antipsychotic monotherapy. Primary outcome was study-defined inefficacy; secondary outcomes included all-cause discontinuation, specific psychopathology ratings, and side effects. Using random effects models, we calculated relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), number-needed-to-treat/harm (NNT/NNH), and effect size (ES). Antidepressant-antipsychotic cotreatment outperformed antidepressant monotherapy regarding less study-defined inefficacy (no. of comparisons = 6; n = 378; RR = 0.76; 95% CI, 0.59-0.98; P = .03; heterogeneity [I2] = 34%) (NNT = 7; 95% CI, 4-20; P = .009) and Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Illness scores (no. of comparisons = 4; n = 289; ES = -0.25; 95% CI, -0.49 to -0.02; P = .03; I2 = 0%), with trend-level superiority for depression ratings (no. of comparisons = 5; n = 324; ES = -0.20; 95% CI, -0.44 to 0.03; P = .09; I2 = 10%), but not regarding psychosis ratings (no. of comparisons = 3; n = 161; ES = -0.24; 95% CI, -0.85 to 0.38; P = .45; I2 = 70%). Antidepressant

  1. Economic impact of antidepressant treatment duration in naturalistic conditions.

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    Tournier, M; Crott, R; Gaudron, Y; Verdoux, H

    2013-05-01

    To assess the economic impact of the duration of antidepressant drug treatment in a real-life setting. A historical fixed cohort study included 27 917 patients aged 18 and over with a new antidepressant treatment registered in the national insurance database. The economic impact concerned healthcare expenditure in the first 3 months after treatment discontinuation. Generalized linear models were used to compare two groups of treatment duration: adjustment for care costs before and during treatment episode, gender, age, chronic diseases, welfare and prescriber specialty, total healthcare costs (in log) [-0.06 (-0.14;0.01) P = 0.11] and psychiatric care costs (in square root) [-0.08 (-0.41;0.25) P = 0.6] were similar in both groups. Non-psychiatric care costs were significantly lower in the 'long treatment duration' group compared with the 'short treatment duration' group [-11.4 (-15.8; -7.0) P costs over the antidepressant treatment episode were larger in the 'long treatment duration' group compared with the 'short treatment duration' group. With regard to healthcare costs and global health, antidepressant drug treatments of short duration appear less effective than treatment of recommended duration. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Comparing augmentation with non-antidepressants over sticking to antidepressants after treatment failure in depression: a naturalistic study.

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    Köhler, S; Unger, T; Hoffmann, S; Steinacher, B; Fydrich, T; Bschor, T

    2013-03-01

    Non-response to an antidepressant monotherapy in unipolar depression is quite common. Therefore strategies for subsequent treatment steps are necessary. However, there is a lack of direct comparisons of these different strategies. In this naturalistic study we compared the outcome to different strategies after failure of the primary antidepressant treatment. Failure of primary antidepressant monotherapy occurred in 135 patients. 98 of these patients have been administered 4 treatment strategies of the physicians' choice: lithium augmentation (Li-Augm), switching to another antidepressant (AD-Switch), combination of 2 antidepressants (AD-Comb) or augmentation with second generation antipsychotic (SGA-Augm). Primary outcome measure was the 17-item Hamilton rating scale for depression (HRSD). Patients who received Li-Augm or augmentation with SGAs showed significantly greater improvement in HRSD and BDI compared to patients with antidepressant switch or antidepressant combination. Remission rates for Li-Augm and SGA-Augm were 89.3% and 86.2% compared to 40.7% for AD-Switch and 42.9% for AD-Comb. Changing to another pharmacological class (Li-Augm or augmentation with SGAs) showed better treatment results than sticking to the class of antidepressants (AD-Switch and AD-Comb) after primary failure in response to antidepressant monotherapy in unipolar depression. The lack of randomization and absence of a non-response definition are design flaws. Controlled studies are required to confirm the findings of this trial. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Antidepressant effect and pharmacological evaluation of standardized extract of flavonoids from Byrsonima crassifolia.

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    Herrera-Ruiz, M; Zamilpa, A; González-Cortazar, M; Reyes-Chilpa, R; León, E; García, M P; Tortoriello, J; Huerta-Reyes, M

    2011-11-15

    Byrsonima crassifolia (Malpighiaceae) has been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of some mental-related diseases; however, its specific neuropharmacological activities remain to be defined. The present study evaluates the anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, antidepressant, sedative effects produced by the extracts of Byrsonima crassifolia, and their influence on motor activity in ICR mice. Additionally, we determine the acute toxicity profiles of the Byrsonima crassifolia extracts and the presence of neuroactive constituents. Our results show that the methanolic extract of Byrsonima crassifolia produces a significant (P0.05). Although the main compound of the methanolic extract was identified as quercetin 3-O-xyloside (12 mg/kg), our findings suggest that flavonoids, such as rutin (4.4 mg/kg), quercetin (1.4 mg/kg) and hesperidin (0.7 mg/kg), may be involved in the antidepressant effects. To the best of our knowledge, the present study constitutes the first report on the presence of the flavonoids with neuropharmacological activity rutin and hesperidin in Byrsonima crassifolia. In conclusion, the present results showed that the methanolic extract standardized on flavonoids content of Byrsonima crassifolia possesses potential antidepressant-like effects in the FST in mice, and could be considered as relatively safe toxicologically with no deaths of mice when orally administered at 2000 mg/kg. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Suicidality and aggression during antidepressant treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Tarang; Guski, Louise Schow; Freund, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study serious harms associated with selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors.Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mortality and suicidality. Secondary outcomes were aggressive behaviour and akathisia. DATA SOURCES: Clinical...... for any of the trials. Differences in mortality (all deaths were in adults, odds ratio 1.28, 95% confidence interval 0.40 to 4.06), suicidality (1.21, 0.84 to 1.74), and akathisia (2.04, 0.93 to 4.48) were not significant, whereas patients taking antidepressants displayed more aggressive behaviour (1.......93, 1.26 to 2.95). For adults, the odds ratios were 0.81 (0.51 to 1.28) for suicidality, 1.09 (0.55 to 2.14) for aggression, and 2.00 (0.79 to 5.04) for akathisia. The corresponding values for children and adolescents were 2.39 (1.31 to 4.33), 2.79 (1.62 to 4.81), and 2.15 (0.48 to 9.65). In the summary...

  5. Suicidality and aggression during antidepressant treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Tarang; Guski, Louise Schow; Freund, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study serious harms associated with selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors.Design Systematic review and meta-analysis.Main outcome measures Mortality and suicidality. Secondary outcomes were aggressive behaviour and akathisia.Data sources Clinical study...... of the trials. Differences in mortality (all deaths were in adults, odds ratio 1.28, 95% confidence interval 0.40 to 4.06), suicidality (1.21, 0.84 to 1.74), and akathisia (2.04, 0.93 to 4.48) were not significant, whereas patients taking antidepressants displayed more aggressive behaviour (1.93, 1.26 to 2.......95). For adults, the odds ratios were 0.81 (0.51 to 1.28) for suicidality, 1.09 (0.55 to 2.14) for aggression, and 2.00 (0.79 to 5.04) for akathisia. The corresponding values for children and adolescents were 2.39 (1.31 to 4.33), 2.79 (1.62 to 4.81), and 2.15 (0.48 to 9.65). In the summary trial reports on Eli...

  6. Anti-depressants in primary care: analysis of treatment discontinuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGettigan, P; Kelly, A; Carvahlo, M; Feely, J

    2000-11-01

    It is well known that adherence to anti-depressant therapy is often poor, but the literature describes little in the way of systematic analyses to determine co-relation between treatment discontinuation and possible contributing factors. We used a community dispensing database to review anti-depressant prescribing patterns and continuity of therapy over a period of 10 months among a population of community-based general practice patients. Some 109,228 anti-depressant prescriptions were dispensed to 24,073 patients, of whom 37.5% collected a single prescription only. Tricyclic anti-depressant prescribing declined significantly during the observation period (from 70% of prescriptions in month 1 to 66% in month 10) while that of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) increased (23% in month 1, 28% in month 10) ( p 1 prescription, adherence was poor and declined over time. The factors that influenced the extent to which patients failed to adhere to therapy included dosage level (% DDD) and age ( p <0.0001 for both), but not drug class or sex. The findings suggest that low dosage is a contributory factor in treatment discontinuation, and that contrary to common perception, SSRIs are not necessarily associated with better adherence to therapy than tricyclics. Copyright (c) 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Antidepressant, antioxidant and neurotrophic properties of the standardized extract of Cocos nucifera husk fiber in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Eliane Brito Cortez; de Sousa, Caren Nádia Soares; Vasconcelos, Germana Silva; Meneses, Lucas Nascimento; E Silva Pereira, Yuri Freitas; Ximenes, Naiara Coelho; Santos Júnior, Manuel Alves; Matos, Natália Castelo Branco; Brito, Rayanne; Miron, Diogo; Leal, Luzia Kalyne Almeida Moreira; Macêdo, Danielle; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes

    2016-07-01

    The plant Cocos nucifera and its derivatives have shown antidepressant-like effects, although its hydroalcoholic extract has not been studied with this end in mind. Therefore, we decided to determine the antidepressant-like effects of the standardized hydroalcoholic extract of Cocos nucifera husk fiber (HECN) as well as oxidative alterations in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HC) and striatum (ST), and the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the HC of mice. The extract was characterized based on the content of total polyphenols as well as two phenol compounds-catechin and chlorogenic acid-by HPLC-PDA. Male animals were treated per os (p.o.) for 7 days with distilled water or HECN (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg), or intraperitoneally with vitamin E (Vit E 400 mg/kg). One hour after the last drug administration, the animals were submitted to the open field test, forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST) and, immediately after the behavioral tests, had their brain removed for neurochemical determinations. The results showed that HECN100 decreased the immobility time in the FST and TST presenting, thus demonstrating an antidepressant-like effect. The administration of HECN decreased malondialdehyde levels in all doses and brain areas studied with the exception of HECN50 in the HC. The administration of HECN also decreased nitrite levels in all doses and brain regions studied. HECN100 also increased the levels of BDNF in HC of mice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that HECN has antidepressant-like properties, probably based on its antioxidant and neurotrophic effects, and is thus relevant for the treatment of depression.

  8. Serotonergic antidepressants as predictors of depressive disorders treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timotijević Ivana P.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available From Kraepelin time to these days, biochemical, neurophysiological and neuropsychological complexity of depression has been reviewed in many different ways, but SSRI antidepressants have unquestionably brought about a significant drift in comprehension of disease, recognition of symptoms, and management. The fact is that high tech and accurate molecular studies may differentiate biological basis (receptor activity, transmitter concentrations not only in synapses, but also in particular CNS structures, cascade processes to changes of genomes in postsynaptic neurons of some depression symptoms. It is a significant progress in overview of psychiatric disorders because any symptom has its equivalent in CNS processes as antidepressants have their recognizable mechanisms of action. In this dynamic drug/disease relation, standard psychiatric classifications maintain their significance yet their approach remains descriptive what is no longer enough for selection of psychopharmacotherapy. Abandonment of categorical and adoption of dimensional approach means that any individual patient has his individual symptom portfolio created and that every symptom is hypothetically mapped in appropriate CNS structures and corresponding impaired information processes, dependent upon neurotransmitter pathways within these structures and connecting neuronal networks. Such approach opens up a possibility for combination of psychopharmacological drugs in different psychiatric categories what will be a huge benefit for patients, because targeted psychopharmacotherapy adjusts therapeutical effect and reduces the number of side effects and intolerable interactions. SSRI antidepressants, due to their broad spectrum of pharmacological characteristics and multiple psychiatric indications may be predictors of diagnostic categorization, causal psychopharmacotherapy and path to further research of etiopathogenesis of affective disorders.

  9. Prophylactic antidepressant treatment following acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ole G; Madsen, Michael T; Simonsen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    the current evidence of primary prophylactic treatment of depression in patients after acute coronary syndrome. The study protocol was prospectively registered at PROSPERO (registration number CRD42015025587). A systematic review were conducted and reported according to Preferred Reporting Items......Major depressive disorder is significantly increased in patients following acute coronary syndrome resulting in twofold increased mortality compared with patients without depression. The depression diagnosis is often missed leading to considerable undertreatment. This systematic review assesses...

  10. Combined treatment with atypical antipsychotics and antidepressants in treatment-resistant depression: preclinical and clinical efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogóż, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Several clinical reports have documented a beneficial effect of adding atypical antipsychotic drugs to ongoing treatments with antidepressants, particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, in ameliorating drug-resistant depression. The aim of this paper was to summarize some preclinical evidence describing the mechanism responsible for the therapeutic action of combined treatment with antidepressants and atypical antipsychotics and also some clinical data supporting the efficacy and safety of the augmentation strategy for improving antidepressant-resistant depression using atypical antipsychotics. This analysis is based on five microdialysis studies and nine behavioral studies assessing the impact of combined atypical antipsychotic and antidepressant treatments on extracellular levels of dopamine, serotonin and noradrenaline in the prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats and on antidepressant-induced effects, respectively. In addition, clinical data demonstrating the efficacy and safety of augmentation strategies for treatment-resistant depression using atypical antipsychotics were included. Combined treatment of rats with all studied atypical antipsychotics (olanzapine, risperidone, clozapine and quetiapine) and antidepressants (citalopram, fluoxetine and fluvoxamine) increased the extracellular level of dopamine in the prefrontal cortex compared to a respective drug given alone; in addition, a combination of olanzapine or quetiapine plus fluoxetine or fluvoxamine increased the levels of dopamine and noradrenaline. Moreover, atypical antipsychotics administered in a low dose enhanced the antidepressant-like activity of antidepressants, with (among other mechanisms) the serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and adrenergic α2 receptors likely playing an important role in their action. The results support the conclusion that atypical antipsychotics may be effective as adjunctive therapy in treatment-resistant depression; however, their adverse effect profile may be

  11. Systems genetics analysis of pharmacogenomics variation during antidepressant treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, M. B.; Kogelman, L. J. A.; Kadarmideen, H. N.

    2018-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most widely used antidepressants, but the efficacy of the treatment varies significantly among individuals. It is believed that complex genetic mechanisms play a part in this variation. We have used a network based approach to unravel...... the involved genetic components. Moreover, we investigated the potential difference in the genetic interaction networks underlying SSRI treatment response over time. We found four hub genes (ASCC3, PPARGC1B, SCHIP1 and TMTC2) with different connectivity in the initial SSRI treatment period (baseline to week 4......) compared with the subsequent period (4-8 weeks after initiation), suggesting that different genetic networks are important at different times during SSRI treatment. The strongest interactions in the initial SSRI treatment period involved genes encoding transcriptional factors, and in the subsequent period...

  12. Season of treatment initiation with antidepressants and suicidal behavior: A population-based cohort study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Georgios D; Reutfors, Johan; Andersen, Morten; White, Richard A; Ekselius, Lisa; Papadopoulos, Fotios C

    2017-06-01

    Decreased binding capacity of SERT in the prefrontal cortex has been observed in both suicide victims and suicide attempters. Moreover, some studies have shown that SERT has a seasonal variation with lower binding capacity in the spring and summer, which coincides with a seasonal peak of suicides. Our aim was to explore whether the season of treatment initiation with antidepressants is associated with suicide or suicide attempt and compare it with the underlying suicide seasonality in the general population. Using Swedish registers, patients who initiated treatment with an antidepressant were followed up to three months for suicidal behavior. Cox regression analyses were used. Results were compared with the underlying seasonal pattern by calculating standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for suicides and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for suicide attempts. Patients aged ≥65 years had higher risk for suicide when initiating antidepressant treatment in the summer, and also a higher risk for suicide attempt when initiating treatment in the spring and summer. Young patients (0-24 years) presented a higher risk for suicide attempt when initiating treatment in the autumn. Patients with previous suicide attempt had a seasonal pattern, with a higher risk to carry out a suicide attempt in the summer and autumn. Results from the SMR and SIR calculations numerically support these findings. We used information of filling an antidepressant prescription as a proxy of actual antidepressant treatment. Patients with combination, augmentation therapy or those switching antidepressant during follow-up were excluded. Thus, our results refer to less complicated psychopathology. Our results indicate an interaction between biological and health care-related factors for the observed seasonal pattern of suicidal behavior in the elderly, whereas psychological and societal factors may be more important for the seasonality observed in the younger patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  13. The Strategy of Combining Antidepressants in the Treatment of Major Depression: Clinical Experience in Spanish Outpatients

    OpenAIRE

    Luis M. Martín-López; Jose E. Rojo; Karina Gibert; Juan Carlos Martín; Lyli Sperry; Lurdes Duñó; Antonio Bulbena; Julio Vallejo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. The combination of antidepressants is a useful tool in the treatment of major depression, especially in cases where there is a partial response to antidepressant monotherapy. However, the use of this strategy is a matter of controversy, and its frequency of use in clinical practice is not clear. The aim of our study is to assess the use of antidepressants combination in Spain by reviewing three databases used between 1997 and 2001. Methods. Databases pertain to patien...

  14. Poor guideline adherence in the initiation of antidepressant treatment in children and adolescents in the Netherlands : choice of antidepressant and dose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Ymkje Anna; de Jonge, Peter; Kalverdijk, Luuk; Bos, Jens H. J.; Schuiling-Veninga, Catharina C. M.; Hak, Eelko

    2016-01-01

    The Dutch guideline for the treatment of depression in young people recommends initiating antidepressant treatment with fluoxetine, as the evidence for its efficacy is strongest and the risk of suicidality may be lower than with other antidepressants. Furthermore, low starting doses are recommended.

  15. Patients' perceptions and illness severity at start of antidepressant treatment in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Geffen, Erica C.G.; Heerdink, Eiebert R.; Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G.; Siero, Frans W.; Egberts, Antoine C.G.; Van Hulten, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Patients' perceptions are important to consider when trying to understand why patients often do not follow prescriptions for antidepressant treatment. This study aimed to investigate the influence of patients' perceptions and illness severity at the start on antidepressant-medication-

  16. Monitoring patients on chronic treatment with antidepressants between 2003 and 2011: analysis of factors associated with compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, M Catalina; Real, Jordi; Cruz, Inés; Galván, Leonardo; Martin, Elisabet

    2015-11-26

    Clinical practice guidelines consider the use of antidepressants as one of the standard treatments for anxiety disorders, due to the significant improvements obtained in quality of life and functional disability. In addition, in patients who have not achieved a favorable response after 3 months of psychotherapy, antidepressants are recommended as part of a combined treatment approach. This combination with psychotropic drugs and psychotherapy appears to be indicated from baseline in patients with moderate, severe or recurrent depression. In the last decade, antidepressant prescription rates in general practice have increased between 4 and 10 times. Depression presents high rates of relapse and recurrence. Treatment is often interrupted prematurely, leading to increases in both relapse rates and health care costs. Few studies have analysed the chronic use of antidepressant drugs and long-term adherence. To evaluate compliance with antidepressant treatment between 2003 and 2011 and to explore the associated factors. Retrospective cohort study of antidepressant dispensing. Health Region of Lleida between 2003 and 2011. Patients with chronic prescription of antidepressants (ATC code NO6A) during 2003 were followed up until December 2011. The sample comprised 3684 subjects. The compliance rate was calculated on the basis of the number of units withdrawn from the pharmacy and the theoretical number of units required according to the scheduled duration of treatment: compliance was defined in cases with scores greater than or equal to 80%. 12.5% of patients received chronic antidepressant treatment for at least 4 years. Mean age was 54 years, and 73.2% of patients were female. Almost a third (32.4%) presented anxiety disorders and 26.5% mood disorders. The overall compliance rate was 22% (28% in patients with depression, and 21% in patients with anxiety). According to gender, compliance rates were 21.4% for males and 22.4% for females. Compliance was more likely in

  17. Efficacy and safety of antidepressant augmentation of continued antipsychotic treatment in patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galling, B; Vernon, J A; Pagsberg, A K

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of antidepressant augmentation of antipsychotics in schizophrenia. METHODS: Systematic literature search (PubMed/MEDLINE/PsycINFO/Cochrane Library) from database inception until 10/10/2017 for randomized, double-blind, efficacy-focused trials comparing...... adjunctive antidepressants vs. placebo in schizophrenia. RESULTS: In a random-effects meta-analysis (studies = 42, n = 1934, duration = 10.1 ± 8.1 weeks), antidepressant augmentation outperformed placebo regarding total symptom reduction [standardized mean difference (SMD) = -0.37, 95% confidence interval.......77, -0.09, P = 0.012). Antidepressants did not improve depressive symptoms more than placebo (P = 0.185). Except for more dry mouth [risk ratio (RR) = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.04-2.36, P = 0.03], antidepressant augmentation was not associated with more adverse events or all-cause/specific-cause discontinuation...

  18. Trazodone Addition to Paroxetine and Mirtazapine in a Patient with Treatment-Resistant Depression: The Pros and Cons of Combining Three Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dual antidepressant combination for treatment-resistant depression is a strategy well supported by literature and accepted in clinical practice. Rather, the usefulness of the combination of more than two antidepressants is controversial. This may be related to the possibility of higher side-effect burden and to doubts about its pharmacological effectiveness and therapeutic advantage compared to other standard treatment options. We report a relapse of moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms with insomnia that successfully remitted after the addition of trazodone to a dual combination of paroxetine and mirtazapine (in standard effective doses in a patient with treatment-resistant depression. We also review the literature and discuss the utility of triple antidepressant combination in treatment-resistant depression. This clinical case highlights the utility of combining trazodone as a third antidepressant for the relapse of depressive symptoms after the failure of a dual antidepressant combination. Trazodone may be advantageous in patients presenting recurrence of moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms that include sleep problems and/or insomnia and may be particularly useful when benzodiazepines are not recommended. Although its use may be controversial and associated with higher risk of side-effects, more investigation is needed to determine the efficacy and safety for triple antidepressant combinations as reliable strategies for treatment-resistant depression in clinical practice.

  19. A psychogenic dystonia perfect responsive to antidepressant treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Solmaz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available After ruling out of organic causes, movement disorders are named as psychogenic movement disorders, it can mimic perfectly Organic movement disorders, but with a good history, clinical observations and detailed examination is very helpful in the diagnosis of this disease. In here we will present a 15 years old male patient, he was complaining of urinary incontinence at night, emerging dystonic posture especially in crowded environments, eating, and during activities that require attention, for 5 years. Self and family history was unremarkable. His physical and neurological examination was normal except for dystonic posture esipecially writing and when doing skilled jobs. All the tests were normal for the differential diagnosis. Taking into account the patient\\s clinical findings and cilinical test, the patient was diagnosed as psychogenic dystonia. He gave a very good response to treatment with antidepressants and psychotherapy. As a result, in clinical practice both the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges the psychogenic movement disorders is an important problem, and to get rid of the negative effects of unnecessary diagnostic test and side efects of treatment, you need to keep in mind this diagnosis. [J Contemp Med 2014; 4(1.000: 29-31

  20. Low Risk for Switch to Mania during Treatment with Sleep Promoting Antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichniak, A; Jarkiewicz, M; Okruszek, Ł; Wierzbicka, A; Holka-Pokorska, J; Rybakowski, J K

    2015-05-01

    Sleep-promoting antidepressants are of interest because they are used not only as antidepressants, but also to promote sleep. We reviewed case reports describing the switch to mania during treatment with trazodone, mirtazapine, or agomelatine. Trazodone, mirtazapine, and agomelatine may induce manic symptoms. However, the risk of switching is related, first of all, to doses recommended for antidepressant treatment, administered without mood-stabilizer co-therapy. Low doses of these antidepressants, used for their hypnotic or sedative effects, were observed to cause mania only in patients with other risk factors for switching. There is no evidence for trazodone or mirtazapine and only sparse evidence for agomelatine, claiming that treatment with these antidepressants is related to an increased risk of switching to mania when administered in combination with a mood stabilizer. These findings suggest that low doses of trazodone and mirtazapine are safe in bipolar disorder, and should still be considered important alternatives to hypnotics when long-term pharmacological treatment of insomnia is necessary. It seems that these antidepressants and agomelatine can also be used safely in antidepressant doses when combined with a mood stabilizer. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Explanatory models of depression and treatment adherence to antidepressant medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Johannessen, Helle; Stage, Kurt Bjerregaard

    2012-01-01

    and medicine were not central. However, taking antidepressant medication was a meaningful part of being admitted to hospital, and the adoption of the rhetoric and practices of biomedicine strengthened patients' sense of control and hope for recovery. If medicine was ineffective, the explanatory models...... legitimised alternative strategies towards recovery, including non-adherence. CONCLUSIONS: The patients' reasons for adhering to antidepressants included a range of diverse psychosocial issues, and could be regarded as a central part of their common sense illness management....

  2. The Antidepressant Treatment Response Index as a Predictor of Reboxetine Treatment Outcome in Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudill, Marissa M; Hunter, Aimee M; Cook, Ian A; Leuchter, Andrew F

    2015-10-01

    Biomarkers to predict clinical outcomes early during the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) could reduce suffering and improve outcomes. A quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) biomarker, the Antidepressant Treatment Response (ATR) index, has been associated with outcomes of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants in patients with MDD. Here, we report the results of a post hoc analysis initiated to evaluate whether the ATR index may also be associated with reboxetine treatment outcome, given that its putative mechanism of action is via norepinephrine reuptake inhibition (NRI). Twenty-five adults with MDD underwent qEEG studies during open-label treatment with reboxetine at doses of 8 to 10 mg daily for 8 weeks. The ATR index calculated after 1 week of reboxetine treatment was significantly associated with overall Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) improvement at week 8 (r=0.605, P=.001), even after controlling for baseline depression severity (P=.002). The ATR index predicted response (≥50% reduction in HAM-D) with 70.6% sensitivity and 87.5% specificity, and remission (final HAM-D≤7) with 87.5% sensitivity and 64.7% specificity. These results suggest that the ATR index may be a useful biomarker of clinical response during NRI treatment of adults with MDD. Future studies are warranted to investigate further the potential utility of the ATR index as a predictor of noradrenergic antidepressant treatment response. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2014.

  3. Efficacy and Safety of Antidepressants for the Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Chen; Tang, Yurong; Wang, Yunfeng; Yu, Ting; Wang, Yun; Jiang, Liuqin; Lin, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this meta-analysis was to analyze the efficacy and safety of antidepressants for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus and The Cochrane Library for randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy and safety of antidepressants in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Article quality was evaluated by Jadad score. RevMan 5.0 and Stata 12.0 were used for the meta-analysis. Results Twelve randomized controlled trials were...

  4. Bulking agents, antispasmodics and antidepressants for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruepert, Lisa; Quartero, A Otto; de Wit, Niek J; van der Heijden, Geert J; Rubin, Gregory; Muris, Jean Wm

    2011-08-10

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic gastrointestinal disorder. The role of pharmacotherapy for IBS is limited and focused mainly on symptom control. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the efficacy of bulking agents, antispasmodics and antidepressants for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Computer assisted structured searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane library, CINAHL and PsychInfo were conducted for the years 1966-2009. An updated search in April 2011 identified 10 studies which will be considered for inclusion in a future update of this review. Randomized controlled trials comparing bulking agents, antispasmodics or antidepressants with a placebo treatment in patients with irritable bowel syndrome aged over 12 years were considered for inclusion. Only studies published as full papers were included. Studies were not excluded on the basis of language. The primary outcome had to include improvement of abdominal pain, global assessment or symptom score. Two authors independently extracted data from the selected studies. Risk Ratios (RR) and Standardized Mean Differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. A proof of practice analysis was conducted including sub-group analyses for different types of  bulking agents, spasmolytic agents or antidepressant medication. This was followed by a proof of principle analysis where only the studies with adequate allocation concealment were included. A total of 56 studies (3725 patients) were included in this review. These included 12 studies of bulking agents (621 patients), 29 of antispasmodics (2333 patients), and 15 of antidepressants (922 patients). The risk of bias was low for most items. However, selection bias is unclear for many of the included studies because the methods used for randomization and allocation concealment were not described. No beneficial effect for bulking agents over placebo was found for improvement of abdominal pain (4 studies

  5. Reduced Treatment-Emergent Sexual Dysfunction as a Potential Target in the Development of New Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Baldwin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleasurable sexual activity is an essential component of many human relationships, providing a sense of physical, psychological, and social well-being. Epidemiological and clinical studies show that depressive symptoms and depressive illness are associated with impairments in sexual function and satisfaction, both in untreated and treated patients. The findings of randomized placebo-controlled trials demonstrate that most of the currently available antidepressant drugs are associated with the development or worsening of sexual dysfunction, in a substantial proportion of patients. Sexual difficulties during antidepressant treatment often resolve as depression lifts but can endure over long periods and may reduce self-esteem and affect mood and relationships adversely. Sexual dysfunction during antidepressant treatment is typically associated with many possible causes, but the risk and type of dysfunction vary with differing compounds and should be considered when making decisions about the relative merits and drawbacks of differing antidepressants. A range of interventions can be considered when managing patients with sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressants, including the prescription of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, but none of these approaches can be considered “ideal.” As treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction is less frequent with certain drugs, presumably related to differences in their pharmacological properties, and because current management approaches are less than ideal, a reduced burden of treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction represents a tolerability target in the development of novel antidepressants.

  6. Are Antidepressants Effective in the Treatment of Postpartum Depression? A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Verinder; Sommerdyk, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In spite of the paucity of randomized controlled trials of antidepressants in postpartum depression, these drugs are the most commonly used agents in the pharmacologic treatment of postpartum depression. This article reviews the literature on the efficacy of antidepressants in randomized controlled trials of postpartum depression. Data Sources: Four electronic databases, MEDLINE/PubMed (1966–2013), PsycINFO (1806–2013), EMBASE (1980–2013), and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Re...

  7. Assessing disruptions in adherence to antidepressant treatments after breast cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yi-Ting; Winn, Aaron N; Rosenstein, Donald L; Dusetzina, Stacie B

    2017-06-01

    Long-term treatment with antidepressants can lessen the symptoms of depression, but health-related crises-such as a cancer diagnosis-may disrupt ongoing depression care. The study aims to estimate the effect of receiving a breast cancer diagnosis on antidepressant adherence among women with depression. Using SEER-Medicare administrative claims, we identified women aged 65+ with newly diagnosed breast cancer between 2008 and 2011, who were diagnosed with depression and used antidepressants during the year before pre-diagnosis year. We compared antidepressant adherence among women with breast cancer to similar women without cancer using generalized estimation equations. Antidepressant adherence was estimated using the proportion of days covered 1 year before and after the index date. We included 1142 women with breast cancer and pre-existing depression and 1142 matched non-cancer patients with pre-existing depression. Mean antidepressant adherence was similar for both groups in the year before and after the index date (all around 0.71); adherence decreased by approximately 0.01 following breast cancer diagnosis in cancer group, with similar reductions among non-cancer group (p = 0.19). However, substantial proportion of patients had inadequate adherence to antidepressants in the post-diagnosis period, and almost 40% of patients in each group discontinued antidepressants over the study period. Antidepressant adherence was not associated with receiving a breast cancer diagnosis beyond what would have been expected in a similar cohort of women without cancer; however, adherence was poor among both groups. Ensuring adequate ongoing depression care is important to improve cancer care and patient quality of life in the long term. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The Timing of Antidepressant Effects: A Comparison of Diverse Pharmacological and Somatic Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Zarate Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently available antidepressants used to treat major depressive disorder (MDD unfortunately often take weeks to months to achieve their full effects, commonly resulting in considerable morbidity and increased risk for suicidal behavior. Our lack of understanding of the precise cellular underpinnings of this illness and of the mechanism of action of existing effective pharmacological treatments is a large part of the reason that therapies with a more rapid onset of antidepressant action (ROAA have not been developed. Other issues that need to be addressed include heterogeneous clinical concepts and statistical models to measure rapid antidepressant effects. This review describes the timing of onset of antidepressant effects for various therapies used to treat MDD. While several agents produce earlier improvement of depressive symptoms (defined as occurring within one week, the response rate associated with such agents can be quite variable. These agents include both currently available antidepressants as well as other pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Considerably fewer treatments are associated with ROAA, defined as occurring within several hours or one day. Treatment strategies for MDD whose sustained antidepressant effects manifest within hours or even a few days would have an enormous impact on public health.

  9. Antidepressants for the treatment of depression in palliative care: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Lauren; Price, Annabel; Evans, Alison; Valsraj, Koravangattu; Hotopf, Matthew; Higginson, Irene J

    2011-01-01

    Depression can exacerbate symptoms associated with life-threatening illness and increase disability and distress. In palliative care, depression occurs in a context of multiple symptoms, which complicates detection and treatment. While systematic reviews of antidepressants have been conducted in specific life-threatening diseases, no previous study has synthesized the evidence in palliative care. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of antidepressants for the treatment of depression in palliative care. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PSYCINFO and Cochrane trials registers were systematically searched to identify randomized controlled trials comparing antidepressants and placebo for the treatment of depression in palliative care. The primary outcome was efficacy assessed at three time-points. Twenty-five studies were included in the review. At each time-point antidepressants were more efficacious than placebo: 4-5 weeks odds ratio (OR) 1.93 (1.15-3.42) p = 0.001; 6-8 weeks OR 2.25 (1.38-3.67) p = 0.001; 9-18 weeks OR 2.71 (1.50-4.91) p = 0.001. This review provides evidence that antidepressants are effective in treating depression in palliative care. Their superiority over placebo is apparent within 4-5 weeks and increases with continued use. It is probable that the effect sizes yielded in this review overestimate the efficacy of antidepressants due to biases such as selective reporting and publication. Nevertheless, the magnitude and consistency of the effect suggests genuine benefit.

  10. Managing antidepressants in primary care: physicians' treatment modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrino, Marijo B; Nagel, Rollin W; Lynch, Denis J

    2011-06-01

    To examine antidepressant management practices in primary care, patients (N = 148) given an antidepressant for at least one month completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), and a demographic survey. Participants' mean age was 50.7 yr. and 80% were women. Patients' charts indicated whether physicians had made changes to prescribed antidepressants or dose either 6 wk. before or 6 wk. after study entry. For the 87% of participants whose depression status could be determined, 10% met dysthymic disorder criteria and only 33% had had a medication change in the previous month. Major depressive disorder occurred in 37% but only 18% had had a medication change. Co-existing dysthymic disorder and major depressive disorder were diagnosed in 34%, with 24% receiving a medication change. Participants not receiving a medication change had mean BDI-II scores indicating moderate depression. Lack of antidepressant adjustment suggests physicians may need to monitor depressive symptoms closely using protocols and prompts.

  11. Antidepressant agents and suicide death among US Department of Veterans Affairs patients in depression treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenstein, Marcia; Kim, Hyungjin Myra; Ganoczy, Dara; Eisenberg, Daniel; Pfeiffer, Paul N; Downing, Karen; Hoggatt, Katherine; Ilgen, Mark; Austin, Karen L; Zivin, Kara; Blow, Frederic C; McCarthy, John F

    2012-06-01

    Studies report mixed findings regarding antidepressant agents and suicide risks, and few examine suicide deaths. Studies using observational data can accrue the large sample sizes needed to examine suicide death, but selection biases must be addressed. We assessed associations between suicide death and treatment with the 7 most commonly used antidepressants in a national sample of Department of Veterans Affairs patients in depression treatment. Multiple analytic strategies were used to address potential selection biases. We identified Department of Veterans Affairs patients with depression diagnoses and new antidepressant starts between April 1, 1999, and September 30, 2004 (N = 502,179). Conventional Cox regression models, Cox models with inverse probability of treatment weighting, propensity-stratified Cox models, marginal structural models (MSM), and instrumental variable analyses were used to examine relationships between suicide and exposure to bupropion, citalopram, fluoxetine, mirtazapine, paroxetine, sertraline, and venlafaxine. Crude suicide rates varied from 88 to 247 per 100,000 person-years across antidepressant agents. In multiple Cox models and MSMs, sertraline and fluoxetine had lower risks for suicide death than paroxetine. Bupropion had lower risks than several antidepressants in Cox models but not MSMs. Instrumental variable analyses did not find significant differences across antidepressants. Most antidepressants did not differ in their risk for suicide death. However, across several analytic approaches, although not instrumental variable analyses, fluoxetine and sertraline had lower risks of suicide death than paroxetine. These findings are congruent with the Food and Drug Administration meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials reporting lower risks for "suicidality" for sertraline and a trend toward lower risks with fluoxetine than for other antidepressants. Nevertheless, divergence in findings by analytic approach suggests caution when

  12. Early discontinuation of antidepressant treatment and suicide risk among persons aged 50 and over

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Agerbo, Esben; Hawton, Keith

    2009-01-01

    without past hospital admissions, the difference was not significant in the adjusted model. LIMITATIONS: Prescriptions redeemed at pharmacies are our only indicator of treatment adherence. Also, information on severity of depression was not available. CONCLUSIONS: We did not find a lower suicide risk......BACKGROUND: As many as 47% of adults over age 50 discontinue treatment with antidepressants after redeeming only one prescription. The study aim was to assess the risk of suicide in adults aged 50+ who discontinue antidepressants at an early stage of treatment. METHOD: Case control study of all......,594 men and 138,529 women aged 50+ began treatment with an antidepressant medication, of whom 309 men and 229 women died by suicide. Men aged 50+ who discontinued treatment early had a suicide rate of 167 per 100,000 compared with 175 per 100,000 in those who continued refilling prescriptions; hazard...

  13. Induction of kf-1 after repeated electroconvulsive treatment and chronic antidepressant treatment in rat frontal cortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, G; Yamada, M; Kudo, K; Takahashi, K; Kiuchi, Y; Higuchi, T; Momose, K; Kamijima, K; Yamada, M

    2003-03-01

    It has been proposed that signaling pathways involved in adaptive neural plasticity are long-term targets for the action of electroconvulsive treatment (ECT), which is widely used in the treatment of drug-resistant depression. We have previously performed EST analysis to identify some molecular machinery responsible for antidepressant effect. One of the cDNA fragments identified as antidepressant related genes/ESTs was identified as kf-1 which has a RING-H2 finger motif at the carboxy-terminus. In the present study, we have demonstrated the induction of kf-1 in rat frontal cortex and hippocampus not only after chronic antidepressant treatment, but also after a single and repeated ECT. RING finger proteins are proposed to play some important roles in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. In conclusion, the current investigation has identified kf-1 as a novel molecular target for antidepressants and ECT.

  14. Relationship between Antidepressant Prescription Rates and Features of Schizophrenic Patients and Its Outcome in Schizophrenia Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanci, Nurcan; Çetin Eker, Özlem; Miraloğlu, Özlem; Argun Uslu, Meral; Özkaya, Güven; Eker, Salih Saygın

    2015-03-01

    Comorbid depression in schizophrenia is associated with poor outcome, increased risk of relapse and a high rate of suicide. Identification of depressive symptoms and their appropriate treatment is crucial for depressed schizophrenic patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the rates of antidepressant prescription and their outcomes. The records of the schizophrenic outpatients, who were consulted at Psychosis Unit of Psychiatry Department between January 2007 and September 2012, were evaluated retrospectively. Enrolled schizophrenic patients' antidepressant medications were at their minimal effective doses and effective duration. The present study demonstrates that 39 of the 101 patients during their follow-ups were prescribed antidepressants. The mean follow-up period was 6.3 (±4.2) years; the mean age at onset was 22 (±6.5) years; the mean duration of illness was 14.7 (±7.3) years and the mean number of psychotic exacerbation was 5 (±3.7). The most prescribed antidepressants were; sertraline (36.9%), venlefaxine (23.8%) and essitalopram (20.2%). SSRI's were prescribed 57 (73.1%), where as SNRI's 21 times (26.9%). There was no significant difference between SSRI (78.6%) and SNRI (21.4%) treatments in terms of psychotic exacerbation under antidepressant medication. Full remission of depressive symptoms was achieved in 21 patients (53.8%). Remission rates were significantly higher (pdepressed schizophrenic patients (85.7%) compared to SSRI treated patients (50.9%). In 8 of the 39 patients (20.5%) antidepressant treatment was terminated due to side effects. This study demonstrates that SSRI's were more often prescribed compared to other classes of antidepressants in emerging depressive symptoms in schizophrenic patients despite full remission with SNRI's is more common. There was no significant difference between SSRI and SNRI treatment in terms of psychotic exacerbation.

  15. Role of AC-cAMP-PKA Cascade in Antidepressant Action of Electroacupuncture Treatment in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-hua Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenylyl cyclase (AC-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA cascade is considered to be associated with the pathogenesis and treatment of depression. The present study was conducted to explore the role of the cAMP cascade in antidepressant action of electroacupuncture (EA treatment for chronic mild stress (CMS-induced depression model rats. The results showed that EA improved significantly behavior symptoms in depression and dysfunction of AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathway induced by CMS, which was as effective as fluoxetine. Moreover, the antidepressant effects of EA rather than Fluoxetine were completely abolished by H89, a specific PKA inhibitor. Consequently, EA has a significant antidepressant treatment in CMS-induced depression model rats, and AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathway is crucial for it.

  16. [Use of antidepressants in the treatment of negative symptoms of schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, A; Lodovighi, M-A; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    Negative symptoms account for a clinical dimension of schizophrenia. They are partly the cause of functional disability of this disease. Clinical experience shows that antipsychotics have little or no effect on these symptoms. The aim of this review is to gather existing data on the treatment of negative symptoms with antidepressants. The combination of antipsychotics with antidepressants is a therapeutic strategy commonly used for the treatment of these symptoms. The pro-dopaminergic effects of antidepressants explain their effectiveness on negative symptoms. There are many comparative, randomized, controlled studies evaluating the efficacy of antidepressant associated with antipsychotic for the treatment of negative symptoms. Furthermore three meta-analyses have been conducted. The overall results suggest that the use of antidepressants may contribute to clinical improvement of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. The limitations of these studies are the small number of patients included and the definition and assessment of negative symptoms. The existing scales are not sufficiently discriminating. Further research using new measurement tools should help refine these results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. [Adherence to patients antidepressant treatment and the factors associated of non-compiance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Párraga Martínez, Ignacio; López-Torres Hidalgo, Jesús; del Campo del Campo, José M; Villena Ferrer, Alejandro; Morena Rayo, Susana; Escobar Rabadán, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    To know the adherence to treatment in patients who initiate antidepressant drugs and to analyze the determinant factors of non-compliance, so much clinical as sociodemographic. Prospective longitudinal observational study. Primary Health Care and Mental Health Surgeries of three Castilla-La Mancha Areas. 185 adults patients who were started in antidepressant treatment were evaluated. Treatment adherence (test Haynes-Sackett, test Morisky-Green, count of tablets and MEMS), adverse effects, intensity of depressive symptoms, sociodemographic characteristics and other characteristics related to antidepressants or participants. After 6months of beginning antidepressing treatment, 46.9% (95%IC: 36.5-57.3) showed an inadequate fulfilment by pill count method and 28.6% (95%IC: 19.1-38.0) with Morisky-Green's questionnaire. To 15 days the lack of adherence was 48.5% (95%IC: 40.6-56.4) and of 33.5% (95%IC: 26.1-41.0). The 38.4% (95%IC: 31.1-45.7) demonstrated some side effect during the follow-up. Using proportional risk model of Cox the variables related to compliance were: younger age, level of instruction lower than secondary studies, free medicines for pensioner, no psychotherapeutic treatment, consume a fewer antidepressants drugs and a frequency ≤ 3 visits to the family doctor 3 months previous to the study. The non-compliance of antidepressant treatment in primary care is high from the first weeks after initiating it. The conditioning factors are related to sociodemographic characteristics and other patient characteristics as type of financing of pharmaceutical benefit and frequentness at primary care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of prolonged duration of untreated depression on antidepressant treatment outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann; Bock, Camilla; Vinberg, Maj

    2013-01-01

    The duration of untreated illness has been considered a likely predictor of the course of psychotic disorders. However, there is only sparse data concerning the influence of treatment delay on the outcome of mood disorders. The present study aimed to assess the effect of prolonged untreated depre...... depression on the outcome of antidepressant treatment....

  19. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder Who Remain Symptomatic following Antidepressant Treatment: A Randomized, Assessor-Blinded, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Naoki; Matsuki, Satoshi; Niitsu, Tomihisa; Sato, Yasunori; Tanaka, Mari; Ibuki, Hanae; Takanashi, Rieko; Ohshiro, Keiko; Ohshima, Fumiyo; Asano, Kenichi; Kobori, Osamu; Yoshimura, Kensuke; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Sawaguchi, Kyoko; Koshizaka, Masaya; Hanaoka, Hideki; Nakagawa, Akiko; Nakazato, Michiko; Iyo, Masaomi; Shimizu, Eiji

    Although antidepressants are still a commonly used treatment for social anxiety disorder (SAD), a significant proportion of patients fail to remit following antidepressants. However, no standard approach has been established for managing such patients. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) as an adjunct to usual care (UC) compared with UC alone in SAD patients who remain symptomatic following antidepressant treatment. This was a prospective randomized open-blinded end-point study with two parallel groups (CBT + UC, and UC alone, both for 16 weeks) conducted from June 2012 to March 2014. SAD patients who remain symptomatic following antidepressant treatment were recruited, and a total sample size of 42 was set based on pilot results. Patients were randomly allocated to CBT + UC (n = 21) or UC alone (n = 21). After 16 weeks, adjusted mean reduction in the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale from baseline for CBT + UC and UC alone was -40.87 and 0.68, respectively; the between-group difference was -41.55 (-53.68 to -29.42, p social anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, and functional impairment. Our results suggest that in SAD patients who have been ineffectively treated with antidepressants, CBT is an effective treatment adjunct to UC over 16 weeks in reducing social anxiety and related symptoms. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. No interactions between genetic polymorphisms and stressful life events on outcome of antidepressant treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens Drachmann; Bock, Camilla; Vinberg, Maj

    2009-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms seem to influence the response on antidepressant treatment and moderate the impact of stress on depression. The present study aimed to assess, whether allelic variants and stressful life events interact on the clinical outcome of depression. In a sample of 290 systematically...... recruited patients diagnosed with a single depressive episode according to ICD-10, we assessed the outcome of antidepressant treatment and the presence of stressful life events in a 6-month period preceding onset of depression by means of structured interviews. Further, we genotyped nine polymorphisms...... dependent on stressful life events experienced by the individual prior to onset of depression....

  1. Lithium's emerging role in the treatment of refractory major depressive episodes: augmentation of antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Michael; Adli, Mazda; Bschor, Tom; Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Pfennig, Andrea; Sasse, Johanna; Schmid, Rita; Lewitzka, Ute

    2010-01-01

    The late onset of therapeutic response and a relatively large proportion of nonresponders to antidepressants remain major concerns in clinical practice. Therefore, there is a critical need for effective medication strategies that augment treatment with antidepressants. To review the available evidence on the use of lithium as an augmentation strategy to treat depressive episodes. More than 30 open-label studies and 10 placebo-controlled double-blind trials have demonstrated substantial efficacy of lithium augmentation in the acute treatment of depressive episodes. Most of these studies were performed in unipolar depression and included all major classes of antidepressants, however mostly tricyclics. A meta-analysis including 10 randomized placebo-controlled trials has provided evidence that lithium augmentation has a statistically significant effect on the response rate compared to placebo with an odds ratio of 3.11, which corresponds to a number-needed-to-treat of 5. The meta-analysis revealed a mean response rate of 41.2% in the lithium group and 14.4% in the placebo group. One placebo-controlled trial in the continuation treatment phase showed that responders to acute-phase lithium augmentation should be maintained on the lithium-antidepressant combination for at least 12 months to prevent early relapses. Preliminary studies to assess genetic influences on response probability to lithium augmentation have suggested a predictive role of the -50T/C single nucleotide polymorphism of the GSK3beta gene. Augmentation of antidepressants with lithium is currently the best-evidenced augmentation therapy in the treatment of depressed patients who do not respond to antidepressants. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. The Effects of Antidepressant Treatment on Serum Cytokines and Nutritional Status in Hemodialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Kyu; Lee, Hong-Seock; Lee, Tae-Byeong; Kim, Do-Hoon; Koo, Ja-Ryong; Kim, Yong-Ku

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of antidepressant treatment on serum cytokines and nutritional status in hemodialysis patients. Twenty-eight hemodialysis patients with a depressed mood were given 20 mg of fluoxetine for 8 weeks. The degree of depressive symptoms, the serum levels of interleukin-1β, interleukin-2, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, c-reactive protein, and markers of nutritional status were assessed at baseline and after treatment. The outcome was assessed in terms of response to treatment (>50% reduction in the score of the Hamilton depression rating scale). Antidepressant treatment decreased the serum level of interleukin-1β in both response and nonresponse groups, and increased the serum level of interleukin-6 only in the response group. At baseline, the level of interleukin-6 in the response group was lower than in the nonresponse group. Antidepressant treatment also increased fat distribution significantly in the response group which might have slightly improved the nutritional status. This study suggests that antidepressant treatment improve depressive symptoms and may affect immunological functions and nutritional status in chronic hemodialysis patients with depression. PMID:15201504

  3. The use of antidepressants in the treatment of chronic pain. A review of the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, G

    1991-11-01

    In the last 30 years antidepressant drugs have been used increasingly in the treatment of patients with chronic pain. This article reviews the results of some 40 placebo-controlled studies. It is difficult to make comparisons between the various studies because they often differ in terms of pain conditions, patient selection, antidepressant drug used, dosages, trial design, etc. However, in spite of this heterogeneity and other methodological problems it is clear that a wide range of pain conditions are responsive to antidepressant drug treatment, in particular: headache, migraine, facial pain, neurogenic pain, fibrositis, and probably arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. More data need to be gathered in cancer pain, and in other conditions such as low back pain for which no, or very limited, effect has been shown. The beneficial effects of antidepressant drugs is in most cases of a mild to moderate degree, some time lag is necessary before it is completely manifest, and it tends to persist over time if drug treatment is continued in the long term. Strong evidence of efficacy is not evident for all the antidepressants, and there are probably significant differences in this respect between various drugs. The effect of a drug on pain does not seem necessarily to be related to its effect on mood. Further studies are needed to clarify this topic, and it will be necessary to examine specific pain conditions, compare different antidepressants, with reference to each other and to placebo, further investigate the role of drug plasma concentrations and control for the presence of concomitant psychiatric disturbances and for organic lesions responsible for the pain symptomatology.

  4. Efficacy and Safety of Antidepressants for the Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunfeng; Yu, Ting; Wang, Yun; Jiang, Liuqin; Lin, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this meta-analysis was to analyze the efficacy and safety of antidepressants for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus and The Cochrane Library for randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy and safety of antidepressants in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Article quality was evaluated by Jadad score. RevMan 5.0 and Stata 12.0 were used for the meta-analysis. Results Twelve randomized controlled trials were included in this study and most of these trials were of high quality (Jadad score ≥4). Five articles focused on tricyclic antidepressants, six articles involved selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and one article investigated both types of treatment. The pooled risk ratio showed antidepressant treatment can improve global symptoms (RR = 1.38, 95% CI 1.08, 1.77). In the subgroup analysis, treatment with tricyclic antidepressants showed an improvement in global symptoms (RR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.07, 1.71), while treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors showed no statistically significant difference in global symptoms compared with the control groups (RR = 1.38, 95% CI 0.83, 2.28). The pooled risk ratio of dropout due to side effects following antidepressant treatment was 1.71 with 95% CI (0.98, 2.99). The subgroup analysis showed the pooled risk ratio of dropout in the tricyclic antidepressants group was 1.92 with 95% CI (0.89, 4.17). In the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors group, the pooled risk ratio of dropout was 1.5 with 95% CI (0.67, 3.37). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors showed no benefit in alleviating abdominal pain and improving quality of life. There was no difference in the incidence of common adverse events between treatment and control groups. Conclusions TCAs can improve global symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, while there was no strong evidence to confirm the effectiveness of SSRIs for the treatment of IBS. PMID:26252008

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Antidepressants for the Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xie

    Full Text Available The aim of this meta-analysis was to analyze the efficacy and safety of antidepressants for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus and The Cochrane Library for randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy and safety of antidepressants in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Article quality was evaluated by Jadad score. RevMan 5.0 and Stata 12.0 were used for the meta-analysis.Twelve randomized controlled trials were included in this study and most of these trials were of high quality (Jadad score ≥4. Five articles focused on tricyclic antidepressants, six articles involved selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and one article investigated both types of treatment. The pooled risk ratio showed antidepressant treatment can improve global symptoms (RR = 1.38, 95% CI 1.08, 1.77. In the subgroup analysis, treatment with tricyclic antidepressants showed an improvement in global symptoms (RR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.07, 1.71, while treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors showed no statistically significant difference in global symptoms compared with the control groups (RR = 1.38, 95% CI 0.83, 2.28. The pooled risk ratio of dropout due to side effects following antidepressant treatment was 1.71 with 95% CI (0.98, 2.99. The subgroup analysis showed the pooled risk ratio of dropout in the tricyclic antidepressants group was 1.92 with 95% CI (0.89, 4.17. In the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors group, the pooled risk ratio of dropout was 1.5 with 95% CI (0.67, 3.37. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors showed no benefit in alleviating abdominal pain and improving quality of life. There was no difference in the incidence of common adverse events between treatment and control groups.TCAs can improve global symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, while there was no strong evidence to confirm the effectiveness of SSRIs for the treatment of IBS.

  6. Does good leadership buffer effects of high emotional demands at work on risk of antidepressant treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida E H; Hanson, Linda L Magnusson; Rugulies, Reiner Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Emotionally demanding work has been associated with increased risk of common mental disorders. Because emotional demands may not be preventable in certain occupations, the identification of workplace factors that can modify this association is vital. This article examines whether effects of emoti...... of emotional demands on antidepressant treatment, as an indicator of common mental disorders, are buffered by good leadership....

  7. Neural Correlates of Antidepressant Treatment Response in Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Kathryn R; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie; Vu, Dung Pham; Westlund Schreiner, Melinda; Mueller, Bryon A; Eberly, Lynn E; Camchong, Jazmin; Westervelt, Ana; Lim, Kelvin O

    2016-10-01

    The neural changes underlying response to antidepressant treatment in adolescents are unknown. Identification of neural change correlates of treatment response could (1) aid in understanding mechanisms of depression and its treatment and (2) serve as target biomarkers for future research. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined changes in brain activation and functional connectivity in 13 unmedicated adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) before and after receiving treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medication for 8 weeks. Specifically, we examined brain activation during a negative emotion task and resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC), focusing on the amygdala to capture networks relevant to negative emotion. We conducted whole-brain analyses to identify how symptom improvement was related to change in brain activation during a negative emotion task or amygdala RSFC. After treatment, clinical improvement was associated with decreased task activation in rostral and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex and increased activation in bilateral insula, bilateral middle frontal cortices, right parahippocampus, and left cerebellum. Analysis of change in amygdala RSFC showed that treatment response was associated with increased amygdala RSFC with right frontal cortex, but decreased amygdala RSFC with right precuneus and right posterior cingulate cortex. The findings represent a foothold for advancing understanding of pathophysiology of MDD in adolescents by revealing the critical neural circuitry changes that underlie a positive response to a standard treatment. Although preliminary, the present study provides a research platform for future work needed to confirm these biomarkers at a larger scale before using them in future target engagement studies of novel treatments.

  8. Serotonin toxicity association with concomitant antidepressants and rasagiline treatment: retrospective study (STACCATO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panisset, Michel; Chen, Jack J; Rhyee, Sean H; Conner, Jill; Mathena, Julie

    2014-12-01

    The serotonin toxicity syndrome (STS) is a potential risk with concurrent use of the monoamine oxidase type-B inhibitor rasagiline and antidepressants. To assess systematically the occurrence of STS in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) treated with rasagiline plus antidepressants (R+ATD), rasagiline without antidepressants (R), or antidepressants plus anti-PD dopaminergic medications (ATD) other than either rasagiline or selegiline. A phase IV multicenter retrospective cohort study was conducted of patients with PD who began receiving R+ATD, R, or ATD between September 1, 2006, and December 31, 2008. Medical records were reviewed for patient demographics, treatment details, and hospitalizations/emergency department (ED) visits. An adjudication committee independently reviewed records to verify case ascertainment and used the Hunter Serotonin Toxicity Criteria for case definition. Outcome variables were analyzed by descriptive statistics. A total of 1504 patients with PD (471 with R+ATD; 511 with R; and 525 with ATD) were enrolled from 37 sites. In the R+ATD and ATD groups, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were most frequently used (74.5% and 77%, respectively). In the R+ATD and ATD groups, mean duration of antidepressant use (tricyclic, SSRI, and other) were 50.5-53.5 weeks and 51.7-80.9 weeks, respectively. Overall, 195 patients (13%) from all three groups had one or more hospitalization/ED visits. No cases of STS were identified in any group. In this large multicenter retrospective cohort study, concurrent administration of R+ATD was not associated with STS. The findings of this phase IV study expand the drug interaction and pharmacovigilance safety awareness for the use of antidepressants in patients with PD. © 2014 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  9. Comparison of mental health treatment status and use of antidepressants in men and women with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapliyal, Priyanka; Mitchison, Deborah; Miller, Caroline; Bowden, Jacqueline; Alejandro González-Chica, David; Stocks, Nigel; Touyz, Stephen; Hay, Phillipa

    2017-11-21

    Mental health treatment status and antidepressant use were investigated among men and women with an eating disorder (ED) who were interviewed in a general population survey of 3005 adults (aged ≥15 years). Compared to women, men with an ED were significantly less likely to receive treatment for a mental health problem or to be currently using an antidepressant. On multivariate analyses, female gender, lower mental health-related quality of life, and lower weight/shape overvaluation were significant predictors of receiving treatment and antidepressant use. Treatment was less likely in men and in people with higher ED cognitions.

  10. Treatment of Adults With Treatment-Resistant Depression: Electroconvulsive Therapy Plus Antidepressant or Electroconvulsive Therapy Alone? Evidence From an Indirect Comparison Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Guo-Min; Tian, Xu; Shuai, Ting; Yi, Li-Juan; Zeng, Zi; Liu, Shuang; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and antidepressant are the effective treatment alternatives for patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD); however, the effects and safety of the ECT plus antidepressant relative to ECT alone remain controversial. We decide to assess the potential of ECT plus antidepressant compared with ECT alone by undertaking an indirect comparison meta-analysis. Databases from PubMed, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, Clinicaltrials.gov, EMBASE, CBM (China Biom...

  11. Involvement of monoaminergic systems in anxiolytic and antidepressive activities of the standardized extract of Cocos nucifera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Eliane Brito Cortez; de Sousa, Caren Nádia Soares; Meneses, Lucas Nascimento; E Silva Pereira, Yuri Freitas; Matos, Natália Castelo Branco; de Freitas, Rayanne Brito; Lima, Nycole Brito Cortez; Patrocínio, Manoel Cláudio Azevedo; Leal, Luzia Kalyne Almeida Moreira; Viana, Glauce Socorro Barros; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes

    2017-01-01

    Extracts from the husk fiber of Cocos nucifera are used in folk medicine, but their actions on the central nervous system have not been studied. Here, the anxiolytic and antidepressant effects of the standardized hydroalcoholic extract of C. nucifera husk fiber (HECN) were evaluated. Male Swiss mice were treated with HECN (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg) 60 min before experiments involving the plus maze test, hole-board test, tail suspension test, and forced swimming test (FST). HECN was administered orally (p.o.) in acute and repeated-dose treatments. The forced swimming test was performed with dopaminergic and noradrenergic antagonists, as well as a serotonin release inhibitor. Administration of HECN in the FST after intraperitoneal (i.p.) pretreatment of mice with sulpiride (50 mg/kg), prazosin (1 mg/kg), or p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 100 mg/kg) caused the actions of these three agents to be reversed. However, this effect was not observed after pretreating the animals with SCH23390 (15 µg/kg, i.p.) or yohimbine (1 mg/kg, i.p.) The dose chosen for HECN was 100 mg/kg, p.o., which increased the number of entries as well as the permanence in the open arms of the maze after acute and repeated doses. In both the forced swimming and the tail suspension tests, the same dose decreased the time spent immobile but did not disturb locomotor activity in an open-field test. The anxiolytic effect of HECN appears to be related to the GABAergic system, while its antidepressant effect depends upon its interaction with the serotoninergic, noradrenergic (α1 receptors), and dopaminergic (D2 dopamine receptors) systems.

  12. Suicidal thoughts and behavior with antidepressant treatment: reanalysis of the randomized placebo-controlled studies of fluoxetine and venlafaxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Robert D; Brown, C Hendricks; Hur, Kwan; Davis, John; Mann, J John

    2012-06-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration issued a black box warning for antidepressants and suicidal thoughts and behavior in children and young adults. To determine the short-term safety of antidepressants by standard assessments of suicidal thoughts and behavior in youth, adult, and geriatric populations and the mediating effect of changes in depressive symptoms. All intent-to-treat person-level longitudinal data of major depressive disorder from 12 adult, 4 geriatric, and 4 youth randomized controlled trials of fluoxetine hydrochloride and 21 adult trials of venlafaxine hydrochloride. All sponsor-conducted randomized controlled trials of fluoxetine and venlafaxine. The suicide items from the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale as well as adverse event reports of suicide attempts and suicide during active treatment were analyzed in 9185 patients (fluoxetine: 2635 adults, 960 geriatric patients, 708 youths; venlafaxine: 2421 adults with immediate-release venlafaxine and 2461 adults with extended-release venlafaxine) for a total of 53 260 person-week observations. Suicidal thoughts and behavior decreased over time for adult and geriatric patients randomized to fluoxetine or venlafaxine compared with placebo, but no differences were found for youths. In adults, reduction in suicide ideation and attempts occurred through a reduction in depressive symptoms. In all age groups, severity of depression improved with medication and was significantly related to suicide ideation or behavior. Fluoxetine and venlafaxine decreased suicidal thoughts and behavior for adult and geriatric patients. This protective effect is mediated by decreases in depressive symptoms with treatment. For youths, no significant effects of treatment on suicidal thoughts and behavior were found, although depression responded to treatment. No evidence of increased suicide risk was observed in youths receiving active medication. To our knowledge, this is the

  13. Mitochondrial plasticity of the hippocampus in a generic rat model of depression after antidepressant treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Wegener, Gregers; Madsen, Torsten Meldgaard

    2012-01-01

    Depressive disorders and the treatment thereof have been associated with a number of neuroplastic events, such as neurogenesis and synaptic remodeling in discrete areas of the brain. The associations of these events in changes regarding the energy supply have not been investigated. Here, we...... investigated the changes in mitochondrial plasticity and its correlation to morphological alterations of neuroplasticity in the hippocampus, both associated with a depressive phenotype, and after treatment, with antidepressant imipramine. Design-based stereological methods were used to estimate the number...... of mitochondrial plasticity in the hippocampus and antidepressant treatment may counteract with the structural impairments. Moreover, the changes in mitochondrial morphology and number are a consistent feature of neuroplasticity. Synapse, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  14. Consensus statement and research needs: the role of dopamine and norepinephrine in depression and antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David J; Baldwin, David S; Clayton, Anita H; Elgie, Rodney; Lecrubier, Yves; Montejo, Angel L; Papakostas, George I; Souery, Daniel; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Tylee, Andre

    2006-01-01

    During a special session, the faculty identified several specific areas related to the role of dopamine and norepinephrine in depression and antidepressant treatment that either warrant the clinician's attention or are in need of more research. Areas of interest include fatigue and lethargy in depression, treatment strategies for treatment-resistant depression, the somatic presentation of depression, neurobiology of fatigue and its role in determining treatment, symptom rating scales, and sexual side effects. In addition, the faculty discussed the importance of patient psychoeducation and self-management as well as the ways in which disease models of depression affect treatment.

  15. Treatment with antidepressants and lithium is associated with increased risk of treatment with antiparkinson drugs: a pharmacoepidemiological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt-Christensen, Anne Mette; Kvist, Tine Kajsa; Nielsen, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    .42) for men and 1.50 (95% CI 1.43 to 1.58) for women. Figures for lithium were almost identical. CONCLUSION: Persons treated with antidepressants or lithium are at increased risk of subsequently treatment with APD, showing an association between anxiety/affective disorder and Parkinson's disease....

  16. Drug evaluation and the permissive principle: continuities and contradictions between standards and practices in antidepressant regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, John; Davis, Courtney

    2009-08-01

    Pharmaceuticals are not permitted on to the market unless they are granted regulatory approval. The regulatory process is, therefore, crucial in whether or not a drug is widely prescribed. Regulatory agencies have developed standards of performance that pharmaceuticals are supposed to meet before entering the market. Regulation of technologies is often discussed by reference to the precautionary principle. In contrast, this paper develops the concept of the 'permissive principle' as a way of understanding the departure of regulators' practices from standards of drug efficacy to which regulatory agencies themselves subscribe. By taking a case study of antidepressant regulation in the UK and the USA, the mechanisms of permissive regulatory practices are examined. An STS methodology of both spatial (international) and temporal comparisons of regulatory practices with regulatory standards is employed to identify the nature and extent of the permissive regulation. It is found that the permissive principle was adopted by drug regulators in the UK and the USA, but more so by the former than the latter. Evidently, permissive regulation, which favours the commercial interests of the drug manufacturer, but is contrary to the interests of patients, may penetrate to the heart of regulatory science. On the other hand, permissive regulation of specific drugs should not be regarded as an inevitable result of marketing strategies and concomitant networks deployed by powerful pharmaceutical companies, because the extent of permissive regulation may vary according to the intra-institutional normative commitments of regulators to uphold their technical standards against the commercial interests of the manufacturer. Likely sociological factors that can account for such permissive regulatory practices are 'corporate bias', secrecy and excessive regulatory trust in the pharmaceutical industry in the UK, political expediency and ideological capture in the USA, combined in both countries

  17. [Antidepressants for treatment of depression in palliative patients : a systematic literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujeyl, M; Müller-Oerlinghausen, B

    2012-09-01

    Treatment of depression in palliative care must take into account expected benefits and risks of antidepressants in patients with potentially limited life expectancy, poor medical condition, advanced age and higher risk to suffer from side effects and drug interactions. This systematic review assesses evidence of the efficacy and safety of different classes of antidepressants depending on the type and severity of the physical illness. A systematic database search (Medline, EMBASE) for clinical studies was carried out and references of identified literature were checked. To be included in the review studies had to be performed in illnesses that were part of in the search strategy, such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, HIV/AIDS, cancer, COPD and heart failure. Considered were controlled studies comparing the efficacy of antidepressants to placebo, other classes of antidepressants, benzodiazepines, psychostimulants or psychotherapy. In a first step only studies with patients meeting established diagnostic criteria of depression and where depression was a primary endpoint were included. In a second step, additional studies were included that did not meet both of the latter criteria but were performed in patients at the end of life. A total of 40 trials (mostly using SSRI or NSMRI) were included, 16 studies were performed in neurological, 24 in general medical conditions and 9 studies were performed in patients at the end of life or in advanced disease stages. Due to heterogeneous study designs no conclusions can be drawn if efficacy or tolerability is dependent on disease severity. In most cases, studies might have been too small to detect limited treatment effects. As a lack of efficacy was predominantly shown in larger trials, publication bias might have been present. In most of the reviewed general medical conditions study results were heterogeneous. In contrast to the popularity of the treatment approach, results suggest that SSRIs

  18. Enhanced sensitivity of muscarinic cholinergic receptor associated with dopaminergic receptor subsensitivity after chronic antidepressant treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, T.; Matsushita, H.

    1981-01-01

    The chronic effects of antidepressant treatment on striatal dopaminergic (DA) and muscarinic cholinergic (mACh) receptors of the rat brain have been examined comparatively in this study using 3 H-spiroperidol ( 3 H-SPD) and 3 H-quinuclidinyl benzilate ( 3 H-QNB) as the respective radioactive ligands. Imipramine and desipramine were used as prototype antidepressants. Although a single administration of imipramine or desipramine did not affect each receptor sensitivity, chronic treatment with each drug caused a supersensitivity of mACh receptor subsequent to DA receptor subsensitivity. Furthermore, it has been suggested that anti-mACh properties of imipramine or desipramine may not necessarily be related to the manifestation of mACh receptor supersensitivity and that sustained DA receptor subsensitivity may play some role in the alterations of mACh receptor sensitivity

  19. Relationship between obesity and depression: characteristics and treatment outcomes with antidepressant medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toups, Marisa S P; Myers, Alyson K; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Kurian, Benji; Morris, David W; Rush, Augustus John; Fava, Maurizio; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and major depressive disorder often co-occur. However, differences between obese and normal-weight depressed patients and the moderating effect of obesity on antidepressant treatment outcome are not well studied. Adults (n = 662) with major depressive disorder in the Combining Medications to Enhance Depression Outcomes study were randomized to treatment with escitalopram plus placebo, bupropion plus escitalopram, or venlafaxine plus mirtazapine for a 12-week primary treatment phase and 16-week follow-up. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated at baseline and categorized according to World Health Organization criteria: normal or low weight (NW), overweight, Obese I and Obese II+. A repeated-effects model, unadjusted and adjusted for baseline variables, assessed outcomes. Obesity was common (46.2%), only 25.5% were NW. Higher BMI was associated with greater medical illness (p Obese I 43%, Obese II+ 37%; p = .69). Lower BMI was associated with more frequent (p = .024 [unadjusted] and .053 [adjusted]) and more severe (p = .008 [unadjusted] and .053 [adjusted]) adverse effects. BMI was related to clinical presentation and prevalence of comorbidities, but not antidepressant outcomes. Lower BMI classes had more psychiatric comorbidities, potentially obscuring the relationship between BMI and antidepressant effects. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00590863.

  20. Neural Plasticity Is Involved in Physiological Sleep, Depressive Sleep Disturbances, and Antidepressant Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Qi Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression, which is characterized by a pervasive and persistent low mood and anhedonia, greatly impacts patients, their families, and society. The associated and recurring sleep disturbances further reduce patient’s quality of life. However, therapeutic sleep deprivation has been regarded as a rapid and robust antidepressant treatment for several decades, which suggests a complicated role of sleep in development of depression. Changes in neural plasticity are observed during physiological sleep, therapeutic sleep deprivation, and depression. This correlation might help us to understand better the mechanism underlying development of depression and the role of sleep. In this review, we first introduce the structure of sleep and the facilitated neural plasticity caused by physiological sleep. Then, we introduce sleep disturbances and changes in plasticity in patients with depression. Finally, the effects and mechanisms of antidepressants and therapeutic sleep deprivation on neural plasticity are discussed.

  1. Increased rate of treatment with antidepressants in patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Harhoff, Mette; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of depression and anxiety is increased in patients with multiple sclerosis, but it has not been investigated whether these conditions are treated in clinical practice. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the rate of treatment with antidepressants is increased...... in patients with multiple sclerosis compared with patients with other chronic illnesses and compared with the general population. By linkage of nationwide case registers, all patients were identified, who had received a main diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or osteoarthritis at first admission or during...... outpatient contact in the period 1995-2000 in Denmark. Rates of subsequent purchase of antidepressants for these patients were calculated. In total, 417 patients with a main diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and 12 127 patients with a main diagnosis of osteoarthritis, at first discharge from hospital...

  2. Neural Plasticity Is Involved in Physiological Sleep, Depressive Sleep Disturbances, and Antidepressant Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng-Qi; Li, Rui; Wang, Yi-Qun; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2017-01-01

    Depression, which is characterized by a pervasive and persistent low mood and anhedonia, greatly impacts patients, their families, and society. The associated and recurring sleep disturbances further reduce patient's quality of life. However, therapeutic sleep deprivation has been regarded as a rapid and robust antidepressant treatment for several decades, which suggests a complicated role of sleep in development of depression. Changes in neural plasticity are observed during physiological sleep, therapeutic sleep deprivation, and depression. This correlation might help us to understand better the mechanism underlying development of depression and the role of sleep. In this review, we first introduce the structure of sleep and the facilitated neural plasticity caused by physiological sleep. Then, we introduce sleep disturbances and changes in plasticity in patients with depression. Finally, the effects and mechanisms of antidepressants and therapeutic sleep deprivation on neural plasticity are discussed.

  3. Testosterone levels and sexual function disorders in depressive female patients: effects of antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumsar, Şükrü; Kumsar, Neslihan Akkişi; Sağlam, Hasan Salih; Köse, Osman; Budak, Salih; Adsan, Öztuğ

    2014-02-01

    Women suffer from depression more frequently than men, which indicates that sex hormones might be involved in the etiology of this disease. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between testosterone and depression pathophysiology in depressive women along with sexual function. We also investigated whether antidepressant treatment causes any change in levels of this hormone or in sexual function. Premenopausal female patients aged 25-46 years (n = 52) with diagnosed major depression were included in this study as the patient group, and 25- to 46-year-old premenopausal women without depression (n = 30) were included as the control group. Serum testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels were measured twice, before and after the antidepressant treatment. Bioavailable testosterone (cBT) levels were calculated using the assay results for total testosterone (TT), SHBG, and albumin according to the formulas of Vermeulen et al. Depression severity was measured using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and sexual function was evaluated with the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale. The mean TT and cBT levels significantly increased in the patient group after the antidepressant treatment (P treatment TT and cBT levels were significantly lower in the patient group than in the control group (P treatment serum TT and cBT levels in the patient and control groups (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences among the groups in terms of SHBG level. The low testosterone levels in depressed women compared with women in the control group and the elevated levels post-pharmacotherapy suggest that testosterone may be involved in depression. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  4. Obesity and Its Potential Effects on Antidepressant Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Depressive Disorders: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Young Sup; Seo, Hye-Jin; McIntyre, Roger S; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2016-01-12

    Accumulating evidence regarding clinical, neurobiological, genetic, and environmental factors suggests a bidirectional link between obesity and depressive disorders. Although a few studies have investigated the link between obesity/excess body weight and the response to antidepressants in depressive disorders, the effect of weight on treatment response remains poorly understood. In this review, we summarized recent data regarding the relationship between the response to antidepressants and obesity/excess body weight in clinical studies of patients with depressive disorders. Although several studies indicated an association between obesity/excess body weight and poor antidepressant responses, it is difficult to draw definitive conclusions due to the variability of subject composition and methodological differences among studies. Especially, differences in sex, age and menopausal status, depressive symptom subtypes, and antidepressants administered may have caused inconsistencies in the results among studies. The relationship between obesity/excess body weight and antidepressant responses should be investigated further in high-powered studies addressing the differential effects on subject characteristics and treatment. Moreover, future research should focus on the roles of mediating factors, such as inflammatory markers and neurocognitive performance, which may alter the antidepressant treatment outcome in patients with comorbid obesity and depressive disorder.

  5. Antidepressants and dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Søndergård, Lars; Forman, Julie Lyng

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that antidepressants may have neuroprotective abilities but it has newer been investigated lately whether treatment with antidepressants reduces the risk of dementia. METHOD: Linkage of registers of all prescribed antidepressants and diagnoses of dementia...... the rate increased with the number of prescriptions but continued long-term antidepressants treatment was associated with a reduction in the rate of dementia, however, not to the same level as the rate for the general population. This pattern was found for all classes of antidepressants (SSRIs, newer non...... in Denmark during a period from 1995 to 2005. RESULTS: Persons who purchased antidepressants once (N=687,552) had an increased rate of dementia compared to persons unexposed to antidepressants (N=779,831). Nevertheless, the rate of dementia changed over time; thus during the initial prescription periods...

  6. Antidepressants and dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Søndergaard, Lars; Forman, Julie Lyng

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that antidepressants may have neuroprotective abilities but it has newer been investigated lately whether treatment with antidepressants reduces the risk of dementia. METHOD: Linkage of registers of all prescribed antidepressants and diagnoses of dementia...... in Denmark during a period from 1995 to 2005. RESULTS: Persons who purchased antidepressants once (N=687,552) had an increased rate of dementia compared to persons unexposed to antidepressants (N=779,831). Nevertheless, the rate of dementia changed over time; thus during the initial prescription periods...... the rate increased with the number of prescriptions but continued long-term antidepressants treatment was associated with a reduction in the rate of dementia, however, not to the same level as the rate for the general population. This pattern was found for all classes of antidepressants (SSRIs, newer non...

  7. Combination of antidepressants in the treatment of major depressive disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Fábio Lopes; Fuzikawa, Cíntia; Riera, Rachel; Hara, Cláudia

    2012-04-01

    The objective was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies that assessed the effect of the combination of antidepressants from the beginning of the treatment of major depressive disorder. Studies were retrieved from PubMed (1966 to August 2010), Cochrane Library (August 2010), Embase (1980 to August 2010), PsycINFO (1980 to August 2010), Lilacs (1982 to August 2010), clinical trials registry, thesis database (www.capes.gov.br), and secondary references. All randomized controlled trials that compared a combination of antidepressants with a single antidepressant from the beginning of the treatment of major depressive disorder in adults were included. Data analysis was performed using the Review Manager 5.0. Of 3492 studies retrieved, five satisfied the inclusion criteria. In one study, only data about dropouts were included. Antidepressant combination was shown to be better than a single antidepressant considering remission (relative risk [RR], 2.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.69-4.35) and response (RR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.21-1.97). Mirtazapine plus selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) was superior to an isolated SSRI for remission (RR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.06-3.33). Tricyclic antidepressant plus SSRI was superior to SSRI for remission and response (RR, 8.58; 95% CI, 1.70-43.32 and RR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.07-2.93, respectively). There was no difference between combined and monotherapy groups in dropouts owing to adverse effects. The results suggest that antidepressant combination is more efficient than a single antidepressant without a significant decrease in tolerability. However, the small number of clinical trials and methodological problems precludes definitive conclusions.

  8. Mind the Gap: Gaps in Antidepressant Treatment, Treatment Adjustments, and Outcomes among Patients in Routine HIV Care in a Multisite U.S. Clinical Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rushina Cholera

    Full Text Available Depression affects 20-30% of HIV-infected patients and is associated with worse HIV outcomes. Although effective depression treatment is available, depression is largely untreated or undertreated in this population.We quantified gaps in antidepressant treatment, treatment adjustments, and outcomes among US patients in routine HIV care in the nationally distributed CNICS observational clinical cohort. This cohort combines detailed clinical data with regular, self-reported depressive severity assessments (Patient Health Questionnaire-9, PHQ-9. We considered whether participants with likely depression received antidepressants, whether participants on antidepressants with persistently high depressive symptoms received timely dose adjustments, and whether participants achieved depression remission. We considered a cross-sectional analysis (6,219 participants in care in 2011-2012 and a prospective analysis (2,936 participants newly initiating CNICS care when PHQ-9 screening was active.The cross-sectional sample was 87% male, 53% Caucasian, 25% African American, and 18% Hispanic; the prospective sample was similar. In both samples, 39-44% had likely depression, with 44-60% of those receiving antidepressants. Of participants receiving antidepressants, 20-26% experienced persistently high depressive symptoms; only a small minority of those received antidepressant dose adjustments. Overall, 35-40% of participants on antidepressants achieved full depression remission. Remission among participants with persistently high depressive symptoms was rare regardless of dose adjustments.In this large, diverse cohort of US patients engaged in routine HIV care, we observed large gaps in antidepressant treatment, timely dose adjustment to address persistently high depressive symptoms, and antidepressant treatment outcomes. These results highlight the importance of more effective pharmacologic depression treatment models for HIV-infected patients.

  9. Increased risk of treatment with antidepressants in stroke compared with other chronic illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Henrik; Harhoff, Mette; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of depression and anxiety is higher in patients with stroke than in the general population but it is unclear whether patients with stroke are at an increased risk of being treated for depression and anxiety compared with patients with other chronic illness. The objective...... of the present study was to investigate whether the rate of treatment with antidepressants is increased in patients with stroke compared with patients with other chronic illness and compared with the general population. By linkage of nationwide case registers, all patients who received a main diagnosis of stroke...

  10. Antidepressant treatment with tianeptine reduces apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and temporal cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, P.J.; Fuchs, E.; Czeh, B.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent clinical and preclinical studies suggest that major depression may be related to impairments of structural plasticity. Consequently, antidepressants may act by restoring altered rates of cell birth or death. Here, we investigated whether the antidepressant tianeptine would affect

  11. Gender-based differences in the antidepressant treatment of patients with depression in German psychiatric practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob, Louis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression is recognized as the leading cause of disability in the world. Our goal was to compare treatment initiation in men and women treated in German neuropsychiatric practices after diagnosis of depression. Methods: Patients aged between 18 and 80 first diagnosed with depression between 2010 and 2013 were identified by 223 psychiatrists in the IMS Disease Analyzer database. Patients who had received antidepressant prescriptions prior to the index date were excluded. The main outcome measure was the initiation of antidepressant drug therapy in men and women within three years after index date in three subgroups of different severity (mild, moderate and severe depression.Results: A total of 35,495 men and 54,467 women were included in this study. After 3 years of follow-up, 77.3% of men and 78.5% of women diagnosed with mild depression (p-value=0.887, 89.2% of men and 90.7% of women with moderate depression (p-value=0.084, and 88.6% of men and 89.5% of women with severe depression (p-value=0.769 had been treated. No association was found between the chances of treatment initiation after diagnosis of depression and gender. Finally, patients with moderate and severe depression were more likely to receive therapy than those with mild depression. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants were the two most commonly prescribed families of drugs in this study (SSRIs: 34.5% to 44.6%, and TCAs: 19.1% to 26.9%.Conclusions: Gender did not impact therapy initiation in depressed patients. Further studies are needed to identify other potential factors involved.

  12. Pregabalin for the treatment of patients with generalized anxiety disorder with inadequate treatment response to antidepressants and severe depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, José M; Álvarez, Enrique; Carrasco, José L; Pérez Páramo, María; López-Gómez, Vanessa

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of pregabalin in patients with resistant generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and severe depressive symptoms, we carried out a post-hoc analysis of a multicenter, prospective, and observational 6-month study. We included patients who were at least 18 years old, fulfilled the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. (DSM-IV) criteria for GAD, showed inadequate responses to previous courses of antidepressant treatment, had Montgomery-Asberg Rating Scale scores of at least 35, had not received pregabalin previously, and were prescribed pregabalin upon entry into this study. We included 1815 patients fulfilling the DSM-IV criteria for GAD, and 133 (7.3%) fulfilled the selection criteria for these analyses. Ninety-seven percent of the patients received pregabalin (mean dose: 222 mg/day) in combination with other psychotropics. The Hamilton Anxiety Scale total score was reduced by a mean of 20.3 points (95% confidence interval, 22.1-18.4) (57.2% reduction) at month 6. Pregabalin also ameliorated comorbid depressive symptoms, with a reduction in the mean score of the Montgomery-Asberg Rating Scale of 22.3 points (95% confidence interval, 24.2-20.4) (56.6% reduction). Our results suggest that pregabalin, as part of a combination regimen with antidepressants and/or benzodiazepines, might be effective for the treatment of patients with GAD who have shown inadequate response to previous antidepressants and have severe depressive symptoms.

  13. Chronic antidepressant and clonidine treatment effects on conflict behavior in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commissaris, R L; Ellis, D M; Hill, T J; Schefke, D M; Becker, C A; Fontana, D J

    1990-09-01

    The present studies examined the effects of chronic treatment with several antidepressants and clonidine on conflict behavior. In daily ten-minute sessions, water-deprived rats were trained to drink from a tube which was occasionally electrified (0.25 or 0.5 mA). Electrification was signalled by a tone. Chronic desipramine (5 mg/kg, IP, b.i.d.) or clonidine (40 micrograms/kg, b.i.d.) treatment resulted in time-dependent anticonflict effects, with a latency to onset of approximately 3-4 weeks. In contrast, chronic buproprion (up to 10 mg/kg, IP, b.i.d.), mianserin (up to 10 mg/kg, IP, b.i.d.) or trazodone (up to 40 mg/kg, IP, b.i.d.) treatment resulted in at best only a weak anticonflict effect. The efficacy of these antidepressants and clonidine to increase punished responding when administered chronically correlates well with their efficacy as antipanic agents in man.

  14. The effect of flexible cognitive-behavioural therapy and medical treatment, including antidepressants on post-traumatic stress disorder and depression in traumatised refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Caecilie Böck; Nordentoft, Merete; Ekstrøm, Morten

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little evidence exists on the treatment of traumatised refugees. AIMS: To estimate treatment effects of flexible cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and antidepressants (sertraline and mianserin) in traumatised refugees. METHOD: Randomised controlled clinical trial with 2 × 2 factorial...... clinical setting, there was no effect of flexible CBT and antidepressants on PTSD, and there was a small-to-moderate effect of antidepressants and psychoeducation on depression in traumatised refugees....

  15. Effectiveness of hygienic-dietary recommendations as enhancers of antidepressant treatment in patients with Depression: Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrano Maria J

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years some studies have been published supporting the efficacy of light exposure, physical activity, sleep control and a Mediterranean diet pattern on the improvement or prevention of Depression. However, to our knowledge, there have been no studies using all these measures together as an adjuvant antidepressant strategy. Methods Multicenter, randomized, controlled, two arm-parallel, clinical trial. Eighty depressed patients undergoing standard antidepressant treatment will be advised to follow four additional hygienic-dietary recommendations about exercise, diet, sunlight exposure and sleep. Outcome measures will be assessed before and after the 6 month intervention period. Discussion We expect the patients in the active recommendations group to experience a greater improvement in their depressive symptoms. If so, this would be a great support for doctors who might systematically recommend these simple and costless measures, especially in primary care. Trial Registration ISRCTN59506583

  16. Effectiveness of hygienic-dietary recommendations as enhancers of antidepressant treatment in patients with depression: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Toro, Mauro; Ibarra, Olga; Gili, Margalida; Salva, Joan; Monzón, Saray; Vives, Margalida; Serrano, Maria J; Garcia-Campayo, Javier; Roca, Miquel

    2010-07-09

    In recent years some studies have been published supporting the efficacy of light exposure, physical activity, sleep control and a Mediterranean diet pattern on the improvement or prevention of depression. However, to our knowledge, there have been no studies using all these measures together as an adjuvant antidepressant strategy. Multicenter, randomized, controlled, two arm-parallel, clinical trial. Eighty depressed patients undergoing standard antidepressant treatment will be advised to follow four additional hygienic-dietary recommendations about exercise, diet, sunlight exposure and sleep. Outcome measures will be assessed before and after the 6 month intervention period. We expect the patients in the active recommendations group to experience a greater improvement in their depressive symptoms. If so, this would be a great support for doctors who might systematically recommend these simple and costless measures, especially in primary care. ISRCTN59506583.

  17. Pharmacogenomic study of side-effects for antidepressant treatment options in STAR*D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S L; Adkins, D E; Aberg, K; Hettema, J M; McClay, J L; Souza, R P; van den Oord, E J C G

    2012-06-01

    Understanding individual differences in susceptibility to antidepressant therapy side-effects is essential to optimize the treatment of depression. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to search for genetic variation affecting the susceptibility to side-effects. The analysis sample consisted of 1439 depression patients, successfully genotyped for 421K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), from the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study. Outcomes included four indicators of side-effects: general side-effect burden, sexual side-effects, dizziness and vision/hearing-related side-effects. Our criterion for genome-wide significance was a prespecified threshold ensuring that, on average, only 10% of the significant findings are false discoveries. Thirty-four SNPs satisfied this criterion. The top finding indicated that 10 SNPs in SACM1L mediated the effects of bupropion on sexual side-effects (p = 4.98 × 10(-7), q = 0.023). Suggestive findings were also found for SNPs in MAGI2, DTWD1, WDFY4 and CHL1. Although our findings require replication and functional validation, this study demonstrates the potential of GWAS to discover genes and pathways that could mediate adverse effects of antidepressant medication.

  18. [Clinical Applications of Peripheral Markers of Response in Antidepressant Treatment: Neurotrophins and Cytokines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez, Constanza Mendoza

    2012-03-01

    Explanatory theories of depression have advanced in recent decades from the monoaminergic hypothesis to neurogenesis alterations to the neurohormonal hypothesis that includes the dysfunction of the inflammatory response. Currently there is a growing interest in the development of biomarkers that can contribute to diagnosis and proper treatment. To describe the role of neurotrophins such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cytokines in the pathophysiology of depressive disorder in addition to reviewing and analyzing evidence about their clinical application as biomarkers of antidepressant therapy. Relevant data research in several databases. In recent years evidence of alterations in neurogenesis mediated by the expression of BDNF in the hippocampus in the pathophysiology of depression has increased and there is ample evidence that BDNF is a marker of the diagnosis of depressive disorder and also of treatment effectiveness. There is little information about other neurotrophins. There has also been increased interest in relation to depression as an "inflammatory disease" and the link with cytokines in its pathogenesis. Evidence has been found for the usefulness of some cytokines especially IL-1 (interleukin 1), IL-6 (interleukin 6), and TNF (tumor necrosis factor) as biomarkers of antidepressant drug response in humans. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Hippocampal astrocytes are necessary for antidepressant treatment of learned helplessness rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Masaaki; Shirayama, Yukihiko; Ishida, Hisahito; Hazama, Gen-i; Nakagome, Kazuyuki

    2011-08-01

    The astrocyte is a major component of the neural network and plays a role in brain function. Previous studies demonstrated changes in the number of astrocytes in depression. In this study, we examined alterations in the number of astrocytes in the learned helplessness (LH) rat, an animal model of depression. The numbers of activated and nonactivated astrocytes in the dentate gyrus (molecular layer, subgranular zone, and hilus), and CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus were significantly increased 2 and 8 days after attainment of LH. Subchronic treatment with imipramine showed a tendency (although not statistically significant) to decrease the LH-induced increment of activated astrocytes in the CA3 region and dentate gyrus. Furthermore, subchronic treatment of naïve rats with imipramine did not alter the numbers of activated and nonactivated astrocytes. However, the antidepressant-like effects of imipramine in the LH paradigm were blocked when fluorocitrate (a reversible inhibitor of astrocyte function) was injected into the dentate gyrus or CA3 region. Injection of fluorocitrate into naive rats failed to induce behavioral deficits in the conditioned avoidance test. These results indicate that astrocytes are responsive to the antidepressant-like effect of imipramine in the dentate gyrus and CA3 region of the hippocampus. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Guideline recommendations for long-term treatment of depression with antidepressants in primary care-a critical review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piek, Ellen; van der Meer, Klaas; Nolen, Willem A.

    Background: Long-term treatment with antidepressants is considered effective in preventing recurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD). It is unclear whether this is true for primary care. Objectives: We investigated whether current guideline recommendations for long-term treatment with

  1. Low and therapeutic doses of antidepressants are associated with similar response in the context of multimodal treatment of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Zahid H; Simopoulos, Thomas T; Pal, Joshua; Kraemer, Jan J; Chopra, Pradeep; Nagda, Jyotsna V; Najib, Umer; Celestin, James; Sial, Khuram; Ahmad, Bilal; Warfield, Carol; Steinman, Theodore I; Wootton, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Antidepressants are prescribed in a wide range of doses to treat both depression and chronic pain, with optimal psychopharmacology individualized for each patient. In the past decade more antidepressants from different chemical classes have become available and are being used for the treatment of both chronic pain and depression. To review the utilization pattern changes and compare response rates of different classes and doses of antidepressants for various pain conditions in the context of multimodal therapies. Chart review. We reviewed 5,916 records at an outpatient multidisciplinary pain center. Of these, 379 records were for patients diagnosed with cancer pain. Because the mechanisms and treatment approaches to cancer pain can differ greatly from non-cancer chronic pain, these records were excluded from the analysis. We assessed 1,506 medical records for patients with chronic non-caner pain who had used at least one antidepressant, with the main outcome measure being the Numeric Rating Pain Scale, 0-10. Of the 5,916 charts reviewed, 1,506 (25.4%) chronic non-cancer pain charts recorded the prescription of at least one antidepressant. Most patients received a combination of medications and procedures. Of the 450 patients receiving secondary amines, favorable responses were recorded for 340 (76%) patients, while 103 (23%) did not respond and 7 had unknown responses. Of the 492 patients receiving tertiary amines, favorable responses were recorded for 375 (76%) patients, while 113 (23%) did not respond, and 4 had unknown responses. Of the 533 patients receiving SSRI/SNRIs, favorable responses were recorded for 382 (72%) patients, while 147 (28%) did not respond, and 4 had unknown responses. Of the 369 patients receiving atypical antidepressants, favorable responses were recorded for 272 (74%) patients, while 94 (25%) did not respond, and 3 had unknown responses. A retrospective study design and the use of antidepressants as a part of multimodal treatment of pain

  2. Dynamics of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) serum levels in major depressive disorder during antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frank M; Nowak, Claudia; Kratzsch, Juergen; Sander, Christian; Hegerl, Ulrich; Schönknecht, Peter

    2015-07-15

    In preclinical studies, the hypothalamic polypeptide melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) has been shown to be involved in depression-like behavior and modulations of MCH and MCH-receptors were proposed as potential new antidepressant drug targets. For the first time, MCH serum levels were explored in 30 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) prior to (T1) and after 2 (T2) and 4 weeks (T3) of antidepressant treatment and in 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls by applying a fluorescence immunoassay. Levels of MCH did not differ significantly between un-medicated patients (444.11±174.63pg/mL SD) and controls (450.68±210.03pg/mL SD). In MDD patients, MCH levels significantly decreased from T1 to T3 (F=4.663; p=0.013). Post-hoc analyses showed that these changes were limited to patients treated with mirtazapine but not escitalopram and female but not male patients. MCH-levels showed high correlations from T1 to T3 (r≥0.964, pdepression but possibly reflecting depression-related state properties that can be modulated by sleep, medication and sex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Curcumin as an add-on to antidepressive treatment: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Joseph; Miodownik, Chanoch; Bersudsky, Yuly; Sokolik, Shmuel; Lerner, Paul P; Kreinin, Anatoly; Polakiewicz, Jacob; Lerner, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a widespread mental disorder in which nearly half of the affected people have recurrent symptoms. Drug combinations may produce cumulative adverse effects, especially in elderly and physically ill patients. It was demonstrated that curcumin possesses antidepressive activity in various animal models of depression, and a combination of curcumin with some antidepressants potentiates the antidepressive effect of these agents. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of curcumin as an antidepressive agent in a combination with other antidepressants in patients with major depression. Forty patients with a first episode of depression participated in a 5-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. The subjects were treated with either 500-mg/d curcumin or placebo together with antidepressants (escitalopram or venlafaxine) during August 2010 until June 2011. The outcome measures were Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale. Analysis of variance showed significant positive changes in both groups from baseline to the end of the study in all scales of measurement. These changes became significant from the first visit after 7 days of treatment. There was no difference between curcumin and placebo, which means negative results. However, the patients in the curcumin group demonstrated a trend to a more rapid relief of depressive symptoms in comparison to those in the placebo group. None of the patients complained of any adverse effect during the study. Although there is no definitive proof that curcumin can induce an earlier beneficial effect of antidepressive agents, it seems like an extended study is needed to prove it, using higher therapeutic doses of curcumin.

  4. Chronic antidepressant treatments resulted in altered expression of genes involved in inflammation in the rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboni, Silvia; Benatti, Cristina; Montanari, Claudia; Tascedda, Fabio; Brunello, Nicoletta

    2013-12-05

    To gain insight into the possible immune targets of antidepressant, we evaluated the expression of several inflammatory mediators in the hypothalamus of rats chronically (28 days) treated with the serotonin selective reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (5mg/kg, i.p.) or the tricyclic compound imipramine (15 mg/kg, i.p.). We focused our attention on the hypothalamus as it plays a key role in determining many of the somatic symptoms experienced by depressed patients. This brain region, critical also for expression of motivated behaviours, participates in the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and in stress response as well as coordinates physiological functions such as sleep and food intake that have been found altered in a high percentage of depressed patients. Notably, hypothalamus is a key structure for brain cytokine expression and function as it integrates signals from the neuro, immune, endocrine systems. By means of quantitative Real Time PCR experiments we demonstrated that a chronic treatment with either fluoxetine or imipramine resulted in a reduction of IL-6 and IFN-γ mRNAs and increased IL-4 mRNA expression in the rat hypothalamus. Moreover, we demonstrated that hypothalamic expression of members of IL-18 system was differentially affected by chronic antidepressant treatments. Chronically administered fluoxetine decreased IL-8 and CX3CL1 hypothalamic expression, while a chronic treatment with imipramine decreased p11 mRNA. Our data suggest that a shift in the balance of the inflammation toward an anti-inflammatory state in the hypothalamus may represent a common mechanism of action of both the chronic treatments with fluoxetine and imipramine. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Combination therapy with monoamine oxidase inhibitors and other antidepressants or stimulants: strategies for the management of treatment-resistant depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Samantha J; Shin, Mirae; McInnis, Melvin G; Bostwick, Jolene R

    2015-04-01

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is a major health concern. More than 40% of patients treated for major depressive disorder with an appropriate antidepressant dose for an adequate duration fail to respond. Further, approximately half of adults with major depressive disorder fail to achieve sustained remission despite various medication trials. The utilization of monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) for the treatment of depression in clinical practice today is low due to their widely known adverse effects, some of which may be life threatening, and the risk for dietary and drug interactions. For these reasons, MAOIs are not recommended to be prescribed along with other antidepressants or certain prescription or nonprescription drugs. Pharmacologic options are limited for individuals with TRD, however, and there is a paucity of data on the efficacy of MAOIs in combination with other antidepressants for the management of TRD. We performed a search of the PubMed database (inception through January 25, 2015) to identify cases that illustrate the potential utility, as well as risks, of combination treatment with MAOIs and other antidepressants for the management of TRD; 18 articles met the criteria for our search. In addition, we performed a retrospective case series by reviewing the medical records of 29 adults treated for depression with an MAOI plus another psychotropic agent (an antidepressant or stimulant medication) between 2003 and 2012 at a large Midwestern teaching hospital. We compared the findings of the published experience with our local experience to allow for more informed decisions regarding pharmacotherapy in patients with TRD. We separated the local experience into two groups: 15 cases with the selective MAO type B inhibitor selegiline combined with medications presumed to increase the risk of serotonin syndrome and 14 cases with nonselective MAOIs (phenelzine and tranylcypromine) combined with other contraindicated medications. Although risks of

  6. Side Effects to Antidepressant Treatment in Patients With Depression and Comorbid Panic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankman, Stewart A; Gorka, Stephanie M; Katz, Andrea C; Klein, Daniel N; Markowitz, John C; Arnow, Bruce A; Manber, Rachel; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Thase, Michael E; Schatzberg, Alan F; Keller, Martin B; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Kocsis, James H

    2017-04-01

    Side effects to antidepressant medication can affect the efficacy of treatment, but few predictors foretell who experiences side effects and which side effects they experience. This secondary data analysis examined whether depressed patients with comorbid panic disorder were more likely to experience side effects than those without panic disorder. The study also examined whether greater burden of side effects predicted a poorer treatment course for patients with panic disorder than those without panic disorder. To examine the specificity of these effects, analyses also examined 2 other anxiety disorders-social phobia and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Between 2002 and 2006, a large sample (N = 808) of chronically depressed individuals (assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders [SCID-IV]) received antidepressants according to a predetermined algorithm for 12 weeks. Every 2 weeks, depressive symptoms (per the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale) and side effects (specific side effects as well as several indicators of side effect burden) were assessed. Lifetime diagnosis of panic disorder (assessed using the SCID-IV) at baseline was associated with higher likelihood of gastrointestinal (OR = 1.6 [95% CI, 1.0-2.6]), cardiac (OR = 1.8 [95% CI, 1.1-3.1]), neurologic (OR = 2.6 [95% CI, 1.6-4.2]), and genitourinary side effects (OR = 3.0 [95% CI, 1.7-5.3]) during treatment. Increases in side effect frequency, intensity, and impairment over time were more strongly associated with increases in depressive symptoms for patients with panic disorder compared to those without panic disorder. Neither social phobia nor GAD was associated with these effects. Potentially due to heighte​ned interoceptive awareness of changes in their body, chronically depressed individuals with panic disorder may be at greater risk than those without panic disorder for antidepressant side effects and to experience a worsening of depressive symptoms as a result

  7. Impact of a Student Pharmacist Driven Medication Reconciliation and Antidepressant Treatment History Project at a Depression Clinic: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Stella S.; Jaward, Leanna; Ward, Kristen; Parikh, Sagar V.; Bostwick, Jolene R.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To improve treatment of patients with depression, a new pilot service project involving student pharmacists who would conduct medication reconciliation and review of antidepressant treatment history was created and evaluated. Experimental design A prospective study conducted at the University of Michigan Depression Center. Principal observations From an initial sample of 78 referrals, 41 subjects were reached by phone, with 34 completing medication reconciliation and antidepressant treatment history. Of the 34 patients, 25 (73.5%) had at least one discrepancy identified in their medication list, resulting in 164 medication changes in the electronic medical record (EMR). A total of 105 past antidepressant trials were documented in the 34 individuals, with 34 (32.4%) trials found to be inadequate. Thirteen (38.2%) patients reported failure to respond to two different antidepressants from different classes. All 34 patients participated well in the phone calls and were willing to consult a pharmacist at their upcoming clinic visit. Conclusions A student pharmacist pilot was feasible, identified many discrepancies in the medication record, and identified important medication treatment history in patients with depression in advance of the clinic visit. The project provides support for a specialized role for student pharmacists and demonstrates that interprofessional care can contribute to improved treatment of depression. PMID:28626270

  8. Randomised controlled trial of counseling sessions, antidepressant medication, and combined treatment for major depression in primary care setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossa, Samir Y.; Al-Sayed, H.; Malik, Mariam A.; Al-Hageri, S.; Al-Shaar, I.

    2006-01-01

    The study was made to determine whether counseling sessions using Egan's model combined with antidepressant medication is more effective than either treatment alone in the management of major depression in primary care. Patient aged 18 years and above with major depression on the research diagnostic criteria - a score of 13 or more on the 17 items. Hamilton rating scale for depression and a minimum duration of 4 weeks. Counseling sessions based on Egan's Model by research family physician or antidepressant medication or combination of both was performed. Hamilton rating scale for depression, Beck depression inventory, clinical interview schedule, and modified social adjustment schedule were used and assessed at 6 , 12 and 52 weeks. Patients in all groups showed a clear improvement after 12 weeks. The combination of counseling sessions and antidepressant medication is more effective than either treatment alone. Counseling sessions used by a trained family physician is an effective treatment for depressive disorders in primary care. The combination of this treatment with antidepressant medication is more effective than either treatment alone. (author)

  9. Platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in major depressive disorder. Binding of tritiated clonidine before and after tricyclic antidepressant drug treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Sevilla, J.A.; Zis, A.P.; Hollingsworth, P.J.; Greden, J.F.; Smith, C.B.

    1981-01-01

    The specific binding of tritiated (3H)-clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor agonist, to platelet membranes was measured in normal subjects and in patients with major depressive disorder. The number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors from the depressed group was significantly higher than that found in platelets obtained from the control population. Treatment with tricyclic antidepressant drugs led to significant decreases in the number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. These results support the hypothesis that the depressive syndrome is related to an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor supersensitivity and that the clinical effectiveness of tricyclic antidepressant drugs is associated with a decrease in the number of these receptors

  10. Augmenting Antidepressant Medication Treatment of Depressed Women with Emotionally Focused Therapy for Couples: A Randomized Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Wayne H.; Wittenborn, Andrea K.; Golden, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first study to evaluate adding emotionally focused therapy for couples (EFT) to antidepressant medication in the treatment of women with major depressive disorder and comorbid relationship discord. Twenty-four women and their male partners were randomized to 6 months of medication management alone (MM) or MM augmented with EFT (MM +…

  11. Rapid and Longer-Term Antidepressant Effects of Repeated Ketamine Infusions in Treatment-Resistant Major Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murrough, James W.; Perez, Andrew M.; Pillemer, Sarah; Stern, Jessica; Parides, Michael K.; aan het Rot, Marije; Collins, Katherine A.; Mathew, Sanjay J.; Charney, Dennis S.; Iosifescu, Dan V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ketamine is reported to have rapid antidepressant effects; however, there is limited understanding of the time-course of ketamine effects beyond a single infusion. A previous report including 10 participants with treatment-resistant major depression (TRD) found that six ketamine

  12. GABA/glutamate co-release controls habenula output and is modified by antidepressant treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabel, Steven J.; Proulx, Christophe D.; Piriz, Joaquin; Malinow, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb), a key regulator of monoaminergic brain regions, is activated by negatively-valenced events. Its hyperactivity is associated with depression. While enhanced excitatory input to the LHb has been linked to depression, little is known about inhibitory transmission. We discovered that GABA is co-released with its functional opponent, glutamate, from long-range basal ganglia inputs (which signal negative events) to limit LHb activity in rodents. At this synapse, the balance of GABA/glutamate signaling is shifted towards reduced GABA in a model of depression and increased GABA by antidepressant treatment. GABA and glutamate co-release therefore controls LHb activity, and regulation of this remarkable form of transmission may be important for determining the impact of negative life events on mood and behavior. PMID:25237099

  13. [Cappuccino coffee treatment of xerostomia in patients taking tricyclic antidepressants: preliminary report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodorowski, Zygmunt

    2002-01-01

    10 patients underwent a trial treatment with Cappuccino coffee. All of them (8 university lecturers and 2 clerks) aged from 60 to 69 (average 63) years old, used tricyclic antidepressant because of insomnia as a monosymptomatic type of depression or insomnia as a dominant symptom in the course of depression. One, evening dose of doxepine was from 150 to 250 (average 225) mg, causing xerostomia next day usually between 9-15 o'clock. The five-minute--chewing of 15.0 g of Cappuccino coffee increased the amount of saliva, decreased xerostomia and improved the ability of speech. Beneficial effect of coffee lasted from 0.5 to 4 (average about 2) hours. To the best of our knowledge there are no publications dealing with the positive effect of coffee in xerostomia.

  14. Tricyclic Antidepressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gary J.

    The use of tricyclic antidepressant drugs is becoming increasingly prevalent for the treatment of depressed patients. It has been suggested that, analogous to many other drug substances, the tricyclic drugs exhibit clinical effectiveness within a defined therapeutic concentration range (1-10). Very recently, both Dito (11) and Orsulak and Schildkraut (12) have summarized the usefulness of measuring serum concentrations of these drugs. These authors suggest that knowledge of the plasma concentrations of these drugs aid the physician in determining patient compliance and initiating the best possible drug treatment.

  15. Combating depression in Huntington's disease: effective antidepressive treatment with venlafaxine XR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Anna K; Wilkinson, Leonora; Painold, Annamaria; Holl, Etienne M; Bonelli, Raphael M

    2010-01-01

    Patients with Huntington's disease (HD) often suffer from psychiatric symptoms including affective disorder, psychosis, irritability, and apathy, which may be present in all stages of the disease. However--despite the obvious likelihood that these symptoms may be reduced by antidepressive treatments--to date, the effectiveness of such treatments in HD has only ever been examined in case studies. Twenty-six HD patients (17 men), with a diagnosis of major depression, were studied. The symptoms of HD and depression were systematically measured using the Beck Depression Inventory and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression both at baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment with venlafaxine XR. After 4 weeks of venlafaxine XR treatment, the symptoms of depression in HD patients decreased significantly relative to baseline. However, approximately one in five patients developed significant venlafaxine-related side effects (nausea and irritability). Venlafaxine XR is highly effective in the treatment of depression in HD, although it may produce unpleasant side effects. Further studies are required to establish the most suitable treatment for depression in HD.

  16. The antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like effects following co-treatment with escitalopram and risperidone in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminska, K; Rogoz, Z

    2016-06-01

    Several clinical reports have documented a beneficial effect of the addition of a low dose of risperidone to the ongoing treatment with antidepressants, in particular selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), in the treatment of drug-resistant depression and treatment-resistant anxiety disorders. In the present study, we investigated the effect of treatment with the antidepressant escitalopram (SSRI) given separately or jointly with a low dose of risperidone (an atypical antipsychotic) in the forced swim test and in the elevated plus-maze test in rats. The obtained results showed that escitalopram at doses of 2.5 or 5 mg/kg evoked antidepressant-like effect in the forced swim test. Moreover, risperidone at low doses (0.05 or 0.1 mg/kg) enhanced the antidepressant-like activity of escitalopram (1 mg/kg) in this test by increasing the swimming time and decreasing the immobility time in those animals. WAY 100635 (a serotonin 5-HT1A receptor antagonist) at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg abolished the antidepressant-like effect induced by co-administration of escitalopram and risperidone. The active behavior in that test did not reflect an increase in general activity, since the combined treatment with escitalopram and risperidone failed to enhance the exploratory activity of rats. In the following experiment, we showed that escitalopram (5 mg/kg) and mirtazapine (5 or 10 mg/kg) or risperidone (0.1 mg/kg) induced an anxiolytic-like effect in the elevated plus-maze test, and the combined treatment with an ineffective dose of risperidone (0.05 mg/kg) enhanced the anxiolytic-like effects of escitalopram (2.5 mg/kg) or mirtazapine (1 and 2.5 mg/kg) in this test. The obtained results suggest that risperidone applied at a low dose enhances the antidepressant-like activity of escitalopram in the forced swim test, and that 5-HT1A receptors may play some role in these effects. Moreover, a low dose of risperidone may also enhance the anxiolytic-like action of the studied

  17. Effect of short-term antidepressant treatment on early maladaptive schemas in patients with major depressive and panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalay, Hakan; Atalay, Figen; Bağdaçiçek, Sedat

    2011-06-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of anti-depressant treatment on early maladaptive schemas (EMSs). Eighty patients were self-referred to a psychiatric outpatient clinic and were diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) (n = 40) and panic disorder (PD) (n = 40) according to the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV-TR). These patients were administered the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and the Young Schema Questionnaire-Short Form (YSQ-SF) before and after a 2-month period of antidepressant treatment and were compared with 40 healthy control subjects. Depressive mood states were more likely to activate early maladaptive schemas compared to the anxious mood states, and treating these mood states simply with anti-depressive medications led to significant improvements in the activation of these schemas. We concluded that half of the schemas might be accepted as antidepressant treatment-resistant EMSs, or, in other words, they can be viewed in part as those specific to depressive mood states.

  18. Antidepressant medication treatment patterns in Asian patients with major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novick D

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Diego Novick,1 William Montgomery,2 Victoria Moneta,3 Xiaomei Peng,4 Roberto Brugnoli,5 Josep Maria Haro3 1Eli Lilly and Company, Windlesham, Surrey, UK; 2Eli Lilly Australia Pty Ltd, West Ryde, Australia; 3Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, CIBERSAM, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 4Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 5Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy Purpose: To describe pharmacological treatment patterns in Asian patients with major depressive disorder (MDD, including duration of treatment, reasons for medication discontinuation, rate of medication nonadherence, factors associated with medication nonadherence, and impact of medication nonadherence on depression outcomes.Patients and methods: Data were from a prospective, observational 3-month study of East Asian MDD inpatients from 40 sites in six East Asian countries who initiated antidepressant treatment at baseline (n=569. Assessments included the Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale (CGI-S, 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17, painful physical symptoms, response and remission, employment status, quality of life (QoL (EuroQOL Questionnaire-5 Dimensions [EQ-5D] and health state using the visual analog scale, adherence by clinician opinion, and patient self-report. Cox proportional hazards modeling, Kaplan–Meier survival analysis, and regression modeling were employed.Results: Median time to discontinuation for any reason was 70 days (95% confidence interval: 47; 95. Reasons for discontinuation were inadequate response in 64.1%, nonadherence in 6.2%, and adverse events in 4.1%; 25.6% who discontinued experienced an adequate response to treatment. In those patients who had an adequate response, age and country were significantly associated with time to medication discontinuation. Patient-reported nonadherence was 57.5% and clinician-reported nonadherence was 14.6% (62/426. At 3 months, nonadherent

  19. Radioactive cDNA microarray (II): Gene expression profiling of antidepressant treatment by human cDNA microarray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Hye; Kang, Rhee Hun; Ham, Byung Joo; Lee, Min Su; Shin, Kyung Ho; Choe, Jae Gol; Kim, Meyoung Kon

    2003-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is a prevalent psychiatric disorder in primary care, associated with impaired patient functioning and well-being. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and is a commonly prescribed antidepressant compound. Its action is primarily attributed to selective inhibition of the reuptake of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in the central nervous system. Objectives ; the aims of this study were two-fold: (1) to determine the usefulness for investigation of the transcription profiles in depression patients, and (2) to assess the differences in gene expression profiles between positive response group and negative response groups by fluoxetine treatment. This study included 53 patients with major depression (26 in positive response group with antidepressant treatment, 27 in negative response group with antidepressant treatment), and 53 healthy controls. To examine the difference of gene expression profile in depression patients, radioactive complementary DNA microarrays were used to evaluate changes in the expression of 1,152 genes in total. Using 33p-labeled probes, this method provided highly sensitive gene expression profiles including brain receptors, drug metabolism, and cellular signaling. Gene transcription profiles were classified into several categories in accordance with the antidepressant gene-regulation. The gene profiles were significantly up-(22 genes) and down-(16 genes) regulated in the positive response group when compared to the control group. Also, in the negative response group, 35 genes were up-regulated and 8 genes were down-regulated when compared to the control group. Consequently, we demonstrated that radioactive human cDNA microarray is highly likely to be an efficient technology for evaluating the gene regulation of antidepressants, such as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), by using high-throughput biotechnology

  20. Radioactive cDNA microarray (II): Gene expression profiling of antidepressant treatment by human cDNA microarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hye; Kang, Rhee Hun; Ham, Byung Joo; Lee, Min Su; Shin, Kyung Ho; Choe, Jae Gol; Kim, Meyoung Kon [College of Medicine, Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Major depressive disorder is a prevalent psychiatric disorder in primary care, associated with impaired patient functioning and well-being. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and is a commonly prescribed antidepressant compound. Its action is primarily attributed to selective inhibition of the reuptake of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in the central nervous system. Objectives ; the aims of this study were two-fold: (1) to determine the usefulness for investigation of the transcription profiles in depression patients, and (2) to assess the differences in gene expression profiles between positive response group and negative response groups by fluoxetine treatment. This study included 53 patients with major depression (26 in positive response group with antidepressant treatment, 27 in negative response group with antidepressant treatment), and 53 healthy controls. To examine the difference of gene expression profile in depression patients, radioactive complementary DNA microarrays were used to evaluate changes in the expression of 1,152 genes in total. Using 33p-labeled probes, this method provided highly sensitive gene expression profiles including brain receptors, drug metabolism, and cellular signaling. Gene transcription profiles were classified into several categories in accordance with the antidepressant gene-regulation. The gene profiles were significantly up-(22 genes) and down-(16 genes) regulated in the positive response group when compared to the control group. Also, in the negative response group, 35 genes were up-regulated and 8 genes were down-regulated when compared to the control group. Consequently, we demonstrated that radioactive human cDNA microarray is highly likely to be an efficient technology for evaluating the gene regulation of antidepressants, such as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), by using high-throughput biotechnology.

  1. Electro-peroxone treatment of the antidepressant venlafaxine: Operational parameters and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Yujue; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Huijiao; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Deng, Shubo; Yu, Gang

    2015-12-30

    Degradation of the antidepressant venlafaxine by a novel electrocatalytic ozonation process, electro-peroxone (E-peroxone), was studied. The E-peroxone treatment involves sparging ozone generator effluent (O2 and O3 gas mixture) into an electrolysis reactor that is equipped with a carbon-polytetrafluoroethylene cathode to electrocatalytically transform O2 in the bubbled gas to H2O2. The in-situ generate H2O2 then reacts with the bubbled O3 to yield OH, which can non-selectively degrade organic compounds rapidly in the solution. Thanks to the significant OH production, the E-peroxone treatment greatly enhanced both venlafaxine degradation and total organic carbon (TOC) removal as compared to ozonation and electrolysis alone. Under optimal reaction conditions, complete venlafaxine degradation and TOC elimination could be achieved within 3 and 120 min of E-peroxone process, respectively. Based on the by-products (e.g., hydroxylated venlafaxine, phenolics, and carboxylic acids) identified by UPLC-UV and UPLC/Q-TOF-mass spectrometry, plausible reaction pathways were proposed for venlafaxine mineralization by the E-peroxone process. The results of this study suggest that the E-peroxone treatment may provide a promising way to treat venlafaxine contaminated water. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Rapid improvement of depressive symptoms in suicide attempters following treatment with milnacipran and tricyclic antidepressants – a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirino E

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Eiji Kirino, Masao GitohDepartment of Psychiatry, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, Shizuoka, JapanAbstract: Suicide is a serious social problem in many countries, including Japan. The majority of people who commit suicide suffer from depression. Suicide attempt patients suffering from serious physical injuries are initially treated in hospital emergency departments. The present post hoc analysis examined data from patients admitted to an emergency hospital for treatment of physical injuries, resulting from a suicide attempt, and initial psychiatric treatment for depression and prevention of future suicide attempts. The effects on depressive symptoms were studied in two groups of patients using the 17-item Hamilton depression scale (HAMD. One group (n = 6 had received intravenous tricyclic antidepressants (TCA (amitriptyline or clomipramine while the other group (n = 7 had been treated orally with milnacipran, a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor antidepressant. Prior to treatment the four highest scoring items on the HAMD scale were the same in both groups namely, item 1 (depressed mood, item 3 (suicidality, item 7 (interest in work and activities, and item 10 (psychic anxiety. After 1 week of treatment, mean global HAMD scores were significantly reduced in both groups. Treatment resulted in a significant reduction of five HAMD items in the TCA group, whereas in the milnacipran group 12 HAMD items were significantly reduced. Suicidality (item 3 was significantly improved by 1 week treatment with milnacipran, but not by TCAs. Milnacipran rapidly improved a wide range of depressive symptoms, including suicidality within the first week. The improvement with milnacipran would appear to be, at least, equivalent to that achieved with TCAs, possibly affecting a wider range of symptoms. Since milnacipran has been shown in comparative studies to be better tolerated than TCAs, this antidepressant offers an interesting option for the

  3. Lithium and Valproate Levels Do Not Correlate with Ketamine’s Antidepressant Efficacy in Treatment-Resistant Bipolar Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie J. Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine and lithium both inhibit glycogen synthase kinase 3. In addition, lithium and ketamine have synergistic antidepressant-like effects at individually subeffective doses in rodents. We hypothesized that ketamine’s antidepressant effects would be improved by therapeutic doses of lithium versus valproate and that serum lithium levels would positively correlate with ketamine’s antidepressant efficacy. Thirty-six patients with treatment-resistant bipolar depression maintained on therapeutic-dose lithium (n=23, 0.79 ± 0.15 mEq/L or valproate (n=13, 79.6 ± 12.4 mg/mL received 0.5 mg/kg ketamine infusion in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. The primary depression outcome measure—the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS—was assessed before infusion and at numerous postinfusion time points. Both lithium (F1,118 = 152.08, p<0.001, and d=2.27 and valproate (F1,128 = 20.12, p<0.001, and d=0.79 significantly improved depressive symptoms, but no statistically significant difference was observed between mood stabilizer groups (F1,28 = 2.51, p=0.12, and d=0.60. Serum lithium and valproate levels did not correlate with ketamine’s antidepressant efficacy. Although the study was potentially underpowered, our results suggest that lithium may not potentiate ketamine’s antidepressant efficacy in treatment-resistant bipolar depression.

  4. Advanced oxidation treatment and photochemical fate of selected antidepressant pharmaceuticals in solutions of Suwannee River humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoke, Hanoz; Song, Weihua; Cooper, William J.; Peake, Barrie M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We elucidate the photochemical degradation of three antidepressant pharmaceuticals. ► Hydroxyl radical is the most significant contributor to the degradation. ► Excited state dissolved organic matter also plays a significant role for duloxetine. ► Tentative reaction byproducts are identified. - Abstract: Antidepressant pharmaceuticals have recently been detected at low concentrations in wastewater and surface water. This work reports studies of the direct and indirect photochemical fate and treatment by advanced oxidation of three antidepressant compounds (duloxetine, venlafaxine and bupropion) in solutions of humic acid in order to elucidate their behavior in the natural environment prior to reaching a water treatment facility and potentially entering a potable water supply. Humic acid solution was prepared by adding to distilled water a known amount of organic matter as a photosensitizer. All three antidepressants react very rapidly with hydroxyl radicals (·OH) and hydrated electrons (e − aq ) with rate constants of ∼10 8 to 10 10 M −1 s −1 , but significantly slower with singlet oxygen ( 1 ΔO 2 ) (∼10 3 to 10 5 M −1 s −1 ). The steady-state concentrations of ·OH and 1 ΔO 2 , in a sample of humic acid solution were measured and used with the second order rate constants to show that the hydroxyl radical was an order of magnitude more effective than the singlet oxygen in the solar-induced photochemical degradation of the antidepressants. Excited state dissolved organic matter also accounted for a substantial portion of degradation of duloxetine, decreasing its half-life by 27% under solar irradiation. Several reaction pathways and by-products arising from the photodegradation were identified using gamma-irradiation followed by LC–MS analysis.

  5. Advanced oxidation treatment and photochemical fate of selected antidepressant pharmaceuticals in solutions of Suwannee River humic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoke, Hanoz, E-mail: hsantoke@uci.edu [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Song, Weihua, E-mail: wsong@uci.edu [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Cooper, William J., E-mail: wcooper@uci.edu [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Peake, Barrie M., E-mail: bpeake@chemistry.otago.ac.nz [Chemistry Department, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin 9054 (New Zealand)

    2012-05-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We elucidate the photochemical degradation of three antidepressant pharmaceuticals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydroxyl radical is the most significant contributor to the degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excited state dissolved organic matter also plays a significant role for duloxetine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tentative reaction byproducts are identified. - Abstract: Antidepressant pharmaceuticals have recently been detected at low concentrations in wastewater and surface water. This work reports studies of the direct and indirect photochemical fate and treatment by advanced oxidation of three antidepressant compounds (duloxetine, venlafaxine and bupropion) in solutions of humic acid in order to elucidate their behavior in the natural environment prior to reaching a water treatment facility and potentially entering a potable water supply. Humic acid solution was prepared by adding to distilled water a known amount of organic matter as a photosensitizer. All three antidepressants react very rapidly with hydroxyl radicals ({center_dot}OH) and hydrated electrons (e{sup -}{sub aq}) with rate constants of {approx}10{sup 8} to 10{sup 10} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, but significantly slower with singlet oxygen ({sup 1}{Delta}O{sub 2}) ({approx}10{sup 3} to 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). The steady-state concentrations of {center_dot}OH and {sup 1}{Delta}O{sub 2}, in a sample of humic acid solution were measured and used with the second order rate constants to show that the hydroxyl radical was an order of magnitude more effective than the singlet oxygen in the solar-induced photochemical degradation of the antidepressants. Excited state dissolved organic matter also accounted for a substantial portion of degradation of duloxetine, decreasing its half-life by 27% under solar irradiation. Several reaction pathways and by-products arising from the photodegradation were identified using gamma-irradiation followed by LC

  6. [Antidepressants in epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño-Monsalve, Beatriz

    2013-08-01

    Depression is a common condition in patients with epilepsy that entails a deterioration of the quality of life of this population and that, therefore, requires appropriate treatment. The potential risk of antidepressants in relation to the seizure threshold is overestimated by many professionals, and this has an influence when it comes to making the decision to treat them. It sometimes means that the patients do not receive antidepressant drugs. In this regard, the aim of this review is to present the current state of the art in terms of the safety of antidepressants in patients with epilepsy. A search of the medical literature was conducted and, following its analysis, the most significant results are presented. Current information indicates that most antidepressants are safe for epileptic patients at therapeutic doses and that the risk of seizures occurs mainly in cases of overdose. Preferred drugs for treating depression in epilepsy are serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Bupropion and tricyclic antidepressants must be avoided.

  7. [Antidepressants in bipolar disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtet, P; Samalin, L; Olié, E

    2011-12-01

    Whereas mania defines the bipolar disorder, depression is the major challenge of treatment. In general, depressions are more frequent, longer, with a major prognostic impact in terms of disability and suicide. How should we treat a patient with bipolar depression? Antidepressants are the treatment of choice for depression, but not in the bipolar disorder. In this context, we have traditionally accepted that antidepressants are effective but they were inducing a significant risk of destabilization of the bipolar disorder, because of the transitions to mania and rapid cycling. Current data reconsider both the two aspects of this risk-benefit ratio. The effectiveness of antidepressants finally seems very limited, especially after the more recent studies with a robust methodology. Manic switches and rapid cycling may not be increased, particularly with new antidepressants and mood stabilizer combinations. The current literature reminds us that these course's modalities are inherent to the disease, with numerous risk factors, and among them, exposure to antidepressants. Who are the bipolar patients who only get the benefits of antidepressant treatment? Research will tell. They are in any case limited. How to navigate in our treatment strategies ? By choosing first drugs that demonstrated efficacy in bipolar depression. When the situation is more complex, "primum non nocere" should lead to support the prescription of the antidepressant in association with mood stabilizer. Copyright © 2011 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  8. Survey of treatment practices for sexual dysfunction(s) associated with anti-depressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balon, Richard; Segraves, R Taylor

    2008-01-01

    There are many management strategies and antidotes available for sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressants available. However, only a few of these strategies and antidotes were tested in rigorous trials and most of them probably will not be rigorously tested. Surveying the prescribing practices of experts in this area provides another opportunity to evaluate these strategies and antidotes. The authors surveyed 29 (of 50) "expert" psychiatrists in the area of sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressants. Switching to another antidepressant, decreasing the dose of an antidepressant, and adding oral agents such as bupropion, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, and some dopaminergic agents (dextroamphetamine, methylphenidate) and a testosterone patch in some dysfunctions (libido, orgasm) are management strategies most frequently used by the experts. The experts also consider these strategies as the most effective ones. These findings are compared with other studies and discussed with regard to the evidence from clinical trials.

  9. The Strategy of Combining Antidepressants in the Treatment of Major Depression: Clinical Experience in Spanish Outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Martín-López

    2011-01-01

    The most frequent combinations are SSRIs and tricyclic antidepressants. The active principle most widely combined is fluoxetine. Conclusions. The prevalence of use of antidepressant combination therapy is 2.2% of the global sample and 8.3% of treated patients. Other than duration of the depressive episode, no clinical characteristics exclusive to patients who received combination rather than monotherapy were found. Our study found that the most frequent combination is SSRIs + TCAs, also being the most studied.

  10. Mitochondrial dynamics in the hippocampus is influenced by antidepressant treatment in a genetic rat model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, F.; Wegener, Gregers; Madsen, T. M.

    2013-01-01

    Post-mortem, genetic, brain imaging, and peripheral cell studies showed that mitochondria may play an important role in the pathophysiology of depression and effects of antidepressant therapy. Here we investigated whether chronic antidepressant treatment on rats induce changes of the mitochondrial...... model of depression. The unbiased stereoloy methods were used to estimate the mitochondria numerical density, the number of mitochondria and the mean size and volume of mitochondria in CA1 stratum radiatum (CA1SR) of hippocampus. The results showed that the mitochondria numerical density and the number...... and SD-saline group. Impramine treatment can significantly increase the mitochondria numerical density and the number of mitochondria in FSL-imipramine group. Our results support the mitochondria plasticity hypothesis that depressive disorders may be related to impairments of mitochondria plasticity...

  11. Telephone-administered psychotherapy in combination with antidepressant medication for the acute treatment of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corruble, Emmanuelle; Swartz, Holly A; Bottai, Thierry; Vaiva, Guillaume; Bayle, Frank; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Courtet, Philippe; Frank, Ellen; Gorwood, Philip

    2016-01-15

    Telephone-administered psychotherapies (T-P) provided as an adjunct to antidepressant medication may improve response rates in major depressive disorder (MDD). The goal of this study was to compare telephone-administered social rhythm therapy (T-SRT) and telephone-administered intensive clinical management (T-ICM) as adjuncts to antidepressant medication for MDD. A secondary goal was to compare T-P with Treatment as Usual (TAU) as adjunctive treatment to medication for MDD. 221 adult out-patients with MDD, currently depressed, were randomly assigned to 8 sessions of weekly T-SRT (n=110) or T-ICM (n=111), administered as an adjunct to agomelatine. Both psychotherapies were administered entirely by telephone, by trained psychologists who were blind to other aspects of treatment. The 221 patients were a posteriori matched with 221 depressed outpatients receiving TAU (controls). The primary outcome measure was the percentage of responders at 8 weeks post-treatment. No significant differences were found between T-SRT and T-ICM. But T-P was associated with higher response rates (65.4% vs 54.8%, p=0.02) and a trend toward higher remission rates (33.2% vs 25.1%; p=0.06) compared to TAU. Short term study. This study is the first assessing the short-term effects of an add-on, brief, telephone-administered psychotherapy in depressed patients treated with antidepressant medication. Eight sessions of weekly telephone-delivered psychotherapy as an adjunct to antidepressant medication resulted in improved response rates relative to medication alone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Chronic Pain Treatment: The Influence of Tricyclic Antidepressants on Serotonin Release and Uptake in Mast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilonka Ferjan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of serotonin (5-HT in chronic pain mechanisms is established. 5-HT inhibits central painful stimuli, but recent data suggests that 5-HT could also enhance pain stimulus from the periphery, where mast cells play an important role. We aimed in our study to clarify the influence of selected tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs on mast cell function: secretion, uptake, and reuptake of 5-HT, that could interfere with 5-HT levels and in this way contribute to the generation of pain. As an experimental model, we used isolated rat peritoneal mast cells and incubated them with selected TCAs (clomipramine, amitriptyline, doxepin, and imipramine under different experimental conditions. 5-HT release, uptake, and reuptake were determined spectrofluorometrically. We showed that TCAs were able to inhibit 5-HT secretion from mast cells, as well as uptake of exogenous 5-HT and reuptake of secreted 5-HT back into mast cells. The effects of TCAs were concentration dependent; higher concentrations of TCAs inhibited the secretion of 5-HT induced by compound 48/80, whereas lower concentrations of TCAs inhibited 5-HT uptake. The most effective TCA was halogenated clomipramine. As TCAs are well introduced in chronic pain treatment, the insight into mechanisms of action is important for an understanding of their effect in various pain conditions.

  13. Association of antidepressant treatment with emergency admission to medical units for patients 65 years or older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortuño, Noèlia; Cobo, Jesús; González, Espe; García, Imma; Ferrer, María-Dolores; Campos, Carmen; Planet, Núria; Oliva, Joan-Carles; Suárez, Mónica; Iglesias-Lepine, María-Luisa; García-Parés, Gemma

    There is increasing evidence relating the presence of depression in seniors and the risk of hospital admission in medical departments from the Emergency Services. To determine the impact of antidepressant treatment (ATD) as a protective factor for emergency hospitalization in older people. All patients aged 65 and over who required urgent attention for medical reasons at the Emergency Department of the Corporació Sanitària i Universitària Parc Taulí (Sabadell, Barcelona, Spain) for the period between January and October 2012 were included in the study. Sociodemographic variables, alcohol and tobacco use, medical history and psychopharmacological treatment were obtained. The necessary sample size was calculated and a simple randomization was performed. Subsequently, a descriptive statistical analysis and parametric tests were conducted. A total of 674 patients (53% women) were evaluated, with a mean age of 78.45 years, and 27.6% of the cases (71% women) were receiving ATD. Among the 333 admitted patients (50%), 83 individuals (24.6%) had previously received ATD; this contrasts with the 103 cases (30.6%) of prior ATD treatment among the patients who were not admitted. After comparative analysis, the relationship between previous use of ATD and being admitted to hospital was not statistically significant in our global sample. This relationship was only statistically significant among the group aged 75 and over (neg. sig. 0.012). In our study, ATD was associated with a decreased risk of hospital admission for urgent medical conditions in people aged 75 and over. Treating depression may protect the elderly against admission to the Emergency department and may potentially be a quality criterion in preventing complications in this population. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Electro-peroxone treatment of the antidepressant venlafaxine: Operational parameters and mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Yujue; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Huijiao; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Deng, Shubo; Yu, Gang, E-mail: yg-den@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • E-peroxone is a novel electrocatalytic ozonation process that couples ozonation with electrolysis to enhance pollutant decay. • Carbon-based cathodes are used to electrocatalytically produce H{sub 2}O{sub 2} from O{sub 2} in sparged O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} mixture. • The in-situ generated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reacts with O{sub 3} to yield ·OH for pollutant mineralization. • Venlafaxine is mineralized much faster by E-peroxone than by ozonation and electrolysis. - Abstract: Degradation of the antidepressant venlafaxine by a novel electrocatalytic ozonation process, electro-peroxone (E-peroxone), was studied. The E-peroxone treatment involves sparging ozone generator effluent (O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} gas mixture) into an electrolysis reactor that is equipped with a carbon-polytetrafluoroethylene cathode to electrocatalytically transform O{sub 2} in the bubbled gas to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The in-situ generate H{sub 2}O{sub 2} then reacts with the bubbled O{sub 3} to yield ·OH, which can non-selectively degrade organic compounds rapidly in the solution. Thanks to the significant ·OH production, the E-peroxone treatment greatly enhanced both venlafaxine degradation and total organic carbon (TOC) removal as compared to ozonation and electrolysis alone. Under optimal reaction conditions, complete venlafaxine degradation and TOC elimination could be achieved within 3 and 120 min of E-peroxone process, respectively. Based on the by-products (e.g., hydroxylated venlafaxine, phenolics, and carboxylic acids) identified by UPLC–UV and UPLC/Q-TOF-mass spectrometry, plausible reaction pathways were proposed for venlafaxine mineralization by the E-peroxone process. The results of this study suggest that the E-peroxone treatment may provide a promising way to treat venlafaxine contaminated water.

  15. Electro-peroxone treatment of the antidepressant venlafaxine: Operational parameters and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Yujue; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Huijiao; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Deng, Shubo; Yu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • E-peroxone is a novel electrocatalytic ozonation process that couples ozonation with electrolysis to enhance pollutant decay. • Carbon-based cathodes are used to electrocatalytically produce H 2 O 2 from O 2 in sparged O 2 and O 3 mixture. • The in-situ generated H 2 O 2 reacts with O 3 to yield ·OH for pollutant mineralization. • Venlafaxine is mineralized much faster by E-peroxone than by ozonation and electrolysis. - Abstract: Degradation of the antidepressant venlafaxine by a novel electrocatalytic ozonation process, electro-peroxone (E-peroxone), was studied. The E-peroxone treatment involves sparging ozone generator effluent (O 2 and O 3 gas mixture) into an electrolysis reactor that is equipped with a carbon-polytetrafluoroethylene cathode to electrocatalytically transform O 2 in the bubbled gas to H 2 O 2 . The in-situ generate H 2 O 2 then reacts with the bubbled O 3 to yield ·OH, which can non-selectively degrade organic compounds rapidly in the solution. Thanks to the significant ·OH production, the E-peroxone treatment greatly enhanced both venlafaxine degradation and total organic carbon (TOC) removal as compared to ozonation and electrolysis alone. Under optimal reaction conditions, complete venlafaxine degradation and TOC elimination could be achieved within 3 and 120 min of E-peroxone process, respectively. Based on the by-products (e.g., hydroxylated venlafaxine, phenolics, and carboxylic acids) identified by UPLC–UV and UPLC/Q-TOF-mass spectrometry, plausible reaction pathways were proposed for venlafaxine mineralization by the E-peroxone process. The results of this study suggest that the E-peroxone treatment may provide a promising way to treat venlafaxine contaminated water.

  16. Escitalopram versus other antidepressive agents for depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Andrea; Santilli, Claudio; Furukawa, Toshi A; Signoretti, Alessandra; Nakagawa, Atsuo; McGuire, Hugh; Churchill, Rachel; Barbui, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    0.53, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.93). Significantly fewer patients allocated to escitalopram withdrew from trials compared with patients allocated to duloxetine, for discontinuation due to any cause (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.99). Authors’ conclusions Some statistically significant differences favouring escitalopram over other antidepressive agents for the acute phase treatment of major depression were found, in terms of efficacy (citalopram and fluoxetine) and acceptability (duloxetine). There is insufficient evidence to detect a difference between escitalopram and other antidepressants in early response to treatment (after two weeks of treatment). Cost-effectiveness information is also needed in the field of antidepressant trials. Furthermore, as with most standard systematic reviews, the findings rely on evidence from direct comparisons. The potential for overestimation of treatment effect due to sponsorship bias should also be borne in mind. PMID:19370639

  17. Highly polygenic architecture of antidepressant treatment response: Comparative analysis of SSRI and NRI treatment in an animal model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malki, Karim; Tosto, Maria Grazia; Mouriño-Talín, Héctor; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, Sabela; Pain, Oliver; Jumhaboy, Irfan; Liu, Tina; Parpas, Panos; Newman, Stuart; Malykh, Artem; Carboni, Lucia; Uher, Rudolf; McGuffin, Peter; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Bryson, Kevin; Herbster, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Response to antidepressant (AD) treatment may be a more polygenic trait than previously hypothesized, with many genetic variants interacting in yet unclear ways. In this study we used methods that can automatically learn to detect patterns of statistical regularity from a sparsely distributed signal across hippocampal transcriptome measurements in a large-scale animal pharmacogenomic study to uncover genomic variations associated with AD. The study used four inbred mouse strains of both sexes, two drug treatments, and a control group (escitalopram, nortriptyline, and saline). Multi-class and binary classification using Machine Learning (ML) and regularization algorithms using iterative and univariate feature selection methods, including InfoGain, mRMR, ANOVA, and Chi Square, were used to uncover genomic markers associated with AD response. Relevant genes were selected based on Jaccard distance and carried forward for gene-network analysis. Linear association methods uncovered only one gene associated with drug treatment response. The implementation of ML algorithms, together with feature reduction methods, revealed a set of 204 genes associated with SSRI and 241 genes associated with NRI response. Although only 10% of genes overlapped across the two drugs, network analysis shows that both drugs modulated the CREB pathway, through different molecular mechanisms. Through careful implementation and optimisations, the algorithms detected a weak signal used to predict whether an animal was treated with nortriptyline (77%) or escitalopram (67%) on an independent testing set. The results from this study indicate that the molecular signature of AD treatment may include a much broader range of genomic markers than previously hypothesized, suggesting that response to medication may be as complex as the pathology. The search for biomarkers of antidepressant treatment response could therefore consider a higher number of genetic markers and their interactions. Through

  18. Non-Antidepressant Long-term Treatment in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerbage, Hala; Richa, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a frequent and disabling condition that occurs after exposure to a traumatic event, and Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are considered the first-line treatment approach for this disorder. However, a large proportion of patients remain symptomatic and other pharmacological agents have been investigated, based on the understanding of the underlying biological dysfunctions of PTSD. We conducted a review of the literature on the pharmacological options for PTSD other than the antidepressants, using MedLine and Web of Science databases, with search terms including the pharmacologic class of each agent plus PTSD, or pharmacotherapy, or fear conditioning. The literature review covered articles published until august 2012, including reviews and original articles. Agents like antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, benzodiazepines, anti-adrenergic agents, have been studied in randomized clinical trials (RCTs), with general positive results for antipsychotics, especially as adjunct therapy, and for prazosin for sleep-related disturbances. However, one important target for novel medications is the modulation of the fear conditioning process, through the alteration of retrieval/reconsolidation or enhancement of fear extinction. This is traditionally targeted in prolonged exposure therapy, but pre-clinical findings from studies investigating agents like propanolol, clonidine, N-Methyl-D-aspartic Acid Receptor (NMDAR) compounds, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA) and cannabinoids, indicate promising results in affecting the fear conditioning process and thus improving PTSD core symptoms. Antipsychotics can be considered a reasonable alternative option to PTSD, with the largest body of evidence for risperidone, even though larger RCTs are warranted. Prazosin is also a promising agent, especially for sleep-related disturbances, while anticonvulsants and benzodiazepines lack empirical support. However, the most promising

  19. Bereavement dream? Successful antidepressant treatment for bereavement-related distressing dreams in patients with major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Mayumi; Onishi, Hideki; Wada, Mei; Wada, Tomomi; Wada, Makoto; Uchitomi, Yosuke; Nomura, Shinobu

    2010-03-01

    The death of a person is a stressful event. Such stress affects the physical and psychological well-being of the bereaved. As an associated mental disorder, major depressive disorder (MDD) is common. Some dream of the deceased, and these dreams are called bereavement dreams. Some MDD patients also experience dreams. These two types of dreams are sometimes difficult to differentiate. The dream of the bereaved might be only a bereavement-related dream, yet it might be a symptom of MDD. Herein, we report one patient who had distressing dreams after the death of her mother. A 63-year-old woman was referred for psychiatric consultation because of generalized fatigue and insomnia. Questioning her about recent events, she said that her mother had died of colonic carcinoma 5 months previously. Two months after the death, she suddenly started dreaming of her mother, getting angry with her almost every night. Generalized fatigue, insomnia, and distressing dreams appeared simultaneously. The dream caused much distress, making her afraid to fall asleep. Her psychiatric features fulfilled the DSM-IV-TR criteria for MDD, single episode. The death of her mother was considered to be one of the causes of MDD. She was administered 25 mg/day of sertraline hydrochloride. After that, her symptoms gradually disappeared, and the frequency of distressing dreams was reduced. Five months later, physical and psychiatric symptoms of MDD were completely resolved. Subsequently, she has not suffered from any distressing dreams of her mother. This case indicates that dreams experienced after the death of a loved one should not be regarded simply as bereavement dreams. Some of the dreams may be symptoms of MDD. If the dreams are the symptoms of MDD, antidepressant treatment as well as psychotherapy may be useful. Therefore, we should avoid regarding symptoms of MDD as reactions to bereavement.

  20. Diagnosis at the first episode to differentiate antidepressant treatment responses in patients with mood and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kemp, E C M; Moleman, P; Hoogduin, C A L; Broekman, T G; Goedhart, A; Schaap, C P D R; van den Berg, P C

    2002-02-01

    Co-morbidity of mood and anxiety disorders is often ignored in pharmacotreatment outcome studies and this complicates the interpretation of treatment response. The clinical trials are usually based on single categories from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). The present study is a first attempt to differentiate the responses to antidepressants using a design that differs from that used in previous clinical trials. To avoid bias due to co-morbidity, we included patients with any DSM-III-R diagnosis of mood or anxiety disorder for which antidepressant treatment was indicated. We also explored the role of the diagnosis at the first episode in the efficacy of the different antidepressants. A total of 92 outpatients with a mood and/or anxiety disorder were randomly assigned to treatment with imipramine or fluvoxamine in a 6-week study. The diagnosis at the first episode--or primary diagnosis--was available for 78 patients, 40 with a primary depression and 38 with a primary anxiety disorder. Analyses using the MIXED procedure for repeated measures showed no general differences between treatment with imipramine and treatment with fluvoxamine. When the primary diagnoses were taken into consideration, differentiation occurred. Patients with primary depression showed better responses to imipramine than to fluvoxamine. The assumption that patients with primary anxiety disorder would respond better to fluvoxamine than imipramine was observed for only the Clinical Global Impression. The results suggest that the nature of the first illness episode may be more valuable than the DSM categories of mood or anxiety disorders, which may lend support to the concept of primary versus secondary depression for purposes of differentiating treatment responses. Given the exploratory nature of the study, however, replication of our finding is needed.

  1. Antidepressants and gastrointestinal symptoms in the general Dutch adult population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, B.; Tielemans, M.M.; Aaldering, B.R.; Eikendal, T.; Jaspers Focks, J.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Rossum, L.G.M. van; Oijen, M.G.H. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal symptoms are frequently reported adverse effects of antidepressants, but antidepressants are also a treatment modality in functional gastrointestinal disorders. We aimed to assess the association between antidepressant use and gastrointestinal symptoms in the general

  2. Pharmacological treatment of depression with and without headache disorders: an appraisal of cost effectiveness and cost utility of antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi-Ju; Kuo, Kuei-Hong; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2015-01-01

    Depression and headache are highly prevalent in clinical settings. The co-occurrence of headache may impact choice of antidepressants, healthcare utilisation, and outcomes in patients with depression. The current study aims to examine the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of different antidepressants for treating patients with depression and comorbid headache disorders. Adult patients prescribed with antidepressants for depression (n=96,501) were identified from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. A cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis was conducted comparing selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), and by the presence of comorbid headache disorders and other pain conditions. In this study, SSRIs dominated SNRIs in both cost-effectiveness and cost-utility. As revealed in the cost-effectiveness acceptability curves, TCAs were likely to have a cost-utility advantage compared to SSRIs and SNRIs in improving quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for patients with comorbid headache; SSRIs remained as the most cost-effective option for patients with other pain conditions. Limitations include the use of proxy definition of remission as effectiveness measure and the adoption of utility values from previous studies. Given a pre-determined willingness-to-pay level, TCAs can be considered as a cost-effective option to improve QALYs for depressed patients with headache disorders. Future research is needed to further clarify factors influencing the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of pharmacological treatments in depressed patients with specific pain conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Combining Antidepressants in Acute Treatment of Depression: A Meta-Analysis of 38 Studies Including 4511 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henssler, Jonathan; Bschor, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Combining antidepressants (ADs) for therapy of acute depression is frequently employed, but randomized studies have yielded conflicting results. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis aimed at determining efficacy and tolerability of combination therapy. Methods: MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, and CENTRAL databases were systematically searched through March 2014 for controlled studies comparing combinations of ADs with AD monotherapy in adult patients suffering from acute depression. The prespecified primary outcome was standardized mean difference (SMD), secondary outcomes were response, remission, and dropouts. Results: Among 8688 articles screened, 38 studies were eligible, including 4511 patients. Combination treatment was statistically, significantly superior to monotherapy (SMD 0.29; 95% CI 0.16 to 0.42). During monotherapy, slightly fewer patients dropped out due to adverse events (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.53 to 1.53). Studies were heterogeneous (I2 = 63%), and there was indication of moderate publication bias (fail-safe N for an effect of 0.1:44), but results remained robust across prespecified secondary outcomes and subgroups, including analyses restricted to randomized controlled trials and low risk of bias studies. Meta-regression revealed an association of SMD with difference in imipramine-equivalent dose. Combining a reuptake inhibitor with an antagonist of presynaptic α2-autoreceptors was superior to other combinations. Conclusion: Combining ADs seems to be superior to monotherapy with only slightly more patients dropping out. Combining a reuptake inhibitor with an antagonist of presynaptic α2-autoreceptors seems to be significantly more effective than other combinations. Overall, our search revealed a dearth of well-designed studies. PMID:27582451

  4. Combining Antidepressants in Acute Treatment of Depression: A Meta-Analysis of 38 Studies Including 4511 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henssler, Jonathan; Bschor, Tom; Baethge, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Combining antidepressants (ADs) for therapy of acute depression is frequently employed, but randomized studies have yielded conflicting results. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis aimed at determining efficacy and tolerability of combination therapy. MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, and CENTRAL databases were systematically searched through March 2014 for controlled studies comparing combinations of ADs with AD monotherapy in adult patients suffering from acute depression. The prespecified primary outcome was standardized mean difference (SMD), secondary outcomes were response, remission, and dropouts. Among 8688 articles screened, 38 studies were eligible, including 4511 patients. Combination treatment was statistically, significantly superior to monotherapy (SMD 0.29; 95% CI 0.16 to 0.42). During monotherapy, slightly fewer patients dropped out due to adverse events (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.53 to 1.53). Studies were heterogeneous (I(2) = 63%), and there was indication of moderate publication bias (fail-safe N for an effect of 0.1:44), but results remained robust across prespecified secondary outcomes and subgroups, including analyses restricted to randomized controlled trials and low risk of bias studies. Meta-regression revealed an association of SMD with difference in imipramine-equivalent dose. Combining a reuptake inhibitor with an antagonist of presynaptic α2-autoreceptors was superior to other combinations. Combining ADs seems to be superior to monotherapy with only slightly more patients dropping out. Combining a reuptake inhibitor with an antagonist of presynaptic α2-autoreceptors seems to be significantly more effective than other combinations. Overall, our search revealed a dearth of well-designed studies. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Anticonvulsants or Antidepressants in Combination Pharmacotherapy for Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jia; Tanaka, Shiro; Kawakami, Koji

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the efficacy of anticonvulsants or antidepressants in combination pharmacotherapy for treatment of neuropathic pain in cancer patients. We systematically searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials for randomized controlled trials that compared anticonvulsants or antidepressants in combination pharmacotherapy (experimental group) with treatments without anticonvulsants or antidepressants (control group) for neuropathic pain in cancer patients. Risk of bias was evaluated in accordance with the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. The primary outcome was a mean difference (MD) in change in global pain analyzed by a random-effects model. Eight trials met the inclusion criteria with a total of 1359 participants of whom 698 received an experimental intervention. The MD in change in global pain suggested a favorable association with anticonvulsants or antidepressants in combination pharmacotherapy compared with control groups (MD, -0.41; 95% confidence interval, -0.70 to -0.12) with no heterogeneity across trials (I=0%). The MD in change estimated in all sensitivity analyses ranged from -0.36 to -0.47, suggesting that these effects were consistent across different study designs and statistical assumptions. Anticonvulsants or antidepressants in combination pharmacotherapy reduce neuropathic pain in cancer patients compared with treatments without anticonvulsants or antidepressants. Limited evidence precludes a recommendation on specific adjuvants in combination pharmacotherapy.

  6. Prevalence of depression, quality of life and antidepressant treatment in the Danish General Suburban Population Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Kvetny, Jan; Christensen, Kaj Sparle

    2014-01-01

    to describe the prevalence of antidepressants received by the respondents in the GESUS study and the correspondence to their subjective well-being on the WHO-5 questionnaire. Methods: To evaluate the validity (scalability) of the MDI and the WHO-5 in the GESUS study we performed the non-parametric Mokken...

  7. Preferential reduction of binding of 125I-iodopindolol to beta-1 adrenoceptors in the amygdala of rat after antidepressant treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordway, G.A.; Gambarana, C.; Tejani-Butt, S.M.; Areso, P.; Hauptmann, M.; Frazer, A.

    1991-01-01

    This study utilized quantitative receptor autoradiography to examine the effects of repeated administration of antidepressants to rats on the binding of the beta adrenoceptor antagonist, 125 I-iodopindolol ( 125 I-IPIN) to either beta-1 or beta-2 adrenoceptors in various regions of brain. Antidepressants were selected to represent various chemical and pharmacological classes including tricyclic compounds (desipramine and protriptyline), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (clorgyline, phenelzine and tranylcypromine), atypical antidepressants (mianserin and trazodone) and selective inhibitors of the uptake of serotonin (citalopram and sertraline). Additionally, rats were treated with various psychotropic drugs that lack antidepressant efficacy (cocaine, deprenyl, diazepam and haloperidol). Repeated treatment of rats with desipramine, protriptyline, clorgyline, phenelzine, tranylcypromine or mianserin reduced the binding of 125 I-IPIN to beta-1 adrenoceptors in many brain areas. Only in the basolateral and lateral nuclei of the amygdala did all six of these antidepressants significantly reduce 125 I-IPIN binding to beta-1 adrenoceptors. In these amygdaloid nuclei, the magnitude of the reduction in the binding of 125 I-IPIN caused by each of these drugs was comparable to or greater than the reduction in binding produced in any other region of brain. Reductions of binding of 125 I-IPIN after antidepressant treatments were not consistently observed in the cortex, the area of brain examined most often in homogenate binding studies. Only the monoamine oxidase inhibitors caused reductions in the binding of 125 I-IPIN to beta-2 adrenoceptors, and this effect was generally localized to the amygdala and hypothalamus

  8. Tianeptine is associated with lower risk of suicidal ideation worsening during the first weeks of treatment onset compared with other antidepressants: A naturalistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, B; Jaussent, I; Gorwood, Ph; Lopez Castroman, J; Olié, E; Guillaume, S; Courtet, Ph

    2018-01-01

    Worsening of suicidal ideation during the first weeks of antidepressant treatment is a poorly understood phenomenon that prompted regulatory bodies to issue specific warnings. To better understand the causes of this phenomenon, this study compared the risk of suicidal ideation worsening in patients taking different types of antidepressant medications. To this aim, 4017 depressed adult outpatients were followed by general practitioners and psychiatrists throughout France for 6 weeks after prescription of an antidepressant treatment. The main study outcomes were to monitor changes (worsening or improvement) in suicidal ideation between baseline (treatment onset) and the study end (week 6) and to determine the remission rates according to the treatment type. Depression severity was assessed with the patient-administered Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and suicidal ideation with the 9-item Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale and the Hopelessness Scale. Use of tianeptine, a mu-opioid receptor agonist was significantly associated with a lower risk of suicidal ideation worsening compared with other antidepressants in the first 6 weeks of treatment. Conversely, remission rates were not significantly affected by the treatment type. Our results highlight a potential interest of opioid agonists to reduce the risk of worsening of suicidal ideation at antidepressant initiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Personality test and prediction of antidepressive treatment effect in mental illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorleifsson, Ari; Holst, Klaus; Diaz, Marta

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The STAR*D project showed that standard treatment of patients with major depression with citalopram resulted in a 36.8% remission in a group of patients. A switch to or supplementing with cognitive therapy substantially increased the remission rate. It would be desirable to identify...

  10. Increased rate of treatment with antidepressants in patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Harhoff, Mette; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2008-01-01

    in patients with multiple sclerosis compared with patients with other chronic illnesses and compared with the general population. By linkage of nationwide case registers, all patients were identified, who had received a main diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or osteoarthritis at first admission or during...... outpatient contact in the period 1995-2000 in Denmark. Rates of subsequent purchase of antidepressants for these patients were calculated. In total, 417 patients with a main diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and 12 127 patients with a main diagnosis of osteoarthritis, at first discharge from hospital...... or outpatient contact, were included. Patients with a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis had a 3.21 [95% confidence intervals (CI): 2.56-4.03] times increased rate of subsequently purchasing antidepressants compared with patients with a first diagnosis of osteoarthritis, and a 4.75 times (95% CI: 3...

  11. Changes in presynaptic release, but not reuptake, of bioamines induced by long-term antidepressant treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolzhenko, A.T.; Komissarov, I.V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation into the effect of long-term administration of antidepressants on neuronal uptake of NA and 5-HT and on their release, induced by electrical stimulation, in rat brain slices. The effects of the test substances on neuronal uptake of 14 C-NA and 3 H-5-HT by the slices was investigated. Values of IC 50 and EC 2 were found and compared in the experiments and control. The inhibitory effect of clonidine (10 -4 M) and of 5-HT (10 -5 M) on presynaptic release of 14 C-NA and 3 H-5-HT also was studied in brain slices from intact rats and rats treated for two weeks with antidepressants

  12. Association of FKBP51 with Priming of Autophagy Pathways and Mediation of Antidepressant Treatment Response: Evidence in Cells, Mice, and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschocke, Jürgen; Stepan, Jens; Hafner, Kathrin; Zellner, Andreas; Kirmeier, Thomas; Kollmannsberger, Lorenz; Wagner, Klaus V.; Dedic, Nina; Balsevich, Georgia; Deussing, Jan M.; Kloiber, Stefan; Lucae, Susanne; Holsboer, Florian; Eder, Matthias; Uhr, Manfred; Ising, Marcus; Schmidt, Mathias V.; Rein, Theo

    2014-01-01

    Background FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP51) is an Hsp90 co-chaperone and regulator of the glucocorticoid receptor, and consequently of stress physiology. Clinical studies suggest a genetic link between FKBP51 and antidepressant response in mood disorders; however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of FKBP51 in the actions of antidepressants, with a particular focus on pathways of autophagy. Methods and Findings Established cell lines, primary neural cells, human blood cells of healthy individuals and patients with depression, and mice were treated with antidepressants. Mice were tested for several neuroendocrine and behavioral parameters. Protein interactions and autophagic pathway activity were mainly evaluated by co-immunoprecipitation and Western blots. We first show that the effects of acute antidepressant treatment on behavior are abolished in FKBP51 knockout (51KO) mice. Autophagic markers, such as the autophagy initiator Beclin1, were increased following acute antidepressant treatment in brains from wild-type, but not 51KO, animals. FKBP51 binds to Beclin1, changes decisive protein interactions and phosphorylation of Beclin1, and triggers autophagic pathways. Antidepressants and FKBP51 exhibited synergistic effects on these pathways. Using chronic social defeat as a depression-relevant stress model in combination with chronic paroxetine (PAR) treatment revealed that the stress response, as well as the effects of antidepressants on behavior and autophagic markers, depends on FKBP51. In human blood cells of healthy individuals, FKBP51 levels correlated with the potential of antidepressants to induce autophagic pathways. Importantly, the clinical antidepressant response of patients with depression (n = 51) could be predicted by the antidepressant response of autophagic markers in patient-derived peripheral blood lymphocytes cultivated and treated ex vivo (Beclin1/amitriptyline: r = 0.572, p

  13. Neurobiological aspects of depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment: role of glia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Páv, M.; Kovářů, H.; Fišerová, Anna; Havrdová, E.; Lisá, Věra

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 2 (2008), s. 151-164 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/05/0267; GA AV ČR IAA500200620 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : major depression * mood disorder * antidepressant Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  14. Antidepressant Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or two, such as: Anxiety Insomnia or vivid dreams Headaches Dizziness Tiredness Irritability Flu-like symptoms, including ... your doctor may prescribe another antidepressant or another type of medication on a short-term basis to ...

  15. Adding antidepressants to antipsychotics for treatment of subsyndromal depressive symptoms in schizophrenia: Impact on positive and negative symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahia, Ipsit V.; Lanouette, Nicole M.; Golshan, Shahrokh; Fellows, Ian; Mohamed, Somaia; Kasckow, John W.; Zisook, Sidney

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: It remains unclear how augmenting anti-psychotic medications with anti-depressants impacts primary positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. In this study, we used data collected from a randomized trial comparing citalopram to placebo for management of subsyndromal depression (SSD) in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, to assess the effects of antidepressant augmentation on positive and negative symptoms. Materials and Methods: Participants in this study conducted at the University of California, San Diego and the University of Cincinnati, were persons with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder aged 40 or older and who met study criteria for SSD. Patients were randomly assigned to flexible-dose treatment with citalopram or placebo augmentation of their current anti-psychotic medication. Analysis of covariance was used to compare changes in positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) scores between treatment groups. We also assessed mediating effects of improvement in depression and moderating effects of multiple factors on positive and negative symptoms. Results: There was significant improvement in PANSS negative symptoms scores in the citalopram group, which was partially mediated by improvement in depressive symptoms. There was no effect on PANSS positive scores. Conclusions: In patients with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder, treating depressive symptoms with citalopram appears to carry the added benefit of improving negative symptoms. PMID:23825848

  16. Comparative benefits and harms of second generation antidepressants and cognitive behavioral therapies in initial treatment of major depressive disorder: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amick, Halle R; Gartlehner, Gerald; Gaynes, Bradley N; Forneris, Catherine; Asher, Gary N; Morgan, Laura C; Coker-Schwimmer, Emmanuel; Boland, Erin; Lux, Linda J; Gaylord, Susan; Bann, Carla; Pierl, Christiane Barbara; Lohr, Kathleen N

    2015-12-08

    What are the benefits and harms of second generation antidepressants and cognitive behavioral therapies (CBTs) in the initial treatment of a current episode of major depressive disorder in adults? This was a systematic review including qualitative assessment and meta-analyses using random and fixed effects models. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, PsycINFO, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched from January 1990 through January 2015. The 11 randomized controlled trials included compared a second generation antidepressant CBT. Ten trials compared antidepressant monotherapy with CBT alone; three compared antidepressant monotherapy with antidepressant plus CBT. Meta-analyses found no statistically significant difference in effectiveness between second generation antidepressants and CBT for response (risk ratio 0.91, 0.77 to 1.07), remission (0.98, 0.73 to 1.32), or change in 17 item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score (weighted mean difference, -0.38, -2.87 to 2.10). Similarly, no significant differences were found in rates of overall study discontinuation (risk ratio 0.90, 0.49 to 1.65) or discontinuation attributable to lack of efficacy (0.40, 0.05 to 2.91). Although more patients treated with a second generation antidepressant than receiving CBT withdrew from studies because of adverse events, the difference was not statistically significant (risk ratio 3.29, 0.42 to 25.72). No conclusions could be drawn about other outcomes because of lack of evidence. Results should be interpreted cautiously given the low strength of evidence for most outcomes. The scope of this review was limited to trials that enrolled adult patients with major depressive disorder and compared a second generation antidepressant with CBT, and many of the included trials had methodological shortcomings that may limit confidence in some of the findings. Second generation antidepressants and CBT

  17. [Treatment of tuberculosis. Current standards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaberg, T

    2015-12-01

    The treatment of drug-sensitive tuberculosis consists of 2 months of isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol, followed by 4 months of isoniazid and rifampin. These drugs are well tolerated and cure rate are above 95 %. In contrast the treatment of drug-resistent tuberculosis is difficult, mostly due to side effects of the drugs used under these circumstances. Therefore, any treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis has to be done by experts.

  18. Demonstrating Test-Retest Reliability of Electrophysiological Measures for Healthy Adults in a Multisite Study of Biomarkers of Antidepressant Treatment Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenke, Craig E.; Kayser, Jürgen; Pechtel, Pia; Webb, Christian A.; Dillon, Daniel G.; Goer, Franziska; Murray, Laura; Deldin, Patricia; Kurian, Benji T.; McGrath, Patrick J.; Parsey, Ramin; Trivedi, Madhukar; Fava, Maurizio; Weissman, Myrna M.; McInnis, Melvin; Abraham, Karen; Alvarenga, Jorge; Alschuler, Daniel M.; Cooper, Crystal; Pizzagalli, Diego A.; Bruder, Gerard E.

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that loudness dependency of auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP) and resting EEG alpha and theta may be biological markers for predicting response to antidepressants. In spite of this promise, little is known about the joint reliability of these markers, and thus their clinical applicability. New, standardized procedures were developed to improve the compatibility of data acquired with different EEG platforms, and used to examine test-retest reliability for the three electrophysiological measures selected for a multisite project—Establishing Moderators and Biosignatures of Antidepressant Response for Clinical Care (EMBARC). Thirty nine healthy controls across four clinical research sites were tested in two sessions separated by about one week. Resting EEG (eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions) was recorded and LDAEP measured using binaural tones (1000 Hz, 40 ms) at five intensities (60–100 dB SPL). Principal components analysis (PCA) of current source density (CSD) waveforms reduced volume conduction and provided reference-free measures of resting EEG alpha and N1 dipole activity to tones from auditory cortex. Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) extracted resting theta current density measures corresponding to rostral anterior cingulate (rACC), which has been implicated in treatment response. There were no significant differences in posterior alpha, N1 dipole or rACC theta across sessions. Test-retest reliability was .84 for alpha, .87 for N1 dipole, and .70 for theta rACC current density. The demonstration of good-to-excellent reliability for these measures provides a template for future EEG/ERP studies from multiple testing sites, and an important step for evaluating them as biomarkers for predicting treatment response. PMID:28000259

  19. Tricyclic Antidepressants and Tetracyclic Antidepressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016. Amoxapine (prescribing information). Verna, Salcette Goa, India: Watson Pharma; 2014. http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_ ... mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/depression/in-depth/antidepressants/ART-20046983 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  20. A pragmatic randomised controlled trial to compare antidepressants with a community-based psychosocial intervention for the treatment of women with postnatal depression: the RESPOND trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, D J; Chew-Graham, C; Tylee, A; Lewis, G; Howard, L; Anderson, I; Abel, K; Turner, K M; Hollinghurst, S P; Tallon, D; McCarthy, A; Peters, T J

    2010-09-01

    antidepressant group, but logistic regression analysis showed no clear benefit for one group over the other [62% versus 51%, OR 1.5 (95% CI 0.8 to 2.6), p = 0.19]. Overall, there was a difference between the groups in favour of the antidepressant group of about 25 percentage points at 4 weeks, which reduced at 18 weeks. No statistical support existed for a benefit of antidepressants at 18 weeks, but 95% CIs could not rule out a clinically important benefit. It was difficult for GPs not to prescribe antidepressants to women randomised to listening visits after the initial 4 weeks, so many women received both interventions in both groups by 18 weeks and consequently power was reduced. Qualitative interviews with women revealed a preference for listening visits but an acceptance that antidepressants might be necessary. They wished to be reassured that their GP and HV were offering continuity of care focusing on their particular set of circumstances. Interviews with GPs and HVs revealed lack of collaboration in managing care for women with PND; neither professional group was willing to assume responsibility. At 4 weeks, antidepressants were significantly superior to general supportive care. Trial design meant that by 18 weeks many of the women initially randomised to listening visits were also receiving antidepressants, and more vice versa. The lack of evidence for differences at 18 weeks is likely to reflect a combination of reduced power and the considerable degree of switching across the two interventions. Qualitative study revealed that women found both antidepressants and listening visits effective depending on their circumstances and preferences. The trial indicates that early treatment with antidepressants leads to clinical benefit for women with PND.

  1. Prevalence of depression, quality of life and antidepressant treatment in the Danish General Suburban Population Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellervik, Christina; Kvetny, Jan; Christensen, Kaj Sparle; Vestergaard, Mogens; Bech, Per

    2014-10-01

    The Danish General Suburban Population Study (GESUS), the objective of which is to facilitate epidemiological and genetic research, has included the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) and the WHO-Five Well-Being Index (WHO-5) among the medical health questionnaires. We were thus in a position to compare the 2-week prevalence of ICD-10 depression in the period from 2010 to 2012 with our previous Danish general population study from 2003, in which the MDI was also included. The aim of our analysis was not only to evaluate the point prevalence of ICD-10 depression but also to describe the prevalence of antidepressants received by the respondents in the GESUS study and the correspondence to their subjective well-being on the WHO-5 questionnaire. To evaluate the validity (scalability) of the MDI and the WHO-5 in the GESUS study we performed the non-parametric Mokken analysis. The scalability of the MDI and the WHO-5 was quite acceptable. In total, 14,787 respondents were available from a response rate of 50%. The 2-week prevalence of ICD-10 depression was 2.3%, which is rather similar to the 2.8% in our 2003 study. The rate of people receiving antidepressants increased consistently with increasing severity of ICD-10 depression. This study has confirmed that the use of the MDI to obtain an ICD-10 depression diagnosis gives rather conservative estimates of the 2-week prevalence of depression in the Danish general population. The prescription of antidepressants depends on the severity of the ICD-10 depression diagnosis.

  2. Association of Antenatal Depression Symptoms and Antidepressant Treatment With Preterm Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Kartik K; Riley, Laura; Castro, Victor M; Perlis, Roy H; Kaimal, Anjali J

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the association of antenatal depression symptoms with preterm birth and small for gestational age (SGA). This was an observational cohort study conducted among women who completed Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale screening and delivered at 20 weeks of gestation or greater. The primary outcomes were preterm birth and an SGA neonate at birth (less than 10th percentile for gestational age); the primary predictor was an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale antepartum score of 10 or greater, indicating symptoms of depression. Logistic regression models were used with and without consideration of antidepressant exposure during pregnancy. Among 7,267 women, 831 (11%) screened positive for depression. In multivariable analyses adjusting for maternal age, race, income, body mass index, tobacco use, lifetime diagnosis of major depression and anxiety, diabetes, hypertension, and preeclampsia, women who screened positive for depression experienced an increased risk of preterm birth (less than 37 weeks of gestation) (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.55) and very preterm birth (less than 32 weeks of gestation) (adjusted OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.09-3.02) as well as of having an SGA neonate (adjusted OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.04-1.58). In secondary analyses, among women who were treated with an antidepressant during pregnancy (19% of those who screened positive and 5% of those who screened negative), depressive symptoms were not associated with a significantly increased risk of preterm and very preterm birth or an SGA neonate. In a large cohort of women screened for depression antepartum, those with depressive symptoms had an increased likelihood of preterm and very preterm delivery as well having an SGA neonate. Such risk was not apparent among women who were treated with an antidepressant medication.

  3. Ketamine: A New Antidepressant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feride Karacaer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Standart antidepressants are needed for the many individuals with major depressive disorder. However they do not respond adequately to treatment and because of a delay of weeks before the emergence of therapeutic effects. Recent studies show that subanesthetic dose of ketamine is efficacy and safety for the treatment of depression. Antidepressant effects of ketamine have been found to be short-lived and its psychotomimetic properties may limit the use of ketamine to depressive patients. Future research studies should focus on identifying predictors of response (pharmalogical and clinical , investigating application of different doses and routes of administration and maintaining antidepressant effect. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(1: 30-40

  4. Antidepressants and Weight Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antidepressants and weight gain: What causes it? Can antidepressants cause weight gain? Answers from Daniel K. Hall- ... is a possible side effect of nearly all antidepressants. However, each person responds to antidepressants differently. Some ...

  5. Mesoporous hydroxyapatite as a carrier of olanzapine for long-acting antidepression treatment in rats with induced depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyong, Yan-Jye; Wang, Mao-Hsien; Kuo, Li-Wei; Su, Chang-Fu; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Chang, Kuo-Chi; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2017-06-10

    An antidepressant carrier, mesoporous hydroxyapatite olanzapine (mesoHAP-OLZ), was designed to maintain 3weeks of constant medication release. The carrier was intramuscularly (IM) injected, where cellular activity played a role in achieving the goal of constant release. The efficiency of the treatment was evaluated from 3 perspectives in in vivo studies: locomotor activities, biomarkers, and learning and memory ability. MesoHAP-OLZ can increase the locomotor activity in rats with induced depression determined by open field test (OFT) and forced swim test (FST). Serotonin (5-HT), one of the most important biomarker in depression can also be increased by mesoHAP-OLZ, leading to increased hippocampus activity as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). MesoHAP-OLZ can also improve learning and memory ability in rats with induced depression during Morris water maze (MWM) test. Our findings further show that mesoHAP-OLZ can provide long-term drug release with a single IM injection, helping to solve the problem of non-adherent medication intake that often occurs in antidepressant therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Kappa opioid receptor antagonism and chronic antidepressant treatment have beneficial activities on social interactions and grooming deficits during heroin abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalanne, L; Ayranci, G; Filliol, D; Gavériaux-Ruff, C; Befort, K; Kieffer, B L; Lutz, P-E

    2017-07-01

    Addiction is a chronic brain disorder that progressively invades all aspects of personal life. Accordingly, addiction to opiates severely impairs interpersonal relationships, and the resulting social isolation strongly contributes to the severity and chronicity of the disease. Uncovering new therapeutic strategies that address this aspect of addiction is therefore of great clinical relevance. We recently established a mouse model of heroin addiction in which, following chronic heroin exposure, 'abstinent' mice progressively develop a strong and long-lasting social avoidance phenotype. Here, we explored and compared the efficacy of two pharmacological interventions in this mouse model. Because clinical studies indicate some efficacy of antidepressants on emotional dysfunction associated with addiction, we first used a chronic 4-week treatment with the serotonergic antidepressant fluoxetine, as a reference. In addition, considering prodepressant effects recently associated with kappa opioid receptor signaling, we also investigated the kappa opioid receptor antagonist norbinaltorphimine (norBNI). Finally, we assessed whether fluoxetine and norBNI could reverse abstinence-induced social avoidance after it has established. Altogether, our results show that two interspaced norBNI administrations are sufficient both to prevent and to reverse social impairment in heroin abstinent animals. Therefore, kappa opioid receptor antagonism may represent a useful approach to alleviate social dysfunction in addicted individuals. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  7. Use of antidepressants in the treatment of major depressive disorder in primary care during a period of economic crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sicras-Mainar A

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antoni Sicras-Mainar,1 Ruth Navarro-Artieda2 1Research Unit, Badalona Serveis Assistencials SA, 2Medical Documentation Unit, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain Objective: To describe antidepressant (AD use in the treatment of major depressive disorder during a period of economic crisis.Patients and methods: This was a retrospective, observational study using population-based databases. Two periods were considered: 1 2008–2009, precrisis, and 2 2012–2013, economic crisis. Certain inclusion/exclusion criteria were taken into account for the study (initiation of AD treatment. Patients were followed up for 12 months. The main measures were use (defined daily doses, epidemiologic measures, strategies used and treatment persistence, referrals, and use of resources. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05.Results: In the precrisis period, 3,662 patients were enrolled, and 5,722 were enrolled in the period of economic crisis. Average age was 58.8 years and 65.4% were women. Comparing the two periods, major depressive disorder prevalence was 5.4% vs 8.1%, P<0.001. During the period of economic crisis, AD use rose by 35.2% and drug expenditures decreased by 38.7%. Defined daily dose per patient per day was 10.0 mg vs 13.5 mg, respectively, P<0.001. At 12-month follow-up, the majority of patients (60.8% discontinued the treatment or continued on the same medication as before, and in 23.3% a change of AD was made.Conclusion: Primary health care professionals are highly involved in the management of the illness; in addition, during the period of economic crisis, patients with major depressive disorder showed higher rates of prevalence of the illness, with increased use of AD drugs. Keywords: consumption, antidepressants, economic crisis

  8. Sertraline: a new antidepressant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auster, R

    1993-08-01

    Sertraline is a serotonin reuptake inhibitor that has been approved for use in the treatment of depression. Its side-effect profile is similar to that of fluoxetine, a drug of the same class. The side effects of these drugs most often affect the gastrointestinal tract. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors are nonsedating and free of cardiac effects; they do not cause hypotension, urinary retention or blurred vision. Sertraline, like fluoxetine, appears to be safer than tricyclic antidepressants in overdose. However, no clinical studies comparing sertraline and fluoxetine have been published. The wholesale cost of a month's supply of sertraline is about $50, compared with about $5 for a generic tricyclic antidepressant. Despite their cost, serotonin uptake inhibitors may be the initial drugs of choice in depressed elderly patients, because these patients are at increased risk for suicide and have a low tolerance for the side effects of tricyclic antidepressants.

  9. From pathophysiology to novel antidepressant drugs: glial contributions to the pathology and treatment of mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanacora, Gerard; Banasr, Mounira

    2013-06-15

    Several structural and cellular changes, including marked glial anomalies, have been observed in association with major depressive disorder. Here we review these cellular alterations and highlight the importance of glial cell pathology, especially astroglial dysfunction, in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders with a particular interest in major depressive disorder. The functional role of astrocytes in glutamate uptake and glutamate/glutamine cycling is discussed, as is the deleterious effects of chronic stress on glial cell function. Lastly, we discuss the effect of antidepressants on glial cell function and the possibility of targeting glial cells in the quest to develop novel therapeutics. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Differential effects of antidepressant treatment on long-range and short-range functional connectivity strength in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jing; Wang, Li; Li, Ke; Zeng, Yawei; Su, Yunai; Jin, Zhen; Yu, Xin; Si, Tianmei

    2017-08-31

    Although we have some basic understanding of the neurochemical mechanisms of the antidepressants, the network-level effect of antidepressant treatment is still not fully understood. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of antidepressant on functional brain networks of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). We performed resting-state fMRI scans on 20 first-episode drug-naive MDD patients at baseline and after escitalopram medication for 8 weeks. Twenty healthy controls also received MRI scans with an 8-week interval. The graph theory indices, long- and short-range functional connectivity strength (FCS), were computed to characterize the brain connectivity. The analysis of covariance was conducted on FCS maps of patients and controls to obtain the interaction effect of group and time, which indicate treatment-related effect. Following treatment, increased long-range FCS in the bilateral posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and right thalamus in MDD patients at baseline were reduced. Meanwhile, increased short-range FCS in the bilateral ventromedial prefrontal cortex and left amygdala in patients were reduced, while reduced short-range FCS in the right parahippocampal gyrus was increased. Results suggest that the brain regions associated with negative emotional processing and regulation, and self-referential function could be modulated by escitalopram treatment; long- and short-range FCS are differentially affected by antidepressant.

  11. Amygdala Reactivity to Emotional Faces in the Prediction of General and Medication-Specific Responses to Antidepressant Treatment in the Randomized iSPOT-D Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Leanne M; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh S; Song, Yun C; Paton, Rebecca; Eagles, Sarah; Goldstein-Piekarski, Andrea; Grieve, Stuart M; Harris, Anthony W F; Usherwood, Tim; Etkin, Amit

    2015-09-01

    Although the cost of poor treatment outcomes of depression is staggering, we do not yet have clinically useful methods for selecting the most effective antidepressant for each depressed person. Emotional brain activation is altered in major depressive disorder (MDD) and implicated in treatment response. Identifying which aspects of emotional brain activation are predictive of general and specific responses to antidepressants may help clinicians and patients when making treatment decisions. We examined whether amygdala activation probed by emotion stimuli is a general or differential predictor of response to three commonly prescribed antidepressants, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). A test-retest design was used to assess patients with MDD in an academic setting as part of the International Study to Predict Optimized Treatment in Depression. A total of 80 MDD outpatients were scanned prior to treatment and 8 weeks after randomization to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors escitalopram and sertraline and the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, venlafaxine-extended release (XR). A total of 34 matched controls were scanned at the same timepoints. We quantified the blood oxygen level-dependent signal of the amygdala during subliminal and supraliminal viewing of facial expressions of emotion. Response to treatment was defined by ⩾50% symptom improvement on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Pre-treatment amygdala hypo-reactivity to subliminal happy and threat was a general predictor of treatment response, regardless of medication type (Cohen's d effect size 0.63 to 0.77; classification accuracy, 75%). Responders showed hypo-reactivity compared to controls at baseline, and an increase toward 'normalization' post-treatment. Pre-treatment amygdala reactivity to subliminal sadness was a differential moderator of non-response to venlafaxine-XR (Cohen's d effect size 1.5; classification accuracy, 81%). Non-responders to

  12. Effects of Antidepressants on Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichniak, Adam; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Walęcka, Małgorzata; Jernajczyk, Wojciech

    2017-08-09

    The aim of this review article was to summarize recent publications on effects of antidepressants on sleep and to show that these effects not only depend on the kind of antidepressant drugs but are also related to the dose, the time of drug administration, and the duration of the treatment. Complaints of disrupted sleep are very common in patients suffering from depression, and they are listed among diagnostic criteria for this disorder. Moreover, midnocturnal insomnia is the most frequent residual symptom of depression. Thus, all antidepressants should normalize sleep. However, at least in short-term treatment, many antidepressants with so-called activating effects (e.g. fluoxetine, venlafaxine) may disrupt sleep, while others with sedative properties (e.g., doxepin, mirtazapine, trazodone) rapidly improve sleep, but may cause problems in long-term treatment due to oversedation.For sleep-promoting action, the best effects can frequently be achieved with a very low dose, administered early enough before bedtime and importantly, always as a part of more complex interventions based on the cognitive-behavioral protocol to treat insomnia (CBT-I). For successful treatment of depression, it is necessary to understand the effects of antidepressants on sleep. Each physician should also be aware that some antidepressants may worsen or induce primary sleep disorders like restless legs syndrome, sleep bruxism, REM sleep behavior disorder, nightmares, and sleep apnea, which may result from an antidepressant-induced weight gain.

  13. Preferential reduction of binding of sup 125 I-iodopindolol to beta-1 adrenoceptors in the amygdala of rat after antidepressant treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordway, G.A.; Gambarana, C.; Tejani-Butt, S.M.; Areso, P.; Hauptmann, M.; Frazer, A. (Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1991-05-01

    This study utilized quantitative receptor autoradiography to examine the effects of repeated administration of antidepressants to rats on the binding of the beta adrenoceptor antagonist, {sup 125}I-iodopindolol ({sup 125}I-IPIN) to either beta-1 or beta-2 adrenoceptors in various regions of brain. Antidepressants were selected to represent various chemical and pharmacological classes including tricyclic compounds (desipramine and protriptyline), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (clorgyline, phenelzine and tranylcypromine), atypical antidepressants (mianserin and trazodone) and selective inhibitors of the uptake of serotonin (citalopram and sertraline). Additionally, rats were treated with various psychotropic drugs that lack antidepressant efficacy (cocaine, deprenyl, diazepam and haloperidol). Repeated treatment of rats with desipramine, protriptyline, clorgyline, phenelzine, tranylcypromine or mianserin reduced the binding of {sup 125}I-IPIN to beta-1 adrenoceptors in many brain areas. Only in the basolateral and lateral nuclei of the amygdala did all six of these antidepressants significantly reduce {sup 125}I-IPIN binding to beta-1 adrenoceptors. In these amygdaloid nuclei, the magnitude of the reduction in the binding of {sup 125}I-IPIN caused by each of these drugs was comparable to or greater than the reduction in binding produced in any other region of brain. Reductions of binding of {sup 125}I-IPIN after antidepressant treatments were not consistently observed in the cortex, the area of brain examined most often in homogenate binding studies. Only the monoamine oxidase inhibitors caused reductions in the binding of {sup 125}I-IPIN to beta-2 adrenoceptors, and this effect was generally localized to the amygdala and hypothalamus.

  14. Switching antidepressants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    depressive disorder, with response rates of 50-60%. Switching within or between classes of antidepressants is often required in patients with an insufficient response to SSRIs.12 Because they share a similar mechanism of action, the immediate substitution of one SSRI for another is probably the easiest switching option.

  15. Evaluation of the antidepressant activity of methanol extract and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antidepressant activity of the methanol extract, aqueous and chloroform fractions was evaluated using the forced swim and tail suspension tests at doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg with imipramine (15 mg/kg) as the standard drug. Changes in body weights and organ weight ratio were also evaluated following treatment with ...

  16. Effects of antidepressant drugs on sexual function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, D S; Thomas, S C; Birtwistle, J

    1997-01-01

    Adequate sexual expression is an essential part of human relationships, enhancing quality of life and providing a sense of physical, psychological and social well-being. Unfortunately, depression is associated with impairments of sexual function and satisfaction. These problems can worsen a quality of life that is already reduced by the effects of depressive illness. The existing antidepressant drugs are far from ideal, most having adverse effects on sexual function. Unfortunately, the exact incidence of sexual dysfunction during treatment with many antidepressants is not known. Disturbances of sexual interest and performance will only be detected in a reliable fashion when systematic enquiries are made during the course of the standard clinical interview. Growing awareness of the adverse effects of many antidepressants on sexual function has led to some re-evaluation of the earlier claims for the good tolerability of many of the newer drugs. There is a clear need for further well-designed controlled studies of the effects of antidepressants on sexual function, so that this aspect of the tolerability of differing drugs can be assessed more reliably. (IntJ Psych Clin Pract 1997; 1: 47-58).

  17. Personality test and prediction of antidepressive treatment effect in mental illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorleifsson, Ari; Holst, Klaus; Diaz, Marta

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The STAR*D project showed that standard treatment of patients with major depression with citalopram resulted in a 36.8% remission in a group of patients. A switch to or supplementing with cognitive therapy substantially increased the remission rate. It would be desirable to identify...... in advance those patients in whom adjuvant therapy would be of a special benefit. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Answers to questions about personality traits (Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI)) were gathered from a mixed group of hospitalized and ambulant Danish psychiatric patients (n = 63) and matched...... with answers to questions on quality of life and degree of depression (Major Depression Inventory (MDI)). The hospitalized patients answered those questions again when discharged. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate the quality of the questions with regard to their information on latent...

  18. Antidepressant activity of anti-cytokine treatment: a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials of chronic inflammatory conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Kappelmann, Nils; Lewis, Glyn; Dantzer, Robert; Jones, Peter Brian; Khandaker, Golam Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are commonly elevated in acute depression and are associated with resistance to monoaminergic treatment. To examine the potential role of cytokines in the pathogenesis and treatment of depression, we carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of antidepressant activity of anti-cytokine treatment using clinical trials of chronic inflammatory conditions where depressive symptoms were measured as a secondary outcome. Systematic search of the PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO...

  19. Antidepressants and the risk of hyponatremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Møller, Katja Biering; Hansen, Annette Højmann; Torstensson, Maia

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between classes of antidepressants and hyponatremia, and between specific antidepressants and hyponatremia. DESIGN: Retrospective register-based cohort study using nationwide registers from 1998 to 2012. SETTING: The North Denmark Region. PARTICIPANTS: In total....../L. The association between use of specific antidepressants and hyponatremia was analysed using multivariable Poisson regression models. RESULTS: An event of hyponatremia occurred in 72 509 individuals and 11.36% (n=6476) of these events happened during treatment with antidepressants. Incidence rate ratios and CIs.......14). CONCLUSIONS: All antidepressants except mianserin are associated with hyponatremia. The association is strongest with citalopram and lowest with duloxetine, venlafaxine and mirtazapine....

  20. Association of FKBP51 with priming of autophagy pathways and mediation of antidepressant treatment response: evidence in cells, mice, and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils C Gassen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP51 is an Hsp90 co-chaperone and regulator of the glucocorticoid receptor, and consequently of stress physiology. Clinical studies suggest a genetic link between FKBP51 and antidepressant response in mood disorders; however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of FKBP51 in the actions of antidepressants, with a particular focus on pathways of autophagy.Established cell lines, primary neural cells, human blood cells of healthy individuals and patients with depression, and mice were treated with antidepressants. Mice were tested for several neuroendocrine and behavioral parameters. Protein interactions and autophagic pathway activity were mainly evaluated by co-immunoprecipitation and Western blots. We first show that the effects of acute antidepressant treatment on behavior are abolished in FKBP51 knockout (51KO mice. Autophagic markers, such as the autophagy initiator Beclin1, were increased following acute antidepressant treatment in brains from wild-type, but not 51KO, animals. FKBP51 binds to Beclin1, changes decisive protein interactions and phosphorylation of Beclin1, and triggers autophagic pathways. Antidepressants and FKBP51 exhibited synergistic effects on these pathways. Using chronic social defeat as a depression-relevant stress model in combination with chronic paroxetine (PAR treatment revealed that the stress response, as well as the effects of antidepressants on behavior and autophagic markers, depends on FKBP51. In human blood cells of healthy individuals, FKBP51 levels correlated with the potential of antidepressants to induce autophagic pathways. Importantly, the clinical antidepressant response of patients with depression (n = 51 could be predicted by the antidepressant response of autophagic markers in patient-derived peripheral blood lymphocytes cultivated and treated ex vivo (Beclin1/amitriptyline: r = 0.572, p = 0.003; Beclin1/PAR: r

  1. Temporal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA in the rat hippocampus after treatment with selective and mixed monoaminergic antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Marianne Hald; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Rønn, Lars Christian B

    2008-01-01

    Strong evidence suggests that antidepressants work by induction of neuroplastic changes mediated through regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). This study was undertaken to investigate the time-course of the effect of three antidepressants; fluoxetine, imipramine and venlafaxine...... treatment with venlafaxine (7, 14 and 21 days) and imipramine (14 and 21 days), but not after treatment with fluoxetine, indicating that stimulation of BDNF mRNA expression is dependent on the pharmacological profile and on the time-course of drug treatment. A transient increase in synaptophysin m......RNA was observed after treatment with venlafaxine and fluoxetine whereas imipramine had no effect. In the CA3 region a reduction of GAP-43 mRNA was observed after treatment with imipramine (21 days) and fluoxetine (7 and 14 days). These results suggest that venlafaxine and imipramine, but not fluoxetine, induce...

  2. Treatment with high-dose antidepressants severely exacerbates the pathological outcome of experimental Escherichia coli infections in poultry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Kromann

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need for novel antibiotics as the current antibiotics are losing their value due to increased resistance among clinically important bacteria. Sertraline, an on-marked anti-depressive drug, has been shown to modify bacterial activity in vitro, including increasing the susceptibility of Escherichia coli to antibiotics. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the antimicrobial activity of sertraline could be documented under clinical settings, hereunder if sertraline could potentiate the effect of tetracycline in treatment of an experimentally induced ascending infection in poultry. A total of 40 chickens were divided in four groups of 10 chickens each. All chickens were challenged with 4x103 colony forming units (CFU of a tetracycline resistant E. coli strain using a surgical infection model, and subsequently treated with either high-dose sertraline, tetracycline, a combination hereof or received no treatment. Seven days post challenge all birds were submitted to necropsy and scored pathologically for lesions. The average lesion scores were significantly higher (P<0.05 in the groups that were treated with high-dose sertraline or high-dose sertraline combined with tetracycline. In conclusion high-dose treatments (four times the maximum therapeutic dose for treating human depression with sertraline as an adjuvant for treatment of antibiotic resistant E. coli infections exacerbate the pathological outcome of infection in chickens.

  3. Recent advances in predicting responses to antidepressant treatment [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Frodl

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder is one of the leading causes of disability in the world since depression is highly frequent and causes a strong burden. In order to reduce the duration of depressive episodes, clinicians would need to choose the most effective therapy for each individual right away. A prerequisite for this would be to have biomarkers at hand that would predict which individual would benefit from which kind of therapy (for example, pharmacotherapy or psychotherapy or even from which kind of antidepressant class. In the past, neuroimaging, electroencephalogram, genetic, proteomic, and inflammation markers have been under investigation for their utility to predict targeted therapies. The present overview demonstrates recent advances in all of these different methodological areas and concludes that these approaches are promising but also that the aim to have such a marker available has not yet been reached. For example, the integration of markers from different systems needs to be achieved. With ongoing advances in the accuracy of sensing techniques and improvement of modelling approaches, this challenge might be achievable.

  4. 24 CFR 35.1335 - Standard treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Lead-Paint Hazard Evaluation and Hazard Reduction Activities § 35.1335 Standard treatments. Standard..., such as metal coil stock, plastic, polyurethane, or linoleum. (c) Correcting dust-generating conditions... incorporate the use of safe work practices in accordance with § 35.1350. (f) Clearance. A clearance...

  5. Adverse reactions to antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uher, Rudolf; Farmer, Anne; Henigsberg, Neven

    2009-01-01

    (74%), constipation (33%) and weight gain (15%) were associated with nortriptyline treatment. Diarrhoea (9%), insomnia (36%) and yawning (16%) were more common during treatment with escitalopram. Problems with urination and drowsiness predicted discontinuation of nortriptyline. Diarrhoea and decreased......Background: Adverse drug reactions are important determinants of non-adherence to antidepressant treatment, but their assessment is complicated by overlap with depressive symptoms and lack of reliable self-report measures. Aims: To evaluate a simple self-report measure and describe adverse...... comparing escitalopram and nortriptyline. Results: There was good agreement between self-report and psychiatrists' ratings. Most complaints listed as adverse reactions in people with depression were more common when they were medication-free rather than during their treatment with antidepressants. Dry mouth...

  6. Use of antidepressants in the treatment of major depressive disorder in primary care during a period of economic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicras-Mainar, Antoni; Navarro-Artieda, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    To describe antidepressant (AD) use in the treatment of major depressive disorder during a period of economic crisis. This was a retrospective, observational study using population-based databases. Two periods were considered: 1) 2008-2009, precrisis, and 2) 2012-2013, economic crisis. Certain inclusion/exclusion criteria were taken into account for the study (initiation of AD treatment). Patients were followed up for 12 months. The main measures were use (defined daily doses), epidemiologic measures, strategies used and treatment persistence, referrals, and use of resources. Statistical significance was set at Peconomic crisis. Average age was 58.8 years and 65.4% were women. Comparing the two periods, major depressive disorder prevalence was 5.4% vs 8.1%, Peconomic crisis, AD use rose by 35.2% and drug expenditures decreased by 38.7%. Defined daily dose per patient per day was 10.0 mg vs 13.5 mg, respectively, Peconomic crisis, patients with major depressive disorder showed higher rates of prevalence of the illness, with increased use of AD drugs.

  7. A retrospective study of predictive factors for effective aripiprazole augmentation of antidepressant therapy in treatment-resistant depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugawara H

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hiroko Sugawara,1,2 Kaoru Sakamoto,1 Tsuyoto Harada,3 Satoru Shimizu,4 Jun Ishigooka1 1Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, 2Support Center for Women Health Care Professionals and Researchers, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Shinjuku-ku, 3Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Women’s Medical University Medical Center East, Arakawa-ku, 4Department of Research, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan Background: Several studies have evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of aripiprazole for augmentation of antidepressant therapy for treatment-resistant depression (TRD. Here, we investigated the efficacy of aripiprazole augmentation for TRD including both major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder and the clinical predictors of treatment efficacy in a Japanese population.  Methods: Eighty-five depressed Japanese patients who underwent aripiprazole augmentation therapy after failing to respond satisfactorily to antidepressant monotherapy were included in the study. Treatment responses were evaluated based on Clinical Global Impression Improvement scores assessed 8 weeks after initiation of aripiprazole administration. We compared demographic and diagnostic variables, psychiatric medication variables, and clinical variables between remission and nonremission groups.  Results: The aripiprazole augmentation remission rate was 36.5%. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that aripiprazole augmentation was significantly more effective for bipolar depression than for major depressive disorder, and both absence of comorbid anxiety disorders and current episode duration >3 months were significantly associated with the efficacy of aripiprazole augmentation.  Conclusion: Polarity of depression, comorbidity of anxiety disorders, and current episode duration may predict the efficacy of aripiprazole augmentation for TRD including both major depressive disorder and

  8. Refining cost-effectiveness analyses using the net benefit approach and econometric methods: an example from a trial of anti-depressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabes-Figuera, Ramon; McCrone, Paul; Kendricks, Antony

    2013-04-01

    Economic evaluation analyses can be enhanced by employing regression methods, allowing for the identification of important sub-groups and to adjust for imperfect randomisation in clinical trials or to analyse non-randomised data. To explore the benefits of combining regression techniques and the standard Bayesian approach to refine cost-effectiveness analyses using data from randomised clinical trials. Data from a randomised trial of anti-depressant treatment were analysed and a regression model was used to explore the factors that have an impact on the net benefit (NB) statistic with the aim of using these findings to adjust the cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Exploratory sub-samples' analyses were carried out to explore possible differences in cost-effectiveness. Results The analysis found that having suffered a previous similar depression is strongly correlated with a lower NB, independent of the outcome measure or follow-up point. In patients with previous similar depression, adding an selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) to supportive care for mild-to-moderate depression is probably cost-effective at the level used by the English National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence to make recommendations. This analysis highlights the need for incorporation of econometric methods into cost-effectiveness analyses using the NB approach.

  9. Ozone oxidation of antidepressants in wastewater –Treatment evaluation and characterization of new by-products by LC-QToFMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lajeunesse André

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fate of 14 antidepressants along with their respective N-desmethyl metabolites and the anticonvulsive drug carbamazepine was examined in a primary sewage treatment plant (STP and following advanced treatments with ozone (O3. The concentrations of each pharmaceutical compound were determined in raw sewage, effluent and sewage sludge samples by LC-MS/MS analysis. The occurrence of antidepressant by-products formed in treated effluent after ozonation was also investigated. Results Current primary treatments using physical and chemical processes removed little of the compounds (mean removal efficiency: 19%. Experimental sorption coefficients (Kd of each studied compounds were also calculated. Sorption of venlafaxine, desmethylvenlafaxine, and carbamazepine on sludge was assumed to be negligible (log Kd ≤ 2, but higher sorption behavior can be expected for sertraline (log Kd ≥ 4. Ozonation treatment with O3 (5 mg/L led to a satisfactory mean removal efficiency of 88% of the compounds. Screening of the final ozone-treated effluent samples by high resolution-mass spectrometry (LC-QqToFMS did confirm the presence of related N-oxide by-products. Conclusion Effluent ozonation led to higher mean removal efficiencies than current primary treatment, and therefore represented a promising strategy for the elimination of antidepressants in urban wastewaters. However, the use of O3 produced by-products with unknown toxicity.

  10. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of antidepressants in primary care: a multiple treatment comparison meta-analysis and cost-effectiveness model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joakim Ramsberg

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine effectiveness and cost-effectiveness over a one-year time horizon of pharmacological first line treatment in primary care for patients with moderate to severe depression. DESIGN: A multiple treatment comparison meta-analysis was employed to determine the relative efficacy in terms of remission of 10 antidepressants (citalopram, duloxetine escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine mirtazapine, paroxetine, reboxetine, sertraline and venlafaxine. The estimated remission rates were then applied in a decision-analytic model in order to estimate costs and quality of life with different treatments at one year. DATA SOURCES: Meta-analyses of remission rates from randomised controlled trials, and cost and quality-of-life data from published sources. RESULTS: The most favourable pharmacological treatment in terms of remission was escitalopram with an 8- to 12-week probability of remission of 0.47. Despite a high acquisition cost, this clinical effectiveness translated into escitalopram being both more effective and having a lower total cost than all other comparators from a societal perspective. From a healthcare perspective, the cost per QALY of escitalopram was €3732 compared with venlafaxine. CONCLUSION: Of the investigated antidepressants, escitalopram has the highest probability of remission and is the most effective and cost-effective pharmacological treatment in a primary care setting, when evaluated over a one year time-horizon. Small differences in remission rates may be important when assessing costs and cost-effectiveness of antidepressants.

  11. Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Antidepressants in Primary Care: A Multiple Treatment Comparison Meta-Analysis and Cost-Effectiveness Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsberg, Joakim; Asseburg, Christian; Henriksson, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine effectiveness and cost-effectiveness over a one-year time horizon of pharmacological first line treatment in primary care for patients with moderate to severe depression. Design A multiple treatment comparison meta-analysis was employed to determine the relative efficacy in terms of remission of 10 antidepressants (citalopram, duloxetine escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine mirtazapine, paroxetine, reboxetine, sertraline and venlafaxine). The estimated remission rates were then applied in a decision-analytic model in order to estimate costs and quality of life with different treatments at one year. Data Sources Meta-analyses of remission rates from randomised controlled trials, and cost and quality-of-life data from published sources. Results The most favourable pharmacological treatment in terms of remission was escitalopram with an 8- to 12-week probability of remission of 0.47. Despite a high acquisition cost, this clinical effectiveness translated into escitalopram being both more effective and having a lower total cost than all other comparators from a societal perspective. From a healthcare perspective, the cost per QALY of escitalopram was €3732 compared with venlafaxine. Conclusion Of the investigated antidepressants, escitalopram has the highest probability of remission and is the most effective and cost-effective pharmacological treatment in a primary care setting, when evaluated over a one year time-horizon. Small differences in remission rates may be important when assessing costs and cost-effectiveness of antidepressants. PMID:22876296

  12. Combination antidepressants - use by GPs and psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horgan, David; Dodd, Seetal

    2011-06-01

    Current treatment of depression fails to achieve remission in 50% of patients. Combinations of two antidepressants are used by some Australian psychiatrists. This article investigates the pros and cons of combination antidepressant therapy and provides suggestions for when to consider their use, which combinations to choose, and how to introduce combination antidepressant therapies. Combining two antidepressants is a controversial strategy, with supporters and critics arguing its efficacy and safety from opposing perspectives. The use of combination antidepressant therapies may facilitate remission from depression. However, there is limited evidence supporting these treatments, and safety concerns are often cited. There is some support for combination therapies in selected cases from international bodies. After considering risks and benefits on a case-by-case basis, careful use of selected combination antidepressant therapy may be one of a range of effective treatments for some individuals suffering from depression.

  13. COMPLIANCE TO LONG-TERM TREATMENT OF CARDIOLOGIC PATIENTS WITH MILD TO MODERATE DEPRESSION: INEFFECTIVENESS OF ANTIDEPRESSIVE THERAPY WITH PIRLINDOL IN RANDOMIZED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Strokova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the influence of antidepressant therapy with pirlindol on compliance to the long-term treatment and quality of life in patients with cardiovascular diseases and mild to moderate depression. Material and methods. 61 patients with cardiovascular diseases and mild to moderate depression (according to Beck depression scale were randomized into two groups. Patients of intervention group received pirlindol, while patients of control group did not receive this drug. Compliance to cardiovascular and antidepressant treatment were estimated in 3 and 6 months. Adverse reactions and patients self-assessment of their well-being and global satisfaction in treatmen were also registered.  Results. 24 (75%, 2 (6% and 0 patients of intervention group continue pirlindol treatment in 1, 3 and 6 months, respectively. In 3 months of observation patients of intervention group took drugs for cardiovascular diseases more often than these in control group (81% vs 72%, respectively , р<0.05, they also less frequently showed adverse reactions (56% vs 72%, respectively ,p=0.01 and more often — improvement of their well-being (65% vs 50%, respectively , р=0.03. Compliance to cardiovascular therapy did not differ significantly in patients of both groups by the end the study.  Conclusion. Antidepressant therapy with pirlindol did not influence compliance to long-term cardiovascular treatment in patients with cardiovascular diseases and mild to moderate depression, apparently because of low compliance to pirlindol therapy.

  14. Burnout as a risk factor for antidepressant treatment - a repeated measures time-to-event analysis of 2936 Danish human service workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida E H; Lange, Theis; Borritz, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Burnout is a state of emotional exhaustion, feelings of reduced personal accomplishment, and withdrawal from work thought to occur as a consequence of prolonged occupational stress. The condition is not included in the diagnostic classifications, but is considered likely to develop into depressive...... disorder in some cases. We examined the prospective association between burnout and antidepressant treatment, as an indicator of clinically significant mental disorder. We further investigated potential effect-modifiers of the association, to identify factors that may prevent this progression of burnout...... modeling, examining the risk of entering antidepressant treatment in relation to the level of work-related burnout measured by the Copenhagen Burnout inventory. As effect-modifiers we examined both sociodemographic factors and a range of psychosocial work environment factors. The level of burnout predicted...

  15. Functional Connectivity of the Subcallosal Cingulate Cortex And Differential Outcomes to Treatment With Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy or Antidepressant Medication for Major Depressive Disorder.

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    Dunlop, Boadie W; Rajendra, Justin K; Craighead, W Edward; Kelley, Mary E; McGrath, Callie L; Choi, Ki Sueng; Kinkead, Becky; Nemeroff, Charles B; Mayberg, Helen S

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to inform the first-line treatment choice between cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or an antidepressant medication for treatment-naive adults with major depressive disorder by defining a neuroimaging biomarker that differentially identifies the outcomes of remission and treatment failure to these interventions. Functional MRI resting-state functional connectivity analyses using a bilateral subcallosal cingulate cortex (SCC) seed was applied to 122 patients from the Prediction of Remission to Individual and Combined Treatments (PReDICT) study who completed 12 weeks of randomized treatment with CBT or antidepressant medication. Of the 122 participants, 58 achieved remission (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HAM-D] score ≤7 at weeks 10 and 12), and 24 had treatment failure (CBT and antidepressant medication and survived application of the subsample permutation tests: the left anterior ventrolateral prefrontal cortex/insula, the dorsal midbrain, and the left ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Using the summed SCC functional connectivity scores for these three regions, overall classification rates of 72%-78% for remission and 75%-89% for treatment failure was demonstrated. Positive summed functional connectivity was associated with remission with CBT and treatment failure with medication, whereas negative summed functional connectivity scores were associated with remission to medication and treatment failure with CBT. Imaging-based depression subtypes defined using resting-state functional connectivity differentially identified an individual's probability of remission or treatment failure with first-line treatment options for major depression. This biomarker should be explored in future research through prospective testing and as a component of multivariate treatment prediction models.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of collaborative care including PST and an antidepressant treatment algorithm for the treatment of major depressive disorder in primary care; a randomised clinical trial

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    Beekman Aartjan TF

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depressive disorder is currently one of the most burdensome disorders worldwide. Evidence-based treatments for depressive disorder are already available, but these are used insufficiently, and with less positive results than possible. Earlier research in the USA has shown good results in the treatment of depressive disorder based on a collaborative care approach with Problem Solving Treatment and an antidepressant treatment algorithm, and research in the UK has also shown good results with Problem Solving Treatment. These treatment strategies may also work very well in the Netherlands too, even though health care systems differ between countries. Methods/design This study is a two-armed randomised clinical trial, with randomization on patient-level. The aim of the trial is to evaluate the treatment of depressive disorder in primary care in the Netherlands by means of an adapted collaborative care framework, including contracting and adherence-improving strategies, combined with Problem Solving Treatment and antidepressant medication according to a treatment algorithm. Forty general practices will be randomised to either the intervention group or the control group. Included will be patients who are diagnosed with moderate to severe depression, based on DSM-IV criteria, and stratified according to comorbid chronic physical illness. Patients in the intervention group will receive treatment based on the collaborative care approach, and patients in the control group will receive care as usual. Baseline measurements and follow up measures (3, 6, 9 and 12 months are assessed using questionnaires and an interview. The primary outcome measure is severity of depressive symptoms, according to the PHQ9. Secondary outcome measures are remission as measured with the PHQ9 and the IDS-SR, and cost-effectiveness measured with the TiC-P, the EQ-5D and the SF-36. Discussion In this study, an American model to enhance care for patients with a

  17. Elevated stress-hemoconcentration in major depression is normalized by antidepressant treatment: secondary analysis from a randomized, double-blind clinical trial and relevance to cardiovascular disease risk.

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    Ma-Li Wong

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD; the presence of MDD symptoms in patients with CVD is associated with a higher incidence of cardiac complications following acute myocardial infarction (MI. Stress-hemoconcentration, a result of psychological stress that might be a risk factor for the pathogenesis of CVD, has been studied in stress-challenge paradigms but has not been systematically studied in MDD.Secondary analysis of stress hemoconcentration was performed on data from controls and subjects with mild to moderate MDD participating in an ongoing pharmacogenetic study of antidepressant treatment response to desipramine or fluoxetine. Hematologic and hemorheologic measures of stress-hemoconcentration included blood cell counts, hematocrit, hemoglobin, total serum protein, and albumin, and whole blood viscosity.Subjects with mild to moderate MDD had significantly increased hemorheologic measures of stress-hemoconcentration and blood viscosity when compared to controls; these measures were correlated with depression severity. Measures of stress-hemoconcentration improved significantly after 8 weeks of antidepressant treatment. Improvements in white blood cell count, red blood cell measures and plasma volume were correlated with decreased severity of depression.Our secondary data analyses support that stress-hemoconcentration, possibly caused by decrements in plasma volume during psychological stress, is present in Mexican-American subjects with mild to moderate MDD at non-challenged baseline conditions. We also found that after antidepressant treatment hemorheologic measures of stress-hemoconcentration are improved and are correlated with improvement of depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that antidepressant treatment may have a positive impact in CVD by ameliorating increased blood viscosity. Physicians should be aware of the potential impact of measures of hemoconcentration and

  18. Robust and Sustained Effect of Ketamine Infusions Coadministered with Conventional Antidepressants in a Patient with Refractory Major Depression

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    José Manuel Montes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antidepressant treatments show low capacity to achieve full clinical remissions. Electroconvulsive therapy is an alternative treatment which has been shown to be more effective but it is not well tolerated and there are concerns regarding its safety. We present the case of a patient with resistant depression and modest and transient response to ECT and who showed a robust and maintained response after six i.v. ketamine (0.5 mg/kg infusions without withdrawing her antidepressant regimen. Ketamine was very well tolerated. This case illustrates the potential role of ketamine as a booster to standard antidepressants.

  19. Role of anti-depressant fluoxetine in the puva treatment of psoriasis vulgaris

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    Mitra A

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Severity of psoriasis vulgaris is known to be modified by psychological stress. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of fluoxetine in the PU VA treatment of psoriasis. Twenty patients with progressive disease having more than thirty per cent body area involvement were included in a randomized, double blinded, placebo- controlled, age and sex matched study. All patients were on PUVA treatment, half of patients were given fluoxetine 20 mgs daily whereas the ten were given placebo. Assessment was done by Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI scoring after every 5 exposures of PUVA treatment till 20 treatments. All ten patients who took fluoxetine along with PUVA treatment showed better response and quicker remission. Fluoxetine may be used as an adjuvant in PUVA treatment of psoriasis.

  20. Gene expression profile analysis of genes in rat hippocampus from antidepressant treated rats using DNA microarray

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    Shin Minkyu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular and biological mechanisms by which many antidepressants function are based on the monoamine depletion hypothesis. However, the entire cascade of mechanisms responsible for the therapeutic effect of antidepressants has not yet been elucidated. Results We used a genome-wide microarray system containing 30,000 clones to evaluate total RNA that had been isolated from the brains of treated rats to identify the genes involved in the therapeutic mechanisms of various antidepressants, a tricyclic antidepressant (imipramine. a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine, a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (phenelzine and psychoactive herbal extracts of Nelumbinis Semen (NS. To confirm the differential expression of the identified genes, we analyzed the amount of mRNA that was isolated from the hippocampus of rats that had been treated with antidepressants by real-time RT-PCR using primers specific for selected genes of interest. These data demonstrate that antidepressants interfere with the expression of a large array of genes involved in signaling, survival and protein metabolism, suggesting that the therapeutic effect of these antidepressants is very complex. Surprisingly, unlike other antidepressants, we found that the standardized herbal medicine, Nelumbinis Semen, is free of factors that can induce neurodegenerative diseases such as caspase 8, α-synuclein, and amyloid precursor protein. In addition, the production of the inflammatory cytokine, IFNγ, was significantly decreased in rat hippocampus in response to treatment with antidepressants, while the inhibitory cytokine, TGFβ, was significantly enhanced. Conclusions These results suggest that antidepressants function by regulating neurotransmission as well as suppressing immunoreactivity in the central nervous system.

  1. Role of anti-depressant fluoxetine in the puva treatment of psoriasis vulgaris

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    Mitra A

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Severity of Psoriasis Vulgaris is known to be modified by psychological stress. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of Fluoxetine in the PUVA treatment of Psoriasis. Twenty patients with progressive disease having more than thirty per cent body area involvement were included in a randomized, double blinded, placebo-controlled, age and sex matched study. All patients were on PUVAtreatment; half of the patients were given Fluoxetine 20 mgms daily whereas the other ten were given placebo. Assessment was done by Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI scoring after every 5 exposures of PUVA treatment till 20 treatments. All ten patients who took Fluoxetine along with PUVA treatment showed better response and quicker remission. Fluoxetine may be used as an adjuvant in PUVA treatment of Psoriasis.

  2. Antidepressants versus placebo for panic disorder in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bighelli, Irene; Castellazzi, Mariasole; Cipriani, Andrea; Girlanda, Francesca; Guaiana, Giuseppe; Koesters, Markus; Turrini, Giulia; Furukawa, Toshi A; Barbui, Corrado

    2018-04-05

    ) allocating adults with panic disorder to antidepressants or placebo. Two review authors independently checked eligibility and extracted data using a standard form. We entered data into Review Manager 5 using a double-check procedure. Information extracted included study characteristics, participant characteristics, intervention details and settings. Primary outcomes included failure to respond, measured by a range of response scales, and treatment acceptability, measured by total number of dropouts for any reason. Secondary outcomes included failure to remit, panic symptom scales, frequency of panic attacks, agoraphobia, general anxiety, depression, social functioning, quality of life and patient satisfaction, measured by various scales as defined in individual studies. We used GRADE to assess the quality of the evidence for each outcome MAIN RESULTS: Forty-one unique RCTs including 9377 participants overall, of whom we included 8252 in the 49 placebo-controlled arms of interest (antidepressant as monotherapy and placebo alone) in this review. The majority of studies were of moderate to low quality due to inconsistency, imprecision and unclear risk of selection and performance bias.We found low-quality evidence that revealed a benefit for antidepressants as a group in comparison with placebo in terms of efficacy measured as failure to respond (risk ratio (RR) 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66 to 0.79; participants = 6500; studies = 30). The magnitude of effect corresponds to a number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) of 7 (95% CI 6 to 9): that means seven people would need to be treated with antidepressants in order for one to benefit. We observed the same finding when classes of antidepressants were compared with placebo.Moderate-quality evidence suggested a benefit for antidepressants compared to placebo when looking at number of dropouts due to any cause (RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.81 to 0.97; participants = 7850; studies = 30). The magnitude of

  3. Antidepressant prescribing in five European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbing-Karahagopian, V; Huerta, C; Souverein, P C

    2014-01-01

    , sex, antidepressant type (selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors [SSRIs] or tricyclic antidepressants [TCAs]) and major indications. RESULTS: The age- and sex-standardized prevalence was lowest in the two Dutch (391 and 429 users per 10,000 PYs) and highest in the two UK (913 and 936 users per 10...

  4. The effect of combined treatment with risperidone and antidepressants on the MK-801-induced deficits in the social interaction test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, Katarzyna; Rogóż, Zofia

    2015-12-01

    Several clinical reports have suggested that augmentation of atypical antipsychotics' activity by antidepressants may efficiently improve the treatment of negative and some cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of antidepressant mirtazapine or escitalopram and risperidone (an atypical antipsychotic), given separately or jointly, on the MK-801-induced deficits in the social interaction test in rats. Antidepressants and risperidone were given 60 and 30 min before the test, respectively. The social interaction of male Wistar rats was measured for 10 min, starting 4 h after MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) administration. In the social interaction test, MK-801-induced deficits in the parameters studied, i.e. the number of episodes and the time of interactions. Risperidone at a higher dose (0.1 mg/kg) reversed that effect. Co-treatment with an ineffective dose of risperidone (0.01 mg/kg) and mirtazapine (2.5 or 5 mg/kg) or escitalopram only at a dose of 5 mg/kg (but not 2.5 and 10 mg/kg) abolished the deficits evoked by MK-801. The obtained results suggest that especially mirtazapine, and to a smaller degree escitalopram may enhance the antipsychotic-like effect of risperidone in the animal test modeling some negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  5. Efficacy and tolerability of antidepressants for treatment of depression in coronary artery disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowlati, Yekta; Herrmann, Nathan; Swardfager, Walter L; Reim, Elyse K; Lanctôt, Krista L

    2010-02-01

    Depression occurs in 18% to 45% of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) where it is associated with an increased risk of acute coronary events and mortality. Our objective was to quantitatively summarize the data on the efficacy and tolerability of antidepressant (AD) treatment for depression in CAD. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials with a database search of the English literature (to March 2008) and manual search of references. Four clinical trials with ADs (mirtazapine, citalopram, fluoxetine, and sertraline) of a 9- to 24-week duration involving 798 subjects (402 ADs, 396 placebo) with documented CAD and meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria for depression were included. ADs were superior to placebo for decreasing Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) scores (402 ADs, 396 placebo; weighted mean difference 1.41, 95% CI 0.53 to 2.29, P = 0.002) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores (373 ADs, 369 placebo; weighted mean difference 2.27, 95% CI 0.60 to 3.94, P = 0.008). The proportion of patients (216 ADs, 213 placebo) who responded (a 50% or more reduction in HDRS scores, OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.17 to 2.54) and remitted (HDRS of 8 or less at final assessment, OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.18 to 2.74), were also significantly higher with AD, compared with placebo, with no significant differences between the 2 groups for overall dropouts (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.42 to 1.68) or dropout owing to adverse events (OR 1.30, 95% CI 0.75 to 2.25). The combined studies were homogeneous except for overall dropout rate (P = 0.01). Treatment with ADs for depression in CAD results in significant therapeutic effects without substantially increased rates of discontinuation.

  6. Should patients with schizophrenia receive antidepressants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terevnikov, Viacheslav; Stenberg, Jan-Henry; Joffe, Grigori

    Antipsychotics play a key role in the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia, and monotherapy is effective for most patients. Achieving an optimal treatment response is, however, often difficult. Combining an antidepressant drug to the antipsychotic regimen could potentially improve treatment outcomes, although the evidence supporting the use of such combinations is limited and contradictory. Positive evidence has mostly been obtained from the efficacy of antidepressants acting on monoamine receptors on the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. These receptor-active drugs may also improve cognition in schizophrenic patients. In the light of current knowledge, antidepressants do not appear to potentiate the psychotic symptoms of schizophrenic patients. However, there is no robust evidence of the efficacy of antidepressants in the treatment of schizophrenia-related depression, and thus monotherapy with an antipsychotic drug is recommended for treating it. If using antidepressants in addition to antipsychotics is deemed necessary, the risk of pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions should be kept in mind.

  7. Neuroanatomical correlates of apathy in late-life depression and antidepressant treatment response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Genevieve S.; Gunning, Faith M.; Woods, Eric; Klimstra, Sibel A.; Hoptman, Matthew J.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Apathy is a prominent feature of geriatric depression that predicts poor clinical outcomes and hinders depression treatment. Yet little is known about the neurobiology and treatment of apathy in late-life depression. This study examined apathy prevalence in a clinical sample of depressed elderly, response of apathy to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment, and neuroanatomical correlates that distinguished responders from nonresponders and healthy controls. Methods Participants included 45 non-demented, elderly with major depression and 43 elderly comparison individuals. After a 2-week single-blind placebo period, depressed participants received escitalopram 10mg daily for 12 weeks. The Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES) and 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) were administered at baseline and 12 weeks. MRI scans were acquired at baseline for concurrent structural and diffusion tensor imaging of anterior cingulate grey matter and associated white matter tracts. Results 35.5% of depressed patients suffered from apathy. This declined to 15.6% (papathy. Improvement of apathy with SSRI was independent of change in depression but correlated with larger left posterior subgenual cingulate volumes and greater fractional anisotropy of left uncinate fasciculi. Limitations modest sample size, no placebo control, post-hoc secondary analysis, use of 1.5T MRI scanner Conclusions While prevalent in geriatric depression, apathy is separable from depression with regards to medication response. Structural abnormalities of the posterior subgenual cingulate and uncinate fasciculus may perpetuate apathetic states by interfering with prefrontal cortical recruitment of limbic activity essential to motivated behavior. PMID:25012429

  8. Mechanisms of antidepressant resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissam eEl Hage

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Depression is one of the most frequent and severe mental disorder. Since the discovery of antidepressant properties of the imipramine and then after of other tricyclic compounds, several classes of psychotropic drugs have shown be effective in treating major depressive disorder. However, there is a wide range of variability in response to antidepressants that might lead to non response or partial response or in increased rate of relapse or recurrence. The mechanisms of response to antidepressant therapy are poorly understood, and few biomarkers are available than can predict response to pharmacotherapy. Here, we will first review markers that can be used to predict response to pharmacotherapy, such as markers of drug metabolism or blood-brain barrier function, the activity of specific brain areas or neurotransmitter systems, hormonal dysregulations or plasticity, and related molecular targets. We will describe both clinical and preclinical studies and describe factors that might affect the expression of these markers, including environmental or genetic factors and comorbidities. This information will permit us to suggest practical recommendations and innovative treatment strategies to improve therapeutic outcomes.

  9. Milnacipran: a unique antidepressant?

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    Siegfried Kasper

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Siegfried Kasper, Gerald PailDepartment of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, AustriaAbstract: Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs are among the most effective antidepressants available, although their poor tolerance at usual recommended doses and toxicity in ­overdose make them difficult to use. While selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are ­better tolerated than TCAs, they have their own specific problems, such as the aggravation of sexual dysfunction, interaction with coadministered drugs, and for many, a discontinuation syndrome. In addition, some of them appear to be less effective than TCAs in more severely depressed patients. Increasing evidence of the importance of norepinephrine in the etiology of depression has led to the development of a new generation of antidepressants, the serotonin and ­norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs. Milnacipran, one of the pioneer SNRIs, was designed from theoretic considerations to be more effective than SSRIs and better tolerated than TCAs, and with a simple pharmacokinetic profile. Milnacipran has the most balanced potency ratio for reuptake inhibition of the two neurotransmitters compared with other SNRIs (1:1.6 for milnacipran, 1:10 for duloxetine, and 1:30 for venlafaxine, and in some studies milnacipran has been shown to inhibit norepinephrine uptake with greater potency than serotonin (2.2:1. Clinical studies have shown that milnacipran has efficacy comparable with the TCAs and is superior to SSRIs in severe depression. In addition, milnacipran is well tolerated, with a low potential for pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions. Milnacipran is a first-line therapy suitable for most depressed patients. It is frequently successful when other treatments fail for reasons of efficacy or tolerability.Keywords: milnacipran, SNRI, antidepressant efficacy, tolerability

  10. Personality dimensions and deep repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (DTMS) for treatment-resistant depression: a pilot trial on five-factor prediction of antidepressant response.

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    McGirr, Alexander; Van den Eynde, Frederique; Chachamovich, Eduardo; Fleck, Marcelo P A; Berlim, Marcelo T

    2014-03-20

    Prognostication is poor in repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD). Personality traits, particularly extraversion and neuroticism, have attracted increasing attention for both trait- and state-dependent characteristics in predicting response to pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and more recently to therapeutic neuromodulation for MDD. The advent of deep rTMS (DTMS) allows stimulation of deeper cortical regions, and we aimed to prospectively characterize personality dimensions and antidepressant response to DTMS in treatment-resistant MDD. A convenience sample of 15 patients with treatment-resistant MDD received four weeks of daily sessions of DTMS (20 Hz, 3000 pulses/session) of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLFPC). At baseline and at the conclusion of treatment, patients completed the Big Five Inventory, a five-factor assessment of major personality dimensions. Clinical response was measured using the 21-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Four weeks of DTMS treatment were not associated with changes in personality measures. Clinical remission was associated with higher baseline levels of agreeableness (score ≥ 29:100% sensitive and 72.7% specific) and conscientiousness (score ≥ 30:75% sensitive and 81.8% specific). Levels of agreeableness and extraversion were linearly associated with antidepressant response. Neuroticism was not associated with the antidepressant effects of DTMS in this cohort. Five-factor personality assessment may have prognostic value in DTMS for resistant MDD. Agreeableness, extraversion, and conscientiousness are associated with decreases in depressive symptoms during treatment with DTMS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimal antidepressant dosing. Practical framework for selection, titration, and duration of therapy.

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    Nielsen, J W; Witek, M W; Hurwitz, S

    2000-10-01

    Appropriate antidepressant dosing and trial duration are crucial for successful treatment of depression. Before prescribing an antidepressant, primary care physicians should take into account each patient's history, responses to previous antidepressants, depressive symptoms, coexisting illnesses, and current prescriptions. Physicians must be able to help patients manage side effects and know when to discontinue treatment, switch antidepressants, or refer patients to a psychiatrist.

  12. The ability of early changes in motivation to predict later antidepressant treatment response

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    Gorwood P

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Philip Gorwood,1,2 Guillaume Vaiva,3 Emmanuelle Corruble,4 Pierre-Michel Llorca,5 Franck J Baylé,1,2 Philippe Courtet61Centre Hospitalier Sainte-Anne (CMME, Paris, France; 2Centre of Psychiatry and Neuroscience, INSERM U894, University Paris-Descartes, Paris, France; 3Pôle de Psychiatrie, CHRU de Lille, Hôpital Michel-Fontan, Université Lille-Nord de France, Lille, France; 4Psychiatry Department of Bicêtre, University Hospital, INSERM U669, Paris XI University, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France; 5CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont Université, Université d’Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France; 6Department of Emergency Psychiatry, CHU Montpellier, Montpellier, FranceIntroduction: Baseline values and early changes of emotional reactivity, cognitive speed, psychomotor function, motivation, and sensory perception have not been studied to any extent in unipolar depression, although they could help to characterize different dimensions of illness that are harder to capture by clinicians, give new insights on how patients improve, and offer new early clinical markers for later treatment response.Methods: About 1,565 adult outpatients with major depressive disorder receiving agomelatine completed the clinician-rated 16-item quick inventory of depressive symptoms, Clinical Global Impression, and Multidimensional Assessment of Thymic States (MAThyS rating scales at inclusion, Week 2 and Week 6. The MAThyS includes a 20-item self-rated visual analog scale (from inhibition [0] to activation [10], with [5] representing the usual state leading to five a priori dimensions (emotional reactivity, cognitive speed, psychomotor function, motivation, and sensory perception.Results: All MAThyS dimension scores increased from inclusion to Week 2 and from inclusion to Week 6 (P<0.001. Improvement was around 2 points (out of 10 for motivation, 1.5 points for psychomotor function, and 0.5 points for other dimensions. Motivation showed a trend to being more severely impaired

  13. Efficacy and feasibility of antidepressants for the prevention of migraine in adults: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X-M; Yang, C; Liu, Y; Dong, M-X; Zou, D-Z; Wei, Y-D

    2017-08-01

    Migraine has greatly impacted the quality of life for migraineurs and was ranked as the seventh highest specific cause of disability worldwide in 2012. Because of the role of serotonin in migraine mechanisms, antidepressants have been used in the prevention of migraine. However, the role of antidepressants for migraine prophylaxis in adults has not been completely established. Our aim was systematically to assess the efficacy and feasibility of antidepressants for the prevention of migraine in adults based on currently available literature. A comprehensive search of databases was conducted including the Cochrane, PubMed, Web of Science and Embase databases from inception to July 2016. Randomized controlled trials that assigned adults with a clinical diagnosis of migraine to antidepressant or placebo treatment were included. The primary outcome was the reduction of migraine frequency or index. Overall, 16 randomized controlled trials including 1082 participants were identified. Antidepressants had a significant advantage over placebo in reducing the migraine frequency or index of adults with a standardized mean difference of -0.79 [95% confidence interval (CI) -1.13 to -0.45, P antidepressant therapy were more likely to experience an at least 50% reduction of headache burden than those receiving placebo (28.9% vs. 20.2%; risk ratio 1.40; 95% CI 0.97-2.02; P = 0.07). However, antidepressants were less well tolerated than placebo because of some adverse events (risk ratio 1.74, 95% CI 1.05-2.89, P = 0.03). Antidepressants are effective in the prophylaxis of migraine in adults, but the level of evidence for antidepressants except for amitriptyline seems to be quite shaky. © 2017 EAN.

  14. Neuroimmune endocrine effects of antidepressants

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    Antonioli M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Marco Antonioli, Joanna Rybka, LA CarvalhoPsychoimmunology Translational Laboratory, Health Science Research Centre, Roehampton University, London, UKAbstract: Antidepressant pharmacotherapy is to date the most often used treatment for depression, but the exact mechanism of action underlying its therapeutic effect is still unclear. Many theories have been put forward to account for depression, as well as antidepressant activity, but none of them is exhaustive. Neuroimmune endocrine impairment is found in depressed patients; high levels of circulating corticosteroids along with hyperactivation of the immune system, high levels of proinflammatory cytokines, low levels of melatonin in plasma and urine, and disentrainment of circadian rhythms have been demonstrated. Moreover, antidepressant treatment seems to correct or at least to interfere with these alterations. In this review, we summarize the complex neuroimmune endocrine and chronobiological alterations found in patients with depression and how these systems interact with each other. We also explain how antidepressant therapy can modify these systems, along with some possible mechanisms of action shown in animal and human models.Keywords: antidepressant agents, biological markers, human, cytokines, neuroinflammation, psychoneuroimmunology, endophenotype

  15. A marginal structural model to estimate the causal effect of antidepressant medication treatment on viral suppression among homeless and marginally housed persons with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Alexander C; Weiser, Sheri D; Petersen, Maya L; Ragland, Kathleen; Kushel, Margot B; Bangsberg, David R

    2010-12-01

    Depression strongly predicts nonadherence to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antiretroviral therapy, and adherence is essential to maintaining viral suppression. This suggests that pharmacologic treatment of depression may improve virologic outcomes. However, previous longitudinal observational analyses have inadequately adjusted for time-varying confounding by depression severity, which could yield biased estimates of treatment effect. Application of marginal structural modeling to longitudinal observation data can, under certain assumptions, approximate the findings of a randomized controlled trial. To determine whether antidepressant medication treatment increases the probability of HIV viral suppression. Community-based prospective cohort study with assessments conducted every 3 months. Community-based research field site in San Francisco, California. One hundred fifty-eight homeless and marginally housed persons with HIV who met baseline immunologic (CD4+ T-lymphocyte count, 13) inclusion criteria, observed from April 2002 through August 2007. Probability of achieving viral suppression to less than 50 copies/mL. Secondary outcomes of interest were probability of being on an antiretroviral therapy regimen, 7-day self-reported percentage adherence to antiretroviral therapy, and probability of reporting complete (100%) adherence. Marginal structural models estimated a 2.03 greater odds of achieving viral suppression (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-3.58; P = .02) resulting from antidepressant medication treatment. In addition, antidepressant medication use increased the probability of antiretroviral uptake (weighted odds ratio, 3.87; 95% CI, 1.98-7.58; P effect is likely attributable to improved adherence to a continuum of HIV care, including increased uptake and adherence to antiretroviral therapy.

  16. Maintenance Treatment of Depression in Old Age: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-Controlled Evaluation of the Efficacy and Safety of Donepezil Combined with Antidepressant Pharmacotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Charles F.; Butters, Meryl A.; Lopez, Oscar; Pollock, Bruce G.; Dew, Mary Amanda; Mulsant, Benoit H.; Lenze, Eric J.; Holm, Margo; Rogers, Joan C.; Mazumdar, Sati; Houck, Patricia R.; Begley, Amy; Anderson, Stewart; Karp, Jordan F.; Miller, Mark D.; Whyte, Ellen M.; Stack, Jacqueline; Gildengers, Ariel; Szanto, Katalin; Bensasi, Salem; Kaufer, Daniel I.; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; DeKosky, Steven T.

    2010-01-01

    Context Cognitive impairment in late-life depression is a core feature of the illness. Objective to test whether donepezil + antidepressant is superior to placebo + antidepressant in (1) improving cognitive performance and instrumental activities of daily living and (2) reducing recurrences of depression over two years of maintenance treatment. Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled maintenance trial. Setting university clinic Main Outcome Measures global neuropsychological performance, cognitive instrumental ADL, and recurrent depression. Results Donepezil + antidepressant temporarily improved global cognition (treatment by time interaction F = 3.78, df = 2, 126, p = .03), but effect sizes were small (Cohen’s d = 0.27: group difference at 1 year). A marginal benefit to cognitive instrumental ADL was also observed (treatment by time interaction; F = 2.94; df = 2, 137, p = 0.06). The donepezil group was more likely to experience recurrent major depression: 35% [95% CI: 24%, 46%] versus 19% [95% CI: 9%, 29%] (log rank chi squared = 3.97, p = .05); hazard ratio = 2.09 [95% CI: 1.00, 4.41]. Post-hoc subgroup analyses showed that, of 57 participants with mild cognitive impairment, 3/30 on donepezil (10%; 95% CI: 0, 21%) and 9/27 on placebo (33%; 95% CI: 16%, 51%) converted to dementia over two years (Fisher exact p = 0.05). The MCI subgroup had a 44 percent recurrence rate of major depression on donepezil verses 12% on placebo (LR=4.91, p=.03). The subgroup with normal cognition (n = 73) showed no benefit on donepezil or increase in recurrence of major depression. Conclusion Whether ChEI should be used as augmentation in the maintenance treatment of late-life depression depends upon a careful weighing of risks and benefits in those with MCI. In cognitively intact patients, donepezil appears to have no clear benefit for preventing progression to MCI/dementia or recurrence of depression. PMID:21199965

  17. Current standard treatment for pediatric glioma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Saito, Ryuta; Kanamori, Masayuki; Yamashita, Yoji; Tominaga, Teiji

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we selected three representative disorders among pediatric gliomas and reviewed standard treatments for these diseases. The formation of this rare disease is involved with BRAF mutation as well as cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma. Radical resection is not recommended as initial therapy due to high morbidity. Despite its good tumor control, radiotherapy is not a standard therapy due to neuroendocrine and neurocognitive dysfunction. Several papers have reported the effectiveness of platinum-based chemotherapy, which is a useful for induction therapy. Recent progress in molecular analyses has suggested that some markers might be used for staging ependymoma. While total resection is considered to be strongly correlated with patients' survival, the majority of recurrence occurs in the primary site. Despite many clinical trials, chemotherapeutic agents were not found to be effective for this disease. Since whole brain radiation cannot prevent dissemination, local radiation is recommended for adjuvant therapy. The prognosis of this disease is still dismal, and median survival time is within 1 year. Although clinical trials have been conducted to assess the efficacy of chemotherapy prior to, concomitantly with, or after radiotherapy, an effective regimen has not yet been established. Therefore, only conventional local radiotherapy is the standard regimen for this disease. A new therapeutic approach, such as convection-enhanced drug delivery, would be required for improved outcomes in patients with this disease. (author)

  18. The Use of Antidepressants in the Long-Term Treatment Should not Improve the Impact of Fibromyalgia on Quality of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Carta, MG; Ruggiero, V; Sancassiani, F; Cutrano, F; Manca, AR; Peri, M; Fais, A; Cacace, E

    2013-01-01

    Background: Antidepressant (AD) drugs are effective in the short term treatment of fibromyalgia (FM). It may be useful to study the long-term impact of AD on patients with FM. Methods: One-year follow-up study on 23 females with FM divided into groups on AD (ADg-N=7), and not taking AD (NADg-N=11). Evaluation at t1 and at the end (t2) with the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ); at t2 with: SCID-IV; Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ); Short Form-12; Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D...

  19. Antidepressants and Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the concern? Why is it bad to mix antidepressants and alcohol? Answers from Daniel K. Hall-Flavin, M.D. It's best to avoid combining antidepressants and alcohol. It may worsen your symptoms, and ...

  20. IC Treatment: Antidepressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IC Epidemiology (RICE) Study Boston Area Community Health (BACH) Survey ICA Pilot Research Program Funding Opportunities Clinical ... IC Epidemiology (RICE) Study Boston Area Community Health (BACH) Survey ICA Pilot Research Program Funding Opportunities Clinical ...

  1. [Antidepressive agents and breast feeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håberg, M; Matheson, I

    1997-11-10

    Postpartum blues occurs in 50-80% of women. A few percent of the cases are classified as serious postpartum depression, requiring antidepressant treatment. There is a growing understanding that women should continue to breast-feed in this situation. Data concerning the transfer of antidepressants into breast milk has been researched. Calculations of the infant relative dose via breast milk were done for the drugs concerned. Few antidepressants have been studied at steady state conditions in nursing mothers. Nortriptyline and amitriptyline have minimal relative doses and can be used when breast-feeding. Doxepine should be avoided, as should lithium, which has a significant transfer. Among the serotonine-reuptake inhibitors fluoxetine has been well studied in breast milk. Since fluoxetine has a long half life and a high transfer, sertraline and possibly paroxetine are better alternatives, but the latter has not yet been studied in repeated doses. Moclobemide also lacks data from multiple dose studies, but extrapolation to steady state indicates that the relative dose is small. More observational studies should be carried out in infants breast-fed by mothers using antidepressants. In the meantime, doctors prescribing antidepressant drugs to nursing mothers should see that the infants are monitored for side effects.

  2. Suicidality: risk factors and the effects of antidepressants. The example of parallel reduction of suicidality and other depressive symptoms during treatment with the SNRI, milnacipran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Courtet

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Philippe CourtetCHRU Montpellier, Inserm U888, University of Montpellier I, Montpellier, FranceAbstract: Suicidal behavior (SB represents a major public health issue. Clinical and basic research suggests that SB is a specific entity in psychiatric nosology involving a combination of personality traits, genetic factors, childhood abuse and neuroanatomical abnormalities. The principal risk factor for suicide is depression. More than 60% of patients who complete suicide are depressed at the time of suicide, most of them untreated. There has been a controversy concerning a possible increased risk of SB in some depressed patients treated with antidepressants. Most recent evidence suggests, however, that treatment of depressed patients is associated with a favorable benefit-risk ratio. A recent study has determined the effects of 6 weeks of antidepressant treatment with the serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, milnacipran, on suicidality in a cohort of 30 patients with mild to moderate depression. At baseline, mild suicidal thoughts were present in 46.7% of patients. Suicidal thoughts decreased progressively throughout the study in parallel with other depressive symptoms and were essentially absent at the end of the study. At no time during treatment was there any indication of an increased suicidal risk. Retardation and psychic anxiety decreased in parallel possibly explaining the lack of any “activation syndrome” in this study.Keywords: suicide, milnacipran, SNRI, activation syndrome

  3. Safety of antidepressants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, J. A.; de Jonghe, F.

    1995-01-01

    There are a number of criteria that can be used when selecting an antidepressant. In particular safety criteria are important, and a distinction can be drawn between "safe" and "less safe" antidepressants. The relative safety of different antidepressants has been assessed by looking at answers to

  4. Stopping antidepressants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I was taught not to scratch if it's not itchy! It is not necessary to change a patient's treatment when his or her condition is stable. However, our complex world and the drive to precision treatment is forcing a rethink of these wise old words. In the context of depression, it means scratching at the stable patient's treatment, and ...

  5. Curcumin and major depression: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigating the potential of peripheral biomarkers to predict treatment response and antidepressant mechanisms of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopresti, Adrian L; Maes, Michael; Meddens, Marc J M; Maker, Garth L; Arnoldussen, Eddy; Drummond, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    A recent randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled study conducted by our research group, provided partial support for the efficacy of supplementation with a patented curcumin extract (500 mg, twice daily) for 8 weeks in reducing depressive symptoms in people with major depressive disorder. In the present paper, a secondary, exploratory analysis of salivary, urinary and blood biomarkers collected during this study was conducted to identify potential antidepressant mechanisms of action of curcumin. Pre and post-intervention samples were provided by 50 participants diagnosed with major depressive disorder, and the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology self-rated version (IDS-SR30) was used as the primary depression outcome measure. Compared to placebo, 8 weeks of curcumin supplementation was associated with elevations in urinary thromboxane B2 (pSR30 score after 8 weeks of treatment. Our findings demonstrate that curcumin supplementation influences several biomarkers that may be associated with its antidepressant mechanisms of action. Plasma concentrations of leptin and endothelin-1 seem to have particular relevance to treatment outcome. Further investigations using larger samples sizes are required to elucidate these findings, as the multiple statistical comparisons completed in this study increased the risk of type I errors. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Heart rate variability in major depressive disorder and after antidepressant treatment with agomelatine and paroxetine: Findings from the Taiwan Study of Depression and Anxiety (TAISDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ta-Chuan; Kao, Lien-Cheng; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Kuo, Terry B J; Huang, San-Yuan; Chang, Chuan-Chia; Chang, Hsin-An

    2016-01-04

    Evidence from previous studies suggests that heart rate variability (HRV) is reduced in major depressive disorder (MDD). However, whether this reduction is attributable to the disorder per se or to medication, since antidepressants may also affect HRV, is still debated. There is a dearth of information regarding the effects of agomelatine, a novel antidepressant, on HRV. Here, we investigated whether HRV is reduced in MDD and compared the effects of agomelatine and paroxetine on HRV. We recruited 618 physically healthy unmedicated patients with MDD and 506 healthy volunteers aged 20-65 years. Frequency-domain measures of resting HRV were obtained at the time of enrollment for all participants. For patients with MDD, these measures were obtained again after 6 weeks of either agomelatine or paroxetine monotherapy. Compared with healthy subjects, unmedicated patients with MDD exhibited significantly lower variance (total HRV), low frequency (LF), and high frequency (HF) HRV, and a higher LF/HF ratio. Depression severity independently contributed to decreased HRV and vagal tone. Fifty-six patients completed the open-label trial (n=29 for agomelatine, n=27 for paroxetine). Between-group analyses showed a significant group-by-time interaction for LF-HRV and HF-HRV, driven by increases in LF-HRV and HF-HRV only after agomelatine treatment. Within the paroxetine-treated group, there were no significant changes in mean R-R intervals or any HRV indices. We therefore concluded that MDD is associated with reduced HRV, which is inversely related to depression severity. Compared with paroxetine, agomelatine has a more vagotonic effect, suggesting greater cardiovascular safety. Clinicians should consider HRV effects while selecting antidepressants especially for depressed patients who already have decreased cardiac vagal tone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Capgras syndrome responding to the antidepressant mirtazapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khouzam, Hani Raoul

    2002-01-01

    A new onset of Capgras syndrome, delusional misidentification, developed in an elderly gentleman. Treatment with the antidepressant mirtazapine led to the remission. Suggestions are made for both dynamic and medical bases for Capgras syndrome and possible antipsychotic effects of mirtazapine.

  8. 'In my life antidepressants have been…': a qualitative analysis of users' diverse experiences with antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Kerry; Cartwright, Claire; Read, John

    2016-05-11

    While mental health professionals have focused on concerns about whether antidepressants work on a neurochemical level it is important to understand the meaning this medication holds in the lives of people who use it. This study explores diversity in the experience of antidepressant users. One thousand seven hundred forty-seven New Zealand antidepressant users responded to an open-ended question about their experience of antidepressants. This was analysed using content and thematic analysis. There was considerable diversity in participants' responses including positive (54 %), negative (16 %) and mixed (28 %) experiences with antidepressants. Those with positive experiences saw antidepressants as a necessary treatment for a 'disease', a life saver, a way of meeting social obligations, dealing with difficult circumstances or a stepping stone to further help. Negative themes described antidepressants as being ineffective, having unbearable side effects, undermining emotional authenticity, masking real problems and reducing the experience of control. Mixed experience themes showed how participants weighed up the unpleasant side effects against the benefits, felt calmer but less like themselves, struggled to find the one or dosage and felt stuck with continuing on antidepressants when they wished to stop. Mental health professions need to recognize that antidepressants are not a 'one size fits all' solution.

  9. Accelerated antidepressant response to lithium augmentation of imipramine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Saini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment of depressive episode often poses a challenge. Although there are numerous medicines available for its treatment but they all have a lag period of 2–3 weeks before they start showing their result. Aim: The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that an initial lithium-tricyclic antidepressant (TCA combination has a quicker and better antidepressant effect than standard TCA treatment in unipolar depression. Materials and Methods: Twenty unipolar depressed inpatients under lithium-TCA treatment were compared with twenty patients with similar diagnosis treated with TCA-placebo combination. The duration of the study was 4 weeks under double-blind conditions. Results: Initial lithium-TCA treatment reduced depressive symptoms significantly more than TCA alone. The difference was evident from 1st week onward and persisted at 4 weeks. Conclusion: Lithium augmentation of TCA at the outset offers a strategy to reduce the lag period of antidepressant action. The choice can be made for those patients who are likely to benefit from long-term prophylaxis.

  10. Antidepressants and benzodiazepines for panic disorder in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bighelli, Irene; Trespidi, Carlotta; Castellazzi, Mariasole; Cipriani, Andrea; Furukawa, Toshi A; Girlanda, Francesca; Guaiana, Giuseppe; Koesters, Markus; Barbui, Corrado

    2016-09-12

    A panic attack is a discrete period of fear or anxiety that has a rapid onset, reaches a peak within 10 minutes and in which at least four of 13 characteristic symptoms are experienced, including racing heart, chest pain, sweating, shaking, dizziness, flushing, stomach churning, faintness and breathlessness. Panic disorder is common in the general population with a lifetime prevalence of 1% to 4%. The treatment of panic disorder includes psychological and pharmacological interventions. Amongst pharmacological agents, antidepressants and benzodiazepines are the mainstay of treatment for panic disorder. Different classes of antidepressants have been compared; and the British Association for Psychopharmacology, and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) consider antidepressants (mainly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)) as the first-line treatment for panic disorder, due to their more favourable adverse effect profile over monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). In addition to antidepressants, benzodiazepines are widely prescribed for the treatment of panic disorder. To assess the evidence for the effects of antidepressants and benzodiazepines for panic disorder in adults. The Specialised Register of the Cochrane Common Mental Disorders Group (CCMDCTR) to 11 September 2015. This register includes relevant randomised controlled trials from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (1950-), Embase (1974-) and PsycINFO (1967-). Reference lists of relevant papers and previous systematic reviews were handsearched. We contacted experts in this field for supplemental data. All double-blind randomised controlled trials allocating adult patients with panic disorder to antidepressants or benzodiazepines versus any other active treatment with antidepressants or benzodiazepines. Two review authors independently checked eligibility and extracted data using a standard form. Data were

  11. An examination of the moderating effect of treatment with anti-depressants on the association of heart disease with depression in males with type 2 diabetes attending a Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Thomas S; Ritchie, Christine S; Stetson, Barbara A; Burke, John D; Looney, Stephen W

    2007-02-01

    To examine the association of heart disease with depression and the impact of treatment with anti-depressants on this association in older males with type 2 diabetes. In this cross-sectional study, data were collected from the electronic medical record system of the Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) in a large mid-western city in the United States. Subjects were 8185 males older than 40, with a history of type 2 diabetes, who had visited the VAMC within the previous 6 years. Odds ratios were used to measure bivariate associations; multivariate logistic regression was used to adjust for potential confounding factors. After adjustments for confounding variables, significant associations were found between depression and any adverse heart event (OR=1.34, p=0.001), coronary artery disease (OR=1.23, p=0.039), myocardial infarction (MI; OR=1.77, pdepression and anti-depressant prescription status indicated that, except for MI, these associations were no longer significant among those who had been prescribed anti-depressants, but remained significant and were increased in magnitude among those who had not been prescribed anti-depressants. These findings support the premise that co-morbid depression in diabetics is associated with the occurrence of adverse heart events, and further suggest that treatment of depression with anti-depressants moderates this association.

  12. [Antidepressants in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortajarena García, M C; Ron Martin, S; Miranda Vicario, E; Ruiz de Vergara Eguino, A; Azpiazu Gomez, P J; Lopez Aldana, J

    2016-10-01

    Depression in the elderly is a changing, difficult and common disorder. At this age, there are more relapses and more long-life treatment is required. The pharmacology approach is a challenge because of concurrent factors that make their treatment more difficult. It is very important to have a basic antidepressant scheme, in order to help treat this disorder with efficiency and success from Primary Care. There are no drugs without side effects, and their characteristics have to be known in order to make the right selection depending on effectiveness, safety and tolerance. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Psychoeducational Intervention in Treatment-Naïve Patients with Antidepressant Medication in Primary Care: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Casañas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is evidence supporting the effectiveness of psychoeducation (PE in patients with symptoms of depression in primary care (PC, but very few studies have assessed this intervention in antidepressant-naïve patients. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a PE program in these patients, since the use of antidepressant (AD medication may interfere with the effects of the intervention. Methods. 106 participants were included, 50 from the PE program (12 weekly 1.5-hour sessions and 56 from the control group (CG that received the usual care. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 3, 6, and 9 months. The main outcome measures were the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and remission based on the BDI. The analysis was carried out on an intention-to-treat basis. Results. The PE program group showed remission of symptoms of 40% (P=0.001 posttreatment and 42% (P=0.012 at 6 months. The analysis only showed significant differences in the BDI score posttreatment (P=0.008; effect size Cohen’s d′=0.55. Conclusions. The PE intervention is an effective treatment in the depressive population not treated with AD medication. Before taking an AD, psychoeducational intervention should be considered.

  14. Investigations of morning and laboratory dream recall and content in depressive patients during baseline conditions and under antidepressive treatment with trimipramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann, D; Löw, H; Schredl, M; Wiegand, M; Dippel, B; Berger, M

    1990-06-01

    REM sleep abnormalities like shortened REM (rapid eye movement) latency, prolongation of the first REM period and heightening of REM density often found in patients with a major depression have prompted an increasing number of studies investigating the neurobiology and neurophysiology of REM sleep in depressive patients, as well as in healthy humans and animals. On the other hand, since the early 1970s investigation of the psychological concomitant of REM sleep, i.e., dreaming, in depressive patients has been extremely sparse. The present study aimed at investigating morning and laboratory dream recall and content in patients with a major depressive disorder to shed more light on this neglected area. In short, morning as well as laboratory dream recall in depressive inpatients was drastically reduced. The low number of scorable dream reports collected did not reveal a heightened incidence of "masochistic" or "negative" content, indeed were rather mundane. In contrast, depressive outpatients (probably less depressed) had a higher rate of morning dream recall. Interestingly, antidepressive treatment with trimipramine (an antidepressant which does not suppress REM sleep) led to a positive influence on patients' mood that was paralleled by a change of dream mood in a positive direction.

  15. Neurotrophic-priming of glucocorticoid receptor signaling is essential for neuronal plasticity to stress and antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango-Lievano, Margarita; Lambert, W Marcus; Bath, Kevin G; Garabedian, Michael J; Chao, Moses V; Jeanneteau, Freddy

    2015-12-22

    Neurotrophins and glucocorticoids are robust synaptic modifiers, and deregulation of their activities is a risk factor for developing stress-related disorders. Low levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) increase the desensitization of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) and vulnerability to stress, whereas higher levels of BDNF facilitate GR-mediated signaling and the response to antidepressants. However, the molecular mechanism underlying neurotrophic-priming of GR function is poorly understood. Here we provide evidence that activation of a TrkB-MAPK pathway, when paired with the deactivation of a GR-protein phosphatase 5 pathway, resulted in sustained GR phosphorylation at BDNF-sensitive sites that is essential for the transcription of neuronal plasticity genes. Genetic strategies that disrupted GR phosphorylation or TrkB signaling in vivo impaired the neuroplasticity to chronic stress and the effects of the antidepressant fluoxetine. Our findings reveal that the coordinated actions of BDNF and glucocorticoids promote neuronal plasticity and that disruption in either pathway could set the stage for the development of stress-induced psychiatric diseases.

  16. Relationship between depressive symptoms and miRNA expression level in monocytes of patients with depression before and after antidepressant treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao-li ZHANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the correlation of depressive symptoms to the microRNA (miRNA expression level in monocytes of patients with depression before and after antidepressant treatment. Methods Eighty-one patients with depression, admitted to the 102 Hospital of PLA from Aug. 2012 to Oct. 2013, having not received antidepressants treatment and meeting the criteria as listed in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual 4th edition (DSM-IV, were selected as case group. Eighty-one normal individuals served as control group. With Affymetrix Expression Array, 26 miRNAs were identified from 3 individuals from each group as candidate miRNA, and among them 9 miRNAs (miR-146b, miR-1972, miR-26b, miR-29b, miR-338, miR-4485, miR-4498, miR-4743 and miR-874 in monocytes were selected for quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR assessment. Twenty patients from the case group were selected for the assessment of miRNA expression levels, and the clinical symptoms and treatment effect were evaluated using Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD and Clinical Global Impression (CGI, before and 6 weeks after antidepressant (venlafaxine, sertraline, mirtazapine, etc. treatment. Results Compared with the control group, the expression levels of miRNA-26b, miRNA-4743, miRNA-4498, miRNA-4485 and miRNA-1972 of the case group were significantly up-regulated (P<0.05. The variance of expression level of miRNA-4743, miRNA-4498, miRNA-4485 and miRNA-1972 was respectively positively correlated with improvement in retardation factors (P<0.05, meanwhile the variance of expression level of miRNA-26b was negatively correlated with the improvement of day and night change factors (P<0.05. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the alteration of miRNA-4485 expression may account 28.8% of retardation variance (P<0.05. Conclusion  The miRNA-4743, miRNA-4498, miRNA-4485, miRNA-1972 and miRNA-26b in monocytes may serve as the biomarkers for the

  17. Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors as Antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Gregers; Volke, Vallo

    2010-01-01

    Affective and anxiety disorders are widely distributed disorders with severe social and economic effects. Evidence is emphatic that effective treatment helps to restore function and quality of life. Due to the action of most modern antidepressant drugs, serotonergic mechanisms have traditionally......, including serotonin, glutamate and GABA, are intimately regulated by NO, and distinct classes of antidepressants have been found to modulate the hippocampal NO level in vivo. The NO system is therefore a potential target for antidepressant and anxiolytic drug action in acute therapy as well...

  18. Antidepressant effects of ketamine: mechanisms underlying fast-acting novel antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Ann Browne

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Newer antidepressants are needed for the many individuals with major depressive disorder that do not respond adequately to treatment and because of a delay of weeks before the emergence of therapeutic effects. Recent evidence from clinical trials shows that the NMDA antagonist ketamine is a revolutionary novel antidepressant because it acts rapidly and is effective for treatment-resistant patients. A single infusion of ketamine alleviates depressive symptoms in treatment-resistant depressed patients within hours and these effects may be sustained for up to 2 weeks. Although the discovery of ketamine’s effects has reshaped drug discovery for antidepressants, the psychotomimetic properties of this compound limit the use of this therapy to the most severely ill patients. In order to develop additional antidepressants like ketamine, adequate preclinical behavioral screening paradigms for fast-acting antidepressants need to be established and used to identify the underlying neural mechanisms. This review examines the preclinical literature attempting to model the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine. Acute administration of ketamine has produced effects in behavioral screens for antidepressants like the forced swim test, novelty suppression of feeding and in rodent models for depression. Protracted behavioral effects of ketamine have been reported to appear after a single treatment that last for days. This temporal pattern is similar to its clinical effects and may serve as a new animal paradigm for rapid antidepressant effects in humans. In addition, protracted changes in molecules mediating synaptic plasticity have been implicated in mediating the antidepressant-like behavioral effects of ketamine. Current preclinical studies are examining compounds with more specific pharmacological effects at glutamate receptors and synapses in order to develop additional rapidly acting antidepressants without the hallucinogenic side effects or abuse

  19. Influence of antidepressants on hemostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Demian; Reber, Guido

    2007-01-01

    Antidepressants, particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are widely used for the treatment of depression and anxious disorders. The observation that depression is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in patients with ischemic heart disease, the assessment of the central role of serotonin in pathophysiological mechanisms of depression, and reports of cases of abnormal bleeding associated with antidepressant therapy have led to investigations of the influence of antidepressants on hemostasis markers. In this review, we summarize data regarding modifications of these markers, drawn from clinical studies and case reports. We observed an association between the type of antidepressant drug and the number of abnormal bleeding case reports, with or without modifications of hemostasis markers. Drugs with the highest degree of serotonin reuptake inhibition - fluoxetine, paroxetine, and sertraline - are more frequently associated with abnormal bleeding and modifications of hemostasis markers. The most frequent hemostatic abnormalities are decreased platelet aggregability and activity, and prolongation of bleeding time. Patients with a history of coagulation disorders, especially suspected or documented thrombocytopenia or platelet disorder, should be monitored in case of prescription of any serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI). Platelet dysfunction, coagulation disorder, and von Willebrand disease should be sought in any case of abnormal bleeding occurring during treatment with an SRI. Also, a non-SSRI antidepressant should be favored over an SSRI or an SRI in such a context. Considering the difficulty in performing platelet aggregation tests, which are the most sensitive in SRI-associated bleeding, and the low sensitivity of hemostasis tests when performed in case of uncomplicated bleeding in the general population, establishing guidelines for the assessment of SRI-associated bleeding complications remains a challenge

  20. [Interactions between metoprolol and antidepressants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molden, Espen; Spigset, Olav

    2011-09-20

    Metoprolol, the most commonly used beta-receptor antagonist in Norway, is eliminated mainly via the enzyme cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6. This enzyme is inhibited to a varying extent by antidepressants. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the interactions between metoprolol and antidepressants with an emphasis on CYP2D6 inhibition. Relevant literature was identified by a PubMed search using the word "metoprolol" combined with generic names of antidepressant drugs. The potent CYP2D6 inhibitor paroxetine has been shown to increase the biologically available dose of metoprolol about 4- to 6-fold. The same degree of increase is expected for the two other potent CYP2D6 inhibitors in the class, fluoxetine and bupropion. Severe bradycardia and atroventricular block has been reported in patients who have taken metoprolol in combination with these three drugs. Escitalopram, citalopram and duloxetine are less potent CYP2D6 inhibitors, and have been shown to cause 2- to 3-fold increases in biologically available dose of metoprolol. Other antidepressants, such as sertraline, venlafaxine, mianserin and mirtazapine, inhibit CYP2D6 to little or no extent, and are not expected to cause clinically relevant interactions with metoprolol. Metoprolol should not be used concomitantly with paroxetine, fluoxetine or bupropion due to extensive interactions and the risk of serious adverse effects. Dose reductions of metoprolol should be considered for combined treatment with citalopram, escitalopram or duloxetine, while concurrent use with sertraline, venlafaxine, mianserin and mirtazapine should be safe.

  1. Exploring a post-traumatic stress disorder paradigm in Flinders sensitive line rats to model treatment-resistant depression II: response to antidepressant augmentation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Sarel Jacobus; Harvey, Brian Herbert

    2017-08-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) displays high co-morbidity with major depression and treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Earlier work demonstrated exaggerated depressive-like symptoms in a gene×environment model of TRD and an abrogated response to imipramine. We extended the investigation by studying the behavioural and monoaminergic response to multiple antidepressants, viz. venlafaxine and ketamine with/without imipramine. Male Flinders sensitive line (FSL) rats, a genetic model of depression, were exposed to a time-dependent sensitisation (TDS) model of PTSD and compared with stress naive controls. 7 days after the TDS procedures, immobility and coping (swimming and climbing), behaviours in the forced swim test (FST) as well as hippocampal and cortical 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA) and noradrenaline (NA) levels were analysed. Response to imipramine, venlafaxine and ketamine treatment (all 10 mg/kg×7 days) alone and in combination were subsequently studied. TDS exacerbated depressive-like behaviour of FSL rats in the FST. Imipramine, venlafaxine and ketamine were ineffective as monotherapy in TDS-exposed FSL rats. However, combining imipramine with either venlafaxine or ketamine resulted in significant anti-immobility effects and enhanced coping behaviours. Only ketamine+imipramine (frontal-cortical 5HIAA and NA), ketamine alone (frontal-cortical and hippocampal NA) and venlafaxine+imipramine (frontal-cortical NA) altered monoamine responses versus untreated TDS-exposed FSL rats. Exposure of FSL rats to TDS inhibits antidepressant response at behavioural and neurochemical levels. Congruent with TRD, imipramine plus venlafaxine or ketamine overcame treatment resistance in these animals. These data further support the hypothesis that exposure of FSL rats to a PTSD-like paradigm produces a valid animal model of TRD and warrants further investigation.

  2. Relabeling the Medications We Call Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Antonuccio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper raises the question about whether the data on the medications we call antidepressants justify the label of antidepressant. The authors argue that a true antidepressant should be clearly superior to placebo, should offer a risk/benefit balance that exceeds that of alternative treatments, should not increase suicidality, should not increase anxiety and agitation, should not interfere with sexual functioning, and should not increase depression chronicity. Unfortunately, these medications appear to fall short on all of these dimensions. Many of the “side effects” of these medications have larger effect sizes than the antidepressant effect size. To call these medications antidepressants may make sense from a marketing standpoint but may be misleading from a scientific perspective. Consumers deserve a label that more accurately reflects the data on the largest effects and helps them understand the range of effects from these medications. In other words, it may make just as much sense to call these medications antiaphrodisiacs as antidepressants because the negative effects on libido and sexual functioning are so common. It can be argued that a misleading label may interfere with our commitment to informed consent. Therefore, it may be time to stop calling these medications antidepressants.

  3. Ketamine treatment involves medial prefrontal cortex serotonin to induce a rapid antidepressant-like activity in BALB/cJ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, T H; Mendez-David, I; Defaix, C; Guiard, B P; Tritschler, L; David, D J; Gardier, A M

    2017-01-01

    Unlike classic serotonergic antidepressant drugs, ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, exhibits a rapid and persistent antidepressant (AD) activity, at sub-anaesthetic doses in treatment-resistant depressed patients and in preclinical studies in rodents. The mechanisms mediating this activity are unclear. Here, we assessed the role of the brain serotonergic system in the AD-like activity of an acute sub-anaesthetic ketamine dose. We compared ketamine and fluoxetine responses in several behavioral tests currently used to predict anxiolytic/antidepressant-like potential in rodents. We also measured their effects on extracellular serotonin levels [5-HT] ext in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFCx) and brainstem dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), a serotonergic nucleus involved in emotional behavior, and on 5-HT cell firing in the DRN in highly anxious BALB/cJ mice. Ketamine (10 mg/kg i.p.) had no anxiolytic-like effect, but displayed a long lasting AD-like activity, i.e., 24 h post-administration, compared to fluoxetine (18 mg/kg i.p.). Ketamine (144%) and fluoxetine (171%) increased mPFCx [5-HT] ext compared to vehicle. Ketamine-induced AD-like effect was abolished by a tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, para-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) pointing out the role of the 5-HT system in its behavioral activity. Interestingly, increase in cortical [5-HT] ext following intra-mPFCx ketamine bilateral injection (0.25 μg/side) was correlated with its AD-like activity as measured on swimming duration in the FST in the same mice. Furthermore, pre-treatment with a selective AMPA receptor antagonist (intra-DRN NBQX) blunted the effects of intra-mPFCx ketamine on both the swimming duration in the FST and mPFCx [5-HT] ext suggesting that the AD-like activity of ketamine required activation of DRN AMPA receptors and recruited the prefrontal cortex/brainstem DRN neural circuit in BALB/c mice. These results confirm a key role of cortical 5-HT release in ketamine's AD-like activity following

  4. Differing antidepressant maintenance methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safer, Daniel J

    2017-10-01

    The principle evidence that antidepressant medication (ADM) is an effective maintenance treatment for adults with major depressive disorder (MDD) is from placebo substitution trials. These trials enter responders from ADM efficacy trials into randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled (RDBPC) effectiveness trials to measure the rate of MDD relapse over time. However, other randomized maintenance trial methodologies merit consideration and comparison. A systematic review of ADM randomized maintenance trials included research reports from multiple databases. Relapse rate was the main effectiveness outcome assessed. Five ADM randomized maintenance methodologies for MDD responders are described and compared for outcome. These effectiveness trials include: placebo-substitution, ADM/placebo extension, ADM extension, ADM vs. psychotherapy, and treatment as usual. The placebo-substitution trials for those abruptly switched to placebo resulted in unusually high (46%) rates of relapse over 6-12months, twice the continuing ADM rate. These trials were characterized by selective screening, high attrition, an anxious anticipation of a switch to placebo, and a risk of drug withdrawal symptoms. Selectively screened ADM efficacy responders who entered into 4-12month extension trials experienced relapse rates averaging ~10% with a low attrition rate. Non-industry sponsored randomized trials of adults with multiple prior MDD episodes who were treated with ADM maintenance for 1-2years experienced relapse rates averaging 40%. Placebo substitution trial methodology represents only one approach to assess ADM maintenance. Antidepressant maintenance research for adults with MDD should be evaluated for industry sponsorship, attrition, the impact of the switch to placebo, and major relapse differences in MDD subpopulations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Treatment response in relation to subthreshold bipolarity in patients with major depressive disorder receiving antidepressant monotherapy: a post hoc data analysis (KOMDD study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park YM

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Young-Min Park,1 Bun-Hee Lee2 1Department of Psychiatry, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang, 2Department of Psychiatry, Seoul Eunpyeong Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea Background: The aim of this observational study was to determine whether subthreshold bipolarity affects treatment response and remission in patients with major depressive disorder receiving antidepressant (AD monotherapy over a 6-month follow-up period. Methods: Seventy-eight patients with major depressive disorder were stratified into two subgroups according to the presence of subthreshold bipolarity, identified using the Korean version of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (K-MDQ, which classifies patients as positive for a screening of bipolarity based on the cutoff for the total K-MDQ score (ie, 7 points. They received AD monotherapy such as escitalopram, sertraline, paroxetine, or tianeptine for 6 months. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD, Hamilton Anxiety Scale, and Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation were applied at baseline, 1 week, 3 weeks, 2 months, 3 months, and 6 months. Results: The mean HAMD, BDI, and Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation scores were higher in the bipolarity group than in the nonbipolarity group at 3 weeks. The mean BDI score was also higher in the bipolarity group than in the nonbipolarity group at 6 months. Evaluation of the ratio of improvement for each scale revealed different patterns of percentage changes between the two groups over the 6-month follow-up period. Furthermore, the response and remission rates (as assessed using BDI and HAMD scores were higher in the nonbipolarity group than in the bipolarity group, with the exception of HAMD scores at the 3-week follow-up time point. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that depressed patients with bipolarity had a worse response to AD monotherapy than did those without bipolarity. Keywords: subthreshold bipolarity

  6. Antidepressants, antimicrobials or both? Gut microbiota dysbiosis in depression and possible implications of the antimicrobial effects of antidepressant drugs for antidepressant effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Danielle; Filho, Adriano José Maia Chaves; Soares de Sousa, Caren Nádia; Quevedo, João; Barichello, Tatiana; Júnior, Hélio Vitoriano Nobre; Freitas de Lucena, David

    2017-01-15

    The first drug repurposed for the treatment of depression was the tuberculostatic iproniazid. At present, drugs belonging to new classes of antidepressants still have antimicrobial effects. Dysbiosis of gut microbiota was implicated in the development or exacerbation of mental disorders, such as major depressive disorder (MDD). Based on the current interest in the gut-brain axis, the focus of this narrative review is to compile the available studies regarding the influences of gut microbiota in behavior and depression and to show the antimicrobial effect of antidepressant drugs. A discussion regarding the possible contribution of the antimicrobial effect of antidepressant drugs to its effectiveness/resistance is included. The search included relevant articles from PubMed, SciELO, LILACS, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Knowledge. MDD is associated with changes in gut permeability and microbiota composition. In this respect, antidepressant drugs present antimicrobial effects that could also be related to the effectiveness of these drugs for MDD treatment. Conversely, some antimicrobials present antidepressant effects. Both antidepressants and antimicrobials present neuroprotective/antidepressant and antimicrobial effects. Further studies are needed to evaluate the participation of antimicrobial mechanisms of antidepressants in MDD treatment as well as to determine the contribution of this effect to antidepressant resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Antidepressive agents and suicidal tendencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gründer, G; Veselinović, T; Paulzen, M

    2014-09-01

    In the last 2 years the discussions on the question whether antidepressants, especially selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can lead to suicidality, aggression and violence, flared up again. The available data on the problem, which has been discussed since the introduction of this substance group in the late 1980s, is presented in this article. A systematic literature search showed that a scientific consensus exists that the benefits of antidepressant pharmacotherapy in general, and of treatment with SSRIs and selective serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSNRIs) in particular, outweigh the risks of their use. This also applies to the treatment of children, adolescents and young adults. The agitation occasionally occurring at the beginning of treatment, which can be experienced as aversive in susceptible patients, can intensify or even trigger suicidal thoughts or impulses. This has to be paid particular attention to especially at the beginning of treatment. It is recommended that the indications for antidepressant pharmacotherapy of children, adolescents and young adults are assessed by a specialist.

  8. Evaluating eating behavior treatments by FDA standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janet eTomiyama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral treatments for obesity are not evaluated by the same criteria as pharmaceutical drugs, even though treatments such as low-calorie dieting are widely prescribed, require the patients’ time and investment, and may have risks. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA has a procedure for evaluating drugs, in which drugmakers must answer the following questions: (1 Is the treatment safe? (2 How dangerous is the condition the intervention is treating? (3 Is the treatment effective? (4 Is the treatment safe and effective for large numbers of people? We argue that using this framework to evaluate behavioral interventions could help identify unanswered research questions on their efficacy and effectiveness, and we use the example of low-calorie dieting to illustrate how FDA criteria might be applied in the context of behavioral medicine.

  9. Antidepressant-selective gynecomastia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Kenneth R; Podolsky, Dina; Greenman, Danielle; Madraswala, Rehman

    2013-01-01

    To describe what we believe is the first reported case of synergistic gynecomastia during treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders when sertraline was added to a stable medication regimen including duloxetine, rosuvastatin, and amlodipine. A 67-year-old male with major depression, dysthymia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social anxiety, hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia presented with new-onset gynecomastia and breast tenderness. Mammography revealed bilateral gynecomastia (fibroglandular tissue posterior to the nipples bilaterally) without suspicious mass, calcification, or other abnormalities. These new symptoms developed after sertraline was added to his stable medication regimen (duloxetine, alprazolam, rosuvastatin, metoprolol, amlodipine, hydrochlorothiazide/triamterene, metformin, and sitagliptin). These symptoms were dose-dependent, with gynecomastia and breast tenderness more severe as sertraline was titrated from 25 mg/day to 50 mg/day and then to 75 mg/day. When sertraline was discontinued, gynecomastia and breast tenderness rapidly resolved. Mammoplasia and gynecomastia are associated with altered dopamine neurotransmission and/or perturbations in sexual hormones. These adverse effects may be medication induced. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (sertraline), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine), rosuvastatin, and amlodipine have been reported to cause these adverse effects. This case was unique, since the patient had been on both sertraline and duloxetine previously as independent psychotropics without the development of gynecomastia. In the context of an additive drug adverse effect, the probability of sertraline as the precipitant drug was determined by both the Naranjo probability scale and the Horn drug interaction probability scale as probable. Gynecomastia is associated with antidepressants and other medications but is rarely addressed. Gynecomastia may be antidepressant selective or may be the result of

  10. New generation of antidepressants in pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladan Kashani

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Although pregnancy was once thought to protect against psychiatric disorders, gravid and non gravid women have similar risks for major depression, at 10% to 15%. Both depression and antidepressant treatment during pregnancy have been associated with risks. Few medications have been proved unequivocally safe during pregnancy. Although certain antidepressants have not been linked with an increased risk of birth defects or impaired development including bupropion, citalopram, escitalopram and venlafaxine, the latest studies aren't necessarily reassuring. As researchers continue to learn more about antidepressants, the risks and benefits of taking the drugs during pregnancy must be weighed carefully on a case-by-case basis. This review discusses about the use of new generation of antidepressants in pregnancy

  11. The effects of antidepressants on gastric ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Latif Güneş

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In their daily practice, psychiatrists often experience gastriccomplaints in patients beside psychiatric disorders.Peptic ulcer is one of the diseases, which accompanyto psychiatric disorders including mainly depression. Itis shown that antidepressants can inflame the bleedingsincluding gastrointestinal (GI bleedings, while they havepositive effect on ulcer healing. In this review, studies,which conducted about the positive or negative effects ofantidepressant drugs on ulcer treatment were examined.Accordingly; it was found that opipramol, amitriptyline,imipramine that of tricyclic antidepressants was found tobe helpful in healing of the ulcer. It was stated that SelectiveSerotonin Reuptake Inhibitors generally inflamedulcers, exceptionally fluvoxamine and fluoxetine reducedulcer; moclobemide that of monoamine-oxidase inhibitorand tianeptine and mirtazapine that of atypical antidepressantshad positive effect in ulcer healing. To be carefulin choosing the appropriate antidepressant in psychiatricpatients with gastric ulcer is important in the prognosisof both ulcer and depression.Key words: peptic ulcer; depression; antidepressant drugs

  12. Antidepressants and platinum drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Brigitte J; Ryan, John J; Farrell, Nicholas P

    2014-01-01

    Antidepressants are frequently prescribed concurrently with anti-cancer drugs and may have synergistic, additive or antagonistic effects. The present work investigated the effect of antidepressants on the cytotoxicity of platinum agents cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. The cytotoxicity of platinum drugs alone or in combination with antidepressants was measured in HCT116 wild-type (wt), HCT116 (p53 -/-), HT-29, SKOV3 and A2780 cells using an apoptosis-based assay. The effect of antidepressants on platinum cytotoxicity is both cell type- and drug dependent. Mostly additive effects were observed. Desipramine and fluoxetine caused the greatest effects, with cisplatin in general being most sensitive to their presence. There is little effect of p53 status on the drug-drug interaction while the calmodulin inhibitor W7 augmented cisplatin cytotoxicity relative to carboplatin and oxaliplatin. The drug-drug interaction between antidepressants and platinum anti-cancer agents requires detailed evaluation for optimization of patient care.

  13. Sexual dysfunction, depression, and the impact of antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Sidney H; Rizvi, Sakina

    2009-04-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common symptom of depression. Although decreased libido is most often reported, difficulties with arousal, resulting in vaginal dryness in women and erectile dysfunction in men, and absent or delayed orgasm are also prevalent. Sexual dysfunction is also a frequent adverse effect of treatment with most antidepressants and is one of the predominant reasons for premature drug discontinuation. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the most widely prescribed antidepressants and have significant effects on arousal and orgasm compared with antidepressants that target norepinephrine, dopamine, and melatonin systems. The availability of an antidepressant that does not cause or exacerbate sexual dysfunction represents an advance in pharmacotherapy for mood disorders and should reduce treatment noncompliance and decrease the need for switching antidepressants or adding antidotes. The purpose of this review was to provide an update on the prevalence, psychobiology, and relative adverse effect burden of sexual dysfunction associated with different antidepressants.

  14. The Pharmacopsychometric Triangle to Illustrate the Effectiveness of T-PEMF Concomitant with Antidepressants in Treatment Resistant Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, P; Gefke, Maria; Lunde, M

    2011-01-01

    Background. Our T-PEMF trial has been revisited with focus on the pharmacopsychometric triangle in which effect size is used when comparing wanted versus unwanted clinical effects and quality of life as outcomes. In this analysis, we have especially focused on the self-reported HAM-D(6). Methods....... The antidepressive medication which the patients were resistant to was kept unchanged during the five weeks of active versus sham T-PEMF. Results. In total 21, patients received active T-PEMF, and 19 patients received sham T-PEMF. The effect size was 1.02 and 0.90, respectively, on HAM-D(6) and HAM-D(6)-S....... Concerning side effects, the active T-PEMF reduced the baseline score on concentration problems with an effect size of 0.44 while inducing more autonomic symptoms than sham T-PEMF with an effect size of -0.41. The advantage of active over sham T-PEMF obtained an effect size of 0.48. Conclusion. Active T-PEMF...

  15. Randomized Controlled Trials of Add-On Antidepressants in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Terevnikov, Viacheslav; Joffe, Grigori; Stenberg, Jan-Henry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite adequate treatment with antipsychotics, a substantial number of patients with schizophrenia demonstrate only suboptimal clinical outcome. To overcome this challenge, various psychopharmacological combination strategies have been used, including antidepressants added to antipsychotics. Methods: To analyze the efficacy of add-on antidepressants for the treatment of negative, positive, cognitive, depressive, and antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms in schizophrenia, ...

  16. Identifying genetic loci affecting antidepressant drug response in depression using drug-gene interaction models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Noordam; C.L. Avery; L.E. Visser; B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAntidepressants are often only moderately successful in decreasing the severity of depressive symptoms. In part, antidepressant treatment response in patients with depression is genetically determined. However, although a large number of studies have been conducted aiming to identify

  17. 40 CFR 268.44 - Variance from a treatment standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... disposal restriction treatment standards that, using a reasonable maximum exposure scenario: (A) For... Chromium .32 NA Lead .040 NA Nickel .44 NA CWM Chemical Services, LLC, Model City, New York K0889 Standards... Lead .040 NA Nickel .44 NA St. Gobain Containers, El Monte, CA 5,7 D010 Standards under § 268.40...

  18. Antidepressant Use and Cognitive Decline: The Health and Retirement Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saczynski, Jane S; Rosen, Allison B; McCammon, Ryan J; Zivin, Kara; Andrade, Susan E; Langa, Kenneth M; Vijan, Sandeep; Pirraglia, Paul A; Briesacher, Becky A

    2015-07-01

    Depression is associated with cognitive impairment and dementia, but whether treatment for depression with antidepressants reduces the risk for cognitive decline is unclear. We assessed the association between antidepressant use and cognitive decline over 6 years. Participants were 3714 adults aged 50 years or more who were enrolled in the nationally representative Health and Retirement Study and had self-reported antidepressant use. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the 8-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Cognitive function was assessed at 4 time points (2004, 2006, 2008, 2010) using a validated 27-point scale. Change in cognitive function over the 6-year follow-up period was examined using linear growth models, adjusted for demographics, depressive symptoms, comorbidities, functional limitations, and antidepressant anticholinergic activity load. At baseline, cognitive function did not differ significantly between the 445 (12.1%) participants taking antidepressants and those not taking antidepressants (mean, 14.9%; 95% confidence interval, 14.3-15.4 vs mean, 15.1%; 95% confidence interval, 14.9-15.3). During the 6-year follow up period, cognition declined in both users and nonusers of antidepressants, ranging from -1.4 change in mean score in those with high depressive symptoms and taking antidepressants to -0.5 change in mean score in those with high depressive symptoms and not taking antidepressants. In adjusted models, cognition declined in people taking antidepressants at the same rate as those not taking antidepressants. Results remained consistent across different levels of baseline cognitive function, age, and duration of antidepressant use (prolonged vs short-term). Antidepressant use did not modify the course of 6-year cognitive change in this nationally representative sample. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pharmacogenetics of antidepressant response: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Antonio

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The past few decades have witnessed much progress in the field of pharmacogenetics. The identification of the genetic background that regulates the antidepressant response has benefited from these advances. This review focuses on the pharmacogenetics of the antidepressant response through the analysis and discussion of the most compelling evidence in this line of research. Online databases (Medline and PsycINFO have been searched and the most replicated association findings relating to the genetics of the antidepressant response have been reported and discussed. Some replicated findings in the literature have suggested the serotonin transporter promoter (5-HTTLPR, serotonin receptor 1A (HTR1A, serotonin receptor 2A (HTR2A, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1 and FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5 as putative regulators of the antidepressant response. A high rate of failure of replication has also been reported. Pharmacogenetics will hopefully provide the basis for personalised antidepressant treatment that is able to maximise the probability of a good response and to minimise side effects; however, this goal is not achievable at the moment. The extent of the validity of the replicated findings and the reasons for the poor results obtained from studies of the pharmacogenetics of the antidepressant response are discussed.

  20. Use of Antidepressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalali, Amir H.; Thase, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated antidepressant prescriptions and reasons for use. According to our data, the top 10 molecules represent ∼95% of total antidepressant prescriptions for both primary care physicians (PCPs) and psychiatrists. The primary difference between PCPs and psychiatrists was the increased use of buproprion and tricyclics/tetracyclics by psychiatrists. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and other newer antidepressants such as venlafaxine (Effexor) and buproprion (Wellbutrin) are used to treat depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorders. The noted exception is duloxetine (Cymbalta), which looks like a blend between the newer agents and the tricyclics where there is use beyond the traditional central nervous system (CNS) disorders into pain and migraine. PMID:20436760

  1. Increased use of antidepressants and decreasing suicide rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Canudas-Romo, V; Conwell, Y

    2008-01-01

    -based record linkage. PARTICIPANTS: All individuals aged 50 years and older living in Denmark between 1 January 1996 and 31 December 2000 (N = 2,100,808). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Suicide rates are calculated according to current antidepressant treatment status (no treatment, tricyclic antidepressants (TCA...... 100,000, recipients of antidepressants contributed to the decline by 0.9 suicides. Women redeeming antidepressant prescriptions accounted for 0.4 suicides of the observed reduction of 3.3 per 100,000. The average suicide rates for men receiving TCA and SSRI were 153.3 and 169.0 per 100,000 person......-years, respectively. Among older women, both TCA and SSRI users had an average suicide rate of 68.8 per 100,000 over the period examined. CONCLUSIONS: Just a small proportion of older adults dying by suicide were found to be in treatment with antidepressants at the time of death. Individuals in active treatment...

  2. Screening of antidepressant activity and estimation of quercetin from Coccinia indica using TLC densitometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Kudrat; Kumar, Deepak; Jamwal, Anupam; Kumar, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Coccinia indica Naud (Cucurbitaceae) has been traditionally used for the treatment of depression but these claims have not been validated. The objective of this study is to investigate antidepressant activity of various extracts and fractions of C. indica aerial parts, and to estimate content of quercetin in the plant using TLC densitometry. Coccinia indica aerial parts were successively extracted using solvents in increasing order of polarity, namely n-hexane, chloroform, methanol, and water. Various extracts were evaluated for antidepressant activity at doses of 200 or 400 mg/kg, p.o., upon acute administration in mice using the forced swim test (FST). The bioactive extract was partitioned successively using solvents in increasing order of polarity, namely n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol. All fractions were also screened for antidepressant activity at doses of 25 or 50 mg/kg, p.o., upon acute administration in mice. The methanol extract significantly reduced the duration of immobility in FST at dose of 400 mg/kg without affecting locomotor activity in open field test, thus, confirmed its antidepressant activity, which was statistically equivalent to the standard drug (imipramine, 15 mg/kg, i.p.). Ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) exhibited antidepressant activity at 50 mg/kg. Comparative TLC fingerprint studies confirmed the presence of quercetin in methanol extract and EAF. Quercetin was used as a chemical marker to standardize C. indica aerial parts using the validated TLC densitometric method, and the content of quercetin was found to be 0.00172% w/w. The present studies scientifically validated traditional claims of C. indica for antidepressant activity.

  3. A double-blind placebo-controlled trial of maca root as treatment for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dording, Christina M; Schettler, Pamela J; Dalton, Elizabeth D; Parkin, Susannah R; Walker, Rosemary S W; Fehling, Kara B; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We sought to demonstrate that maca root may be an effective treatment for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction (AISD) in women. Method. We conducted a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of maca root (3.0 g/day) in 45 female outpatients (mean age of 41.5 ± 12.5 years) with SSRI/SNRI-induced sexual dysfunction whose depression remitted. Endpoints were improvement in sexual functioning as per the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) and the Massachusetts General Hospital Sexual Function Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ). Results. 45 of 57 consented females were randomized, and 42 (30 premenopausal and 12 postmenopausal women) were eligible for a modified intent-to-treat analysis based on having had at least one postmedication visit. Remission rates by the end of treatment were higher for the maca than the placebo group, based on attainment of an ASEX total score ≤ 10 (9.5% for maca versus 4.8% for placebo), attaining an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 12 (30.0% for maca versus 20.0% for placebo) and reaching an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 8 (9.5% for maca versus 5.0% for placebo). Higher remission rates for the maca versus placebo group were associated with postmenopausal status. Maca was well tolerated. Conclusion. Maca root may alleviate SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women. This trial is registered with NCT00568126.

  4. A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial of Maca Root as Treatment for Antidepressant-Induced Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M. Dording

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We sought to demonstrate that maca root may be an effective treatment for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction (AISD in women. Method. We conducted a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of maca root (3.0 g/day in 45 female outpatients (mean age of 41.5 ± 12.5 years with SSRI/SNRI-induced sexual dysfunction whose depression remitted. Endpoints were improvement in sexual functioning as per the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX and the Massachusetts General Hospital Sexual Function Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ. Results. 45 of 57 consented females were randomized, and 42 (30 premenopausal and 12 postmenopausal women were eligible for a modified intent-to-treat analysis based on having had at least one postmedication visit. Remission rates by the end of treatment were higher for the maca than the placebo group, based on attainment of an ASEX total score ≤ 10 (9.5% for maca versus 4.8% for placebo, attaining an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 12 (30.0% for maca versus 20.0% for placebo and reaching an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 8 (9.5% for maca versus 5.0% for placebo. Higher remission rates for the maca versus placebo group were associated with postmenopausal status. Maca was well tolerated. Conclusion. Maca root may alleviate SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women. This trial is registered with NCT00568126.

  5. [Modification of sexual functions by antidepressants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, D; Philipp, M

    1994-01-01

    Sexual dysfunctions appear to be frequently occurring adverse events in treatment with antidepressants. Due to methodological reasons, a reliable estimation of the frequency of such events is currently not yet possible. There is evidence, that antidepressants could be differentiated with respect to their potency and specificity for disturbances of certain sexual subfunctions according to their pharmacological profile. With SSRIs in particular impaired functions of orgasm and ejaculation can be observed. No deteriorations are reported for buproprion and an improvement of sexual dysfunctions within the course of treatment for moclobemide. Viloxazine and trazodone appear to possess marked stimulating effects on libido and erectile functions. Generally the incidence of sexual adverse events is underestimated, although there is a pronounced impact on patient compliance. Taking into account this well documented side effect, sexual impairments should be monitored carefully within antidepressive treatment.

  6. Systematic Review of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Failed Antidepressant Treatment Response in Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia, and Subthreshold Depression in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacQueen, Glenda; Santaguida, Pasqualina; Keshavarz, Homa; Jaworska, Natalia; Levine, Mitchell; Beyene, Joseph; Raina, Parminder

    2017-01-01

    This systematic review critically evaluated clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for treating adults with major depressive disorder, dysthymia, or subthreshold or minor depression for recommendations following inadequate response to first-line treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Searches for CPGs (January 2004 to November 2014) in English included 7 bibliographic databases and grey literature sources using CPG and depression as the keywords. Two raters selected CPGs on depression with a national scope. Data extraction included definitions of adequate response and recommended treatment options. Two raters assessed quality using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) instrument. From 46,908 citations, 3167 were screened at full text. From these 21 CPG were applicable to adults in primary care and outpatient settings. Five CPGs consider patients with dysthymia or subthreshold or minor depression. None provides recommendations for those who do not respond to first-line SSRI treatment. For adults with MDD, most CPGs do not define an "inadequate response" or provide specific suggestions regarding how to choose alternative medications when switching to an alternative antidepressant. There is variability between CPGs in recommending combination strategies. AGREE II ratings for stakeholder involvement in CPG development, editorial independence, and rigor of development are domains in which depression guidelines are often less robust. About half of patients with depression require second-line treatment to achieve remission. Consistency and clarity in guidelines for second-line treatment of depression are therefore important for clinicians but lacking in most current guidelines. This may reflect a paucity of primary studies upon which to base conclusions.

  7. Relative efficacy and tolerability of vortioxetine versus selected antidepressants by indirect comparisons of similar clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Lançon, Christophe; Brignone, Mélanie; Rive, Benoît; Salah, Samir; Ereshefsky, Larry; Francois, Clément

    2014-12-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant with multimodal activity which has shown efficacy in major depressive disorder (MDD) patients in six of ten short-term, randomized, placebo-controlled trials (completed end 2012). We performed meta-regression analyses to indirectly compare vortioxetine to seven marketed antidepressants with different mechanisms of action. To ensure study comparability, only experimental drug and placebo arms from placebo-controlled registration studies were included in primary analyses. The main outcomes were efficacy (standardized mean difference in change from baseline to 2 months on primary endpoint [MADRS/HAM-D]), and tolerability (withdrawal rate due to adverse events). For efficacy, estimates of treatment effect (negative estimates favor vortioxetine) for vortioxetine versus comparators were: agomelatine, -0.16 (p = 0.11); desvenlafaxine, 0.03 (p = 0.80); duloxetine, 0.09 (p = 0.42); escitalopram, -0.05 (p = 0.70); sertraline, -0.04 (p = 0.83); venlafaxine IR/XR, 0.12 (p = 0.33); and vilazodone, -0.25 (p = 0.11). For tolerability, all but one combination was numerically in favor of vortioxetine (odds ratio antidepressant effect estimates or relative ranking. These meta-regression data show that vortioxetine offers a comparable or favorable combination of efficacy (measured by MADRS/HAM-D) and tolerability (measured by withdrawal rate due to adverse events) versus other antidepressants in registration studies in MDD. Alternative methods like mixed-treatment comparison and inclusion of all randomized studies and active reference arms may provide complementary information to this analysis (more evidence but also more heterogeneity). Key messages: Indirect comparisons based on registration studies allow a useful comparison between a recently approved antidepressant and an approved drug. Vortioxetine offers a comparable or favorable combination of efficacy (measured by MADRS/HAM-D assessments) and tolerability (measured by withdrawal rate due to

  8. The effect of antidepressants on fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casilla-Lennon, Marianne M; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Steiner, Anne Z

    2016-09-01

    Information on the effects of different pharmaceuticals on fertility is sparse. Human and animal models indicate that antidepressant use could have a negative effect on fertility through alteration of levels of the neurosteroid, allopregnanolone. The objective of this study is to assess the effects of antidepressants on the natural fertility in women. A secondary analysis of data from Time to Conceive, a prospective cohort study, was conducted. Women ages 30 to 44 years without a history of infertility, early in their attempts to conceive, were followed with standardized pregnancy testing until pregnancy was detected. Medication use was assessed at enrollment, daily for up to 4 months, and then monthly. For this analysis, discrete time regression models were created to calculate the association between antidepressant use and fecundability. Potential confounders-age, body mass index, caffeine, alcohol use, and education-were included in all models. Ninety-two (9.6%) of 957 women reported antidepressant use while attempting to conceive. Women taking antidepressants were more likely to be non-Hispanic Caucasian (91% vs 75%, P Antidepressant use at enrollment had an adjusted fecundability ratio (FR) of 0.86 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.63-1.20). However, time-varying analyses suggested that antidepressant use in a given cycle is associated with a reduced probability of conceiving in that cycle (adjusted FR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.53-1.06). After adjusting for history of depression or restricting the analysis to women who reported a history of depression, the association between antidepressant use and decreased fecundability remained [adjusted FR, 0.66 (95% CI, 0.45-0.97) and (adjusted FR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.43-0.94), respectively]. Our data suggest that antidepressants may reduce the probability of a woman with a history of depression to conceive naturally. Future studies are needed to differentiate the extent to which this association is due to the antidepressant itself

  9. Antidepressants for depression in adults with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshun-Wilson, Ingrid; Siegfried, Nandi; Akena, Dickens H; Stein, Dan J; Obuku, Ekwaro A; Joska, John A

    2018-01-22

    Rates of major depression among people living with HIV (PLWH) are substantially higher than those seen in the general population and this may adversely affect antiretroviral treatment outcomes. Several unique clinical and psychosocial factors may contribute to the development and persistence of depression in PLWH. Given these influences, it is unclear if antidepressant therapy is as effective for PLWH as the general population. To assess the efficacy of antidepressant therapy for treatment of depression in PLWH. We searched The Cochrane Common Mental Disorders Group's specialised register (CCMD-CTR), the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase and ran a cited reference search on the Web of Science for reports of all included studies. We conducted additional searches of the international trial registers including; ClinicalTrials.gov, World Health Organization Trials Portal (ICTRP), and the HIV and AIDS - Clinical trials register. We searched grey literature and reference lists to identify additional studies and contacted authors to obtain missing data. We applied no restrictions on date, language or publication status to the searches, which included studies conducted between 1 January 1980 and 18 April 2017. We included randomized controlled trials of antidepressant drug therapy compared to placebo or another antidepressant drug class. Participants eligible for inclusion had to be aged 18 years and older, from any setting, and have both HIV and depression. Depression was defined according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders or International Statistical Classification of Diseases criteria. Two review authors independently applied the inclusion criteria and extracted data. We presented categorical outcomes as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Continuous outcomes were presented mean (MD) or standardized mean differences (SMD) with standard deviations (SD). We assessed quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. We included 10 studies

  10. Mind your state: Insights into antidepressant nonadherence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is an insidious disease and affects up to 15% of the global population. Although MDD responds to a wide range of pharmacological treatment options, a number of factors, i.e. not adhering to treatment for at least 4–12 months, contribute to antidepressants not being highly effective.

  11. Efficacy of antidepressants on orofacial pain: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, W.J.J.M.; Perez, R.S.G.M.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2012-01-01

    Orofacial pain is a common complaint with multiple diagnoses. There is controversy about the effectiveness of antidepressants for the management of orofacial pain disorders. In order to be able to make a best evidence choice between available antidepressants for the treatment of orofacial pain, a

  12. Antidepressants for non-specific low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urquhart, D. M.; Hoving, J. L.; Assendelft, W. W. J. J.; Roland, M.; van Tulder, M. W.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antidepressants are commonly used in the management of low-back pain. However, their use is controversial. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this review was to determine whether antidepressants are more effective than placebo for the treatment of non-specific low-back pain. SEARCH STRATEGY:

  13. [Analysis on standardization of patient posture for acupuncture treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yonghui

    2018-02-12

    The standardization of patient posture for acupuncture treatment was discussed. According to the opinions in Neijing ( Inner Canon of Huangdi ), combined with the clinical practice of acupuncture, it was believed that the patient posture for acupuncture treatment should be standardized based on Neijing . The standardized patient posture was the foundation of acupuncture, the need of blood flow and requirement of acupuncture technique. The combination of three elements was beneficial for the traveling of spirit- qi through meridian-acupoint, which could regulate balance of yin and yang to treat disease. In addition, the principles and methods of standardization of patient posture was proposed, and the important clinical significance of standardization of patient posture for acupuncture treatment was highlighted.

  14. Chronic Treatment with Escitalopram but Not R-Citalopram Translocates Gαs from Lipid Raft Domains and Potentiates Adenylyl Cyclase: A 5-Hydroxytryptamine Transporter-Independent Action of This Antidepressant Compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lanqiu

    2010-01-01

    Chronic antidepressant treatment has been shown to increase adenylyl cyclase activity, in part, due to translocation of Gαs from lipid rafts to a nonraft fraction of the plasma membrane where they engage in a more facile stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. This effect holds for multiple classes of antidepressants, and for serotonin uptake inhibitors, it occurs in the absence of the serotonin transporter. In the present study, we examined the change in the amount of Gαs in lipid raft and whole cell lysate after exposing C6 cells to escitalopram. The results showed that chronic (but not acute) escitalopram decreased the content of Gαs in lipid rafts, whereas there was no change in overall Gαs content. These effects were drug dose- and exposure time-dependent. Although R-citalopram has been reported to antagonize some effects of escitalopram, this compound was without effect on Gαs localization in lipid rafts, and R-citalopram did not inhibit these actions of escitalopram. Escitalopram treatment increased cAMP accumulation, and this seemed due to increased coupling between Gαs and adenylyl cyclase. Thus, escitalopram is potent, rapid and efficacious in translocating Gαs from lipid rafts, and this effect seems to occur independently of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters. Our results suggest that, although antidepressants display distinct affinities for well identified targets (e.g., monoamine transporters), several presynaptic and postsynaptic molecules are probably modified during chronic antidepressant treatment, and these additional targets may be required for clinical efficacy of these drugs. PMID:19996298

  15. Chronic treatment with escitalopram but not R-citalopram translocates Galpha(s) from lipid raft domains and potentiates adenylyl cyclase: a 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter-independent action of this antidepressant compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lanqiu; Rasenick, Mark M

    2010-03-01

    Chronic antidepressant treatment has been shown to increase adenylyl cyclase activity, in part, due to translocation of Galpha(s) from lipid rafts to a nonraft fraction of the plasma membrane where they engage in a more facile stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. This effect holds for multiple classes of antidepressants, and for serotonin uptake inhibitors, it occurs in the absence of the serotonin transporter. In the present study, we examined the change in the amount of Galpha(s) in lipid raft and whole cell lysate after exposing C6 cells to escitalopram. The results showed that chronic (but not acute) escitalopram decreased the content of Galpha(s) in lipid rafts, whereas there was no change in overall Galpha(s) content. These effects were drug dose- and exposure time-dependent. Although R-citalopram has been reported to antagonize some effects of escitalopram, this compound was without effect on Galpha(s) localization in lipid rafts, and R-citalopram did not inhibit these actions of escitalopram. Escitalopram treatment increased cAMP accumulation, and this seemed due to increased coupling between Galpha(s) and adenylyl cyclase. Thus, escitalopram is potent, rapid and efficacious in translocating Galpha(s) from lipid rafts, and this effect seems to occur independently of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters. Our results suggest that, although antidepressants display distinct affinities for well identified targets (e.g., monoamine transporters), several presynaptic and postsynaptic molecules are probably modified during chronic antidepressant treatment, and these additional targets may be required for clinical efficacy of these drugs.

  16. An innovative design to establish proof of concept of the antidepressant effects of the NR2B subunit selective N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, CP-101,606, in patients with treatment-refractory major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preskorn, Sheldon H; Baker, Bryan; Kolluri, Sheela; Menniti, Frank S; Krams, Michael; Landen, Jaren W

    2008-12-01

    This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study was the first to evaluate the antidepressant efficacy, safety, and tolerability of an NR2B subunit-selective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, CP-101,606. Subjects had major depression, according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria and a history of treatment refractoriness to least 1 adequate trial of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. The study had 2 treatment periods. In period 1, subjects first received a 6-week open-label trial of paroxetine and a single-blind, intravenous placebo infusion. Period 1 nonresponders (n = 30) then received a randomized double-blind single infusion of CP-101,606 or placebo plus continued treatment with paroxetine for up to an additional 4 weeks (period 2). Depression severity was assessed using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale and 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. On the prespecified main outcome measure (change from baseline in the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale total score at day 5 of period 2), CP-101,606 produced a greater decrease than did placebo (mean difference, 8.6; 80% confidence interval, -12.3 to -4.5) (P Depression Rating Scale response rate was 60% for CP-101,606 versus 20% for placebo. Seventy-eight percent of CP-101,606-treated responders maintained response status for at least 1 week after the infusion. CP-101,606 was safe, generally well tolerated, and capable of producing an antidepressant response without also producing a dissociative reaction. Antagonism of the NR2B subtype of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor may be a fruitful target for the development of a new antidepressant with more robust effects and a faster onset compared with those currently available and capable of working when existing antidepressants do not.

  17. Identifying fast-onset antidepressants using rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaker, M J; Dulawa, S C

    2017-05-01

    Depression is a leading cause of disability worldwide and a major contributor to the burden of suicide. A major limitation of classical antidepressants is that 2-4 weeks of continuous treatment is required to elicit therapeutic effects, prolonging the period of depression, disability and suicide risk. Therefore, the development of fast-onset antidepressants is crucial. Preclinical identification of fast-onset antidepressants requires animal models that can accurately predict the delay to therapeutic onset. Although several well-validated assay models exist that predict antidepressant potential, few thoroughly tested animal models exist that can detect therapeutic onset. In this review, we discuss and assess the validity of seven rodent models currently used to assess antidepressant onset: olfactory bulbectomy, chronic mild stress, chronic forced swim test, novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH), novelty-suppressed feeding (NSF), social defeat stress, and learned helplessness. We review the effects of classical antidepressants in these models, as well as six treatments that possess fast-onset antidepressant effects in the clinic: electroconvulsive shock therapy, sleep deprivation, ketamine, scopolamine, GLYX-13 and pindolol used in conjunction with classical antidepressants. We also discuss the effects of several compounds that have yet to be tested in humans but have fast-onset antidepressant-like effects in one or more of these antidepressant onset sensitive models. These compounds include selective serotonin (5-HT) 2C receptor antagonists, a 5-HT 4 receptor agonist, a 5-HT 7 receptor antagonist, NMDA receptor antagonists, a TREK-1 receptor antagonist, mGluR antagonists and (2R,6R)-HNK. Finally, we provide recommendations for identifying fast-onset antidepressants using rodent behavioral models and molecular approaches.

  18. Antidepressant-like effects of aniracetam in aged rats and its mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Tanaka, Y

    2001-11-01

    Aniracetam has been reported to be efficacious for treating poststroke depression, but no studies that basically examined the antidepressive effects have been made. We aimed to test the antidepressant-like property of aniracetam in rats and to clarify the mechanisms of action through the interaction studies with some receptor antagonists. Antidepressant-like effects of aniracetam and various classes of compounds including different antidepressants were examined in a forced swim test with young (9 weeks old) and aged (25-30 months old) rats. Rats were exposed to a 5-min swim in a test session on day 2 following a 15-min swim in a training session on day 1, and immobility time during the period on day 2 was measured. The test compounds were administered subacutely (three doses over 2 days) or acutely (0.5 h before the testing). Standard antidepressants except for tandospirone significantly reduced immobility time in both young and aged rats. Aniracetam (10-100 mg/kg PO) failed to decrease immobility time in young rats, but it (100 mg/kg PO) significantly shortened immobility in aged rats, the effects of which were mainly mimicked by combined treatment of the metabolites, 2-pyrrolidinone and N-anisoyl-GABA. The effects of aniracetam was reversed completely by mecamylamine (10 mg/kg IP) or haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg IP) and slightly by ketanserin (1 m/kg IP) but was potentiated by scopolamine (0.03 mg/kg IP). These results indicate that aniracetam acts more effective when the forced swim stress-induced immobility is accompanied with brain dysfunction that occurs with aging. The antidepressant-like activity of aniracetam, which is probably due to the combined effects of 2-pyrrolidinone and N-anisoyl-GABA, may be mediated by mainly facilitating dopaminergic transmission (dopamine release and dopamine D2 receptor activation) through nicotinic acetylcholine receptor stimulation.

  19. No change in N-acetyl aspartate in first episode of moderate depression after antidepressant treatment: 1H magnetic spectroscopy study of left amygdala and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajs Janović M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Maja Bajs Janović,1,3 Petra Kalember,2 Špiro Janović,1,3 Pero Hrabač,2 Petra Folnegović Grošić,1 Vladimir Grošić,4 Marko Radoš,5 Neven Henigsberg2,61University Department of Psychiatry, Clinical Hospital Center Zagreb, Zagreb, 2Polyclinic Neuron, Croatian Institute for Brain Research, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, 3University North, Varaždin, 4Psychiatric Hospital Sveti Ivan, Zagreb, 5University Department of Radiology, Clinical Hospital Center Zagreb, Zagreb, 6Psychiatric Clinic Vrapče, Zagreb, CroatiaBackground: The role of brain metabolites as biological correlates of the intensity, symptoms, and course of major depression has not been determined. It has also been inconclusive whether the change in brain metabolites, measured with proton magnetic spectroscopy, could be correlated with the treatment outcome. Methods: Proton magnetic spectroscopy was performed in 29 participants with a first episode of moderate depression occurring in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and left amygdala at baseline and after 8 weeks of antidepressant treatment with escitalopram. The Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and the Beck Depression Inventory were used to assess the intensity of depression at baseline and at the endpoint of the study. At endpoint, the participants were identified as responders (n=17 or nonresponders (n=12 to the antidepressant therapy. Results: There was no significant change in the N-acetyl aspartate/creatine ratio (NAA/Cr after treatment with antidepressant medication. The baseline and endpoint NAA/Cr ratios were not significantly different between the responder and nonresponder groups. The correlation between NAA/Cr and changes in the scores of clinical scales were not significant in either group. Conclusion: This study could not confirm any significant changes in NAA after antidepressant treatment in the first episode of moderate depression, or in

  20. Effectiveness of permethrin standard and modified methods in scabies treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleha Sungkar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Permethrin is the drug of choice for scabies with side effects such as erythema, pain, itching and prickling sensation. Whole-body (standard topical application of permethrin causes discomfort; thus, modified application of permethrin to the lesion only, followed with baths twice daily using soap was proposed. The objective of the study is to know the effectiveness of standard against lesion-only application of permethrin in scabies treatment.Methods: An experimental study was conducted in pesantren in East Jakarta and data was collected in May-July 2012. Diagnosis of scabies was made through anamnesis and skin examination. Subjects positive for scabies were divided into three groups: one standard method group (whole-body topical application and two modified groups (lesion-only application followed by the use of regular soap and antiseptic soap group. The three groups were evaluated weekly for three consecutive weeks. Data was processed using SPSS 20 and analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test.Results: Total of 94 subjects was scabies positive (prevalence 50% but only 69 subjects were randomly picked to be analyzed. The cure rate at the end of week III of the standard method group was 95.7%, modified treatment followed by the use of regular soap was 91.3%, and modified treatment followed by the use of antiseptic soap was 78.3% (p = 0.163. The recurrence rate of standard treatment was 8.7%,  modified treatment followed by the use of regular soap was 13% and modified treatment followed by the use of antiseptic soap was 26.1% (p = 0.250.Conclusion: The standard scabies treatment was as effective as the modified scabies treatment.

  1. Treatment with high-dose antidepressants severely exacerbates the pathological outcome of experimental Escherichia coli infections in poultry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Sofie; Kudirkiene, Egle; Li, Lili

    2017-01-01

    combined with tetracycline. In conclusion high-dose treatments (four times the maximum therapeutic dose for treating human depression) with sertraline as an adjuvant for treatment of antibiotic resistant E. coli infections exacerbate the pathological outcome of infection in chickens....... the susceptibility of Escherichia coli to antibiotics. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the antimicrobial activity of sertraline could be documented under clinical settings, hereunder if sertraline could potentiate the effect of tetracycline in treatment of an experimentally induced ascending...... infection in poultry. A total of 40 chickens were divided in four groups of 10 chickens each. All chickens were challenged with 4x103 colony forming units (CFU) of a tetracycline resistant E. coli strain using a surgical infection model, and subsequently treated with either high-dose sertraline...

  2. [Multimodal serotonergic antidepressants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, D S

    Based on the original literature, the author for the first time describes a history of selective serotonergic antidepressants simultaneously inhibiting the serotonin reuptake and directly interacting with serotonin receptors. A history of creation and introduction of their main representatives is presented. A history of investigation of their neurochemical activity is analyzed in details. The history of the evolution of their classifications is systemized. The data presented suggest the rationale for unifying all selective serotonergic antidepressants, simultaneously inhibiting the serotonin reuptake and directly interacting with serotonin receptors (trazodone, etoperidone, nefazodone, vilazodone, vortioxetine), in one group of 'multimodal serotonergic antidepressants'. The expediency to include this group in the modern neurochemical classification of nootropic drugs is substantiated.

  3. Trans-identity - the Standards of Diagnostics and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gessmann H.-V.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available German Society for Sexual Research, Academy of Sexual Medicine and Society of Sexology formulated standards for evaluation and treatment of transsexuals. The creation of the standards involved Sophinette Becker, Hartmut A. G. Bosinski, Ulrich Clement, Wolf Eicher, Thomas M. Goerlich, Uwe Hartmann, Götz Kockott, Dieter Langer, Wilhelm E. Preuss, Gunter Schmidt, Alfred Springer, Reinhard Wille. Since 1980, the Federal Republic of Germany has a law on transsexualism, which regulates the right of the individual to change the sex. However, until now there were no specifically defined standards of assessment and treatment of transsexuals. For the first time, in 1979 Harry Benjamin invited the International Medical Association of Germany to revise the standards of medical care for gender dysphoria. The following standards of assessment and treatment of transsexuals have been developed at a conference convened by the German Society for Research Expert Committee under the leadership of Sophinette Becker. The review of currently valid standards for evaluation and treatment of transgender is the subject of this article

  4. Dealing With Depression: Antidepressant Skills for Teens

    OpenAIRE

    Bilsker, Dan; Gilbert, Merv; Worling, David; Garland, Jane

    2005-01-01

      Dealing with Depression is a workbook for teens that explains depression and teaches three main antidepressant skills you can use to help overcome or prevent it. The skills are presented in a step-by-step way so that you may learn them easily and apply them to your life. Sometimes these antidepressant skills can be used on their own, when the mood problem isn't too severe, and sometimes they have to be used along with treatments prescribed by professionals. Either way, practicing th...

  5. Diagnosis at the first episode to differentiate antidepressant treatment responses in patients with mood and anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kemp, ECM; Moleman, P; Hoogduin, CAL; Broekman, TG; Schaap, CPDR; van den Berg, PC

    Rationale: Co-morbidity of mood and anxiety disorders is often ignored in pharmacotreatment outcome studies and this complicates the interpretation of treatment response. The clinical trials are usually based on single categories from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM).

  6. Diagnosis at the first episode to differentiate antidepressant treatment responses in patients with mood and anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemp, E.C.M. de; Moleman, P.; Hoogduin, C.A.L.; Broekman, T.G.; Goedhart, A.; Schaap, C.P.D.R.; Berg, P.C. van den

    2002-01-01

    Rationale: Co-morbidity of mood and anxiety disorders is often ignored in pharmacotreatment outcome studies and this complicates the interpretation of treatment response. The clinical trials are usually based on single categories from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM).

  7. Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors as Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallo Volke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Affective and anxiety disorders are widely distributed disorders with severe social and economic effects. Evidence is emphatic that effective treatment helps to restore function and quality of life. Due to the action of most modern antidepressant drugs, serotonergic mechanisms have traditionally been suggested to play major roles in the pathophysiology of mood and stress-related disorders. However, a few clinical and several pre-clinical studies, strongly suggest involvement of the nitric oxide (NO signaling pathway in these disorders. Moreover, several of the conventional neurotransmitters, including serotonin, glutamate and GABA, are intimately regulated by NO, and distinct classes of antidepressants have been found to modulate the hippocampal NO level in vivo. The NO system is therefore a potential target for antidepressant and anxiolytic drug action in acute therapy as well as in prophylaxis. This paper reviews the effect of drugs modulating NO synthesis in anxiety and depression.

  8. Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Depressive Disorders, and Antidepressant Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Paizanis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence that neural stem cells reside in the adult central nervous system where neurogenesis occurs throughout lifespan. Neurogenesis concerns mainly two areas in the brain: the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus and the subventricular zone, where it is controlled by several trophic factors and neuroactive molecules. Neurogenesis is involved in processes such as learning and memory and accumulating evidence implicates hippocampal neurogenesis in the physiopathology of depression. We herein review experimental and clinical data demonstrating that stress and antidepressant treatments affect neurogenesis in opposite direction in rodents. In particular, the stimulation of hippocampal neurogenesis by all types of antidepressant drugs supports the view that neuroplastic phenomena are involved in the physiopathology of depression and underlie—at least partly—antidepressant therapy.

  9. Evolution: Its Treatment in K-12 State Science Curriculum Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, L. S.

    2001-12-01

    State standards are the basis upon which states and local schools build curricula. Usually taking the form of lists of what students are expected to learn at specified grades or clusters of grades, they influence statewide examinations, textbooks, teacher education and credentialing, and other areas in which states typically exercise control over local curriculum development. State science standards vary very widely in overall quality.1,2 This is especially true in their treatment of evolution, both in the life sciences and to a somewhat lesser extent in geology and astronomy. Not surprisingly, a detailed evaluation of the treatment of evolution in state science standards3 has evoked considerably more public interest than the preceding studies of overall quality. We here consider the following questions: What constitutes a good treatment of evolution in science standards and how does one evaluate the standards? Which states have done well, and which less well? What nonscientific influences have been brought to bear on standards, for what reasons, and by whom? What strategies have been used to obscure or distort the role of evolution as the central organizing principle of the historical sciences? What are the effects of such distortions on students' overall understanding of science? What can the scientific community do to assure the publication of good science standards and to counteract attacks on good science teaching? 1. Lerner, L. S., State Science Standards: An Appraisal of Science Standards in 36 States, The Thomas B. Fordham Foundation, Washington, D.C., March 1998. 2. Lerner, L. S. et al ., The State of State Standards 2000, ibid., January 2000. 3. Lerner, L. S., Good Science, Bad Science: Teaching Evolution In the States, ibid., September 2000.

  10. Tratamento de idosos com depressão utilizando tricíclicos, IMAO, ISRS e outros antidepressivos Depression treatment of elderly patients using tricyclics, MAOI, SSRI, and other antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Z Scalco

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Antidepressivos são eficazes no tratamento da depressão em idosos. O sucesso do tratamento depende do tipo e da gravidade da depressão; das comorbidades com outras doenças psiquiátricas ou clínicas; da escolha adequada de antidepressivos, de sua eficácia e perfil de efeitos adversos; da orientação do paciente e de sua aderência ao tratamento. O manejo dos efeitos adversos em pacientes idosos, que usam muito mais medicações e apresentam mais doenças, é o ponto forte na escolha de antidepressivos. Em geral, os inibidores seletivos da recaptação de serotonina têm sido preferidos por apresentar menos riscos de complicações por efeitos adversos. Porém, diferentes antidepressivos podem ser preferíveis para diferentes pacientes. É indispensável que o médico conheça o paciente que irá tratar e o perfil de efeitos adversos e de possíveis interações medicamentosas dos antidepressivos para poder escolher o mais adequado para cada paciente. Neste artigo, são abordados os diferentes grupos de antidepressivos no tratamento agudo da depressão em idosos e o tratamento em populações especiais de idosos (idosos debilitados e idosos com demência.Antidepressants are effective in treating depression in the elderly. Treatment response depends on the type and severity of depression, comorbidities, efficacy and tolerability of antidepressants, patient education and treatment compliance. The aging process leads to physiological changes that, in association with concomitant diseases and use of several medications, render the elderly person more vulnerable to the adverse effects of antidepressants and an increased risk of drug interactions. It is very important that psychiatrists treating elderly patients be aware of possible adverse effects and drug interactions of different antidepressants. This paper reviews data on the efficacy and safety of antidepressant agents currently available for the treatment of the elderly, and includes

  11. Surrogate markers of visceral fat and response to anti-depressive treatment in patients with major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønning, Morten; Petersen, Dorthe; Steglich-Petersen, Marie

    2017-01-01

    was to prospectively investigate whether visceral fat, as measured by hip-to-waist ratio and waist circumference, affects treatment outcome in patients with major depressive disorder in patients attending a hospital psychiatric care unit in Denmark. Methods: The study was conducted as an observational prospective......Background: Body mass index (BMI) and body weight have been shown to be associated to treatment outcome in patients with major depressive disorder, but this relationship is not clear. Visceral fat might be an underlying mechanism explaining this relationship. Aims: The aim of this study...... study including 33 patients with major depressive disorder. Assessments were made at enrolment and after 8 weeks. Primary variables were hip-to-waist ratio and waist circumference. Outcome were remission or response of depressive symptoms measured with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D17...

  12. The effects of gestational stress and SSRI antidepressant treatment on structural plasticity in the postpartum brain - a translational model for postpartum depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haim, Achikam; Albin-Brooks, Christopher; Sherer, Morgan; Mills, Emily; Leuner, Benedetta

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common complication following childbirth experienced by one in every five new mothers. Although the neural basis of PPD remains unknown previous research in rats has shown that gestational stress, a risk factor for PPD, induces depressive-like behavior during the postpartum period. Moreover, the effect of gestational stress on postpartum mood is accompanied by structural modifications within the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) – limbic regions that have been linked to PPD. Mothers diagnosed with PPD are often prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant medications and yet little is known about their effects in models of PPD. Thus, here we investigated whether postpartum administration of Citalopram, an SSRI commonly used to treat PPD, would ameliorate the behavioral and morphological consequences of gestational stress. In addition, we examined the effects of gestational stress and postpartum administration of Citalopram on structural plasticity within the basolateral amygdala (BLA) which together with the mPFC and NAc forms a circuit that is sensitive to stress and is involved in mood regulation. Our results show that postpartum rats treated with Citalopram do not exhibit gestational stress-induced depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test. In addition, Citalopram was effective in reversing gestational stress-induced structural alterations in the postpartum NAc shell and mPFC. We also found that gestational stress increased spine density within the postpartum BLA, an effect which was not reversed by Citalopram treatment. Overall, these data highlight the usefulness of gestational stress as a valid and informative translational model for PPD. Furthermore, they suggest that structural alterations in the mPFC-NAc pathway may underlie stress-induced depressive-like behavior during the postpartum period and provide much needed information on how SSRIs may act in the

  13. Treatment response in relation to subthreshold bipolarity in patients with major depressive disorder receiving antidepressant monotherapy: a post hoc data analysis (KOMDD study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Min; Lee, Bun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this observational study was to determine whether subthreshold bipolarity affects treatment response and remission in patients with major depressive disorder receiving antidepressant (AD) monotherapy over a 6-month follow-up period. Seventy-eight patients with major depressive disorder were stratified into two subgroups according to the presence of subthreshold bipolarity, identified using the Korean version of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (K-MDQ), which classifies patients as positive for a screening of bipolarity based on the cutoff for the total K-MDQ score (ie, 7 points). They received AD monotherapy such as escitalopram, sertraline, paroxetine, or tianeptine for 6 months. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD), Hamilton Anxiety Scale, and Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation were applied at baseline, 1 week, 3 weeks, 2 months, 3 months, and 6 months. The mean HAMD, BDI, and Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation scores were higher in the bipolarity group than in the nonbipolarity group at 3 weeks. The mean BDI score was also higher in the bipolarity group than in the nonbipolarity group at 6 months. Evaluation of the ratio of improvement for each scale revealed different patterns of percentage changes between the two groups over the 6-month follow-up period. Furthermore, the response and remission rates (as assessed using BDI and HAMD scores) were higher in the nonbipolarity group than in the bipolarity group, with the exception of HAMD scores at the 3-week follow-up time point. The findings of this study showed that depressed patients with bipolarity had a worse response to AD monotherapy than did those without bipolarity.

  14. Elucidating the functions of brain GSK3α: Possible synergy with GSK3β upregulation and reversal by antidepressant treatment in a mouse model of depressive-like behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Dmitrii; Markova, Nataliia; Bettendorff, Lucien; Chekhonin, Vladimir; Pomytkin, Igor; Lioudyno, Viktoria; Svistunov, Andrei; Ponomarev, Eugene; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Strekalova, Tatyana

    2017-09-29

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) has been linked to the mechanisms of stress, mood regulation, and the effects of antidepressants. The functions of the GSK3β isoform have been extensively investigated, but little is known about the α-isoform, although they may functionally related. In a recently established modified swim test with a third delayed swim exposure, brain GSK3β mRNA expression positively correlated with floating behaviour on the third test. A two-week-long pretreatment regime with imipramine (7.5mg/kg/day) or thiamine (200mg/kg/day), which is known to have antidepressant properties, reduced the GSK3β over-expression and decreased floating behaviour on Day 5. GSK3α mRNA levels were measured in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex on Days 1, 2 and 5. GSK3α expression was decreased in the prefrontal cortex on Day 2 and increased on Day 5. In this model, GSK3α mRNA changes were prevented by imipramine or thiamine treatment. There was a significant correlation between the expression of the two isoforms in the prefrontal cortex on Day 2 in untreated group. These results provide the first evidence for the potential involvement of GSK3α in depressive-like behaviours and as a target of anti-depressant therapy. Furthermore, the correlations suggest some cross-talk may exist between the two GSK3 isoforms. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Chronic treatment with caffeine and its withdrawal modify the antidepressant-like activity of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the forced swim and tail suspension tests in mice. Effects on Comt, Slc6a15 and Adora1 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopa, Aleksandra; Doboszewska, Urszula; Herbet, Mariola; Wośko, Sylwia; Wyska, Elżbieta; Świąder, Katarzyna; Serefko, Anna; Korga, Agnieszka; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Wróbel, Andrzej; Ostrowska, Marta; Terlecka, Joanna; Kanadys, Adam; Poleszak, Ewa; Dudka, Jarosław; Wlaź, Piotr

    2017-12-15

    Recent preclinical and clinical data suggest that low dose of caffeine enhances the effects of common antidepressants. Here we investigated the effects of chronic administration of caffeine (5mg/kg, twice daily for 14days) and its withdrawal on day 15th on the activity of per se ineffective doses of fluoxetine (5mg/kg) and escitalopram (2mg/kg) given on day 15th. We found decreased immobility time in the forced swim and tail suspension tests in mice in which caffeine was administered simultaneously with antidepressants on day 15th following a 14-day caffeine treatment and no alterations in the spontaneous locomotor activity. A decrease in the level of escitalopram and an increase in the level of caffeine in serum were observed after concomitant administration of these compounds, while the joint administration of caffeine and fluoxetine was not associated with changes in their levels in serum or brain. Caffeine withdrawal caused a decrease in Adora1 mRNA level in the cerebral cortex (Cx). Administration of escitalopram or fluoxetine followed by caffeine withdrawal caused an increase in this gene expression, whereas administration of escitalopram, but not fluoxetine, on day 15th together with caffeine caused a decrease in Adora1 mRNA level in the Cx. Furthermore, antidepressant-like activity observed after joint administration of the tested drugs with caffeine was associated with decreased Slc6a15 mRNA level in the Cx. The results show that withdrawal of caffeine after its chronic intake may change activity of antidepressants with concomitant alterations within monoamine, adenosine and glutamate systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Adherence to antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abimbola Farinde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While major depression is considered a frequent mental illness there are ongoing reports of high non-adherence to antidepressant medications which places suffers at high risk for relapse, recurrence, or greater impairment,. The World Health Organization (WHO defines adherence as the extent to which a person′s behavior (e.g. taking medications can align with the agreed recommendations of a health care provider. Unfortunately while patient may recognize the importance of adherence to antidepressant medications the majority of patients do not adhere to their prescribed antidepressants. Some of the factors that may contribute to or lead to non-adherence include knowingly or unknowingly missing doses, taking extra doses, delaying administration times, or taking drug holidays. Pharmacists have the unique ability to deter non-adherence through the performance of continuous assessment and monitoring of adherence in this population given these accessibility. Additionally, pharmacists are able to develop therapeutic alliances with patients that can help to increase the likelihood of achieving positive patient outcomes. Antidepressant non-adherence can be viewed as a significant public health concern so it is important for patients to be educated about the importance of adherence, and health care professionals should be aware of factors or patient characteristics that can serve as barriers to non-adherence.

  17. Antidepressant medications and osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzoli, R; Cooper, C; Reginster, J-Y

    2012-01-01

    Use of antidepressant medications that act on the serotonin system has been linked to detrimental impacts on bone mineral density (BMD), and to osteoporosis. This article reviews current evidence for such effects, and identifies themes for future research. Serotonin receptors are found in all major...

  18. The efficacy of primary care chaplaincy compared with antidepressants: a retrospective study comparing chaplaincy with antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Gordon

    2017-07-01

    Aim To determine the effectiveness of primary care chaplaincy (PCC) when used as the sole intervention, with outcomes being compared directly with those of antidepressants. This was to be carried out in a homogenous study population reflective of certain demographics in the United Kingdom. Increasing numbers of patients are living with long-term conditions and 'modern maladies' and are experiencing loss of well-being and depression. There is an increasing move to utilise non-pharmacological interventions such as 'talking therapies' within this context. Chaplaincy is one such 'talking therapy' but within primary care its evidence base is sparse with only one quantitative study to date. There is therefore a need to evaluate PCC excluding those co-prescribed antidepressants, as this is not evidenced in the literature as yet. PCC also needs to be directly compared with the use of antidepressants to justify its use as a valid alternative treatment for loss of well-being and depression. This was a retrospective observational study based on routinely collected data. There were 107 patients in the PCC group and 106 in the antidepressant group. Socio-demographic data were collected. Their pre- and post-intervention (either chaplaincy or antidepressant) well-being was assessed, by the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (WEMWBS) which is a validated Likert scale. Findings The majority of both groups were female with both groups showing marked ethnic homogeneity. PCC was associated with a significant and clinically meaningful improvement in well-being at a mean follow-up of 80 days. This treatment effect was maintained after those co-prescribed antidepressants were removed. PCC was associated with an improvement in well-being similar to that of antidepressants with no significant difference between the two groups.

  19. Are antidepressants safe in the treatment of bipolar depression? A critical evaluation of their potential risk to induce switch into mania or cycle acceleration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Licht, R. W.; Gijsman, H.; Nolen, W. A.; Angst, J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To address whether switch of depression into hypomania or mania or cycle acceleration in patients with bipolar disorder is caused by antidepressants or whether this phenomenon is attributable to the natural history of bipolar disorder itself. Method: A critical review of the literature,

  20. Cardiovascular Effects of Antidepressants and Mood Stabilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Maleki

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available  Depression is a serious disorder in today’s society, with the estimates of lifetime prevalence being as high as 21% of the general population in some developed countries. As defined by the American Psychiatric Association, depression is a heterogeneous disorder often manifested with symptoms at the psychological, behavioral, and physiological levels. Such patients are often reluctant to take synthetic antidepressants in their appropriate doses due to their anticipated side effects including inability to drive a car, dry mouth, constipation, and sexual dysfunction. As a therapeutic alternative, effective herbal drugs may offer advantages in terms of safety and tolerability, possibly also improving patient compliance. The advent of the first antidepressants, Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs and Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCAs, in the 1950s and 1960s represented a dramatic leap forward in the clinical management of depression. The subsequent development of the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs and the Serotonin Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor (SNRI venlafaxine in the past decade and a half has greatly enhanced the treatment of depression by offering patients medications that are as effective as the older agents but are generally more tolerable and safer in an overdose. The introduction of atypical antidepressants, such as bupropion, nefazadone, and mirtazapine, has added substantially to the available pharmacopoeia for depression. Nonetheless, rates of remission tend to be low and the risk of relapse and recurrence remains high. One of the concerns regarding the safety of antidepressant is its potential risk of cardiotoxicity and cardiovascular side effects. In this review, we will focus on the cardiovascular side effects of different types of antidepressants.

  1. Cardiovascular Effects of Antidepressants and Mood Stabilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Akhondzadeh

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a serious disorder in today’s society, with the estimates of lifetime prevalence being as high as 21% of the general population in some developed countries. As defined by the American Psychiatric Association, depression is a heterogeneous disorder often manifested with symptoms at the psychological, behavioral, and physiological levels. Such patients are often reluctant to take synthetic antidepressants in their appropriate doses due to their anticipated side effects including inability to drive a car, dry mouth, constipation, and sexual dysfunction. As a therapeutic alternative, effective herbal drugs may offer advantages in terms of safety and tolerability, possibly also improving patient compliance. The advent of the first antidepressants, Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs and Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCAs, in the 1950s and 1960s represented a dramatic leap forward in the clinical management of depression. The subsequent development of the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs and the Serotonin Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor (SNRI venlafaxine in the past decade and a half has greatly enhanced the treatment of depression by offering patients medications that are as effective as the older agents but are generally more tolerable and safer in an overdose. The introduction of atypical antidepressants, such as bupropion, nefazadone, and mirtazapine, has added substantially to the available pharmacopoeia for depression. Nonetheless, rates of remission tend to be low and the risk of relapse and recurrence remains high. One of the concerns regarding the safety of antidepressant is its potential risk of cardiotoxicity and cardiovascular side effects. In this review, we will focus on the cardiovascular side effects of different types of antidepressants.

  2. Compliance with standard treatment guidelines in the management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compliance with standard treatment guidelines in the management of hypertension: A review of practice of healthcare workers in Potchefstroom, North West Province, South ... Conclusions: As the adherence to hypertension guidelines in primary care by healthcare workers in general is suboptimal, continuous professional ...

  3. Utilization of standard treatment guidelines (STG) at primary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a need to increase sensitization of the tools and supervision. Further studies on patient prescriptions from large sample size using exit interviews, and less reliance on self-reported use of STG by prescribers is recommended. Key words: Standard Treatment Guideline, Prescribers, Primary Health Facilities ...

  4. Differences in Associations of Antidepressants and Hospitalization Due to Hyponatremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmand, Shermineh; Lindh, Jonatan D; Calissendorff, Jan; Skov, Jakob; Falhammar, Henrik; Nathanson, David; Mannheimer, Buster

    2018-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and other antidepressants are important as a cause of hyponatremia. However, most studies have focused on the effect on sodium levels regardless of clinical symptoms, or have been too small to be able to discriminate between the effects of specific antidepressant drugs. The objective of the present study was to investigate the association between different groups of antidepressants and the risk of hospitalization due to hyponatremia. In this register-based case-control study of patients in the general Swedish population, we identified 14,359 individuals with a main diagnosis of hyponatremia. For every case, 4 matched controls were included (n = 57,382). To investigate the temporal aspects of drug-induced hyponatremia, antidepressant exposure was divided into patients with newly initiated and ongoing treatment. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the association of antidepressant use and hospitalization. For newly initiated antidepressants, adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for a main diagnosis of hyponatremia compared with controls were: citalopram 5.50 (4.71-6.44); sertraline 4.96 (3.81-6.48); venlafaxine 5.28 (3.20-8.83); tricyclic antidepressants 1.59 (1.13-2.24); and mirtazapine 2.54 (2.04-3.16). Adjusted odds ratio (confidence interval) for individuals with ongoing treatment ranged from 0.57 (0.52-0.63) for citalopram to 1.08 (0.85-1.36) for other SSRIs. There was a strong association between newly initiated treatment with SSRIs or venlafaxine and hospitalization due to hyponatremia. The association for tricyclic antidepressants and mirtazapine was small to moderate. In contrast, there was no evidence that ongoing treatment with antidepressants increases the risk for hospitalization due to hyponatremia. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. COMPARISON OF ANTIDEPRESSANT ACTIVITY OF LOSARTAN WITH IMIPRAMINE IN ALBINO MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choppadandi

    2016-06-01

    the control group. The antidepressant activity of Losartan is intermediate to that of the Standard (Imipramine group and the control (Distilled water. CONCLUSION Losartan showed antidepressant activity in albino mice raising the possibility of itself being used as an antidepressant alone or can be used as a single agent for the treatment of both hypertension and depression simultaneously avoiding multiple medications.

  6. Effectiveness of a smartphone app for guiding antidepressant drug selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Colin; Nguyen, Cathina; Lin, Steven

    2014-09-01

    Major depression is a prevalent chronic disease in the United States. However, many physicians lack access to decision support tools at point of care to help choose antidepressants in a rational, evidence-based manner. A patient-centered treatment model that uses a symptom-based approach to selecting antidepressants was developed into a smartphone application to provide instant, evidence-based recommendations and drug monographs. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of this mobile application on the confidence level of family physicians in treating depression. The smartphone application was provided to 14 family medicine residents and attending physicians from the O'Connor Family Medicine Residency Program in San Jose, CA. Participants were asked to use the software as drug reference and clinical decision support during patient care activities. Three surveys were administered over a 12-week period to assess provider characteristics, outcome measures (ie, confidence in managing depression and choosing an initial antidepressant based on patient symptoms, medical comorbidities, potential side effects, and drug interactions), and fund of antidepressant knowledge. The average confidence levels in managing depression, starting an antidepressant on a patient with depression, and choosing an initial antidepressant based on patient symptoms increased significantly within the period of smartphone application usage. The average scores on the antidepressant knowledge tests also improved. The smartphone application was an effective tool for both increasing confidence in depression treatment and educating physicians. Future studies to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of smartphone applications on medical education and postgraduate training are warranted.

  7. Randomized Controlled Trials of Add-On Antidepressants in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terevnikov, Viacheslav; Joffe, Grigori; Stenberg, Jan-Henry

    2015-05-19

    Despite adequate treatment with antipsychotics, a substantial number of patients with schizophrenia demonstrate only suboptimal clinical outcome. To overcome this challenge, various psychopharmacological combination strategies have been used, including antidepressants added to antipsychotics. To analyze the efficacy of add-on antidepressants for the treatment of negative, positive, cognitive, depressive, and antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms in schizophrenia, published randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of adjunctive antidepressants in schizophrenia were reviewed using the following parameters: baseline clinical characteristics and number of patients, their on-going antipsychotic treatment, dosage of the add-on antidepressants, duration of the trial, efficacy measures, and outcomes. There were 36 randomized controlled trials reported in 41 journal publications (n=1582). The antidepressants used were the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, duloxetine, imipramine, mianserin, mirtazapine, nefazodone, reboxetin, trazodone, and bupropion. Mirtazapine and mianserin showed somewhat consistent efficacy for negative symptoms and both seemed to enhance neurocognition. Trazodone and nefazodone appeared to improve the antipsychotics-induced extrapyramidal symptoms. Imipramine and duloxetine tended to improve depressive symptoms. No clear evidence supporting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors' efficacy on any clinical domain of schizophrenia was found. Add-on antidepressants did not worsen psychosis. Despite a substantial number of randomized controlled trials, the overall efficacy of add-on antidepressants in schizophrenia remains uncertain mainly due to methodological issues. Some differences in efficacy on several schizophrenia domains seem, however, to exist and to vary by the antidepressant subgroups--plausibly due to differences in the mechanisms of action. Antidepressants may not worsen the course of psychosis. Better designed

  8. Pediatric Tricyclic Antidepressant Poisoning: Approach and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Roldán Ovalle, Tatiana; Hospital Universitario de San Ignacio; López Millán, Angelo; Hospital Universitario de San Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Antidepressants are agents that cause significant morbidity and mortality with important toxicity particularly on cardiovascular and neurological systems, which is mainly based on their pharmacology and is that determines specific treatment. Unfortunately, children are vulnerable population because the increase in psychiatric disorders which are treated with these drugs. The purpose of this article is to review the pharmacokinetics, clinical presentation and treatment of acute poisoning with ...

  9. Diving and antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querido, Abraham L

    2017-12-01

    Psychoactive drugs pose a risk to both the diver and his or her buddy. Little is known about the safety of diving with antidepressants. Amongst the potential interactions with the diving environment are: somnolence; convulsions; a bleeding tendency (potentially worsening decompression illness, DCI), alterations to glucose metabolism and psychiatric side effects. Fluoxetine may potentially reduce the inflammatory process associated with DCI. This article presents guidelines for recreational diving in combination with antidepressants. These guidelines were endorsed at a meeting of the Dutch Association for Diving Medicine in 2015 and are solely based on 'expert' opinion. Copyright: This article is the copyright of the authors who grant Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine a non-exclusive licence to publish the article in printed and other forms.

  10. B vitamins to enhance treatment response to antidepressants in middle-aged and older adults: results from the B-VITAGE randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Osvaldo P; Ford, Andrew H; Hirani, Varsha; Singh, Vash; vanBockxmeer, Frank M; McCaul, Kieran; Flicker, Leon

    2014-12-01

    Depression is common and the efficacy of antidepressants is suboptimal. High plasma homocysteine has been consistently associated with depression, and treatment with certain B vitamins demonstrably reduces its concentration. To determine whether vitamins B6, B12 and folic acid enhance response to antidepressant treatment over 52 weeks. Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of citalopram (20-40 g) together with 0.5 mg of vitamin B12, 2 mg of folic acid and 25 mg of vitamin B6 for 52 weeks (Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: 12609000256279). Participants were community-dwelling adults aged 50 years or over with DSM-IV-TR major depression. We measured severity of symptoms with the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). The primary outcome was remission of the depressive episode after 12, 26 and 52 weeks. Secondary outcomes included reduction of MADRS scores over time and relapse of major depression after recovery by week 12. Results In total, 153 people were randomised (76 placebo, 77 vitamins). Remission of symptoms was achieved by 78.1 and 79.4% of participants treated with placebo and vitamins by week 12 (P = 0.840), by 76.5 and 85.3% at week 26 and 75.8 and 85.5% at week 52 (effect of intervention over 52 weeks: odds ratio (OR) = 2.49, 95% CI 1.12-5.51). Group differences in MADRS scores over time were not significant (P = 0.739). The risk of subsequent relapse among those who had achieved remission of symptoms at week 12 was lower in the vitamins than placebo group (OR = 0.33, 95% CI 0.12-0.94). B vitamins did not increase the 12-week efficacy of antidepressant treatment, but enhanced and sustained antidepressant response over 1 year. Replication of these findings would mandate that treatment guidelines adopt the adjunctive use of B vitamins as a safe and inexpensive strategy to manage major depression in middle-aged and older adults. Royal College of Psychiatrists.

  11. Association between mortality from suicide in England and antidepressant prescribing: an ecological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majeed Azeem

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antidepressant prescribing has been increasing in England. Studies in other countries suggest that while this may be associated with reduced suicide rates, it may also be associated with increased fatal poisoning from antidepressant drugs. We therefore conducted an ecological study to assess the association between prescription rates for antidepressants and suicide or fatal antidepressant-related poisoning in England. Methods The Office for National Statistics provided information on the number of suicides, antidepressant-related poisoning deaths and populations for England between 1993 and 2002. The Department of Health supplied data on prescriptions for all antidepressants dispensed in England. Associations between prescriptions and deaths were assessed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Results There were 46,747 suicides, 3,987 deaths involving tricyclic antidepressants and 430 involving selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors and other antidepressants. Increased antidepressant prescribing was statistically associated with a fall in suicide rates (Spearman's rs = -0.73, p = 0.02 and fatal poisoning involving tricyclic antidepressants (rs = -0.64, p = 0.05. In contrast, increased prescribing of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors and other antidepressants was statistically associated with an increase in fatal poisoning involving these drugs (rs = 0.99, p Conclusion Increased prescribing of antidepressants may indicate improved diagnosis and treatment of depression in primary care. Our analysis suggests that this was accompanied by lower suicide rates. A decrease in poisoning deaths involving tricyclic antidepressants may suggest a change in preference for using serotonin reuptake inhibitors and other antidepressant drugs for high-risk patients. This may also partially explain the increase in deaths involving these drugs. Due to the ecological nature of the design, we cannot say conclusively whether reduced

  12. Reevaluating the role of antidepressants in cancer-related depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riblet, Natalie; Larson, Robin; Watts, Bradley V; Holtzheimer, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Prior reviews evaluating the role of antidepressants in cancer-related depression have drawn conflicting conclusions. These reviews have also not explored differences in efficacy and tolerability between antidepressants. We conducted a meta-analysis to address these limitations. We searched Medline (1948-2013), the Cochrane Library (1800-2013), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (1986-2013), ClinicalTrials.gov (2013) and meeting abstracts. We included randomized trials comparing antidepressants to placebo or no treatment for cancer-related depression. We used random effects to calculate standardized mean differences (SMD). Of 5178 potentially eligible citations, 9 trials (1169 subjects) met inclusion criteria. Trials of mianserin found a robust reduction in depression scores at ≥4 weeks of treatment (SMD: 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.24-0.95). Similar, but less robust, results were observed with paroxetine (SMD: 0.22, 95% CI: 0.01-0.42) and fluoxetine (SMD 0.34, 95% CI: 0.02-0.66). Conversely, there was no advantage with amitriptyline or desipramine. Compared to placebo, the odds of dropping out due to side effect were higher with fluoxetine and paroxetine and lower with mianserin. Methodological quality was moderate. Paroxetine, fluoxetine and mianserin improve cancer-related depression but may vary in efficacy and tolerability. High-quality, randomized trials of newer antidepressant agents are needed to identify optimal treatments for managing cancer-related depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tratamento da disforia pré-menstrual com antidepressivos: revisão dos ensaios clínicos controlados Treatment of premenstrual dysphoria with antidepressants: review of controlled clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Cheniaux

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A disforia pré-menstrual (DPM, que acomete entre 3% e 8% das mulheres em idade fértil, representa uma forma mais grave de síndrome pré-menstrual, na qual predominam as alterações do humor e do comportamento. Acredita-se que haja algum tipo de ligação entre a DPM e os transtornos do humor. OBJETIVO: Estudar a eficácia dos antidepressivos na DPM. MÉTODOS: Foi realizada uma revisão dos ensaios clínicos controlados com antidepressivos no tratamento da DPM, utilizando-se as seguintes bases de dados: Medline, Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS, psycINFO e Biblioteca Cochrane. RESULTADOS: A clomipramina, a fluoxetina, a sertralina, a paroxetina e a venlafaxina se mostraram superiores ao placebo em diversos estudos. DISCUSSÃO: As mulheres que sofrem de DPM possivelmente apresentam uma disfunção serotoninérgica. CONCLUSÃO: Alguns antidepressivos, especialmente os inibidores seletivos da recaptação da serotonina (ISRS, parecem ser eficazes no tratamento da DPM.INTODUCTION: Premenstrual dysphoria (PMD, which affects between 3% and 8% of women during reproductive years, represents a more severe type of premenstrual syndrome. Mood and behavior changes are predominant in PMD. It is believed that there is some kind of link between PMS and mood disorders. OBJECTIVE: Studying the efficacy of antidepressants in PMD. METHODS: We elaborated a review of controlled clinical trials with antidepressants in the treatment of PMD, using the following databases: Medline, LILACS, psycINFO and Cochrane Library. RESULTS: Clomipramine, fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine and venlafaxine were superior to placebo in various studies. DISCUSSION: Women with PMD possibly present a serotonergic dysfunction. CONCLUSION: Some antidepressants, specialy SSRIs, seem to be effective in the treatment of PMD.

  14. Active metabolites as antidepressant drugs: The role of norquetiapine in the mechanism of action of quetiapine in the treatment of mood disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco eLopez-Munoz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Active metabolites of some antipsychotic drugs exhibit pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties that may be similar to or differ from the original compound and that can be translated by a different profile of responses and interactions to clinical level. Some of these antipsychotics’ active metabolites might participate in mechanisms of antidepressant activity, as m-chlorophenylpiperazine (aripiprazole, 9-OH-risperidone and norquetiapine. Norquetiapine exhibits distinct pharmacological activity from quetiapine and plays a fundamental role in its antidepressant efficacy. In this review, we analyze the differential pharmacological aspects between quetiapine and norquetiapine, both from the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic perspectives (affinity for dopaminergic, noradrenegic and/or serotonergic receptors, etc., as well as differential neuroprotective role. The pharmacological differences between the two drugs could explain the differential clinical effect, as well as some differences in tolerability profile and drug interactions. The available data are sufficient to arrive at the conclusion that antidepressant activity of quetiapine is mediated, at least in part, by the active metabolite norquetiapine, which selectively inhibits noradrenaline reuptake, is a partial 5-HT1A receptor agonist, and acts as an antagonist at presynaptic α2, 5-HT2C and 5-HT7 receptors.

  15. [Depressive symptoms during anorexia nervosa: State of the art and consequences for an appropriate use of antidepressants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblé, N; Radon, L; Rabot, M; Godart, N

    2017-02-01

    Depressive comorbidity is often associated with anorexia nervosa (AN), and antidepressant medication is widely used although it does not rely on any convincing data in the scientific literature. Our objectives were: to summarize the epidemiological, physiological, psychopathological literature about the relation between AN and manifestations of depression, and to focus on the clinical trial data assessing the use of antidepressant medication in AN in order to clarify the strategy for the use of antidepressant in AN during adolescence. A manual computerised search (Medline) was performed for relevant published studies assessing the association between depressive signs or Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and AN. Another manual computerised search (Medline) listed clinical trials assessing antidepressant in AN. On the one hand, depressive symptoms are common during the course of AN and could have different meaning. Indeed, firstly, we can distinguish symptoms that are inherent to AN and which can be mistaken for depressive signs (for instance: low self-esteem, reduced social contacts). Secondly, long-term undernourishment can be held responsible for numerous psychological distortions, including anxiety and depression symptoms such as insomnia, impaired concentration, or social isolation. Thirdly, the natural course of AN can also lead to "depressive moments", in particular when switching to a "purging type" AN, or when recovery mobilizes control and narcissistic issues. On the other hand, MDD is also highly prevalent among AN patients and is a negative prognosis factor. Thus, it is complex to differentiate MDD from isolated depressive symptoms that could be inherent of the AN symptomatology which raises the question of the role of antidepressant medication in treatment of depression in AN. No significant benefit of antidepressant medication in AN has been shown in clinical trials, and according to international guidelines it should be prescribed only as a second

  16. NMDAR inhibition-independent antidepressant actions of ketamine metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Morris, Patrick J.; Georgiou, Polymnia; Fischell, Jonathan; Elmer, Greg I.; Alkondon, Manickavasagom; Yuan, Peixiong; Pribut, Heather J.; Singh, Nagendra S.; Dossou, Katina S.S.; Fang, Yuhong; Huang, Xi-Ping; Mayo, Cheryl L.; Wainer, Irving W.; Albuquerque, Edson X.; Thompson, Scott M.; Thomas, Craig J.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Gould, Todd D.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts ~16 percent of the world population at some point in their lives. Despite a number of available monoaminergic-based antidepressants, most patients require many weeks, if not months, to respond to these treatments, and many patients never attain sustained remission of their symptoms. The non-competitive glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, (R,S)-ketamine (ketamine), exerts rapid and sustained antidepressant effects following a single dose in depressed patients. Here we show that the metabolism of ketamine to (2S,6S;2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK) is essential for its antidepressant effects, and that the (2R,6R)-HNK enantiomer exerts behavioural, electroencephalographic, electrophysiological and cellular antidepressant actions in vivo. Notably, we demonstrate that these antidepressant actions are NMDAR inhibition-independent but they involve early and sustained α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor activation. We also establish that (2R,6R)-HNK lacks ketamine-related side-effects. Our results indicate a novel mechanism underlying ketamine’s unique antidepressant properties, which involves the required activity of a distinct metabolite and is independent of NMDAR inhibition. These findings have relevance for the development of next generation, rapid-acting antidepressants. PMID:27144355

  17. The monitoring of longer term prescriptions of antidepressants: observational study in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Jennifer E; Aucott, Lorna S; Lawton, Kenneth; Reid, Ian C; Cameron, Isobel M

    2014-08-01

    There is little evidence to guide the frequency of review for patients taking antidepressants in the longer term. To measure the frequency with which patients on longer term courses of antidepressants have their treatment monitored in primary care and to identify patient characteristics associated with the frequency of monitoring. A cohort of patients who were receiving antidepressants continuously for at least two years was identified from four general practices. Data were collected from patients' general medical records. The dates of all GP consultations and whether they included a documented review of antidepressant therapy were recorded, along with patient characteristics hypothesized to influence the frequency of monitoring. The frequency of antidepressant review consultations and proportion of participants being reviewed during a specific year of antidepressant therapy decreased with increasing year of antidepressant therapy. Individuals who receive antidepressants for an overt mental health reason; undergo more dose and drug changes; and who are referred to the community mental health team have their antidepressant therapy reviewed more often during the first five years of antidepressant therapy. As many patients on longer term courses of antidepressants are not being appropriately reviewed, a 'chronic disease management approach' to depression in primary care is advocated. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Efficacy of New Generation Antidepressants: Differences Seem Illusory

    OpenAIRE

    Del Re A. C.; Spielmans Glen I.; Flueckiger Christoph; Wampold Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, Cipriani and colleagues examined the relative efficacy of 12 new-generation antidepressants on major depression using network meta-analytic methods. They found that some of these medications outperformed others in patient response to treatment. However, several methodological criticisms have been raised about network meta-analysis and Cipriani's analysis in particular which creates the concern that the stated superiority of some antidepressants relative to others may be ...

  19. Antidepressants for cocaine dependence and problematic cocaine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Pier Paolo; Trogu, Emanuela; Vecchi, Simona; Amato, Laura

    2011-12-07

    Cocaine dependence is a disorder for which no pharmacological treatment of proven efficacy exists, advances in the neurobiology could guide future medication development. To investigate the efficacy and acceptability of antidepressants alone or in combination with any psychosocial intervention for the treatment of cocaine dependence and problematic cocaine use. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, EMBASE and CINAHL in July 2011 and researchers for unpublished trials. Randomised clinical trials comparing antidepressants alone or associated with psychosocial intervention with placebo, no treatment, other pharmacological or psychosocial interventions. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. 37 studies were included in the review (3551 participants).Antidepressants versus placebo: results for dropouts did not show evidence of difference, 31 studies, 2819 participants, RR 1.03 (Cl 95% 0.93 to 1.14). Looking at Abstinence from cocaine use, even though not statistically significant, the difference shown by the analysis in the three-weeks abstinence rate was in favour of antidepressants (eight studies, 942 participants, RR 1.22 (Cl 95% 0.99 to 1.51)). Considering only studies involving tricyclics, five studies, 367 participants, or only desipramine, four studies, 254 participants, the evidence was in favour of antidepressants. However, selecting only studies with operationally defined diagnostic criteria, statistical significance favouring antidepressants, as well as the trend for significance shown by the full sample, disappeared. Looking at safety issues, the results did not show evidence of differences (number of patients withdrawn for medical reasons, thirteen studies, 1396 participants, RR 1.39 (Cl 95% 0.91 to 2.12)). Subgroup analysis considering length of the trial, associated opioid dependence or associated psychosocial interventions as confounding factors, failed in showing consistent and

  20. Efficacy and Safety of Antidepressants Added to Antipsychotics for Schizophrenia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, Bartosz; Samara, Myrto T; Huhn, Maximilian; Klupp, Elisabeth; Leucht, Claudia; Zhu, Yikang; Engel, Rolf R; Leucht, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    The authors examined the safety and efficacy of antidepressants added to antipsychotic drugs in the treatment of schizophrenia. Multiple databases and previous publications were searched through June 2015 to identify all randomized controlled trials of any add-on antidepressants compared with placebo or no-treatment in schizophrenia. Depressive and negative symptoms (primary outcomes), overall symptoms, positive symptoms, side effects, exacerbation of psychosis, and responder rates were examined. Subgroup, meta-regression, and sensitivity analyses were performed, as well as investigations of publication bias and risk of bias. Eighty-two randomized controlled trials with a total of 3,608 participants were included. Add-on antidepressants appeared more efficacious than controls for depressive symptoms (standardized mean difference: -0.25, 95% CI=-0.38 to -0.12), negative symptoms (standardized mean difference: -0.30, 95% CI=-0.44 to -0.16), overall symptoms (standardized mean difference: -0.24, 95% CI=-0.39 to -0.09), positive symptoms (standardized mean difference: -0.17, 95% CI=-0.33 to -0.01), quality of life (standardized mean difference: -0.32, 95% CI=-0.57 to -0.06), and responder rate (risk ratio: 1.52, 95% CI=1.29 to 1.78; number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit: 5, 95% CI=4 to 7). The effects on depressive and negative symptoms appeared more pronounced when minimum thresholds of these symptoms were inclusion criteria (standardized mean difference: -0.34, 95% CI=-0.58 to -0.09 and standardized mean difference: -0.58, 95% CI=-0.94 to -0.21, respectively). There were no significant differences between antidepressants and controls in terms of exacerbation of psychosis, premature discontinuation, and the number of participants with at least one adverse event. More patients taking add-on antidepressants suffered from abdominal pain, constipation, dizziness, and dry mouth. Analysis of primary outcomes (depressive and negative symptoms) suggests small, beneficial effects

  1. Dose equivalents of antidepressants: Evidence-based recommendations from randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayasaka, Yu; Purgato, Marianna; Magni, Laura R; Ogawa, Yusuke; Takeshima, Nozomi; Cipriani, Andrea; Barbui, Corrado; Leucht, Stefan; Furukawa, Toshi A

    2015-07-15

    Dose equivalence of antidepressants is critically important for clinical practice and for research. There are several methods to define and calculate dose equivalence but for antidepressants, only daily defined dose and consensus methods have been applied to date. The purpose of the present study is to examine dose equivalence of antidepressants by a less arbitrary and more systematic method. We used data from all randomized, double-blind, flexible-dose trials comparing fluoxetine or paroxetine as standard drugs with any other active antidepressants as monotherapy in the acute phase treatment of unipolar depression. We calculated the ratio of the mean doses for each study and weighted it by the total sample size to find the weighted mean ratio for each drug, which was then used to define the drug׳s dosage equivalent to fluoxetine 40mg/d. We included 83 studies (14 131 participants). In the primary analysis, fluoxetine 40mg/day was equivalent to paroxetine dosage of 34.0mg/day, agomelatine 53.2mg/day, amitriptyline, 122.3mg/day, bupropion 348.5mg/day, clomipramine 116.1mg/day, desipramine 196.3mg/day, dothiepin 154.8mg/day, doxepin 140.1mg/day, escitalopram 18.0mg/day, fluvoxamine 143.3mg/day, imipramine 137.2mg/day, lofepramine 250.2mg/day, maprotiline 118.0mg/day, mianserin, 101.1mg/day, mirtazapine 50.9mg/day, moclobemide 575.2mg/day, nefazodone 535.2mg/day, nortriptyline 100.9mg/day, reboxetine 11.5mg/day, sertraline 98.5mg/day, trazodone 401.4mg/day, and venlafaxine 149.4mg/day. Sensitivity analyses corroborated the results except for doxepin. The number of studies for some drugs was small. The current method assumes dose response relationship of antidepressants. Our findings can be useful for clinicians when they switch antidepressants and for researchers when they compare various antidepressants in their research. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Evolution in consumption of anti-depressants during the years 2002 to 2004].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna Arnáiz, Catalina; Galván Santiago, Leonardo; Gascó Eguíluz, Eduardo; Santafé Soler, Plácido; Martín Gracia, Elisabeth; Vila Parrot, Teresa

    2006-11-15

    To analyse the use of antidepressants from 2002 to 2004 and the length of treatment. Cross-sectional, descriptive study of antidepressant drugs prescribed through the National Health System during 2002-2004. Lleida Health Region, Spain. A total of 54,890 patients received an antidepressant drug between 2002 and 2004. Age, sex, medicine, prescription period, centre. The prevalence of antidepressant treatment was: 8.4% in 2002 (368,976 inhabitants); 8.6% in 2003 (376,638 inhabitants); and 8.7% in 2004 (388,148 inhabitants). The increase in antidepressant treatment in 2004 over 2002 was 9.4%. Prevalence among men was 5.4% and women, 12.7%. The distribution according to antidepressant classes was: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, 73.7%; tricyclic antidepressants, 26.2%; heterocyclic antidepressants, 10%, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors, 0.1%. The duration of treatment was 1 to 3 months (43%), 4 to 12 months (22.7%), 13 to 24 months (14.4%), and over 24 months (19.9%). A steady increase in the use of antidepressants is being observed, predominantly new drugs. Regarding the length of treatment, a high proportion of patients are treated for under 4 months, which does not follow recent recommendations in the scientific literature for treatment of depression. This is a major element of inefficiency in the health system.

  3. Antidepressants are not overprescribed for mild depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Gregory E; Rossom, Rebecca C; Beck, Arne; Waitzfelder, Beth E; Coleman, Karen J; Stewart, Christine; Operskalski, Belinda; Penfold, Robert B; Shortreed, Susan M

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate overprescribing of antidepressant medication for minimal or mild depression. Electronic records data from 4 large health care systems identified outpatients aged 18 years or older starting a new episode of antidepressant treatment in 2011 with an ICD-9 diagnosis of depressive disorder (296.2, 296.3, 311, or 300.4). Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) depression severity scores at time of treatment initiation were used to examine the distribution of baseline severity and the association between baseline severity and patients' demographic and clinical characteristics. Of 19,751 adults beginning treatment in 2011, baseline PHQ-9 scores were available for 7,051. In those with a baseline score, 85% reported moderate or severe symptoms (PHQ-9 score of 10 or more), 12% reported mild symptoms (PHQ-9 score of 5 to 9), and 3% reported minimal symptoms (PHQ-9 score of less than 5). The proportion reporting minimal or mild symptoms when starting treatment increased with age, ranging from 11% in those under age 65 years to 26% in those aged 65 and older. The proportion with minimal or mild symptoms was also moderately higher among patients living in wealthier neighborhoods and those treated by psychiatrists. Nevertheless, across all subgroups defined by sex, race/ethnicity, prescriber specialty, and treatment history, the proportions with minimal or mild symptoms did not exceed 18%. Secondary analyses, including weighting and subgroup analyses, found no evidence that estimates of baseline severity were biased by missing PHQ-9 scores. In these health systems, prescribing of antidepressant medication for minimal or mild depression is much less common than suggested by previous reports. Given that this practice may sometimes be clinically appropriate, our findings indicate that overprescribing of antidepressants for mild depression is not a significant public health concern. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  4. Tricyclic antidepressant radioreceptor assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innis, R.B.; Tune, L.; Rock, R.; Depaulo, R.; U'Prichard, D.C.; Snyder, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    A receptor assay for tricyclic antidepressants described here is based on the ability of these drugs to compete with [ 3 H]-3-guinuclidnyl benzilate ( 3 H-QNB) for binding to muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat brain membranes. The assay is sensitive, in that it can detect, for example, 2ng/ml nortriptyline in plasma. Seven plasma samples from depressed patients treated with nortriptyline were assayed with the radioreceptor and gas liquid chromatographic methods, and the results from these two methods were almost identical. This assay should be used cautiously, if at all, in patients treated with other drugs that have potent anticholinergic effects. (Auth.)

  5. Stimulation of entorhinal cortex-dentate gyrus circuitry is antidepressive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sanghee; Reynolds, Ryan P; Petrof, Iraklis; White, Alicia; Rivera, Phillip D; Segev, Amir; Gibson, Adam D; Suarez, Maiko; DeSalle, Matthew J; Ito, Naoki; Mukherjee, Shibani; Richardson, Devon R; Kang, Catherine E; Ahrens-Nicklas, Rebecca C; Soler, Ivan; Chetkovich, Dane M; Kourrich, Saïd; Coulter, Douglas A; Eisch, Amelia J

    2018-04-16

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is considered a 'circuitopathy', and brain stimulation therapies hold promise for ameliorating MDD symptoms, including hippocampal dysfunction. It is unknown whether stimulation of upstream hippocampal circuitry, such as the entorhinal cortex (Ent), is antidepressive, although Ent stimulation improves learning and memory in mice and humans. Here we show that molecular targeting (Ent-specific knockdown of a psychosocial stress-induced protein) and chemogenetic stimulation of Ent neurons induce antidepressive-like effects in mice. Mechanistically, we show that Ent-stimulation-induced antidepressive-like behavior relies on the generation of new hippocampal neurons. Thus, controlled stimulation of Ent hippocampal afferents is antidepressive via increased hippocampal neurogenesis. These findings emphasize the power and potential of Ent glutamatergic afferent stimulation-previously well-known for its ability to influence learning and memory-for MDD treatment.

  6. Biosynthesis of catecholamines, uptake of 3H-noradrenaline, and reactivity of cardiovascular system of the rat after chronic and acute treatment with a new antidepressant agent, IPF C-45

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filczewski, M.; Szymanska-Kosmala, M.; Oledzka, K.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of acute and chronic treatment of rats with IPF C-45 on the following biochemical and pharmacological parameters was tested: catecholamine concentration in brain, heart and adrenals, 3 H-noradrenaline uptake by cardiac muscle, the action on catecholamine synthesis following treatment with alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine, reactivity of cardiovascular system to catecholamines and isproterenol-induced tachycardia. Given chronically, IPF C-45 does not affect noradrenaline uptake by the cardia muscle. Both chronic and acute administration of the drug decelerates catecholamine biosynthesis by inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase activity. It seems that the action of IPF C-45, a benzonaphthyridone derivative, affects catecholamine metabolism in a manner distinctly different from that of tricyclic antidepressant drugs. (author)

  7. Antidepressant-Induced Female Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Tierney; Rullo, Jordan; Faubion, Stephanie

    2016-09-01

    Because 1 in 6 women in the United States takes antidepressants and a substantial proportion of patients report some disturbance of sexual function while taking these medications, it is a near certainty that the practicing clinician will need to know how to assess and manage antidepressant-related female sexual dysfunction. Adverse sexual effects can be complex because there are several potentially overlapping etiologies, including sexual dysfunction associated with the underlying mood disorder. As such, careful assessment of sexual function at the premedication visit followed by monitoring at subsequent visits is critical. Treatment of adverse sexual effects can be pharmacological (dose reduction, drug discontinuation or switching, augmentation, or using medications with lower adverse effect profiles), behavioral (exercising before sexual activity, scheduling sexual activity, vibratory stimulation, psychotherapy), complementary and integrative (acupuncture, nutraceuticals), or some combination of these modalities. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Neurogenesis and the Effect of Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Taupin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent evidence that neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood and neural stem cells (NSCs reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS suggests that the CNS has the potential for self-repair. Beside this potential, the function of newly generated neuronal cells in the adult brain remains the focus of intense research. The hippocampus of patients with depression show signs of atrophy and neuronal loss. This suggests that adult neurogenesis may contribute to the biology of depression. The observations that antidepressants, like fluoxetine, increase neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG and neurogenesis is required for the behavioral effect of antidepressants, lead to a new theory for depression and the design of new strategies and drugs for the treatment of depression. However, the role of adult neurogenesis in the etiology of depression remains the source of controversies and debates.

  9. Neurogenesis and The Effect of Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Taupin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent evidence that neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood and neural stem cells (NSCs reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS suggests that the CNS has the potential for self-repair. Beside this potential, the function of newly generated neuronal cells in the adult brain remains the focus of intense research. The hippocampus of patients with depression show signs of atrophy and neuronal loss. This suggests that adult neurogenesis may contribute to the biology of depression. The observations that antidepressants, like fluoxetine, increase neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG and neurogenesis is required for the behavioral effect of antidepressants, lead to a new theory for depression and the design of new strategies and drugs for the treatment of depression. However, the role of adult neurogenesis in the etiology of depression remains the source of controversies and debates.

  10. Antidepressants Increase REM Sleep Muscle Tone in Patients with and without REM Sleep Behavior Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarter, Stuart J; St Louis, Erik K; Sandness, David J; Arndt, Katlyn; Erickson, Maia; Tabatabai, Grace; Boeve, Bradley F; Silber, Michael H

    2015-06-01

    REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is associated with antidepressant treatment, especially in younger patients; but quantitative REM sleep without atonia (RSWA) analyses of psychiatric RBD patients remain limited. We analyzed RSWA in adults receiving antidepressants, with and without RBD. We comparatively analyzed visual, manual, and automated RSWA between RBD and control groups. RSWA metrics were compared between groups, and regression was used to explore associations with clinical variables. Tertiary-care sleep center. Participants included traditional RBD without antidepressant treatment (n = 30, 15 Parkinson disease [PD-RBD] and 15 idiopathic); psychiatric RBD receiving antidepressants (n = 30); and adults without RBD, including antidepressant-treated psychiatric (n = 30), untreated psychiatric (n = 15), and OSA (n = 60) controls. N/A. RSWA was highest in traditional and psychiatric RBD, intermediate in treated psychiatric controls, and lowest in untreated psychiatric and OSA controls (P sleep without atonia (RSWA) even without REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), suggesting that antidepressants, not depression, promote RSWA. Differences in RSWA distribution and type were also seen, with higher anterior tibialis RSWA in antidepressant-treated patients and higher tonic RSWA in Parkinson disease-RBD patients, which could aid distinction between RBD subtypes. These findings suggest that antidepressants may mediate different RSWA mechanisms or, alternatively, that RSWA type and distribution evolve during progressive neurodegeneration. Further prospective RSWA analyses are necessary to clarify the relationships between antidepressant treatment, psychiatric disease, and RBD. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  11. Antidepressants and sleep: a qualitative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sue; Argyropoulos, Spilios

    2005-01-01

    Most antidepressants change sleep; in particular, they alter the physiological patterns of sleep stages recorded overnight with EEG and other physiological measures. These effects are greatest and most consistent on rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and tend to be in the opposite direction to the sleep abnormalities found in major depression, but are usually of greater degree. Reductions in the amount of REM sleep and increases in REM sleep onset latency are seen after taking antidepressants, both in healthy volunteers and in depressed patients. Antidepressants that increase serotonin function by blocking reuptake or by inhibiting metabolism have the greatest effect on REM sleep. The decrease in amount of REM sleep appears to be greatest early in treatment, and gradually diminishes during long-term treatment, except after monoamine oxidase inhibitors when REM sleep is often absent for many months. Sleep initiation and maintenance are also affected by antidepressants, but the effects are much less consistent between drugs. Some antidepressants such as clomipramine and the selective serotonin receptor inhibitors (SSRIs), particularly fluoxetine, are sleep-disturbing early in treatment and some others such as amitriptyline and the newer serotonin 5-HT2-receptor antagonists are sleep promoting. However, these effects are fairly short-lived and there are very few significant differences between drugs after a few weeks of treatment. In general, the objectively measured sleep of depressed patients improves during 3-4 weeks of effective antidepressant treatment with most agents, as does their subjective impression of their sleep. Sleep improvement earlier in treatment may be an important clinical goal in some patients, perhaps when insomnia is particularly distressing, or to ensure compliance. In these patients, the choice of a safely used and effective antidepressant which improves sleep in short term is indicated. Patients with other sleep disorders such as restless legs

  12. Antidepressants versus placebo in major depression: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif; Brown, Walter A

    2015-10-01

    Although the early antidepressant trials which included severely ill and hospitalized patients showed substantial drug-placebo differences, these robust differences have not held up in the trials of the past couple of decades, whether sponsored by pharmaceutical companies or non-profit agencies. This narrowing of the drug-placebo difference has been attributed to a number of changes in the conduct of clinical trials. First, the advent of DSM-III and the broadening of the definition of major depression have led to the inclusion of mildly to moderately ill patients into antidepressant trials. These patients may experience a smaller magnitude of antidepressant-placebo differences. Second, drug development regulators, such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency, have had a significant, albeit underappreciated, role in determining how modern antidepressant clinical trials are designed and conducted. Their concerns about possible false positive results have led to trial designs that are poor, difficult to conduct, and complicated to analyze. Attempts at better design and patient selection for antidepressant trials have not yielded the expected results. As of now, antidepressant clinical trials have an effect size of 0.30, which, although similar to the effects of treatments for many other chronic illnesses, such as hypertension, asthma and diabetes, is less than impressive. © 2015 World Psychiatric Association.

  13. Oil production enhancement through a standardized brine treatment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adewumi, A.; Watson, R.; Tian, S.; Safargar, S.; Heckman, S.; Drielinger, I.

    1995-08-01

    In order to permit the environmentally safe discharge of brines produced from oil wells in Pennsylvania to the surface waters of the Commonwealth and to rapidly brings as many wells as possible into compliance with the law, the Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Association (POGAM) approached the Pennsylvania State University to develop a program designed to demonstrate that a treatment process to meet acceptable discharge conditions and effluent limitations can be standardized for all potential stripper wells brine discharge. After the initial studies, the first phase of this project was initiated. A bench-scale prototype model was developed for conducting experiments in laboratory conditions. The experiments pursued in the laboratory conditions were focused on the removal of ferrous iron from synthetically made brine. Iron was selected as the primary heavy metals for studying the efficiency of the treatment process. The results of a number of experiments in the lab were indicative of the capability of the proposed brine treatment process in the removal of iron. Concurrent with the laboratory experiments, a comprehensive and extensive kinetic study was initiated. This study was necessary to provide the required data base for process modeling. This study included the investigation of the critical pH as well as the rate and order of reactions of the studied elements: aluminum, lead, zinc, and copper. In the second phase of this project, a field-based prototype was developed to evaluate and demonstrate the treatment process effectiveness. These experiments were conducted under various conditions and included the testing on five brines from different locations with various dissolved constituents. The outcome of this research has been a software package, currently based on iron`s reactivity, to be used for design purposes. The developed computer program was refined as far as possible using the results from laboratory and field experiments.

  14. DMTO: a realistic ontology for standard diabetes mellitus treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sappagh, Shaker; Kwak, Daehan; Ali, Farman; Kwak, Kyung-Sup

    2018-02-06

    Treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex problem. A clinical decision support system (CDSS) based on massive and distributed electronic health record data can facilitate the automation of this process and enhance its accuracy. The most important component of any CDSS is its knowledge base. This knowledge base can be formulated using ontologies. The formal description logic of ontology supports the inference of hidden knowledge. Building a complete, coherent, consistent, interoperable, and sharable ontology is a challenge. This paper introduces the first version of the newly constructed Diabetes Mellitus Treatment Ontology (DMTO) as a basis for shared-semantics, domain-specific, standard, machine-readable, and interoperable knowledge relevant to T2DM treatment. It is a comprehensive ontology and provides the highest coverage and the most complete picture of coded knowledge about T2DM patients' current conditions, previous profiles, and T2DM-related aspects, including complications, symptoms, lab tests, interactions, treatment plan (TP) frameworks, and glucose-related diseases and medications. It adheres to the design principles recommended by the Open Biomedical Ontologies Foundry and is based on ontological realism that follows the principles of the Basic Formal Ontology and the Ontology for General Medical Science. DMTO is implemented under Protégé 5.0 in Web Ontology Language (OWL) 2 format and is publicly available through the National Center for Biomedical Ontology's BioPortal at http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/DMTO . The current version of DMTO includes more than 10,700 classes, 277 relations, 39,425 annotations, 214 semantic rules, and 62,974 axioms. We provide proof of concept for this approach to modeling TPs. The ontology is able to collect and analyze most features of T2DM as well as customize chronic TPs with the most appropriate drugs, foods, and physical exercises. DMTO is ready to be used as a knowledge base for

  15. Depressão vascular no idoso: resposta ao tratamento antidepressivo associado a inibidor das colinesterases Vascular depression in elderly: response to treatment with antidepressant associated to cholinesterase inhibitor

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    Ricardo Barcelos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Entre os transtornos neuropsiquiátricos ocasionados por eventos cerebrovasculares, a depressão vascular é pouco diagnosticada por médicos não especialistas, causando aumento da morbimortalidade de pacientes idosos. CASO CLÍNICO: Trata-se de um paciente com 67 anos que apresentou resposta parcial a tratamento com inibidores da recaptura de serotonina e efeitos adversos autonômicos graves com outros antidepressivos. A adição de rivastigmina ao citalopram promoveu sucesso terapêutico, com redução de 23 para 7 pontos, na escala de Hamilton para depressão. DISCUSSÃO: O resultado obtido traz novas perspectivas para o tratamento da depressão vascular, sendo necessários ensaios clínicos controlados que evidenciem o benefício da adição dos inibidores das colinesterases aos antidepressivos no tratamento destes pacientes.CONTEXT: Among neuropsychiatric disorders caused by cerebrovascular factors, vascular depression is diagnosed in a small degree by general practitioners, causing morbid-mortality increase in elderly. CASE REPORT: That is a case of a 67 year-old-man with partial response after treatment with a Selective Serotonin Receptors Inhibitor, and severe autonomic adverse effects with other antidepressants. The addition of rivastigmine to citalopram resulted in a therapeutic success, with a reduction of 23 to 7 points on the Hamilton Depressive Scale (HAM-D. DISCUSSION: The result obtained brings new perspectives to the treatment of vascular depression, providing that randomized controlled trials with larger sample sizes confirm the positive effect of the addition of a cholinesterase inhibitor to antidepressants in the treatment of these patients.

  16. Comparative efficacy and acceptability of antidepressants in Parkinson's disease: a network meta-analysis.

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    Jinling Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depression is a common non-motor symptom in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD. There are many kinds of antidepressants being used, such as tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs, and Dopamine agonists which are suggested as alternative antidepressants for the treatment of depression in PD. Which one should we choose first? Literatures have shown inconsistent results. METHODS: We conducted a network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to compare the efficacy and acceptability of therapeutic methods for the treatment of depression in Parkinson's disease. RESULTS: We used the odds ratios (OR as effect size firstly and the results indicated no statistical significance between each compared intervention. Then we used the logarithm of the individual odds ratios as effect size. With efficacy of TCAs as the standard of comparison, the degree of incoherence (a measure of how closely the entire network fits together was small (ω =  4.824827e-05. The logor were: SSRIs -0.69 (95% CI -1.28- -0.10; Pramipexole -0.73 (-1.71- -0.26; Pergolide -1.97 (-3.67- 0.27; SNRIs -0.86 (-1.86- 0.15; Placebo -1.24 (-1.99- -0.50. With Placebo as the standard of comparison, the logor were: TCAs 1.24 (0.50- 1.99; SSRIs 0.55 (-0.03- 1.13; Pramipexole 0.51 (-0.12- 1.15; Pergolide -0.73 (-2.25- 0.80; SNRIs 0.38 (-0.42- 1.19; TCAs, pramipexole, pergolide and SNRIs showed better profile of acceptability, leading to significant fewer discontinuations than that of SSRIs. CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient evidence to support antidepressant efficacy for SSRIs, pramipexole, pergolide and SNRIs. TCAs might be the best choice when starting antidepressant treatment in patients of Parkinson's disease because it has the most favorable balance between benefits and acceptability, followed by pramipexole and SNRIs, SSRIs might be the last choice.

  17. Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial comparing mindfulness-based cognitive therapy with maintenance anti-depressant treatment in the prevention of depressive relapse/recurrence: the PREVENT trial

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    Hayes Rachel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is a common and distressing mental health problem that is responsible for significant individual disability and cost to society. Medication and psychological therapies are effective for treating depression and maintenance anti-depressants (m-ADM can prevent relapse. However, individuals with depression often express a wish for psychological help that can help them recover from depression in the long-term. We need to develop psychological therapies that prevent depressive relapse/recurrence. A recently developed treatment, Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT, see http://www.mbct.co.uk shows potential as a brief group programme for people with recurring depression. In two studies it has been shown to halve the rates of depression recurring compared to usual care. This trial asks the policy research question, is MBCT superior to m-ADM in terms of: a primary outcome of preventing depressive relapse/recurrence over 24 months; and, secondary outcomes of (a depression free days, (b residual depressive symptoms, (c antidepressant (ADM usage, (d psychiatric and medical co-morbidity, (e quality of life, and (f cost effectiveness? An explanatory research question asks is an increase in mindfulness skills the key mechanism of change? Methods/Design The design is a single blind, parallel RCT examining MBCT vs. m-ADM with an embedded process study. To answer the main policy research question the proposed trial compares MBCT plus ADM-tapering with m-ADM for patients with recurrent depression. Four hundred and twenty patients with recurrent major depressive disorder in full or partial remission will be recruited through primary care. Depressive relapse/recurrence over two years is the primary outcome variable. The explanatory question will be addressed in two mutually informative ways: quantitative measurement of potential mediating variables pre/post-treatment and a qualitative study of service users' views and experiences

  18. [Latest standards of muscle injury prophylactic activities, treatment and rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroszewski, Jacek; Bakowski, Paweł; Tabiszewski, Maciej

    2008-01-01

    Muscle injury represents the highest proportion of sport-linked contusions. Experimental and clinical studies aim at increasingly detailed recognition of muscle physiology and pathophysiology. It would allow to set up functional standards and permit to minimize risk of contusions associated with sport activities. In cases of such contusions it would restrict its sequele and would abbreviate the duration of treatment. In the study elements of prophylaxis, treatment and rehabilitation of injured muscles will be discussed, based on current scientific results. Review study includes data from studies investigating prophylactic activities, types of teratment and the effects of different rehabilitation strategy. Latest standards from First European Congress of Football Medicine, Munich 2004, were also taken into account. The prophylactic activities should focus on education attempting to popularize the knowledge of the role of warm-up activities which precede proper physical effort, muscle stretching and activities augmenting muscle strength. The treatment of muscle injury is related to the extent of their damage. First actions should be focused on the RICE principle (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation). In case of torn tissues, local injections of anesthetics, anti-inflammatory agents and regeneration-promoting agents used to be applied. Application of NSAIDs and anti-thrombotic prophylaxis is sound but due to their side effects it is recommended as frequently as it is counterindicated by physicians. A threshold in the therapy, not always noted by therapeutists, involves rapid mobilization of the injured tissue. This involves mobility exercises starting at 3-5 days post-trauma, with no load at the beginning, but starting at days 4 to 6 asssociated with appropriate loading. The recently conducted studies aim at stimulation of rapid muscle regeneration, inhibition of scar formation in the site of injury and elimination of already existing scars. The latter seems most

  19. Antidepressant induced excessive yawning and indifference

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    Bruno Palazzo Nazar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Antidepressant induced excessive yawning has been described as a possible side effect of pharmacotherapy. A syndrome of indifference has also been described as another possible side effect. The frequency of those phenomena and their physiopathology are unknown. They are both considered benign and reversible after antidepressant discontinuation but severe cases with complications as temporomandibular lesions, have been described. Methods We report two unprecedented cases in which excessive yawning and indifference occurred simultaneously as side effects of antidepressant therapy, discussing possible physiopathological mechanisms for this co-occurrence. Case 1: A male patient presented excessive yawning (approximately 80/day and apathy after venlafaxine XR treatment. Symptoms reduced after a switch to escitalopram, with a reduction to 50 yawns/day. Case 2: A female patient presented excessive yawning (approximately 25/day and inability to react to environmental stressors with desvenlafaxine. Conclusion Induction of indifference and excessive yawning may be modulated by serotonergic and noradrenergic mechanisms. One proposal to unify these side effects would be enhancement of serotonin in midbrain, especially paraventricular and raphe nucleus.

  20. Antidepressants and Suicide Risk: A Comprehensive Overview

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    Roberto Tatarelli

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The annual worldwide suicide rate currently averages approximately 13 per 100,000 individuals per year (0.013% per year, with higher average rates for men than for women in all but a few countries, very low rates in children, and relatively high rates in elderly men. Suicide rates vary markedly between countries, reflecting in part differences in case-identification and reporting procedures. Rates of attempted suicide in the general population average 20–30 times higher than rates of completed suicide, but are probably under-reported. Research on the relationship between pharmacotherapy and suicidal behavior was rare until a decade ago. Most ecological studies and large clinical studies have found that a general reduction in suicide rates is significantly correlated with higher rates of prescribing modern antidepressants. However, ecological, cohort and case-control studies and data from brief, randomized, controlled trials in patients with acute affective disorders have found increases, particularly in young patients and particularly for the risk of suicide attempts, as well as increases in suicidal ideation in young patients. whether antidepressants are associated with specific aspects of suicidality (e.g., higher rates of completed suicide, attempted suicide and suicidal ideation in younger patients with major affective disorders remains a highly controversial question. In light of this gap this paper analyzes research on the relationship between suicidality and antidepressant treatment.

  1. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of antidepressant action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing theory is that brain monoamine signalling is critically involved in the mechanisms of antidepressant drug treatment. Theories on the nature of these mechanisms commenced with ideas developed in the 1960s that the drugs act simply by increasing monoamine availability in the synapse. However, this thinking has advanced remarkably in the last decade to concepts which position that antidepressant drug action on monoamine signalling is just the starting point for a complex sequence of neuroadaptive molecular and cellular changes that bring about the therapeutic effect. These changes include activation of one or more programmes of gene expression that leads to the strengthening of synaptic efficacy and connectivity, and even switching neural networks into a more immature developmental state. It is thought that through this increase in plasticity, key neural circuits within the limbic system are more easily remodelled by incoming emotionally relevant stimuli. This article attempts to bring together previous and current knowledge of antidepressant drug action on monoamine signalling at molecular and cellular levels, and introduces current thinking that these changes interact with neuropsychological processes ultimately to elevate mood.

  2. Antidepressants: Can They Lose Effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be having the same effect. Can antidepressants lose effectiveness? Answers from Daniel K. Hall-Flavin, M.D. ... Policy Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  3. Effectiveness of antidepressants: an evidence myth constructed from a thousand randomized trials?

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    Ioannidis John PA

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antidepressants, in particular newer agents, are among the most widely prescribed medications worldwide with annual sales of billions of dollars. The introduction of these agents in the market has passed through seemingly strict regulatory control. Over a thousand randomized trials have been conducted with antidepressants. Statistically significant benefits have been repeatedly demonstrated and the medical literature is flooded with several hundreds of "positive" trials (both pre-approval and post-approval. However, two recent meta-analyses question this picture. The first meta-analysis used data that were submitted to FDA for the approval of 12 antidepressant drugs. While only half of these trials had formally significant effectiveness, published reports almost ubiquitously claimed significant results. "Negative" trials were either left unpublished or were distorted to present "positive" results. The average benefit of these drugs based on the FDA data was of small magnitude, while the published literature suggested larger benefits. A second meta-analysis using also FDA-submitted data examined the relationship between treatment effect and baseline severity of depression. Drug-placebo differences increased with increasing baseline severity and the difference became large enough to be clinically important only in the very small minority of patient populations with severe major depression. In severe major depression, antidepressants did not become more effective, simply placebo lost effectiveness. These data suggest that antidepressants may be less effective than their wide marketing suggests. Short-term benefits are small and long-term balance of benefits and harms is understudied. I discuss how the use of many small randomized trials with clinically non-relevant outcomes, improper interpretation of statistical significance, manipulated study design, biased selection of study populations, short follow-up, and selective and distorted

  4. Antidepressant-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSanty, Kevin P; Amabile, Celene M

    2007-07-01

    To review principles of drug-induced liver injury (DILI), summarize characteristics of antidepressant-mediated liver injury, and provide recommendations for monitoring and management. A search relating to antidepressant-induced liver injury was performed using MEDLINE (1966-March 2007). Search terms included antidepressant, cholestasis, hepatotoxicity, jaundice, liver injury, toxic hepatitis, and transaminases. Reference citations not identified in the initial database search were also utilized. All English-language case reports, letters, and review articles identified from the data sources were used. Case reports and letters relating to hepatotoxicity from antidepressant overdose were excluded. Antidepressant-induced liver injury described in published cases were of the idiopathic type and, by definition, cannot be predicted based on dose or specific risk factors. Paroxetine had the largest number of cases within the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor class. Nefazodone, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, appeared to have the most serious cases and is the only antidepressant agent that carries a Food and Drug Administration Black Box Warning regarding hepatotoxicity. The tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors are capable of producing hepatotoxicity, but fewer cases with these agents have been reported in the past 15 years, possibly due to a decline in their use. Causality has not been well established in all reports due to the concurrent use of other drugs and/or underlying liver disease. Most antidepressant agents have the potential to produce idiopathic liver injury. There is no way to prevent idiopathic DILI, but the severity of the reaction may be minimized with prompt recognition and early withdrawal of the agent. The clinician must be careful to provide ongoing therapy of the underlying depressive disorder and be aware of possible drug discontinuation syndromes should potential hepatotoxicity be suspected.

  5. Antidepressant-like effects of methanolic extract of Bacopa monniera in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannan, Abdul; Abir, Ariful Basher; Rahman, Rashidur

    2015-09-25

    Bacopa monniera has been used as a cure for various ailments that include anxiety, epileptic disorders, dementia, blood purifier, cough and rheumatism, and some important local uses of the plant are in dermatitis, anemia, diabetes, promote fertility and prevent miscarriage for many years in Bangladesh. According to this background, the aim of the study was to evaluate the antidepressant-like effect of the methanolic extract of B. monniera (MEBM) in different behavioral models such as forced swimming test (FST), measurement of locomotor activity test (MLAT) and tail suspension test (TST) on mice after two weeks treatment. Mice were divided into five groups (n = 5/group): control group (deionized water), standard group where Imipramine hydrochloride (30 mg/kg) was used as standard drug and three test groups where three doses of the methanolic extract of B. monniera (MEBM) (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) was used for two weeks treatment. All the drug and test samples were administered via gavage through oral route. To assess the antidepressant-like effect of MEBM forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST) and measurement of locomotor activity test (MLAT) have been done in mice. The results showed that a strong and dose-dependent antidepressant effects in different mice models. The main findings of the MEBM significantly reduced the duration of immobility times in the forced swimming test (p < 0.001). Likewise, the extract significantly decreased the immobility time in the tail suspension test (p < 0.001). Moreover, we employed an additional measurement of locomotor activity test to check the motor stimulating activity of the MEBM. The extract also significantly increased the locomotion, rearing and defecation effects in comparison to the control group (p < 0.001). The present results clearly demonstrate that the methanolic extract of B. monniera possesses antidepressant-like activity in the animal behavioral models. The current study warrants

  6. Efficacy of new generation antidepressants: differences seem illusory.

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    A C Del Re

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, Cipriani and colleagues examined the relative efficacy of 12 new-generation antidepressants on major depression using network meta-analytic methods. They found that some of these medications outperformed others in patient response to treatment. However, several methodological criticisms have been raised about network meta-analysis and Cipriani's analysis in particular which creates the concern that the stated superiority of some antidepressants relative to others may be unwarranted. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A Monte Carlo simulation was conducted which involved replicating Cipriani's network meta-analysis under the null hypothesis (i.e., no true differences between antidepressants. The following simulation strategy was implemented: (1 1000 simulations were generated under the null hypothesis (i.e., under the assumption that there were no differences among the 12 antidepressants, (2 each of the 1000 simulations were network meta-analyzed, and (3 the total number of false positive results from the network meta-analyses were calculated. FINDINGS: Greater than 7 times out of 10, the network meta-analysis resulted in one or more comparisons that indicated the superiority of at least one antidepressant when no such true differences among them existed. INTERPRETATION: Based on our simulation study, the results indicated that under identical conditions to those of the 117 RCTs with 236 treatment arms contained in Cipriani et al.'s meta-analysis, one or more false claims about the relative efficacy of antidepressants will be made over 70% of the time. As others have shown as well, there is little evidence in these trials that any antidepressant is more effective than another. The tendency of network meta-analyses to generate false positive results should be considered when conducting multiple comparison analyses.

  7. Efficacy of new generation antidepressants: differences seem illusory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Re, A C; Spielmans, Glen I; Flückiger, Christoph; Wampold, Bruce E

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Cipriani and colleagues examined the relative efficacy of 12 new-generation antidepressants on major depression using network meta-analytic methods. They found that some of these medications outperformed others in patient response to treatment. However, several methodological criticisms have been raised about network meta-analysis and Cipriani's analysis in particular which creates the concern that the stated superiority of some antidepressants relative to others may be unwarranted. A Monte Carlo simulation was conducted which involved replicating Cipriani's network meta-analysis under the null hypothesis (i.e., no true differences between antidepressants). The following simulation strategy was implemented: (1) 1000 simulations were generated under the null hypothesis (i.e., under the assumption that there were no differences among the 12 antidepressants), (2) each of the 1000 simulations were network meta-analyzed, and (3) the total number of false positive results from the network meta-analyses were calculated. Greater than 7 times out of 10, the network meta-analysis resulted in one or more comparisons that indicated the superiority of at least one antidepressant when no such true differences among them existed. Based on our simulation study, the results indicated that under identical conditions to those of the 117 RCTs with 236 treatment arms contained in Cipriani et al.'s meta-analysis, one or more false claims about the relative efficacy of antidepressants will be made over 70% of the time. As others have shown as well, there is little evidence in these trials that any antidepressant is more effective than another. The tendency of network meta-analyses to generate false positive results should be considered when conducting multiple comparison analyses.

  8. Is the efficacy of antidepressants in panic disorder mediated by adverse events? A mediational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bighelli, Irene; Borghesani, Anna; Barbui, Corrado

    2017-01-01

    It has been hypothesised that the perception of adverse events in placebo-controlled antidepressant clinical trials may induce patients to conclude that they have been randomized to the active arm of the trial, leading to the breaking of blind. This may enhance the expectancies for improvement and the therapeutic response. The main objective of this study is to test the hypothesis that the efficacy of antidepressants in panic disorder is mediated by the perception of adverse events. The present analysis is based on a systematic review of published and unpublished randomised trials comparing antidepressants with placebo for panic disorder. The Baron and Kenny approach was applied to investigate the mediational role of adverse events in the relationship between antidepressants treatment and efficacy. Fourteen placebo-controlled antidepressants trials were included in the analysis. We found that: (a) antidepressants treatment was significantly associated with better treatment response (ß = 0.127, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.21, p = 0.003); (b) antidepressants treatment was not associated with adverse events (ß = 0.094, 95% CI -0.05 to 0.24, p = 0.221); (c) adverse events were negatively associated with treatment response (ß = 0.035, 95% CI -0.06 to -0.05, p = 0.022). Finally, after adjustment for adverse events, the relationship between antidepressants treatment and treatment response remained statistically significant (ß = 0.122, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.23, p = 0.039). These findings do not support the hypothesis that the perception of adverse events in placebo-controlled antidepressant clinical trials may lead to the breaking of blind and to an artificial inflation of the efficacy measures. Based on these results, we argue that the moderate therapeutic effect of antidepressants in individuals with panic disorder is not an artefact, therefore reflecting a genuine effect that doctors can expect to replicate under real-world conditions.

  9. Signaling pathways regulating Homer1a expression : implications for antidepressant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serchov, Tsvetan; Heumann, Rolf; van Calker, Dietrich; Biber, Knut

    Homer1a is upregulated by several different antidepressant measures, including non-pharmacological treatments, like sleep deprivation (SD) and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and antidepressant drugs, such as imipramine, fluoxetine and ketamine. Homer1a induction might thus be a crucial joint

  10. [Biomarkers for Mood Disorders and a Novel Antidepressant (R)-ketamine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2017-10-01

    Depression is often misdiagnosed as major depressive disorder in patients with bipolar disorder. Therapeutic drugs for these two disorders are quite different, but the anesthetic ketamine shows fast-acting antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant patients with these disorders. Here, we discuss biomarkers for both disorders, recent findings regarding ketamine, and predictable biomarkers for ketamine's antidepressant actions.

  11. Economic Effects of Anti-Depressant Usage on Elective Lumbar Fusion Surgery

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    Amirali Sayadipour

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been suggested, although not proven, that presence of concomitant psychiatric disorders may increase the inpatient costs for patients undergoing elective surgery. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that elective lumbar fusion surgery is more costly in patients with under treatment for depression. Methods: This is a retrospective case-control study of 142 patients who underwent elective lumbar fusion. Of those 142 patients, 41 patients were chronically using an antidepressant medication that considered as a "study group", and 101 patients were not taking an antidepressant medication that considered as a "control group". Data was collected for this cohort regarding antidepressant usage patient demographics, length of stay (LOS, age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index scores and cost. Costs were compared between those with a concomitant antidepressant usage and those without antidepressant usage using multivariate analysis. Results: Patients using antidepressants and those with no history of antidepressant usage were similar in terms of gender, age and number of operative levels. The LOS demonstrated a non-significant trend towards longer stays in those using anti-depressants. Total charges, payments, variable costs and fixed costs were all higher in the antidepressant group but none of the differences reached statistical significance. Using Total Charges as the dependent variable, gender and having psychiatric comorbidities were retained independent variables. Use of an antidepressant was independently predictive of a 36% increase in Total Charges . Antidepressant usage as an independent variable also conferred a 22% increase in cost and predictive of a 19% increase in Fixed Cost . Male gender was predictive of a 30% increase in Total Charges . Conclusion: This study suggests use of antidepressant in patients who undergo elective spine fusion compared with control group is associated with increasing total cost and

  12. National treatment in international trade: National law and international standards

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    Divljak Drago

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the paper is the principle of national treatment, namely one of the basic principles of international trade. The objective is to determine its outreach and contents set in the forms of international trade organising, primarily in the World Trade Organization, from a legal perspective, naturally, all in the context of the Serbian law. The analysis that has been carried out indicates that there is an obvious intention of our legislators to harmonise in principle our legislation with the WTO requirements and standards, which are incomplete themselves and cause disputes that are not resolved in the practice of dispute resolving either entirely or consistently. In our law, a step forward has been made in relation to the situation from the previous relevant legislation, because the application of this principle is extended not only to trade with goods but also to trade with services, and to industrial property rights. However, in the most significant, basic field, namely trade with goods, it is still being done in a general way, by simplifying the entire topic and bringing it down only to protection against discrimination and neglecting the sphere of protectionism. Such acting does not include all the complexity of this matter and it is not entirely harmonised with the WTO requirements. However, a good side of such an approach is that it gives the state more freedom for acting in this sphere, which may be acceptable in the transition period until full membership of Serbia in this organization.

  13. Decisional conflict among women considering antidepressant medication use in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Georgia D; Ross, Lori E; Stewart, Donna E; Grigoriadis, Sophie; Dennis, Cindy-Lee; Vigod, Simone

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine decision-making among women considering antidepressant medication use in pregnancy. Decisional conflict was assessed using the Decisional Conflict Scale (DCS) among pregnant women considering antidepressant medication treatment (N = 40). Overall DCS and subscale scores were compared between women who were antidepressant users and non-users. Semi-structured interviews (N = 10) explored barriers and facilitators of decision-making. Twenty-one women (52 %) had moderate or high decisional conflict (DCS ≥ 25). Overall DCS scores did not differ between groups, but antidepressant use was associated with feeling more adequately informed (subscale mean 17.5, SD 17.9 vs. 42.1, SD 23.8, p = 0.001) and clear about values (subscale mean 16.7, SD 15.1 vs. 29.8, SD 24.0, p = 0.043). Barriers to decision-making were (1) difficulty weighing maternal versus infant health, (2) lack of high quality information, (3) negative external influences, and (4) emotional reactions to decision-making. Facilitators were (1) interpersonal supports, (2) accessible subspecialty care, and (3) severe depressive symptoms. Many pregnant women facing decisions regarding antidepressant medication use experience decisional conflict. Interventions that provide accurate information, assistance with weighing risks and benefits of treatment, management of problematic external influences, and emotional support may reduce decisional conflict and facilitate the decision-making process.

  14. Peripheral administration of lactate produces antidepressant-like effects

    KAUST Repository

    Carrard, A

    2016-10-18

    In addition to its role as metabolic substrate that can sustain neuronal function and viability, emerging evidence supports a role for l-lactate as an intercellular signaling molecule involved in synaptic plasticity. Clinical and basic research studies have shown that major depression and chronic stress are associated with alterations in structural and functional plasticity. These findings led us to investigate the role of l-lactate as a potential novel antidepressant. Here we show that peripheral administration of l-lactate produces antidepressant-like effects in different animal models of depression that respond to acute and chronic antidepressant treatment. The antidepressant-like effects of l-lactate are associated with increases in hippocampal lactate levels and with changes in the expression of target genes involved in serotonin receptor trafficking, astrocyte functions, neurogenesis, nitric oxide synthesis and cAMP signaling. Further elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant effects of l-lactate may help to identify novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of depression.

  15. Antidepressant efficacy and side-effect burden: a quick guide for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Santarsieri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Prescribing of antidepressant treatment (ADT for major depressive disorder (MDD has increased in quantity and popularity over the last two decades. This is likely due to the approval of safer medications, better education of clinicians and their patients, direct-to-consumer marketing practices, and less stigma associated with those taking ADT. This trend has also been met with some controversy, however, as the ongoing safety and effectiveness of these treatments have at times been called into question. This paper discusses the differing levels of evidence that support the use of ADT based on (A Food and Drug Administration approvals, (B data from randomized controlled trials or meta-analyses and, where these are not available, the authors discuss and apply, (C theoretical pharmacodynamic principles to justify antidepressant choice in the treatment of MDD patients. The final section discusses standard psychopharmacology guideline approaches to better alert the reader as to which practices are commonplace compared with those which are more outside of the standard of care.

  16. Antidepressant efficacy and side-effect burden: a quick guide for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarsieri, Daniel; Schwartz, Thomas L

    2015-01-01

    Prescribing of antidepressant treatment (ADT) for major depressive disorder (MDD) has increased in quantity and popularity over the last two decades. This is likely due to the approval of safer medications, better education of clinicians and their patients, direct-to-consumer marketing practices, and less stigma associated with those taking ADT. This trend has also been met with some controversy, however, as the ongoing safety and effectiveness of these treatments have at times been called into question. This paper discusses the differing levels of evidence that support the use of ADT based on (A) Food and Drug Administration approvals, (B) data from randomized controlled trials or meta-analyses and, where these are not available, the authors discuss and apply, (C) theoretical pharmacodynamic principles to justify antidepressant choice in the treatment of MDD patients. The final section discusses standard psychopharmacology guideline approaches to better alert the reader as to which practices are commonplace compared with those which are more outside of the standard of care.

  17. Treatment with tianeptine induces antidepressive-like effects and alters the neurotrophin levels, mitochondrial respiratory chain and cycle Krebs enzymes in the brain of maternally deprived adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della, Franciela P; Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Santos, Maria Augusta B dos; Tomaz, Débora B; Antunes, Altamir R; Scaini, Giselli; Morais, Meline O S; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2013-03-01

    Maternally deprived rats were treated with tianeptine (15 mg/kg) once a day for 14 days during their adult phase. Their behavior was then assessed using the forced swimming and open field tests. The BDNF, NGF and energy metabolism were assessed in the rat brain. Deprived rats increased the immobility time, but tianeptine reversed this effect and increased the swimming time; the BDNF levels were decreased in the amygdala of the deprived rats treated with saline and the BDNF levels were decreased in the nucleus accumbens within all groups; the NGF was found to have decreased in the hippocampus, amygdala and nucleus accumbens of the deprived rats; citrate synthase was increased in the hippocampus of non-deprived rats treated with tianeptine and the creatine kinase was decreased in the hippocampus and amygdala of the deprived rats; the mitochondrial complex I and II-III were inhibited, and tianeptine increased the mitochondrial complex II and IV in the hippocampus of the non-deprived rats; the succinate dehydrogenase was increased in the hippocampus of non-deprived rats treated with tianeptine. So, tianeptine showed antidepressant effects conducted on maternally deprived rats, and this can be attributed to its action on the neurochemical pathways related to depression.

  18. Monitoring improvement using a patient-rated depression scale during treatment with anti-depressants in general practice. A validation study on the Goldberg Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, J; Holm, L; Bech, P

    2001-12-01

    To perform a pilot study on the value of the Goldberg Depression Scale as an instrument for monitoring improvement in depressed patients treated with anti-depressants in general practice. A comparative study using simultaneous ratings on the observer-based 17-item Hamilton Depression Scale and the patient-rated Goldberg Depression Scale. General practice. Twenty-one patients meeting the ICD-10 criteria of a moderate depressive episode were assessed at the time of inclusion and through three follow-up visits. Scores on the Goldberg Depression Scale compared to the Hamilton Depression Scale. An acceptable internal and external validity of the Goldberg Depression Scale was demonstrated. The Loevinger coefficient varied from 0.25 at the time of diagnosis to 0.57, 0.65 and 0.69 by visits two, three and four. Factor analysis identified only one general factor explaining 50% or more of the variants, except at visit 1. When the Goldberg Depression Scale was correlated to the Hamilton Depression Scales, a coefficient of 0.74 was obtained (p Depression Scale is suitable for monitoring improvement in depressed patients treated in general practice. Further studies are recommended.

  19. Placebo-Activated Neural Systems are Linked to Antidepressant Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peciña, Marta; Bohnert, Amy S. B.; Sikora, Magdalena; Avery, Erich T.; Langenecker, Scott A.; Mickey, Brian J.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2016-01-01

    Importance High placebo responses have been observed across a wide range of pathologies, severely impacting drug development. Objective Here we examined neurochemical mechanisms underlying the formation of placebo effects in patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Participants Thirty-five medication-free MDD patients. Design and Intervention We performed a single-blinded two-week cross-over randomized controlled trial of two identical oral placebos (described as having either “active” or “inactive” fast-acting antidepressant-like effects) followed by a 10-week open-label treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or in some cases, another agent as clinically indicated. The volunteers were studied with PET and the μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-selective radiotracer [11C]carfentanil after each 1-week “inactive” and “active” oral placebo treatment. In addition, 1 mL of isotonic saline was administered intravenously (i.v.) within sight of the volunteer during PET scanning every 4 min over 20 min only after the 1-week active placebo treatment, with instructions that the compound may be associated with the activation of brain systems involved in mood improvement. This challenge stimulus was utilized to test the individual capacity to acutely activate endogenous opioid neurotransmision under expectations of antidepressant effect. Setting A University Health System. Main Outcomes and Measures Changes in depressive symptoms in response to “active” placebo and antidepressant. Baseline and activation measures of MOR binding. Results Higher baseline MOR binding in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) was associated with better response to antidepressant treatment (r=0.48; p=0.02). Reductions in depressive symptoms after 1-week of “active” placebo treatment, compared to the “inactive”, were associated with increased placebo-induced μ-opioid neurotransmission in a network of regions implicated in emotion, stress regulation, and the

  20. Serotonin 2C receptor antagonists induce fast-onset antidepressant effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opal, M D; Klenotich, S C; Morais, M; Bessa, J; Winkle, J; Doukas, D; Kay, L J; Sousa, N; Dulawa, S M

    2014-10-01

    Current antidepressants must be administered for several weeks to produce therapeutic effects. We show that selective serotonin 2C (5-HT2C) antagonists exert antidepressant actions with a faster-onset (5 days) than that of current antidepressants (14 days) in mice. Subchronic (5 days) treatment with 5-HT2C antagonists induced antidepressant behavioral effects in the chronic forced swim test (cFST), chronic mild stress (CMS) paradigm and olfactory bulbectomy paradigm. This treatment regimen also induced classical markers of antidepressant action: activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). None of these effects were induced by subchronic treatment with citalopram, a prototypical selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Local infusion of 5-HT2C antagonists into the ventral tegmental area was sufficient to induce BDNF in the mPFC, and dopamine D1 receptor antagonist treatment blocked the antidepressant behavioral effects of 5-HT2C antagonists. 5-HT2C antagonists also activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) in the mPFC, effects recently linked to rapid antidepressant action. Furthermore, 5-HT2C antagonists reversed CMS-induced atrophy of mPFC pyramidal neurons. Subchronic SSRI treatment, which does not induce antidepressant behavioral effects, also activated mTOR and eEF2 and reversed CMS-induced neuronal atrophy, indicating that these effects are not sufficient for antidepressant onset. Our findings reveal that 5-HT2C antagonists are putative fast-onset antidepressants, which act through enhancement of mesocortical dopaminergic signaling.

  1. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) Task Force Report on Antidepressant Use in Bipolar Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacchiarotti, Isabella; Bond, David J.; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Nolen, Willem A.; Grunze, Heinz; Licht, Rasmus W.; Post, Robert M.; Berk, Michael; Goodwin, Guy M.; Sachs, Gary S.; Tondo, Leonardo; Findling, Robert L.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Tohen, Mauricio; Undurraga, Juan; González-Pinto, Ana; Goldberg, Joseph F.; Yildiz, Ayşegül; Altshuler, Lori L.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Thase, Michael E.; Koukopoulos, Athanasios; Colom, Francesc; Frye, Mark A.; Malhi, Gin S.; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.; Vázquez, Gustavo; Perlis, Roy H.; Ketter, Terence A.; Cassidy, Frederick; Akiskal, Hagop; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Valentí, Marc; Mazzei, Diego Hidalgo; Lafer, Beny; Kato, Tadafumi; Mazzarini, Lorenzo; Martínez-Aran, Anabel; Parker, Gordon; Souery, Daniel; Özerdem, Ayşegül; McElroy, Susan L.; Girardi, Paolo; Bauer, Michael; Yatham, Lakshmi N.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Birmaher, Boris; Kanba, Shigenobu; El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Serretti, Alessandro; Rihmer, Zoltan; Young, Allan H.; Kotzalidis, Georgios D.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Bowden, Charles L.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Rybakowski, Janusz; Ha, Kyooseob; Perugi, Giulio; Kasper, Siegfried; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Hirschfeld, Robert M.; Kapczinski, Flávio; Vieta, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Objective The risk-benefit profile of antidepressant medications in bipolar disorder is controversial. When conclusive evidence is lacking, expert consensus can guide treatment decisions. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to seek consensus recommendations on the use of antidepressants in bipolar disorders. Method An expert task force iteratively developed consensus through serial consensus-based revisions using the Delphi method. Initial survey items were based on systematic review of the literature. Subsequent surveys included new or reworded items and items that needed to be rerated. This process resulted in the final ISBD Task Force clinical recommendations on antidepressant use in bipolar disorder. Results There is striking incongruity between the wide use of and the weak evidence base for the efficacy and safety of antidepressant drugs in bipolar disorder. Few well-designed, long-term trials of prophylactic benefits have been conducted, and there is insufficient evidence for treatment benefits with antidepressants combined with mood stabilizers. A major concern is the risk for mood switch to hypomania, mania, and mixed states. Integrating the evidence and the experience of the task force members, a consensus was reached on 12 statements on the use of antidepressants in bipolar disorder. Conclusions Because of limited data, the task force could not make broad statements endorsing antidepressant use but acknowledged that individual bipolar patients may benefit from antidepressants. Regarding safety, serotonin reuptake inhibitors and bupropion may have lower rates of manic switch than tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants and norepinephrine-serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The frequency and severity of antidepressant-associated mood elevations appear to be greater in bipolar I than bipolar II disorder. Hence, in bipolar I patients antidepressants should be prescribed only as an adjunct to mood-stabilizing medications

  2. Down-regulation of dopamine D-2, 5-HT2 receptors and β-adrenoceptors in rat brain after prolonged treatment with a new potential antidepressant, Lu 19-005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, G.; Arnt, J.; Hyttel, J.; Svendsen, O.

    1985-01-01

    Lu 19-005 is a new phenylindan derivative with strong and equipotent inhibitory effect on dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) uptake. The adaptive effects of 2 weeks treatment with Lu 19-005, on receptor binding in vitro and on d-amphetamine responsiveness in vivo have been investigated in rats. One or 3 days after the final dose the number of β-adrenoceptors and of 5-HT 2 and DA D-2 receptors was decreased by 20-30%, whereas αsub1-adrenoceptor number was slightly decreased only 1 day after withdrawal. The DA D-2 receptor number remained decreased at 7 days withdrawal, but returned to normal after another 3 days. The brain levels of DA, NA and 5-HT were not changed by 2 weeks' Lu 19-005 treatment. The down-regulation of DA D-2 receptors was accompanied by tolerance to d-amphetamine-induced hypermotility (after low doses) and stereotyped licking or biting (after a high dose). The tolerance to d-amphetamine-induced hypermotility was maximal 3-5 days withdrawal time, and remained significant also 15 days after the last dose. The results are discussed in relation to the effect of prolonged treatment with other antidepressant drugs. (Author)

  3. Migraine Medications and Antidepressants: A Risky Mix?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health risks associated with taking migraine medications and antidepressants at the same time? Answers from Jerry W. ... that combining migraine medications called triptans with certain antidepressants — including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin ...

  4. Investigation of antidepressant mechanisms in an animal model of depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesberger, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The rat olfactory bulbectomy model has recently been found to exhibit good predictive properties when used to screen drugs for antidepressant activity, thereby suggesting that it may have a pathological defect particularly sensitive to the antidepressant activity of drugs. This model, with its well defined behavioral syndrome, was thus used to investigate some neurochemical effects of 4 species of antidepressant drugs and to see if drug actions varied between the normal and pathological states. A major finding in the study was the regional variation in /sup 3/H-imipramine binding and beta receptor density following the lesion. In addition treatment of normal rats with one of the 4 different antidepressant drugs caused changes in the density of /sup 3/H-imipramine recognition sites and beta receptors that varied between the 4 regions examined and with the drug administered such that none of the 4 drugs had identical response profiles. This suggests that the different drugs may be acting on different neurochemical substrates and that the distribution and sensitivity of the substrate varies for the different brain regions. Furthermore, results obtained in this investigation suggests that the effects of some antidepressant drugs on noradrenergic and serotonergic systems are markedly state-dependent and that this varies between different brain regions.

  5. Association between antidepressants and falls in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Giugni, Juan C; Almeida, Leonardo; Walz, Roger; Ahmed, Bilal; Chai, Fiona A; Rundle-Gonzalez, Valerie; Bona, Alberto R; Monari, Erin; Wagle Shukla, Aparna; Hess, Christopher W; Hass, Chris J; Okun, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients have an increased risk of falls resulting in important social and economical consequences. Risk factors for falls include the use of psychotropic drugs, which are used for the treatment of PD neuropsychiatric symptoms. We aimed to determine the association between psychotropic drug use and falls in a PD cohort. A cross-sectional study from the NPF QII study UF site was conducted. Subjects reported presence and frequency of falls in the prior year. Frequency was scored from 0 (no falls) to 4 (falling daily). Antidepressants, antipsychotics, cognitive enhancers/stimulants, and benzodiazepines were considered psychotropics. Forty percent of the 647 subjects included had a fall in the previous year. Fallers were found to have clinical signs of a more advanced disease. After adjusting for confounding variables, the regression analysis showed that use of antidepressants alone (adjusted OR 2.2, CI 95 % 1.3-3.8, p = 0.04), benzodiazepines alone (adjusted OR 2.0, CI 95 % 1.1-3.5, p = 0.02), and the combination of antidepressants with benzodiazepines (adjusted OR 4.1, CI 95 % 2.0-8.3, p antidepressants alone had a significantly higher mean frequency of falls score (1.07 vs. 0.44, p antidepressants was independently associated with falls in our PD cohort after considering for confounding variables such as age and measures of disease progression. Other factors related to disease progression should be considered before claiming the use of psychotropic drugs as causative.

  6. Effect of a standardized treatment regime for infection after osteosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellebrekers, Pien; Leenen, Luke P H; Hoekstra, Meriam; Hietbrink, Falco

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection after osteosynthesis is an important complication with significant morbidity and even mortality. These infections are often caused by biofilm-producing bacteria. Treatment algorithms dictate an aggressive approach with surgical debridement and antibiotic treatment. The aim of

  7. Antidepressant-Resistant Depression and Antidepressant-Associated Suicidal Behaviour: The Role of Underlying Bipolarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Rihmer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex relationship between the use of antidepressants and suicidal behaviour is one of the hottest topics of our contemporary psychiatry. Based on the literature, this paper summarizes the author's view on antidepressant-resistant depression and antidepressant-associated suicidal behaviour. Antidepressant-resistance, antidepressant-induced worsening of depression, antidepressant-associated (hypomanic switches, mixed depressive episode, and antidepressant-associated suicidality among depressed patients are relatively most frequent in bipolar/bipolar spectrum depression and in children and adolescents. As early age at onset of major depressive episode and mixed depression are powerful clinical markers of bipolarity and the manic component of bipolar disorder (and possible its biological background shows a declining tendency with age antidepressant-resistance/worsening, antidepressant-induced (hypomanic switches and “suicide-inducing” potential of antidepressants seem to be related to the underlying bipolarity.

  8. Combined Use of Opioids and Antidepressants in the Treatment of Pain: A Review of Veterans Health Administration Data for Patients with Pain Both With and Without Co-morbid Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellinger, John J; Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Kerns, Robert D; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2016-12-01

    Musculoskeletal pain is prevalent among Veterans treated within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Depression is highly co-prevalent, and antidepressants are increasingly being used for psychiatric and analgesic benefit. The current study examined prescribing patterns of antidepressants and opioids in the context of musculoskeletal pain using a national VHA database. All Veterans diagnosed with musculoskeletal pain who attended at least one appointment through the VHA during Fiscal Year 2012 were dichotomized based on the presence or absence of a depression diagnosis. We compared the proportion in each group that were prescribed antidepressants to the entire sample and repeated this comparison along a continuum of the number of annual opioid prescriptions received (ranging in five categories from no opioids up to >20 scripts). Of the 5.1 million Veterans seen, 19.1 % were diagnosed with musculoskeletal pain, of whom, 27.2 % were diagnosed with major depressive disorder. Antidepressants were prescribed to 78.41 % of patients with musculoskeletal pain and depression, compared to 20.23 % of those without depression. For both groups, antidepressant use increased linearly as annual opioid fills increased. Across the categories of opioid use, patients with depression showed a 13.98 % increase in antidepressant use, compared to a 33.97 % increase in the non-depressed group. Results suggest that antidepressants are frequently prescribed to patients with musculoskeletal pain who are using opioids, consistent with multi-modal pharmacotherapy. Increasing use of antidepressants in conjunction with escalating opioid prescribing, particularly in the absence of diagnosed depression, suggests that antidepressants are being used in both groups to complement opioid therapy.

  9. Emerging antidepressants to treat major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Samantha G; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2014-12-01

    Depression is a common disorder with an annual risk of a depressive episode in the United States of 6.6%. Only 30-40% of patients remit with antidepressant monotherapy, leaving 60-70% of patients who do not optimally respond to therapy. Unremitted depressive patients are at increased risk for suicide. Considering the prevalence of treatment resistant depression and its consequences, treatment optimization is imperative. This review summarizes the latest treatment modalities for major depressive disorder including pharmacotherapy, electroconvulsive therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and psychotherapy. Through advancements in research to better understand the pathophysiology of depression, advances in treatment will be realized. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Effects of anti-depressants on olfactory sensitivity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombion, Sandrine; Morand-Villeneuve, Nadège; Millot, Jean-Louis

    2008-04-01

    Some studies have underlined a decrease in olfactory sensitivity in patients suffering from depression. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of current anti-depressant drugs on the olfactory sensitivity in mice. METHODS MICE: (N degrees =22) were tested in a Y-maze with a choice between an odorant (butanol) or distilled water before and during 3 weeks of daily intra-peritoneal injection of either citalopram or clomipramine. Their performance was compared with those of a control group (N degrees =11) injected with a saline solution. The results showed a significant decrease in olfactory sensitivity with both anti-depressants during the three weeks of treatment. The antidepressant induced alteration in serotonin and/or noradrenaline transmission in the olfactory bulb may account for the altered olfactory sensitivity observed in this study.

  11. Increased risk of antidepressant use in childhood cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Lasse Wegener; Winther, J.F.; Cederkvist, L

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Childhood cancer survivors are at risk of both somatic and mental late effects, but large population-based studies of depression are lacking. METHODS: Risk of antidepressant use was evaluated in a population-based cohort of 5452 Danish children treated for cancer in 1975-2009 by linkage...... on the association between childhood cancer and antidepressant use indicated no modifying effect. CONCLUSION: Childhood cancer survivors should be followed-up for depression. Our results indicate an increasing need for follow-up especially in survivors treated by more recent, intensive anticancer treatment....... to the National Prescription Drug Database, which worldwide is the oldest nationwide registry of prescription medication. Hazard ratios (HRs) for antidepressant use were estimated in a Cox proportional hazards model stratified on sex, with population comparisons as referents. RESULTS: Overall, childhood cancer...

  12. Antidepressant exposure during early pregnancy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars Henning

    Pharmacological treatment of pregnant women with depression is hampered by concerns for the developing fetus. The presentation will summarize existing knowledge on the potential association between antidepressants and congenital malformations, elaborate on the scientific background, and discuss...... the clinical significance. Most information on malformations in humans is derived from epidemiological studies. The strengths and limitations of the different designs need careful consideration, including issues of confounding by indication, recall bias, and power. For most antidepressants existing data...... are reassuring, however, an association with heart malformations has been suggested for e.g. paroxetine. A potential biological explanation will be reviewed. The potential teratogenic potential of antidepressants needs to be balanced against the obvious problems associated with under-treated maternal depression...

  13. Effects of Calcium Channel Blockers on Antidepressant Action of Alprazolam and Imipramine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorash ZM

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Alprazolam is effective as an anxiolytic and in the adjunct treatment of depression. In this study, the effects of calcium channel antagonists on the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine were investigated. A forced swimming maze was used to study behavioral despair in albino mice. Mice were divided into nine groups (n = 7 per group. One group received a single dose of 1% Tween 80; two groups each received a single dose of the antidepressant alone (alprazolam or imipramine; two groups each received a single dose of the calcium channel blocker (nifedipine or verapamil; four groups each received a single dose of the calcium channel blocker followed by a single dose of the antidepressant (with same doses used for either in the previous four groups. Drug administration was performed concurrently on the nine groups. Our data confirmed the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine. Both nifedipine and verapamil produced a significant antidepressant effect (delay the onset of immobility when administered separately. Verapamil augmented the antidepressant effects of alprazolam and imipramine (additive antidepressant effect. This may be due to the possibility that verapamil might have antidepressant-like effect through different mechanism. Nifedipine and imipramine combined led to a delay in the onset of immobility greater than their single use but less than the sum of their independent administration. This may be due to the fact that nifedipine on its own might act as an antidepressant but blocks one imipramine mechanism that depends on L-type calcium channel activation. Combining nifedipine with alprazolam produced additional antidepressant effects, which indicates that they exert antidepressant effects through different mechanisms.

  14. Antidepressant use during pregnancy and asthma in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Olsen, Jørn; Pedersen, Lars Henning

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: It has been suggested that maternal depression during pregnancy is abstract associated with asthma in the offspring, but the role of medical treatment of depression is not known. Our goal was to examine whether prenatal antidepressant use increases the risk of asthma in...

  15. Antidepressant-like Potentials of Buchholzia Coriacea Seed Extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    amygdala, and thalamus (Drevets et al., 2002). Together, these ... critical role in learning and memory, the hippocampus is one of the ..... stress. Eur J Pharmacol; 371:113-122. Malberg, J. E, Eisch, A. J, Nestler, E. J, Duman, R. S. (2000). Chronic antidepressant treatment increases neurogenesis in adult rat hippocampus.

  16. The Effect of Sympathetic Antagonists on the Antidepressant Action ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alprazolam is an anti-anxiety drug shown to be effective in the treatment of depression. In this study, the effect of sympathetic receptor antagonists on alprazolam–induced antidepressant action was studied using a mouse model of forced swimming behavioral despair. The interaction of three sympathetic receptor ...

  17. Exercise as an augmentation strategy for treatment of major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Madhukar H; Greer, Tracy L; Grannemann, Bruce D; Chambliss, Heather O; Jordan, Alexander N

    2006-07-01

    The use of augmentation strategies among patients with major depression is increasing because rates of complete remission with standard antidepressant monotherapy are quite low. Clinical and neurobiological data suggest that exercise may be a good candidate for use as an augmentation treatment for depression. This pilot study examined the use of exercise to augment antidepressant medication in patients with major depression. Seventeen patients with incomplete remission of depressive symptoms began a 12-week exercise program while continuing their antidepressant medication (unchanged in type or dose). Individual exercise prescriptions were calculated based on an exercise dose consistent with currently recommended public health guidelines. The exercise consisted of both supervised and home-based sessions. The 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17) and the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report (IDS-SR30) were used to assess symptoms of depression on a weekly basis. Intent-to-treat analyses yielded significant decreases on both the HRSD17 (5.8 points, p SR30 (13.9 points, p SR30 scores decreased by 18.8 points. This study provides preliminary evidence for exercise as an effective augmentation treatment for antidepressant medication. This is a lower-cost augmentation strategy that has numerous health benefits and may further reduce depressive symptoms in partial responders to antidepressant treatment. Practical tips on how practitioners can use exercise to enhance antidepressant treatment are discussed. Longer-term use of exercise is also likely to confer additional health benefits for this population.

  18. Venlafaxine extended release versus conventional antidepressants in the remission of depressive disorders after previous antidepressant failure: ARGOS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldomero, E Baca; Ubago, J Giner; Cercós, C Leal; Ruiloba, J Vallejo; Calvo, C García; López, R Prieto

    2005-01-01

    Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) may be used as an alternative treatment for depressed patients who do not tolerate or respond adequately to treatment with a conventional antidepressant. This randomized, open-label, multicenter study compared the effectiveness of the SNRI venlafaxine extended release (VXR) with that of conventional antidepressants (CA) in patients who were referred to an outpatient psychiatric specialty care setting for treatment after failure to tolerate or respond to at least 4 weeks of treatment with a CA in a primary care setting. Patients with a Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D17) score > or =17 were randomly assigned to treatment with an alternative CA or VXR. Remission was defined as a score < or =7 on the HAM-D17. Efficacy analyses were carried out on 3,097 patients from the intent-to-treat (ITT) population (1,632 VXR; 1,465 CA). The antidepressants prescribed most frequently in the CA group were paroxetine (21.3%), citalopram (20.1%), sertraline (19.1%), fluoxetine (17.0%), and mirtazapine (7.9%). After 24 weeks of treatment, the VXR group demonstrated a significantly higher remission rate than did the CA group (59.3% VXR; 51.5% CA; P<.0001; odds ratio: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.19-1.58; P<.01). Despite the limitations of the open design, the results of this study suggest that venlafaxine extended release may be more effective than the conventional antidepressants used in this study when treating depressed patients who do not tolerate or respond adequately to treatment with a conventional antidepressant.

  19. Effectiveness of integrating individualized and generic complementary medicine treatments with standard care versus standard care alone for reducing preoperative anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, Samuel; Keinan Boker, Lital; Arnon, Zahi; Ben-Arye, Eran; Bar'am, Ayala; Sroka, Gideon; Matter, Ibrahim; Somri, Mostafa; Schiff, Elad

    2016-03-01

    Preoperative anxiety is commonly reported by people undergoing surgery. A significant number of studies have found a correlation between preoperative anxiety and post-operative morbidity. Various methods of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) were found to be effective in alleviating preoperative anxiety. This study examined the relative effectiveness of various individual and generic CAM methods combined with standard treatment (ST) in relieving preoperative anxiety, in comparison with ST alone. Randomized controlled trial. Holding room area Three hundred sixty patients. Patients were randomly divided into 6 equal-sized groups. Group 1 received the standard treatment (ST) for anxiety alleviation with anxiolytics. The five other groups received the following, together with ST (anxiolytics): Compact Disk Recording of Guided Imagery (CDRGI); acupuncture; individual guided imagery; reflexology; and individual guided imagery combined with reflexology, based on medical staff availability. Assessment of anxiety was taken upon entering the holding room area (surgery preparation room) ('pre-treatment assessment'), and following the treatment, shortly before transfer to the operating room ('post-treatment assessment'), based on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) questionnaire. Data processing included comparison of VAS averages in the 'pre' and 'post' stages among the various groups. Preoperatively, CAM treatments were associated with significant reduction of anxiety level (5.54-2.32, p<0.0001). In contrast, no significant change was noted in the standard treatment group (4.92-5.44, p=0.15). Individualized CAM treatments did not differ significantly in outcomes. However, CDRGI was less effective than individualized CAM (P<0.001), but better than ST (p=0.005). Individual CAM treatments integrated within ST reduce preoperative anxiety significantly, compared to standard treatment alone, and are more effective than generic CDRGI. In light of the scope of preoperative

  20. Role of corticosteroids in the antidepressant response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierscionek T

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tomasz Pierscionek, Oluyemi Adekunte, Stuart Watson, I Nicol Ferrier, Akintunde Alabi Wolfson Research Institute, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Campus for Ageing and Health, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK Abstract: Anything that engenders a homeostatic response in the tightly regulated hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA axis may be thought of as a stressor and may exert an allostatic load, engendering a sustained change in the regulation of this system. Genetic, epigenetic, endocrine, post mortem, and animal studies suggest that dysregulation of the HPA axis plays a part in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and negatively impacts the antidepressant response and prognosis. Neuropsychological impairment, which is a common and disabling concomitant of depression, has been linked to disturbance of the HPA axis. A number of HPA axis-mediated treatment strategies have shown benefit in open or small-scale preliminary trials, and there are ongoing studies seeking both to replicate these initial findings and to develop new targets. HPA axis-based treatments are a fertile area of research, and much current thought pertains to the optimum targets, optimum population (including the potential for stratified medicine, and optimum outcome measures. We have, for instance, argued here that neuropsychological performance may be more sensitive and robust than scores on traditional depression rating scales. Keywords: hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, cortisol, corticotrophin-releasing hormone, arginine vasopressin, depression, bipolar disorder, antidepressant response

  1. 40 CFR 268.40 - Applicability of treatment standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... K002 Wastewater treatment sludge from the production of chrome yellow and orange pigments. Chromium... from the production of molybdate orange pigments. Chromium (Total)Lead 7440-47-37439-92-1 2.770.69 0.60 mg/L TCLP0.75 mg/L TCLP K004 Wastewater treatment sludge from the production of zinc yellow pigments...

  2. PHARMACOEPIDEMIOLOGICAL MONITORING OF ANTIDEPRESSANT USAGE IN PATIENTS WITH ANXIOUS AND DEPRESSIVE SYNDROMES IN INTERNAL MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Ivanova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study antidepressant usage in treatment of anxious and depressive disorders in real internal medicine practice.Material and methods. Retrospective analysis of 290 charts of patients, which were observed in Pskov region hospital from 2004 to 2005 was held. All patients suffered from different internal diseases and were treated with antidepressants because of anxious and depressive concomitant disorders.Results. Arterial hypertension observed in 28% of patients, ischemic heart disease – in 20%, heart failure – in 14%, cerebrovascular and peripheral nervous system diseases – in 18% and gastroduodenal diseases – in 20% of patients. Amitriptyline took the first place (49% among antidepressant prescriptions. Next antidepressants according to prescription popularity were paroxetine (22% and tianeptine (12%. Rate of other antidepressant prescriptions were not higher than 5%. There were differences in antidepressant prescriptions between physicians of different specialties.Conclusion. Reasonable approaches should be used to choose antidepressants. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have benefit for the therapy of concomitant anxious and depressive disorders due to their good tolerability. Nevertheless tricyclic antidepressants are essential in some clinical situations.

  3. Prescription of antidepressants to patients on opioid maintenance therapy – a pharmacoepidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingeborg Hartz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Depression and anxiety are commonly reported among patients in opioid maintenance treatment (OMT. The aim of the present study was to describe aspects of prescription of antidepresant drug therapy among patients on OMT. Our research questions were: 1 What is the prevalence of antidepressant use according to age and gender? 2 Which antidepressants are used? 3 How are antidepressants used in terms of reimbursement codes, dispensed dose and duration of therapy?Methods: Pharmacoepidemiological data were retrieved from the complete national Norwegian Prescription Database which contains information on all prescription drugs (such as Anatomical Theraputical Chemical (ATC-code, Defined Daily Dose (DDDs, dispensed at pharmacies to individual patients. Norwegian OMT-patients (N=4374, 3035 men and 1339 women who received methadone mixture, buprenorphine capsules or combined buprenorphine-naloxone capsules for at least 6 months in 2009 were included. Prevalence of antidepressant use in the studied patients was measured in terms of retrieval of prescriptions.Results: During 2009 21.7% of the studied patients filled at least one prescription for an antidepressant drugs (men: 21.2%; women: 22.9%. The subgroup of antidepressants most frequently dispensed was selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs (33%, followed by the sedative antidepressants mianserin and mirtazapin (22% and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs (20%. Except for TCAs, prescriptions of all antidepressant subgroups were reimbursed for either anxiety or depression in 90% of the cases. Overall, 46.9% of the antidepressant users were prescribed antidepressants in the category < 1 DDD per day and/or treatment < 3 months, with no gender difference.Conclusions: About one out of five OMT-patients filled a prescription for an antidepressant drug in 2009. Above 90% had their prescriptions reimbursed for either depression or anxiety. Use at low doses and/or sporadic use among half

  4. Spadin, a Sortilin-derived peptide: a new concept in the antidepressant drug design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heurteaux Catherine

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Depression is the most common of psychiatric illnesses. The design of effective treatments for this disorder is a challenging process. Recently, the two-pore domain potassium channel TREK-1 has been identified as a new target in depression, and its antagonists might become effective antidepressants. Deletion of TREK-1 gene results in a depression-resistant phenotype that mimics antidepressant treatments. Here, we validate the fast antidepressant effects of spadin, a secreted peptide derived from the propeptide generated by the maturation of the sortilin receptor and acting through TREK-1 inhibition.

  5. Patient risk profiles and practice variation in nonadherence to antidepressants, antihypertensives and oral hypoglycemics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, L. van; Heerdink, E.R.; Somai, D.; Dulmen, S. van; Sluijs, E.M.; Ridder, D.T. de; Griens, A.M.G.F.; Bensing, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients experience difficulties in following treatment recommendations. This study's objective is to identify nonadherence risk profiles regarding medication (antidepressants, antihypertensives, and oral hypoglycemics) from a combination of patients' socio-demographic

  6. Patient risk profiles and practice variation in nonadherence to antidepressants, antihypertensives and oral hypoglycemics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Liset van; Heerdink, E.R.; Somai, D.; Dulmen, S. van; Sluijs, E.M.; Ridder, D.T.D. de; Griens, A.M.G.F.; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Many patients experience difficulties in following treatment recommendations. This study's objective is to identify nonadherence risk profiles regarding medication (antidepressants, antihypertensives, and oral hypoglycemics) from a combination of patients' socio-demographic

  7. Antidepressant effects on emotional temperament: toward a biobehavioral research paradigm for major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soskin, David P; Carl, Jenna R; Alpert, Jonathan; Fava, Maurizio

    2012-06-01

    Given the limited efficacy of current pharmacotherapy for major depressive disorder (MDD) and the historical decline in antidepressant development, there is increasing clinical urgency to develop more effective treatments. To synthesize findings from clinical psychology and affective neuroscience related to the construct of emotional temperament; to examine the effects of antidepressants on the temperament dimensions of positive (PA) and negative affectivity (NA); and to propose a biobehavioral research paradigm for the treatment of MDD. We begin with an introduction to PA and NA, which emphasizes their construct development, historical context, and relevance to psychopathology. We then review studies of antidepressant effects on PA and NA, and explore two related hypotheses: (1) Cause-correction: The antidepressant response may fundamentally occur through changes in emotional temperament, with subsequent spread to syndrome or symptom changes; (2) preferential effects: Antidepressants with different mechanisms of action may have preferential effects on PA or NA. Preliminary findings appear to support the cause-correction hypothesis; there is insufficient clinical evidence to support the preferential effects hypothesis. PA and NA are biologically based temperament dimensions, which modulate emotional, motivational, and behavioral responses to positive and negative incentives. They can be altered by antidepressants, and may independently contribute to depression improvement. In addition, the distinct biobehavioral features of PA and NA suggest that combined pharmacological and cognitive-behavioral treatments targeting these dimensions may have specific, and perhaps, synergistic antidepressant effects. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Interim versus standard methadone treatment: a benefit-cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Robert P; Alexandre, Pierre K; Kelly, Sharon M; O'Grady, Kevin E; Gryczynski, Jan; Jaffe, Jerome H

    2014-03-01

    A benefit-cost analysis was conducted as part of a clinical trial in which newly-admitted methadone patients were randomly assigned to interim methadone (IM; methadone without counseling) for the first 4 months of 12 months of methadone treatment or 12 months of methadone with one of two counseling conditions. Health, residential drug treatment, criminal justice costs, and income data in 2010 dollars were obtained at treatment entry, and 4- and 12-month follow-up from 200 participants and program costs were obtained. The net benefits of treatment were greater for the IM condition but controlling for the baseline variables noted above, the difference between conditions in net monetary benefits was not significant. For the combined sample, there was a pre- to post-treatment net benefit of $1470 (95% CI: -$625; $3584) and a benefit-cost ratio of 1.5 (95% CI: 0.8, 2.3), but using our conservative approach to calculating benefits, these values were not significant. © 2014.

  9. New framework for standardized notation in wastewater treatment modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corominas, L.; Rieger, L.; Takacs, I.

    2010-01-01

    Many unit process models are available in the field of wastewater treatment. All of these models use their own notation, causing problems for documentation, implementation and connection of different models (using different sets of state variables). The main goal of this paper is to propose a new...... is a framework that can be used in whole plant modelling, which consists of different fields such as activated sludge, anaerobic digestion, sidestream treatment, membrane bioreactors, metabolic approaches, fate of micropollutants and biofilm processes. The main objective of this consensus building paper...... is to establish a consistent set of rules that can be applied to existing and most importantly, future models. Applying the proposed notation should make it easier for everyone active in the wastewater treatment field to read, write and review documents describing modelling projects....

  10. Antidepressant drug therapy and suicide in severely depressed children and adults: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olfson, Mark; Marcus, Steven C; Shaffer, David

    2006-08-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has issued a boxed warning concerning increased suicidal ideation and behavior associated with antidepressant drug treatment in children and adolescents. It is unknown whether antidepressant agents increase the risk of suicide death in children or adults. To estimate the relative risk of suicide attempt and suicide death in severely depressed children and adults treated with antidepressant drugs vs those not treated with antidepressant drugs. Matched case-control study. Outpatient treatment settings in the United States. Medicaid beneficiaries from all 50 states who received inpatient treatment for depression, excluding patients treated for pregnancy, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or other psychoses, mental retardation, dementia, or delirium. Controls were matched to cases for age, sex, race or ethnicity, state of residence, substance use disorder, recent suicide attempt, number of days since hospital discharge, and recent treatment with antipsychotic, anxiolytic/hypnotic, mood stabilizer, and stimulant medications. Suicide attempts and suicide deaths. In adults (aged 19-64 years), antidepressant drug treatment was not significantly associated with suicide attempts (odds ratio [OR], 1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86-1.39 [521 cases and 2394 controls]) or suicide deaths (OR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.52-1.55 [86 cases and 396 controls]). However, in children and adolescents (aged 6-18 years), antidepressant drug treatment was significantly associated with suicide attempts (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.12-2.07 [263 cases and 1241 controls]) and suicide deaths (OR, 15.62; 95% CI, 1.65-infinity [8 cases and 39 controls]). In these high-risk patients, antidepressant drug treatment does not seem to be related to suicide attempts and death in adults but might be related in children and adolescents. These findings support careful clinical monitoring during antidepressant drug treatment of severely depressed young people.

  11. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Depression and Antidepressants Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialou, Vincent; Feng, Jian; Robison, Alfred J.; Nestler, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, which control chromatin structure and function, mediate changes in gene expression that occur in response to diverse stimuli. Recent research has established that environmental events and behavioral experience induce epigenetic changes at particular gene loci that help shape neuronal plasticity and function, and hence behavior, and that some of these changes can be very stable and even persist for a lifetime. Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that aberrations in chromatin remodeling and subsequent effects on gene expression within limbic brain regions contribute to the pathogenesis of depression and other stress-related disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder and other anxiety syndromes. Likewise, the gradually developing but persistent therapeutic effects of antidepressant medications may be achieved in part via epigenetic mechanisms. This review discusses recent advances in understanding epigenetic regulation of stress-related disorders and focuses on three distinct aspects of stress-induced epigenetic pathology: the effects of stress and antidepressant treatment during adulthood, the life-long effects of early life stress on subsequent stress vulnerability, and the possible trans-generational transmission of stress-induced abnormalities. PMID:23020296

  12. Antidepressant therapy with milnacipran and venlafaxine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucilla Mansuy

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Lucilla MansuyPierre Fabre Médicament, Toulouse, FranceAbstract: Specific serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs have been described as “better tolerated tricyclic antidepressants” or as “boosted” selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs. Venlafaxine has become a therapeutic reference treatment for major depression. Although less widely studied, indirect comparisons with another SNRI, milnacipran, suggest an equivalent efficacy. This paper discusses these indirect comparisons and the recently published first double-blind, head-to-head comparison. Venlafaxine has potency at serotonin transporters which is about 30-fold greater than that at norepinephrine transporters while milnacipran has a similar potency at each transporter. Thus, at low doses, venlafaxine acts essentially as a SSRI, with significant noradrenergic activity only occurring at higher doses. To overcome the problem of the differing profile of venlafaxine at increasing doses, the first head-to-head study compared the therapeutic effects and tolerability of the two antidepressants when flexibly titrated to the high dose of 200 mg/day. The study showed that the two SNRIs have similar efficacy and safety profiles. Both drugs produced about 42% remissions at the end of the 20-week study. The most frequent adverse events in both groups were nausea, dizziness, headache, and sweating. Certain specific differences in tolerability are discussed.Keywords: milnacipran, venlafaxine, antidepressant efficacy, tolerability, dose-titration

  13. Increased use of antidepressants and decreasing suicide rates: a population-based study using Danish register data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Canudas-Romo, V.; Conwell, Yeates

    2008-01-01

    -based record linkage. PARTICIPANTS: All individuals aged 50 years and older living in Denmark between 1 January 1996 and 31 December 2000 (N = 2,100,808). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Suicide rates are calculated according to current antidepressant treatment status (no treatment, tricyclic antidepressants (TCA...... 100,000, recipients of antidepressants contributed to the decline by 0.9 suicides. Women redeeming antidepressant prescriptions accounted for 0.4 suicides of the observed reduction of 3.3 per 100,000. The average suicide rates for men receiving TCA and SSRI were 153.3 and 169.0 per 100,000 person......-years, respectively. Among older women, both TCA and SSRI users had an average suicide rate of 68.8 per 100,000 over the period examined. CONCLUSIONS: Just a small proportion of older adults dying by suicide were found to be in treatment with antidepressants at the time of death. Individuals in active treatment...

  14. Antidepressant-like effect of peony glycosides in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qing-Qiu; Ip, Siu-Po; Tsai, Sam-Hip; Che, Chun-Tao

    2008-09-26

    The root part of Paeonia lactiflora Pall. (Ranunculaceae), known as peony, is often used in Chinese herbal formulae for the treatment of depression-like disorders. Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that an ethanol extract of peony produced antidepressive effects in mouse models of depression. It is well known that peony contains glycosides such as paeoniflorin and albiflorin, yet it remains unclear whether the total glycosides of peony (TGP) are effective. The present study aims to evaluate the antidepressant-like effects of TGP. The antidepressant-like effects of TGP was determined by using animal models of depression including forced swim and tail suspension tests. The acting mechanism was explored by determining the effect of TGP on the activities of monoamine oxidases. Intragastric administration of TGP at 80 and 160 mg/kg for seven days caused a significant reduction of immobility time in both forced swim and tail suspension tests, yet TGP did not stimulate locomotor activity in the open-field test. In addition, TGP treatment antagonized reserpine-induced ptosis and inhibited the activities of monoamine oxidases in mouse cerebrum. These results suggest that the antidepressive effects of TGP are mediated, at least in part, by the inhibition of monoamine oxidases.

  15. Assessment of the Risk of Suicide-Related Events Induced by Concomitant Use of Antidepressants in Cases of Smoking Cessation Treatment with Varenicline and Assessment of Latent Risk by the Use of Varenicline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayato Akimoto

    Full Text Available Smoking Cessation Treatment (SCT is a policy that has to be promoted for health economics, and expectations for the success of treatments with varenicline (VAR are large. However, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA have issued a warning on VAR-induced depression and suicide. In the present study, utilizing the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS, we searched for antidepressants (ADs used during SCT that cause fewer suicide-related events (SRE (Study 1. We also investigated whether VAR concomitantly administered with ADs increases the risk of SRE (Study 2. In addition, we investigated whether the use of VAR alone is a latent risk factor of SRE. The backgrounds of cases with and without SRE were matched using the Propensity Score. In Study 1, the highest integrated Reporting Odds Ratio (iROR was noted in concomitantly administered mirtazapine (iROR 6.98; 95% Confidence Interval (CI 1.57-30.99, while the lowest ratio was noted in concomitantly administered amitriptyline (iROR 0.59; iROR95%CI 0.23-1.50. Study 2 clarified that SCT increases the risk of SRE in AD-treated cases (iROR 8.02; iROR95%CI 5.47-11.76; not significance. Of ADs concomitantly used during SCT with VAR, amitriptyline and mirtazapine showed the lowest and highest risks, respectively (Study 1. It was clarified that concomitant use of VAR in the treatment of depression with ADs increased the risk of SRE (Study 2. The results of Studies 1 and 2 suggested that the use of VAR alone is a latent risk factor inducing suicide.

  16. 40 CFR 268.45 - Treatment standards for hazardous debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... debris that has been treated using one of the specified extraction or destruction technologies in Table 1... using simple physical or mechanical means; and (ii) Residue from the treatment of hazardous debris is... restrictions 2 A. Extraction Technologies: 1. Physical Extraction a. Abrasive Blasting: Removal of contaminated...

  17. Suicides and Suicide Attempts during Long-Term Treatment with Antidepressants: A Meta-Analysis of 29 Placebo-Controlled Studies Including 6,934 Patients with Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Cora; Bschor, Tom; Franklin, Jeremy; Baethge, Christopher

    It is unclear whether antidepressants can prevent suicides or suicide attempts, particularly during long-term use. We carried out a comprehensive review of long-term studies of antidepressants (relapse prevention). Sources were obtained from 5 review articles and by searches of MEDLINE, PubMed Central and a hand search of bibliographies. We meta-analyzed placebo-controlled antidepressant RCTs of at least 3 months' duration and calculated suicide and suicide attempt incidence rates, incidence rate ratios and Peto odds ratios (ORs). Out of 807 studies screened 29 were included, covering 6,934 patients (5,529 patient-years). In total, 1.45 suicides and 2.76 suicide attempts per 1,000 patient-years were reported. Seven out of 8 suicides and 13 out of 14 suicide attempts occurred in antidepressant arms, resulting in incidence rate ratios of 5.03 (0.78-114.1; p = 0.102) for suicides and of 9.02 (1.58-193.6; p = 0.007) for suicide attempts. Peto ORs were 2.6 (0.6-11.2; nonsignificant) and 3.4 (1.1-11.0; p = 0.04), respectively. Dropouts due to unknown reasons were similar in the antidepressant and placebo arms (9.6 vs. 9.9%). The majority of suicides and suicide attempts originated from 1 study, accounting for a fifth of all patient-years in this meta-analysis. Leaving out this study resulted in a nonsignificant incidence rate ratio for suicide attempts of 3.83 (0.53-91.01). Therapists should be aware of the lack of proof from RCTs that antidepressants prevent suicides and suicide attempts. We cannot conclude with certainty whether antidepressants increase the risk for suicide or suicide attempts. Researchers must report all suicides and suicide attempts in RCTs. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Treatment of Anxiety Disorders and Comorbid Alcohol Abuse with Buspirone in a Patient with Antidepressant-Induced Platelet Dysfunction: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Mazhar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of abnormal bleeding with serotonin reuptake inhibitors has been known, but there is insufficient evidence base to guide pharmacological treatment of anxiety in patients with underlying haematological conditions. The following case report is about a 50-year-old female with generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder, and alcohol abuse where pharmacological treatment of anxiety symptoms has been difficult as it would lead to bruising due to the patient’s underlying qualitative platelet dysfunction. Treatment with venlafaxine, citalopram, escitalopram, and clomipramine resulted in improvement and anxiety symptoms, as well as reduction in alcohol use, but pharmacological treatment has to be discontinued because of bruising and hematomas. In view of an active substance use disorder, benzodiazepines were avoided as a treatment option. The patient’s anxiety symptoms and comorbid alcohol abuse responded well to pharmacological treatment with buspirone which gradually titrated up to a dose of 30 mg BID. Patient was followed for around a six-month period while she was on buspirone before being discharged to family doctor’s care. Buspirone is unlikely to have a significant effect on platelet serotonin transponder and could be an effective alternative for pharmacological treatment of anxiety in patients with a bleeding diathesis.

  19. Neuronal and immunological basis of action of antidepressants in chronic pain - clinical and experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Joanna; Zychowska, Magdalena; Makuch, Wioletta; Rojewska, Ewelina; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The current knowledge of the pharmacological actions of the tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) has slowly evolved through their over 40-year history. Chronic pain represents one of the most important public health problems, and antidepressants are an essential part of the therapeutic strategy in addition to classical analgesics. This article reviews the available evidence on the efficacy and safety of antidepressants in chronic pain conditions; namely, headaches, low back pain, fibromyalgia, cancer pain and especially neuropathic pain. TCAs are traditionally the main type of depression medication used to treat chronic pain. Recently, new antidepressants were introduced into clinical use, with a significant reduction in side effects and equivalent efficacy on mood disorders. These new drugs that are effective for chronic pain belong to the tetracyclic antidepressants (TeCAs) group (amoxapine, maprotiline), the serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) group (duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran) and the atypical antidepressants group (bupropion, trazodone, mirtazapine, nefazodone). In this review, we present the available publications on TCAs (amitriptyline, doxepin, imipramine, desipramine, nortriptyline), TeCAs (amoxapine, maprotiline), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (citalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine), SNRIs (duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran) and atypical antidepressants (bupropion) for the treatment of neuropathic pain. We also review analgesics acting as both opioid receptor agonists and also acting as aminergic reuptake inhibitors. Existing data are insufficient to conclude which of these new classes of antidepressants has the best clinical profile and will be the most effective in the treatment of neuropathic pain; in addition, a lower incidence of side effects should be considered. Increased experimental and translational research is a key for further improvement of the treatment of chronic pain with antidepressants. However

  20. Modulation of muscarinic system with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor antidepressant attenuates depression in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Paramdeep; Singh, Thakur Gurjeet

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Several studies suggest that muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine is a rapidly acting antidepressant for the treatment-resistant depression. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the possibility of synergistic potential of scopolamine with antidepressants for the treatment of depression without memory impairment in mice. Materials and Methods: Antidepressants such as citalopram, duloxetine, fluvoxamine, and venlafaxine at their median effective dose that is 12.5, 42.8, 17.5, 15.7 mg/kg p.o., respectively, were evaluated in combination with scopolamine 0.2 mg/kg intraperitoneally for the synergistic potential for ameliorating depression in Swiss albino mice. A battery of tests including forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST) were performed in all the groups comprising vehicle control, scopolamine, antidepressants per se, and the combinations of antidepressants with scopolamine. This was followed by the locomotor activity and memory tests. Results: Behavioral studies indicated that only antidepressant venlafaxine with scopolamine resulted in 95.5% and 93.6% reduction in immobility time compared to the vehicle control in FST and TST, respectively. This is significant (P antidepressive-like effect compared to scopolamine per se and venlafaxine per se treatment effects in antidepressant paradigms. All the data were evaluated using the one-way analysis of variance followed by individual comparisons using Tukey's post-hoc test. Control open field studies demonstrated no significant increase in general locomotion after co-administration of the compounds. Step down avoidance paradigm confirmed that scopolamine at the selected dose has no cognition deficit in any mice. Conclusions: The dose of scopolamine selected for synergistic potential has no detrimental effect on memory. The present results suggest the concoction of scopolamine with venlafaxine for enhanced synergistic antidepressive effects with the reduction of dose. PMID

  1. Report on ANSI/ASME nuclear air and gas treatment standards for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Original N Committee, N45-8, has completed and published through the approved American National Standards Institute process two Standards, N-509 and N-510. This committee has been dissolved and replaced by ASME Committee on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment with expanded scope to cover not only air cleaning, but thermal treatment equipment. Current efforts are directed to produce Code documents rather than Standards type publications. This report summarizes changed scope, current organization and sub-committee coverage areas

  2. Factors associated with switching and combination use of antidepressants in young Swedish adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson Sundell, K; Petzold, M G; Wallerstedt, S M

    2013-01-01

    Aims Little is known on factors associated with switching and combination use of antidepressants. Our aim was to describe such use and to analyse the association with socioeconomic factors and level of care in Swedish adults aged 20–34 years. Methods Individuals, aged 20–34 years, who purchased an antidepressant in January–June 2006, and who had not purchased any antidepressant in the preceding 6 months (n = 24,897) were followed from 6 up to 12 months. Among those who purchased ≥ 2 antidepressant substances, switchers were defined as those who did not fulfil the requirements for combination use. Data on purchased antidepressants and socioeconomic characteristics were obtained from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register and Statistics Sweden. The association between (i) ≥ 2 antidepressants or (ii) switching, respectively, and socioeconomic factors as well as level of care was analysed with multiple logistic regression. Results A total of 4254 individuals (17%) purchased ≥ 2 antidepressant substances, and the remaining 20,643 (83%) purchased one antidepressant. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for purchase of ≥ 2 antidepressants (vs. purchase of one antidepressant only) was higher among those who started on mirtazapine compared with selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors: 2.23 (95% confidence interval: 1.93–2.57), and lower in individuals with high education: 0.64 (0.54–0.75), and shorter length of follow-up: 0.73 (0.62–0.85). Among those with ≥ 2 antidepressants, 71.6% were classified as switchers. The adjusted OR for switching (vs. combination use) were higher among divorced/widows/widowers: 1.61 (1.05–2.49), and lower among individuals with short university education: 0.58 (0.43–0.78), those starting on mirtazapine: 0.78 (0.62–0.97), and when treatment was initiated in psychiatric care: 0.75 (0.63–0.88). Conclusions One of six new users purchased at least two antidepressants, the majority were classified as switchers. Purchase

  3. Factors associated with switching and combination use of antidepressants in young Swedish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson Sundell, K; Petzold, M G; Wallerstedt, S M

    2013-12-01

    Little is known on factors associated with switching and combination use of antidepressants. Our aim was to describe such use and to analyse the association with socioeconomic factors and level of care in Swedish adults aged 20-34 years. Individuals, aged 20-34 years, who purchased an antidepressant in January-June 2006, and who had not purchased any antidepressant in the preceding 6 months (n = 24,897) were followed from 6 up to 12 months. Among those who purchased ≥ 2 antidepressant substances, switchers were defined as those who did not fulfil the requirements for combination use. Data on purchased antidepressants and socioeconomic characteristics were obtained from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register and Statistics Sweden. The association between (i) ≥ 2 antidepressants or (ii) switching, respectively, and socioeconomic factors as well as level of care was analysed with multiple logistic regression. A total of 4254 individuals (17%) purchased ≥ 2 antidepressant substances, and the remaining 20,643 (83%) purchased one antidepressant. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for purchase of ≥ 2 antidepressants (vs. purchase of one antidepressant only) was higher among those who started on mirtazapine compared with selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors: 2.23 (95% confidence interval: 1.93-2.57), and lower in individuals with high education: 0.64 (0.54-0.75), and shorter length of follow-up: 0.73 (0.62-0.85). Among those with ≥ 2 antidepressants, 71.6% were classified as switchers. The adjusted OR for switching (vs. combination use) were higher among divorced/widows/widowers: 1.61 (1.05-2.49), and lower among individuals with short university education: 0.58 (0.43-0.78), those starting on mirtazapine: 0.78 (0.62-0.97), and when treatment was initiated in psychiatric care: 0.75 (0.63-0.88). One of six new users purchased at least two antidepressants, the majority were classified as switchers. Purchase patterns were associated with socioeconomic

  4. Antidepressants and seizure-interactions at the GABA-receptor chloride-ionophore complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malatynska, E.; Knapp, R.J.; Ikeda, M.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1988-01-01

    Convulsive seizures are a potential side effect of antidepressant drug treatment and can be produced by all classes of antidepressants. It is also know that some convulsant and anticonvulsant drug actions are mediated by the GABA-receptor chloride-ionophore complex. Drugs acting at this complex appear to induce convulsions by inhibiting chloride conductance through the associated chloride channel. Using the method of GABA-stimulated 36 Cl-uptake by rat cerebral cortical vesicles, we show that some antidepressant drugs can inhibit the GABA-receptor chloride uptake, and that the degree of chloride channel inhibition by these drugs correlates with the frequency of convulsive seizures induced by them

  5. Mortality in major affective disorder: relationship to subtype of depression. The Danish University Antidepressant Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholtz-Hansen, P E; Wang, A G; Kragh-Sørensen, P

    1993-01-01

    of comparing the antidepressant effect of newer 5-HT reuptake inhibitors with that of the tricyclic antidepressant drug, clomipramine. The study comprised patients with a total Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score of > or = 18 and/or a Hamilton subscale score of > or = 9. Diagnostic classification...... a significantly higher suicide rate than endogenously depressed patients. The excess number of suicides in the nonendogenous group largely occurred within the first year of observation. No association was found between response to the antidepressant treatment in the trial and the suicide risk in the first 3 years...

  6. Drug Combinations as the New Standard for Melanoma Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkowska, Marta; Czepielewska, Edyta; Kozłowska-Wojciechowska, Małgorzata

    2016-12-01

    Advanced melanoma is related to a very grim prognosis and fast progression. Until recently, there has been no indicated treatment that would affect the disease's outcome. However, the progress in immunotherapy and molecular therapy has significantly changed the unfavourable prognosis of melanoma progression and its short survival rate. Both approaches have improved patients' outcomes and provided renewed hope for successful treatment. Moreover, in order to further enhance patients' outcomes and to avoid mechanisms of tumour resistance, investigators attempted a combined approach. Targeted therapy combinations allowed a better response rate and progression-free survival than monotherapy with one of the agents. Another promising combination, but with limiting toxicities, is a concurrent immuno- and molecular-targeted therapy. It is suspected that complimentary usage of these drugs may lead to synergism, providing robust and quick tumour responses as well as long-lasting effects. Results of currently ongoing clinical trials that investigate combination strategies in melanoma are expected to provide more mature data about the effectiveness and the safety profile of those therapies. Until more robust results of these studies occur, the best management of advanced and metastatic melanoma is immunotherapy with anti-PD1 drugs or targeted therapy with concomitant BRAF and MEK inhibitor. However, which of these two options should be used first is still under discussion.

  7. Recommendations for the treatment of aging in standard technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, R.D.; Allen, R.P.

    1995-09-01

    As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated the standard technical specifications for nuclear power plants to determine whether the current surveillance requirements (SRs) were effective in detecting age-related degradation. Nuclear Plant Aging Research findings for selected systems and components were reviewed to identify the stressors and operative aging mechanisms and to evaluate the methods available to detect, differentiate, and trend the resulting aging degradation. Current surveillance and testing requirements for these systems and components were reviewed for their effectiveness in detecting degraded conditions and for potential contributions to premature degradation. When the current surveillance and testing requirements appeared ineffective in detecting aging degradation or potentially could contribute to premature degradation, a possible deficiency in the SRs was identified that could result in undetected degradation. Based on this evaluation, PNL developed recommendations for inspection, surveillance, trending, and condition monitoring methods to be incorporated in the SRs to better detect age- related degradation of these selected systems and components

  8. Treatment emergent psychosis associated with mirtazapine and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychosis, in vulnerable individuals, may emerge on anti - depressant treatment. Treatment emergent psychosis is reported with two newer generation antidepressants. Keywords: Antidepressants, Psychosis, Mirtazapine, Tianeptine South African Psychiatry Review - November 2002 ...

  9. Explanation of application standards of hematopoietic stimulating factors in the treatment of acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhiwei; Jiang Enhai; Wang Guilin; Luo Qingliang

    2012-01-01

    Occupational standard of the Ministry of health-Application Standards of Hematopoietic Stimulating Factors in the Treatment of Acute Radiation Sickness has been completed as a draft standard. Based on the wide study and analysis of related animal experimental literature about hematopoietic stimulating factor in the treatment of acute radiation sickness and domestic and foreign clinical reports about application of hematopoietic stimulating factor in radiation accidents in the past decade, the standard was enacted according to the suggestions of International Atomic Energy Agency and the United States Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group and European countries about the application of hematopoietic stimulating factor. It is mainly used for nuclear accident emergency and the treatment of the bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness caused by radiation accidents. It also applies to other hematopoietic failure diseases. In order to implement this standard correctly, the relevant contents of the standard were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  10. Antidepressant treatment effects on dopamine transporter availability in patients with major depression: a prospective123I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Sabine; Frings, Lars; Masuch, Annette; Vach, Werner; Domschke, Katharina; Normann, Claus; Meyer, Philipp T

    2018-02-23

    We investigated if sleep deprivation (SD) and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) affect striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) availability assessed by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and 123 I-FP-CIT, if dopamine transporter gene (SLC6A3; DAT) variation modifies aforementioned parameters, and if SD response or SD-induced DAT changes correlate with ECT response. Sixteen patients with major depression (MDD) referred for ECT and 12 matched controls were prospectively recruited for imaging and SLC6A3 VNTR genotyping. After withdrawal from any psychiatric medication, 123 I-FP-CIT-SPECT was acquired at baseline, after SD and after ECT series. Striatal DAT availability was assessed by volume-of-interest analysis of SPECT data. Eleven patients underwent combined treatment with SD and ECT (five ECT responders and six non-responders). Per-protocol analyses yielded no significant effect of SD or ECT on striatal DAT availability using repeated-measures ANOVA. However, intention-to-treat analysis indicated a significant decrease of striatal DAT availability due to SD (paired t test, p availability of the left caudate nucleus predicted ECT response. This study revealed a treatment effect of SD on striatal DAT availability-possibly depending on SLC6A3 VNTR genotype. This and the observed association between SD-induced change of striatal DAT availability and response to ECT may help to identify treatment mechanisms and response predictors useful for precision medicine approaches in the treatment of MDD.

  11. Prenatal Antidepressants and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0306 TITLE: Prenatal Antidepressants and Autism Spectrum Disorder PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1Sept 2013-31Aug2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prenatal Antidepressants and Autism Spectrum Disorder 5a... antidepressants (ADs) during pregnancy. We are testing this hypothesis in rodents. The study is a 2-year long experiment to be decoded and

  12. Antidepressant administration modulates stress-induced DNA methylation and DNA methyltransferase expression in rat prefrontal cortex and hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales, Amanda J; Joca, Sâmia R L

    2018-01-01

    Stress and antidepressant treatment can modulate DNA methylation in promoter region of genes related to neuroplasticity and mood regulation, thus implicating this epigenetic mechanism in depression neurobiology and treatment. Accordingly, systemic administration of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT...

  13. 9 CFR 166.5 - Licensed garbage-treatment facility standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Licensed garbage-treatment facility... garbage-treatment facility standards. Garbage-treatment facilities shall be maintained as set forth in... where insects and rodents may breed is prohibited. (b) Equipment used for handling untreated garbage...

  14. Antidepressant or Antipsychotic Overdose in the Intensive Care Unit - Identification of Patients at Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Linda; Julkunen, Anna; Madsen, Kristian Rørbaek

    2016-01-01

    It is often advised that patients who have ingested an overdose of antidepressants (AD) or antipsychotics (AP) are monitored with continuous ECG for minimum of 12-24 hr. These patients are often observed in an ICU. Our aim was to identify the number of patients with AD and/or AP overdose without...... adverse signs at hospital admission that turned out to need intensive care treatment. The effect of the antidepressants overdose risk assessment (ADORA) system was evaluated in patients with antidepressant as well as antipsychotic overdose. Our hypothesis was that patients with low ADORA do not need...... as antipsychotic overdose who would not require initial intensive care treatment. This is the first time the ADORA system has been evaluated in patients with antidepressant as well as antipsychotic overdose. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  15. Placental and fetal effects of antenatal exposure to antidepressants or untreated maternal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Salvatore; Fusco, Maria Luigia

    2017-05-01

    To assess systematically the effects of antidepressants and untreated maternal depression on human placenta and the developing fetus. Pertinent medical literature information was identified using MEDLINE/PubMed, SCOPUS and EMBASE. Electronic searches, limited to human studies published in English, provided 21 studies reporting primary data on placental and fetal effects of antidepressant exposure or untreated gestational depression. The impact of antidepressants and non-medicated maternal depression on placental functioning and fetal biochemical architecture seems to be demonstrated, although its clinical significance remains unclear. More robust data seem to indicate that exposure to either antidepressants or untreated maternal depression may induce epigenetic changes and interfere with the physiological fetal behavior. Two cases of iatrogenic fetal tachyarrhythmia have also been reported. Future research should clarify the clinical relevance of the impact of antidepressant and untreated maternal depression exposure on placental functioning. Moreover, ultrasound studies investigating fetal responses to antidepressants or maternal depressive symptoms are mandatory. This assessment should be performed during the whole duration of gestational period, when different fetal behavioral patterns become progressively detectable. Analyses of biochemical and epigenetic modifications associated with maternal mood symptoms and antidepressant treatment should also be implemented.

  16. Antidepressant Use Amongst College Students: Findings of a Phenomenological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshmi L. Singh, Ph.D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression among college students is an escalating problem and could have serious consequences such as suicide. There has been an increase in use of antidepressants on college campuses in United States. However, an in depth understanding of this phenomenon from the college student’s perspective is lacking in the literature. Objective: This study examined college students’ experiences and treatment decision making during their depression treatment. Methods: A longitudinal, phenomenological research methodology was completed. The participants were nine students who were taking antidepressants for diagnosis of depression. Recruitment was done via brochures placed at University bulletin boards, and a mental health clinic. Three audio taped, unstructured interviews were conducted with each participant over four months. The central question asked was: What has the experience of treating depression been for you? Analysis of text was done using Van Manen’s lifeworld existentials of lived body, lived time, lived relation and lived space as the organizing framework. Results: Thirteen themes were identified within the four lifeworlds. The results showed that lived relation with providers was important for college students’ decision to both initiate and continue antidepressant use. Students’ role was defined in conjunction with provider’s role by them as wanting to be a ‘player’ in their treatment decisions and needing to be ‘acknowledged’ as such by their providers. Conclusions: Overall, the underlying essential theme of ‘autonomy’ was portrayed by the students’ experiential accounts of their depression treatment and treatment decision making.

  17. Antidepressant Use Amongst College Students: Findings of a Phenomenological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshmi L. Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression among college students is an escalating problem and could have serious consequences such as suicide. There has been an increase in use of antidepressants on college campuses in United States. However, an in depth understanding of this phenomenon from the college student's perspective is lacking in the literature. Objective: This study examined college students' experiences and treatment decision making during their depression treatment. Methods: A longitudinal, phenomenological research methodology was completed. The participants were nine students who were taking antidepressants for diagnosis of depression. Recruitment was done via brochures placed at University bulletin boards, and a mental health clinic. Three audio taped, unstructured interviews were conducted with each participant over four months. The central question asked was: What has the experience of treating depression been for you? Analysis of text was done using Van Manen's lifeworld existentials of lived body, lived time, lived relation and lived space as the organizing framework. Results: Thirteen themes were identified within the four lifeworlds. The results showed that lived relation with providers was important for college students' decision to both initiate and continue antidepressant use. Students' role was defined in conjunction with provider's role by them as wanting to be a 'player' in their treatment decisions and needing to be 'acknowledged' as such by their providers. Conclusions: Overall, the underlying essential theme of ‘autonomy’ was portrayed by the students’ experiential accounts of their depression treatment and treatment decision making.   Type: Original Research

  18. Antidepressants & suicide: putting the risk in perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Robert H

    2007-07-01

    Suicidal thoughts are a symptom of depression, and completed suicide is a tragic complication of depressive illness. Although pharmacotherapy is effective for the treatment of depression, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has ordered that all antidepressant medications carry a warning indicating that they are associated with an increased risk of suicidal thinking, feeling, and behavior in children, adolescents, and young adults. These warnings have received much attention in the general media and have caused much controversy and debate about the relative safety of these commonly used drugs and the appropriateness of their use, especially in younger patients. In this article, I will discuss this issue with the goal of putting the risk in perspective.

  19. Treatment with an SSRI antidepressant restores hippocampo-hypothalamic corticosteroid feedback and reverses insulin resistance in low-birth-weight rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhl, Esben S; Jensen, Thomas Korgaard; Jessen, Niels; Elfving, Betina; Buhl, Christian S; Kristiansen, Steen B; Pold, Rasmus; Solskov, Lasse; Schmitz, Ole; Wegener, Gregers; Lund, Sten; Petersen, Kitt Falck

    2010-05-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) is associated with type 2 diabetes and depression, which may be related to prenatal stress and insulin resistance as a result of chronic hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity. We examined whether treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor [escitalopram (ESC)] could downregulate HPA axis activity and restore insulin sensitivity in LBW rats. After 4-5 wk of treatment, ESC-exposed LBW (SSRI-LBW) and saline-treated control and LBW rats (Cx and LBW) underwent an oral glucose tolerance test or a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp to assess whole body insulin sensitivity. Hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) mRNA expression and red skeletal muscle PKB Ser(473) phosphorylation were used to assess tissue-specific insulin sensitivity. mRNA expression of the hypothalamic mineralocorticoid receptor was fivefold upregulated in LBW (P < 0.05 vs. Cx), accompanied by increased corticosterone release during restraint stress and total 24-h urinary excretion (P < 0.05 vs. Cx), whole body insulin resistance (P < 0.001 vs. Cx), and impaired insulin suppression of hepatic PEPCK mRNA expression (P < 0.05 vs. Cx). Additionally, there was a tendency for reduced red muscle PKB Ser(473) phosphorylation. The ESC treatment normalized corticosterone secretion (P < 0.05 vs. LBW), whole body insulin sensitivity (P < 0.01) as well as postprandial suppression of hepatic mRNA PEPCK expression (P < 0.05), and red muscle PKB Ser(473) phosphorylation (P < 0.01 vs. LBW). We conclude that these data suggest that the insulin resistance and chronic HPA axis hyperactivity in LBW rats can be reversed by treatment with an ESC, which downregulates HPA axis activity, lowers glucocorticoid exposure, and restores insulin sensitivity in LBW rats.

  20. Surrogate markers of visceral fat and response to anti-depressive treatment in patients with major depressive disorder: a prospective exploratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønning, Morten; Petersen, Dorthe; Steglich-Petersen, Marie; Csillag, Claudio

    2017-02-01

    Body mass index (BMI) and body weight have been shown to be associated to treatment outcome in patients with major depressive disorder, but this relationship is not clear. Visceral fat might be an underlying mechanism explaining this relationship. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate whether visceral fat, as measured by hip-to-waist ratio and waist circumference, affects treatment outcome in patients with major depressive disorder in patients attending a hospital psychiatric care unit in Denmark. The study was conducted as an observational prospective study including 33 patients with major depressive disorder. Assessments were made at enrolment and after 8 weeks. Primary variables were hip-to-waist ratio and waist circumference. Outcome were remission or response of depressive symptoms measured with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D 17 ) interviews and HAM-D 6 self-rating questionnaires. No differences were found in outcome between groups of patients with high vs low visceral fat in this population. The lack of association was evident for all surrogate markers of visceral fat, and suggests that visceral fat has no impact on outcomes of depressive symptoms. However, study limitations might have contributed to this lack of association, especially sample size and considerable variations on multiple parameters including treatment received during the 8 weeks of follow-up.

  1. Depressão resistente a tratamento: uma revisão das estratégias farmacológicas de potencialização de antidepressivos Treatment-resistant depression: review of pharmacologic antidepressant strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Antunes Santos

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Fazer uma revisão sobre oito estratégias farmacológicas de potencialização de antidepressivos na DRT. MÉTODOS: Fez-se um levantamento bibliográfico de 1990 até janeiro de 2006, nas bases eletrônicas de busca Medline, LILACS e da Biblioteca Cochrane, utilizando-se os termos de busca treatment, resistant, refractory e depression e os descritores depression, drug resistance e augmentation, incluindo apenas ensaios controlados duplo-cegos. Foi consultada a referência dos artigos para obtenção de ensaios realizados em data anterior a 1990 e artigos originais de valor histórico. RESULTADOS: Foram encontrados 17 estudos duplo-cegos com o lítio, seis com o hormônio tireoidiano, dois com a buspirona, seis com o pindolol, um com a carbamazepina, dois com a lamotrigina e quatro com a olanzapina. Foram favoráveis à potencialização 41,2% dos ensaios com lítio; 60% daqueles com hormônio tireoidiano e antidepressivos tricíclicos e nenhum com hormônio tireoidiano e inibidores seletivos da recaptação da serotonina (ISRS; 50% dos com pindolol; 100% dos ensaios com carbamazepina e 40% daqueles com olanzapina. Nenhum dos estudos com a buspirona foi favorável. No único estudo com lamotrigina não houve eficácia de tratamento na avaliação pelo critério principal, mas superioridade ao placebo em critérios secundários. CONCLUSÃO: Na DRT há evidência de eficácia apenas em relação ao lítio na potencialização de várias classes de antidepressivos e ao hormônio tireoidiano na potencialização de tricíclicos. A olanzapina foi razoavelmente estudada e sua eficácia não foi estabelecida. Os poucos estudos realizados com a buspirona e o pindolol não comprovaram sua eficácia. A carbamazepina foi muito pouco estudada, e a lamotrigina ainda não foi adequadamente avaliada.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to review eight pharmacologic antidepressant augmentation strategies in TRD. METHODS: Database search on Medline

  2. Rave drug (ecstasy) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor anti-depressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A N; Catalan, J

    2000-04-01

    3, 4 Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) also known as Ecstasy is a common recreational drug of abuse and reports of abuse of tricyclic antidepressants are also known. We report two cases of misuse of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antidepressants in combination with Ecstasy and their beneficial subjective effects experienced by misusers. We hypothesise the probable underlying pharmacological reasons and recommend its use in the treatment of neurotoxic effects of MDMA.

  3. Antidepressant Prescribing Patterns in Korea: Results from the Clinical Research Center for Depression Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Kyung-Yeol; Kim, Sung-Wan; Kim, Jae-Min; Shin, Il-Seon; Yoon, Jin-Sang; Jung, Sung-Won; Lee, Min-Soo; Yim, Hyeon-Woo; Jun, Tae-Youn

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate antidepressant prescribing patterns, including initial choice, switching and combining, and concomitant use of non-antidepressant agents, for depressive disorders in naturalistic clinical care settings in Korea. Methods Patients with depressive disorder were recruited from both outpatient and inpatient settings in 18 hospitals from all over Korea. Treatment was performed in naturalistic patterns based on each clinician's decision. Data were collected ...

  4. RAVE DRUG (ECSTASY) AND SELECTIVE SEROTONIN REUPTAKE INHIBITOR ANTI-DEPRESSANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, A.N.; Catalan, J.

    2000-01-01

    3, 4 Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) also known as Ecstasy is a common recreational drug of abuse and reports of abuse of tricyclic antidepressants are also known. We report two cases of misuse of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antidepressants in combination with Ecstasy and their beneficial subjective effects experienced by misusers. We hypothesise the probable underlying pharmacological reasons and recommend its use in the treatment of neurotoxic effects of MDMA.

  5. Use of antipsychotic and antidepressant within the Psychiatric Disease Centre, Regional Health Service of Ferrara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Stefano; Bianchini, Erica; Scanavacca, Paola

    2011-12-20

    This study aimed at describing the type and dosage of psychopharmaceuticals dispensed to patients with psychiatric disorders and to assess the percentage of patients treated with antipsychotics and antidepressants, the associated therapies, treatment adherence, and dosages used in individuals registered at the Psychiatric Disease Center (PDC), Regional Health Service of Ferrara. The analysis focused on therapeutic programmes presented to the Department of Pharmacy of the University Hospital of Ferrara of 892 patients treated by the PDC (catchment area of 134605 inhabitants). All diagnoses were made according to International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9). The analysis focused on prescriptions from September 2007 to June 2009. Data on adherence to prescribed therapy have were processed by analysis of variance. Among the patients 63% were treated with antipsychotics and 40% with antidepressants. Among patients receiving antipsychotics 92% used second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) whereas the remaining 8% used first generation antipsychotics (FGAs). Antipsychotic doses were lower than Daily Defined Dose (DDDs), and SGAs were often given with anticholinergics to decrease side effects. Mean adherence to antipsychotic therapy was 64%. Among antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were the most often prescribed, 55%. Dosages of these were within the limits indicated by the technical datasheet but higher than DDDs. Only 26% of patients underwent monotherapy. In antidepressants polytherapy, medication was associated with another antidepressant, 6% or with an antipsychotic, 51%. Mean adherence to the antidepressant therapy was 64%. Patients treated with antipsychotics tend to use doses lower than DDDs. The opposite tendency was noted in patients treated with antidepressants. Only a small percentage of patients (14%) modified their neuroleptic therapy by increasing the dosage. On the contrary, patients treated with antidepressants mainly

  6. Safety limits of antidepressant use plus combinations: focus on cardiovascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Florindo; Loureiro, Julia C; Pais, Marcos V; Canineu, Paulo R; Florenza, Orestes V

    2017-12-27

    Antidepressants have been widely prescribed for depression, anxiety, sleep disorders, and in the management of behavioural symptoms of adult-old patients. Although generally safe, newer generation antidepressants are not devoid of the risk of inducing clinically relevant adverse events. To investigate the association between newer generation antidepressants and the occurrence of cardiovascular adverse events and electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities. Studies were included in the review according to the following criteria: a) clinical trials (placebo-controlled or not) or case reports; b) short- or long-term interventions with antidepressants; c) prescription of newer generation antidepressants as first-line treatment; d) samples of adult or adult-old patients. From a total of 301 articles addressing the association between antidepressants and cardiovascular adverse events as primary or secondary outcomes, we selected 30 controlled clinical trials and 10 case reports. In most clinical studies, the effects of antidepressants on cardiac function are usually computed as secondary outcome variables, however with limited information. Conversely, case reports tend to present more comprehensive sets of clinical and laboratorial parameters, but the generalization of such data is limited by the small number of observations. The occurrence of QTc prolongation (with increased risk of torsade de pointes) has been reported. Aging, higher dosages of antidepressants, drug interaction, and pre-existing cardiovascular comorbidities were found as risk factors for the aforementioned cardiovascular and ECG abnormalities. Prescribing antidepressants requires caution given their potential impact on cardiac function, and the clinician should carefully monitor cardiovascular and ECG parameters particularly in cases with underlying heart disease. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Antidepressants and the risk of hyponatremia: a class-by-class review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Picker, Livia; Van Den Eede, Filip; Dumont, Glenn; Moorkens, Greta; Sabbe, Bernard G C

    2014-01-01

    Antidepressant-induced hyponatremia can cause significant morbidity and mortality. It is mostly associated with the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), but its frequency and class specificity are uncertain. To determine the relationship between hyponatremia and antidepressants and to define the incidence and odds ratios for antidepressant classes. A review of the literature prior to March 2013 was performed using Web of Science and PubMed by employing combinations of search strings "antidepressants" and antidepressant class and generic drug names with "hyponatr(a)emia," "SIADH," or "inappropriate ADH." Overall, 21 effect studies and more than 100 case reports were considered, most concerning SSRIs. Because of variations in study designs, populations, and cutoff values, incidence rates diverged between 0.06% and 40% for SSRIs and 0.08% and 70% for venlafaxine. Although based on less solid evidence, incidence figures for mirtazapine and tricyclic antidepressants were lower. Regarding classes, odds ratios for SSRIs (1.5-21.6) were consistently higher than for tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) (1.1-4.9). The risks associated with monoamine oxidase inhibitors, reboxetine, and bupropion could not be established owing to insufficient information. Patient risk factors included older age (odds ratios = 6.3) and concomitant use of (thiazide) diuretics (odds ratios = 11.2-13.5). Hyponatremia is a potentially dangerous side effect of antidepressants and is not exclusive to SSRIs. Current evidence suggests a relatively higher risk of hyponatremia with SSRIs and venlafaxine, especially when combined with patient risk factors, warranting clinicians to be aware of this complication. The risks associated with mirtazapine are moderate, supporting this antidepressant as an alternative treatment for patients with (an increased risk of) hyponatremia. Copyright © 2014 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Antidepressant Medication Use and Risk of Hyperglycemia and Diabetes Mellitus—A Noncausal Association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Batty, G. David; Jokela, Markus; Ebmeier, Klaus P.; Vahtera, Jussi; Virtanen, Marianna; Brunner, Eric J.; Tabak, Adam G.; Witte, Daniel R.; Kumari, Meena; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Hamer, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous research suggests a link between antidepressant use and diabetes, but it is unclear whether the association is causal or attributable to detection/ascertainment bias. To examine this, we assessed the associations of antidepressant use with change in glucose levels and incidence of undiagnosed and diagnosed diabetes. Methods During an 18-year period, we monitored antidepressant use, glucose levels, and diabetes status in 5978 civil servants (70.9% male, age range 39–64 years) free of diabetes at baseline (the Whitehall II study). Use of medication and plasma glucose were assessed at four study screenings: 1991/1993, 1997/1999, 2003/2004, and 2008/2009. Incident diabetes cases were classified as either diagnosed (n = 294) if detected using self-report of physician diagnosis and/or the use of diabetes medication or undiagnosed (n = 346) if detected based on fasting and/or 2-hour postload glucose levels using an oral glucose tolerance test at the study screenings. Results Incidence of diagnosed diabetes was higher among antidepressant users than nonusers (odds ratio 3.10, 95% confidence interval: 1.66–5.78). However, antidepressant use was not associated with undiagnosed diabetes at any follow-up examination nor with higher fasting or 2-hour postload plasma glucose levels or increasing glucose levels over time. Odds ratio for undiagnosed diabetes for antidepressant users versus nonusers was .88 (95% confidence interval: .45–1.72, p = .70). The mean difference in glucose changes between participants reporting antidepressant use at three screenings compared with those not on antidepressant treatment was .0 mmol/L. Conclusions The link between antidepressant use and diabetes risk may not be causal in nature. PMID:21872216

  9. "My dirty little habit": Patient constructions of antidepressant use and the 'crisis' of legitimacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, Damien; Kokanovic, Renata; Broom, Alex; Kirkpatrick, Susan; Anderson, Claire; Tanner, Claire

    2015-12-01

    Discontents surrounding depression are many, and include concerns about a creeping appropriation of everyday kinds of misery; divergent opinions on the diagnostic category(ies); and debates about causes and appropriate treatments. The somewhat mixed fortunes of antidepressants - including concerns about their efficacy, overuse and impacts on personhood - have contributed to a moral ambivalence around antidepressant use for people with mental health issues. Given this, we set out to critically examine how antidepressant users engage in the moral underpinnings of their use, especially how they ascribe legitimacy (or otherwise) to this usage. Using a modified constant comparative approach, we analyzed 107 narrative interviews (32 in UKa, 36 in UKb, 39 in Australia) collected in three research studies of experiences of depression in the UK (2003-4 UKa, and 2012 UKb) and in Australia (2010-11). We contend that with the precariousness of the legitimacy of the pharmaceutical treatment of depression, participants embark on their own legitimization work, often alone and while distressed. We posit that here, individuals with depression may be particularly susceptible to moral uncertainty about their illness and pharmaceutical interventions, including concerns about shameful antidepressant use and deviance (e.g. conceiving medication as pseudo-illicit). We conclude that while people's experiences of antidepressants (including successful treatments) involve challenges to illegitimacy narratives, it is difficult for participants to escape the influence of underlying moral concerns, and the legitimacy quandary powerfully shapes antidepressant use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Antidepressants for depression in patients with dementia: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Christine

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the literature investigating the efficacy and safety of antidepressants for treating depression in individuals with dementia. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, PUBMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases from inception to May 2013 for studies in English that evaluated the treatment of depression in patients with dementia. All relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses were identified using the search terms "dementia" or "Alzheimer's disease," and "depression" or "major depressive disorder." Reference lists from retrieved articles and practice guidelines were also searched for relevant literature. Only randomized, placebo-controlled trials and meta-analyses that compared an antidepressant with placebo for the treatment of depression in patients with dementia were included. In this systematic review, 10 RCTs and 3 meta-analyses were identified that examined the efficacy and safety of antidepressants compared with placebo in treating depression in patients with dementia. The majority of the RCTs consisted of a small sample size, and the antidepressants studied were not routinely used in practice. The evidence for antidepressants in the treatment of depression in patients with dementia is inconclusive. The accumulation of evidence suggests nonpharmacologic approaches and watchful waiting be attempted for the first 8 to 12 weeks in a patient who presents with both mild-to-moderate depression and dementia. In cases of severe depression, or depression not managed through nonpharmacologic means, a trial of an antidepressant may be initiated. However, further well-designed trials are needed to support these recommendations.

  11. Antidepressant-like effect of modafinil in mice: Evidence for the involvement of the dopaminergic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Javad; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Talebi, Mahnaz; Sabermarouf, Babak; Sadigh-Eteghad, Saeed

    2015-06-01

    Modafinil is a wake-promoting agent that provides wide ranges of neurological effects. There is evidence that it can produce antidepressant effects. This study investigated the antidepressant effect of modafinil in the tail suspension (TST) in mice. Different doses of modafinil was intraperitoneally (ip) administrated and then animals were subjected to TST and/or open field test (OFT). Moreover, the implication of the dopaminergic neurotransmission in modafinil's antidepressant effect was studied. For this purpose, animals were pretreated with haloperidol (non-selective dopamine receptor antagonist), or SCH23390 and sulpiride (the dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonist, respectively), then were assessed by TST. The possible effect of sub-effective dose of modafinil in combination with sub-therapeutic doses of standard antidepressants was also evaluated in separate groups. Modafinil (75 mg/kg, ip) produced antidepressant effect in TST, as compared to a control group, without any alterations in ambulation in OFT. Pretreatment of mice with haloperidol (0.2mg/kg, ip) and sulpride (50mg/kg, ip) blocked the anti-immobility effect of modafinil (75 mg/kg, ip). We also found that the administration of SCH23390 (0.05 mg/kg, sc) couldn't antagonize the antidepressant effects of modafinil. In addition, a sub-effective dose of modafinil (50mg/kg, ip) potentiated the sub-effective doses of standard antidepressants including of bupropion (1mg/kg, ip), fluoxetine (1mg/kg, ip) and imipramine (0.1mg/kg, ip) and reduced immobility time in TST. Results show that modafinil induced an antidepressant property in TST and this effect apparently was mediated through interaction with the dopaminergic (D2 receptors) system. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. Prospective randomized trial of sclerotherapy vs standard treatment for epistaxis due to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Holly; Fernandes, Patricia; Le, Chap; Yueh, Bevan

    2015-05-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated the tolerability and low side-effect profile of office-based sclerotherapy with sodium tetradecyl sulfate (STS) for treating recurrent epistaxis due to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). The objective of this study was to use a prospective randomized trial to determine the effectiveness of sclerotherapy with STS vs standard treatment. This prospective randomized trial (conducted from November 1, 2011, through January 31, 2014) involved 17 patients with recurrent epistaxis due to HHT. We defined standard treatment as continuation of any treatment that the patient had previously undergone, such as moisturization, packing, and cautery. We used a crossover design, so study participants were randomized to either sclerotherapy or standard treatment during the first time period, and then to the other during the second period. The primary outcome measure was frequency and severity of epistaxis, as measured by the epistaxis severity score (ESS). The ESS is a 10-point scale, with higher scores corresponding to more bleeding. After controlling for treatment order, bleeding was substantially better controlled after sclerotherapy; the ESS after sclerotherapy was nearly one point lower than after standard treatment (-0.95, 1-sided p = 0.027). Treatment order, baseline ESS, the number of lesions, moisturization practices, and a history of previous blood transfusions did not significantly affect the results. This trial demonstrated that sclerotherapy with STS (vs standard treatment) significantly reduced epistaxis due to HHT. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  13. Serotonin 5-HT4 receptors: A new strategy for developing fast acting antidepressants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Rebeca; Castro, Elena; Pilar-Cuéllar, Fuencisla; Pascual-Brazo, Jesús; Díaz, Alvaro; Rojo, María Luisa; Linge, Raquel; Martín, Alicia; Valdizán, Elsa M; Pazos, Angel

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of the activity of brain monoaminergic systems has been the focus of attention of many studies since the first antidepressant drug emerged 50 years ago. The search for novel antidepressants is deeply linked to the search for fast-acting strategies, taking into account that 2-4 weeks of treatment with classical antidepressant are required before clinical remission of the symptoms becomes evident. In the recent years several hypotheses have been proposed on the basis of the existence of alterations in brain synaptic plasticity in major depression. Recent evidences support a role for 5-HT4 receptors in the pathogenesis of depression as well as in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs. In fact, chronic treatment with antidepressant drugs appears to modulate, at different levels, the signaling pathway associated to 5-HT4 receptors, as well as their levels of expression in the brain. Moreover, several experimental studies have identified this receptor subtype as a promising new target for fast-acting antidepressant strategy: the administration of partial agonists of this receptor induces a number of responses similar to those observed after chronic treatment with classical antidepressants, but with a rapid onset of action. They include efficacy in behavioral models of depression, rapid desensitization of 5-HT1A autoreceptors, and modifications in the expression of several molecular markers of brain neuroplasticity. Although much work remains to be done in order to clarify the real therapeutic potential of these drugs, the evidences reviewed below support the hypothesis that 5-HT4 receptor partial agonists could behave as rapid and effective antidepressants.

  14. Newer generation antidepressants for depressive disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetrick, Sarah E; McKenzie, Joanne E; Cox, Georgina R; Simmons, Magenta B; Merry, Sally N

    2012-11-14

    Depressive disorders are common in young people and are associated with significant negative impacts. Newer generation antidepressants, particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are often used, however evidence of their effectiveness in children and adolescents is not clear. Furthermore, there have been warnings against their use in this population due to concerns about increased risk of suicidal ideation and behaviour. To determine the efficacy and adverse outcomes, including definitive suicidal behaviour and suicidal ideation, of newer generation antidepressants compared with placebo in the treatment of depressive disorders in children and adolescents. For this update of the review, we searched the Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Review Group's Specialised Register (CCDANCTR) to October 2011. The CCDANCTR includes relevant randomised controlled trials from the following bibliographic databases: CENTRAL (the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) (all years), EMBASE (1974 -), MEDLINE (1950 -) and PsycINFO (1967 -). We searched clinical trial registries and pharmaceutical company websites. We checked reference lists of included trials and other reviews, and sent letters to key researchers and the pharmaceutical companies of included trials from January to August 2011. Published and unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cross-over trials and cluster trials comparing a newer generation antidepressant with a placebo in children and adolescents aged 6 to 18 years old and diagnosed with a depressive disorder were eligible for inclusion. In this update, we amended the selection criteria to include newer generation antidepressants rather than SSRIs only. Two or three review authors selected the trials, assessed their quality, and extracted trial and outcome data. We used a random-effects meta-analysis. We used risk ratio (RR) to summarise dichotomous outcomes and mean difference (MD) to summarise continuous measures

  15. Antidepressants for chronic non-cancer pain in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Tess E; Heathcote, Lauren C; Clinch, Jacqui; Gold, Jeffrey I; Howard, Richard; Lord, Susan M; Schechter, Neil; Wood, Chantal; Wiffen, Philip J

    2017-08-05

    Pain is a common feature of childhood and adolescence around the world, and for many young people, that pain is chronic. The World Health Organization guidelines for pharmacological treatments for children's persisting pain acknowledge that pain in children is a major public health concern of high significance in most parts of the world. While in the past pain was largely dismissed and was frequently left untreated, views on children's pain have changed over time and relief of pain is now seen as important.We designed a suite of seven reviews on chronic non-cancer pain and cancer pain (looking at antidepressants, antiepileptic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, and paracetamol) in order to review the evidence for children's pain utilising pharmacological interventions.As the leading cause of morbidity in the world today, chronic disease (and its associated pain) is a major health concern. Chronic pain (that is pain lasting three months or longer) can arise in the paediatric population in a variety of pathophysiological classifications (nociceptive, neuropathic, or idiopathic) from genetic conditions, nerve damage pain, chronic musculoskeletal pain, and chronic abdominal pain, as well as for other unknown reasons.Antidepressants have been used in adults for pain relief and pain management since the 1970s. The clinical impression from extended use over many years is that antidepressants are useful for some neuropathic pain symptoms, and that effects on pain relief are divorced and different from effects on depression; for example, the effects of tricyclic antidepressants on pain may occur at different, and often lower, doses than those on depression. Amitriptyline is one of the most commonly used drugs for treating neuropathic pain in the UK. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of antidepressants used to treat chronic non-cancer pain in children and adolescents aged between birth and 17 years, in any setting. We searched the

  16. Identification of a novel, fast-acting GABAergic antidepressant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, K M J; Ramaker, M J; Barkley-Levenson, A M; Sidhu, P S; Elkin, P K; Reddy, M K; Guthrie, M L; Cook, J M; Rawal, V H; Arnold, L A; Dulawa, S C; Palmer, A A

    2018-02-01

    Current pharmacotherapies for depression exhibit slow onset, side effects and limited efficacy. Therefore, identification of novel fast-onset antidepressants is desirable. GLO1 is a ubiquitous cellular enzyme responsible for the detoxification of the glycolytic byproduct methylglyoxal (MG). We have previously shown that MG is a competitive partial agonist at GABA-A receptors. We examined the effects of genetic and pharmacological inhibition of GLO1 in two antidepressant assay models: the tail suspension test (TST) and the forced swim test (FST). We also examined the effects of GLO1 inhibition in three models of antidepressant onset: the chronic FST (cFST), chronic mild stress (CMS) paradigm and olfactory bulbectomy (OBX). Genetic knockdown of Glo1 or pharmacological inhibition using two structurally distinct GLO1 inhibitors (S-bromobenzylglutathione cyclopentyl diester (pBBG) or methyl-gerfelin (MeGFN)) reduced immobility in the TST and acute FST. Both GLO1 inhibitors also reduced immobility in the cFST after 5 days of treatment. In contrast, the serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (FLX) reduced immobility after 14, but not 5 days of treatment. Furthermore, 5 days of treatment with either GLO1 inhibitor blocked the depression-like effects induced by CMS on the FST and coat state, and attenuated OBX-induced locomotor hyperactivity. Finally, 5 days of treatment with a GLO1 inhibitor (pBBG), but not FLX, induced molecular markers of the antidepressant response including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) induction and increased phosphorylated cyclic-AMP response-binding protein (pCREB) to CREB ratio in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Our findings indicate that GLO1 inhibitors may provide a novel and fast-acting pharmacotherapy for depression.

  17. Identification of a novel, fast acting GABAergic anti-depressant

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, Katherine M. J.; Ramaker, Marcia J.; Barkley-Levenson, Amanda M.; Sidhu, Preetpal S.; Elkin, Pavel; Reddy, M. Kashi; Guthrie, Margaret L.; Cook, James M.; Rawal, Viresh H.; Arnold, Leggy A.; Dulawa, Stephanie C.; Palmer, Abraham A.

    2017-01-01

    Current pharmacotherapies for depression exhibit slow onset, side effects and limited efficacy. Therefore, identification of novel fast-onset antidepressants is desirable. GLO1 is a ubiquitous cellular enzyme responsible for the detoxification of the glycolytic byproduct methylglyoxal (MG). We have previously shown that MG is a competitive partial agonist at GABA-A receptors. We examined the effects of genetic and pharmacological inhibition of GLO1 in two antidepressant assay models: the tail suspension test (TST) and the forced swim test (FST). We also examined the effects of GLO1 inhibition in three models of antidepressant onset: the chronic FST (cFST), chronic mild stress (CMS) paradigm, and olfactory bulbectomy (OBX). Genetic knockdown of Glo1 or pharmacological inhibition using two structurally distinct GLO1 inhibitors (S-bromobenzylglutathione cyclopentyl diester (pBBG) or methyl gerfelin (MeGFN)) reduced immobility in the TST and acute FST. Both GLO1 inhibitors also reduced immobility in the cFST after 5 days of treatment. In contrast, the serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (FLX) reduced immobility after 14, but not 5 days of treatment. Furthermore, 5 days of treatment with either GLO1 inhibitor blocked the depression-like effects induced by CMS on the FST and coat state, and attenuated OBX-induced locomotor hyperactivity. Finally, 5 days of treatment with a GLO1 inhibitor (pBBG), but not FLX, induced molecular markers of the antidepressant response including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) induction and increased phosphorylated cyclic-AMP response binding protein (pCREB) to CREB ratio in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Our findings indicate that GLO1 inhibitors may provide a novel and fast-acting pharmacotherapy for depression. PMID:28322281

  18. Antidepressant-Like Effects of Central BDNF Administration in Mice of Antidepressant Sensitive Catalepsy (ASC) Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonova, Maria; Kulikov, Alexander V

    2012-08-31

    Although numerous data evidence the implication of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathophysiology of depression, the potential for BDNF to correct genetically defined depressive-like states is poorly studied. This study was aimed to reveal antidepressant-like effects of BDNF (300 ng, 2×, i.c.v.) on behavior and mRNA expression of genes associated with depression-like state in the brain in mice of antidepressant sensitive catalepsy (ASC) strain characterized by high hereditary predisposition to catalepsy and depressive-like features. Behavioral tests were held on the 7th-16th days after the first (4th-13th after the second) BDNF injection. Results showed that BDNF normalized impaired sexual motivation in the ASC males, and this BDNF effect differed, with advantageous effects, from that of widely used antidepressants. The anticataleptic effect of two BDNF injections was enhanced compared with a single administration. A tendency to decrease the immobility duration in tail-suspension test was observed in BDNF-treated ASC mice. The effects on catalepsy and sexual motivation were specific since BDNF did not alter locomotor and exploratory activity or social interest in the ASC mice. Along with behavioral antidepressant-like effects on the ASC mice, BDNF increased hippocampal mRNA levels of Bdnf and Creb1 (cAMP response element-binding protein gene). BDNF also augmented mRNA levels of Arc gene encoding Arc (Activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated) protein involved in BDNF-induced processes of neuronal and synaptic plasticity in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. The data suggest that: [1] BDNF is effective in the treatment of some genetically defined behavioral disturbances; [2] BDNF influences sexually-motivated behavior; [3] Arc mRNA levels may serve as a molecular marker of BDNF physiological activity associated with its long-lasting behavioral effects; [4] ASC mouse strain can be used as a suitable model to study mechanisms of BDNF effects on

  19. Citalopram versus other anti-depressive agents for depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Andrea; Purgato, Marianna; Furukawa, Toshi A; Trespidi, Carlotta; Imperadore, Giuseppe; Signoretti, Alessandra; Churchill, Rachel; Watanabe, Norio; Barbui, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent US and UK clinical practice guidelines recommend that second-generation antidepressants should be considered amongst the best first-line options when drug therapy is indicated for a depressive episode. Systematic reviews have already highlighted some differences in efficacy between second-generation antidepressants. Citalopram, one of the first selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) introduced in the market, is one of these antidepressant drugs that clinicians use for routine depression care. Objectives To assess the evidence for the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of citalopram in comparison with tricyclics, heterocyclics, other SSRIs and other conventional and non-conventional antidepressants in the acute-phase treatment of major depression. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials up to February 2012. No language restriction was applied. We contacted pharmaceutical companies and experts in this field for supplemental data. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials allocating patients with major depression to citalopram versus any other antidepressants. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently extracted data. Information extracted included study characteristics, participant characteristics, intervention details and outcome measures in terms of efficacy (the number of patients who responded or remitted), patient acceptability (the number of patients who failed to complete the study) and tolerability (side-effects). Main results Thirty-seven trials compared citalopram with other antidepressants (such as tricyclics, heterocyclics, SSRIs and other antidepressants, either conventional ones, such as mirtazapine, venlafaxine and reboxetine, or non-conventional, like hypericum). Citalopram was shown to be significantly less effective than escitalopram in achieving acute response (odds

  20. Antidepressant induced sexual dysfunction, part 1: epidemiology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... their compliance with medication and ultimately the prognosis of their illness. This review will be presented in two parts. The first part focuses on the prevalence of antidepressant induced sexual dysfunction and its clinical presentation both generally and in the case of individual classes of antidepressants. The second part ...

  1. Identifying genetic loci affecting antidepressant drug response in depression using drug–gene interaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordam, Raymond; Avery, Christy L; Visser, Loes E; Stricker, Bruno H

    2016-01-01

    Antidepressants are often only moderately successful in decreasing the severity of depressive symptoms. In part, antidepressant treatment response in patients with depression is genetically determined. However, although a large number of studies have been conducted aiming to identify genetic variants associated with antidepressant drug response in depression, only a few variants have been repeatedly identified. Within the present review, we will discuss the methodological challenges and limitations of the studies that have been conducted on this topic to date (e.g., ‘treated-only design’, statistical power) and we will discuss how specifically drug–gene interaction models can be used to be better able to identify genetic variants associated with antidepressant drug response in depression. PMID:27248517

  2. Factors associated with the prescription of antidepressive medication to breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, Nis P; Deltour, Isabelle; Damkjaer, Lars H

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated factors associated with use of antidepressant medication subsequent to a diagnosis of breast cancer. We also evaluated the effect of participation in a cancer rehabilitation program on use of antidepressants. Material and methods. We conducted a register-based cohort study of 1 247...... women with breast cancer diagnosed between 1998 and 2006 who attended a week-long rehabilitation program and a comparison group of 2 903 women who did not attend the program matched through the registers of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. The associations between breast cancer......-related, treatment-related, and sociodemographic factors and use of antidepressants were evaluated in multivariate Cox proportional hazard models separated on use of antidepressants before diagnosis of breast cancer. Results. The mean follow-up for the 4 150 women in the study was 3.3 years (5-95% range, 0...

  3. The inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 5 as a novel target for antidepressant action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebenberg, Nico

    2010-01-01

    therapy of depression. A recent study from our laboratory reported an antidepressant-like response in the rat forced swim test (FST) following chronic (11 day) co-administration of the phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor sildenafil and the muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor antagonist atropine...... in Sprague Dawley rats. In the current study we explored the antidepressant-like properties of PDE5 inhibitors in Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats, a genetic animal model of depression, and investigated the mechanism(s) that may be involved in the antidepressant-like activity of these drugs. We also......Major depression is one of the most debilitating diseases of our time, while current antidepressant treatments remain deficient in several ways. The nitric oxide (NO) / cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) / cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PK-G) pathway shows promise as a novel target for the drug...

  4. Rapid antidepressant effects of Yueju: A new look at the function and mechanism of an old herbal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Li; Chen, Gang

    2017-05-05

    Yueju is a traditional herbal medicine which consists of five herbs and formulated to treat depression-related syndromes 800 years ago. Yueju is still widely prescribed to treat conditions which include digestive dysfunction and depression. Recently, Yueju has been shown to promote a fast-onset antidepressant effect clinically and in preclinical studies. Because conventional antidepressants have a delayed onset in treating depression, the novelty of Yueju's rapid antidepressant effect and its underlying mechanism are of great significance both clinically and scientifically. To review the use of Yueju for treatment of mood-related syndromes, and particularly its use in depression. To evaluate recent evidence of Yueju rapid antidepressant actions, based on new findings at behavioral and molecular levels. To suggest direction for future studies to address further scientific issues. Reports regarding to the history and current use of Yueju are summarized. Recent progress on rapid antidepressant effects of Yueju, the crucial constituent, Gardenia jasminoides J.Ellis (GJ) and other herbs, are reviewed. The medical need for rapid antidepressant actions, as well as breakthrough findings using ketamine and its limitations are introduced. Studies with Yueju using a number of acute, subacute and chronic behavioral paradigms are compared with ketamine. Findings from clinical reports also support the rapid action of Yueju. Studies examine the contribution of the constituent herb GJ, in rapid antidepressant effects. Importantly, research into the mechanism of Yueju or GJ's antidepressant response indicate the importance of up-regulation in the neural circuit responsible for antidepressant activity, and highlight common and specific molecular signaling by Yueju that may explain why this herb formula has unique antidepressant activity. Preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate that Yueju confers rapid antidepressant effects. The common mechanisms shared both for ketamine and

  5. A brief history of antidepressant drug development: from tricyclics to beyond ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Vitor Silva; Hiroaki-Sato, Vinícius Antonio

    2018-02-01

    Although monoaminergic-targeted drugs have prompted great advances in the development of treatments for depression, the need for new options persists, since these drugs still have a delayed clinical effect and most patients do not respond properly to them. Recently, the observation of the antidepressant effects of ketamine brought on a new wave of studies regarding the comprehension of the neurobiology of depression and the development of new and more effective antidepressant drugs. Thus, in this paper, we present a historical review of the development of monoaminergic antidepressant drugs and the role of ketamine as the introductory agent of a new era in the research of the neurobiology of depression. Firstly, we review how the pharmacological treatment for major depression started, and we point out the main drugs discovered, the researchers involved, and how the studies developed have contributed to the understanding of the neurobiology of depression. Secondly, the major problems regarding the clinical efficacy and acceptance of these drugs are discussed, and the introduction of the glutamatergic system as a target for antidepressant drugs is presented. Finally, we review how ketamine revealed itself as an exciting option towards obtaining pharmacological agents to treat depression, through the understanding of biological markers. Discussion Ketamine contributed to confirm that different targets of the glutamatergic system and neurotrophic pathways are strictly related to the neurobiology of depression. There are several antidepressant drugs based on ketamine's mechanism of action already in the pipeline, and glutamatergic-targeted antidepressants may be on the market in the near future.

  6. E-mailed standardized cognitive behavioural treatment of work-related stress : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruwaard, Jeroen; Lange, Alfred; Bouwman, Manon; Broeksteeg, Janneke; Schrieken, Bart

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a 7-week standardized cognitive behavioural treatment of work-related stress conducted via e-mail. A total of 342 people applied for treatment in reaction to a newspaper article. Initial screening reduced the sample to a heterogeneous (sub)clinical

  7. Depression, antidepressants, and sexual function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, B S

    1995-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested that serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's), prescribed for the relief of depression, can cause sexual dysfunction in up to fifty percent of those taking them. The SSRI's--including fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil)--affect mood stabilization by promoting the transmission of the neurotransmitter serotonin, although enhancing serotonergic function can decrease libido or lead to erectile difficulties. As an alternative to lowering antidepressant dosages and risking losing therapeutic gains, administering serotonin-blockers, such as cyproheptadine (Periactin) and yohimbine (Yocon), has been shown to restore sexual function. However, the serotonin antagonist, cyproheptadine, causes sedation and can reverse the antidepressant or anti-obsessive effect of the SSRI. Yohimbine enhances transmission of the neurotransmitter epinephrine, increasing the flow of blood to erectile tissue and stimulating sexual desire by activating the cerebral cortex. Its drawbacks are increased levels of panic attacks and higher required dosages. Other potential biochemical stratagems are: amantadine (Symmetrel), bromcriptine (Parlodel), and buspirone (Buspar), which enhance dopamine and serotonin transmission; and bethanecol (Urechline), which enhances choline transmission. One study indicates improved sexual response when the nonserotonergic, mildly dopamine-enhancing buproprion (Welbutrin) is substituted for fluoxetine.

  8. Disrupting the rhythm of depression: design and protocol of a randomized controlled trial on preventing relapse using brief cognitive therapy with or without antidepressants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bockting, Claudi L. H.; Elgersma, Hermien J.; van Rijsbergen, Gerard D.; de Jonge, Peter; Ormel, Johan; Buskens, Erik; Stant, A. Dennis; de Jong, Peter J.; Peeters, Frenk P. M. L.; Huibers, Marcus J. H.; Arntz, Arnoud; Muris, Peter; Nolen, Willem A.; Schene, Aart H.; Hollon, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Maintenance treatment with antidepressants is the leading strategy to prevent relapse and recurrence in patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) who have responded to acute treatment with antidepressants (AD; 1-2). However, in clinical practice most patients (up

  9. Disrupting the rhythm of depression: Design and protocol of a randomized controlled trial on preventing relapse using brief cognitive therapy with or without antidepressants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L.H. Bockting (Claudi ); H.J. Elgersma (Hermien ); G.D. Rijsbergen (Gerard ); P. de Jonge (Peter); J. Ormel (Johan Hans); E. Buskens (Erik); A.D. Stant (Dennis); P.J. de Jong (Peter); F.P.M.L. Peeters (Frenk ); M.J.H. Huibers (Marcus); A. Arntz (Arnoud); P.E.H.M. Muris (Peter); W.A. Nolen (Willem); A.H. Schene (Aart); S.D. Hollon (Steven)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Maintenance treatment with antidepressants is the leading strategy to prevent relapse and recurrence in patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) who have responded to acute treatment with antidepressants (AD). However, in clinical practice most patients (up to

  10. Disrupting the rhythm of depression : Design and protocol of a randomized controlled trial on preventing relapse using brief cognitive therapy with or without antidepressants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bockting, Claudi L H; Elgersma, Hermien J; van Rijsbergen, Gerard D; de Jonge, Peter; Ormel, Johan; Buskens, Erik; Stant, A Dennis; de Jong, Peter J; Peeters, Frenk P M L; Huibers, Marcus J H; Arntz, Arnoud; Muris, Peter; Nolen, Willem A; Schene, Aart H; Hollon, Steven D

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Maintenance treatment with antidepressants is the leading strategy to prevent relapse and recurrence in patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) who have responded to acute treatment with antidepressants (AD). However, in clinical practice most patients (up to 70-80%) are

  11. Disrupting the rhythm of depression: design and protocol of a randomized controlled trial on preventing relapse using brief cognitive therapy with or without antidepressants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bockting, C.L.H.; Elgersma, H.J.; van Rijsbergen, G.D.; de Jonge, P.; Ormel, J.; Buskens, E.; Stant, A.D.; de Jong, P.J.; Peeters, F.P.M.L.; Huibers, M.J.H.; Arntz, A.; Muris, P.; Nolen, W.A.; Schene, A.H.; Hollon, S.D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Maintenance treatment with antidepressants is the leading strategy to prevent relapse and recurrence in patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) who have responded to acute treatment with antidepressants (AD). However, in clinical practice most patients (up to 70-80%) are

  12. Social-skills and parental training plus standard treatment versus standard treatment for children with ADHD--the randomised SOSTRA trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Jakob Storebø

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of social-skills training and parental training programme for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD.We conducted a randomized two-armed, parallel group, assessor-blinded superiority trial consisting of social-skills training plus parental training and standard treatment versus standard treatment alone. A sample size calculation showed at least 52 children should be included for the trial with follow up three and six months after randomization. The primary outcome measure was ADHD symptoms and secondary outcomes were social skills and emotional competences. RESULTS 56: children (39 boys, 17 girls, mean age 10.4 years, SD 1.31 with ADHD were randomized, 28 to the experimental group and 27 to the control group. Mixed-model analyses with repeated measures showed that the time course (y  =  a + bt + ct(2 of ADHD symptoms (p = 0.40, social skills (p = 0.80, and emotional competences (p = 0.14 were not significantly influenced by the intervention.Social skills training plus parental training did not show any significant benefit for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder when compared with standard treatment. More and larger randomized trials are needed.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00937469.

  13. The influence of antidepressants on restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movements: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolla, Bhanu Prakash; Mansukhani, Meghna P; Bostwick, J Michael

    2018-04-01

    Restless legs syndrome is commonly co-morbid with medical conditions that are treated with antidepressant medications, such as depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, and chronic insomnia disorder. Evidence from case reports and cross-sectional studies suggests that antidepressants may induce or worsen restless legs syndrome and increase periodic limb movements. We undertook a systematic review of the literature to identify and collate all prospective studies that measured restless legs syndrome symptoms and/or periodic limb movements following the introduction of an antidepressant. Eighteen studies were eligible for inclusion. Current data indicate that onset or exacerbation of restless legs syndrome and rise in frequency of periodic limb movements are uncommon following the initiation of an antidepressant. Among the various antidepressants, mirtazapine may be associated with higher rates of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movements. One small study of normal volunteers suggested that venlafaxine may be associated with an increase in restless legs syndrome symptoms and periodic limb movements. Sertraline, fluoxetine, and amitriptyline appear to increase periodic limb movements that do not disrupt sleep and are thus unlikely to be clinically significant. On the other hand, bupropion may reduce restless legs syndrome symptoms, at least in the short term. Sedating antidepressants such as trazodone, nefazodone, and doxepin do not seem to aggravate periodic limb movements. The current evidence is limited by poor study design, inadequate use of standardized questionnaires, and heterogeneous populations studied for variable lengths of time. Future research should attempt to remedy these shortcomings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Antidepressant sales and the risk for alcohol-related and non-alcohol-related suicide in Finland--an individual-level population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustgaard, Heta; Joutsenniemi, Kaisla; Myrskylä, Mikko; Martikainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    A marked decline in suicide rates has co-occurred with increased antidepressant sales in several countries but the causal connection between the trends remains debated. Most previous studies have focused on overall suicide rates and neglected differential effects in population subgroups. Our objective was to investigate whether increasing sales of non-tricyclic antidepressants have reduced alcohol- and non-alcohol-related suicide risk in different population subgroups. We followed a nationally representative sample of 950,158 Finnish adults in 1995-2007 for alcohol-related (n = 2,859) and non-alcohol-related (n = 8,632) suicides. We assessed suicide risk by gender and social group according to regional sales of non-tricyclic antidepressants, measured by sold doses per capita, prevalence of antidepressant users, and proportion of antidepressant users with doses reflecting minimally adequate treatment. Fixed-effects Poisson regression models controlled for regional differences and time trends that may influence suicide risk irrespective of antidepressant sales. The number of sold antidepressant doses per capita and the prevalence of antidepressant users were unrelated to male suicide risk. However, one percentage point increase in the proportion of antidepressant users receiving minimally adequate treatment reduced non-alcohol-related male suicide risk by one percent (relative risk 0.987, 95% confidence interval 0.976-0.998). This beneficial effect only emerged among men with high education, high income, and employment, among men without a partner, and men not owning their home. Alcohol-related suicides and female suicides were unrelated to all measures of antidepressant sales. We found little evidence that increase in overall sales or in the prevalence of non-tricyclic antidepressant users would have caused the fall in suicide rates in Finland in 1995-2007. However, the rise in the proportion of antidepressant users receiving minimally adequate treatment, possibly

  15. Antidepressant sales and the risk for alcohol-related and non-alcohol-related suicide in Finland--an individual-level population study.

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    Heta Moustgaard

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: A marked decline in suicide rates has co-occurred with increased antidepressant sales in several countries but the causal connection between the trends remains debated. Most previous studies have focused on overall suicide rates and neglected differential effects in population subgroups. Our objective was to investigate whether increasing sales of non-tricyclic antidepressants have reduced alcohol- and non-alcohol-related suicide risk in different population subgroups. METHODS: We followed a nationally representative sample of 950,158 Finnish adults in 1995-2007 for alcohol-related (n = 2,859 and non-alcohol-related (n = 8,632 suicides. We assessed suicide risk by gender and social group according to regional sales of non-tricyclic antidepressants, measured by sold doses per capita, prevalence of antidepressant users, and proportion of antidepressant users with doses reflecting minimally adequate treatment. Fixed-effects Poisson regression models controlled for regional differences and time trends that may influence suicide risk irrespective of antidepressant sales. RESULTS: The number of sold antidepressant doses per capita and the prevalence of antidepressant users were unrelated to male suicide risk. However, one percentage point increase in the proportion of antidepressant users receiving minimally adequate treatment reduced non-alcohol-related male suicide risk by one percent (relative risk 0.987, 95% confidence interval 0.976-0.998. This beneficial effect only emerged among men with high education, high income, and employment, among men without a partner, and men not owning their home. Alcohol-related suicides and female suicides were unrelated to all measures of antidepressant sales. CONCLUSION: We found little evidence that increase in overall sales or in the prevalence of non-tricyclic antidepressant users would have caused the fall in suicide rates in Finland in 1995-2007. However, the rise in the proportion of

  16. Clinically significant drug interactions with newer antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Edoardo; Trifirò, Gianluca; Caraci, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    After the introduction of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), other newer antidepressants with different mechanisms of action have been introduced in clinical practice. Because antidepressants are commonly prescribed in combination with other medications used to treat co-morbid psychiatric or somatic disorders, they are likely to be involved in clinically significant drug interactions. This review examines the drug interaction profiles of the following newer antidepressants: escitalopram, venlafaxine, desvenlafaxine, duloxetine, milnacipran, mirtazapine, reboxetine, bupropion, agomelatine and vilazodone. In general, by virtue of a more selective mechanism of action and receptor profile, newer antidepressants carry a relatively low risk for pharmacodynamic drug interactions, at least as compared with first-generation antidepressants, i.e. monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). On the other hand, they are susceptible to pharmacokinetic drug interactions. All new antidepressants are extensively metabolized in the liver by cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes, and therefore may be the target of metabolically based drug interactions. Concomitant administration of inhibitors or inducers of the CYP isoenzymes involved in the biotransformation of specific antidepressants may cause changes in their plasma concentrations. However, due to their relatively wide margin of safety, the consequences of such kinetic modifications are usually not clinically relevant. Conversely, some newer antidepressants may cause pharmacokinetic interactions through their ability to inhibit specific CYPs. With regard to this, duloxetine and bupropion are moderate inhibitors of CYP2D6. Therefore, potentially harmful drug interactions may occur when they are coadministered with substrates of these isoforms, especially compounds with a narrow therapeutic index. The other new antidepressants are only weak inhibitors or are not inhibitors of CYP isoforms at

  17. Duloxetine versus other anti-depressive agents for depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Andrea; Koesters, Markus; Furukawa, Toshi A; Nosè, Michela; Purgato, Marianna; Omori, Ichiro M; Trespidi, Carlotta; Barbui, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Background Although pharmacological and psychological interventions are both effective for major depression, in primary and secondary care settings antidepressant drugs remain the mainstay of treatment. Amongst antidepressants many different agents are available. Duloxetine hydrochloride is a dual reuptake inhibitor of serotonin and norepinephrine and has been licensed by the Food and Drug Administration in the US for major depressive disorder (MDD), generalised anxiety disorder, diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, fibromyalgia and chronic musculoskeletal pain. Objectives To assess the evidence for the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of duloxetine in comparison with all other antidepressant agents in the acute-phase treatment of major depression. Search methods MEDLINE (1966 to 2012), EMBASE (1974 to 2012), the Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials up to March 2012. No language restriction was applied. Reference lists of relevant papers and previous systematic reviews were hand-searched. Pharmaceutical company marketing duloxetine and experts in this field were contacted for supplemental data. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials allocating patients with major depression to duloxetine versus any other antidepressive agent. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and a double-entry procedure was employed. Information extracted included study characteristics, participant characteristics, intervention details and outcome measures in terms of efficacy, acceptability and tolerability. Main results A total of 16 randomised controlled trials (overall 5735 participants) were included in this systematic review. Of these, three trials were unpublished. We found 11 studies (overall 3304 participants) comparing duloxetine with one selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) (six studies versus paroxetine, three studies

  18. Neuroimaging in aphasia treatment research: Standards for establishing the effects of treatment

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    Kiran, Swathi; Ansaldo, Ana; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Cherney, Leora R.; Howard, David; Faroqi-Shah, Yasmeen; Meinzer, Marcus; Thompson, Cynthia K

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to discuss experimental design options available for establishing the effects of treatment in studies that aim to examine the neural mechanisms associated with treatment-induced language recovery in aphasia, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We present both group and single-subject experimental or case-series design options for doing this and address advantages and disadvantages of each. We also discuss general components of and requirements for treatment research studies, including operational definitions of variables, criteria for defining behavioral change and treatment efficacy, and reliability of measurement. Important considerations that are unique to neuroimaging-based treatment research are addressed, pertaining to the relation between the selected treatment approach and anticipated changes in language processes/functions and how such changes are hypothesized to map onto the brain. PMID:23063559

  19. Quantitative determination of antidepressants and their select degradates by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in biosolids destined for land application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Lydia M; Stencel, Katherine A; Murphy, Madigan J; Schultz, Melissa M

    2013-08-06

    Antidepressants are one of the most widely dispensed classes of pharmaceuticals in the United States. As wastewater treatment plants are a primary source of pharmaceuticals in the environment, the use of biosolids as fertilizer is a potential route for antidepressants to enter the terrestrial environment. A microsolvent extraction method, utilizing green chemistry, was developed for extraction of the target antidepressants and degradation products from biosolids, or more specifically lagoon biosolids. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was used for quantitative determination of antidepressants in the lagoon biosolid extracts. Recoveries from matrix spiking experiments for the individual antidepressants had an average of 96%. The limits of detection for antidepressant pharmaceuticals and degradates ranged from 0.36 to 8.0 ng/kg wet weight. The method was applied to biosolids destined for land application. A suite of antidepressants was consistently detected in the lagoon biosolid samples, and thus antidepressants are being introduced to terrestrial environments through the land application of these biosolids. Sertraline and norsertraline were the most abundant antidepressant and degradation product detected in the biosolid samples. Detected, individual antidepressant concentrations ranged from 8.5 ng/kg (norfluoxetine) to 420 ng/kg wet weight (norsertraline).

  20. Neuroimaging in aphasia treatment research : Standards for establishing the effects of treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiran, Swathi; Ansaldo, Ana; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Cherney, Leora R.; Howard, David; Faroqi-Shah, Yasmeen; Meinzer, Marcus; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to discuss experimental design options available for establishing t