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Sample records for standard anthropometric measurements

  1. Neck Circumference May Be a Better Alternative to Standard Anthropometric Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaumudi Joshipura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates neck circumference as a metabolic risk marker. Overweight/obese, nondiabetic Hispanics, 40–65 years old, who are free of major cardiovascular diseases, were recruited for the San Juan Overweight Adults Longitudinal Study (SOALS. Baseline exams were completed by 1,206 participants. Partial correlation coefficients (r and logistic models adjusted for age, gender, smoking status, and physical activity were computed. Neck circumference was significantly correlated with waist circumference (r=0.64, BMI (r=0.66, and body fat % (r=0.45. Neck circumference, highest (compared to lowest tertile, had higher association with prediabetes: multivariable OR = 2.30 (95% CI: 1.71–3.06 compared to waist circumference OR = 1.97 (95% CI: 1.48–2.66 and other anthropometric measures. Neck circumference showed higher associations with HOMA, low HDL-C, and triglycerides, multivariable OR = 8.42 (95% CI: 5.43–13.06, 2.41 (95% CI: 1.80–3.21, and 1.52 (95% CI: 1.14–2.03, but weaker associations with hs-CRP and hypertension, OR = 3.61 (95% CI: 2.66–4.90 and OR = 2.58 (95% CI: 1.90–3.49, compared to waist circumference. AIC for model fit was generally similar for neck or waist circumference. Neck circumference showed similar or better associations with metabolic factors and is more practicable than waist circumference. Hence, neck circumference may be a better alternative to waist circumference.

  2. The influence of anthropometrics on physical employment standard performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, T; Spivock, M; Prayal-Brown, A; Stockbrugger, B; Blacklock, R

    2016-10-01

    The Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) recently implemented the Fitness for Operational Requirements of CAF Employment (FORCE), a new physical employment standard (PES). Data collection throughout development included anthropometric profiles of the CAF. To determine if anthropometric measurements and demographic information would predict the performance outcomes of the FORCE and/or Common Military Task Fitness Evaluation (CMTFE). We conducted a secondary analysis of data from FORCE research. We obtained bioelectrical impedance and segmental analysis. Statistical analysis included correlation and linear regression analyses. Among the 668 study subjects, as predicted, any task requiring lifting, pulling or moving of an object was significantly and positively correlated (r > 0.67) to lean body mass (LBM) measurements. LBM correlated with stretcher carry (r = 0.78) and with lifting actions such as sand bag drag (r = 0.77), vehicle extrication (r = 0.71), sand bag fortification (r = 0.68) and sand bag lift time (r = -0.67). The difference between the correlation of dead mass (DM) with task performance compared with LBM was not statistically significant. DM and LBM can be used in a PES to predict success on military tasks such as casualty evacuation and manual material handling. However, there is no minimum LBM required to perform these tasks successfully. These data direct future research on how we should diversify research participants by anthropometrics, in addition to the traditional demographic variables of gender and age, to highlight potential important adverse impact with PES design. In addition, the results can be used to develop better training regimens to facilitate passing a PES. © All rights reserved. ‘The Influence of Anthropometrics on Physical Employment Standard Performance’ has been reproduced with the permission of DND, 2016.

  3. Equipment Development for Automatic Anthropometric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, J. P.; Oakey, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    An automated procedure for measuring and recording the anthropometric active angles is presented. The small portable system consists of a microprocessor controlled video data acquisition system which measures single plane active angles using television video techniques and provides the measured data on sponsored-specified preformatted data sheets. This system, using only a single video camera, observes the end limits of the movement of a pair of separated lamps and calculates the vector angle between the extreme positions.

  4. Ethnic differences in anthropometric measures and abdominal fat distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, Pernille F; Andersen, Gregers S; Lauritzen, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    Background Ethnic variation in abdominal fat distribution may explain differences in cardiometabolic risk between populations. However, the ability of anthropometric measures to quantify abdominal fat is not clearly understood across ethnic groups. The aim of this study was to investigate...... across ethnic groups. Thus, the obesity level at which Inuit and Africans are at increased cardiometabolic risk is likely to differ from that of Europeans....... differences most apparent at higher levels of the anthropometric measures. Similar ethnic differences were seen in the associations with SAT for a given anthropometric measure. Conclusions Conventional anthropometric measures like BMI and waist circumference do not reflect the same amount of VAT and SAT...

  5. Standardization of calibration method of whole-body counter. 1. Calibration by using anthropometric phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Masaki; Uchiyama, Masafumi; Kobayashi, Sadayoshi; Mizushita, Seiichi.

    1995-01-01

    To standardize the calibration methods of whole-body counters, three anthropometric phantoms were manufactured based on dozens of Japanese average value of body size data. Using these phantoms, the calibrations of some whole-body counters were carried out and the comparison of counting efficiency between anthropometric phantoms and block phantoms, which used to be used for the calibration of whole-body counters generally, was implemented. Five whole-body counters, one scanning system, two stationary systems and two chair systems, were used for this study. The following results were derived: As an example, in NIRS scanning system, the counting efficiency of anthropometric phantom of 162cm height was 12.7% greater than that of block phantom of the same height. This means 137 Cs body burdens in adult men used to be estimated with the excess of about 10%. Body burdens tended to be estimated excessively in adult because the difference of counting efficiency between anthropometric phantom and block phantom increases with increase of height. To standardize body burden data measured with various whole-body counters, the calibration of each whole-body counter should be conducted using anthropometric phantoms and phantoms which used to be used for the calibration of that whole-body counter. (author)

  6. The relation between bone demineralization, physical activity and anthropometric standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Barbosa Camara

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to verify the correlation between bone mineral density and the level of physical activity, as well as the food intake and the anthropometric parameters. It intended to analyse the bone mineral density (BMD of menopausal women through the bone densitometry test (DO in the lumbar region (L1 to L4, femoral neck and total femur, and also use Bouchard’s self-recall of daily activities; employing the food record from Buker and Stuart to dose and quantify the daily intake of calcium and vitamin D. The data were analysed via Kolmogorov-Smirnov’s test, and default value of α = 0.05 was set to compare the BMD averages. It was observed that one hundred percent of the assessed individuals had a BMD level below the average fixed by WHO: 14.4% with osteopenia and 85.6% with osteoporosis; a lower BMD in the femoral area (0.721g and the biggest loss among the sedentary ones (0.698g. It was noticed that there was a correlation between the physical activities and the BMD only when associated with anthropometric standards and the daily ingestion of vitamin D.

  7. Blood pressure and anthropometric measurements in healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods. We measured the blood pressures of 650 healthy, randomly ... In addition, blood pressure measurement should be a part of the routine clinical examination of children. ... familial risk factors.2 ... common cause of elevated blood pressure in children.4 They ... sphygmomanometer (Accoson, hospital model BS 274,.

  8. The effect of maternal anemia on anthropometric measurements of newborns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telatar, Berrin; Comert, Serdar; Vitrinel, Ayca; Akin, Yasemin; Erginoz, Ethem

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the relation between maternal prenatal hemoglobin concentration and neonatal anthropometric measurements. All pregnant women who gave birth at the Obstetrics Department of Dr. LK Kartal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey, from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2006, and their newborns were included in this prospective, cross-sectional study. The newborns weight, height, head, and chest circumference were recorded. Mothers with hemoglobin concentration less than 11g/dl were evaluated as anemic. The anemic mothers were then grouped into 3 categories according to the corresponding hemoglobin concentration: mild (10.9-9.0g/dl), moderate (8.9-7.0 g/dl), and severe anemic (less than 7 g/dl). The anthropometric measurements of newborns from non-anemic and anemic mother groups were compared. Of the 3688 pregnant women, 1588 (43%) were found to be anemic. Among the anemic mothers, 1245 had mild (78.5%), 311 had moderate (19.5%), and 32 (2%) had severe anemia. The anthropometric measurements (height, weight, head and chest circumference) of newborns of anemic and non-anemic mother groups showed a statistically significant difference (p=0.036, p=0.044, p=0.013, and p=0.0002). There was a statistically significant difference in height, weight, and chest circumference of newborns of severe anemic and mild anemic mothers (p=0.017, p=0.008 and p=0.02). The height (1.1 cm), weight (260 g), head (0.42 cm), and chest (1 cm) circumference of neonates in the severe anemic group is less than the mild anemic group. Anemia during pregnancy affect the anthropometric measurements of a newborn. Severe anemia had significant negative effect on neonatal anthropometric measurements. (author)

  9. Anthropometric protocols for the construction of new international fetal and newborn growth standards: the INTERGROWTH-21st Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheikh Ismail, L; Knight, H E; Bhutta, Z; Chumlea, W C

    2013-09-01

    The primary aim of the INTERGROWTH-21(st) Project is to construct new, prescriptive standards describing optimal fetal and preterm postnatal growth. The anthropometric measurements include the head circumference, recumbent length and weight of the infants, and the stature and weight of the parents. In such a large, international, multicentre project, it is critical that all study sites follow standardised protocols to ensure maximal validity of the growth and nutrition indicators used. This paper describes, in detail, the selection of anthropometric personnel, equipment, and measurement and calibration protocols used to construct the new standards. Implementing these protocols at each study site ensures that the anthropometric data are of the highest quality to construct the international standards. © 2013 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  10. Over Time, Do Anthropometric Measures Still Predict Diabetes Incidence in Chinese Han Nationality Population from Chengdu Community?

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    Kai Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine whether anthropometric measures could predict diabetes incidence in a Chinese population during a 15-year follow-up. Design and Methods. The data were collected in 1992 and then again in 2007 from the same group of 687 individuals. Waist circumference, body mass index, waist to hip ratio, and waist to height ratio were collected based on a standard protocol. To assess the effects of baseline anthropometric measures on the new onset of diabetes, Cox's proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratios of them, and the discriminatory power of anthropometric measures for diabetes was assessed by the area under the receiver operating curve (AROC. Results. Seventy-four individuals were diagnosed with diabetes during a 15-year follow-up period (incidence: 10.8%. These anthropometric measures also predicted future diabetes during a long follow-up (. At 7-8 years, the AROC of central obesity measures (WC, WHpR, WHtR were higher than that of general obesity measures (BMI (. But, there were no significant differences among the four anthropometric measurements at 15 years. Conclusions. These anthropometric measures could still predict diabetes with a long time follow-up. However, the validity of anthropometric measures to predict incident diabetes may change with time.

  11. Harmonization process and reliability assessment of anthropometric measurements in the elderly EXERNET multi-centre study.

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    Alba Gómez-Cabello

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The elderly EXERNET multi-centre study aims to collect normative anthropometric data for old functionally independent adults living in Spain. PURPOSE: To describe the standardization process and reliability of the anthropometric measurements carried out in the pilot study and during the final workshop, examining both intra- and inter-rater errors for measurements. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 98 elderly from five different regions participated in the intra-rater error assessment, and 10 different seniors living in the city of Toledo (Spain participated in the inter-rater assessment. We examined both intra- and inter-rater errors for heights and circumferences. RESULTS: For height, intra-rater technical errors of measurement (TEMs were smaller than 0.25 cm. For circumferences and knee height, TEMs were smaller than 1 cm, except for waist circumference in the city of Cáceres. Reliability for heights and circumferences was greater than 98% in all cases. Inter-rater TEMs were 0.61 cm for height, 0.75 cm for knee-height and ranged between 2.70 and 3.09 cm for the circumferences measured. Inter-rater reliabilities for anthropometric measurements were always higher than 90%. CONCLUSION: The harmonization process, including the workshop and pilot study, guarantee the quality of the anthropometric measurements in the elderly EXERNET multi-centre study. High reliability and low TEM may be expected when assessing anthropometry in elderly population.

  12. Thigh muscle volume predicted by anthropometric measurements and correlated with physical function in the older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B B; Shih, T T F; Hsu, C Y; Yu, C W; Wei, S Y; Chen, C Y; Wu, C H; Chen, C Y

    2011-06-01

    (1) to correlate thigh muscle volume measured by magnetic resonance image (MRI) with anthropometric measurements and physical function in elderly subjects; (2) to predict MRI-measured thigh muscle volume using anthropometric measurements and physical functional status in elderly subjects. Cross-sectional, nonrandomized study. Outpatient clinic in Taiwan. Sixty-nine elderly subjects (33 men and 36 women) aged 65 and older. The anthropometric data (including body height, body weight, waist size, and thigh circumference), physical activity and function (including grip strength, bilateral quadriceps muscle power, the up and go test, chair rise, and five meters walk time) and bioelectrical impedance analysis data (including total body fat mass, fat-free mass, and predictive muscle size) were measured. MRI-measured muscle volume of both thighs was used as the reference standard. The MRI-measured thigh volume was positively correlated with all anthropometric data, quadriceps muscle power and the up and go test as well as fat-free mass and predictive muscle mass, whereas it was negatively associated with age and walk time. In predicting thigh muscle volume, the variables of age, gender, body weight, and thigh circumference were significant predictors in the linear regression model: Muscle volume (cm3) =4226.3-42.5 × Age (year)-955.7 × gender (male=1, female=2) + 45.9 × body weight(kg) + 60.0 × thigh circumference (cm) (r2 = 0.745, P estimate = 581.6 cm3). The current work provides evidence of a strong relationship between thigh muscle volume and physical function in the elderly. We also developed a prediction equation model using anthropometric measurements. This model is a simple and noninvasive method for everyday clinical practice and follow-up.

  13. Can foot anthropometric measurements predict dynamic plantar surface contact area?

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    Collins Natalie

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have suggested that increased plantar surface area, associated with pes planus, is a risk factor for the development of lower extremity overuse injuries. The intent of this study was to determine if a single or combination of foot anthropometric measures could be used to predict plantar surface area. Methods Six foot measurements were collected on 155 subjects (97 females, 58 males, mean age 24.5 ± 3.5 years. The measurements as well as one ratio were entered into a stepwise regression analysis to determine the optimal set of measurements associated with total plantar contact area either including or excluding the toe region. The predicted values were used to calculate plantar surface area and were compared to the actual values obtained dynamically using a pressure sensor platform. Results A three variable model was found to describe the relationship between the foot measures/ratio and total plantar contact area (R2 = 0.77, p R2 = 0.76, p Conclusion The results of this study indicate that the clinician can use a combination of simple, reliable, and time efficient foot anthropometric measurements to explain over 75% of the plantar surface contact area, either including or excluding the toe region.

  14. COMPARISON OF SOME ANTHROPOMETRIC MEASURES AND MOTOR ABILITIES BETWEEN ALPINE AND SPORT CLIMBERS

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    Stojan Burnik

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to establish the differences in some anthropometric measures and motor abilities between mountaineers and sport climbers. Our sample consisted of 11 top mountaineers and 12 members of A and B national teams in sport climbing. The survey was carried out by means of a standard battery of tests. Anthropo- metric measures were represented by 5 variables, while motor abilities were represented by 14 variables. Motor ability tests were divided into two groups due to a large number of variables. Mobility was surveyed with 6 tests and strength with 8 tests. The data we- re processed with statistical programme package SPSS with the method of discriminant analysis. Discriminant analysis was made separately of anthropometry, mobility and strength. Discriminant function statistically significantly divides mountaineers from sport climbers in anthropometric measures as well as mobility. In the field of strength, stati- stically significant differences between mountaineers and sport climbers were not indi- cated.

  15. Anthropometric measurements for ergonomic design of students’ furniture in India

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    Ismail Wilson Taifa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents anthropometric measurements regarding engineering students in India. Health survey (ergonomic assessment was carried out to know the health status of all students who have been using poorly designed furniture. The data were measured with the help of various tools. After data collection and analysis, authors came up with exhaustive dimensions for designing adjustable classrooms furniture. Dimensions recommended include; bench surface height, bench depth and width, back rest width and height, backrest angle, desk height, desk depth, width, and desk angle. Therefore, an implementation of these data will help to create comfortability, safety, well-being, suitability, reduce Musculoskeletal disorders, and improve performance of students in terms of attentiveness. Also, it is highly recommended to consider requirements from students in designing classrooms furniture and conduct seminar or workshop to educate students regarding the negative impact towards adapting poor posture in the long usage of classrooms furniture.

  16. Anthropometric measurements of foot length and shape in children 2 to 7 years of age

    OpenAIRE

    Vrdoljak, Ozren; Kujundžić Tiljak, Mirjana; Čimić, Mislav

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: A child’s foot changes shape and proportions during growth so that it adapts to function. The purpose of this article is to determine foot length in children aged 2-7 years as a fundamental unit for measuring the growth of the foot, with which it will be able to compare other anthropometric measures of the foot. Determination of the shape of the foot and interpretation of the growth curve of the foot in length are important for standardization of the foot.Materials and...

  17. Evaluation of positional plagiocephaly: Conventional anthropometric measurement versus laser scanning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahles, Susanne; Klein, Martin; Yacoub, Anke; Neyer, Julia

    2018-01-01

    The incidence of plagiocephaly has increased in the 25 years since the "Back to Sleep" campaign in 1991 to prevent sudden infant death. Plagiocephaly is not considered to be a pathological condition. It is more of an esthetic impairment and could have potentially negative psychological or psychosocial consequences; therefore, treatment is recommended. The aim of this study is to compare conventional anthropometry and laser scanning - two different measurement methods - as diagnostic instruments for plagiocephaly. The present study also tests the measurement time of both methods and whether one method is easier on the patient than the other. A total of 44 children (21 girls, 23 boys) with a mean age of 8.8 months were involved in the present study. Of all patients, the following parameters were routinely evaluated using a standard protocol with the conventional anthropometric method and the scan method: head circumference, head length, head width, head diagonals, and distances ex-t. Furthermore, the time required to obtain measurements and the behavior of the children during measurement were documented. For statistical analysis, a t-test and a Wilcoxon test were used to analyze differences between the two methods. The results for head circumference showed a mean of 441.5 mm for the anthropometric measurements and 441.6 mm for the scan method, with no significant difference between the two methods. A significant difference was found regarding the head width, head length, diagonals, and distance ex-t. The measurement process using the scan method needed a mean of 579.6 s in contrast to the manual anthropometric method, which required a mean time of 180.5 s. In comparison with the conventional anthropometric method, measurements made with a 3D laser scanner yield inconsistent results. Moreover, the current state of technology of 3D cephalometry has no advantages compared with the conventional anthropometric method. Disadvantages worth mentioning appear to be the

  18. A comparison of manual anthropometric measurements with Kinect-based scanned measurements in terms of precision and reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragança, Sara; Arezes, Pedro; Carvalho, Miguel; Ashdown, Susan P; Castellucci, Ignacio; Leão, Celina

    2018-01-01

    Collecting anthropometric data for real-life applications demands a high degree of precision and reliability. It is important to test new equipment that will be used for data collectionOBJECTIVE:Compare two anthropometric data gathering techniques - manual methods and a Kinect-based 3D body scanner - to understand which of them gives more precise and reliable results. The data was collected using a measuring tape and a Kinect-based 3D body scanner. It was evaluated in terms of precision by considering the regular and relative Technical Error of Measurement and in terms of reliability by using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient, Reliability Coefficient, Standard Error of Measurement and Coefficient of Variation. The results obtained showed that both methods presented better results for reliability than for precision. Both methods showed relatively good results for these two variables, however, manual methods had better results for some body measurements. Despite being considered sufficiently precise and reliable for certain applications (e.g. apparel industry), the 3D scanner tested showed, for almost every anthropometric measurement, a different result than the manual technique. Many companies design their products based on data obtained from 3D scanners, hence, understanding the precision and reliability of the equipment used is essential to obtain feasible results.

  19. ANTHROPOMETRIC MEASUREMENT OF PRIMARY SCHOOL GOING CHILDREN IN KARACHI

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    Kashmala Khan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Children were major part of our society and their health issues were too much, so it’s necessary that child should b healthy so their health assessment is important worldwide the acceptable method for assessment of health status is anthropometry (weight & height. This study was done to assess the anthropometric measurement of primary school going children of Karachi, sindh Pakistan, and evaluate how much students were underweight. Methods: The study was done in different primary school of Karachi including private semiprivate and government. The study design was cross sectional study. The sample size of our study was 240, including both genders male& female with range between 7-12 years. Result: The result shows that 34.9% were underweight (below 5th percentile, 63.44% were normal weight (between 5-95th percentile and only0.8% overweight (above 95th percentile.The result showed male-female ratio was 51.5% boys and 48.5% were underweight. The prevalence of underweight in private sector was only 9.5% but in government it was 45.5%.The height of student also calculated and 26.3% children were below the 5th percentile of height for the age, 62.8% were between 5th to 95th percentile and 10.9% above 95thpercentile. Conclusion: The prevalence of underweight in primary school going children in Karachi shows the dietary requirements of children are not fulfilled properly and this may lead to many sever pathological conditions, so it is necessary to take positive steps regarding awareness of proper diet, hygiene and growth & development of child.

  20. changes in body composition and other anthropometric measures of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to investigate the changes in body composition and other anthropometric .... showing a good fit between the values obtained from the equation ..... ideally at 6-monthly intervals, in order to provide useful information to ... training on quality of life in HAART-treated HIV-positive Rwandan subjects with body fat ...

  1. Salivary adiponectin concentration in healthy adult males in relation to anthropometric measures and fat distribution

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    Abdalla Mona Mohamed Ibrahim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Body fat content, fat distribution, and adiponectin level are important variables in the development of obesity related complications. Anthropometric indices may provide an economic and faster method in measuring the risk for complications through their predictive effect of fat distribution and adiponectin concentration. We aimed to determine, which of the waist circumference (WC, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, and body mass index (BMI may be the best predictor for the total fat percentage (WF, visceral fat level (VF, and subcutaneous whole-body fat (SCWBF. We aimed also to investigate the potential use of the anthropometric measures and fat distribution as predictors for the salivary adiponectin level in the healthy adult males. Subjects. A total of 88 adult males aged between 18−25 years with a wide range of BMI were studied. Anthropometric indices were measured using standardized methods and salivary adiponectin level was assessed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. In path analysis of the Structural Equation Model (SEM using IBM@SPSS AMOS, version22, BMI and WC, but not WHR, were strong predictors for WF and SCWBF (p<0.05. BMI but not WC was a strong predictor for VF (p<0.001. WF was strong predictor for SCWBF (p<0.001, but not for VF. BMI, WC, WHR, WF, VF, and SCWBF were poor predictors of the salivary adiponectin level. Conclusion. BMI is the best predictor for the total body fat and fat distribution. However, WHR seems to be of a little value and the salivary adiponectin level independent of BMI and body fat in healthy adult Malay males.

  2. Anthropometric Measurements and Dental Caries in Children: A Systematic Review of Longitudinal Studies123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling-Wei; Wong, Hai Ming; Peng, Si-Min; McGrath, Colman P

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in childhood over time (life-course studies). The aim of this review was to identify and systematically review the evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in childhood over time. PubMed, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Knowledge, the Cochrane Library, and 6 other databases were searched to identify effective articles. A systematic approach involving critical appraisal was conducted to examine the relation between anthropometric measurements and dental caries in preschool- and school-aged populations from longitudinal studies. An initial search identified 1338 studies, with 59 potentially effective studies (κ = 0.82) and 17 effective studies (κ = 0.88). The quality of reporting among the studies ranged from 19.5 to 30.0 according to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria. Among the effective studies, 2 studies in which caries was used to predict anthropometric measurements consistently found an inverse association and 15 studies in which anthropometric measurements were used to predict caries were inconsistent, with results appearing to be influenced by nonuniformity of assessments, setting, and procedure of measurements; age and ethnicity of participants; and confounders of dental caries. In conclusion, among >1000 studies identified, 17 informed this systematic review. The quality of reporting of these studies varied considerably. Evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and dental caries is conflicting and remains inconclusive. PMID:25593143

  3. Different anthropometric adiposity measures and their association with cardiovascular disease risk factors: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijk, S. B.; Takken, T.; Prinsen, E. C.; Wittink, H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate which anthropometric adiposity measure has the strongest association with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in Caucasian men and women without a history of CVD. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods We searched databases for studies reporting correlations between anthropometric adiposity measures and CVD risk factors in Caucasian subjects without a history of CVD. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, waist-to-height ra...

  4. Height and Weight Estimation From Anthropometric Measurements Using Machine Learning Regressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rativa, Diego; Fernandes, Bruno J T; Roque, Alexandre

    2018-01-01

    Height and weight are measurements explored to tracking nutritional diseases, energy expenditure, clinical conditions, drug dosages, and infusion rates. Many patients are not ambulant or may be unable to communicate, and a sequence of these factors may not allow accurate estimation or measurements; in those cases, it can be estimated approximately by anthropometric means. Different groups have proposed different linear or non-linear equations which coefficients are obtained by using single or multiple linear regressions. In this paper, we present a complete study of the application of different learning models to estimate height and weight from anthropometric measurements: support vector regression, Gaussian process, and artificial neural networks. The predicted values are significantly more accurate than that obtained with conventional linear regressions. In all the cases, the predictions are non-sensitive to ethnicity, and to gender, if more than two anthropometric parameters are analyzed. The learning model analysis creates new opportunities for anthropometric applications in industry, textile technology, security, and health care.

  5. Anthropometric measurements of students athletes in relation to physically inactive students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namik Trtak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anthropometry is a method of anthropology that refers to the measuring and testing the human body and to the relationship between the size of its individual parts.The task of anthropometry is as accurately as possible quantitatively characterize the morphological features of the human body.Measurements are made due to the anthropometric points which can be: fixed (standard on the site of prominence and virtual (change due to the bodyposition. Goals of research: To evaluate the impact of basketball on the growth and development of seventeen years old adolescents and prevention of deformities of the spinal column and chest.Methods: The study included 40 respondents. Criteria for inclusion: male respondents aged 17 years who played basketball for more than one year, male respondents aged 17 years who are physically inactive. Criteria for exclusion: female respondents, respondents who played basketball for less than one year, respondents who are engaged in some other sport professionally or recreationally, respondents younger and olderthan 17 years. In the study,there were made measurements of thorax scope in the axillary and mamilar level, measurements of body weight and height and measurements of Body mass index.Results of research: Out of 40 respondents 20 are basketball players and 20 physically inactive. Compared to the average value between the two groups of respondents certain differences were observed, which aremost noticeable in body weight (basketball players had more weigh about, 5 kg on average and height (basketball players are taller, about 7 cm on average. During the anthropometric measurements of thoraxdeformities of the spinal column have been observed which affect the deformation of the thorax. Of the 20 players one has a deformity of the spinal column, and out of the same number of physically inactive studentseven 12 have deformed spine.Conclusion: Basketball has a positive effect on the proper growth and development

  6. Standards for holdup measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    Holdup measurement, needed for material balance, depend intensively on standards and on interpretation of the calibration procedure. More than other measurements, the calibration procedure using the standard becomes part of the standard. Standards practical for field use and calibration techniques have been developed. While accuracy in holdup measurements is comparatively poor, avoidance of bias is a necessary goal

  7. Correlation of cephalometric and anthropometric measures with obstructive sleep apnea severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Paulo de Tarso M; Filho, Edson Santos Ferreira; Araujo, Telma Maria Evangelista de; Neto, Jose Machado Moita; Borges, Nubia Evangelista de Sa; Neto, Baltasar Melo; Campelo, Viriato; Paschoal, Jorge Rizzato; Li, Li M

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) often have associated changes in craniofacial morphology and distribution of body fat, either alone or in combination. Aim: To correlate cephalometric and anthropometric measures with OSAHS severity by using the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Method: A retrospective cephalometry study of 93 patients with OSAHS was conducted from July 2010 to July 2012. The following measurements were evaluated: body mass index (BMI), neck circumference (NC), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), the angles formed by the cranial base and the maxilla (SNA) and the mandible (SNB), the difference between SNA and SNB (ANB), the distance from the mandibular plane to the hyoid bone (MP-H), the space between the base of the tongue and the posterior pharyngeal wall (PAS), and the distance between the posterior nasal spine and the tip of the uvula (PNS-P). Means, standard deviations, and Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated and analyzed. Results: AHI correlated significantly with BMI (r = 0.207, p = 0.047), NC (r = 0.365, p = 0.000), WC (r = 0.337, p = 0.001), PNS-P (r = 0.282, p = 0.006), and MP-H (r = 0.235, p = 0.023). Conclusion: Anthropometric measurements (BMI, NC, and WC) and cephalometric measurements (MP-H and PNS-P) can be used as predictors of OSAHS severity. PMID:25992029

  8. Anthropometric measurements and periodontal diseases in children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling-Wei; Wong, Hai Ming; Sun, Ling; Wen, Yi Feng; McGrath, Colman P

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to identify and summarize evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and periodontal status in children and adolescents. We searched PubMed, Institute for Scientific Information Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Library, and 7 additional databases, following the guidance of Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses, up to December 2014. Observational studies reporting data on the association between anthropometric measurements and periodontal diseases in 2-18-y-old participants were included. An initial search identified 4191 papers; 278 potentially effective studies (k = 0.82) and 16 effective studies (k = 0.83) were included after screening. The mean quality of evidence among the studies was 20.3, according to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology checklist (k = 0.79). Meta-analyses showed that obesity (measured by body mass index) was significantly associated with visible plaque index (OR: 4.75; 95% CI: 2.42, 9.34), bleeding on probing (OR: 5.41; 95% CI: 2.75, 10.63), subgingival calculus (OR: 3.07; 95% CI: 1.10, 8.62), probing depth (OR: 14.15; 95% CI: 5.10, 39.25) and flow rate of salivary secretion (standardized mean difference: -0.89; 95% CI: -1.18, -0.61). However, various results were reported in the effective studies that were not included in meta-analyses. In conclusion, obesity is associated with some signs of periodontal disease in children and adolescents. Further studies with a comprehensive prospective cohort design and more potential variables are recommended. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Percentile Curves for Anthropometric Measures for Canadian Children and Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhle, Stefan; Maguire, Bryan; Ata, Nicole; Hamilton, David

    2015-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) is commonly used to assess a child's weight status but it does not provide information about the distribution of body fat. Since the disease risks associated with obesity are related to the amount and distribution of body fat, measures that assess visceral or subcutaneous fat, such as waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), or skinfolds thickness may be more suitable. The objective of this study was to develop percentile curves for BMI, WC, WHtR, and sum of 5 skinfolds (SF5) in a representative sample of Canadian children and youth. The analysis used data from 4115 children and adolescents between 6 and 19 years of age that participated in the Canadian Health Measures Survey Cycles 1 (2007/2009) and 2 (2009/2011). BMI, WC, WHtR, and SF5 were measured using standardized procedures. Age- and sex-specific centiles were calculated using the LMS method and the percentiles that intersect the adult cutpoints for BMI, WC, and WHtR at age 18 years were determined. Percentile curves for all measures showed an upward shift compared to curves from the pre-obesity epidemic era. The adult cutoffs for overweight and obesity corresponded to the 72nd and 91st percentile, respectively, for both sexes. The current study has presented for the first time percentile curves for BMI, WC, WHtR, and SF5 in a representative sample of Canadian children and youth. The percentile curves presented are meant to be descriptive rather than prescriptive as associations with cardiovascular disease markers or outcomes were not assessed. PMID:26176769

  10. Predicting intra-abdominal fatness from anthropometric measures : the influence of stature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, T.S.; McNeill, G; Seidell, J C; Lean, M.E.J.

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of height on the relationships between the intra-abdominal fat and anthropometric measures. SUBJECTS: Twenty healthy female volunteers aged 20-51 y from Aberdeen, and 71 men and 34 women aged 19-85 y from Nijmegen, The Netherlands. OUTCOME MEASURES:

  11. Absence of disparities in anthropometric measures among Chilean indigenous and non-indigenous newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies throughout North America and Europe have documented adverse perinatal outcomes for racial/ethnic minorities. Nonetheless, the contrast in newborn characteristics between indigenous and non-indigenous populations in Latin America has been poorly characterized. This is due to many challenges, including a lack of vital registration information on ethnicity. The objective of this study was to analyze trends in anthropometric measures at birth in Chilean indigenous (Mapuche) and non-indigenous children over a 5-year period. Methods We examined weight and length at birth using information available through a national data base of all birth records for the years 2000 through 2004 (n = 1,166.513). Newborns were classified ethnically according to the origins of the parents' last names. Result The average birthweight was stable over the 5 year period with variations of less than 20 g in each group, and with mean values trivially higher in indigenous newborns. The proportion weighing less than 2500 g at birth increased modestly from 5.2% to 5.6% in non-indigenous newborns whereas the indigenous births remained constant at 5.2%. In multiple regression analyses, adjusting flexibly for gestational age and maternal characteristics, the occurrence of an indigenous surname added only 14 g to an average infant's birthweight while holding other factors constant. Results for length at birth were similar, and adjusted time trend variation in both outcomes was trivially small after adjustment. Anthropometric indexes at birth in Chile are quite favorable by international standards. Conclusion There is only a trivial degree of ethnic disparity in these values, in contrast to conditions for ethnic minorities in other countries. Moreover, these values remained roughly constant over the 5 years of observation in this study. PMID:20598150

  12. Anthropometric and performance measures to study talent detection in youth volleyball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchiorri, Giovanni; Viero, Valerio; Triossi, Tamara; Annino, Giuseppe; Padua, Elvira; Tancredi, Virginia

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study anthropometric and performance measurements in 60 young male volleyball players (YV) and 60 youth not active in the sport (YNA) to assess which of these would be more useful to study the characteristics of potential performers. Eight measures to assess anthropometric characteristics, six performance measures and two tests for joint mobility were used. Also relative age and level of maturation were assessed. The anthropometric variables, relative age and level of maturation measured did not show statistically significant differences between groups. The YV and YNA groups showed differences in the performance measures. YV group was characterized by a better performance of the ability to repeat short sprints, of the upper limbs, abdominal muscles and lower limbs, with a medium effect size (Shuttle Running Test: 0.6; Push-Up: 0.5; Sit-Up: 0.4; counter movement jump: 0.4). These performance variables were very sensitive and specific: the SRT measurement had the best positive likelihood ratio that indicates the utility of the test in identifying type of players (YV and YNA). In talent detection in youth volleyball, in the 11-13 age range, performance variables should be preferred to anthropometric ones.

  13. Different anthropometric adiposity measures and their association with cardiovascular disease risk factors: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, S B; Takken, T; Prinsen, E C; Wittink, H

    2012-05-01

    To investigate which anthropometric adiposity measure has the strongest association with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in Caucasian men and women without a history of CVD. Systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched databases for studies reporting correlations between anthropometric adiposity measures and CVD risk factors in Caucasian subjects without a history of CVD. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, waist-to-height ratio and body fat percentage were considered the anthropometric adiposity measures. Primary CVD risk factors were: systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and fasting glucose. Two independent reviewers performed abstract, full text and data selection. Twenty articles were included describing 21,618 males and 24,139 females. Waist circumference had the strongest correlation with all CVD risk factors for both men and women, except for HDL and LDL in men. When comparing BMI with waist circumference, the latter showed significantly better correlations to CVD risk factors, except for diastolic blood pressure in women and HDL and total cholesterol in men. We recommend the use of waist circumference in clinical and research studies above other anthropometric adiposity measures, especially compared with BMI, when evaluating CVD risk factors.

  14. Comparison of Some Biomotoric Properties and Anthropometric Measurements of Male Basketball and Football Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turna, Bülent; Kilinç, Fatih

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine and compare some biomotoric properties and anthropometric measurements of Antalya Muratpasa High School Boys' Basketball Team and Football Team. Thirty volunteering players from Antalya Muratpasa High School Boys' Basketball and Football Teams participated in the study. Fifteen of the participants were…

  15. Accuracy and repeatability of anthropometric facial measurements using cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Gerrits, Peter O.; Ren, Yijin

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy and repeatability of linear anthropometric measurements on the soft tissue surface model generated from cone beam computed tomography scans. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of seven cadaver heads. The accuracy and

  16. Errors in anthropometric measurements in neonates and infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Harrison

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of methods used in Cape Town hospitals and clinics for the measurement of weight, length and age in neonates and infants became suspect during a survey of 12 local authority and 5 private sector clinics in 1994-1995 (Harrison et al. 1998. A descriptive prospective study to determine the accuracy of these methods in neonates at four maternity hospitals [ 2 public and 2 private] and infants at four child health clinics of the Cape Town City Council was carried out. The main outcome measures were an assessment of three currently used methods namely to measure crown-heel length with a measuring board, a mat and a tape measure; a comparison of weight differences when an infant is fully clothed, naked and in napkin only; and the differences in age estimated by calendar dates and by a specially designed electronic calculator. The results showed that the current methods which are used to measure infants in Cape Town vary widely from one institution to another. Many measurements are inaccurate and there is a real need for uniformity and accuracy. This can only be implemented by an effective education program so as to ensure that accurate measurements are used in monitoring the health of young children in Cape Town and elsewhere.

  17. Anthropometric standardisation and quality control protocols for the construction of new, international, fetal and newborn growth standards: the INTERGROWTH-21st Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheikh Ismail, L; Knight, H E; Ohuma, E O; Hoch, L; Chumlea, W C

    2013-09-01

    The primary aim of the INTERGROWTH-21(st) Project is to construct new, prescriptive standards describing optimal fetal and preterm postnatal growth. The anthropometric measurements include the head circumference, recumbent length and weight of the infants, and the stature and weight of the parents. In such a large, international, multicentre project, it is critical that all study sites follow standardised protocols to ensure maximal validity of the growth and nutrition indicators used. This paper describes in detail the anthropometric training, standardisation and quality control procedures used to collect data for these new standards. The initial standardisation session was in Nairobi, Kenya, using newborns, which was followed by similar sessions in the eight participating study sites in Brazil, China, India, Italy, Kenya, Oman, UK and USA. The intraobserver and inter-observer technical error of measurement values for head circumference range from 0.3 to 0.4 cm, and for recumbent length from 0.3 to 0.5 cm. These standardisation protocols implemented at each study site worldwide ensure that the anthropometric data collected are of the highest quality to construct international growth standards. © 2013 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  18. Association of Anthropometric Measurement Methods with Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaan Sözmen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to compare the predic­tive power of anthropometric indices for risk of developing Coronary Heart Disease (CHD or CHD death. Methods: We used cross-sectional data from nationally representative Chronic Diseases and Risk Factors Sur­vey conducted by the Ministry of Health in 2011. Body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, waist to height ratio (WHtR, body adiposity index (BAI and A Body Shape Index (ABSI formed the anthropometric measures. For each participant risk of de­veloping CHD or dying from CVDs were calculated based on Framingham and SCORE risk equations. Predictive ability of anthropometric measurements was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves. Results: Anthropometric measurements of central obe­sity recorded higher area under the ROC curve (AUC values than BMI in both men and women. While ABSI had the highest AUC values for Framingham 10-year pre­dicted risk (FRS for CHD death (AUC = 0.613, SCORE 10-year risk for CVD death (AUC = 0.633, in women AUC for ABSI was the highest for only SCORE risk threshold (AUC = 0.705. Among women, WHtR was found to be the best indicator for estimating CHD incidence (AUC = 0.706 and death from CVD (AUC = 0.696. Conclusion: Compared to traditional anthropometric measurements such as BMI, ABSI was a better indicator for given thresholds for estimating the risk of developing CHD and CVD death in men. Among women WHtR made better predictions for FRS thresholds, however, ABSI was better for predicting 10-year risk of CVD death calculated by SCORE risk equation.

  19. International Construction Measurement Standard

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The International Construction Measurement Standard Coalition (the Coalition) was formed on 17 June 2015 after meeting at the International Monetary Fund in Washington DC, USA. The Coalition, comprising the organisations listed below at the date of publication, aims to bring about consistency in construction cost reporting standards internationally. This is achieved by the creation and adoption of this ICMS, an agreed international standard for the structuring and presentation of cost reports...

  20. Association of Age at Menarche with Anthropometric Measures in Punjabi Bania Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Pratibha; Singh, Zora; Sethi, Gurmeet Kaur

    2016-11-01

    Menarcheal age is the age at which menstruation begins. Menarcheal age is regarded as a sensitive indicator of physical, biological and psychological environment. 1) To determine the menarcheal age and to examine the relationship between current age at menarche with anthropometric measures in Punjabi bania girls. 2) To develop maturity standards for Bania girls. The present cross-sectional survey was carried out on 200 bania girls at the age of onset of menarche. Menarcheal data was obtained by status quo method by asking about whether menarche has been experienced or not. In the present survey adolescent girls were interviewed with the help of pre-designed questionnaire. Statistical analysis was carried out in SPSS software, version 16.0. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics and one-way ANOVA. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used for correlation studies. A total of 200 Punjabi bania girls were examined in the study. The median age of onset of menarche in these girls was 12.3 years. Menarcheal age was positively associated with bi-acromial width, bi-iliac width and arm span. The present research has revealed secular trend in the age of onset of menarche as indicated by median age of 12.3 years in Bania girls. The bi-acromial width, bi-iliac width and arm span were also correlated with the age of menarche.

  1. 100% citrus juice: Nutritional contribution, dietary benefits, and association with anthropometric measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampersaud, Gail C; Valim, M Filomena

    2017-01-02

    Citrus juices such as 100% orange (OJ) and grapefruit juice (GJ) are commonly consumed throughout the world. This review examines the contributions of OJ and GJ to nutrient intake, diet quality, and fruit intake, and supports citrus juices as nutrient-dense beverages. This review also explores the research examining associations between OJ and GJ intake and anthropometric measures. Citrus juices are excellent sources of vitamin C and contribute other key nutrients such as potassium, folate, magnesium, and vitamin A. OJ intake has been associated with better diet quality in children and adults. OJ intake has not been associated with adverse effects on weight or other body measures in observational studies in children and adults. In adults, some observational studies report more favorable body mass index or body measure parameters in OJ consumers compared to nonconsumers. Intervention studies in adults report no negative impacts of OJ or GJ consumption on anthropometric measures, although these measures were typically not the primary outcomes examined in the studies. Moderate consumption of citrus juices may provide meaningful nutritional and dietary benefits and do not appear to negatively impact body weight, body composition, or other anthropometric measures in children and adults.

  2. Multiple regression analysis of anthropometric measurements influencing the cephalic index of male Japanese university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Golam; Saw, Aik; Alam, Rashidul; Ohtsuki, Fumio; Kamarul, Tunku

    2013-09-01

    Cephalic index (CI), the ratio of head breadth to head length, is widely used to categorise human populations. The aim of this study was to access the impact of anthropometric measurements on the CI of male Japanese university students. This study included 1,215 male university students from Tokyo and Kyoto, selected using convenient sampling. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine the effect of anthropometric measurements on CI. The variance inflation factor (VIF) showed no evidence of a multicollinearity problem among independent variables. The coefficients of the regression line demonstrated a significant positive relationship between CI and minimum frontal breadth (p regression analysis showed a greater likelihood for minimum frontal breadth (p regression analysis revealed bizygomatic breadth, head circumference, minimum frontal breadth, head height and morphological facial height to be the best predictor craniofacial measurements with respect to CI. The results suggest that most of the variables considered in this study appear to influence the CI of adult male Japanese students.

  3. Assessment of the intraday variability of anthropometric measurements in the work environment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragança, Sara; Arezes, Pedro; Carvalho, Miguel; Ashdown, Susan P; Leão, Celina

    2017-05-19

    Sitting for long periods of time, both during work and leisure times, is the typical behavior of the modern society. Especially at work, where there is not much flexibility, adopting the sitting posture for the entire day can cause some short-term and long-term effects. As workers' productivity and well-being relies on working conditions, evaluating the effects caused by work postures assumes a very important role. The purpose of this article was to evaluate the variation of some anthropometric measurements during one typical workday to understand whether the known long-term effects can also be seen and quantified in an 8-h period. Twenty participants were measured before and after work, using traditional anthropometry equipment. The data from the two repetitions were compared using statistical tests. The results showed a slight variation in the anthropometric measurements, some with a tendency to increase over time and others with a tendency to decrease.

  4. Effects of weight loss diet therapy on anthropometric measurements and biochemical variables in schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urhan, Murat; Ergün, Can; Aksoy, Meral; Ayer, Ahmet

    2015-07-01

    Prevalence of obesity in schizophrenic patients is two to three times higher than in the general population and unhealthy dietary patterns, a sedentary lifestyle and antipsychotic medication use may contribute to the higher levels of obesity among schizophrenic patients. We evaluated the effects of diet therapy on weight loss, anthropometric and biochemical variables in overweight or obese (body mass index, BMI ≥ 27 kg/m(2)) female schizophrenic patients who use antipsychotic medications and in healthy volunteers. Primary demographic variables were collected via questionnaire; blood samples and anthropometric measurements were obtained. Personalized diet recipes were prepared and nutritional education was shared. We logged the physical activity of the patients and maintained food consumption records at 3-day intervals. Participants were weighed every week; anthropometric measurements and blood samples were collected at the end of the first and second months. At the end of the study, reductions in body weight and other anthropometric measurements were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Reductions in body weight and BMI values for patient group were - 4.05 ± 1.73 kg and - 1.62 ± 0.73 kg/m(2) and for the control group were - 6.79 ± 1.80 kg and - 2.55 ± 0.64 kg/m(2), respectively. When compared with the patient group, reductions in the anthropometric variables of the control group were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Fasting glucose, blood lipids, albumin and leptin levels were decreased; insulin and homeostatic model assessment-measured insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) levels were increased insignificantly. Increases in the blood ghrelin levels for both groups were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Improvements to the diets of schizophrenic patient led to improvements in anthropometric measurements and biochemical variables and reduced the health risks caused by antipsychotic medications. Furthermore, we hypothesize that antipsychotic medications do not

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of maternal anthropometric measurements as predictors for dystocia in nulliparous women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alijahan, Rahele; Kordi, Masoumeh; Poorjavad, Munira; Ebrahimzadeh, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dystocia is one of the important causes of maternal morbidity and mortality in low-income countries. This study was aimed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of maternal anthropometric measurements as predictors for dystocia in nulliparous women. Materials and Methods: This prospective cohort study was conducted on 447 nulliparous women who referred to Omolbanin hospital. Several maternal anthropometric measurements such as height, transverse and vertical diameters of Michaelis sacral rhomboid area, foot length, head circumference, vertebral and lower limb length, symphysio-fundal height, and abdominal girth were taken in cervical dilatation ≤ 5 cm. Labor progression was controlled by a researcher blind to these measurements. After delivery, the accuracy of individual and combined measurements in prediction of dystocia was analyzed. Dystocia was defined as cesarean section and vacuum or forceps delivery for abnormal progress of labor (cervical dilatation less than 1 cm/h in the active phase for 2 h, and during the second stage, beyond 2 h or fetal head descend less than 1 cm/h). Results: Among the different anthropometric measurements, transverse diameter of the Michaelis sacral rhomboid area ≤9.6 cm, maternal height ≤ 155 cm, height to symphysio-fundal height ratio ≤4.7, lower limb length ≤78 cm, and head circumference to height ratio ≥ 35.05 with accuracy of 81.2%, 68.2%, 65.5%, 63.3%, and 61.5%, respectively, were better predictors. The best predictor was obtained by combination of maternal height ≤155 cm or the transverse diameter of the Michaelis sacral rhomboid area ≤9.6 cm and Johnson's formula estimated fetal weight ≥3255 g, with an accuracy of 90.5%, sensitivity of 70%, and specificity of 93.7%. Conclusions: Combination of other anthropometric measurements and estimated fetal weight with maternal height in comparison to maternal height alone leads to a better predictor for dystocia. PMID:24554954

  6. Anthropometric body measurements based on multi-view stereo image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoxin; Jia, Wenyan; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Li, Jie; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Zuo, Wangmeng; Wang, Kuanquan; Sun, Mingui

    2013-01-01

    Anthropometric measurements, such as the circumferences of the hip, arm, leg and waist, waist-to-hip ratio, and body mass index, are of high significance in obesity and fitness evaluation. In this paper, we present a home based imaging system capable of conducting anthropometric measurements. Body images are acquired at different angles using a home camera and a simple rotating disk. Advanced image processing algorithms are utilized for 3D body surface reconstruction. A coarse body shape model is first established from segmented body silhouettes. Then, this model is refined through an inter-image consistency maximization process based on an energy function. Our experimental results using both a mannequin surrogate and a real human body validate the feasibility of the proposed system.

  7. Prospective Study of the Surgical Techniques Used in Primary Rhinoplasty on the Caucasian Nose and Comparison of the Preoperative and Postoperative Anthropometric Nose Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Cezar Augusto Sarraf; Freitas, Renato da Silva; Malafaia, Osvaldo; Pinto, José Simão de Paula; Macedo Filho, Evaldo Dacheux; Mocellin, Marcos; Fagundes, Marina Serrato Coelho

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The knowledge and study of surgical techniques and anthropometric measurements of the nose make possible a qualitative and quantitative analysis of surgical results. Objective Study the main technique used in rhinoplasty on Caucasian noses and compare preoperative and postoperative anthropometric measurements of the nose. Methods A prospective study with 170 patients was performed at a private hospital. Data were collected using the Electronic System Integrated of Protocols software (Sistema Integrado de Protocolos Eletrônicos, SINPE©). The surgical techniques used in the nasal dorsum and tip were evaluated. Preoperative and 12-month follow-up photos as well as the measurements compared with the ideal aesthetic standard of a Caucasian nose were analyzed objectively. Student t test and standard deviation test were applied. Results There was a predominance of endonasal access (94.4%). The most common dorsum technique was hump removal (33.33%), and the predominance of sutures (24.76%) was observed on the nasal tip, with the lateral intercrural the most frequent (32.39%). Comparison between preoperative and postoperative photos found statistically significant alterations on the anthropometric measurements of the noses. Conclusion The main surgical techniques on Caucasian noses were evaluated, and a great variety was found. The evaluation of anthropometric measurements of the nose proved the efficiency of the performed procedures. PMID:25992149

  8. Prospective Study of the Surgical Techniques Used in Primary Rhinoplasty on the Caucasian Nose and Comparison of the Preoperative and Postoperative Anthropometric Nose Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger, Cezar Augusto Sarraf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The knowledge and study of surgical techniques and anthropometric measurements of the nose make possible a qualitative and quantitative analysis of surgical results. Objective Study the main technique used in rhinoplasty on Caucasian noses and compare preoperative and postoperative anthropometric measurements of the nose. Methods A prospective study with 170 patients was performed at a private hospital. Data were collected using the Electronic System Integrated of Protocols software (Sistema Integrado de Protocolos Eletrônicos, SINPE©. The surgical techniques used in the nasal dorsum and tip were evaluated. Preoperative and 12-month follow-up photos as well as the measurements compared with the ideal aesthetic standard of a Caucasian nose were analyzed objectively. Student t test and standard deviation test were applied. Results There was a predominance of endonasal access (94.4%. The most common dorsum technique was hump removal (33.33%, and the predominance of sutures (24.76% was observed on the nasal tip, with the lateral intercrural the most frequent (32.39%. Comparison between preoperative and postoperative photos found statistically significant alterations on the anthropometric measurements of the noses. Conclusion The main surgical techniques on Caucasian noses were evaluated, and a great variety was found. The evaluation of anthropometric measurements of the nose proved the efficiency of the performed procedures.

  9. Some metabolic and anthropometric variables in obes children by measuring serum insulin, and leptin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nour Eldin, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess serum leptin level in obese children to study its correlation with some metabolic variables as serum insulin and serum glucose. The study was conducted on 30 obese children of age from 9-14 years with body mass index (BMI) > 27.8 Kg/m 2 . All children were subjected to history taking, clinical examination, anthropometric measurements and laboratory investigations including fasting serum leptin, insulin and blood glucose. Serum leptin was significantly higher in obese children (102.3± 56.2 ng/ml) compared to non-obese ones (48.15±26.1 ng/ml). The relation between serum leptin and anthropometric measurements and laboratory investigations including fasting serum insulin and blood glucose. Serum leptin was significantly higher in obese children (102.3± 56.2 ng/ml)compared to non-obese ones (48.15±26.1 ng/ml). The relation between serum leptin and anthropometric variables was positively correlated with BMI r s = 0.68, (p s = 0.59.(p<0.01). It is concluded that serum leptin is increased in obesity and its concentration effects the size of the body. Moreover, the relation of leptin and insulin suggests a positive role of leptin in insulin resistance, which are common metabolic disorders associated with obesity

  10. A new technique to determine vertical dimension of occlusion from anthropometric measurements of fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Ladda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to find the correlation between vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO and length of fingers. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 dentate subjects comprising of 200 males and 200 females. Anthropometric measurements of VDO, length of index finger, length of little finger, and distance from tip of thumb to tip of index finger of right hand were recorded clinically using modified digital vernier caliper. Correlation between VDO and length of fingers was studied using Spearman′s coefficient. For the execution of regression command and preparation of prediction equations to estimate VDO, Statistical Package for Social Sciences Software Version 11.5 was used. Results: VDO was significantly and positively correlated with all the parameters studied. In males, correlation of VDO was strongest for length of index finger (r-0.406 whereas in females, it was strongest for length of little finger (r-0.385. VDO estimation using regression equation had a standard error of ± 3.76 in males and ± 2.86 in females for length of index finger, ±3.81 and ± 2.74 in males and females respectively for length of little finger, ±3.99 and ± 2.89 in males and females respectively for distance from tip of thumb to tip of index finger. Conclusions: Since the variations between VDO and finger lengths are within the range of 2-4 mm, VDO prediction through this method is reliable, and reproducible. Also the method is simple, economic, and non-invasive; hence, it could be recommended for everyday practice.

  11. Standardization of depression measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahl, Inka; Löwe, Bernd; Bjørner, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To provide a standardized metric for the assessment of depression severity to enable comparability among results of established depression measures. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A common metric for 11 depression questionnaires was developed applying item response theory (IRT) methods. Data...... of 33,844 adults were used for secondary analysis including routine assessments of 23,817 in- and outpatients with mental and/or medical conditions (46% with depressive disorders) and a general population sample of 10,027 randomly selected participants from three representative German household surveys....... RESULTS: A standardized metric for depression severity was defined by 143 items, and scores were normed to a general population mean of 50 (standard deviation = 10) for easy interpretability. It covers the entire range of depression severity assessed by established instruments. The metric allows...

  12. Effect of a Trampoline Exercise on the Anthropometric Measures and Motor Performance of Adolescent Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalizadeh, Bahman; Mohammadzadeh, Hassan; Khazani, Ali; Dadras, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercises can influence some anthropometric and fitness components differently. The aim of present study was to evaluate how a relatively long-term training program in 11-14-year-old male Iranian students affects their anthropometric and motor performance measures. Measurements were conducted on the anthropometric and fitness components of participants (n = 28) prior to and following the program. They trained 20 weeks, 1.5 h/session with 10 min rest, in 4 times trampoline training programs per week. Motor performance of all participants was assessed using standing long jump and vertical jump based on Eurofit Test Battery. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) repeated measurement test showed a statistically significant main effect of time in calf girth P = 0.001, fat% P = 0.01, vertical jump P = 0.001, and long jump P = 0.001. The ANOVA repeated measurement test revealed a statistically significant main effect of group in fat% P = 0.001. Post hoc paired t-tests indicated statistical significant differences in trampoline group between the two measurements about calf girth (t = -4.35, P = 0.001), fat% (t = 5.87, P = 0.001), vertical jump (t = -5.53, P = 0.001), and long jump (t = -10.00, P = 0.001). We can conclude that 20-week trampoline training with four physical activity sessions/week in 11-14-year-old students seems to have a significant effect on body fat% reduction and effective results in terms of anaerobic physical fitness. Therefore, it is suggested that different training model approach such as trampoline exercises can help students to promote the level of health and motor performance.

  13. Effect of a trampoline exercise on the anthropometric measures and motor performance of adolescent students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Aalizadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical exercises can influence some anthropometric and fitness components differently. The aim of present study was to evaluate how a relatively long-term training program in 11-14-year-old male Iranian students affects their anthropometric and motor performance measures. Methods: Measurements were conducted on the anthropometric and fitness components of participants (n = 28 prior to and following the program. They trained 20 weeks, 1.5 h/session with 10 min rest, in 4 times trampoline training programs per week. Motor performance of all participants was assessed using standing long jump and vertical jump based on Eurofit Test Battery. Results: The analysis of variance (ANOVA repeated measurement test showed a statistically significant main effect of time in calf girth P = 0.001, fat% P = 0.01, vertical jump P = 0.001, and long jump P = 0.001. The ANOVA repeated measurement test revealed a statistically significant main effect of group in fat% P = 0.001. Post hoc paired t-tests indicated statistical significant differences in trampoline group between the two measurements about calf girth (t = −4.35, P = 0.001, fat% (t = 5.87, P = 0.001, vertical jump (t = −5.53, P = 0.001, and long jump (t = −10.00, P = 0.001. Conclusions: We can conclude that 20-week trampoline training with four physical activity sessions/week in 11-14-year-old students seems to have a significant effect on body fat% reduction and effective results in terms of anaerobic physical fitness. Therefore, it is suggested that different training model approach such as trampoline exercises can help students to promote the level of health and motor performance.

  14. Anthropometric measurements of tibial plateau and correlation with the current tibial implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkocak, Omer Faruk; Kucukdurmaz, Fatih; Sayar, Safak; Erdil, Mehmet Emin; Ceylan, Hasan Huseyin; Tuncay, Ibrahim

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to make an anthropometric analysis at the resected surfaces of the proximal tibia in the Turkish population and to compare the data with the dimensions of tibial components in current use. We hypothesized that tibial components currently available on the market do not fulfil the requirements of this population and a new tibial component design may be required, especially for female patients with small stature. Anthropometric data from the proximal tibia of 226 knees in 226 Turkish subjects were measured using magnetic resonance imaging. We measured the mediolateral, middle anteroposterior, medial and lateral anteroposterior dimensions and the aspect ratio of the resected proximal tibial surface. All morphological data were compared with the dimensions of five contemporary tibial implants, including asymmetric and symmetric design types. The dimensions of the tibial plateau of Turkish knees demonstrated significant differences according to gender (P < 0.05). Among the different tibial implants reviewed, neither asymmetric nor symmetric designs exhibited a perfect conformity to proximal tibial morphology in size and shape. The vast majority of tibial implants involved in this study tend to overhang anteroposteriorly, and a statistically significant number of women (21 %, P < 0.05) had tibial anteroposterior diameters smaller than the smallest available tibial component. Tibial components designed according to anthropometric measurements of Western populations do not perfectly meet the requirements of Turkish population. These data could provide the basis for designing the optimal and smaller tibial component for this population, especially for women, is required for best fit. II.

  15. Anthropometric measures in relation to Basal Cell Carcinoma: a longitudinal study

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    Pandeya Nirmala

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between anthropometric indices and risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC is largely unknown. We aimed to examine the association between anthropometric measures and development of BCC and to demonstrate whether adherence to World Health Organisation guidelines for body mass index, waist circumference, and waist/hip ratio was associated with risk of BCC, independent of sun exposure. Methods Study participants were participants in a community-based skin cancer prevention trial in Nambour, a town in southeast Queensland (latitude 26°S. In 1992, height, weight, and waist and hip circumferences were measured for all 1621 participants and weight was remeasured at the end of the trial in 1996. Prevalence proportion ratios were calculated using a log-binomial model to estimate the risk of BCC prior to or prevalent in 1992, while Poisson regression with robust error variances was used to estimate the relative risk of BCC during the follow-up period. Results At baseline, 94 participants had a current BCC, and 202 had a history of BCC. During the 5-year follow-up period, 179 participants developed one or more new BCCs. We found no significant association between any of the anthropometric measures or indices and risk of BCC after controlling for potential confounding factors including sun exposure. There was a suggestion that short-term weight gain may increase the risk of developing BCC for women only. Conclusion Adherence to World Health Organisation guidelines for body mass index, waist circumference and waist/hip ratio is not significantly associated with occurrence of basal cell carcinomas of the skin.

  16. Anthropometric measures in relation to Basal Cell Carcinoma: a longitudinal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Catherine M; Hughes, Maria Celia; Pandeya, Nirmala; Green, Adèle C

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between anthropometric indices and risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is largely unknown. We aimed to examine the association between anthropometric measures and development of BCC and to demonstrate whether adherence to World Health Organisation guidelines for body mass index, waist circumference, and waist/hip ratio was associated with risk of BCC, independent of sun exposure. Study participants were participants in a community-based skin cancer prevention trial in Nambour, a town in southeast Queensland (latitude 26°S). In 1992, height, weight, and waist and hip circumferences were measured for all 1621 participants and weight was remeasured at the end of the trial in 1996. Prevalence proportion ratios were calculated using a log-binomial model to estimate the risk of BCC prior to or prevalent in 1992, while Poisson regression with robust error variances was used to estimate the relative risk of BCC during the follow-up period. At baseline, 94 participants had a current BCC, and 202 had a history of BCC. During the 5-year follow-up period, 179 participants developed one or more new BCCs. We found no significant association between any of the anthropometric measures or indices and risk of BCC after controlling for potential confounding factors including sun exposure. There was a suggestion that short-term weight gain may increase the risk of developing BCC for women only. Adherence to World Health Organisation guidelines for body mass index, waist circumference and waist/hip ratio is not significantly associated with occurrence of basal cell carcinomas of the skin

  17. Prenatal Triclosan Exposure and Anthropometric Measures Including Anogenital Distance in Danish Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Tina Harmer; Frederiksen, Hanne; Kyhl, Henriette Boye

    2016-01-01

    , Swan SH, Main KM, Andersson AM, Lind DV, Husby S, Wohlfahrt-Veje C, Skakkebæk NE, Jensen TK. 2016. Prenatal triclosan exposure and anthropometric measures including anogenital distance in Danish infants. Environ Health Perspect 124:1261-1268; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409637.......BACKGROUND: Triclosan (TCS) is widely used as an antibacterial agent in consumer products such as hand soap and toothpaste, and human exposure is widespread. TCS is suspected of having endocrine-disrupting properties, but few human studies have examined the developmental effects of prenatal TCS...

  18. Pseudoachondroplasia in a child: The role of anthropometric measurements and skeletal imaging in differential diagnosis

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    Radwa Gamal, MSc

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoachondroplasia is a rare osteochondrodysplasia characterized by disproportionate short stature and limb deformity. Diagnostic accuracy is based on a detailed evaluation of the radioclinical features. We report a boy with pseudoachondroplasia. We aim to underscore why is accurate delineation of the pattern of radioclinical skeletal abnormalities in pseudoachondroplasia a weighty part of diagnosis. Furthermore, we aim to highlight the main clinical and skeletal imaging features of skeletal dysplasias that overlap with pseudoachondroplasia using clinical cases evaluated in our institution. The findings affirm that anthropometric measurements and skeletal radiography are important contributors to the differential diagnosis and classification of disproportionate growth.

  19. Reliability of anthropometric measurements in young male and female artistic gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siatras, Theophanis; Skaperda, Malamati; Mameletzi, Dimitra

    2010-12-01

    Body dimensions and body composition of children participating in artistic activities, such as gymnastics and many types of dancing, are important factors in performance improvement. The present study aimed to determine the reliability of a series of selected anthropometric measurements in young male and female gymnasts. Segment lengths, body breadths, circumferences, and skinfold thickness were measured in 20 young gymnasts by the same experienced examiner, using portable and easy-to-use instruments. All parameters were measured twice (test-retest) under the same conditions within a week's period. The high intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) values ranging from 0.87 to 0.99, as well as the low coefficient of variation (CV) values (artistic gymnasts. Therefore, these measurements could contribute to further research in this field of investigation, helping to monitor young artistic gymnasts' growth status and identify specific characteristics for increased performance in this sport.

  20. Comparative study of cranial anthropometric measurement by traditional calipers to computed tomography and three-dimensional photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, Derick A; Naidoo, Sybill D; Skolnick, Gary; Skladman, Rachel; Woo, Albert S

    2013-07-01

    Craniofacial anthropometry by direct caliper measurements is a common method of quantifying the morphology of the cranial vault. New digital imaging modalities including computed tomography and three-dimensional photogrammetry are similarly being used to obtain craniofacial surface measurements. This study sought to compare the accuracy of anthropometric measurements obtained by calipers versus 2 methods of digital imaging.Standard anterior-posterior, biparietal, and cranial index measurements were directly obtained on 19 participants with an age range of 1 to 20 months. Computed tomographic scans and three-dimensional photographs were both obtained on each child within 2 weeks of the clinical examination. Two analysts measured the anterior-posterior and biparietal distances on the digital images. Measures of reliability and bias between the modalities were calculated and compared.Caliper measurements were found to underestimate the anterior-posterior and biparietal distances as compared with those of the computed tomography and the three-dimensional photogrammetry (P photogrammetry (P = 0.002). The coefficients of variation for repeated measures based on the computed tomography and the three-dimensional photogrammetry were 0.008 and 0.007, respectively.In conclusion, measurements based on digital modalities are generally reliable and interchangeable. Caliper measurements lead to underestimation of anterior-posterior and biparietal values compared with digital imaging.

  1. Prediction of insulin resistance with anthropometric measures: lessons from a large adolescent population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wedin WK

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available William K Wedin,1 Lizmer Diaz-Gimenez,1 Antonio J Convit1,21Department of Psychiatry, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; 2Nathan Kline Institute, Orangeburg, NY, USAObjective: The aim of this study was to describe the minimum number of anthropometric measures that will optimally predict insulin resistance (IR and to characterize the utility of these measures among obese and nonobese adolescents.Research design and methods: Six anthropometric measures (selected from three categories: central adiposity, weight, and body composition were measured from 1298 adolescents attending two New York City public high schools. Body composition was determined by bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA. The homeostatic model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR, based on fasting glucose and insulin concentrations, was used to estimate IR. Stepwise linear regression analyses were performed to predict HOMA-IR based on the six selected measures, while controlling for age.Results: The stepwise regression retained both waist circumference (WC and percentage of body fat (BF%. Notably, BMI was not retained. WC was a stronger predictor of HOMA-IR than BMI was. A regression model using solely WC performed best among the obese II group, while a model using solely BF% performed best among the lean group. Receiver operator characteristic curves showed the WC and BF% model to be more sensitive in detecting IR than BMI, but with less specificity.Conclusion: WC combined with BF% was the best predictor of HOMA-IR. This finding can be attributed partly to the ability of BF% to model HOMA-IR among leaner participants and to the ability of WC to model HOMA-IR among participants who are more obese. BMI was comparatively weak in predicting IR, suggesting that assessments that are more comprehensive and include body composition analysis could increase detection of IR during adolescence, especially among those who are lean, yet insulin-resistant.Keywords: BMI, bioelectrical impedance

  2. Anthropometric Measurements and Periodontal Diseases in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling-Wei; Wong, Hai Ming; Sun, Ling; Wen, Yi Feng; McGrath, Colman P

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to identify and summarize evidence of the association between anthropometric measurements and periodontal status in children and adolescents. We searched PubMed, Institute for Scientific Information Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Library, and 7 additional databases, following the guidance of Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses, up to December 2014. Observational studies reporting data on the association between anthropometric measurements and periodontal diseases in 2–18-y-old participants were included. An initial search identified 4191 papers; 278 potentially effective studies (k = 0.82) and 16 effective studies (k = 0.83) were included after screening. The mean quality of evidence among the studies was 20.3, according to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology checklist (k = 0.79). Meta-analyses showed that obesity (measured by body mass index) was significantly associated with visible plaque index (OR: 4.75; 95% CI: 2.42, 9.34), bleeding on probing (OR: 5.41; 95% CI: 2.75, 10.63), subgingival calculus (OR: 3.07; 95% CI: 1.10, 8.62), probing depth (OR: 14.15; 95% CI: 5.10, 39.25) and flow rate of salivary secretion (standardized mean difference: −0.89; 95% CI: −1.18, −0.61). However, various results were reported in the effective studies that were not included in meta-analyses. In conclusion, obesity is associated with some signs of periodontal disease in children and adolescents. Further studies with a comprehensive prospective cohort design and more potential variables are recommended. PMID:26567204

  3. The association between self-rated health and different anthropometric and body composition measures in the Chinese population

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    Kun Tang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze the strength of association between self-rated health and six anthropometric and body composition measures to explore the best indicator. Methods Analyses were based on the cross-sectional data from the China Kadoorie Biobank Study and approximately 300,000 adults were analyzed. Logistics regression was used to analyze the association between self-rated health (good or poor and anthropometric and body composition measures (height, weight, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, hip circumference (HC and body fat percentage, waist-to-hip ratio and waist-to-height ratio. Stratified analyses were undertaken to understand the effect modification of socioeconomic status on the association. Result Odds ratio of self-rated better health had an inverted U-shape association with weight, BMI, WC and body fat, with weight levels increasing until around 73.8 and 65.7 kg for male and female, BMI around 26.8 kg/m2, WC around 85.8 and 87.6 cm, body fat around 24.3 and 36.3%, and then declining thereafter. Height and HC also indicated a slightly inverted U-shape association. The strongest association was observed after adjustment was weight, with one standard deviation greater weight associated with 10.2% and 10.6% increased odds in male and female. Conclusions Being underweight and overweight are both risk factors for poor self-rated health in males and females, and weight is the best indicator of self-rated health compared with other measures.

  4. Relationship between anthropometric measures and sagittal spinal curvatures in adult male handball players

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    Ameer Mariam Abdul-Moneem

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Increasing anthropometric measures bring considerable spinal loads during sports practice, which inversely affects the adaptation abilities of the spinal structures; this in turn influences the spinal curvatures. The study was conducted to explore the relationship between anthropometric measures and sagittal spinal curvatures in handball players. Method. The total of 83 male handball players were divided into 2 groups, depending on their body height: group 1 (age, 23.62 ± 2.07 years consisted of 40 handball players with height above average, group 2 (age, 24.63 ± 2.58 years consisted of 43 handball players with height below average. The thoracic and lumbar curvatures and trunk height were measured with the Formetric III 4D spine and posture analysis system. Results. The thoracic kyphosis of group 1 was significantly higher than that of group 2 (p = 0.038, without a significant difference in lumbar lordosis (p = 0.312, and significant difference in the coefficient of compensation between thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis (p = 0.026. Group 1 showed strong positive correlation between body height and kyphotic angle (r = 0.897, and moderate positive correlation with lordosis angle (r = 0.496. In group 2, there was weak positive correlation with kyphotic angle (r = 0.381, and weak negative correlation with lumbar lordosis angle (r = -0.355. Conclusions. Increasing body height of handball players is associated with bigger kyphotic and lordotic angles. Owing to frequent sagittal asymmetric overloading of the spine during handball training, exercises that help maintain good posture and correct the thoracic kyphosis are required, especially for taller players.

  5. Evaluation of fetal anthropometric measures to predict the risk for shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, T; Schmidt, M; Kurmanavicius, J; Zimmermann, R; Schäffer, L

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the quality of anthropometric measures to improve the prediction of shoulder dystocia by combining different sonographic biometric parameters. This was a retrospective cohort study of 12,794 vaginal deliveries with complete sonographic biometry data obtained within 7 days before delivery. Receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curves of various combinations of the biometric parameters, namely, biparietal diameter (BPD), occipitofrontal diameter (OFD), head circumference, abdominal diameter (AD), abdominal circumference (AC) and femur length were analyzed. The influences of independent risk factors were calculated and their combination used in a predictive model. The incidence of shoulder dystocia was 1.14%. Different combinations of sonographic parameters showed comparable ROC curves without advantage for a particular combination. The difference between AD and BPD (AD - BPD) (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.704) revealed a significant increase in risk (odds ratio (OR) 7.6 (95% CI 4.2-13.9), sensitivity 8.2%, specificity 98.8%) at a suggested cut-off ≥ 2.6 cm. However, the positive predictive value (PPV) was low (7.5%). The AC as a single parameter (AUC = 0.732) with a cut-off ≥ 35 cm performed worse (OR 4.6 (95% CI 3.3-6.5), PPV 2.6%). BPD/OFD (a surrogate for fetal cranial shape) was not significantly different between those with and those without shoulder dystocia. The combination of estimated fetal weight, maternal diabetes, gender and AD - BPD provided a reasonable estimate of the individual risk. Sonographic fetal anthropometric measures appear not to be a useful tool to screen for the risk of shoulder dystocia due to a low PPV. However, AD - BPD appears to be a relevant risk factor. While risk stratification including different known risk factors may aid in counseling, shoulder dystocia cannot effectively be predicted. Copyright © 2013 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The influence of anthropometric factors on postural balance: the relationship between body composition and posturographic measurements in young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Castilho Alonso

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of anthropometric characteristics and gender on postural balance in adults. One hundred individuals were examined (50 males, 50 females; age range 20-40 years. METHODS: The following body composition measurements were collected (using bone densitometry measurements: fat percentage (% fat, tissue (g, fat (g, lean mass (g, bone mineral content (g, and bone mineral density (g/cm2. In addition, the following anthropometric measurements were collected: body mass (kg, height (cm, length of the trunk-cephalic region (cm, length of the lower limbs (cm and length of the upper limbs (cm. The following indices were calculated: body mass index (kg/m², waist-hip ratio and the support base (cm². Also, a postural balance test was performed using posturography variables with open and closed eyes. RESULTS: The analysis revealed poor correlations between postural balance and the anthropometric variables. A multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that the whole group (female and male height explained 12% of the medial-lateral displacement, 10% of the speed of oscillation, and 11% of the displacement area. The length of the trunk-cephalic length explained 6% of the displacement in the anteroposterior direction. With eyes closed, the support base and height explained 18% of the medial displacement, and the lateral height explained 10% of the displacement speed and 5% of the scroll area. CONCLUSION: Measured using posturography, the postural balance was only slightly influenced by the anthropometric variables, both with open and closed eyes. Height was the anthropometric variable that most influenced postural balance, both in the whole group and separately for each gender. Postural balance was more influenced by anthropometric factors in males than females.

  7. Optimal anthropometric measures and thresholds to identify undiagnosed type 2 diabetes in three major Asian ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperet, Derrick Johnston; Lim, Wei-Yen; Mok-Kwee Heng, Derrick; Ma, Stefan; van Dam, Rob M

    2016-10-01

    To identify optimal anthropometric measures and cutoffs to identify undiagnosed diabetes mellitus (UDM) in three major Asian ethnic groups (Chinese, Malays, and Asian-Indians). Cross-sectional data were analyzed from 14,815 ethnic Chinese, Malay, and Asian-Indian participants of the Singapore National Health Surveys, which included anthropometric measures and an oral glucose tolerance test. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were used with calculation of the area under the curve (AUC) to evaluate the performance of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and waist-to-height ratio (WHTR) for the identification of UDM. BMI performed significantly worse (AUCMEN  = 0.70; AUCWOMEN  = 0.75) than abdominal measures, whereas WHTR (AUCMEN  = 0.76; AUCWOMEN  = 0.79) was among the best performing measures in both sexes and all ethnic groups. Anthropometric measures performed better in Chinese than in Asian-Indian participants for the identification of UDM. A WHTR cutoff of 0.52 appeared optimal with a sensitivity of 76% in men and 73% in women and a specificity of 63% in men and 70% in women. Although ethnic differences were observed in the performance of anthropometric measures for the identification of UDM, abdominal adiposity measures generally performed better than BMI, and WHTR performed best in all Asian ethnic groups. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  8. Beyond Body Mass Index: Using Anthropometric Measures and Body Composition Indicators to Assess Odds of an Endometriosis Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backonja, Uba; Hediger, Mary L; Chen, Zhen; Lauver, Diane R; Sun, Liping; Peterson, C Matthew; Buck Louis, Germaine M

    2017-09-01

    Body mass index (BMI) and endometriosis have been inversely associated. To address gaps in this research, we examined associations among body composition, endometriosis, and physical activity. Women from 14 clinical sites in the Salt Lake City, Utah and San Francisco, California areas and scheduled for laparoscopy/laparotomy were recruited during 2007-2009. Participants (N = 473) underwent standardized anthropometric assessments to estimate body composition before surgery. Using a cross-sectional design, odds of an endometriosis diagnosis (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]; 95% confidence interval [CI]) were calculated for anthropometric and body composition measures (weight in kg; height in cm; mid upper arm, waist, hip, and chest circumferences in cm; subscapular, suprailiac, and triceps skinfold thicknesses in mm; arm muscle and fat areas in cm 2 ; centripetal fat, chest-to-waist, chest-to-hip, waist-to-hip, and waist-to-height ratios; arm fat index; and BMI in kg/m 2 ). Physical activity (metabolic equivalent of task-minutes/week) and sedentariness (average minutes sitting on a weekday) were assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form. Measures were modeled continuously and in quartiles based on sample estimates. Adjusted models were controlled for age (years, continuous), site (Utah/California), smoking history (never, former, or current smoker), and income (below, within 180%, and above of the poverty line). Findings were standardized by dividing variables by their respective standard deviations. We used adjusted models to examine whether odds of an endometriosis diagnosis were moderated by physical activity or sedentariness. Inverse relationships were observed between endometriosis and standardized: weight (aOR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.57-0.88); subscapular skinfold thickness (aOR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.65-0.98); waist and hip circumferences (aOR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.64-0.98 and aOR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.61-0.94, respectively); total

  9. Standardization of radon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuszek, J.M.; Hutchinson, J.A.; Lance, B.H.; Virgil, M.G.; Mahoney, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Radon escaping from soil into homes appears to present the single greatest source of radiation exposure that most people will ever face. Measurement protocols for the relatively inert gas inextricably link the method of collection with the counting of the specimen. The most commonly used methods depend on the measurement of dislocation sites on plastic α-track detectors or on the adsorption of radon onto activated charcoal for subsequent counting of the γ-rays produced by decay of the radon progeny. The uncertainties inherent to the radon-measurement methods used commercially in the United States are far greater than those for measurements of other environmental radionuclides. The results of this preliminary study raise doubts as to whether existing proficiency-testing programs can provide assurance that radon-measurement methods are representative of actual conditions in any dwelling. 17 refs., 1 figs., 4 tabs

  10. The Reliability of Anthropometric Measurements Used Preoperatively in Aesthetic Breast Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Kathryn V; Murphy, Blake D; Beber, Brett; Brown, Mitchell

    2016-04-01

    Patient outcomes in aesthetic breast surgery are highly dependent on breast measurements used in preoperative planning. The purpose of this study is to determine the reliability of anthropometric breast measurements. Four raters measured 28 women using 7 measurements: sternal notch to nipple distance (Sn-N), nipple to midline (N-M), nipple to inframammary-fold distance under maximal stretch (N-IMF), breast base width (BW), soft tissue pinch thickness of the upper pole (STPT:UP), STPT at the inframammary fold (STPT:IMF), and anterior pull skin stretch (APSS). Reliability was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs). Inter-rater reliability was excellent for Sn-N, N-M, and BW (ICC = 0.94, 0.90, and 0.76, respectively) and was good for N-IMF (ICC = 0.70). The STPT:UP, STPT:IMF, and APSS measurements were not reliable between raters (ICC reliability was excellent for Sn-N, N-M, and BW for all raters (all ICC > 0.75). The N-IMF intra-rater reliability was excellent in senior raters (ICC > 0.75) and good in junior raters (ICC > 0.6). The STPT:UP, STPT:IMF, and APSS measurements showed fair or poor reliability for most raters (ICC reliable. Dynamic measurements including APSS, STPT:UP, and STUP:IMF are unreliable. N-IMF is the only reliable dynamic measurement, and its reliability improves with increasing clinical experience. The variable reliability of preoperative measurements must be considered in the planning of aesthetic breast surgery. 4 Diagnostic. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Anthropometric measurements of adolescents from two Amazonian ecosystems: variations according to seasonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Hilton P; Veiga, Gloria V; Kac, Gilberto; Pereira, Rosangela A

    2010-03-01

    This paper aims to describe the nutritional status of Caboclo adolescents living in two areas of the Amazon Basin. Two cross-sectional studies, the first in the dry and the second in the wet season, were carried out in two Amazonian ecosystems: the forest and black water ecosystem, and the floodplain and white water ecosystem. Measurements of weight, stature, arm circumference and triceps, subscapular and suprailiac skinfolds were performed on 247 adolescents (10-19 years of age). Nutritional status was classified using body mass index according to international criteria and the prevalence of underweight and overweight was estimated. Linear mixed effects models were used with the anthropometric measurements as dependent variables and time interval, place of residence, sex, age and stature variation as independent variables. During the wet season, the prevalence of overweight among girls was higher in the forest (42%) than in the floodplain (9%). Longitudinal linear regression models showed that the arm circumference measurement was influenced both by seasonality and location, revealing that the increment between dry and wet seasons was less pronounced in the floodplain. At the time of the study, overweight already constituted a major public health concern among girls living in the forest area. In order to develop adequate public health policies for this important segment of the Amazon population further studies are necessary to investigate the role of environment and seasonality on the growth and nutritional status of adolescents.

  12. Effects of gamma oryzanol supplementation on anthropometric measurements & muscular strength in healthy males following chronic resistance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saghar Eslami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Enhanced muscle strength is seen when resistance exercise is combined with the consumption of nutritional supplements. Although there is a limited number of studies available about the efficacy of gamma oryzanol supplementation with resistance exercise in humans, but its usage as a nutritional supplement for strength is common in athletes. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of gamma oryzanol supplementation during 9-week resistance training on muscular strength and anthropometric measurements of young healthy males. Methods: In this double-blind clinical trial, changes of anthropometric measurements and muscular strength were studied after chronic resistance exercise and gamma oryzanol supplementation in 30 healthy volunteers (16 in supplement and 14 in placebo. Each day, gamma oryzanol supplement (600 mg and placebo (the same amount of lactose were consumed after training. The participants exercised with 80 per cent 1-Repetition Maximum (1-RM, for one hour and four days/week. Anthropometric measurements and subjects′ 1-RM for muscular strength were determined at the commencement and end of the 9-week study. Results: There was no significant difference between the baseline characteristics and target variables at baseline between the two groups. After gamma oryzanol supplementation, there was no significant difference in the means of anthropometric and skin fold measurements between the supplement and placebo groups. However, there were significant differences between the supplement and placebo groups for 1-RM of bench press and leg curl, which showed that gamma oryzanol improved muscle strength following resistance training. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings indicated that 600 mg/day gamma oryzanol supplementation during the 9-week resistance training did not change anthropometric and body measurements, but it increased muscular strength in young healthy males. Further, studies need to be done

  13. Using alternative or direct anthropometric measurements to assess risk for malnutrition in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorini, Chiara; Collini, Francesca; Castagnoli, Mariangela; Di Bari, Mauro; Cavallini, Maria Chiara; Zaffarana, Nicoletta; Pepe, Pasquale; Lucenteforte, Ersilia; Vannacci, Alfredo; Bonaccorsi, Guglielmo

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to use the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) to assess the applicability of alternative versus direct anthropometric measurements for evaluating the risk for malnutrition in older individuals living in nursing homes (NHs). We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 67 NHs in Tuscany, Italy. We measured the weight, standing height (SH), knee height (KH), ulna length (UL), and middle-upper-arm circumference of 641 NH residents. Correlations between the different methods for calculating body mass index (BMI; using direct or alternative measurements) were evaluated by the intraclass correlation coefficient and the Bland-Altman method; agreement in the allocation of participants to the same risk category was assessed by squared weighted kappa statistic and indicators of internal relative validity. The intraclass correlation coefficient for BMI calculated using KH was 0.839 (0.815-0.861), whereas those calculated by UL were 0.890 (0.872-0.905). The limits of agreement were ±6.13 kg/m(2) using KH and ±4.66 kg/m(2) using UL. For BMI calculated using SH, 79.9% of the patients were at low risk, 8.1% at medium risk, and 12.2% at high risk for malnutrition. The agreement between this classification and that obtained using BMI calculated by alternative measurements was "fair-good." When it is not possible to determine risk category by using SH, we suggest using the alternative measurements (primarily UL, due to its highest sensitivity) to predict the height and to compare these evaluations with those obtained by using middle-upper-arm-circumference to predict the BMI. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Severity of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Diagnostic Accuracy of Hand and Body Anthropometric Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondelli, Mauro; Farioli, Andrea; Mattioli, Stefano; Aretini, Alessandro; Ginanneschi, Federica; Greco, Giuseppe; Curti, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the diagnostic properties of hand/wrist and body measures according to validated clinical and electrophysiological carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) severity scales. Methods We performed a prospective case-control study. For each case, two controls were enrolled. Two five-stage clinical and electrophysiological scales were used to evaluate CTS severity. Anthropometric measurements were collected and obesity indicators and hand/wrist ratios were calculated. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios were calculated separately by gender. Results We consecutively enrolled 370 cases and 747 controls. The wrist-palm ratio, waist-hip-height ratio and waist-stature ratio showed the highest proportion of cases with abnormal values in the severe stages of CTS for clinical and electrophysiological severity scales in both genders. Accuracy tended to increase with CTS severity for females and males. In severe stage, most of the indexes presented moderate accuracy in both genders. Among subjects with severe CTS, the wrist-palm ratio presented the highest AUC for hand measures in the clinical and electrophysiological severity scales both in females (AUC 0.83 and 0.76, respectively) and males (AUC 0.91 and 0.82, respectively). Among subjects with severe CTS, the waist-stature ratio showed the highest AUC for body measures in the clinical and electrophysiological severity scales both in females (AUC 0.78 and 0.77, respectively) and males (AUC 0.84 and 0.76, respectively). The results of waist-hip-height ratio AUC were similar. Conclusions Wrist-palm ratio, waist-hip-height ratio and waist-stature ratio could contribute to support the diagnostic hypothesis of severe CTS that however has to be confirmed by nerve conduction study. PMID:27768728

  15. Severity of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Diagnostic Accuracy of Hand and Body Anthropometric Measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Mondelli

    Full Text Available To study the diagnostic properties of hand/wrist and body measures according to validated clinical and electrophysiological carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS severity scales.We performed a prospective case-control study. For each case, two controls were enrolled. Two five-stage clinical and electrophysiological scales were used to evaluate CTS severity. Anthropometric measurements were collected and obesity indicators and hand/wrist ratios were calculated. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC, sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios were calculated separately by gender.We consecutively enrolled 370 cases and 747 controls. The wrist-palm ratio, waist-hip-height ratio and waist-stature ratio showed the highest proportion of cases with abnormal values in the severe stages of CTS for clinical and electrophysiological severity scales in both genders. Accuracy tended to increase with CTS severity for females and males. In severe stage, most of the indexes presented moderate accuracy in both genders. Among subjects with severe CTS, the wrist-palm ratio presented the highest AUC for hand measures in the clinical and electrophysiological severity scales both in females (AUC 0.83 and 0.76, respectively and males (AUC 0.91 and 0.82, respectively. Among subjects with severe CTS, the waist-stature ratio showed the highest AUC for body measures in the clinical and electrophysiological severity scales both in females (AUC 0.78 and 0.77, respectively and males (AUC 0.84 and 0.76, respectively. The results of waist-hip-height ratio AUC were similar.Wrist-palm ratio, waist-hip-height ratio and waist-stature ratio could contribute to support the diagnostic hypothesis of severe CTS that however has to be confirmed by nerve conduction study.

  16. A new anthropometric phantom of the human leg for calibrating in vivo measurements of stable lead in bone using x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitz, Henry; Jenkins, Mark; Lodwick, Jeffrey

    1997-01-01

    Full text. A new anthropometric phantom of the human leg has been developed for calibrating in vivo measurements of stable lead in the bone using x-ray fluorescence. The phantom reproduces the shape and radiological characteristics of the midshaft of the human leg and includes tissue substitutes for cortical bone, bone marrow, and muscle which have been formulated using polyurethanes and calcium carbonate to provide the desired characteristics of density x-ray attenuation, and calcium content. The phantom includes a set of simulated tibia bones, each containing a precisely known concentration of stable lead, that can be easily inserted into the leg. Formerly, of a set of plexiglas cylinders filled with plaster of-paris, each containing a known lead content, was the consensus standard calibration phantom. Tissue substitute materials used in the new anthropometric calibration phantom are much more uniform in density and composition than the plaster-of-paris phantoms and its realistic appearance provides a practical means of evaluating the variability in measurements results due to the changes in subject-detector positioning. Use of the new anthropometric calibration phantom results in a energy spectrum that closely resembles the spectrum observed when measuring a human subject. The energy spectrum produced by the plaster-of-paris phantom lacks the substantial Compton Scattering component produced by the leg muscle mass which leads to unrealistic estimates of in vivo measurement sensitivity. The minimum detection limit (MDL) for in vivo measurement of stable lead in bone, using an efficiency derived from the new anthropometric phantom, ranges from 18,6 parts per million (ppm) to 26,3 ppm using the K β1,3 /Elastic ratio or the K 1 /Elastic ratio, respectively. These values are significantly greater than the MDL cited in the literature obtained using a efficiency derived the conventional cylindrical plaster-of-paris phantom. Likewise, the realistic shape of the new

  17. Anthropometric measurements and vertebral deformities. European Vertebral Osteoporosis Study (EVOS) Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnell, O; O'Neill, T; Felsenberg, D; Kanis, J; Cooper, C; Silman, A J

    1997-08-15

    To investigate the association between anthropometric indices and morphometrically determined vertebral deformity, the authors carried out a cross-sectional study using data from the European Vertebral Osteoporosis Study (EVOS), a population-based study of vertebral osteoporosis in 36 European centers from 19 countries. A total of 16,047 EVOS subjects were included in this analysis, of whom 1,973 subjects (915 males, 1,058 females) (12.3%) aged 50 years or over had one or more vertebral deformities ("cases"). The cases were compared with the 14,074 subjects (6,539 males, 7,535 females) with morphometrically normal spines ("controls"). Data were collected on self-reported height at age 25 years and minimum weight after age 25 years, as well as on current measured height and weight. Body mass index (BMI) and height and weight change were calculated from these data. The relations between these variables and vertebral deformity were examined separately by sex with logistic regression adjusting for age, smoking, and physical activity. In females, there was a significant trend of decreasing risk with increasing quintile of current weight, current BMI, and weight gain since age 25 years. In males, subjects in the lightest quintile for these measures were at increased risk but there was no evidence of a trend. An ecologic analysis by country revealed a negative correlation between mean BMI and the prevalence of deformity in females but not in males. The authors conclude that low body weight is associated with presence of vertebral deformity.

  18. [Comparison of self-reported anthropometric variables and real measurement data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-García, J; González-Zapata, L I; Estrada-Restrepo, A

    2012-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate self-reporting of weight, height, and waist circumference, and to compare that perception with the real measurements in college students of the MESPYN cohort--Medellin, Salud Pública y Nutrición--from the University of Antioquia (UdeA), Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted starting with the first measurement of the MESPYN Cohort 2009-2010. The sample included volunteer students from different academic areas. Self-perception of weight, height, and waist circumference were recorded before the real measurements were performed. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated for all the variables, and an alpha of 0.05 was used. The concordance between real measurements and self-referred values was evaluated with the Bland and Altman method. 424 volunteer students were included. The average real weight (kg) in males was 67.4 +/- 10.4 and self-reported: 67.0 +/- 11.0; in females the real value was 55.7 +/- 10.1 and self-reported: 55.0 +/- 9.0. The average real height (m) in males was 1.73 +/- 6.1 and self-reported: 1.73 +/- 6.0; in females the real value was 1.60 +/- 5.9 and self-reported: 1.61 +/- 6.0. In males, the average real waist circumference (cm) was 76.6 +/- 8.0 and self-reported: 75.0 +/- 14.0; in females the real value was 69.9 +/- 8.0 and self-reported: 70.0 +/- 9.0. Weight ICC: 0.956, 95% CI (0.95; 0.97), (p < 0.01); height ICC: 0.953, 95%IC (0.91; 0.97), (p < 0.01), and waist circumference ICC: 0.593, 95% IC (0.55; 0.65), (p < 0.01). In conclusion, anthropometric nutritional evaluation of UdeA students can be performed with self-reported data for weight and height, but the evaluation of abdominal obesity requires direct measurement of waist circumference.

  19. Influence of Anthropometric Measurements on Abnormal Gonadotropin Secretion in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haider, S.; Mannan, N.; Qureshi, M. A.; Khan, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of anthropometric measurements on abnormal gonadotropin secretion in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The Institute of Basic Medical Sciences (IBMS), DUHS in collaboration with Gynae/infertility clinics of the Civil Hospital and Lady Dufferin Hospital, Karachi, from October 2010 to February 2011. Methodology: One hundred and sixty three oligomenorrhic PCOS women of reproductive age (18 - 40 years) fulfilling the revised Rotterdam 2003 criteria were studied. The data recorded on a prescribed proforma included current age, age at menarche, menstrual irregularities, presence of hirsuitism, acne, infertility, familial nature, blood pressure, BMI and waisthip ratio. Blood samples for gonadotropin assay were taken randomly on day 6th to 30th of menstrual cycle, in a gel tube. Hormonal assay was performed using chemiluminescent immunoassay. Kruskul Wallis test was used to assess the influence of BMI levels on LH:FSH values. Results: The mean weight was 66.14 +- 11.02 kg and mean BMI was 27.03 +- 4.42 kg/m2. There was no significant difference in mean LH/FSH ratio (p=.575) among BMI groups. However, there was a positive correlation between BMI and LH:FSH ratio (p=0.04, r=0.155). Conclusion: There was high frequency of obesity (69%) in women with PCOS. Although no significant difference was found between mean LH:FSH ratio among different BMI groups levels but significant correlation between BMI levels and LH: FSH suggested that there was positive relation between BMI and LH: FSH. (author)

  20. Predicting gestational diabetes mellitus during the first trimester using anthropometric measurements and HOMA-IR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alptekin, Hüsnü; Çizmecioğlu, Ahmet; Işık, Hatice; Cengiz, Türkan; Yildiz, Murat; Iyisoy, Mehmet Sinan

    2016-05-01

    To determine the predictability of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) during the first trimester using the degree of insulin resistance and anthropometric measurements and to assign the risk of developing GDM by weight gained during pregnancy (WGDP). A total of 250 singleton pregnancies at 7-12 gestational weeks were studied. Body mass index (BMI), waist/hip ratio (WHR), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) scores and WGDP were determined. The backward stepwise method was applied to estimate possible associations with GDM. Cutoff points were estimated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. GDM was found in 20 of 227 singleton pregnancies (8.8 %). The calculated HOMA-IR, QUICKI, BMI, WHR, WGDP, and parity were significantly associated with GDM. Logistic regression analyses showed that three covariates (HOMA-IR, BMI, WGDP) remained independently associated with GDM. It was calculated as OR 1.254 (95 % CI 1.006-1.563), AUC 0.809, sensitivity 90 %, specificity 61 % with cutoff = 2.08 for HOMA-IR; OR 1.157 (CI 1.045-1.281), AUC 0.723, sensitivity 80 %, specificity 58 % with cutoff = 25.95 for BMI; OR 1.221, (CI 1.085-1.374), AUC 0.654, sensitivity 80 %, specificity 46 % with cutoff = 4.7 for WGDP. Despite a HOMA-IR score of >3.1 in pregnant women, GDM was detected in only three of 29 patients (10.3 %) if WGDP was HOMA-IR. In particular, if BMI is >25.95 kg/m(2) and the HOMA-IR score >2.08, controlling weight gain may protect against GDM.

  1. Preference and intake frequency of high sodium foods and dishes and their correlations with anthropometric measurements among Malaysian subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Choong, Stella Sinn-Yee; Balan, Sumitha Nair; Chua, Leong-Siong; Say, Yee-How

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the preference and intake frequency of a list of 15 commonly available high sodium Malaysian foods/dishes, discretionary salt use, and their possible association with demographics, blood pressures and anthropometric measurements among 300 Malaysian university students (114 males, 186 females; 259 ethnic Chinese, 41 Indians; 220 lean, 80 overweight). French fries and instant soup noodle were found to be the most preferred and most frequently consumed salty food, respect...

  2. Relation of anthropometric measurements to ocular biometric changes and refractive error in children with thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkitkat, Rania S; El-Shazly, Amany A; Ebeid, Weam M; Deghedy, Marwa R

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate and correlate anthropometric, biometric, and refractive error changes in thalassemia major (TM). One hundred children with TM and another hundred healthy controls were recruited. Height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC) were the anthropometric parameters recorded. Full ophthalmologic examination was performed, including best-corrected visual acuity, cycloplegic refraction, slit-lamp examination, Goldmann applanation tonometry, indirect ophthalmoscopy, keratometry (K readings), and ocular biometry. Compared to controls, children with TM were shorter and lighter, with a smaller BMI (pbiometric data, patients with thalassemia had steeper mean K readings (p = 0.03), shorter axial length (AXL) (p = 0.005), shorter vitreous chamber depth (pbiometric changes (steeper corneas and thicker lenses) to reach emmetropization, with an exaggerated response and subsequent myopic shift. However, growth retardation is not directly related to ocular growth changes, myopic shift, or variations in biometric parameters.

  3. The Relation of Q Angle and Anthropometric Measures with Ankle Sprain; a Case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Zamani Moghadam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since most studies on ankle sprain are medical and sports-related and not much epidemiologic and etiologic data from the general population exist in this field, the present study evaluates the relationship between Q angle and anthropometric measures with ankle sprain in the general population.Methods: In the present case-control study, all of the patients over 18 years age presenting to emergency departments (ED of two educational Hospitals, complaining from ankle sprain, were evaluated during more than 1 year. A checklist consisting of demographic data, height, weight, body mass index (BMI, and history of ankle sprain, as well as degree of Q angle was filled for all participants. The correlation of mentioned variables with incidence of ankle sprain was calculated using SPSS 22.Results: 300 patients with ankle sprain were evaluated (53.5% male. Mean age of the patients was 37.03 ± 14.20 years. Mean weight, height, and BMI were 71.71 ± 11.26 (43 – 114, 168.74 ± 8.63 (143 – 190 and 25.14 ± 3.19 (18.41 – 38.95, respectively. Mean Q angle of the patients was 12.78 ± 3.19 degrees (5 – 23. There was a significant correlation between weight (p < 0.001, BMI (p = 0.001, history of sprain (r: 0.26, p < 0.001 and Q angle (p = 0.002 with incidence of ankle sprain. In addition, there was a significant statistical correlation between weight (p = 0.031, BMI (p = 0.020 and Q angle (p = 0.004 with history of ankle sprain. In patients with a history of ankle sprain, Q angle was wider by about 2 degrees.Conclusion: It seems that the prevalence of ankle sprain directly correlates with high weight, BMI, and Q angle and is more prevalent in those with a history of sprain. Although the findings of the present study show a statistically significant correlation between these factors and ankle sprain, the correlation is not clinically significant.

  4. The Relationship of Static Anthropometric Measurements to Lower Leg, Ankle, and Foot Injuries in Air Force Academy Cadets: A Prospective Longitudinal Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McMahon, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to investigate the relationship between static anthropometric measures or demographical information and overuse injuries in the lower leg, ankle and foot...

  5. Standardization of UV LED measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppeldauer, G. P.; Larason, T. C.; Yoon, H. W.

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally used source spectral-distribution or detector spectral-response based standards cannot be applied for accurate UV LED measurements. Since the CIE standardized rectangular-shape spectral response function for UV measurements cannot be realized with small spectral mismatch when using filtered detectors, the UV measurement errors can be several times ten percent or larger. The UV LEDs produce broadband radiation and both their peaks or spectral bandwidths can change significantly. The detectors used for the measurement of these LEDs also have different spectral bandwidths. In the discussed example, where LEDs with 365 nm peak are applied for fluorescent crack-recognition using liquid penetrant (non-destructive) inspection, the broadband radiometric LED (signal) measurement procedure is standardized. A UV LED irradiance-source was calibrated against an FEL lamp standard to determine its spectral irradiance. The spectral irradiance responsivity of a reference UV meter was also calibrated. The output signal of the reference UV meter was calculated from the spectral irradiance of the UV source and the spectral irradiance responsivity of the reference UV meter. From the output signal, both the integrated irradiance (in the reference plane of the reference meter) and the integrated responsivity of the reference meter were determined. Test UV meters calibrated for integrated responsivity against the reference UV meter, can be used to determine the integrated irradiance from a field UV source. The obtained 5 % (k=2) measurement uncertainty can be decreased when meters with spectral response close to a constant value are selected.

  6. The association between anthropometric measures and lung function in a population-based study of Canadian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, A; Hernandez, P; Kuhle, S; Kirkland, S

    2017-10-01

    Decreased lung function has health impacts beyond diagnosable lung disease. It is therefore important to understand the factors that may influence even small changes in lung function including obesity, physical fitness and physical activity. The aim of this study was to determine the anthropometric measure most useful in examining the association with lung function and to determine how physical activity and physical fitness influence this association. The current study used cross-sectional data on 4662 adults aged 40-79 years from the Canadian Health Measures Survey Cycles 1 and 2. Linear regression models were used to examine the association between the anthropometric and lung function measures (forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV 1 ] and forced vital capacity [FVC]); R 2 values were compared among models. Physical fitness and physical activity terms were added to the models and potential confounding was assessed. Models using sum of 5 skinfolds and waist circumference consistently had the highest R 2 values for FEV 1 and FVC, while models using body mass index consistently had among the lowest R 2 values for FEV 1 and FVC and for men and women. Physical activity and physical fitness were confounders of the relationships between waist circumference and the lung function measures. Waist circumference remained a significant predictor of FVC but not FEV 1 after adjustment for physical activity or physical fitness. Waist circumference is an important predictor of lung function. Physical activity and physical fitness should be considered as potential confounders of the relationship between anthropometric measures and lung function. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Anthropometric midarm measurements can detect systemic fat-free mass depletion in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.F. Sanchez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to determine whether anthropometric measurements of the midarm (MA could identify subjects with whole body fat-free mass (FFM depletion. Fifty-five patients (31% females; age: 64.6 ± 9.3 years with mild/very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, 18 smokers without COPD (39% females; age: 49.0 ± 7.3 years and 23 never smoked controls (57% females; age: 48.2 ± 9.6 years were evaluated. Spirometry, muscle strength and MA circumference were measured. MA muscle area was estimated by anthropometry and MA cross-sectional area by computerized tomography (CT scan. Bioelectrical impedance was used as the reference method for FFM. MA circumference and MA muscle area correlated with FFM and biceps and triceps strength. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that MA circumference and MA muscle area cut-off points presented sensitivity and specificity >82% to discriminate FFM-depleted subjects. CT scan measurements did not provide improved sensitivity or specificity. For all groups, there was no significant statistical difference between MA muscle area [35.2 (29.3-45.0 cm²] and MA cross-sectional area values [36.4 (28.5-43.3 cm²] and the linear correlation coefficient between tests was r = 0.77 (P < 0.001. However, Bland-Altman plots revealed wide 95% limits of agreement (-14.7 to 15.0 cm² between anthropometric and CT scan measurements. Anthropometric MA measurements may provide useful information for identifying subjects with whole body FFM depletion. This is a low-cost technique and can be used in a wider patient population to identify those likely to benefit from a complete body composition evaluation.

  8. Anthropometric and performance measures for the development of a talent detection and identification model in youth handball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Hasan; Vaeyens, Roel; Matthys, Stijn; Multael, Marc; Lefevre, Johan; Lenoir, Matthieu; Philppaerts, Renaat

    2009-02-01

    The first part of this study examined in which basic morphological and fitness measures Under-14 (n=34) and Under-16 (n=47) male youth handball players differ from reference samples of the same age (n=430 and n=570, respectively). To help develop a talent identification model, the second part of the study investigated which specific morphological and performance measures describe differences between elite (n=18) and non-elite (n=29) Under-16 youth handball players. The results showed that Under-16 handball players were significantly taller than the reference group; this was not the case in the Under-14 age group. Physical fitness in handball players was significantly better than in the reference groups. Multivariate analysis of covariance (maturation and chronological age as covariates) showed that the Under-16 elite players were heavier and had greater muscle circumferences than their non-elite peers. Elite players scored significantly better on strength, speed and agility, and cardiorespiratory endurance but not on balance, upper limb speed, flexibility or upper body muscular endurance. Maturation was a significant covariate in anthropometric measures but not in physical performance. Discriminant analysis between elite and non-elite players revealed that height, running speed, and agility are important parameters for talent identification. Specific anthropometric measures, in addition to some performance measures, are useful for talent identification in youth handball.

  9. Association of anthropometric measures with fat and fat-free mass in the elderly: The Rotterdam study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhana, Klodian; Koolhaas, Chantal M; Schoufour, Josje D; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Kavousi, Maryam; Franco, Oscar H

    2016-06-01

    The decrease in fat-free mass (FFM) seen in many elderly people is usually associated with an increase in fat mass (FM), a state referred to as sarcopenic obesity. It is not clear which anthropometric measures are best used to identify sarcopenic obesity. We therefore evaluated which anthropometric measures are differentially associated with FM and FFM. The anthropometric measures tested were body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and a body shape index (ABSI = WC/(BMI(2/3)*Height(1/2))). FM and FFM were estimated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. An index-score was calculated for both FM (FMI) and FFM (FFMI) by dividing FM and FFM by height. Multivariable linear regression models were used to assess the associations of BMI, WC and ABSI with FMI and FFMI among 3612 participants (2092 women) from the prospective population-based Rotterdam Study. In multivariate models adjusted for confounders, BMI and WC were positively associated with both FMI and FFMI in men and women. ABSI was positively associated with FMI (β 1.01, 95% confidence interval (95%CI) 0.85, 1.17) and negatively associated with FFMI (β -0.28, 95%CI -0.38, -0.17) in men. In women, ABSI was not associated with FMI and was positively associated with FFMI (β 0.18, 95%CI 0.10, 0.26). While BMI and WC were both positively associated with FM and FFM, ABSI showed a differential association with FM and FFM in men, but not in women. Since sarcopenic obesity is associated with decreased FFM and increased FM, ABSI could be a useful tool for identifying men at higher risk of sarcopenic obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Simple anthropometric measures correlate with metabolic risk indicators as strongly as magnetic resonance imaging-measured adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, Rebecca; Shen, Wei; Bacchetti, Peter; Kotler, Donald; Lewis, Cora E; Shlipak, Michael G; Heymsfield, Steven B; Grunfeld, Carl

    2008-06-01

    Studies in persons without HIV infection have compared percentage body fat (%BF) and waist circumference as markers of risk for the complications of excess adiposity, but only limited study has been conducted in HIV-infected subjects. We compared anthropometric and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based adiposity measures as correlates of metabolic complications of adiposity in HIV-infected and control subjects. The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 666 HIV-positive and 242 control subjects in the Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection (FRAM) study assessing body mass index (BMI), waist (WC) and hip (HC) circumferences, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), %BF, and MRI-measured regional adipose tissue. Study outcomes were 3 metabolic risk variables [homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol]. Analyses were stratified by sex and HIV status and adjusted for demographic, lifestyle, and HIV-related factors. In HIV-infected and control subjects, univariate associations with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL were strongest for WC, MRI-measured visceral adipose tissue, and WHR; in all cases, differences in correlation between the strongest measures for each outcome were small (r HDL, WC appeared to be the best anthropometric correlate of metabolic complications, whereas, for triglycerides, the best was WHR. Relations of simple anthropometric measures with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol are approximately as strong as MRI-measured whole-body adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects.

  11. Simple anthropometric measures correlate with metabolic risk indicators as strongly as magnetic resonance imaging–measured adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, Rebecca; Shen, Wei; Bacchetti, Peter; Kotler, Donald; Lewis, Cora E; Shlipak, Michael G; Heymsfield, Steven B

    2008-01-01

    Background Studies in persons without HIV infection have compared percentage body fat (%BF) and waist circumference as markers of risk for the complications of excess adiposity, but only limited study has been conducted in HIV-infected subjects. Objective We compared anthropometric and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)–based adiposity measures as correlates of metabolic complications of adiposity in HIV-infected and control subjects. Design The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 666 HIV-positive and 242 control subjects in the Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection (FRAM) study assessing body mass index (BMI), waist (WC) and hip (HC) circumferences, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), %BF, and MRI-measured regional adipose tissue. Study outcomes were 3 metabolic risk variables [homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol]. Analyses were stratified by sex and HIV status and adjusted for demographic, lifestyle, and HIV-related factors. Results In HIV-infected and control subjects, univariate associations with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL were strongest for WC, MRI-measured visceral adipose tissue, and WHR; in all cases, differences in correlation between the strongest measures for each outcome were small (r ≤ 0.07). Multivariate adjustment found no significant difference for optimally fitting models between the use of anthropometric and MRI measures, and the magnitudes of differences were small (adjusted R2 ≤ 0.06). For HOMA and HDL, WC appeared to be the best anthropometric correlate of metabolic complications, whereas, for triglycerides, the best was WHR. Conclusion Relations of simple anthropometric measures with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol are approximately as strong as MRI-measured whole-body adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects. PMID:18541572

  12. Conformity of pre-gestational weight measurement and agreement of anthropometric data reported by pregnant women and those recorded in prenatal cards, City of Rio de Janeiro, 2007-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niquini, Roberta Pereira; Bittencourt, Sonia Azevedo; Leal, Maria do Carmo

    2013-09-01

    To assess the conformity of the weight measurement process in the pre-gestational care offered in the city of Rio de Janeiro by primary units and hospitals of the National Health System, as well as to verify the agreement between the anthropometric data reported by pregnant women and those recorded in prenatal cards. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2007 - 2008 with two cluster samples: one to obtain a sample of pregnant women to be interviewed and another one for the weight measurement procedures to be observed. The conformity of the weight measurement process was evaluated according to the Ministry of Health standards, and the agreement between the two sources of anthropometric data was evaluated using mean differences, Bland-Altman method, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and weighted Kappa. Out of the twelve criteria for weight measurement evaluation (n = 159 observations), three weren't in conformity (conformity), two of them only need to be assessed when the scale is mechanical. For the interviewed pregnant women (n = 2,148), who had the two sources of anthropometric data, there was a tendency of self-reported height overestimation and pre-gestational and current weight and Body Mass Index underestimation. Accordance between the two sources of anthropometric information, according to ICC and weighted Kappa, were high (> 0.80). Studies may use weight and height information reported by pregnant women, in the absence of prenatal cards records, when it is an important economy to their execution, although the improvement of these two sources of information by means of better anthropometric process is necessary.

  13. Effects of Zinc Supplementation on the Anthropometric Measurements, Lipid Profiles and Fasting Blood Glucose in the Healthy Obese Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepide Mahluji

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of zinc supplementation on anthropometric measures, improving lipid profile biomarkers, and fasting blood glucose level in obese people. Methods: This randomized, double- blind clinical trial was carried out on 60 obese participants in the 18-45 age range for one month. The participants were randomly divided into the intervention group, who received 30 mg/d zinc gluconate, and the placebo group who received 30mg/d starch. Anthropometric measurements (body mass index (BMI, weight and waist circumference were recorded before and at the end of study. Lipid profile biomarkers and fasting blood glucose were determined using enzymatic procedure. Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA test was run to compare the post-treatment values of the two groups, and t-test was conducted to compare within group changes. Results: Serum zinc concentration was increased significantly in intervention group (p=0.024. BMI and body weight was significantly decreased (p=0.030 and p=0.020, respectively. Lipid profile biomarkers and fating blood glucose did not change significantly but triglyceride level was significantly decreased (p=0.006 in the intervention group. Conclusion: The obtained results indicate that zinc supplementation improves BMI, body weight, and triglyceride concentration without considerable effects on lipid profile and glucose level. Zinc can be suggested as a suitable supplementation therapy for obese people, but more studies are needed to verify the results.

  14. A Comparison of Anthropometric Measures for Assessing the Association between Body Size and Risk of Chronic Low Back Pain: The HUNT Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Heuch

    Full Text Available Previous work indicates that overweight and obese individuals carry an increased risk of experiencing chronic low back pain (LBP. It is not known, however, how the association with body size depends on the choice of anthropometric measure used.This work compares relationships with LBP for several measures of body size. Different results may indicate underlying mechanisms for the association between body size and risk of LBP.In a cohort study, baseline information was collected in the community-based HUNT2 (1995-1997 and HUNT3 (2006-2008 surveys in Norway. Participants were 10,059 women and 8725 men aged 30-69 years without LBP, and 3883 women and 2662 men with LBP at baseline. Associations with LBP at end of follow-up were assessed by generalized linear modeling, with adjustment for potential confounders.Relationships between waist-hip-ratio and occurrence of LBP at end of follow-up were weak and non-significant after adjustment for age, education, work status, physical activity, smoking, lipid levels and blood pressure. Positive associations with LBP at end of follow-up were all significant for body weight, BMI, waist circumference and hip circumference after similar adjustment, both in women without and with LBP at baseline, and in men without LBP at baseline. After additional mutual adjustment for anthropometric measures, the magnitude of the association with body weight increased in women without LBP at baseline (RR: 1.130 per standard deviation, 95% CI: 0.995-1.284 and in men (RR: 1.124, 95% CI 0.976-1.294, with other measures showing weak associations only.Central adiposity is unlikely to play a major role in the etiology of LBP. Total fat mass may be one common factor underlying the associations observed. The association with body weight remaining after mutual adjustment may reflect mechanical or structural components behind the relationship between overweight or obesity and LBP.

  15. Polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor and their associations with risk of schizophrenia and selected anthropometric measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoko, H Y; Nancarrow, D J; Mowry, B J; McGrath, J J

    2006-01-01

    The association between vitamin D levels and skeletal growth has long been recognized. However, exposure to low levels of vitamin D during early life is also known to alter brain development, and is a candidate risk factor for schizophrenia. This study examines the association between four polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and 1) risk of schizophrenia, and 2) three anthropometric variables (height, head size, and head shape). Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs10735810/FokI, rs1544410/BsmI, rs7975232/ApaI, and rs731236/TaqI) in the VDR gene were genotyped in 179 individuals with schizophrenia and 189 healthy controls. No significant associations were detected between any of the four VDR SNPs and risk of schizophrenia. Patients were slightly but significantly shorter compared to controls. Of the four SNPs, only rs10735810/FokI was associated with any of the anthropometric measures: the M4 isoform of this SNP was significantly associated with larger head size (P = 0.002). In light of the evidence demonstrating a role for vitamin D during brain development, the association between polymorphisms in VDR and brain development warrants closer scrutiny.

  16. Acculturation and changes in dietary behavior and anthropometric measures among Chinese international students in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jounghee; Gao, Ran-Ran; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2015-06-01

    International students face dissimilar food environments, which could lead to changes in dietary behaviors and anthropometric characteristics between before and after migration. We sought to examine the risk factors, including dietary behaviors, acculturation, and demographic characteristics, related to overweight subjects residing in South Korea. We conducted a cross-sectional study, collecting data from 142 Chinese international students (63 males, 79 females) in 2013. The mean age of the subjects was 25.4 years, and almost half of them immigrated to South Korea to earn a master's degree or doctoral degree (n = 70, 49.3%). Chinese international students showed an increase in skipping meals and eating speed, but a decrease in the frequency of fruit and vegetable consumption in South Korea compared to when they lived in China. We found a statistically significant increase in weight (69.4 → 73.9 kg) and BMI (22.4 → 23.8 kg/m(2)) for male subjects (P < 0.001) but no change for female subjects. We also found that overweight subjects were more likely to be highly acculturated and male compared with normal-weight subjects. Among Chinese international students living in South Korea, male and more highly acculturated subjects are more vulnerable to weight gain. This study provides useful information to design tailored nutrition intervention programs for Chinese international students.

  17. Estimation of sex from the anthropometric ear measurements of a Sudanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Altayeb Abdalla; Omer, Nosyba

    2015-09-01

    The external ear and its prints have multifaceted roles in medico-legal practice, e.g., identification and facial reconstruction. Furthermore, its norms are essential in the diagnosis of congenital anomalies and the design of hearing aids. Body part dimensions vary in different ethnic groups, so the most accurate statistical estimations of biological attributes are developed using population-specific standards. Sudan lacks comprehensive data about ear norms; moreover, there is a universal rarity in assessing the possibility of sex estimation from ear dimensions using robust statistical techniques. Therefore, this study attempts to establish data for normal adult Sudanese Arabs, assessing the existence of asymmetry and developing a population-specific equation for sex estimation. The study sample comprised 200 healthy Sudanese Arab volunteers (100 males and 100 females) in the age range of 18-30years. The physiognomic ear length and width, lobule length and width, and conchal length and width measurements were obtained by direct anthropometry, using a digital sliding caliper. Moreover, indices and asymmetry were assessed. Data were analyzed using basic descriptive statistics and discriminant function analyses employing jackknife validations of classification results. All linear dimensions used were sexually dimorphic except lobular lengths. Some of the variables and indices show asymmetry. Ear dimensions showed cross-validated sex classification accuracy ranging between 60.5% and 72%. Hence, the ear measurements cannot be used as an effective tool in the estimation of sex. However, in the absence of other more reliable means, it still can be considered a supportive trait in sex estimation. Further, asymmetry should be considered in identification from the ear measurements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Impact of Different Anthropometric Measures on Sustained Normotension, White Coat Hypertension, Masked Hypertension, and Sustained Hypertension in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Afsar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMany studies have aimed to determine whether body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, or waist to hip ratio (WHR best predicts hypertension in diabetic patients, with conflicting results. However, no study has examined the specific relationship between these anthropometric parameters with sustained normotension (SNT, white coat hypertension (WCHT, masked hypertension (MHT, and sustained hypertension (SHT based on office and ambulatory blood pressure (BP measurements in these patients.MethodsPatients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes underwent the following procedures: history taking, measurements of anthropometric parameters, office and ambulatory BP measurements, physical examination, laboratory analysis, and random and 24-hour urine analysis.ResultsIn total, there were 65 dippers and 37 nondipper patients. None of the anthropometric parameters were different between the dippers and the nondippers. There were 25 patients with SNT, 32 with WCHT, seven with MHT, and 38 with SHT. A comparison of anthropometric parameters between these four groups of patients showed that WC (P=0.016 and WHR (P=0.015 were different among all groups. According to regression analysis, only BMI was independently related with MHT (odds ratio [OR], 1.373, P=0.022, whereas only WC has been associated with SHT (OR, 1.321, P=0.041.ConclusionAmong anthropometric parameters, only WC and WHR were different in SNT, WCHT, MHT, and SHT in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes.

  19. Levels of DDT and its metabolites in placenta, maternal and cord blood and their potential influence on neonatal anthropometric measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Saleh, Iman, E-mail: iman@kfshrc.edu.sa [Environmental Health Section, Biological and Medical Research Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Doush, Inaam; Alsabbaheen, Ammar [Environmental Health Section, Biological and Medical Research Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Mohamed, Gamal El Din [Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Scientific Computing Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Rabbah, Abdullah [Department of Pediatrics, King Khalid Hospital, Al-Kharj (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies of in utero exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) have shown mixed results for the harmful effects on fetal growth and development. This cross-sectional study was designed to: (1) examine the extent of DDT exposure in 1578 women, aged 28.5 {+-} 6.0 who delivered between June 2005 and 2006 in the area of Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia; and (2) assess its influence on neonatal anthropometric measurement of newly born babies. DDT and its metabolites, namely 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethylene (p,p Prime -DDE), 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane (p,p Prime -DDD) and 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2 Prime bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane (p,p Prime -DDT) were measured in cord and maternal serum as well as placenta by Gas Chromatography coupled with an Electron Capture Detector (GC/ECD). p,p Prime -DDE was detected in 28.3% of cord and 54.4% of maternal serum, reflecting past exposure, whereas the p,p Prime -DDT was only found in 0.46% cord and 1.2% maternal samples. As expected the p,p Prime -DDE cord levels (0.197 {+-} 0.961 {mu}g/L) were 2.8 times lower than the maternal levels (0.551 {+-} 1.778 {mu}g/L), and both were significantly correlated (r = 0.517) suggesting its transplacental transfer. The picture was different in placental tissues. p,p Prime -DDE and p,p Prime -DDT were detected in 84% and 99% of placental tissues, with the highest p,p Prime -DDT in placental tissues (29.62 {+-} 158.282 Micro-Sign g/kg dry wt.) compare to p,p Prime -DDE (10.167 {+-} 18.851 {mu}g/kg dry wt.). In general, the presence of DDT metabolites in our participants indicates that these chemicals are still relevant despite the fact that they have been banned or restricted in the study area for many years. Our results support the view for an association between low in utero exposure to DDT and the anthropometric development of the fetus leading to a reduction in its head circumference, crown-heel length, birth weight and birth height. Since the reduction in these

  20. Case-control study of anthropometric measures and testicular cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio eGiannandrea

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs is poorly understood. Recent epidemiological findings suggest that TGCT risk is determined very early in life, although the available data are still conflicting. The rapid growth of the testes during puberty may be another period of vulnerability. Body size has received increasing attention as possible risk factor for TC. To clarify the relation of body size and its anthropometric variables to TGCT risk, the authors analyzed data from 272 cases and 382 controls with regard to height (cm, weight (Kg and body mass index (BMI; kg/m2. Overall, participants in the highest quartile of height were more likely to be diagnosed with TGCTs than participants in the lowest quartile of height, OR 2.22 (95% confidence intervals (CI: 1.25-3.93; adjusted; ptrend = 0.033. Moreover, histological seminoma subgroup was significantly associated with tallness, very tall men (>182 cm having a seminoma TGCT risk of OR=2.44 (95% confidence intervals (CI: 1.19-4.97; adjusted; ptrend = 0.011. There was also a significant inverse association of TGCT with increasing BMI (ptrend = 0.001; age-adjusted analysis and this association was equally present in both histological subgroups. These preliminary results indicate that testicular cancer is inversely associated with BMI and positively associated with height, in particular with seminoma subtype. Several studies have reported similar findings on body size. As adult height is largely determined by high-calorie intake in childhood and influenced by hormonal factors at puberty, increased attention to postnatal exposures in this interval may help elucidate the etiology of TGCTs.

  1. A training program for anthropometric measurements by a dedicated nutrition support team improves nutritional status assessment of the critically ill child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valla, Frederic V; Ford-Chessel, Carole; Meyer, Rosan; Berthiller, Julien; Dupenloup, Christine; Follin-Arbelet, Nathalie; Hubert, Anna; Javouhey, Etienne; Peretti, Noel

    2015-03-01

    The cornerstone of an optimal nutrition approach in PICUs is to evaluate the nutritional status of any patient. Anthropometric measurements and nutritional indices calculation allow for nutritional status assessment, which is not often part of routine management, as it is considered difficult to perform in this setting. We designed a study to evaluate the impact of a training program by the PICU nutritional support team on the implementation of routine anthropometric measurements on our PICU. A prospective study was performed over a 2-year period, which included: a baseline evaluation of nutritional assessment, knowledge, anthropometric measurements (weight, height, and head and mid upper arm circumferences), and nutritional indices calculation in patient files. This was followed by a training program to implement the newly developed nutrition assessment guidelines, which included anthropometrical measurements and also the interpretation of these. The impact of this nutritional assessment program was reviewed annually for 2 years after the implementation. PICU--Lyon, France. PICU nursing and medical staff, and patients admitted in February 2011, 2012, and 2013. Training program. Ninety-nine percent of staff (n = 145) attended the individual teaching. We found significant progress in nutritional awareness and confidence about nutritional assessment following the teaching program. In addition, an improvement in staff knowledge about undernutrition and its consequences were found. We enrolled 41, 55, and 91 patients in 2011, 2012, and 2013, respectively. There was a significant increase in anthropometric measurements during this time: 32%, 65% (p = 0.002), and 96% in 2013 (p Nutritional indices were calculated in 20%, 74% (p nutritional assessment teaching program that highlights both the importance and techniques of anthropometrical measurements has successfully been implemented in a PICU. It managed to improve staff knowledge and nutritional practice.

  2. Thyroid volume measurement in external beam radiotherapy patients using CT imaging: correlation with clinical and anthropometric characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veres, C; Garsi, J P; Rubino, C; De Vathaire, F; Diallo, I; Pouzoulet, F; Bidault, F; Chavaudra, J; Bridier, A; Ricard, M; Ferreira, I; Lefkopoulos, D

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to define criteria for accurate representation of the thyroid in human models used to represent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) patients and evaluate the relationship between the volume of this organ and clinical and anthropometric characteristics. From CT images, we segmented the thyroid gland and calculated its volume for a population of 188 EBRT patients of both sexes, with ages ranging from 1 to 89 years. To evaluate uncertainties linked to measured volumes, experimental studies on the Livermore anthropomorphic phantom were performed. For our population of EBRT patients, we observed that in children, thyroid volume increased rapidly with age, from about 3 cm 3 at 2 years to about 16 cm 3 at 20. In adults, the mean thyroid gland volume was 23.5 ± 9 cm 3 for males and 17.5 ± 8 cm 3 for females. According to anthropometric parameters, the best fit for children was obtained by modeling the log of thyroid volume as a linear function of body surface area (BSA) (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.04) and for adults, as a linear function of BSA (p < 0.0001) and gender (p = 0.01). This work enabled us to demonstrate that BSA was the best indicator of thyroid volume for both males and females. These results should be taken into account when modeling the volume of the thyroid in human models used to represent EBRT patients for dosimetry in retrospective studies of the relationship between the estimated dose to the thyroid and long-term follow-up data on EBRT patients. (note)

  3. The effect of probiotic soy milk and soy milk on anthropometric measures and blood pressure in patients with type II diabetes mellitus: A randomized double-blind clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Hariri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of this clinical trial was to assess the effects of probiotic soy milk and soy milk on anthropometric measures and blood pressure (BP in type 2 diabetic (T2D patients. METHODS: A total of 40 patients with T2D, 35-68 years old, were assigned to two groups in this randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial. The patients in the intervention group consumed 200 ml/day of probiotic soy milk containing Lactobacillus planetarium A7 and those in control group consumed 200 ml/day of soy milk for 8 weeks. Anthropometric and BP measurements were performed according to standard protocols. For detecting within-group differences paired-sample t-tests was used and analysis of covariance was used for determining any differences between two groups. (The trial has been registered in the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials, identifier: IRCT: IRCT201405265062N8. RESULTS: In this study, we failed to find any significant changes between probiotic soy milk and soy milk in term of body mass index (26.65 ± 0.68 vs. 26.33 ± 0.74, P = 0.300 and waist to hip ratio (1.49 ± 0.08 vs. 1.54 ± 0.1, P = 0.170. Although soy milk did not have any effect on BP, probiotic soymilk significantly decreased systolic (14.7 ± 0.48 vs. 13.05 ± 0.16, P = 0.001 and diastolic BP (10 ± 0.7 vs. 9.1 ± 1, P = 0.031. CONCLUSION: In our study, probiotic soy milk in comparing with soy milk did not have any beneficial effects on anthropometric measures in these patients. We need more clinical trial for confirming the effect of probiotic foods on anthropometric measure in diabetic patients. However, probiotic soy milk decreased systolic and diastolic BP significantly.   

  4. Associations of sedentary behaviour, physical activity, blood pressure and anthropometric measures with cardiorespiratory fitness in children with cerebral palsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Ryan

    Full Text Available Children with cerebral palsy (CP have poor cardiorespiratory fitness in comparison to their peers with typical development, which may be due to low levels of physical activity. Poor cardiorespiratory fitness may contribute to increased cardiometabolic risk.The aim of this study was to determine the association between sedentary behaviour, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness in children with CP. An objective was to determine the association between cardiorespiratory fitness, anthropometric measures and blood pressure in children with CP.This study included 55 ambulatory children with CP [mean (SD age 11.3 (0.2 yr, range 6-17 yr; Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS levels I and II]. Anthropometric measures (BMI, waist circumference and waist-height ratio and blood pressure were taken. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured using a 10 m shuttle run test. Children were classified as low, middle and high fitness according to level achieved on the test using reference curves. Physical activity was measured by accelerometry over 7 days. In addition to total activity, time in sedentary behaviour and light, moderate, vigorous, and sustained moderate-to-vigorous activity (≥10 min bouts were calculated.Multiple regression analyses revealed that vigorous activity (β = 0.339, p<0.01, sustained moderate-to-vigorous activity (β = 0.250, p<0.05 and total activity (β = 0.238, p<0.05 were associated with level achieved on the shuttle run test after adjustment for age, sex and GMFCS level. Children with high fitness spent more time in vigorous activity than children with middle fitness (p<0.05. Shuttle run test level was negatively associated with BMI (r2 = -0.451, p<0.01, waist circumference (r2 = -0.560, p<0.001, waist-height ratio (r2 = -0.560, p<0.001 and systolic blood pressure (r2 = -0.306, p<0.05 after adjustment for age, sex and GMFCS level.Participation in physical activity, particularly at a vigorous intensity, is

  5. Association of Breast Feeding and Birth Weight with Anthropometric Measures and Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents: The CASPIAN-IV Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Djalalinia

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: BW was associated with a higher prevalence in general obesity and a lower prevalence of being underweight. Duration of BF had no significant association with anthropometric measures and BP. Future longitudinal studies are necessary to determine the clinical implications of these findings.

  6. Standard-Setting Methods as Measurement Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Paul; Twing, Jon; Mueller, Canda D.; O'Malley, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Some writers in the measurement literature have been skeptical of the meaningfulness of achievement standards and described the standard-setting process as blatantly arbitrary. We argue that standard setting is more appropriately conceived of as a measurement process similar to student assessment. The construct being measured is the panelists'…

  7. The CODAtwins project: the cohort description of COllaborative project of Development of Anthropometrical measures in Twins to study macro-environmental variation in genetic and environmental effects on anthropometric traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Jelenkovic, Aline; Sund, Reijo; Honda, Chika; Aaltonen, Sari; Yokoyama, Yoshie; Tarnoki, Adam D; Tarnoki, David L; Ning, Feng; Ji, Fuling; Pang, Zengchang; Ordoñana, Juan R; Sánchez-Romera, Juan F; Colodro-Conde, Lucia; Burt, S Alexandra; Klump, Kelly L; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Kandler, Christian; McAdams, Tom A; Eley, Thalia C; Gregory, Alice M; Saudino, Kimberly J; Dubois, Lise; Boivin, Michel; Haworth, Claire MA; Plomin, Robert; Öncel, Sevgi Y; Aliev, Fazil; Stazi, Maria A; Fagnani, Corrado; D'Ippolito, Cristina; Craig, Jeffrey M; Saffery, Richard; Siribaddana, Sisira H; Hotopf, Matthew; Sumathipala, Athula; Spector, Timothy; Mangino, Massimo; Lachance, Genevieve; Gatz, Margaret; Butler, David A; Bayasgalan, Gombojav; Narandalai, Danshiitsoodol; Freitas, Duarte L; Maia, José Antonio; Harden, K Paige; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M; Christensen, Kaare; Skytthe, Axel; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Hong, Changhee; Chong, Youngsook; Derom, Catherine A; Vlietinck, Robert F; Loos, Ruth JF; Cozen, Wendy; Hwang, Amie E; Mack, Thomas M; He, Mingguang; Ding, Xiaohu; Chang, Billy; Silberg, Judy L; Eaves, Lindon J; Maes, Hermine H; Cutler, Tessa L; Hopper, John L; Aujard, Kelly; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Pedersen, Nancy L; Dahl-Aslan, Anna K; Song, Yun-Mi; Yang, Sarah; Lee, Kayoung; Baker, Laura A; Tuvblad, Catherine; Bjerregaard-Andersen, Morten; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Sodemann, Morten; Heikkilä, Kauko; Tan, Qihua; Zhang, Dongfeng; Swan, Gary E; Krasnow, Ruth; Jang, Kerry L; Knafo-Noam, Ariel; Mankuta, David; Abramson, Lior; Lichtenstein, Paul; Krueger, Robert F; McGue, Matt; Pahlen, Shandell; Tynelius, Per; Duncan, Glen E; Buchwald, Dedra; Corley, Robin P; Huibregtse, Brooke M; Nelson, Tracy L; Whitfield, Keith E; Franz, Carol E; Kremen, William S; Lyons, Michael J; Ooki, Syuichi; Brandt, Ingunn; Nilsen, Thomas Sevenius; Inui, Fujio; Watanabe, Mikio; Bartels, Meike; van Beijsterveldt, Toos CEM; Wardle, Jane; Llewellyn, Clare H; Fisher, Abigail; Rebato, Esther; Martin, Nicholas G; Iwatani, Yoshinori; Hayakawa, Kazuo; Rasmussen, Finn; Sung, Joohon; Harris, Jennifer R; Willemsen, Gonneke; Busjahn, Andreas; Goldberg, Jack H; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hur, Yoon-Mi; Sørensen, Thorkild IA; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2015-01-01

    For over one hundred years, the genetics of human anthropometric traits has attracted scientific interest. In particular, height and body mass index (BMI, calculated as kg/m2) have been under intensive genetic research. However, it is still largely unknown whether and how heritability estimates vary between human populations. Opportunities to address this question have increased recently because of the establishment of many new twin cohorts and the increasing accumulation of data in established twin cohorts. We started a new research project to analyze systematically 1) the variation of heritability estimates of height, BMI and their trajectories over the life course between birth cohorts, ethnicities and countries, and 2) to study the effects of birth related factors, education and smoking on these anthropometric traits and whether these effects vary between twin cohorts. We identified 67 twin projects including both monozygotic and dizygotic twins using various sources. We asked for individual level data on height and weight including repeated measurements, birth related traits, background variables, education and smoking. By the end of 2014, 48 projects participated. Together, we have 893,458 height and weight measures (52% females) from 434,723 twin individuals, including 201,192 complete twin pairs (40% monozygotic, 40% same-sex dizygotic and 20% opposite-sex dizygotic) representing 22 countries. This project demonstrates that large-scale international twin studies are feasible and can promote the use of existing data for novel research purposes. PMID:26014041

  8. The CODATwins Project: The Cohort Description of Collaborative Project of Development of Anthropometrical Measures in Twins to Study Macro-Environmental Variation in Genetic and Environmental Effects on Anthropometric Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Jelenkovic, Aline; Sund, Reijo; Honda, Chika; Aaltonen, Sari; Yokoyama, Yoshie; Tarnoki, Adam D; Tarnoki, David L; Ning, Feng; Ji, Fuling; Pang, Zengchang; Ordoñana, Juan R; Sánchez-Romera, Juan F; Colodro-Conde, Lucia; Burt, S Alexandra; Klump, Kelly L; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Kandler, Christian; McAdams, Tom A; Eley, Thalia C; Gregory, Alice M; Saudino, Kimberly J; Dubois, Lise; Boivin, Michel; Haworth, Claire M A; Plomin, Robert; Öncel, Sevgi Y; Aliev, Fazil; Stazi, Maria A; Fagnani, Corrado; D'Ippolito, Cristina; Craig, Jeffrey M; Saffery, Richard; Siribaddana, Sisira H; Hotopf, Matthew; Sumathipala, Athula; Spector, Timothy; Mangino, Massimo; Lachance, Genevieve; Gatz, Margaret; Butler, David A; Bayasgalan, Gombojav; Narandalai, Danshiitsoodol; Freitas, Duarte L; Maia, José Antonio; Harden, K Paige; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M; Christensen, Kaare; Skytthe, Axel; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Hong, Changhee; Chong, Youngsook; Derom, Catherine A; Vlietinck, Robert F; Loos, Ruth J F; Cozen, Wendy; Hwang, Amie E; Mack, Thomas M; He, Mingguang; Ding, Xiaohu; Chang, Billy; Silberg, Judy L; Eaves, Lindon J; Maes, Hermine H; Cutler, Tessa L; Hopper, John L; Aujard, Kelly; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Pedersen, Nancy L; Aslan, Anna K Dahl; Song, Yun-Mi; Yang, Sarah; Lee, Kayoung; Baker, Laura A; Tuvblad, Catherine; Bjerregaard-Andersen, Morten; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Sodemann, Morten; Heikkilä, Kauko; Tan, Qihua; Zhang, Dongfeng; Swan, Gary E; Krasnow, Ruth; Jang, Kerry L; Knafo-Noam, Ariel; Mankuta, David; Abramson, Lior; Lichtenstein, Paul; Krueger, Robert F; McGue, Matt; Pahlen, Shandell; Tynelius, Per; Duncan, Glen E; Buchwald, Dedra; Corley, Robin P; Huibregtse, Brooke M; Nelson, Tracy L; Whitfield, Keith E; Franz, Carol E; Kremen, William S; Lyons, Michael J; Ooki, Syuichi; Brandt, Ingunn; Nilsen, Thomas Sevenius; Inui, Fujio; Watanabe, Mikio; Bartels, Meike; van Beijsterveldt, Toos C E M; Wardle, Jane; Llewellyn, Clare H; Fisher, Abigail; Rebato, Esther; Martin, Nicholas G; Iwatani, Yoshinori; Hayakawa, Kazuo; Rasmussen, Finn; Sung, Joohon; Harris, Jennifer R; Willemsen, Gonneke; Busjahn, Andreas; Goldberg, Jack H; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hur, Yoon-Mi; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2015-08-01

    For over 100 years, the genetics of human anthropometric traits has attracted scientific interest. In particular, height and body mass index (BMI, calculated as kg/m2) have been under intensive genetic research. However, it is still largely unknown whether and how heritability estimates vary between human populations. Opportunities to address this question have increased recently because of the establishment of many new twin cohorts and the increasing accumulation of data in established twin cohorts. We started a new research project to analyze systematically (1) the variation of heritability estimates of height, BMI and their trajectories over the life course between birth cohorts, ethnicities and countries, and (2) to study the effects of birth-related factors, education and smoking on these anthropometric traits and whether these effects vary between twin cohorts. We identified 67 twin projects, including both monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins, using various sources. We asked for individual level data on height and weight including repeated measurements, birth related traits, background variables, education and smoking. By the end of 2014, 48 projects participated. Together, we have 893,458 height and weight measures (52% females) from 434,723 twin individuals, including 201,192 complete twin pairs (40% monozygotic, 40% same-sex dizygotic and 20% opposite-sex dizygotic) representing 22 countries. This project demonstrates that large-scale international twin studies are feasible and can promote the use of existing data for novel research purposes.

  9. Anthropometric measures as fitness indicators in primary school children: The Health Oriented Pedagogical Project (HOPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamen, Asgeir; Fredriksen, Per Morten

    2018-05-01

    As children's fitness continues to decline, frequent and systematic monitoring of fitness is important. Easy-to-use and low-cost methods with acceptable accuracy are essential in screening situations. This study aimed to investigate how the measurements of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) relate to selected measurements of fitness in children. A total of 1731 children from grades 1 to 6 were selected who had a complete set of height, body mass, running performance, handgrip strength and muscle mass measurements. A composite fitness score was established from the sum of sex- and age-specific z-scores for the variables running performance, handgrip strength and muscle mass. This fitness z-score was compared to z-scores and quartiles of BMI, WC and WHtR using analysis of variance, linear regression and receiver operator characteristic analysis. The regression analysis showed that z-scores for BMI, WC and WHtR all were linearly related to the composite fitness score, with WHtR having the highest R 2 at 0.80. The correct classification of fit and unfit was relatively high for all three measurements. WHtR had the best prediction of fitness of the three with an area under the curve of 0.92 ( p fit and unfit in this population.

  10. Prevalence of Neck and Back Pain amongst Aircrew at the Extremes of Anthropometric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    Nutrition Examination Survey III for body measurements (Westar, Inc., 1988). Many of the safety features of current aircraft are developed to...Detailed description Sport and PT Physical exercise, soccer Due to sports activities Running or heavy lifting caused by lower back pain...injury last month Lower back muscle pull from playing sports Injured back in high school football Physical exercise, soccer Bad posture

  11. Efficacy of anthropometric measures for identifying cardiovascular disease risk in adolescents: review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenauer, Michael; Wheatley, Sean D; Martyn-St James, Marrissa; Duncan, Michael J; Cobayashi, Fernanda; Berg, Gabriela; Musso, Carla; Graffigna, Mabel; Soutelo, Jimena; Bovet, Pascal; Kollias, Anastasios; Stergiou, George S; Grammatikos, Evangelos; Griffiths, Claire; Ingle, Lee; Jung, Christian

    2018-04-12

    To compare the ability of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist to height ratio (WHtR) to estimate cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk levels in adolescents. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed after a database search for relevant literature (Cochrane, Centre for Review and Dissemination, PubMed, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, BIOSIS citation index, ChildData, metaRegister). 117 records representing 96 studies with 994,595 participants were included in the systematic review, 14 of which (13 studies, n=14,610) were eligible for the meta-analysis. The results of the meta-analysis showed that BMI was a strong indicator of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and insulin; but not total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein or glucose. Few studies were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis considering WC or WHtR (n≤2). The narrative synthesis found measures of central adiposity to be consistently valid indicators of the same risk factors as BMI. BMI was an indicator of CVD risk. WC and WHtR were efficacious for indicating the same risk factors BMI performed strongly for, though there was insufficient evidence to judge the relative strength of each measure possibly due to heterogeneity in the methods for measuring and classifying WC.

  12. Apolipoprotein E gene polymorphism and its effect on anthropometric measures in normoglycemic subjects and type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabatabaei-Malazy Ozra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apolipoprotein E (apo E plays a major role in lipid metabolism, obesity and accordingly in development of diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD. Our main objective was to evaluate the association between apo E gene polymorphism with anthropometric measures. Methods Participants were selected from zone 17 Tehran/Iran. We assessed height, weight, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, blood pressure, serum fasting blood sugar, total cholesterol and triglycerides. Genotyping for apo E gene polymorphism was carried out using PCR-RFLP technique. Results Among total study population (n=311, 156 subjects were diabetic. The apo E3/E3 was the most common genotype in our population while E2 and E4 alleles had lower frequencies, respectively. After adjustment for diabetes, the apo E2 and E4 alleles were significantly associated with hypercholesterolemia and WC, respectively (p= 0.009, 0.034. This association was also related to sex and age. The probability of having abdominal obesity in E4 allele carriers was increased from 0.22 to 8.12 in women and to 3.08 in age ≥ 50 years. Conclusions Apo E polymorphism had significant influences on WC and total cholesterol level in patients with type 2 diabetes. This study highlights the importance of lifestyle modifications which may be more beneficial in hypercholesterolemic women carriers of E2 and E4 alleles concomitant central obesity.

  13. The role of geriatric assessment tests and anthropometric measurements in identifying the risk of falls in elderly nursing home residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardimci, Bulent; Aran, Sinan N.; Ozkaya, Ismail; Aksoy, Sevki M.; Demir, Tarik; Tezcan, Gulsen; Kaptanoglu, Aysegul Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the relation among the risk of falls, geriatric assessment, and anthropometric measurements, including the mini mental state examination, geriatric depression scale, handgrip test, and key pinch test. Methods: This prospective study included 89 residents hospitalized between May 2014 and September 2015 in the geriatric care unit of the Istanbul Balikli Rum Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. Patients were followed-up for one year, and their falls were recorded. Medical records of the included patients were retrieved and analyzed. Results: A total of 89 patients, comprising 37 men and 52 women with an average age of 75.8 ± 8.2 years were included in the study. The residents’ annual falling averages were 1.0 ± 1.5. The most significant factors were identified to be predicted muscle mass, skeletal muscle index, whole body bioimpedance, dominant arm muscle strength, dominant arm bioimpedance, and free fat mass. Conclusions: The mini mental test, geriatric depression scale and lawton-brody scale combined with the handgrip, 6-meters walking, and bioimpedance tests are favorable for detecting the risk of falls and recurrent falls in vulnerable elderly nursing home residents. PMID:27652361

  14. Body configuration as a predictor of mortality: comparison of five anthropometric measures in a 12 year follow-up of the Norwegian HUNT 2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petursson, Halfdan; Sigurdsson, Johann A; Bengtsson, Calle; Nilsen, Tom I L; Getz, Linn

    2011-01-01

    Distribution of body fat is more important than the amount of fat as a prognostic factor for life expectancy. Despite that, body mass index (BMI) still holds its status as the most used indicator of obesity in clinical work. We assessed the association of five different anthropometric measures with mortality in general and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in particular using Cox proportional hazards models. Predictive properties were compared by computing integrated discrimination improvement and net reclassification improvement for two different prediction models. The measures studied were BMI, waist circumference, hip circumference, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR). The study population was a prospective cohort of 62,223 Norwegians, age 20-79, followed up for mortality from 1995-1997 to the end of 2008 (mean follow-up 12.0 years) in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT 2). After adjusting for age, smoking and physical activity WHR and WHtR were found to be the strongest predictors of death. Hazard ratios (HRs) for CVD mortality per increase in WHR of one standard deviation were 1.23 for men and 1.27 for women. For WHtR, these HRs were 1.24 for men and 1.23 for women. WHR offered the greatest integrated discrimination improvement to the prediction models studied, followed by WHtR and waist circumference. Hip circumference was in strong inverse association with mortality when adjusting for waist circumference. In all analyses, BMI had weaker association with mortality than three of the other four measures studied. Our study adds further knowledge to the evidence that BMI is not the most appropriate measure of obesity in everyday clinical practice. WHR can reliably be measured and is as easy to calculate as BMI and is currently better documented than WHtR. It appears reasonable to recommend WHR as the primary measure of body composition and obesity.

  15. Anthropometric Measurements of the Human Distal Femur: A Study of the Adult Malay Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Fitdriyah; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Sa'at, Azlin; Aziz, Azian Abd.; Hossain, Md. Golam; Kamarul, T.; Syahrom, Ardiyansyah

    2013-01-01

    The distal femurs of 100 subjects (50 men, 50 women) from the Malay population aged between 19 and 38 years were scanned to measure the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) width. The mean AP values were 64.02 ± 3.38 mm and 57.33 ± 3.26 mm for men and women, respectively, and the mean ML values were 74.91 ± 3.52 mm and 64.53 ± 3.07 mm. We compared our data to that published previously for the Chinese and Indian populations. It was found that the Malay population had smaller distal femur than that of the Chinese but was larger than that of the Indian population (P population, the variations in different Asian ethnicities may need to be considered when designing the appropriate knee implant. PMID:24294597

  16. Single camera multi-view anthropometric measurement of human height and mid-upper arm circumference using linear regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingying; Sowmya, Arcot; Khamis, Heba

    2018-01-01

    Manually measured anthropometric quantities are used in many applications including human malnutrition assessment. Training is required to collect anthropometric measurements manually, which is not ideal in resource-constrained environments. Photogrammetric methods have been gaining attention in recent years, due to the availability and affordability of digital cameras. The primary goal is to demonstrate that height and mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC)-indicators of malnutrition-can be accurately estimated by applying linear regression to distance measurements from photographs of participants taken from five views, and determine the optimal view combinations. A secondary goal is to observe the effect on estimate error of two approaches which reduce complexity of the setup, computational requirements and the expertise required of the observer. Thirty-one participants (11 female, 20 male; 18-37 years) were photographed from five views. Distances were computed using both camera calibration and reference object techniques from manually annotated photos. To estimate height, linear regression was applied to the distances between the top of the participants head and the floor, as well as the height of a bounding box enclosing the participant's silhouette which eliminates the need to identify the floor. To estimate MUAC, linear regression was applied to the mid-upper arm width. Estimates were computed for all view combinations and performance was compared to other photogrammetric methods from the literature-linear distance method for height, and shape models for MUAC. The mean absolute difference (MAD) between the linear regression estimates and manual measurements were smaller compared to other methods. For the optimal view combinations (smallest MAD), the technical error of measurement and coefficient of reliability also indicate the linear regression methods are more reliable. The optimal view combination was the front and side views. When estimating height by linear

  17. In vivo measurements background estimation of low energy trough the anthropometric parameters correlation and with the potassium body content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Wanderson O.; Dantas, Ana Leticia A.; Dantas, Bernardo M.

    2002-01-01

    The occupational monitoring of individuals with potential risk of incorporation of radionuclides such as Am-241, U-238, U-235 and Ra-226 by inhalation in workplaces where particulates in suspension can be present, is frequently performed by in vivo measurements of the lungs. The activity calculation involves a comparison of the acquired spectrum with a reference spectrum. The accuracy of the background prediction is critical when the expected activities are close to the minimum detection limit. This is the case of occupational monitoring where most of the activities observed are bellow or very close the detection limit. The use of a inappropriate reference spectrum can lead to false-positive or false-negative results. The variability of potassium content among individuals in one of the major factors in the fluctuation of the count rate in the low energy region of the spectrum. This contribution is associated with the Compton effect due to the interaction of 1461 keV photons emitted by K-40. In order to verify the correlation between the background count rate in the various regions of interest of the low energy spectra with the potassium mass in the body it was designed an experimental procedure consisting of measuring a thoracic phantom containing known amounts of potassium. The strong correlation observed motivated the continuity of this work which consisted in the analysis of real low energy in vivo spectra with the aim of verifying the correlation between anthropometric parameters (sex, age, weight and height) and the count rates in the region of K-40 with the count rates in the low energy regions of interest. The results obtained show a significant correlation between the selected parameters with the count rate of the background. This allows a more reliable estimation of activity of low energy radionuclides in individuals monitored through in vivo measurements. The occupational monitoring. (author)

  18. Anthropometric Measurements of the Human Distal Femur: A Study of the Adult Malay Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitdriyah Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The distal femurs of 100 subjects (50 men, 50 women from the Malay population aged between 19 and 38 years were scanned to measure the anterior-posterior (AP and medial-lateral (ML width. The mean AP values were 64.02 ± 3.38 mm and 57.33 ± 3.26 mm for men and women, respectively, and the mean ML values were 74.91 ± 3.52 mm and 64.53 ± 3.07 mm. We compared our data to that published previously for the Chinese and Indian populations. It was found that the Malay population had smaller distal femur than that of the Chinese but was larger than that of the Indian population (P < 0.05. In conclusion, although it is well established that Asians have a smaller distal femur size than that of the Western population, the variations in different Asian ethnicities may need to be considered when designing the appropriate knee implant.

  19. Anthropometric measurements of the human distal femur: a study of the adult Malay population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Fitdriyah; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Sa'at, Azlin; Aziz, Azian Abd; Hossain, Golam; Kamarul, T; Syahrom, Ardiyansyah

    2013-01-01

    The distal femurs of 100 subjects (50 men, 50 women) from the Malay population aged between 19 and 38 years were scanned to measure the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) width. The mean AP values were 64.02 ± 3.38 mm and 57.33 ± 3.26 mm for men and women, respectively, and the mean ML values were 74.91 ± 3.52 mm and 64.53 ± 3.07 mm. We compared our data to that published previously for the Chinese and Indian populations. It was found that the Malay population had smaller distal femur than that of the Chinese but was larger than that of the Indian population (P < 0.05). In conclusion, although it is well established that Asians have a smaller distal femur size than that of the Western population, the variations in different Asian ethnicities may need to be considered when designing the appropriate knee implant.

  20. Relationship between Anthropometric Measures and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Children and Adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgos, Miria Suzana; Burgos, Leandro Tibiriçá; Camargo, Marcelo Dias; Franke, Silvia Isabel Rech; Prá, Daniel; Silva, Antônio Marcos Vargas da; Borges, Tássia Silvana; Todendi, Pâmela Ferreira; Reckziegel, Miriam Beatris; Reuter, Cézane Priscila

    2013-01-01

    Obesity has been identified as an important risk factor in the development of cardiovascular diseases; however, other factors, combined or not with obesity, can influence cardiovascular risk and should be considered in cardiovascular risk stratification in pediatrics. To analyze the association between anthropometry measures and cardiovascular risk factors, to investigate the determinants to changes in blood pressure (BP), and to propose a prediction equation to waist circumference (WC) in children and adolescents. We evaluated 1,950 children and adolescents, aged 7 to 18 years. Visceral fat was assessed by WC and waist hip relationship, BP and body mass index (BMI). In a randomly selected subsample of these volunteers (n = 578), total cholesterol, glucose and triglycerides levels were evaluated. WC was positively correlated with BMI (r = 0.85; p < 0.001) and BP (SBP r = 0.45 and DBP = 0.37; p < 0.001). Glycaemia and triglycerides showed a weak correlation with WC (r = 0.110; p = 0.008 e r = 0.201; p < 0.001, respectively). Total cholesterol did not correlate with any of the variables. Age, BMI and WC were significant predictors on the regression models for BP (p < 0.001). We propose a WC prediction equation for children and adolescents: boys: y = 17.243 + 0.316 (height in cm); girls: y = 25.197 + 0.256 (height in cm). WC is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and presents itself as a risk factor predictor of hypertension in children and adolescents. The WC prediction equation proposed by us should be tested in future studies

  1. Ramadan major nutrient patterns are associated with anthropometric measurements and physical activity in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdieh Akhoundan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available During Ramadan fasting quantity and quality of dietary intake may change. There was no data on nutrient patterns in Ramadan fasting. The purpose of this study was to identify Ramadan major nutrient patterns among those who fast in Tehran, Iran. 510 fasting people aged 18-65 years and BMI 18.5-40 Kg/m2 were recruited in our study by 2-stage cluster sampling method in June-July 2014. Data on the socio-demographic and physical activity level were collected by questionnaire. Usual diet during Ramadan was estimated by valid and reliable food frequency questionnaire. BMI was calculated based on measured height and weight. Three nutrient patterns derived by conducting principal component factor analysis on 30 major nutrients. Micronutrient and fiber pattern which characterized by high intake of vitamin K, total fiber, iron, manganese, magnesium, β-carotene, folate, vitamin B12, potassium and calcium was adversely associated with weight (b=-0.16, P= 0.004. High protein pattern had great loadings on protein, riboflavin, phosphorous and zinc which physical activity level was decreased by tertiles of this pattern (b=0.13, P=0.02. High carbohydrate pattern which presented high positive loadings on carbohydrate and thiamin and negative loading on total fat, poly unsaturated fatty acids and monounsaturated fatty acids was positively associated with BMI (b= 0.12, P=0.03. Adherence to different Ramadan nutrient patterns is associated with weight, BMI and physical activity level. People on high in carbohydrate may have a higher BMI and low micronutrient density diet that should be considered in Ramadan fasting nutrition educational programs.

  2. Relationship between Anthropometric Measures and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Children and Adolescents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos, Miria Suzana [Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul - UNISC, Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-graduação - Mestrado em Promoção da Saúde - UNISC, Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil); Burgos, Leandro Tibiriçá; Camargo, Marcelo Dias [Grupo de Pesquisa em Cardiologia do Exercício HCPA/UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Franke, Silvia Isabel Rech; Prá, Daniel [Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul - UNISC, Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-graduação - Mestrado em Promoção da Saúde - UNISC, Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil); Silva, Antônio Marcos Vargas da [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria - UFSM, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Borges, Tássia Silvana; Todendi, Pâmela Ferreira [Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul - UNISC, Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-graduação - Mestrado em Promoção da Saúde - UNISC, Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil); Reckziegel, Miriam Beatris [Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul - UNISC, Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil); Reuter, Cézane Priscila, E-mail: cpreuter@hotmail.com [Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul - UNISC, Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-graduação - Mestrado em Promoção da Saúde - UNISC, Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil)

    2013-10-15

    Obesity has been identified as an important risk factor in the development of cardiovascular diseases; however, other factors, combined or not with obesity, can influence cardiovascular risk and should be considered in cardiovascular risk stratification in pediatrics. To analyze the association between anthropometry measures and cardiovascular risk factors, to investigate the determinants to changes in blood pressure (BP), and to propose a prediction equation to waist circumference (WC) in children and adolescents. We evaluated 1,950 children and adolescents, aged 7 to 18 years. Visceral fat was assessed by WC and waist hip relationship, BP and body mass index (BMI). In a randomly selected subsample of these volunteers (n = 578), total cholesterol, glucose and triglycerides levels were evaluated. WC was positively correlated with BMI (r = 0.85; p < 0.001) and BP (SBP r = 0.45 and DBP = 0.37; p < 0.001). Glycaemia and triglycerides showed a weak correlation with WC (r = 0.110; p = 0.008 e r = 0.201; p < 0.001, respectively). Total cholesterol did not correlate with any of the variables. Age, BMI and WC were significant predictors on the regression models for BP (p < 0.001). We propose a WC prediction equation for children and adolescents: boys: y = 17.243 + 0.316 (height in cm); girls: y = 25.197 + 0.256 (height in cm). WC is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and presents itself as a risk factor predictor of hypertension in children and adolescents. The WC prediction equation proposed by us should be tested in future studies.

  3. Comparison of regional fat mass measurement by whole body DXA scans and anthropometric measures to predict insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Houborg Petersen, Maria; Ravn, Pernille

    2016-01-01

    by whole body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans. Anthropometric measures (BMI, waist) and fasting metabolic analyses (insulin, glucose, lipids, Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR), lipid accumulation product, and visceral adiposity index) were determined. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBERS: NCT......00451568, NCT00145340 RESULTS: Women with PCOS had higher central fat mass (waist, Waist-hip ratio, and upper/lower fat ratio) compared to controls. In bivariate associations, the strongest associations were found between HOMA-IR and the fat mass measures trunk fat (r=0.59), waist (r=0.57) and BMI (r= 0.......56), all pHOMA-IR (R(2) = 0.48, 0.49, and 0.47, respectively) CONCLUSIONS: Women with PCOS were characterized by central obesity. Trunk fat, waist and BMI were the best predictors of HOMA-IR in PCOS, but only...

  4. The effects of 17β-estradiol plus drospirenone on anthropometric and biochemical measures of adiposity in menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Mesut; Gelisgen, Remise; Topcuoglu, Ata; Guralp, Onur; Topcuoglu, Deniz; Simsek, Gonul; Uludag, Seyfettin; Uzun, Hafize

    2012-11-01

    To assess whether there are changes on anthropometric and biochemical measures of adiposity in pre- and postmenopausal women and in the latter before and after 6 months treatment with 17β-estradiol plus drospirenone. Twenty postmenopausal and 20 premenopausal women were enrolled in a prospective comparative study. Postmenopausal women received 1 mg 17β-estradiol plus 2 mg drospirenone daily for 6 months. Measurements of body mass index (BMI), waist/hip ratio and plasmatic levels of insulin, glucose, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglyceride, leptin, adiponectin, orexin-A, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and ghrelin were performed in premenopausal (group 1) and postmenopausal women and in the latter before (group 2a) and after (group 2b) 6 months treatment with 17β-estradiol plus drospirenone. No significant changes in BMIs, insulin and glucose were observed between group 1 and 2a; and group 2a and 2b. GLP-1 levels were significantly increased in group 1 compared to group 2a (p = 0.035). Leptin levels were significantly increased (p = 0.001) and GLP-1 levels were significantly decreased (p = 0.021) in group 2b compared to group 2a. HDL was significantly decreased while LDL and triglyceride levels were significantly increased in group 2a compared to group 1. (p = 0.030, p = 0.001, p = 0.020; respectively) LDL was significantly decreased (p = 0.010) in group 2b compared to group 2a. GLP-1 had a positive correlation with orexin-A (p correlation with leptin (p = 0.008, r = -0.345). Leptin was significantly higher and GLP-1 was significantly lower in women receiving 17β-estradiol plus drospirenone treatment. GLP-1 levels were significantly lower after the menopause compared to premenopausal levels. Orexin-A and GLP-1 were positively correlated.

  5. Technical Report on the Modification of 3-Dimensional Non-contact Human Body Laser Scanner for the Measurement of Anthropometric Dimensions: Verification of its Accuracy and Precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari Roodbandi, Akram Sadat; Naderi, Hamid; Hashenmi-Nejad, Naser; Choobineh, Alireza; Baneshi, Mohammad Reza; Feyzi, Vafa

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Three-dimensional (3D) scanners are widely used in medicine. One of the applications of 3D scanners is the acquisition of anthropometric dimensions for ergonomics and the creation of an anthropometry data bank. The aim of this study was to evaluate the precision and accuracy of a modified 3D scanner fabricated in this study. Methods: In this work, a 3D scan of the human body was obtained using DAVID Laser Scanner software and its calibration background, a linear low-power laser, and one advanced webcam. After the 3D scans were imported to the Geomagic software, 10 anthropometric dimensions of 10 subjects were obtained. The measurements of the 3D scanner were compared to the measurements of the same dimensions by a direct anthropometric method. The precision and accuracy of the measurements of the 3D scanner were then evaluated. The obtained data were analyzed using an independent sample t test with the SPSS software. Results: The minimum and maximum measurement differences from three consecutive scans by the 3D scanner were 0.03 mm and 18 mm, respectively. The differences between the measurements by the direct anthropometry method and the 3D scanner were not statistically significant. Therefore, the accuracy of the 3D scanner is acceptable. Conclusion: Future studies will need to focus on the improvement of the scanning speed and the quality of the scanned image.

  6. Three-dimensional surface scanners compared with standard anthropometric measurements for head shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumont, C.A.A. (Caroline A.A.); Knoops, P.G.M. (Paul G.M.); Borghi, A. (Alessandro); Jeelani, N.U.O. (N.U. Owase); M.J. Koudstaal (Maarten); S. Schievano (Silvia); D.J. Dunaway (David); Rodriguez-Florez, N. (Naiara)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThree-dimensional (3D) surface imaging devices designed to capture and quantify craniofacial surface morphology are becoming more common in clinical environments. Such scanners overcome the limitations of two-dimensional photographs while avoiding the ionizing radiation of computed

  7. Three-dimensional surface scanners compared with standard anthropometric measurements for head shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumont, C.A.A. (Caroline A.A.); Knoops, P.G.M. (Paul G.M.); Borghi, A. (Alessandro); Jeelani, N.U.O. (N.U. Owase); M.J. Koudstaal (Maarten); S. Schievano (Silvia); D.J. Dunaway (David); Rodriguez-Florez, N. (Naiara)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThree-dimensional (3D) surface imaging devices designed to capture and quantify craniofacial surface morphology are becoming more common in clinical environments. Such scanners overcome the limitations of two-dimensional photographs while avoiding the ionizing radiation of computed

  8. Caffeine Intake During Pregnancy in Different Intrauterine Environments and its Association with Infant Anthropometric Measurements at 3 and 6 Months of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, Thamíris Santos; Bernardi, Juliana Rombaldi; de Brito, Mariana Lopes; Bosa, Vera Lucia; Goldani, Marcelo Zubaran; da Silva, Clécio Homrich

    2017-06-01

    Objective To investigate the association between maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy and infant anthropometric measurements at age 3 and 6 months. Methods Longitudinal observational study of mother-child pairs stratified into five groups: diabetic women (DM), hypertensive women (HYP), smoking mothers (SMO), mothers of infants small for gestational age (SGA), and controls (CTL). Pairs were recruited from three public hospitals in Porto Alegre, Brazil, from 2011 to 2015, using a convenience sampling strategy. The Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) was administered on postpartum day 7 to evaluate maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy. The anthropometric measurements of interest (weight, length, and skinfold thickness) were assessed at birth and at age 3 and 6 months. Linear regression was used to analyze the interaction between caffeine intake and skinfold thickness. Results Overall, 272 mother-child pairs were investigated (41 DM, 26 HYP, 68 SMO, 25 SGA, and 112 CTL). There were no differences in anthropometric measurements between infants born to mothers who had and had not consumed caffeine during pregnancy (P > 0.05). Children of mothers in the DM group had the highest adjusted average skinfold thicknesses at 3 months. An interaction between maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy and the sum of skinfolds at age 3 months was found in the DM and CTL groups (P caffeine intake influenced infants skinfold thickness measurements at 3 months of age. This parameter was reduced in infants born to mothers with DM and increased in those born to healthy control mothers.

  9. Preference and intake frequency of high sodium foods and dishes and their correlations with anthropometric measurements among Malaysian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Stella Sinn-Yee; Balan, Sumitha Nair; Chua, Leong-Siong; Say, Yee-How

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the preference and intake frequency of a list of 15 commonly available high sodium Malaysian foods/dishes, discretionary salt use, and their possible association with demographics, blood pressures and anthropometric measurements among 300 Malaysian university students (114 males, 186 females; 259 ethnic Chinese, 41 Indians; 220 lean, 80 overweight). French fries and instant soup noodle were found to be the most preferred and most frequently consumed salty food, respectively, while salted fish was least preferred and least frequently consumed. Males had a significantly higher intake frequency of at least 6 of the salty foods, but the preference of most salty foods was not significantly different between genders. Ethnic Chinese significantly preferred more and took more frequently traditional and conventional Malaysian foods like asam laksa (a Malaysian salty-sour-spicy noodle in fish stock), salted biscuits and salted vegetable, while Indians have more affinity and frequency towards eating salty Western foods. Body Mass Index was significantly negatively correlated with the intake frequency of canned/packet soup and salted fish while waist circumference was significantly positively correlated with the preference of instant noodle. Also, an increased preference of potato chips and intake frequency of salted biscuits seemed to lead to a decreased WHR. Other than these, all the other overweight/obesity indicators did not seem to fully correlate with the salty food preference and intake frequency. Nevertheless, the preference and intake frequency of asam laksa seemed to be significant negative predictors for blood pressures. Finally, increased preference and intake frequency of high sodium shrimp paste (belacan)-based foods like asam laksa and belacan fried rice seemed to discourage discretionary salt use. In conclusion, the preference and intake frequency of the high sodium belacan-based dish asam laksa seems to be a good predictor for ethnic

  10. Preference and intake frequency of high sodium foods and dishes and their correlations with anthropometric measurements among Malaysian subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Stella Sinn-Yee; Balan, Sumitha Nair; Chua, Leong-Siong

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the preference and intake frequency of a list of 15 commonly available high sodium Malaysian foods/dishes, discretionary salt use, and their possible association with demographics, blood pressures and anthropometric measurements among 300 Malaysian university students (114 males, 186 females; 259 ethnic Chinese, 41 Indians; 220 lean, 80 overweight). French fries and instant soup noodle were found to be the most preferred and most frequently consumed salty food, respectively, while salted fish was least preferred and least frequently consumed. Males had a significantly higher intake frequency of at least 6 of the salty foods, but the preference of most salty foods was not significantly different between genders. Ethnic Chinese significantly preferred more and took more frequently traditional and conventional Malaysian foods like asam laksa (a Malaysian salty-sour-spicy noodle in fish stock), salted biscuits and salted vegetable, while Indians have more affinity and frequency towards eating salty Western foods. Body Mass Index was significantly negatively correlated with the intake frequency of canned/packet soup and salted fish while waist circumference was significantly positively correlated with the preference of instant noodle. Also, an increased preference of potato chips and intake frequency of salted biscuits seemed to lead to a decreased WHR. Other than these, all the other overweight/obesity indicators did not seem to fully correlate with the salty food preference and intake frequency. Nevertheless, the preference and intake frequency of asam laksa seemed to be significant negative predictors for blood pressures. Finally, increased preference and intake frequency of high sodium shrimp paste (belacan)-based foods like asam laksa and belacan fried rice seemed to discourage discretionary salt use. In conclusion, the preference and intake frequency of the high sodium belacan-based dish asam laksa seems to be a good predictor for ethnic

  11. Effects of ballet training of children in Turkey on foot anthropometric measurements and medial longitudinal arc development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdinc, Sevgi Anar; Turan, Fatma Nesrin

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effects of ballet training on foot structure and the formation of the medial longitudinal arc in childhood, and the association of body mass index with structural change secondary to ballet training. This study was conducted at Öykü Ballet and Dance School and Trakya University, Edirne, Turkey, from September 2007 to November 2008, and comprised girl students who were taking ballet classes, and a group of those who were not taking such who acted as the controls. Static footprints of both feet of all participants were taken with an ink paedogram. Parameters evaluated from footprints included foot length, metatarsal width, heel width and medial longitudinal arch. The relationship between the parameters, the ballet starting age, training duration and body mass index was investigated. Of the 67 participants, there were 36(53.7%) in the experimental group and 31(48.3%) in the control group. The difference between age, height, weight and body mass index between the two groups was insignificant (p>0.05). The average ballet starting age was 6.47±1.55 years and duration was 4.36±2.002 years. Positive correlations were found between body mass index and foot length, metatarsal width, heel width, medial longitudinal arch contact width and halluxvalgus angle; between ballet starting age and metatarsal width, heel width; between duration of training and foot length, metatarsal width and hallux valgus angle (p?0.05 each). Evidence supporting the education in children on foot anthropometric measurements and medial longitudinal arc development could not be found.

  12. Anthropometric comparison of Anthropometric Test Device (ATD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anthropometric test device (ATD) is surrogate used in automotive crash testing. Female ATDs used worldwide in the evaluation of vehicle safety performance was produced based on anthropometry of U.S. population. This work is aimed at assessing the difference between the anthropometric dimensions of Nigerian female ...

  13. Standard Model measurements with the ATLAS detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassani Samira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various Standard Model measurements have been performed in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 and 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. A review of a selection of the latest results of electroweak measurements, W/Z production in association with jets, jet physics and soft QCD is given. Measurements are in general found to be well described by the Standard Model predictions.

  14. Status of Photovoltaic Calibration and Measurement Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraona, Cosmo; Bailey, Sheila; Curtis, Henry; Brinker, David; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, David

    2001-01-01

    The 7th International Workshop on Space Solar Cell Calibration and Measurement was held on September 25-27, 2000 in Girdwood, Alaska. Representatives from eight countries discussed international standards for single and multijunction solar cell measurement and calibration methods, round robin intercomparisons, and irradiation test methods for space solar cells. Progress toward adoption of an ISO standard on single junction cells was made. Agreement was reached to begin work on new standards for multijunction cells and irradiation testing. Progress on present single junction round robin measurements was discussed and future multijunction round robins were planned. The next workshop will be held in Germany in October 2001.

  15. Nutritional Status of Children in Bangladesh:Measuring Composite Index of Anthropometric Failure (CIAF) and its Determinants

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Rana Ejaz Ali; Raza, Muhammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the current analysis is to see the factors responsible for malnutrition in children (under-5 years) in urban and rural areas of Bangladesh. In this study binary logistic model is applied to 1831 observations of urban and 3427 observations of rural areas. The Composite Index of Anthropometric Failure (CIAF) is constructed and used as an indicator of malnutrition. It is estimated that malnutrition in rural children is much higher than in urban children. The results have shown...

  16. Body configuration as a predictor of mortality: comparison of five anthropometric measures in a 12 year follow-up of the Norwegian HUNT 2 study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halfdan Petursson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Distribution of body fat is more important than the amount of fat as a prognostic factor for life expectancy. Despite that, body mass index (BMI still holds its status as the most used indicator of obesity in clinical work. METHODS: We assessed the association of five different anthropometric measures with mortality in general and cardiovascular disease (CVD mortality in particular using Cox proportional hazards models. Predictive properties were compared by computing integrated discrimination improvement and net reclassification improvement for two different prediction models. The measures studied were BMI, waist circumference, hip circumference, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR. The study population was a prospective cohort of 62,223 Norwegians, age 20-79, followed up for mortality from 1995-1997 to the end of 2008 (mean follow-up 12.0 years in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT 2. RESULTS: After adjusting for age, smoking and physical activity WHR and WHtR were found to be the strongest predictors of death. Hazard ratios (HRs for CVD mortality per increase in WHR of one standard deviation were 1.23 for men and 1.27 for women. For WHtR, these HRs were 1.24 for men and 1.23 for women. WHR offered the greatest integrated discrimination improvement to the prediction models studied, followed by WHtR and waist circumference. Hip circumference was in strong inverse association with mortality when adjusting for waist circumference. In all analyses, BMI had weaker association with mortality than three of the other four measures studied. CONCLUSIONS: Our study adds further knowledge to the evidence that BMI is not the most appropriate measure of obesity in everyday clinical practice. WHR can reliably be measured and is as easy to calculate as BMI and is currently better documented than WHtR. It appears reasonable to recommend WHR as the primary measure of body composition and obesity.

  17. The 5th national survey on the physical growth and development of children in the nine cities of China: Anthropometric measurements of Chinese children under 7 years in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya-Qin; Li, Hui; Wu, Hua-Hong; Zong, Xin-Nan; Zhu, Zong-Han; Pan, Ying; Li, Jia; Zheng, Xing-Rong; Wei, Mei; Tong, Mei-Ling; Zhou, Ai-Fen; Hu, Yan; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Ke; Yu, Yang

    2017-07-01

    To describe the physical growth of healthy children under 7 years in China based on the latest national survey and provide more data for revising growth reference and monitoring the impact of social development on children's health and growth. In the cross-sectional survey, 161,774 healthy children under 7 years were selected by multistage stratified cluster sampling method in nine cities of China. According to the geographical location, the nine cities were divided into northern, central and southern regions, and each city included urban and suburban areas. Anthropometric measurements were obtained on the spots and other related information was collected with questionnaires. There were slight urban-suburban difference and obvious regional difference in anthropometric measurements in China. Comparison with the 4th NSPGDC in 2005, measurements increased 0.1-1.1 kg in weight, 0.5-1.8 cm in height in urban areas (except children under 3 years) and 0.1-2.5 kg in weight, 0.2-3.8 cm in height in suburban areas. The urban-suburban difference of those measurements became smaller than 10 years ago, but their regional difference persistently exist. Chinese children were 0.36 SD in weight, 0.43 SD in height in urban areas and 0.30 SD in weight, 0.30 SD in height in suburban areas higher than WHO standards. Physical growth of children under 7 years old was undergoing a slowly positive secular trend during the latest decade in more economically developed regions of China. Urban-suburban difference of those measurements became smaller, while their regional difference persistently exist. Chinese healthy children under 7 years in nine cities was taller and heavier than WHO standards. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Breakfast and Breakfast Cereal Choice and Its Impact on Nutrient and Sugar Intakes and Anthropometric Measures among a Nationally Representative Sample of Australian Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Fayet-Moore

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There is limited evidence in Australia that compares the nutritional impact of a breakfast cereal breakfast to a non-cereal breakfast, and includes the type of cereal. This study investigated the impact of breakfast choice and the total sugar content of breakfast cereal on nutrient intakes and anthropometric measures among Australian children and adolescents. Data from 2 to 18-year-old in the 2011–2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey were used (n = 2821. Participants were classified as breakfast cereal consumers (minimally pre-sweetened (MPS or pre-sweetened (PS, non-cereal breakfast consumers, or breakfast skippers. Foods consumed for breakfast, foods added to the cereal bowl, and the impact of breakfast choice on daily nutrient intakes and anthropometric measures were determined. Although only 9% of children skipped breakfast, 61% of skippers were aged 14–18 years. Among breakfast consumers, 49% had breakfast cereal, and 62% of these exclusively consumed MPS cereal. Breakfast skippers had a higher saturated fat intake than breakfast cereal consumers, and lower intakes of dietary fibre and most micronutrients (p < 0.001. Compared with non-cereal breakfast consumers, breakfast cereal consumers had additional free sugars intake, lower sodium, and higher total sugars, carbohydrate, dietary fibre, and almost all other micronutrients (p < 0.001. The only difference in nutrient intakes between MPS and PS cereal consumers was higher folate among PS consumers. No associations between anthropometric measures and breakfast or breakfast cereal choice were found. The highest prevalence of breakfast skipping was among 14–18-year old. Breakfast cereal consumers had higher intakes of dietary fibre and most micronutrients compared with non-cereal breakfast consumers and skippers, and almost no differences were found between MPS and PS cereal consumers.

  19. Pericardial and thoracic peri-aortic adipose tissues contribute to systemic inflammation and calcified coronary atherosclerosis independent of body fat composition, anthropometric measures and traditional cardiovascular risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Chun-Ho; Lin, Tin-Yu; Wu, Yih-Jer; Liu, Chuan-Chuan; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Yeh, Hung-I.; Yang, Fei-Shih; Chen, Su-Chiu; Hou, Charles Jia-Yin; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Cury, Ricardo C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Coronary atherosclerosis has traditionally been proposed to be associated with several cardiovascular risk factors and anthropometric measures. However, clinical data regarding the independent value of visceral adipose tissue in addition to such traditional predictors remains obscure. Materials and methods: We subsequently studied 719 subjects (age: 48.1 ± 8.3 years, 25% females) who underwent multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for coronary calcium score (CCS) quantification. Baseline demographic data and anthropometric measures were taken with simultaneous body fat composition estimated. Visceral adipose tissue of pericardial and thoracic peri-aortic fat was quantified by MDCT using TeraRecon Aquarius workstation (San Mateo, CA). Traditional cardiovascular risk stratification was calculated by metabolic (NCEP ATP III) and Framingham (FRS) scores and high-sensitivity CRP (Hs-CRP) was taken to represent systemic inflammation. The independent value of visceral adipose tissue to systemic inflammation and CCS was assessed by utilizing multivariable regression analysis. Results: Of all subjects enrolled in this study, the mean values for pericardial and peri-aortic adipose tissue were 74.23 ± 27.51 and 7.23 ± 3.69 ml, respectively. Higher visceral fat quartile groups were associated with graded increase of risks for cardiovascular diseases. Both adipose burdens strongly correlated with anthropometric measures including waist circumference, body weight and body mass index (all p < 0.001). In addition, both visceral amount correlates well with ATP and FRS scores, all lipid profiles and systemic inflammation marker in terms of Hs-CRP (all p < 0.001). After adjustment for baseline variables, both visceral fat were independently related to Hs-CRP levels (all p < 0.05), but only pericardial fat exerted independent role in coronary calcium deposit. Conclusion: Both visceral adipose tissues strongly correlated with systemic inflammation beyond traditional

  20. Association between Anthropometric Measures and Indicators for Hypertension Control among Kazakh-Chinese Hypertension Patients in Xinjiang, China: Results from a Cross-sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Zhang

    Full Text Available Among Kazakh-Chinese population in Xinjiang province of China, prevalence of obesity and hypertension were 40.1% and 50.3% respectively, the highest across all ethnic groups residing in this pastureland. Despite this, there remained a dearth of information regarding the association between the anthropometric measures [body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, waist-hip ratio (WHR, Waist-to-height ratio (WHtR etc.] and indicators for hypertension control [achieved levels of systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP and DBP, pulse pressure index (PPI, ankle-brachial index (ABI etc.] among them.A cross-sectional study was conducted in Xinjiang to determine the distribution and inter-relationships of the anthropometric measures and indicators for achieved BP control as well as their predictors among hypertension patients of Kazakh-Chinese ethnicity. Out of 550 randomly selected patients, 516 completed the interview, anthropometry and BP assessments.In the sample population, average SBP, DBP and PP were 156.26±24.40mmHg, 87.55±14.73mmHg and 68.71±19.39mmHg respectively. Bivariate analysis identified age, gender, education, duration of hypertension, WC and BMI being factors influencing the achieved levels of BP. Adjusted multiple linear regression models elicited positive associations of age (βa = 0.152, p = 0.001 and duration of hypertension (βa = 0.132, p = 0.003 with achieved level of SBP as well as BMI (βa = 0.135, p = 0.002 with DBP. Age (βa = 0.207, p<0.001 and WHtR (βa = 0.304, p = 0.005 were positively and WC (βa = -0.406, p<0.001 was negatively associated with PPI. Increasing age (βa = -0.125, p = 0.005, female gender (βa = -0.122, p = 0.005 and 5years' duration of hypertension (βa = -0.091, p<0.039 were negatively associated with ABI. After adjustment for socio-demographic variables, hypertensive patients with (reference = without abdominal obesity had 93% (p = 0.013 higher odds of missing the target BP control.Anthropometric

  1. Longitudinal changes and correlations of bioimpedance and anthropometric measurements in pregnancy: Simple possible bed-side tools to assess pregnancy evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piuri, Gabriele; Ferrazzi, Enrico; Bulfoni, Camilla; Mastricci, Luciana; Di Martino, Daniela; Speciani, Attilio Francesco

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess longitudinal changes of bioimpedance analysis compared with anthropometric measurements in low-risk pregnant woman recruited in the first trimester and to observe possible differences in these indices in women who developed high-risk pregnancies. Bioimpedance indices for the three trimesters of pregnancies were calculated separately for uneventful pregnancies delivered of newborns > the 10th centile. These findings were compared with anthropometric measurements. Data of women who developed hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) or delivered SGA newborns were calculated and compared. Significantly longitudinal increases were observed in these pregnancies for total body water (TBW), free fat mass, fat mass, and extra-cellular water. These increases were paralleled body mass index (BMI), skinfolds, and waist measurements. The correlations between these two sets of findings were poor. Women who developed HDP with AGA fetuses showed significantly different bioimpedance from normal cases. TBW indices were highly significantly different since the first trimester. In pregnancies delivered of SGA newborns, these indices were opposite of the values observed in patients with HDP-AGA, TBW in these patients was significantly reduced compared with normal pregnancies. The bioelectrical impedance is a fast, simple, noninvasive way to assess the TBW content in pregnancy. Our findings are in agreement with the hypothesis that bioimpedance might help to identify early in gestation patients at risk of developing different clinical phenotypes of hypertensive disease of pregnancy and SGA fetuses.

  2. The Agency's Safety Standards and Measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-04-01

    The Agency's Health and Safety Measures were first, approved by the Board of Governors on 31 March 1960 in implementation of Articles III.A.6 and XII of the Statute of the Agency. On the basis of the experience gained from applying those measures to projects carried out by Members under agreements concluded with the Agency, the Agency's Health and Safety Measures were revised in 1975 and approved by the Board of Governors on 25 February 1976. The Agency's Safety Standards and Measures as revised are reproduced in this document for the information of all Members

  3. Standard deviation of scatterometer measurements from space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The standard deviation of scatterometer measurements has been derived under assumptions applicable to spaceborne scatterometers. Numerical results are presented which show that, with sufficiently long integration times, input signal-to-noise ratios below unity do not cause excessive degradation of measurement accuracy. The effects on measurement accuracy due to varying integration times and changing the ratio of signal bandwidth to IF filter-noise bandwidth are also plotted. The results of the analysis may resolve a controversy by showing that in fact statistically useful scatterometer measurements can be made from space using a 20-W transmitter, such as will be used on the S-193 experiment for Skylab-A.

  4. The standardizing measures which are needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasse, R.

    1974-01-01

    1. The necessity for standardizing measures: a) for the construction of final storage sites, b) for the operation of final storage sites, c) securing the existence and warranting the safety towards intervening third parties. 2. Legislative power and the incorporation of new regulations into established law. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Traceability and standardization of large dose measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ryuichi

    1989-01-01

    The reliability of dose control for radiation sterilization and food irradiation depends on the relative errors in measurements made by different dosimeters and the level of process control techniques as well as traceability. International efforts have been made for standardization of dose measurement procedures and process control techniques. A system for traceability of large dose measurement has already been established in the U.S. and Britain, and it has become urgent in Japan to establish a traceability system. For process control for radiation sterilization of medical tools, dose measurement is replacing the use of a biological indicator to play a more important role in relation to sterilization assurance. AAMI is making efforts to establish implementation standards for process control for industrial sterilization with electron beam. In Japan, the Radiation Irradiation Promotion Association has developed a manual 'Measurement of Dose of Electron Beam for Irradiation' to be used by users of electron beam for irradiation. Further efforts are required to establish a proper traceability system and standardization of dose measurement. (N.K.)

  6. Does the Supine Position Affect the Nasal Profile in Rhinoplasty Patients? A Comparison of Nasal Anthropometric Measurements in Different Body Positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Jin; Ryu, In Yong; Kim, Sung Wan; Lee, Kun Hee

    2017-10-16

    Rhinoplasty surgeons are aware that the nasal profile differs according to body position, namely, the erect position in the consultation room vs the supine position on the operating table. It is not clear whether this difference is caused by an optical illusion or skin laxity due to positional change. To evaluate anthropometric measurements of the nose with different body positions and determine whether the supine position affects the nasal profile. In this retrospective study, 103 patients who underwent primary rhinoplasty were enrolled. Preoperatively, all patients underwent lateral cephalography in the erect position, and facial computed tomography (CT), in the supine position. We measured four nasal anthropometric parameters (the nasofrontal, nasolabial, and nasomental angles, and Simon's ratio) on lateral cephalograms and facial CT images, and compared these parameters between the two body positions. The nasofrontal angle was greater on facial CT than on cephalograms (P sex, or body mass index (P > 0.05 each). We found no significant difference (P > 0.05) between the two positions in the nasolabial angle, nasomental angle, or Simon's ratio. The supine position does affect the nasal profile, especially in the radix area. Surgeons need to consider this difference in patients undergoing rhinoplasty. 2. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. The effects of symbiotic therapy on anthropometric measures, body composition and blood pressure in patient with metabolic syndrome: a triple blind RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiei, Samira; Shakerhosseini, Rahebeh; Saadat, Navid

    2015-01-01

    Increase in prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes which are of the main risk factors of metabolic syndrome, is not only the result of changes in genetic, diet or physical activity, but also an imbalance of micro flora may play an important role. Therefore, alteration of micro flora using pre/probiotic is considered as a new strategy for treatment of metabolic disorders. The current study is a triple blind randomized controlled trial. 46 patients from both sexes, who fulfilled inclusion criteria, randomly categorized into intervention or placebo group. The intervention and placebo groups consumed 2 probiotic capsules or 2 placebo capsules during 3 months, respectively. Both groups received a weight loss diet, according to their adjusted ideal body weight. Anthropometric, body composition, blood pressure and nutritional measurements were done in the beginning, at 6th week, and at the end of the study. T-test and paired-t test were used for statistical analysis. 40 patients completed the study. BMI, WC, HC, fat mass, lean mass and blood pressure were reduced in all participants (psymbiotic group was less than placebo group, significantly (psymbiotic group continued at least for 12 weeks while it was stopped at week 6 in placebo group. Symbiotic supplement with the weight loss diet had synergistic effects on improvement in systolic blood pressure and anthropometric measurements. Based on our findings, symbiotic can postpone plateau phase of weight loss and it may prevent resistance to further weight loss.

  8. The CODATwins Project: The Cohort Description of Collaborative Project of Development of Anthropometrical Measures in Twins to Study Macro-Environmental Variation in Genetic and Environmental Effects on Anthropometric Traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silventoinen, K.; Jelenkovic, A.; Sund, R.; Honda, C.; Aaltonen, S.; Yokoyama, Y.; Tarnoki, A.D.; Tarnoki, D.L.; Ning, F.; Ji, F.; Pang, Z.; Ordonana, J.R.; Sanchez-Romera, J.F.; Colodro-Conde, L.; Burt, S.A.; Klump, K.L.; Medland, S.E.; Montgomery, G.W.; Kandler, C.; McAdams, T.A.; Eley, T.C.; Gregory, A.M.; Saudino, K.J.; Dubois, L.; Boivin, M.; Haworth, C.M.A.; Plomin, R.; Oncel, S.Y.; Aliev, F.; Stazi, M.A.; Fagnani, C.; D'Ippolito, C.; Craig, J.M.; Saffery, R.; Siribaddana, S.H.; Hotopf, M.; Sumathipala, A.; Spector, T.; Mangino, M.; Lachance, G.; Gatz, M.; Butler, D.A.; Bayasgalan, G.; Narandalai, D.; Freitas, D.L.; Maia, J.A.; Harden, K.P.; Tucker-Drob, E.M.; Christensen, K.; Skytthe, A.; Kyvik, K.O.; Hong, C.; Chong, Y.; Derom, C.A.; Vlietinck, R.F.; Loos, R.J.F.; Cozen, W.; Hwang, A.E.; Mack, T.M.; He, M.; Ding, X.; Chang, B.; Silberg, J.L.; Eaves, L.J.; Maes, H.H.; Cutler, T.L.; Hopper, J.L.; Aujard, K.; Magnusson, P.K.E.; Pedersen, N.L.; Aslan, A.K.D.; Song, Y.; Yang, S.; Lee, K; Baker, L.A.; Tuvblad, C.; Bjerregaard-Andersen, M.; Beck-Nielsen, H.; Sodemann, M.; Heikkila, K.; Tan, Q.; Zhang, D.; Swan, G.E.; Krasnow, R.; Jang, K.L.; Knafo-Noam, A.; Mankuta, D.; Abramson, L.; Lichtenstein, P.; Krueger, R.F.; McGue, M.; Pahlen, S.; Tynelius, P.; Duncan, G.E.; Buchwald, D.; Corley, R.P.; Huibregtse, B.M.; Nelson, T.L.; Whitfield, K.E.; Franz, C.E.; Kremen, W.S.; Lyons, M.J.; Ooki, S.; Brandt, I.; Nilsen, T.S.; Inui, F.; Watanabe, M.; Bartels, M.; van Beijsterveldt, T.C.E.M.; Wardle, J.; Llewellyn, C.H.; Fisher, A.; Rebato, E.; Martin, N.G.; Iwatani, Y.; Hayakawa, K.; Rasmussen, F.; Sung, J.; Harris, J.R.; Willemsen, G.; Busjahn, A.; Goldberg, J.H.; Boomsma, D.I.; Hur, Y.; Sorensen, T.I.A.; Kaprio, J.

    2015-01-01

    For over 100 years, the genetics of human anthropometric traits has attracted scientific interest. In particular, height and body mass index (BMI, calculated as kg/m2) have been under intensive genetic research. However, it is still largely unknown whether and how heritability estimates vary between

  9. Adult anthropometric measures and socio-demographic factors influencing age at menarche of university students in malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Golam; Wee, Ai-Sze; Ashaie, Maeirah; Kamarul, T

    2013-09-01

    Early onset of menarche has been shown to be associated with breast cancer and ischaemic heart disease. Studies on age at menarche of the Malaysian population are poorly documented. This study aimed to determine the influence of anthropometric and socio-demographic factors on the age at menarche of university students in Malaysia. Data were obtained in 2010-11 from 961 students between the ages of 18 and 25 years from the University of Malaya using stratified sampling, and multiple regression analysis was applied. Sixty-three per cent of students reached menarche at the age of 12 or 13 years, with the mean and median of age at menarche being 12.45 ± 1.17 and 12.01 years, respectively. Menarcheal age was positively associated with height (pObese and overweight students reached menarche earlier than students who were underweight or of normal weight (p<0.01). The variations in age at menarche among the Malaysian ethnic groups were statistically insignificant. The results suggest that heavier and first-born students from small families are more likely to attain menarche earlier than their counterparts.

  10. Absolute measurement of a tritium standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadzisehovic, M.; Mocilnik, I.; Buraei, K.; Pongrac, S.; Milojevic, A.

    1978-01-01

    For the determination of a tritium absolute activity standard, a method of internal gas counting has been used. The procedure involves water reduction by uranium and zinc further the measurement of the absolute disintegration rate of tritium per unit of the effective volume of the counter by a compensation method. Criteria for the choice of methods and procedures concerning the determination and measurement of gaseous 3 H yield, parameters of gaseous hydrogen, sample mass of HTO and the absolute disintegration rate of tritium are discussed. In order to obtain gaseous sources of 3 H (and 2 H), the same reversible chemical reaction was used, namely, the water - uranium hydride - hydrogen system. This reaction was proved to be quantitative above 500 deg C by measuring the yield of the gas obtained and the absolute activity of an HTO standard. A brief description of the measuring apparatus is given, as well as a critical discussion of the brass counter quality and the possibility of obtaining equal working conditions at the counter ends. (T.G.)

  11. Quantitative Anthropometric Measures of Facial Appearance of Healthy Hispanic/Latino White Children: Establishing Reference Data for Care of Cleft Lip With or Without Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juhun; Ku, Brian; Combs, Patrick D.; Da Silveira, Adriana. C.; Markey, Mia K.

    2017-06-01

    Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL ± P) is one of the most common congenital facial deformities worldwide. To minimize negative social consequences of CL ± P, reconstructive surgery is conducted to modify the face to a more normal appearance. Each race/ethnic group requires its own facial norm data, yet there are no existing facial norm data for Hispanic/Latino White children. The objective of this paper is to identify measures of facial appearance relevant for planning reconstructive surgery for CL ± P of Hispanic/Latino White children. Quantitative analysis was conducted on 3D facial images of 82 (41 girls, 41 boys) healthy Hispanic/Latino White children whose ages ranged from 7 to 12 years. Twenty-eight facial anthropometric features related to CL ± P (mainly in the nasal and mouth area) were measured from 3D facial images. In addition, facial aesthetic ratings were obtained from 16 non-clinical observers for the same 3D facial images using a 7-point Likert scale. Pearson correlation analysis was conducted to find features that were correlated with the panel ratings of observers. Boys with a longer face and nose, or thicker upper and lower lips are considered more attractive than others while girls with a less curved middle face contour are considered more attractive than others. Associated facial landmarks for these features are primary focus areas for reconstructive surgery for CL ± P. This study identified anthropometric measures of facial features of Hispanic/Latino White children that are pertinent to CL ± P and which correlate with the panel attractiveness ratings.

  12. Anthropometric Indicators Predict Metabolic Syndrome Diagnosis in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Barbara Perez; Ponce, Daniela; Caramori, Jacqueline Costa Teixeira

    2016-06-01

    Obesity has been considered the key in metabolic syndrome (MetS) development, and fat accumulation may be responsible for the occurrence of metabolic abnormalities in hemodialysis patients. The use of gold-standard methods to evaluate obesity is limited, and anthropometric measures may be the simplest methods. However, no study has investigated the association between anthropometric indexes and MetS in these patients. Therefore, the aim was to determine which anthropometric indexes had the best association and prediction for MetS in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Cross-sectional study that included patients older than 18 years, undergoing hemodialysis for at least 3 months. Patients with liver disease and cancer or those receiving corticosteroids or antiretroviral therapy were excluded. Diagnostic criteria from Harmonizing Metabolic Syndrome were used for the diagnosis of MetS. Anthropometric indexes evaluated were body mass index (BMI); percent standard of triceps skinfold thickness and of middle arm muscle circumference; waist circumference (WC); sagittal abdominal diameter; neck circumference; waist-to-hip, waist-to-thigh, and waist-to-height ratios; sagittal index; conicity index; and body fat percentage. Ninety-eight patients were included, 54.1% male, and mean age was 57.8 ± 12.9 years. The prevalence of MetS was 74.5%. Individuals with MetS had increased accumulation of abdominal fat and general obesity. Waist-to-height ratio was the variable independently associated with MetS diagnosis (odds ratio, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.34; P < .01) and that better predicts MetS, followed by WC and BMI (area under the curve of 0.840, 0.836, and 0.798, respectively, P < .01). Waist-to-height ratio was the best anthropometric predictor of MetS in maintenance hemodialysis patients. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  13. A comparison of the effects of 6 weeks of traditional resistance training, plyometric training, and complex training on measures of strength and anthropometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Christopher J; Lamont, Hugh S; Garner, John C

    2012-02-01

    Complex training (CT; alternating between heavy and lighter load resistance exercises with similar movement patterns within an exercise session) is a form of training that may potentially bring about a state of postactivation potentiation, resulting in increased dynamic power (Pmax) and rate of force development during the lighter load exercise. Such a method may be more effective than either modality, independently for developing strength. The purpose of this research was to compare the effects of resistance training (RT), plyometric training (PT), and CT on lower body strength and anthropometrics. Thirty recreationally trained college-aged men were trained using 1 of 3 methods: resistance, plyometric, or complex twice weekly for 6 weeks. The participants were tested pre, mid, and post to assess back squat strength, Romanian dead lift (RDL) strength, standing calf raise (SCR) strength, quadriceps girth, triceps surae girth, body mass, and body fat percentage. Diet was not controlled during this study. Statistical measures revealed a significant increase for squat strength (p = 0.000), RDL strength (p = 0.000), and SCR strength (p = 0.000) for all groups pre to post, with no differences between groups. There was also a main effect for time for girth measures of the quadriceps muscle group (p = 0.001), the triceps surae muscle group (p = 0.001), and body mass (p = 0.001; post hoc revealed no significant difference). There were main effects for time and group × time interactions for fat-free mass % (RT: p = 0.031; PT: p = 0.000). The results suggest that CT mirrors benefits seen with traditional RT or PT. Moreover, CT revealed no decrement in strength and anthropometric values and appears to be a viable training modality.

  14. An anthropometric analysis of Korean male helicopter pilots for helicopter cockpit design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonsup; Jung, Kihyo; Jeong, Jeongrim; Park, Jangwoon; Cho, Jayoung; Kim, Heeeun; Park, Seikwon; You, Heecheon

    2013-01-01

    This study measured 21 anthropometric dimensions (ADs) of 94 Korean male helicopter pilots in their 20s to 40s and compared them with corresponding measurements of Korean male civilians and the US Army male personnel. The ADs and the sample size of the anthropometric survey were determined by a four-step process: (1) selection of ADs related to helicopter cockpit design, (2) evaluation of the importance of each AD, (3) calculation of required sample sizes for selected precision levels and (4) determination of an appropriate sample size by considering both the AD importance evaluation results and the sample size requirements. The anthropometric comparison reveals that the Korean helicopter pilots are larger (ratio of means = 1.01-1.08) and less dispersed (ratio of standard deviations = 0.71-0.93) than the Korean male civilians and that they are shorter in stature (0.99), have shorter upper limbs (0.89-0.96) and lower limbs (0.93-0.97), but are taller on sitting height, sitting eye height and acromial height (1.01-1.03), and less dispersed (0.68-0.97) than the US Army personnel. The anthropometric characteristics of Korean male helicopter pilots were compared with those of Korean male civilians and US Army male personnel. The sample size determination process and the anthropometric comparison results presented in this study are useful to design an anthropometric survey and a helicopter cockpit layout, respectively.

  15. Standardization in measurement philosophical, historical and sociological issues

    CERN Document Server

    Schlaudt, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The application of standard measurement is a cornerstone of modern science. In this collection of essays, standardization of procedure, units of measurement and the epistemology of standardization are addressed by specialists from sociology, history and the philosophy of science.

  16. A comparison between handgrip strength, upper limb fat free mass by segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis (SBIA) and anthropometric measurements in young males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Correa, C H; Caicedo-Eraso, J C; Varon-Serna, D R

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical function and size of a muscle may be closely linked. Handgrip strength (HGS) has been used as a predictor of functional performing. Anthropometric measurements have been made to estimate arm muscle area (AMA) and physical muscle mass volume of upper limb (ULMMV). Electrical volume estimation is possible by segmental BIA measurements of fat free mass (SBIA-FFM), mainly muscle-mass. Relationship among these variables is not well established. We aimed to determine if physical and electrical muscle mass estimations relate to each other and to what extent HGS is to be related to its size measured by both methods in normal or overweight young males. Regression analysis was used to determine association between these variables. Subjects showed a decreased HGS (65.5%), FFM, (85.5%) and AMA (74.5%). It was found an acceptable association between SBIA-FFM and AMA (r 2 = 0.60) and poorer between physical and electrical volume (r 2 = 0.55). However, a paired Student t-test and Bland and Altman plot showed that physical and electrical models were not interchangeable (pt 2 = 0.07) and electrical (r 2 = 0.192) ULMMV showing that muscle mass quantity does not mean muscle strength. Other factors influencing HGS like physical training or nutrition require more research.

  17. Association of Anthropometric Indices of Obesity with Hypertension in Chinese Elderly: An Analysis of Age and Gender Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Xu, Lingzhong; Li, Jiajia; Sun, Long; Qin, Wenzhe; Ding, Gan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Jiao; Yu, Zihang; Xie, Su

    2018-04-19

    This study aims to explore the association of anthropometric indices of obesity with hypertension in Chinese elderly and its possible gender and age differences. A total of 7070 adults age 60 or older were interviewed in a cross-sectional study conducted in 2017. Anthropometric indices for each participant were measured by using standard methods of trained doctoral/master students. We performed two binary logistic regression models to examine the association of the nine different anthropometric indices and hypertension by gender. Lastly, analyses were performed in two steps stratified for age. Comparing individuals with and without hypertension, there were statistically significant differences in anthropometric indices except height, a body shape index (ABSI), and hip index (HI) in males; and except height in females. There were gender differences in the relationship between anthropometric indices and the prevalence of hypertension in Chinese older adults. After stratification by age, the associations of all anthropometric indices became weaker, disappeared, or even went in the opposite direction. Furthermore, body mass index (BMI) in men (except individuals older than 80) and hip circumference (HC) in women showed a significant impact on the risk of hypertension. The association of anthropometric indices of obesity with hypertension in Chinese elderly differ by gender and age. These findings indicate a need to develop gender-specific strategies for the male and female elderly in the primary and secondary prevention of hypertension.

  18. An Anthropometric Study of Cranio-Facial Measurements and Their Correlation with Vertical Dimension of Occlusion among Saudi Arabian Subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Muhammed Irfan; Haralur, Satheesh B; Khan, Muhammed Farhan; Al Ahmari, Maram Awdah; Al Shahrani, Nourah Falah; Shaik, Sharaz

    2018-04-15

    Determining and restoring physiological vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) is the critical step during complete mouth rehabilitation. The improper VDO compromises the aesthetics, phonetics and functional efficiency of the prosthesis. Various methods are suggested to determine the accurate VDO, including the facial measurements in the clinical situations with no pre-extraction records. The generalisation of correlation between the facial measurements to VDO is criticised due to gender dimorphism and racial differences. Hence, it is prudent to verify the hypothesis of facial proportion and correlation of lower third of the face to remaining craniofacial measurements in different ethnic groups. The objective of the study was to evaluate the correlation of craniofacial measurements and OVD in the Saudi-Arabian ethnic group. Total of 228 participants from Saudi-Arabian Ethnic group were randomly recruited in this cross-sectional study. Fifteen craniofacial measurements were recorded with modified digital Vernier callipers, and OVD was recorded at centric occlusion. The obtained data were analysed by using the Spearman's correlation and linear regression analysis. The Mean OVD in male participants was higher (69.25 ± 5.54) in comparison to female participants (57.41 ± 5.32). The craniofacial measurement of Exocanthion-right labial commissure and the Mesial wall of the right external auditory canal-orbitale lateral had a strong positive correlation with VDO. The strong correlation was recorded with a trichion-upper border of right eyebrow line and trichion-Nasion only in males. Meanwhile, the length of an auricle recorded the positive correlation in female participants. Being simple and non-invasive technique, craniofacial measurements and linear equations could be routinely utilised to determine VDO.

  19. Anthropometric, physiological and performance characteristics of elite team-handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouachi, Anis; Brughelli, Matt; Levin, Gregory; Boudhina, Nahla Ben Brahim; Cronin, John; Chamari, Karim

    2009-01-15

    The objective of this study was to provide anthropometric, physiological, and performance characteristics of an elite international handball team. Twenty-one elite handball players were tested and categorized according to their playing positions (goalkeepers, backs, pivots, and wings). Testing consisted of anthropometric and physiological measures of height, body mass, percentage body fat and endurance (VO(2max)), performance measures of speed (5, 10, and 30 m), strength (bench press and squat), unilateral and bilateral horizontal jumping ability, and a 5-jump horizontal test. Significant differences were found between player positions for some anthropometric characteristics (height and percentage body fat) but not for the physiological or performance characteristics. Strong correlations were noted between single leg horizontal jumping distances with 5-, 10-, and 30-m sprint times (r = 0.51-0.80; P team-handball players appear to be very similar. Single leg horizontal jumping distance could be a specific standardized test for predicting sprinting ability in elite handball players.

  20. Overweight and obesity in New Caledonian adults: Results from measured and adjusted self-reported anthropometric data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsenac, Philippe; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Hoy, Damian; Roth, Adam; Rouchon, Bernard; Capart, Isabelle; Taylor, Richard

    2017-11-01

    To estimate the overweight (OW) and obesity (Ob) prevalence and associated socio-demographic risk factors in New Caledonian adults aged 18-67years. From a randomly selected cross-sectional population survey, self-reported (n=2513) and measured (n=736) height and weight data were collected. Separate linear regression analyses for measured weight and height were performed, using cases with both self-reported weight and height and socio-demographic variables. The final weight and height assigned to each case was either measured or predicted from the regression (n=2075). OW prevalence was defined as: Body Mass Index (BMI) ≥25 and F) OW was 26% (95% CI: 23-28), Ob 34% (95% CI: 31-37) and OW-Ob 60% (95% CI: 57-63). Compared to Melanesians (OR=1.0) for male/female: Polynesians had the highest prevalence of OW (1.7/1.5), Ob (4.7/3.5), and OW-Ob (3.0/2.5); New Caledonian-born Europeans had greater OW, Ob and OW-Ob (0.3/0.4) than immigrant Europeans (0.2/0.2). Findings contribute to obesity comparisons with other Pacific Islands, and they establish trends in New Caledonia for targeting policies and strategies of prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Accuracy and Utility of Estimating Lean Body Mass and Nutritional Status in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease on Long-Term Hemodialysis Using Anthropometric Skinfold Thickness Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Khai Gene; Chee, Jia Lian; Karahalios, Amalia; Skelley, Annabelle; Wong, Kim

    2018-01-01

    Malnutrition is common in patients on hemodialysis (prevalence of 30% to 50%) and is associated with higher mortality. Lean body mass (LBM) assessment is an accurate way of assessing nutritional status. The dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan is a reliable method in assessing body compositions and LBM; however, it is expensive and largely inaccessible. Anthropometric skinfold thickness measurement (ASFM) is useful in assessing LBM. It is cheaper and accessible, but underutilized clinically. The subjective global score (SGA) is a well-established method of assessing nutritional status. All three methods of assessing nutritional status were compared. In this pilot observational study, there was a significant correlation between LBM% estimated by DEXA and ASFM (mean difference -1.46% [95% CI -4.09 to 1.18]; LOA -14.0 to 11.1). Nutritional status by SGA could only detect those severely malnourished when using LBM% by ASFM as comparison. Our study demonstrated that ASFM is a useful method of assessing LBM and nutritional status, which can be easily utilized clinically. Copyright© by the American Nephrology Nurses Association.

  2. Association of Anthropometric Measures with Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Metabolic Syndrome in Normal-Weight Children and Adolescents: The CASPIAN III Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Qorbani

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This nationwide study was conducted to determine the association of anthropometric measures with cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic syndrome (MetS in Iranian normal-weight children and adolescents. Methods: We analyzed the data of 3,565 children and adolescents (50.3% boys, aged 10-18 years, with a normal BMI (5th-84th percentile obtained from the third survey of ‘Childhood and Adolescence Surveillance and Prevention of Adult Non-communicable Disease' (CASPIAN III study. The diagnostic criteria for MetS were defined by the International Diabetes Federation consensus. Results: The prevalence of MetS for 10- to 13.9-year-old boys, 14- to 18-year-old boys, 10- to 13.9-year-old girls, and 14- to 18-year-old girls were 1.4, 2.8, 2.3, and 3.3%, respectively. After adjustment for age and sex, each unit increase in BMI (within normal range and waist circumference increased the odds of MetS from 6 to 72% and from 1 to 20%, respectively. The dominant pattern of dyslipidemia among the participants was high triglycerides and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Conclusion: This study complements recent research about the high frequency of metabolic risk factors among normal-weight individuals in the pediatric age group.

  3. The effect of hypocaloric diet enriched in legumes with or without L- arginine and selenium on anthropometric measures in central obese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Alizadeh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identifying new ways to decrease adiposity will be very valuable for health. The aim of this study was to find out whether L- Arginine (Arg and selenium alone or together can increase the effect of hypocaloric diet enriched in legumes (HDEL on anthropometric measures in healthy obese women. Methods: This randomized, double- blind, placebo- controlled trial was undertaken in 84 healthy premenopausal women with central obesity. After 2 weeks of run- in on an isocaloric diet, participants were randomly considered to eat HDEL, Arg (5 g/d and HDEL, selenium (200 μg/d and HDEL or Arg, selenium and HDEL for 6 weeks. The following variables were assessed before intervention and 3 and 6 weeks after it: weight, waist circumference, hip circumference, waist to hip ratio (WHR, body mass index (BMI, and fasting nitrite/nitrate (NOx concentrations. Other variables (arm, thigh, calf and breast circumferences, subscapular, triceps, biceps and suprailiac skinfold thicknesses, sum of skinfold thicknesses (SSF, body density (D and estimated percent of body fat (EPF were assessed before and after intervention. Results: HDEL showed a significant effect in reduction of waist, hip, arm, thigh, calf and breast circumferences, triceps, biceps, subscapular and suprailiac skinfold thicknesses, WHR, SSF, D and EPF. HDEL + Arg + selenium significantly reduced suprailiac skinfold thicknesses; and there was no significant effect of HDEL, Arg, selenium and Arg plus selenium on weight, BMI and fasting NOx . Conclusions: The study indicates that HDEL + Arg + selenium reduce suprailiac skinfold thicknesses which represents the abdominal obesity reduction.

  4. Relationship between anthropometric and haematological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship between anthropometric and haematological parameters among third trimester pregnant women in Sokoto State, Northwest Nigeria. ... access to good healthcare so that the ideal anthropometric and haematological parameters can be achieved during pregnancy to guarantee good feto-maternal outcome.

  5. Study of Anthropometric Measurements of the Anterior Ethmoidal Artery using Three-dimensional Scanning on 300 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoli, Vinicius Tomadon; Martins, Rafael Ferri; Negri, Krystal Calmeto

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The anterior ethmoidal artery (AEA) is one of the main arteries that supply both the nasal mucosa and the ethmoid sinuses. The AEA shows variability regarding its distance from adjacent structures. Several studies have developed techniques to identify the AEA. Objective This study aimed to compare the measurements from the AEA to the ethmoid bulla and to the frontal beak by using computed tomography of the face, while identifying their intraindividual and interindividual variations. Methods We analyzed 300 CT scans of the face performed at the CT scan Center at Hospital. The average age of subjects was 36 ± 15.1 years (range 4–84). Results We found that the average distance from the AEA to the ethmoid bulla was 17.2 ± 1.8 mm and the distance from the AEA to the frontal beak was 15.1 ± 2.2 mm. Regarding the average distance from the AEA to the frontal beak (AEA-frontal beak), there was a difference between the right and left sides, with the former being 0.4 mm higher on average than the latter. Among the age groups, there was a significant difference of distances between the AEA and the ethmoid bulla (AEA-ethmoid bulla), which were shorter in the ≤ 12 years group. There was a positive and significant correlation between both measurements analyzed, with low values (high) of AEA-ethmoid bulla distance corresponding to low values (high) of AEA-frontal beak distance. Conclusion The measurements obtained adds anatomical knowledge that can serve as a parameter in frontal and ethmoid sinus surgery. PMID:28382116

  6. Comparison of 3D laser-based photonic scans and manual anthropometric measurements of body size and shape in a validation study of 123 young Swiss men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Koepke

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Manual anthropometric measurements are time-consuming and challenging to perform within acceptable intra- and inter-individual error margins in large studies. Three-dimensional (3D laser body scanners provide a fast and precise alternative: within a few seconds the system produces a 3D image of the body topography and calculates some 150 standardised body size measurements. Objective The aim was to enhance the small number of existing validation studies and compare scan and manual techniques based on five selected measurements. We assessed the agreement between two repeated measurements within the two methods, analysed the direct agreement between the two methods, and explored the differences between the techniques when used in regressions assessing the effect of health related determinants on body shape indices. Methods We performed two repeated body scans on 123 volunteering young men using a Vitus Smart XXL body scanner. We manually measured height, waist, hip, buttock, and chest circumferences twice for each participant according to the WHO guidelines. The participants also filled in a basic questionnaire. Results Mean differences between the two scan measurements were smaller than between the two manual measurements, and precision as well as intra-class correlation coefficients were higher. Both techniques were strongly correlated. When comparing means between both techniques we found significant differences: Height was systematically shorter by 2.1 cm, whereas waist, hip and bust circumference measurements were larger in the scans by 1.17–4.37 cm. In consequence, body shape indices also became larger and the prevalence of overweight was greater when calculated from the scans. Between 4.1% and 7.3% of the probands changed risk category from normal to overweight when classified based on the scans. However, when employing regression analyses the two measurement techniques resulted in very similar coefficients, confidence

  7. Anthropometric measurements of lip-nose complex in 11-17 years old males of Mashhad using photographic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourmomeni Abbas Ali

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction: Although there are several methods to evaluate facial nerve palsy, most of them are not objective. In case of symmetric movements of face, photoshop software is useful for objective assessment of facial nerve injuries.  Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-analytic study, the facial movements of sixty normal subjects (30 females and 30 males were photographed. Displacement of facial movements in specific landmarks was measured by Photoshop software. The collected data then were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: The mean displacement of forehead wrinkles and landmarks on cheeks in right and left sides was respectively 10.6 mm, 10.1 mm and 9.4 mm, 9.7 mm. The mean displacement of oral commissure in right and left sides during smile was 11.8 mm and 11.5 mm. The comparison showed no significant difference between both sides (P>0.05. The mean distance between landmarks (lateral canthus, oral commissure and Cheek and axis of face were compared too. The results showed that both sides were symmetric. Conclusion: Facial movements were measurable by Photoshop software and this method was applicable to assessment of facial nerve palsy and also synkinesis.

  8. Overweight and obesity in students of a dental college of Karachi: lifestyle influence and measurement by an appropriate anthropometric index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingorjo, Mozaffer Rahim; Syed, Sadiqa; Qureshi, Masood Anwar

    2009-08-01

    To compare body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and body fat percentage (%BF), as index of overweight and obesity in young adults. We also intended to find an association between lifestyle behaviours and obesity. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Fatima Jinnah Dental College, Karachi, during 2007 to 2008, with 192 first year dental students, (18-21years) of high socioeconomic class. All were questioned regarding lifestyle behaviours. Overweight and obesity were estimated by measuring %BF, BMI, and WC. For %BF, skinfold thickness was measured using skinfold calipers. BMI > or = 23.0-24.9 kg/m2 was taken as overweight and > or = 25.0 kg/m2 as obese (Asians criteria proposed by Western Pacific Regional Office of World Health Organization). WC using Asian cutoff values for overweight and obesity were: males > or = 78 cm and > or = 90 cm; females > or = 72 cm and > or = 80 cm, respectively. Body fat percentage used to define overweight and obesity was: males 22.1-27.0 and > 27.1; females 27.1-32.0 and > 32.1, respectively. Pearson's correlation was done between the BMI, WC and %BF with statistical significance taken at P obese. Obesity was underpredicted by BMI when compared to skinfold calipers method. The obese were seen to skip breakfast more often [odds ratio (OR): 2.39], take frequent snacks (OR: 1.58), watch television more (OR: 1.58), and were physically less active than their non-obese counterparts. Body fat percentage using skinfold caliper is a reliable index of obesity. Lack of sleep and skipping of breakfast, are prominent promoters of obesity, in addition to other lifestyle behaviours.

  9. NUTRITIONAL ESTIMATES OF SCHOOL GOING CHILDREN BASED ON ANTHROPOMETRIC MEASUREMENTS: STUDY FROM A RURAL AREA OF VARANASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M K Gupta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the adoption of western lifestyle the problem of overweight and obesity is gradually increasing in children, while problem of malnutrition is persisting continuously in the country. With this background a school based cross sectional study was conducted to assess the nutritional status of school going children in a rural area: Chiraigaon block of Varanasi. Study period: July 2010 to September 2010 Methods: A school-based study with cross-sectional design was adopted. A total of 1448 school children were examined from 3 middle-schools that were selected by simple random sampling method. Height and weight of the children were measured, and BMI and other parameters were assessed. Results: On applying the BMI-for-age criteria, twelve percent of the children (12.4% boys and 11.1% girls were found underweight while 5.4% were overweight or obese (5.71% of the boys and 4.63% of the girls. But when the previous WHO’s BMI classification was used, 86.5% children had BMI <18.5 (88.4% of total boys and 81.9% of all girls. Conclusion: Nutritional status of school going children based on WHO criteria of BMI for age has been satisfactory. However, this approach needs scientific validation by undertaking a multi-centric study.

  10. Interactions between Neighbourhood Urban Form and Socioeconomic Status and Their Associations with Anthropometric Measurements in Canadian Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin R. McCormack

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neighbourhood-level socioeconomic composition and built context are correlates of weight-related behaviours. We investigated the relations between objective measures of neighbourhood design and socioeconomic status (SES and their interaction, in relation to self-reported waist circumference (WC, waist-to-hip ratio, and body mass index (BMI in a sample of Canadian adults (n=851 from 12 Calgary neighbourhoods. WC and BMI were higher among residents of disadvantaged neighbourhoods, independent of neighbourhood design (grid, warped grid, and curvilinear street patterns and individual-level characteristics (sex, age, education, income, dog ownership, marital status, number of dependents, motor vehicle access, smoking, sleep, mental health, physical health, and past attempts to modify bodyweight. The association between neighbourhood-level SES and WC was modified by neighbourhood design; WC was higher in disadvantaged-curvilinear neighbourhoods and lower in advantaged-grid neighbourhoods. Policies making less obesogenic neighbourhoods affordable to low socioeconomic households and that improve the supportiveness for behaviours leading to healthy weight in low socioeconomic neighbourhoods are necessary.

  11. Interactions between Neighbourhood Urban Form and Socioeconomic Status and Their Associations with Anthropometric Measurements in Canadian Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedenreich, Christine; McLaren, Lindsay; Potestio, Melissa; Sandalack, Beverly; Csizmadi, Ilona

    2017-01-01

    Neighbourhood-level socioeconomic composition and built context are correlates of weight-related behaviours. We investigated the relations between objective measures of neighbourhood design and socioeconomic status (SES) and their interaction, in relation to self-reported waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio, and body mass index (BMI) in a sample of Canadian adults (n = 851 from 12 Calgary neighbourhoods). WC and BMI were higher among residents of disadvantaged neighbourhoods, independent of neighbourhood design (grid, warped grid, and curvilinear street patterns) and individual-level characteristics (sex, age, education, income, dog ownership, marital status, number of dependents, motor vehicle access, smoking, sleep, mental health, physical health, and past attempts to modify bodyweight). The association between neighbourhood-level SES and WC was modified by neighbourhood design; WC was higher in disadvantaged-curvilinear neighbourhoods and lower in advantaged-grid neighbourhoods. Policies making less obesogenic neighbourhoods affordable to low socioeconomic households and that improve the supportiveness for behaviours leading to healthy weight in low socioeconomic neighbourhoods are necessary. PMID:29056976

  12. A Study on Anthropometric Measurements, Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Food Intakes Among Different Social Status and Ethnicities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafarirad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Metabolic syndrome is a disorder that increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate some risk factors of the metabolic syndrome and food intakes among people who lived in Ahvaz City, Iran. Methods It was a filed study that was conducted on 211 subjects who participated in health exhibition. Socioeconomic status and ethnicity were asked by a general questionnaire. Weight, height, body mass index, waist circumference (WC and WC to hip circumference ratio (WHR were obtained. Blood sugar was measured by a glucometer. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were obtained and dietary intakes were assessed by a brief instrument. Results There was a significant difference in weight, height, WC, WHR and systolic blood pressure among different jobs. Workers had more intakes of cake and sweets. Arab subjects had more intakes of bread and fishes and Persians more intakes of vegetables. Soda, chocolate and candy were more consumed by Kurd ethnicity. Conclusions Job may be accounted as an important effective socioeconomic factor related to metabolic syndrome risk factors; also different cultures due to different ethnicities may have an influence on lifestyle and dietary intakes.

  13. Predicting Forearm Physical Exposures During Computer Work Using Self-Reports, Software-Recorded Computer Usage Patterns, and Anthropometric and Workstation Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huysmans, Maaike A; Eijckelhof, Belinda H W; Garza, Jennifer L Bruno; Coenen, Pieter; Blatter, Birgitte M; Johnson, Peter W; van Dieën, Jaap H; van der Beek, Allard J; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2017-12-15

    Alternative techniques to assess physical exposures, such as prediction models, could facilitate more efficient epidemiological assessments in future large cohort studies examining physical exposures in relation to work-related musculoskeletal symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate two types of models that predict arm-wrist-hand physical exposures (i.e. muscle activity, wrist postures and kinematics, and keyboard and mouse forces) during computer use, which only differed with respect to the candidate predicting variables; (i) a full set of predicting variables, including self-reported factors, software-recorded computer usage patterns, and worksite measurements of anthropometrics and workstation set-up (full models); and (ii) a practical set of predicting variables, only including the self-reported factors and software-recorded computer usage patterns, that are relatively easy to assess (practical models). Prediction models were build using data from a field study among 117 office workers who were symptom-free at the time of measurement. Arm-wrist-hand physical exposures were measured for approximately two hours while workers performed their own computer work. Each worker's anthropometry and workstation set-up were measured by an experimenter, computer usage patterns were recorded using software and self-reported factors (including individual factors, job characteristics, computer work behaviours, psychosocial factors, workstation set-up characteristics, and leisure-time activities) were collected by an online questionnaire. We determined the predictive quality of the models in terms of R2 and root mean squared (RMS) values and exposure classification agreement to low-, medium-, and high-exposure categories (in the practical model only). The full models had R2 values that ranged from 0.16 to 0.80, whereas for the practical models values ranged from 0.05 to 0.43. Interquartile ranges were not that different for the two models, indicating that only for some

  14. The Efficacy of Acupuncture on Anthropometric Measures and the Biochemical Markers for Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjuan Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many previous studies have shown the potential therapeutic effect of acupuncture for metabolic syndrome (MetS. However, most of these studies were limited by short durations of observation and a lack of sham acupuncture as control. We designed a randomized controlled trial, used sham acupuncture as the control, and evaluated the efficacy over 12 weeks of treatment and 12 weeks of follow-up. Methods/Design. The study was designed as a multicentre, parallel-group, randomized, double-blinded trial. 40 patients were randomly assigned to two groups: treatment group (treated with acupuncture and control group (treated with sham acupuncture. Outcomes were measured at 4, 8, and 12 weeks and 3 months after treatment. Results. 33 participants (17 in acupuncture group and 16 in control group completed the treatment and the follow-up. Decreases from baseline in mean waist circumference (WC and weight at the end of treatment were 4.85 cm (95% CI [2.405,5.595] and 4.00 kg (95% CI [1.6208,4.4498] in acupuncture group and 1.62 cm and 1.64 kg in control group (P<0.01. The changes in mean glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c, triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol (TC, and blood pressure in acupuncture group were greater than the changes in control group (P<0.05, P<0.01. Conclusion. Acupuncture decreases WC, HC, HbA1c, TG, and TC values and blood pressure in MetS.

  15. 47 CFR 15.31 - Measurement standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Commission's Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau at 1-888-CALL-FCC (1-888-225-5322). (1) FCC/OET MP-2... are to be measured for compliance using ANSI C63.17-1998: “Methods of Measurement of the... unintentional radiators are to be measured for compliance using the following procedure excluding sections 4.1.5...

  16. Standards for reference reactor physics measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.R.; Cokinos, D.M.; Uotinen, V.

    1990-01-01

    Reactor physics analysis methods require experimental testing and confirmation over the range of practical reactor configurations and states. This range is somewhat limited by practical fuel types such as actinide oxides or carbides enclosed in metal cladding. On the other hand, this range continues to broaden because of the trend of using higher enrichment, if only slightly enriched, electric utility fuel. The need for experimental testing of the reactor physics analysis methods arises in part because of the continual broadening of the range of core designs, and in part because of the nature of the analysis methods. Reactor physics analyses are directed primarily at the determination of core reactivities and reaction rates, the former largely for reasons of reactor control, and the latter largely to ensure that material limitations are not violated. Errors in these analyses can be regarded as being from numerics, from the data base, and from human factors. For numerical, data base, and human factor reasons, then, it is prudent and customary to qualify reactor physical analysis methods against experiments. These experiments can be treated as being at low power or at high power, and each of these types is subject to an American National Standards Institute standard. The purpose of these standards is to aid in improving and maintaining adequate quality in reactor physics methods, and it is from this point of view that the standards are examined here

  17. A randomized comparison study regarding the impact of short-duration, high-intensity exercise and traditional exercise on anthropometric and body composition measurement changes in post-menopausal women--A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Joan A Cebrick; Payne, Ellen K

    2016-03-01

    The mode and duration of exercise necessary to change body composition and reduce weight remains debatable. Menopause results in hormonal changes that preclude weight loss. This randomized pilot study compared the effects of short-duration, high-intensity interval training and traditional exercise on anthropometric and body composition measurement changes in post-menopausal women. To compare the effects of short-duration, high-intensity interval training and traditional methods of exercise (walking) on anthropometric, body composition and body weight change over a 12-week period. Subjects (N = 18) were post-menopausal, sedentary female volunteers, randomly assigned into one of two exercise groups. Both groups exercised five out of seven days for 12 weeks. The resistance group (n = 8) (54.3 ± 7.3 years; BMI = 28.0 ± 2.1 kg/m(2); mean ± SD) exercised for 15.0 ± 3.5 min, which consisted of five different exercise routines including upper and lower extremity, a cardio segment, yoga and abdominal exercises. The walkers (n = 10) (56.6 ± 5.2 years; BMI = 29.2 ± 2.6 kg/m(2); mean ± SD) exercised for 40.0 ± 5.0 min at 65% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate. Relative (%) body fat was measured via DEXA scan, along with five anthropometric measurements, all of which were taken prior to and after 12 weeks. Independent sample t-tests were probed for differences, p ≤ 0.05. No statistically significant changes were determined between the groups for pre-and post-measurements. The outcomes of this study provide a foundation for future comparisons of short-duration high-intensity interval training exercise and traditional exercise, or walking, on anthropometric and body composition measurement changes in sedentary, overweight, post-menopausal females over a 12-week period. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. The effect of almonds on anthropometric measurements and lipid profile in overweight and obese females in a weight reduction program: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Abazarfard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the wholesome benefits of nuts increased consumption of them has been recommended. However, because of nut′s high energy density, the role of them in the treatment of overweight and obesity is vague. This current clinical trial study aims to investigate the effects of a balanced hypocaloric almond-enriched diet (AED (almond group in comparison to a balanced hypocaloric nut-free diet (NFD (nut-free group on body weight and cardiovascular disease risk factors in women with body mass index (BMI >25 for 3-month. Materials and Methods: A total of 108 overweight and obese women were assigned in our 3-month randomized controlled trial. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups regarding a balanced hypocaloric diet with or without almond. The planned reduced calorie diets for both groups were identical except for the almond group who consumed 50 g of almonds daily. Anthropometric and laboratory measurements of the participants who completed the study were made prior to and at the end of the study. Results: A total of 100 subjects completed the study. Weight, BMI, waist circumference, waist to hip circumference ratio, total cholesterol, and triglyceride, total: High density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C, fasting blood sugar and diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly in the almond group compared to the nut-free group (P > 0.001. Greater reduction in low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (P > 0.002 and systolic blood pressure (P > 0.001 and greater increase in HDL-C (P = 0.001 were found in the nut-free group. Conclusion: The balanced hypocaloric AED in comparison to the balanced hypocaloric NFD led to a greater weight-loss and overall better improvements in studied cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  19. The effect of hypocaloric diet enriched in legumes with or without L-arginine and selenium on anthropometric measures in central obese women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Mohammad; Daneghian, Sevana; Ghaffari, Aida; Ostadrahimi, Alireza; Safaeiyan, Abdolrasoul; Estakhri, Rassul; Gargari, Bahram Pourghasem

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identifying new ways to decrease adiposity will be very valuable for health. The aim of this study was to find out whether L-Arginine (Arg) and selenium alone or together can increase the effect of hypocaloric diet enriched in legumes (HDEL) on anthropometric measures in healthy obese women. METHODS: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken in 84 healthy premenopausal women with central obesity. After 2 weeks of run-in on an isocaloric diet, participants were randomly considered to eat HDEL, Arg (5 g/d) and HDEL, selenium (200 µg/d) and HDEL or Arg, selenium and HDEL for 6 weeks. The following variables were assessed before intervention and 3 and 6 weeks after it: weight, waist circumference, hip circumference, waist to hip ratio (WHR), body mass index (BMI), and fasting nitrite/nitrate (NOx) concentrations. Other variables (arm, thigh, calf and breast circumferences, subscapular, triceps, biceps and suprailiac skinfold thicknesses, sum of skinfold thicknesses (SSF), body density (D) and estimated percent of body fat (EPF)) were assessed before and after intervention. RESULTS: HDEL showed a significant effect in reduction of waist, hip, arm, thigh, calf and breast circumferences, triceps, biceps, subscapular and suprailiac skinfold thicknesses, WHR, SSF, D and EPF. HDEL + Arg + selenium significantly reduced suprailiac skinfold thicknesses; and there was no significant effect of HDEL, Arg, selenium and Arg plus selenium on weight, BMI and fasting NOx. CONCLUSIONS: The study indicates that HDEL + Arg + selenium reduce suprailiac skinfold thicknesses which represents the abdominal obesity reduction. PMID:21526106

  20. STANDARDS OF FUNCTIONAL MEASUREMENTS IN OCULAR TOXICOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The visual system, like other sensory systems, may be a frequent target of exposure to toxic chemicals. A thorough evaluation of visual toxicity should include both structural and functional measures. Sensory evoked potentials are one set of neurophysiological procedures that...

  1. Anthropometric and Biochemical Profiles of Black South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rev Dr Olaleye

    Anthropometric and biochemical profiles were determined according to standard methods. From the ... Email: bejufemi@yahoo.co.uk ... 995 plots, Pahameng 1 711, Joe Slovo 1 359, and. Botchabela 2 ...... York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Steyn K ...

  2. ANTHROPOMETRICAL STATUS AND GENDER DIFFERENCES AT 12 YEARS OF AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilir Gllareva

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to verify the current anthropometrical status of the pupils of the age 12, as well as to compare it with the standards of raising in accordance with the WHO standards. In the study were included 62 pupils (42 male and 20 female. The anthropometric tests were done in height, weight, biacromial and elbow breadth, subcutaneous adipose tissue at the : suprailiac skinfold; subscapular skinfold; triceps skinfold, as well as the abdominal circumference. The results showed that there was a heterogenic distribution of results, especially in the body weight, where the distribution between the minimal and maximal results is 28-70 kg, with the average 43, 14 ± 9, 78 of standard deviation with the male pupils, while with the female pupils was noticed more homogenous group and the standard deviation was significantly lower than with the female pupils in all variables. The findings show that almost in all measured variables female pupils are more developed at this age, especially the body high, body weight and subcutaneous adipose tissue, while as regards the abdominal circumference and body breadth, the male pupils are more developed. Comparison of symbolic sample of this research with the WHO data shows an approximate trend of raising and development of children which were included in this research, and the difference is as follows: Female pupils age 12, body height=151.97 cm

  3. Morphormetric Measurements Of Barbels, Head And Standard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measurement of sensory barbels of five catfish species from the Osse River was undertaken to ascertain the differences between the types of barbels. The five species showed the maxillary to have the largest proportion of SL. The differential rankings of the maxillary were Heterobranchus bidorsalis Geoffrey Saint Hilaire ...

  4. A comparative study of performance measurement standards of railway operator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongjirawut Siripong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The European standard (EN 13816, is one of the widely accepted standards for measuring the quality of public passenger transport (PPT service. EN 13816 indicates 8 measurement criteria, 29 sub-criteria and 193 Key Performance Indicators (KPIs to be used to measure the performance of railway operators. Nowadays, there are other addition criteria beyond EN13816, developed by various organisations. This research firstly aims to explore the service performance measurement of railway operators used by actual railway operators at international level and in Thailand. After an intensive review of performance measurement standards, 9 standards are compiled and compared in terms of criteria, sub-criteria and KPIs using a cluster analysis methodology. The result found additional performance measurement aspects at 2 sub-criteria and 91 KPIs in addition to EN 13816. This research summarized and compared different performance measurement standards to measure service quality of metro rail line.

  5. Anthropometric and Performance Perspectives of Female Competitive Surfing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barlow Matthew John

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the anthropometric profiles of female surfers and to identify whether any anthropometrical factors might predict competitive ranking. Secondly, to evaluate the activity profile of female competitive surfing with respect to environmental conditions using Global Positioning System (GPS derived measures.

  6. Anthropometric indices and energy intakes of alcoholic adolescent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed the nutritional status of alcoholics in relation to non-alcoholic adolescent students, as well as the relationship between alcohol consumption, and energy intake, and the anthropometric indices of the adolescent students of Abia state university. Anthropometric measurements (weight and height) of 513 ...

  7. Cassava household expenditure and anthropometric indices of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In an attempt to verify the myth associated with cassava, that high consumption causes malnutrition, anthropometric measurements of 445 preschool children aged 0 - 5 years in 90 randomly selected farm households of cassava growing areas of Imo State were undertaken. Growth deviations (Z – scores) were calculated ...

  8. The Relationship between Nutritional Status and Anthropometric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred and six (306) children of both sexes aged 1-5 years were classified into three groups: Normal, protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and vitamin deficiency (VD). The relative importance of the various anthropometric measurements was assessed in these three categories of children through comparison of their ...

  9. The relationship between standard automated perimetry and GDx VCC measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Reus; H.G. Lemij (Hans)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: To investigate the relationship between retinal light sensitivity measured with standard automated perimetry (SAP) and retardation of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) measured with the GDx VCC (Laser Diagnostic Technologies, Inc., San Diego,

  10. Association between milk and milk product consumption and anthropometric measures in adult men and women in India: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambika Satija

    Full Text Available The nutritional aetiology of obesity remains unclear, especially with regard to the role of dairy products in developing countries.To examine whether milk/milk product consumption is associated with obesity and high waist circumference among adult Indians.Information on plain milk, tea, curd and buttermilk/lassi consumption assessed using a Food Frequency Questionnaire was obtained from the cross-sectional sib-pair designed Indian Migration Study (3698 men and 2659 women, conducted at four factory locations across north, central and south India. The anthropometric measures included were Body Mass Index (BMI and Waist Circumference (WC. Mixed-effect logistic regression models were conducted to accommodate sib-pair design and adjust for potential confounders.After controlling for potential confounders, the risk of being obese (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2 was lower among women (OR = 0.57;95%CI:0.43-0.76;p ≤ 0.0001 and men (OR = 0.67;95%CI: 0.51-0.87;p = 0.005, and the risk of a high WC (men: >90 cm; women: >80 cm was lower among men (OR = 0.71;95%CI:0.54-0.93;p = 0.005 and women (OR = 0.79;95%CI:0.59-1.05;p>0.05 who consume ≥1 portions of plain milk daily than those who do not consume any milk. The inverse association between daily plain milk consumption and obesity was also confirmed in sibling-pair analyses. Daily tea consumption of ≥ 1 portion was associated with obesity (OR = 1.51;95%CI:1.00-2.25;p>0.050 and high WC (OR = 1.65;95%CI:1.08-2.51;p>0.019 among men but not among women but there was no strong evidence of association of curd and buttermilk/lassi consumption with obesity and high waist circumference among both men and women.The independent, inverse association of daily plain milk consumption with the risk of being obese suggests that high plain milk intake may lower the risk of obesity in adult Indians. However, this is an observational finding and uncontrolled confounding cannot be excluded as an explanation for the association. Therefore

  11. Changes in anthropometric measurements, body composition, blood pressure, lipid profile, and testosterone in patients participating in a low-energy dietary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliett, Mary; Burke, Jeanmarie R

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe changes in anthropometric measurements, body composition, blood pressure, lipid profile, and testosterone following a low-energy-density dietary intervention plus regimented supplementation program. The study design was a pre-post intervention design without a control group. Normal participants were recruited from the faculty, staff, students, and community members from a chiropractic college to participate in a 21-day weight loss program. All participants (n = 49; 36 women, 13 men; 31 ± 10.3 years of age) received freshly prepared mostly vegan meals (breakfast, lunch, and dinner) that included 1200 to 1400 daily calories (5020.8 to 5857.6 J) for the women and 1600 to 1800 (6694.4 to 7531.2 J) daily calories for the men. Nutritional supplements containing enzymes that were intended to facilitate digestion, reduce cholesterol levels, increase metabolic rate, and mediate inflammatory processes were consumed 30 minutes before each meal. The regimented supplementation program included once-daily supplementation with a green drink that contained alfalfa, wheatgrass, apple cider vinegar, and fulvic acid throughout the study period. A cleanse supplementation containing magnesium, chia, flaxseed, lemon, camu camu, cat's claw, bentonite clay, tumeric, pau d'arco, chanca piedra, stevia, zeolite clay, slippery elm, garlic, ginger, peppermint, aloe, citrus bioflavonoids, and fulvic acid was added before each meal during week 2. During week 3, the cleanse supplementation was replaced with probiotic and prebiotic supplementation. Multiple paired t tests detected clinically meaningful reductions in weight (- 8.7 ± 5.54 lb) (- 3.9 ± 2.5 kg), total cholesterol (- 30.0 ± 29.77 mg/dL), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (- 21.0 ± 25.20 mg/dL) (P < .05). There was a pre-post intervention increase in testosterone for men (111.0 ± 121.13 ng/dL, P < .05). Weight loss and improvements in total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein

  12. Development of a standard for indoor radon measurements in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, R.S.; Solomon, S.B.

    1994-01-01

    A standard covering methodologies for the measurement of indoor radon and radon progeny concentrations in air in Australian buildings is currently under preparation as part of a set of standards covering total indoor air quality. This paper outlines the suggested methodology for radon and discusses some of the problems associated with the development of the standard. The draft standard recommends measurement of the radon concentration in air using scintillation cells, charcoal cups and solid state nuclear track detectors, and measurement of radon progeny concentration in air using the Rolle method or the Nazaroff method. 14 refs., 1 tab

  13. The use of personal values in living standards measures | Ungerer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Living Standards Measure (LSM), a South African marketing segmentation method, is a multivariate wealth measure based on standard of living. This article reports on whether a rationale can be found for the inclusion of psychological variables, particularly personal values, in this type of multivariate segmentation.

  14. Rating anthropometric parameters of children with polyarticular hypermobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Cardinali

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Polyarticular hypermobility manifests in an increased range of motion in the joints compared to standards that include gender and age. It is given that it occurs even in 30% of children. It can lead to many biomechanical disorders and injuries. Science, which describes the measurement of the different body parameters such as height, body weight or fat content in the body is anthropometry and it was used to characterize the child diagnosed with arthritis polyarticular hypermobility. Material and Methods: The study was conducted on the group of 35 children aged 6 to 11 years old with diagnosed polyarticular hypermobility. The control group were randomly selected children in the same age from the same school without diagnosed polyarticular hypermobility. Anthropometric parameters of all children were measured according to accepted methods. The children were tested for body weight, height, body mass index, WHR index and their skinfolds were measured by skinfolds calipers. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the anthropometric parameters of children with diagnosed polyarticular hypermobility and to compare these results to their contemporaries with no identified polyarticular hypermobility. Results: All the examined parameters (height, body weight, BMI, WHR, skinfolds measurement in the two groups were on very similar levels, there were no statistically significant differences (BMI p = 0.3435, WHR p = 0.806. Conclusions: There is no significant difference between the study group and the control group in the examined anthropometric parameters (height, body weight and BMI. Children with diagnosed polyarticular hypermobility in terms of weight and height do not stand out from their peers.

  15. Ergonomic and Anthropometric Consideration for Library Furniture in an Iranian Public University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Osquei-Zadeh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In our competing educational world, students spend a considerable part of their daily life, studying at library furniture. Not surprisingly, due to lack of proper anthropometric databases, these products have typically been ill fitted for the intended user populations. Objective: To verify the optimum anthropometric match of library furniture within an academic environment, through a combined qualitative and quantitative approach. Methods: 267 (120 female and 147 male students, were subjected to 11 standard anthropometric measurements. In line with the measurements, subjective evaluations were also considered through detailed fitting trials on selected groups of participants. Results: Combinational equations defined the unacceptable furniture dimensions according to elbow and sitting popliteal heights, mainly for smaller and taller divisions of the studied population, which were systematically comparable along with subjective and objective outcomes. In brief, if we classified studied students into “small,” “medium,” and “tall” groups, the design dimensions should be altered by -5.1, -2.2, and +1.6 cm for chair seat height; and by -8.3, -5.4, and +1.1 cm for table height, for each student group, respectively. Conclusion: The furniture size to be used by Iranian students should be changed to fit their anthropometric measures.

  16. Ergonomic and anthropometric consideration for library furniture in an Iranian public university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osquei-Zadeh, R; Ghamari, J; Abedi, M; Shiri, H

    2012-01-01

    In our competing educational world, students spend a considerable part of their daily life, studying at library furniture. Not surprisingly, due to lack of proper anthropometric databases, these products have typically been ill fitted for the intended user populations. To verify the optimum anthropometric match of library furniture within an academic environment, through a combined qualitative and quantitative approach. 267 (120 female and 147 male) students, were subjected to 11 standard anthropometric measurements. In line with the measurements, subjective evaluations were also considered through detailed fitting trials on selected groups of participants. Combinational equations defined the unacceptable furniture dimensions according to elbow and sitting popliteal heights, mainly for smaller and taller divisions of the studied population, which were systematically comparable along with subjective and objective outcomes. In brief, if we classified studied students into "small," "medium," and "tall" groups, the design dimensions should be altered by -5.1, -2.2, and +1.6 cm for chair seat height; and by -8.3, -5.4, and +1.1 cm for table height, for each student group, respectively. The furniture size to be used by Iranian students should be changed to fit their anthropometric measures.

  17. The Australian Commonwealth standard of measurement for absorbed radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherlock, S.L.

    1990-06-01

    This report documents the absorbed dose standard for photon beams in the range from 1 to 25 MeV. Measurements of absorbed dose in graphite irradiated by a beam of cobalt-60 gamma rays from an Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) E1 Dorado 6 teletherapy unit are reported. The measurements were performed using a graphite calorimeter, which is the primary standard for absorbed dose. The measurements are used to calibrate a working standard ion chamber in terms of absorbed dose in graphite. Details of the methods, results and correction factors applied are given in Appendices. 13 refs., 6 tabs., 6 figs

  18. ASTM International Workshop on Standards & Measurements for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Carl G.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Ratcliffe, Anthony; Tomlins, Paul; Luginbuehl, Reto; Tesk, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The “Workshop on Standards & Measurements for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds” was held on May 21, 2013 in Indianapolis, IN and was sponsored by the ASTM International (ASTM). The purpose of the workshop was to identify the highest priority items for future standards work for scaffolds used in the development and manufacture of tissue engineered medical products (TEMPs). Eighteen speakers and 78 attendees met to assess current scaffold standards and to prioritize needs for future standards. A key finding was that the ASTM TEMPs subcommittees (F04.41-46) have many active “guide” documents for educational purposes, but that few standard “test methods” or “practices” have been published. Overwhelmingly, the most clearly identified need was standards for measuring the structure of scaffolds, followed by standards for biological characterization, including in vitro testing, animal models and cell-material interactions. The third most pressing need was to develop standards for assessing the mechanical properties of scaffolds. Additional needs included standards for assessing scaffold degradation, clinical outcomes with scaffolds, effects of sterilization on scaffolds, scaffold composition and drug release from scaffolds. Discussions also highlighted the need for additional scaffold reference materials and the need to use them for measurement traceability. Finally, dialogue emphasized the needs to promote the use of standards in scaffold fabrication, characterization, and commercialization and to assess the use and impact of standards in the TEMPs community. Many scaffold standard needs have been identified and focus should now turn to generating these standards to support the use of scaffolds in TEMPs. PMID:25220952

  19. Temperature standards, what and where: resources for effective temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, W.W. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Many standards have been published to describe devices, methods, and other topics. How they are developed and by whom are briefly described, and an attempt is made to extract most of those relating to temperature measurements. A directory of temperature standards and their sources is provided

  20. Portable radiation instrumentation traceability of standards and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiserman, A.; Walke, M.

    1995-01-01

    Portable radiation measuring instruments are used to estimate and control doses for workers. Calibration of these instruments must be sufficiently accurate to ensure that administrative and legal dose limits are not likely to be exceeded due to measurement uncertainties. An instrument calibration and management program is established which permits measurements made with an instrument to be traced to a national standard. This paper describes the establishment and maintenance of calibration standards for gamma survey instruments and an instrument management program which achieves traceability of measurement for uniquely identified field instruments. (author)

  1. Measurements and standards for bulk-explosives detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, Larry, E-mail: larry.hudson@nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8460, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Bateman, Fred; Bergstrom, Paul; Cerra, Frank; Glover, Jack; Minniti, Ronaldo; Seltzer, Stephen; Tosh, Ronald [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8460, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Recent years have seen a dramatic expansion in the application of radiation and isotopes to security screening. This has been driven primarily by increased incidents involving improvised explosive devices as well as their ease of assembly and leveraged disruption of transportation and commerce. With global expenditures for security-screening systems in the hundreds of billions of dollars, there is a pressing need to develop, apply, and harmonize standards for x-ray and gamma-ray screening systems used to detect explosives and other contraband. The National Institute of Standards and Technology has been facilitating the development of standard measurement tools that can be used to gauge the technical performance (imaging quality) and radiation safety of systems used to screen luggage, persons, vehicles, cargo, and left-behind objects. After a review of this new suite of national standard test methods, test objects, and radiation-measurement protocols, we highlight some of the technical trends that are enhancing the revision of baseline standards. Finally we advocate a more intentional use of technical-performance standards by security stakeholders and outline the advantages this would accrue. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This work responds to the need for standards for x-ray screening systems used to detect explosives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Described are new measurement tools to gage the performance and radiation safety of such systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A more intentional use of technical-performance standards by security stakeholders is argued.

  2. Measurements and standards for bulk-explosives detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, Larry; Bateman, Fred; Bergstrom, Paul; Cerra, Frank; Glover, Jack; Minniti, Ronaldo; Seltzer, Stephen; Tosh, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen a dramatic expansion in the application of radiation and isotopes to security screening. This has been driven primarily by increased incidents involving improvised explosive devices as well as their ease of assembly and leveraged disruption of transportation and commerce. With global expenditures for security-screening systems in the hundreds of billions of dollars, there is a pressing need to develop, apply, and harmonize standards for x-ray and gamma-ray screening systems used to detect explosives and other contraband. The National Institute of Standards and Technology has been facilitating the development of standard measurement tools that can be used to gauge the technical performance (imaging quality) and radiation safety of systems used to screen luggage, persons, vehicles, cargo, and left-behind objects. After a review of this new suite of national standard test methods, test objects, and radiation-measurement protocols, we highlight some of the technical trends that are enhancing the revision of baseline standards. Finally we advocate a more intentional use of technical-performance standards by security stakeholders and outline the advantages this would accrue. - Highlights: ► This work responds to the need for standards for x-ray screening systems used to detect explosives. ► Described are new measurement tools to gage the performance and radiation safety of such systems. ► A more intentional use of technical-performance standards by security stakeholders is argued.

  3. The relative age effect on anthropometric characteristics and motor performances in Turkish children aged between 8 and 12 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haslofça Ercan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to investigate the effect of relative age on anthropometric properties and motor performance in Turkish children (girls n=423, boys n=601. Anthropometric measurement sites and techniques have been set out by the ISAK (International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry. A group of tests involved in Eurofit Test Battery and other standard tests were used. For each age, the data of those who were born within the first three months and the last three months of the year were compared. The MedCalc Statistics Program was used for the differentiation and variation percentages between two periods were studied (p≤ 0.001, p= 0.05. Consequently effect of relative age was observed on anthropometric characteristics and motor performances of Turkish girls and boys between 8 and 12 years old. Researchers, trainers, families, sports managers and organizers are advised to consider Effect of Relative Age.

  4. Teacher Assessment Literacy: A Review of International Standards and Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, Christopher; LaPointe-McEwan, Danielle; Luhanga, Ulemu

    2016-01-01

    Assessment literacy is a core professional requirement across educational systems. Hence, measuring and supporting teachers' assessment literacy have been a primary focus over the past two decades. At present, there are a multitude of assessment standards across the world and numerous assessment literacy measures that represent different…

  5. Vitamin D measurement standardization: the way out of the chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substantial variability is associated with laboratory measurement of serum total 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]. The resulting chaos impedes development of consensus 25(OH)D values to define stages of vitamin D status. As resolving this situation requires standardized measurement of 25(OH)D, the Vita...

  6. Women's dietary diversity scores and childhood anthropometric measurements as indices of nutrition insecurity along the urban-rural continuum in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagomoka, Takemore; Drescher, Axel; Glaser, Rüdiger; Marschner, Bernd; Schlesinger, Johannes; Nyandoro, George

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is still prevalent worldwide, and its severity, which differs between regions and countries, has led to international organisations proposing its inclusion in the global development framework that will succeed the Millennium Development Goals (post-2015 framework). In Sub-Saharan Africa, malnutrition is particularly severe, among women and children under 5 years. The prevalence of malnutrition has been reported worldwide, differing from region to region and country to country. Nevertheless, little is known about how malnutrition differs between multiple locations along an urban-rural continuum. A survey was carried out in and around Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, between August and September 2014 to map household nutrition insecurity along the urban-rural continuum, using a transect approach to guide the data collection. Transects of 70 km long and 2 km wide directed radially from the city centre outwards were laid, and data were collected from randomly selected households along these transects. Women's dietary diversity scores (WDDSs) were calculated from a sample of 179 women of reproductive age (15-49 years) from randomly selected households. Additionally, anthropometric data (height/length and weight) of 133 children under 5 years of age were collected along the same transects for the computation of anthropometric indices. We found that relative proportions of the nutrition indices such as stunting, wasting and underweight varied across the urban-rural continuum. Rural households (15%) had the highest relative proportion of WDDS compared with urban households (11%) and periurban households (8%). There was a significant association between children under 5 years' nutritional status (wasting, stunting and underweight) and spatial location (p=0.023). The level of agricultural activities is a possible indicator of wasting in children aged 6-59 months (p=0.032). Childhood undernutrition certainly has a spatial dimension that is highly influenced by the

  7. Women's dietary diversity scores and childhood anthropometric measurements as indices of nutrition insecurity along the urban–rural continuum in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takemore Chagomoka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malnutrition is still prevalent worldwide, and its severity, which differs between regions and countries, has led to international organisations proposing its inclusion in the global development framework that will succeed the Millennium Development Goals (post-2015 framework. In Sub-Saharan Africa, malnutrition is particularly severe, among women and children under 5 years. The prevalence of malnutrition has been reported worldwide, differing from region to region and country to country. Nevertheless, little is known about how malnutrition differs between multiple locations along an urban–rural continuum. Objective: A survey was carried out in and around Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, between August and September 2014 to map household nutrition insecurity along the urban–rural continuum, using a transect approach to guide the data collection. Design: Transects of 70 km long and 2 km wide directed radially from the city centre outwards were laid, and data were collected from randomly selected households along these transects. Women's dietary diversity scores (WDDSs were calculated from a sample of 179 women of reproductive age (15–49 years from randomly selected households. Additionally, anthropometric data (height/length and weight of 133 children under 5 years of age were collected along the same transects for the computation of anthropometric indices. Results: We found that relative proportions of the nutrition indices such as stunting, wasting and underweight varied across the urban–rural continuum. Rural households (15% had the highest relative proportion of WDDS compared with urban households (11% and periurban households (8%. There was a significant association between children under 5 years’ nutritional status (wasting, stunting and underweight and spatial location (p=0.023. The level of agricultural activities is a possible indicator of wasting in children aged 6–59 months (p=0.032. Conclusion: Childhood

  8. High-Sensitive C-Reactive Protein Levels in a Group of Syrian University Male Students and Its Associations with Smoking, Physical Activity, Anthropometric Measurements, and Some Hematologic Inflammation Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafika Zarzour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In Syria, health risk data on young males are limited. Hence, the aim of the present study was to evaluate cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors along with C-reactive protein levels measured by high-sensitive method (hsCRP in a group of healthy males of university students (n=101, 18–25 years old. Participants’ anthropometric characteristics; alcohol drinking, smoking, and physical activity habits; parents medical history; and some inflammatory biomarkers were inspected for their associations with hsCRP. Results. Regarding hsCRP level, 19 participants were at average (1–3 mg/L and 13 were at high (>3 mg/L risk of CVD. Nonparametric statistical tests (p value < 0.05 revealed that hsCRP level was higher in participants who had high body mass index (BMI, had high BMI with high waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, or did not practice sport frequently. Unexpectedly, it did not vary between smokers and nonsmokers. In general, it correlated positively with anthropometric and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR measurements. Nevertheless, it negatively correlated with sports practicing in overall and nonsmoker groups and in participants whose parents were without medical history. Finally, when participants with high BMI were smokers, did not practice sport frequently, or had a parent with medical history, their hsCRP levels were higher than others who had the same circumstances but with low BMI.

  9. Anthropometric changes and fluid shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, W. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Rummel, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Several observations of body size, shape, posture, and configuration were made to document changes resulting from direct effects of weightlessness during the Skylab 4 mission. After the crewmen were placed in orbit, a number of anatomical and anthropometric changes occurred including a straightening of the thoracolumbar spine, a general decrease in truncal girth, and an increase in height. By the time of the earliest in-flight measurement on mission day 3, all crewmen had lost more than two liters of extravascular fluid from the calf and thigh. The puffy facies, the bird legs effect, the engorgement of upper body veins, and the reduced volume of lower body veins were all documented with photographs. Center-of-mass measurements confirmed a fluid shift cephalad. This shift remained throughout the mission until recovery, when a sharp reversal occurred; a major portion of the reversal was completed in a few hours. The anatomical changes are of considerable scientific interest and of import to the human factors design engineer, but the shifts of blood and extravascular fluid are of more consequence. It is hypothesized that the driving force for the fluid shift is the intrinsic and unopposed lower limb elasticity that forces venous blood and then other fluid cephalad.

  10. Measurement of microchannel fluidic resistance with a standard voltage meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godwin, Leah A.; Deal, Kennon S.; Hoepfner, Lauren D.; Jackson, Louis A.; Easley, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Standard voltage meter used to measure fluidic resistance. ► Manual measurement takes a few seconds, akin to electrical resistance measurements. ► Measurement error is reduced compared to other approaches. ► Amenable to dynamic measurement of fluidic resistance. - Abstract: A simplified method for measuring the fluidic resistance (R fluidic ) of microfluidic channels is presented, in which the electrical resistance (R elec ) of a channel filled with a conductivity standard solution can be measured and directly correlated to R fluidic using a simple equation. Although a slight correction factor could be applied in this system to improve accuracy, results showed that a standard voltage meter could be used without calibration to determine R fluidic to within 12% error. Results accurate to within 2% were obtained when a geometric correction factor was applied using these particular channels. When compared to standard flow rate measurements, such as meniscus tracking in outlet tubing, this approach provided a more straightforward alternative and resulted in lower measurement error. The method was validated using 9 different fluidic resistance values (from ∼40 to 600 kPa s mm −3 ) and over 30 separately fabricated microfluidic devices. Furthermore, since the method is analogous to resistance measurements with a voltage meter in electrical circuits, dynamic R fluidic measurements were possible in more complex microfluidic designs. Microchannel R elec was shown to dynamically mimic pressure waveforms applied to a membrane in a variable microfluidic resistor. The variable resistor was then used to dynamically control aqueous-in-oil droplet sizes and spacing, providing a unique and convenient control system for droplet-generating devices. This conductivity-based method for fluidic resistance measurement is thus a useful tool for static or real-time characterization of microfluidic systems.

  11. Comparison of anthropometric parameters among Iranian and Spanish water polo players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooya Nekooei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the anthropometric parameters between Iranian and Spanish water polo national team players. Material and Methods ― The research was conducted in the physiological laboratory of Isfahan Azad University. Participants who participate in this study were 44 male national water polo players (22 Iranian and 22 Spanish, age 22±2 years old (Mean±SD. For the aim of this study twenty anthropometric parameters that was more important for water polo was measured and analysis. All the parameters were measured base on the international standard of anthropometric parameters (International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry – ISAK. For analysis data, normal distribution of the data was proved by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and then comparison between two groups was done by t-test. Results ― The results showed a significant difference in seven anthropometric parameters contain body fat percentage (P=0.031, biliocristal breadth (P<0.001, wrist breadth (P<0.001, chest girth (P=0.021, mid-thigh girth (P=0.019, palm length (P<0.001 and height (P=0.032. Conclusion ― Spanish players with relatively higher underlying levels of anthropometric parameters compare to Iranian water polo players had stronger ability to control the ball with the bigger palm and bigger wrist breadth, also they had stronger ability to do water vertical jump, cause of higher value of biliocristal breadth and mid-thigh girth and also stronger throwing the ball because of bigger muscle on their chest part of their body. However, Base on this study, having longer hands, more muscular body than fat and taller stature is an advantage for the players because it is considered to be a useful parameter in water polo.

  12. Performance Measurement of Management System Standards Using the Balanced Scorecard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kopia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Management system standards (MSS, such as ISO standards, TQM, etc. are widely-used standards adopted by millions of organizations worldwide. It is still an unclear question whether these standards are beneficial for an organization, besides the fact that they might be required or expected by law or customers. The question, whether MSS increase the efficiency, the output, or the performance of an organization is still discussed in scientific research. One reason might be that performance measurement itself is not fully understood or in constant development ranging from pure financial evaluations over intellectual capital rating to calculating of levels of environmental, social or economic expectations known as the Trible Bottom Line. The Balanced Scorecard is one possible solution for performance measurement on a strategic and operational level and therefore useful for the measurement of the influence of MSS within organizations. This study summarized current research in the field of performance measurement in the context of MSS and IMS and the use of BSC and quantitatively and qualitatively tests the usefulness of BSC in measuring the effect of MSSs using the Execution Premium. It was found that BSC is often used, that an average number of companies integrate their measurement initiatives of their MSSs into the BSC-process, and that a high integration of MSS into the BSC improves the organizational performance. This research is useful for researchers and practitioners in order to understand the benefits of the usage of the BSC in the context of MSS or Integrated Management Systems.

  13. Comparison of anthropometry with photogrammetry based on a standardized clinical photographic technique using a cephalostat and chair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kihwan; Kwon, Hyuk Joon; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kim, Jun Hyung; Son, Daegu

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to standardize clinical photogrammetric techniques, and to compare anthropometry with photogrammetry. To standardize clinical photography, we have developed a photographic cephalostat and chair. We investigated the repeatability of the standardized clinical photogrammetric technique. Then, with 40 landmarks, a total of 96 anthropometric measurement items was obtained from 100 Koreans. Ninety six photogrammetric measurements from the same subjects were also obtained from standardized clinical photographs using Adobe Photoshop version 7.0 (Adobe Systems Corporation, San Jose, CA, USA). The photogrammetric and anthropometric measurement data (mm, degree) were then compared. A coefficient was obtained by dividing the anthropometric measurements by the photogrammetric measurements. The repeatability of the standardized photography was statistically significantly high (p=0.463). Among the 96 measurement items, 44 items were reliable; for these items the photogrammetric measurements were not different to the anthropometric measurements. The remaining 52 items must be classified as unreliable. By developing a photographic cephalostat and chair, we have standardized clinical photogrammetric techniques. The reliable set of measurement items can be used as anthropometric measurements. For unreliable measurement items, applying a suitable coefficient to the photogrammetric measurement allows the anthropometric measurement to be obtained indirectly.

  14. Geographical and temporal changes of anthropometric traits in historical Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danubio, Maria Enrica; Milia, Nicola; Coppa, Alfredo; Rufo, Fabrizio; Sanna, Emanuele

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates secular changes of anthropometric variables among four geographic groups in historical Yemen, to evaluate possible regional differences in the evolution of living standards. Nineteen somatic and cephalic measures collected by Coon in 1939, and 8 anthropometric indices in 1244 Yemenite adult males were analyzed. The individuals were divided into 10-year age groups. Within-group variations were tested by One-way ANCOVA (age as covariate). ANCOVA (controlling for age), and Forward stepwise discriminant analysis were used to evaluate and represent regional differences. ANCOVA and discriminant analysis confirmed and enhanced previous findings. At the time, the Yemenite population presented high intergroup heterogeneity. The highest mean values of height at all ages were found in the "mountain" region, which is characterized by very fertile soils and where, nowadays, most of the cereals and pulses are grown and where most livestock is raised. Within-group variations were limited and generally inconsistent in all geographic regions and concern vertical dimensions, but mean values of height never differed. The prolonged internal isolation of these groups resulted in significant regional morphometric differentiation. The main evidence comes from height which suggests that socioeconomic factors have played a role. Nevertheless, the possible better living conditions experienced by the "mountain" group, with the highest mean values of stature in all periods, did not allow the secular trend to take place in that region, too. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  15. Constraining new physics with collider measurements of Standard Model signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterworth, Jonathan M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London,Gower St., London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Grellscheid, David [IPPP, Department of Physics, Durham University,Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Krämer, Michael; Sarrazin, Björn [Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, RWTH Aachen University,Sommerfeldstr. 16, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Yallup, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London,Gower St., London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-14

    A new method providing general consistency constraints for Beyond-the-Standard-Model (BSM) theories, using measurements at particle colliders, is presented. The method, ‘Constraints On New Theories Using Rivet’, CONTUR, exploits the fact that particle-level differential measurements made in fiducial regions of phase-space have a high degree of model-independence. These measurements can therefore be compared to BSM physics implemented in Monte Carlo generators in a very generic way, allowing a wider array of final states to be considered than is typically the case. The CONTUR approach should be seen as complementary to the discovery potential of direct searches, being designed to eliminate inconsistent BSM proposals in a context where many (but perhaps not all) measurements are consistent with the Standard Model. We demonstrate, using a competitive simplified dark matter model, the power of this approach. The CONTUR method is highly scaleable to other models and future measurements.

  16. Establishment and application of standard devices for radioactivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Changgui; Li Xingyuan; Chen Zigen

    1991-03-01

    In order to establish the radioactivity measurement standards a 4πβ-γ coincidence apparatus and a 4πγ ionization chamber have been installed in the laboratory. The 4πβ-γ coincidence apparatus is for absolute measurement, and its uncertainty is ±(0.3∼5)%. The 4πγ ionization chamber is for working standard, and its uncertainty is ±(1∼5)%. The combination of these devices can meet the quality requirements controlled by National Verification System in the transfer of radioactivity values

  17. A COMPARISON OF THE ANTHROPOMETRIC PARAMETERS BETWEEN BASKETBALL PLAYERS, HANDBALL PLAYERS AND VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS

    OpenAIRE

    Florian Miftari; Juel Jarani; Dhimitraq Stratoberdha; Hazir Salihu

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the anthropometric measurement to the professional players of the three different disciplines of basketball, handball and volleyball. . For each player anthropometric measurements such as weight, body height, waist circumference, BMI and skinfold calculation on different sports are performed. Differences in terms of anthropometric measurements were assessed by independent static tests and the differences for each variable for each sport were evaluated ...

  18. Overview of the Standard Model Measurements with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yanwen; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration is engaged in precision measurement of fundamental Standard Model parameters, such as the W boson mass, the weak-mixing angle or the strong coupling constant. In addition, the production cross-sections of a large variety of final states involving high energetic jets, photons as well as single and multi vector bosons are measured multi differentially at several center of mass energies. This allows to test perturbative QCD calculations to highest precision. In addition, these measurements allow also to test models beyond the SM, e.g. those leading to anomalous gauge couplings. In this talk, we give a broad overview of the Standard Model measurement campaign of the ATLAS collaboration, where selected topics will be discussed in more detail.

  19. Development of standard ionization chamber counting system for activity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyun, Woong Beom; Lee, Hyun Koo; Lee, Hai Yong; Park, Tae Soon

    1998-01-01

    This study is to set up the activity measuring system using a 4π γ ionization chamber as used mainly in national standards laboratories that are responsible for radionuclide metrology. The software for automatic control between the electrometer and personal computer is developed using Microsoft visual basic 4.0 and IEEE488 Interface. The reproducibility of this 4π γ ionization chamber is about 0.02% and the background current is 0.054±0.024 pA. this 4π γ ionization chamber is calibrated by 6 standard gamma emitting radionuclides from KRISS. According to the result of this study, it is revealed that this 4π γ ionization chamber counting system can be used as a secondary standard instrument for radioactivity measurement

  20. Development of standard ionization chamber counting system for activity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Pyun, W B; Lee, H Y; Park, T S

    1998-01-01

    This study is to set up the activity measuring system using a 4 pi gamma ionization chamber as used mainly in national standards laboratories that are responsible for radionuclide metrology. The software for automatic control between the electrometer and personal computer is developed using Microsoft visual basic 4.0 and IEEE488 Interface. The reproducibility of this 4 pi gamma ionization chamber is about 0.02% and the background current is 0.054+-0.024 pA. this 4 pi gamma ionization chamber is calibrated by 6 standard gamma emitting radionuclides from KRISS. According to the result of this study, it is revealed that this 4 pi gamma ionization chamber counting system can be used as a secondary standard instrument for radioactivity measurement.

  1. ATLAS Standard Model Measurements Using Jet Grooming and Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Ucchielli, Giulia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Boosted topologies allow to explore Standard Model processes in kinematical regimes never tested before. In such LHC challenging environments, standard reconstruction techniques quickly hit the wall. Targeting hadronic final states means to properly reconstruct energy and multiplicity of the jets in the event. In order to be able to identify the decay product of boosted objects, i.e. W bosons, $t\\bar{t}$ pairs or Higgs produced in association with $t\\bar{t}$ pairs, ATLAS experiment is currently exploiting several algorithms using jet grooming and jet substructure. This contribution will mainly cover the following ATLAS measurements: $t\\bar{t}$ differential cross section production and jet mass using the soft drop procedure. Standard Model measurements offer the perfect field to test the performances of new jet tagging techniques which will become even more important in the search for new physics in highly boosted topologies.”

  2. Requirements for a quality measurement instrument for semantic standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folmer, E.J.A.; Krukkert, D.; Oude Luttighuis, P.; Hillegersberg van, J. van

    2010-01-01

    This study describes requirements for an instrument to measure the quality of semantic standards. A situational requirements engineering method was used, resulting in a goal-tree in which requirements are structured. This structure shows requirements related to the input of the instrument; stating

  3. Conditional Standard Errors of Measurement for Scale Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolen, Michael J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A procedure is described for estimating the reliability and conditional standard errors of measurement of scale scores incorporating the discrete transformation of raw scores to scale scores. The method is illustrated using a strong true score model, and practical applications are described. (SLD)

  4. Standardized measurement of quality of life after incisional hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Henriksen, Nadia A; Harling, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    repair. The aim of this systematic review was to analyze existing standardized methods to measure quality of life after incisional hernia repair. DATA SOURCES: A PubMed and Embase search was carried out together with a cross-reference search of eligible papers, giving a total of 26 included studies...

  5. Designing Standardized Patient Assessments to Measure SBIRT Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamsley, Maria A.; Julian, Katherine A.; O'Sullivan, Patricia; Satterfield, Jason M.; Satre, Derek D.; McCance-Katz, Elinore; Batki, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Resident physicians report insufficient experience caring for patients with substance use disorders (SUDs). Resident training in Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) has been recommended. We describe the development of a standardized patient (SP) assessment to measure SBIRT skills, resident perceptions of…

  6. The use of personal values in living standards measures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-08-26

    Aug 26, 2011 ... Values Questionnaire, Living Standards Measure, purchase decision- .... According to Schwartz (1992), scholars in the areas of psychology, anthropology ... The application of the values perspective to the marketing of .... is a fairly complex task involving large data tables, and that some of the LSM groups.

  7. 28 CFR 55.2 - Purpose; standards for measuring compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the satisfaction of the Attorney General or to the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia...; standards for measuring compliance. (a) The purpose of this part is to set forth the Attorney General's... to conduct elections in the language of certain “language minority groups” in addition to English. (b...

  8. Vitamin D measurement standardization: The way out of the chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkley, N; Dawson-Hughes, B; Durazo-Arvizu, R; Thamm, M; Tian, L; Merkel, J M; Jones, J C; Carter, G D; Sempos, C T

    2017-10-01

    Substantial variability is associated with laboratory measurement of serum total 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]. The resulting chaos impedes development of consensus 25(OH)D values to define stages of vitamin D status. As resolving this situation requires standardized measurement of 25(OH)D, the Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) developed methodology to standardize 25(OH)D measurement to the gold standard reference measurement procedures of NIST, Ghent University and CDC. Importantly, VDSP developed protocols for standardizing 25(OH)D values from prior research based on availability of stored serum samples. The effect of such retrospective standardization on prevalence of "low" vitamin D status in national studies reported here for The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III, 1988-1994) and the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KIGGS, 2003-2006) was such that in NHANES III 25(OH)D values were lower than original values while higher in KIGGS. In NHANES III the percentage with values below 30, 50 and 75 nmol/L increased from 4% to 6%, 22% to 31% and 55% to 71%, respectively. Whereas in KIGGS after standardization the percentage below 30, 50, and 70 nmol/L decreased from 28% to 13%, 64% to 47% and 87% to 85% respectively. Moreover, in a hypothetical example, depending on whether the 25(OH)D assay was positively or negatively biased by 12%, the 25(OH)D concentration which maximally suppressed PTH could vary from 20 to 35ng/mL. These examples underscore the challenges (perhaps impossibility) of developing vitamin D guidelines using unstandardized 25(OH)D data. Retrospective 25(OH)D standardization can be applied to old studies where stored serum samples exist. As a way forward, we suggest an international effort to identify key prior studies with stored samples for re-analysis and standardization initially to define the 25(OH)D level associated with vitamin D deficiency (rickets

  9. Anthropometric and physiological predispositions for elite soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, T; Bangsbo, J; Franks, A

    2000-09-01

    This review is focused on anthropometric and physiological characteristics of soccer players with a view to establishing their roles within talent detection, identification and development programmes. Top-class soccer players have to adapt to the physical demands of the game, which are multifactorial. Players may not need to have an extraordinary capacity within any of the areas of physical performance but must possess a reasonably high level within all areas. This explains why there are marked individual differences in anthropometric and physiological characteristics among top players. Various measurements have been used to evaluate specific aspects of the physical performance of both youth and adult soccer players. The positional role of a player is related to his or her physiological capacity. Thus, midfield players and full-backs have the highest maximal oxygen intakes ( > 60 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) and perform best in intermittent exercise tests. On the other hand, midfield players tend to have the lowest muscle strength. Although these distinctions are evident in adult and elite youth players, their existence must be interpreted circumspectly in talent identification and development programmes. A range of relevant anthropometric and physiological factors can be considered which are subject to strong genetic influences (e.g. stature and maximal oxygen intake) or are largely environmentally determined and susceptible to training effects. Consequently, fitness profiling can generate a useful database against which talented groups may be compared. No single method allows for a representative assessment of a player's physical capabilities for soccer. We conclude that anthropometric and physiological criteria do have a role as part of a holistic monitoring of talented young players.

  10. Computer-based anthropometrical system for total body irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Nieto, B; Sánchez-Doblado, F; Terrón, J A; Arráns, R; Errazquin, L

    1997-05-01

    For total body irradiation (TBI) dose calculation requirements, anatomical information about the whole body is needed. Despite the fact that video image grabbing techniques are used by some treatment planning systems for standard radiotherapy, there are no such systems designed to generate anatomical parameters for TBI planning. The paper describes an anthropometrical computerised system based on video image grabbing which was purpose-built to provide anatomical data for a PC-based TBI planning system. Using software, the system controls the acquisition and digitalisation of the images (external images of the patient in treatment position) and the measurement procedure itself (on the external images or the digital CT information). An ASCII file, readable by the TBI planning system, is generated to store the required parameters of the dose calculation points, i.e. depth, backscatter tissue thickness, thickness of inhomogeneity, off-axis distance (OAD) and source to skin distance (SSD).

  11. Comparison of associations of maternal peri-pregnancy and paternal anthropometrics with child anthropometrics from birth through age 7 y assessed in the Danish National Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Ajslev, Teresa Adeltoft; Angquist, Lars

    2016-01-01

    body mass index (BMI) with child anthropometric measurements from birth through infancy and at 7 y of age exceed those of paternal associations. Design: In the Danish National Birth Cohort, information on parental and child anthropometric measures is available for 30,655 trio families from maternal...

  12. Selected anthropometric indices of maritime university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rębacz-Maron, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obesity during working life are becoming an increasingly serious challenge to various professional groups where recruits and personnel must be healthy and fit. Marine recruitment, even at the training stage, should be open to applicants who meet health and fitness criteria. The objective of the study is to determine the overweight and adiposity rates among seafarer candidates (n = 368). Based on anthropometric measurements and somatic indices the extent of obesity among marine students/ /future seafarers was investigated. In the groups identified according to the year of study, arithmetic averages (SD - standard deviation) were calculated for somatometric characteristics, and were then used to analyse the phenomena of overweight and obesity. The comparison was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) by ranks. The highest average body mass index (BMI) score was found in fourth-year students (mean BMI 25.7 ± 2.8). The average BMI for years one and two was in the upper range of 'healthy' weight. In 24.0% of first-year students and 32.2% of second-year students, the waist circumference was higher than half of the body height. Body fat percentage results indicate that this feature is highly variable, with a strong upward trend. Findings regarding overweight among future seamen give cause for concern. The participants of the study were characterised by excessive weight and adiposity. Recruitment criteria for uniformed services are not as restrictive as they used to be, as it is getting increasingly more difficult to find sufficiently slim and fit applicants.

  13. An XML-Based Networking Method for Connecting Distributed Anthropometric Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Cheng

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Anthropometric data are used by numerous types of organizations for health evaluation, ergonomics, apparel sizing, fitness training, and many other applications. Data have been collected and stored in electronic databases since at least the 1940s. These databases are owned by many organizations around the world. In addition, the anthropometric studies stored in these databases often employ different standards, terminology, procedures, or measurement sets. To promote the use and sharing of these databases, the World Engineering Anthropometry Resources (WEAR group was formed and tasked with the integration and publishing of member resources. It is easy to see that organizing worldwide anthropometric data into a single database architecture could be a daunting and expensive undertaking. The challenges of WEAR integration reflect mainly in the areas of distributed and disparate data, different standards and formats, independent memberships, and limited development resources. Fortunately, XML schema and web services provide an alternative method for networking databases, referred to as the Loosely Coupled WEAR Integration. A standard XML schema can be defined and used as a type of Rosetta stone to translate the anthropometric data into a universal format, and a web services system can be set up to link the databases to one another. In this way, the originators of the data can keep their data locally along with their own data management system and user interface, but their data can be searched and accessed as part of the larger data network, and even combined with the data of others. This paper will identify requirements for WEAR integration, review XML as the universal format, review different integration approaches, and propose a hybrid web services/data mart solution.

  14. Association of anthropometric indices with continuous metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents: the CASPIAN-V study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejtahed, Hanieh-Sadat; Qorbani, Mostafa; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Angoorani, Pooneh; Hasani-Ranjbar, Shirin; Ziaodini, Hasan; Taheri, Majzoubeh; Ahadi, Zeinab; Beshtar, Shaghayegh; Aminaee, Tahereh; Heshmat, Ramin; Kelishadi, Roya

    2017-11-01

    This study aims to examine the association of anthropometric indices with continuous metabolic syndrome (cMetS) among Iranian children and adolescents. This multicentric study was conducted on 14138 students aged 7-18 years, who participated in a national surveillance program. Fasting blood sample was obtained from a subsample of 3843 randomly selected students. Physical examination including the measurement of anthropometric indices and blood pressure was conducted; fasting blood glucose and lipid profile were measured; and cMetS score was computed. Standardized residuals (z-scores) were calculated for MetS components. A higher cMetS score indicates a less favorable metabolic profile. Linear regression models were applied to determine the association between cMetS and anthropometric indices. The study participants consisted of 3843 children and adolescents (52.3% boys) with mean (SD) age of 12.45 ± 3.04 years. All anthropometric indices had positive correlation with standardized scores of mean arterial pressure, waist circumference and cMetS (P obesity, as well as high circumferences of neck, wrist, and hip circumferences increased the standardized cMetS risk score to 1.8, 1.9, 1.6, 1.5 and 1.5, respectively (P < 0.05 for all variables). The results demonstrated that higher anthropometric indices are associated with higher cMetS risk score in children and adolescents. This information could be valuable for screening and prevention of MetS at population level. V, cross-sectional descriptive study (National surveillance study).

  15. Standardization for oxygen isotope ratio measurement - still an unsolved problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornexl; Werner; Gehre

    1999-07-01

    Numerous organic and inorganic laboratory standards were gathered from nine European and North American laboratories and were analyzed for their delta(18)O values with a new on-line high temperature pyrolysis system that was calibrated using Vienna standard mean ocean water (VSMOW) and standard light Antartic precipitation (SLAP) internationally distributed reference water samples. Especially for organic materials, discrepancies between reported and measured values were high, ranging up to 2 per thousand. The reasons for these discrepancies are discussed and the need for an exact and reliable calibration of existing reference materials, as well as for the establishment of additional organic and inorganic reference materials is stressed. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Advisory Committee for the calibration standards of ionizing radiation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The meeting consisted exceptionally of two sessions (in May and December 1977). The members discussed the comparisons of absorbed dose standards and exposure standards which had taken place since 1975 and suggested improvements for future comparisons. A recommendation was made concerning the humidity correction factor to be applied when using cavity chambers and free-air chambers. Further studies were requested concerning the effective point of measurement of ionization chambers. No method was recommended for the statement of uncertainty in calibration certificates. The exposure standards and calibrations in terms of exposure were maintained but it was agreed that other possibilities should be explored. Finally, progress reports of the national laboratories and a description of the recent work carried out at BIPM were presented and appear as appendices to the report [fr

  17. Measurement of microchannel fluidic resistance with a standard voltage meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Leah A; Deal, Kennon S; Hoepfner, Lauren D; Jackson, Louis A; Easley, Christopher J

    2013-01-03

    A simplified method for measuring the fluidic resistance (R(fluidic)) of microfluidic channels is presented, in which the electrical resistance (R(elec)) of a channel filled with a conductivity standard solution can be measured and directly correlated to R(fluidic) using a simple equation. Although a slight correction factor could be applied in this system to improve accuracy, results showed that a standard voltage meter could be used without calibration to determine R(fluidic) to within 12% error. Results accurate to within 2% were obtained when a geometric correction factor was applied using these particular channels. When compared to standard flow rate measurements, such as meniscus tracking in outlet tubing, this approach provided a more straightforward alternative and resulted in lower measurement error. The method was validated using 9 different fluidic resistance values (from ∼40 to 600kPa smm(-3)) and over 30 separately fabricated microfluidic devices. Furthermore, since the method is analogous to resistance measurements with a voltage meter in electrical circuits, dynamic R(fluidic) measurements were possible in more complex microfluidic designs. Microchannel R(elec) was shown to dynamically mimic pressure waveforms applied to a membrane in a variable microfluidic resistor. The variable resistor was then used to dynamically control aqueous-in-oil droplet sizes and spacing, providing a unique and convenient control system for droplet-generating devices. This conductivity-based method for fluidic resistance measurement is thus a useful tool for static or real-time characterization of microfluidic systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Research standardization tools: pregnancy measures in the PhenX Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Ann Kinga; Ananth, Cande V; Catalano, Patrick; Hines, Erin P; Kirby, Russell S; Klebanoff, Mark A; Mulvihill, John J; Simhan, Hyagriv; Hamilton, Carol M; Hendershot, Tabitha P; Phillips, Michael J; Kilpatrick, Lisa A; Maiese, Deborah R; Ramos, Erin M; Wright, Rosalind J; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2017-09-01

    Only through concerted and well-executed research endeavors can we gain the requisite knowledge to advance pregnancy care and have a positive impact on maternal and newborn health. Yet the heterogeneity inherent in individual studies limits our ability to compare and synthesize study results, thus impeding the capacity to draw meaningful conclusions that can be trusted to inform clinical care. The PhenX Toolkit (http://www.phenxtoolkit.org), supported since 2007 by the National Institutes of Health, is a web-based catalog of standardized protocols for measuring phenotypes and exposures relevant for clinical research. In 2016, a working group of pregnancy experts recommended 15 measures for the PhenX Toolkit that are highly relevant to pregnancy research. The working group followed the established PhenX consensus process to recommend protocols that are broadly validated, well established, nonproprietary, and have a relatively low burden for investigators and participants. The working group considered input from the pregnancy experts and the broader research community and included measures addressing the mode of conception, gestational age, fetal growth assessment, prenatal care, the mode of delivery, gestational diabetes, behavioral and mental health, and environmental exposure biomarkers. These pregnancy measures complement the existing measures for other established domains in the PhenX Toolkit, including reproductive health, anthropometrics, demographic characteristics, and alcohol, tobacco, and other substances. The preceding domains influence a woman's health during pregnancy. For each measure, the PhenX Toolkit includes data dictionaries and data collection worksheets that facilitate incorporation of the protocol into new or existing studies. The measures within the pregnancy domain offer a valuable resource to investigators and clinicians and are well poised to facilitate collaborative pregnancy research with the goal to improve patient care. To achieve this

  19. Relationship between insulin resistance-associated metabolic parameters and anthropometric measurements with sugar-sweetened beverage intake and physical activity levels in US adolescents: findings from the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Andrew A; Auinger, Peggy; Byrd, Robert S

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the relationship between insulin resistance-associated metabolic parameters and anthropometric measurements with sugar-sweetened beverage intake and physical activity levels. A cross-sectional analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics. Nationally representative samples of US adolescents participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey during the years 1999-2004. A total of 6967 adolescents aged 12 to 19 years. Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and physical activity levels. Glucose and insulin concentrations, a homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), total, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, triglyceride concentrations, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) percentile for age and sex. Multivariate linear regression analyses showed that increased sugar-sweetened beverage intake was independently associated with increased HOMA-IR, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and body mass index percentile for age and sex and decreased HDL cholesterol concentrations; alternatively, increased physical activity levels were independently associated with decreased HOMA-IR, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, and triglyceride concentrations and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations. Furthermore, low sugar-sweetened beverage intake and high physical activity levels appear to modify each others' effects of decreasing HOMA-IR and triglyceride concentrations and increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations. Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and physical activity levels are each independently associated with insulin resistance-associated metabolic parameters and anthropometric measurements in adolescents. Moreover, low sugar

  20. The preparation of large standards for NDA measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guardini, S.

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of a nuclear material balance determination is dependent on the reference materials used to calibrate. The calibration needs of nondestructive assay techniques differ from the needs of destructive techniques: nondestructive techniques use the reference materials more than once and can require larger masses of special nuclear material. Therefore, the expertise inherited from destructive methods is not destructive measurements. The procurement process for reference materials is expensive and complex. Careful specification of the desired attributes defines the required quality measures. A detailed procurement plan, agreed upon and documented before acquisition starts, is crucial to obtaining a set of high quality references materials. The acquisition of some recent Los Alamos standards and the Ispra PERLA (Performance Laboratory) standards are following such plans. To date, plutonium oxide standards of three burnups ranging to 2.5 kg and uranium oxide standards of four (high) enrichments ranging to 1.5 kg are in routine use for calibration, performance evaluation and training. In this paper, the authors discuss an alternative

  1. Experience with local lymph node assay performance standards using standard radioactivity and nonradioactive cell count measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basketter, David; Kolle, Susanne N; Schrage, Arnhild; Honarvar, Naveed; Gamer, Armin O; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2012-08-01

    The local lymph node assay (LLNA) is the preferred test for identification of skin-sensitizing substances by measuring radioactive thymidine incorporation into the lymph node. To facilitate acceptance of nonradioactive variants, validation authorities have published harmonized minimum performance standards (PS) that the alternative endpoint assay must meet. In the present work, these standards were applied to a variant of the LLNA based on lymph node cell counts (LNCC) run in parallel as a control with the standard LLNA with radioactivity measurements, with threshold concentrations (EC3) being determined for the sensitizers. Of the 22 PS chemicals tested in this study, 21 yielded the same results from standard radioactivity and cell count measurements; only 2-mercaptobenzothiazole was positive by LLNA but negative by LNCC. Of the 16 PS positives, 15 were positive by LLNA and 14 by LNCC; methylmethacrylate was not identified as sensitizer by either of the measurements. Two of the six PS negatives tested negative in our study by both LLNA and LNCC. Of the four PS negatives which were positive in our study, chlorobenzene and methyl salicylate were tested at higher concentrations than the published PS, whereas the corresponding concentrations resulted in consistent negative results. Methylmethacrylate and nickel chloride tested positive within the concentration range used for the published PS. The results indicate cell counts and radioactive measurements are in good accordance within the same LLNA using the 22 PS test substances. Comparisons with the published PS results may, however, require balanced analysis rather than a simple checklist approach. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Precision Electroweak Measurements and Constraints on the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2010-01-01

    This note presents constraints on Standard Model parameters using published and preliminary precision electroweak results measured at the electron-positron colliders LEP and SLC. The results are compared with precise electroweak measurements from other experiments, notably CDF and DØ at the Tevatron. Constraints on the input parameters of the Standard Model are derived from the combined set of results obtained in high-$Q^2$ interactions, and used to predict results in low-$Q^2$ experiments, such as atomic parity violation, Møller scattering, and neutrino-nucleon scattering. The main changes with respect to the experimental results presented in 2009 are new combinations of results on the width of the W boson and the mass of the top quark.

  3. Estimating Wet Bulb Globe Temperature Using Standard Meteorological Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    The heat stress management program at the Department of Energy''s Savannah River Site (SRS) requires implementation of protective controls on outdoor work based on observed values of wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT). To ensure continued compliance with heat stress program requirements, a computer algorithm was developed which calculates an estimate of WBGT using standard meteorological measurements. In addition, scripts were developed to generate a calculation every 15 minutes and post the results to an Intranet web site

  4. International standards for phytosanitary measures (ISPM), publication No. 15

    CERN Multimedia

    Tom Wegelius

    2006-01-01

    GUIDELINES FOR REGULATING WOOD PACKAGING MATERIAL IN INTERNATIONAL TRADE SCOPE This standard describes phytosanitary measures to reduce the risk of introduction and/or spread of quarantine pests associated with wood packaging material (including dunnage), made of coniferous and non-coniferous raw wood, in use in international trade. For more information, contact the Shipping Service (FI-LS-SH) at 79947. Table of guidelines

  5. Gas measuring apparatus with standardization means, and method therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Typpo, P.M.

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus and a method for standardizing a gas measuring device has a source capable of emitting a beam of radiation aligned to impinge a detector. A housing means encloses the beam. The housing means has a plurality of apertures permitting the gas to enter the housing means, to intercept the beam, and to exit from the housing means. The device further comprises means for closing the apertures and a means for purging said gas from the housing means

  6. A spectroscopic transfer standard for accurate atmospheric CO measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaboh, Javis A.; Li, Gang; Serdyukov, Anton; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) is a precursor of essential climate variables and has an indirect effect for enhancing global warming. Accurate and reliable measurements of atmospheric CO concentration are becoming indispensable. WMO-GAW reports states a compatibility goal of ±2 ppb for atmospheric CO concentration measurements. Therefore, the EMRP-HIGHGAS (European metrology research program - high-impact greenhouse gases) project aims at developing spectroscopic transfer standards for CO concentration measurements to meet this goal. A spectroscopic transfer standard would provide results that are directly traceable to the SI, can be very useful for calibration of devices operating in the field, and could complement classical gas standards in the field where calibration gas mixtures in bottles often are not accurate, available or stable enough [1][2]. Here, we present our new direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) sensor capable of performing absolute ("calibration free") CO concentration measurements, and being operated as a spectroscopic transfer standard. To achieve the compatibility goal stated by WMO for CO concentration measurements and ensure the traceability of the final concentration results, traceable spectral line data especially line intensities with appropriate uncertainties are needed. Therefore, we utilize our new high-resolution Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy CO line data for the 2-0 band, with significantly reduced uncertainties, for the dTDLAS data evaluation. Further, we demonstrate the capability of our sensor for atmospheric CO measurements, discuss uncertainty calculation following the guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) principles and show that CO concentrations derived using the sensor, based on the TILSAM (traceable infrared laser spectroscopic amount fraction measurement) method, are in excellent agreement with gravimetric values. Acknowledgement Parts of this work have been

  7. Data format standard for sharing light source measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, G. Groot; Ashdown, Ian; Brandenburg, Willi; Chabaud, Dominique; Dross, Oliver; Gangadhara, Sanjay; Garcia, Kevin; Gauvin, Michael; Hansen, Dirk; Haraguchi, Kei; Hasna, Günther; Jiao, Jianzhong; Kelley, Ryan; Koshel, John; Muschaweck, Julius

    2013-09-01

    Optical design requires accurate characterization of light sources for computer aided design (CAD) software. Various methods have been used to model sources, from accurate physical models to measurement of light output. It has become common practice for designers to include measured source data for design simulations. Typically, a measured source will contain rays which sample the output distribution of the source. The ray data must then be exported to various formats suitable for import into optical analysis or design software. Source manufacturers are also making measurements of their products and supplying CAD models along with ray data sets for designers. The increasing availability of data has been beneficial to the design community but has caused a large expansion in storage needs for the source manufacturers since each software program uses a unique format to describe the source distribution. In 2012, the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) formed a working group to understand the data requirements for ray data and recommend a standard file format. The working group included representatives from software companies supplying the analysis and design tools, source measurement companies providing metrology, source manufacturers creating the data and users from the design community. Within one year the working group proposed a file format which was recently approved by the IES for publication as TM-25. This paper will discuss the process used to define the proposed format, highlight some of the significant decisions leading to the format and list the data to be included in the first version of the standard.

  8. Development of measurement standards for verifying functional performance of surface texture measuring instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, A [Life and Industrial Product Development Department Olympus Corporation, 2951 Ishikawa-machi, Hachiouji-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, H [Industrial Marketing and Planning Department Olympus Corporation, Shinjyuku Monolith, 3-1 Nishi-Shinjyuku 2-chome, Tokyo (Japan); Yanagi, K, E-mail: a_fujii@ot.olympus.co.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-machi, Nagaoka-shi, Niigata (Japan)

    2011-08-19

    A new measurement standard is proposed for verifying overall functional performance of surface texture measuring instruments. Its surface is composed of sinusoidal surface waveforms of chirp signals along horizontal cross sections of the material measure. One of the notable features is that the amplitude of each cycle in the chirp signal form is geometrically modulated so that the maximum slope is kept constant. The maximum slope of the chirp-like signal is gradually decreased according to movement in the lateral direction. We fabricated the measurement standard by FIB processing, and it was calibrated by AFM. We tried to evaluate the functional performance of Laser Scanning Microscope by this standard in terms of amplitude response with varying slope angles. As a result, it was concluded that the proposed standard can easily evaluate the performance of surface texture measuring instruments.

  9. Measuring Life Skills: Standardizing the Assessment of Youth Development Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat D. Duerden

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available While the development of life skills (e.g., communication, problem solving, etc. is a commonly targeted youth program outcome, the lack of standardized conceptualizations and instrumentation make it difficult to compare impacts across programs and develop validated best practices. In order to promote a more unified approach to life skill development, literature reviews were conducted for 10 life skill domains to identify common definitions and, if available, appropriate outcome measures. Data were then collected from an ethnically diverse sample (N = 758 of elementary, middle, and high school aged youth for the 10 identified instruments. Analyses were conducted to ascertain the psychometric qualities of each measure, the interrelationships among measures, and the measures’ relationships with gender, ethnicity, and school level. Results are discussed in terms of their relevance to life skill theory and measurement.

  10. Facial anthropometric differences among gender, ethnicity, and age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Ziqing; Landsittel, Douglas; Benson, Stacey; Roberge, Raymond; Shaffer, Ronald

    2010-06-01

    The impact of race/ethnicity upon facial anthropometric data in the US workforce, on the development of personal protective equipment, has not been investigated to any significant degree. The proliferation of minority populations in the US workforce has increased the need to investigate differences in facial dimensions among these workers. The objective of this study was to determine the face shape and size differences among race and age groups from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health survey of 3997 US civilian workers. Survey participants were divided into two gender groups, four racial/ethnic groups, and three age groups. Measurements of height, weight, neck circumference, and 18 facial dimensions were collected using traditional anthropometric techniques. A multivariate analysis of the data was performed using Principal Component Analysis. An exploratory analysis to determine the effect of different demographic factors had on anthropometric features was assessed via a linear model. The 21 anthropometric measurements, body mass index, and the first and second principal component scores were dependent variables, while gender, ethnicity, age, occupation, weight, and height served as independent variables. Gender significantly contributes to size for 19 of 24 dependent variables. African-Americans have statistically shorter, wider, and shallower noses than Caucasians. Hispanic workers have 14 facial features that are significantly larger than Caucasians, while their nose protrusion, height, and head length are significantly shorter. The other ethnic group was composed primarily of Asian subjects and has statistically different dimensions from Caucasians for 16 anthropometric values. Nineteen anthropometric values for subjects at least 45 years of age are statistically different from those measured for subjects between 18 and 29 years of age. Workers employed in manufacturing, fire fighting, healthcare, law enforcement, and other occupational

  11. Anthropometric evaluation of the Creches children furniture in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barli, Onder; Sari, Reyhan Midilli; Elmali, Derya; Aydintan, Erkan

    2006-12-01

    The dimensions of the living and working space and buildings, the types of material and different riggings should be designed to conform to the users' anthropometric measures. The first requirement to design on ergonomic system is to measure the human being who will work and live in that system. Because of this, anthropometric measures are the most frequently used ergonomic data during the design process. In this research paper, we attempt to organize a new data base of anthropometric data to use in the design of children's equipment and furniture used in crèches. A starting point for research on the proper dimensions of creche furniture is to investigate how the dimensions of furniture reflect the body dimensions and the functional needs of the children using furniture. The anthropometric data of 3, 4 and 5 year-old-children in crèches was used. We report the results of the measurements of 18 anthropometric characteristics of children which constitute a set of basic data for the design of functional spaces and furniture.

  12. Spectroscopic metrology for isotope composition measurements and transfer standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyangwe Nwaboh, Javis; Balslev-Harder, David; Kääriäinen, Teemu; Richmond, Craig; Manninen, Albert; Mohn, Joachim; Kiseleva, Maria; Petersen, Jan C.; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2017-04-01

    The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has identified greenhouse gases such as CO2, CH4 and N2O as critical for global climate monitoring. Other molecules such as CO that has an indirect effect of enhancing global warming are also monitored. WMO has stated compatibility goals for atmospheric concentration and isotope ratio measurements of these gases, e.g. 0.1 ppm for CO2 concentration measurements in the northern hemisphere and 0.01 ‰ for δ13C-CO2. For measurements of the concentration of greenhouse gases, gas analysers are typically calibrated with static gas standards e.g. traceable to the WMO scale or to the International System of Units (SI) through a national metrology institute. However, concentrations of target components, e.g. CO, in static gas standards have been observed to drift, and typically the gas matrix as well as the isotopic composition of the target component does not always reflect field gas composition, leading to deviations of the analyser response, even after calibration. The deviations are dependent on the measurement technique. To address this issue, part of the HIGHGAS (Metrology for high-impact greenhouse gases) project [1] focused on the development of optical transfer standards (OTSs) for greenhouse gases, e.g. CO2 and CO, potentially complementing gas standards. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) [2] is currently used to provide state-of-the-art high precision (in the 0.01 ‰ range) measurements for the isotopic composition of greenhouse gases. However, there is a need for field-deployable techniques such as optical isotope ratio spectroscopy (OIRS) that can be combined with metrological measurement methods. Within the HIGHGAS project, OIRS methods and procedures based on e.g. cavity enhanced spectroscopy (CES) and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), matched to metrological principles have been established for the measurement of 13C/12C and 18O/16O ratios in CO2, 15N/14N ratios in N2O, and 13C/12C and 2H

  13. Platelet function, anthropometric and metabolic variables in Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Platelet function, anthropometric and metabolic variables in Nigerian Type 2 Diabetic patients. ... (BSA) were assessed as indices of anthropometry, fasting blood sugar (FBS), plasma cholesterol and triglycerides (TAG) were determined using standard method and platelet aggregation test was done on the whole blood.

  14. Characterization of textile electrodes and conductors using standardized measurement setups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, L; Neuhaus, C; Medrano, G; Walter, M; Leonhardt, S; Jungbecker, N; Gries, T

    2010-01-01

    Textile electrodes and conductors are being developed and used in different monitoring scenarios, such as ECG or bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements. Compared to standard materials, conductive textile materials offer improved wearing comfort and enable long-term measurements. Unfortunately, the development and investigation of such materials often suffers from the non-reproducibility of the test scenarios. For example, the materials are generally tested on human skin which is difficult since the properties of human skin differ for each person and can change within hours. This study presents two test setups which offer reproducible measurement procedures for the systematic analysis of textile electrodes and conductors. The electrode test setup was designed with a special skin dummy which allows investigation of not only the electrical properties of textile electrodes but also the contact behavior between electrode and skin. Using both test setups, eight textile electrodes and five textile conductors were analyzed and compared

  15. Measurement uncertainty. A practical guide for Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-05-01

    The need for international traceability for radiation dose measurements has been understood since the early nineteen-sixties. The benefits of high dosimetric accuracy were recognized, particularly in radiotherapy, where the outcome of treatments is dependent on the radiation dose delivered to patients. When considering radiation protection dosimetry, the uncertainty may be greater than for therapy, but proper traceability of the measurements is no less important. To ensure harmonization and consistency in radiation measurements, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) created a Network of Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) in 1976. An SSDL is a laboratory that has been designated by the competent national authorities to undertake the duty of providing the necessary link in the traceability chain of radiation dosimetry to the international measurement system (SI, for Systeme International) for radiation metrology users. The role of the SSDLs is crucial in providing traceable calibrations; they disseminate calibrations at specific radiation qualities appropriate for the use of radiation measuring instruments. Historically, although the first SSDLs were established mainly to provide radiotherapy level calibrations, the scope of their work has expanded over the years. Today, many SSDLs provide traceability for radiation protection measurements and diagnostic radiology in addition to radiotherapy. Some SSDLs, with the appropriate facilities and expertise, also conduct quality audits of the clinical use of the calibrated dosimeters - for example, by providing postal dosimeters for dose comparisons for medical institutions or on-site dosimetry audits with an ion chamber and other appropriate equipment. The requirements for traceable and reliable calibrations are becoming more important. For example, for international trade where radiation products are manufactured within strict quality control systems, it is

  16. Accuracy of standard craniometric measurements using multiple data formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Adam H; Parks, Connie L; Monson, Keith L

    2014-09-01

    With continuing advancements in biomedical imaging technologies, anthropologists are increasingly making use of data derived from indirect measurement and analysis of skeletal material. To that end, the purpose of this study was to test the reliability of 26 standard craniometric measurements routinely utilized in forensic casework across several different imaging technologies. Measurements from five crania of known individuals were collected in duplicate by two anthropologists via computed tomography (CT) scans and three-dimensional (3D) laser scans of the known skulls. The laser scans were also used to create prototype models of the known skulls. These prototypes were, themselves, laser-scanned, and measurements were also collected from the prototypes and the laser scans of the prototypes. Measurement sets from each technology were then compared with one another using the previously collected osteometric measurements taken on the crania themselves as the ground truth. indicate that, while the majority of measurements showed no significant differences across data formats, a handful were found to be problematic for particular technologies. For instance, measurements taken in a supero-inferior direction (e.g., BBH, OBH) from CT scans were prone to greater deviation from direct measurements of the cranium than other technologies, especially for CT scans taken at 5 mm thickness and increment. Also, several measurements defined by Type 1 landmarks, particularly those occurring at complicated or indistinct suture junctures (e.g., ASB, ZMB), were found to have high variance across all technologies while measurements based on Type 3 landmarks proved to be highly reproducible. This is contrary to measurements taken directly on crania, in which measures defined by Type 1 landmarks are typically the most reliable, likely attributable to diminished or totally obscured suture definition in the scan data. If medical imaging data are to be increasingly utilized in

  17. — study of the use of two standard- and non-standard-measuring devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Ostapkowicz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with leak detection in liquid transmission pipelines. Diagnostic method based on negative pressure wave detection is taken into account here. The paper focuses on variant of this method, related to the use of only two measurement points (devices, placed at the inlet and outlet of the pipeline. Standard transducers for measurement of pressure signals and non-standard elaborated technique for measurement of new diagnostic signals were used. New diagnostic signals, conventionally named the signals of weak interactions, result from the work of special devices (correctors joined to the pipeline. In order to compare both hardware solutions key performance attributes for the analyzed leak detection method were determined. The bases of such assessment were experimental tests. They were conducted with the use of a physical model of a pipeline. The pipeline was 380 meters long, 34 mm in internal diameter and made of polyethylene (PEHD pipes. The medium pumped through the pipeline was water. Carrying out such research, diagnostic procedures elaborated by the author were used and tested.[b]Keywords[/b]: technical diagnostics, pipelines, leak detection

  18. Relating Standardized Visual Perception Measures to Simulator Visual System Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Sweet, Barbara T.

    2013-01-01

    Human vision is quantified through the use of standardized clinical vision measurements. These measurements typically include visual acuity (near and far), contrast sensitivity, color vision, stereopsis (a.k.a. stereo acuity), and visual field periphery. Simulator visual system performance is specified in terms such as brightness, contrast, color depth, color gamut, gamma, resolution, and field-of-view. How do these simulator performance characteristics relate to the perceptual experience of the pilot in the simulator? In this paper, visual acuity and contrast sensitivity will be related to simulator visual system resolution, contrast, and dynamic range; similarly, color vision will be related to color depth/color gamut. Finally, we will consider how some characteristics of human vision not typically included in current clinical assessments could be used to better inform simulator requirements (e.g., relating dynamic characteristics of human vision to update rate and other temporal display characteristics).

  19. Different methods for assessment of nutritional status in newborn infants based on physical and anthropometric indexes: a short review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Rashidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Several complications during childhood is associated with nutritional status of infants at birth. Therefore, nutritional status of newborns must be evaluated properly after birth. Assessment of the nutritional status of neonates based on anthropometric and physical indices is simple and inexpensive without the need for advanced medical equipment. However, no previous studies have focused on the assessment methods of the nutritional status of infants via anthropometric and physical indices. This study aimed to review some of the key methods used to determine the nutritional status of neonates using anthropometric and physical indices. To date, most studies have focused on the diagnosis of fetal malnutrition (FM and growth monitoring. In order to diagnose FM, researchers have used growth charts and Ponderal index (PI based on anthropometric indices, as well as Clinical Assessment of Nutritional (CAN Score based on physical features. Moreover, in order to assess the growth status of infants, growth charts were used. According to the findings of this study, standard intrauterine growth curves and the PI are common measurement tools in the diagnosis of FM. Furthermore, CAN score is widely used in the evaluation of the nutritional status of neonates. Given the differences in the physical features of term and preterm infants, this index should be adjusted for preterm neonates. Longitudinal growth charts are one of the most prominent methods used for monitoring of the growth patterns of infants.

  20. Cryogenic flow rate measurement with a laser Doppler velocimetry standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, R.; Strzelecki, A.; Auclercq, C.; Lehot, Y.; Loubat, S.; Chevalier, J.; Ben Rayana, F.

    2018-03-01

    A very promising alternative to the state-of-the-art static volume measurements for liquefied natural gas (LNG) custody transfer processes is the dynamic principle of flow metering. As the Designated Institute (DI) of the LNE (‘Laboratoire National de métrologie et d’Essais’, being the French National Metrology Institute) for high-pressure gas flow metering, Cesame-Exadebit is involved in various research and development programs. Within the framework of the first (2010-2013) and second (2014-2017) EURAMET Joint Research Project (JRP), named ‘Metrological support for LNG custody transfer and transport fuel applications’, Cesame-Exadebit explored a novel cryogenic flow metering technology using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) as an alternative to ultrasonic and Coriolis flow metering. Cesame-Exadebit is trying to develop this technique as a primary standard for cryogenic flow meters. Currently, cryogenic flow meters are calibrated at ambient temperatures with water. Results are then extrapolated to be in the Reynolds number range of real applications. The LDV standard offers a unique capability to perform online calibration of cryogenic flow meters in real conditions (temperature, pressure, piping and real flow disturbances). The primary reference has been tested on an industrial process in a LNG terminal during truck refuelling. The reference can calibrate Coriolis flow meters being used daily with all the real environmental constraints, and its utilisation is transparent for LNG terminal operators. The standard is traceable to Standard International units and the combined extended uncertainties have been determined and estimated to be lower than 0.6% (an ongoing improvement to reducing the correlation function uncertainty, which has a major impact in the uncertainty estimation).

  1. Comprehensive Group Therapy of Obesity and Its Impact on Selected Anthropometric and Postural Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horák, Stanislav; Sovová, Eliška; Pastucha, Dalibor; Konečný, Petr; Radová, Lenka; Calabová, Naděžda; Janoutová, Jana; Janout, Vladimír

    2017-12-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease. This non-infectious epidemic has reached pandemic proportions in the 21 century. Posture is a dynamic process referring to an active maintenance of body movement segments against the action of external forces. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of comprehensive group therapy for obese persons on selected anthropometric and postural parameters. The study comprised 53 females with a mean age of 44.5 years (range 29–65 years, standard deviation 9.42 years, median 44 years), who completed a controlled weight loss programme. At the beginning and at the end of the programme, anthropometric parameters (Body Mass Index (BMI), weight and waist circumference) were measured and the posturography tests Limits of Stability (LOS) and Motor Control Test (MCT) were performed using the NeuroCom's SMART EquiTest system. The data were statistically analyzed using R software at a level of significance of 0.05. There were positive changes after the controlled weight loss programme in anthropometric parameters (BMI reduction, with pobesity in terms of reductions in waist circumference, body weight and BMI, and thus the overall reduction of both cardiovascular and metabolic risks, as well as improved postural skills (activity and reactions). Copyright© by the National Institute of Public Health, Prague 2017

  2. Sexual Dimorphism and Estimation of Height from Body Length Anthropometric Parameters among the Hausa Ethnic Group of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaafar Aliyu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to investigate the sexual dimorphism in length and other anthropometric parameters. To also generate formulae for height estimation using anthropometric measurements of some length parameters among Hausa ethnic group of Kaduna State, Nigeria. A cross sectional study was conducted and a total of 500 subjects participated in this study which was mainly secondary school students between the age ranges of 16-27 years, anthropometric measurements were obtained using standard protocols. It was observed that there was significant sexual dimorphism in all the parameters except for body mass index. In all the parameters males tend to have significantly (P < 0.05 higher mean values except biaxillary distances. Height showed positive and strongest correlations with demispan length, followed by knee height, thigh length, sitting height, hand length, foot length, humeral length, forearm length and weight respectively. There were weak and positive correlations between height and neck length as well as biaxillary length. The demi span length showed the strongest correlation coefficient and low standard error of estimate indicating the strong estimation ability than other parameters. The combination of two parameters tends to give better estimations and low standard error of estimates, so also combining the three parameters gives better estimations with a lower standard error of estimates. The better correlation coefficient was also observed with the double and triple parameters respectively. Male Hausa tend to have larger body proportion compared to female. Height showed positive and strongest correlations with demispan length. Body length anthropometric proved to be useful in estimation of stature among Hausa ethnic group of Kaduna state Nigeria.

  3. Seventy Years of Radio Science, Technology, Standards, and Measurement at the National Bureau of Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmor, C. Stewart

    This large volume describes all the forms of radio research done at the National Bureau of Standards (now, National Institute of Standards and Technology) from its founding in 1901 until about 1980. The volume truly reflects its subtitle; it describes in great detail research in radio propagation and all its connections with geophysics and geospace, but also radio as instrument for discovery and application in meteorology, navigation, and in standards of measurement and testing in electronics.The book is a bit unwieldy and some of its chapters will be of most interest to former NBS employees. For example, there is a lengthy chapter on the transfer of radio research work from Washington, D.C, to Boulder, Colo., in the early 1950s, complete with photostat of the quit claim deed to NBS from the Boulder Chamber of Commerce. On the other hand, radio research developed and flourished in this country in the early days at industrial (Bell Telephone, General Electric, Westinghouse) and government (NBS, Naval Research Laboratory) labs more than in academia, and it is very interesting to learn how the labs interacted and to read details of the organizational structure. I can attest personally to the great difficulties in locating materials concerning radio history. While we have numerous volumes devoted to certain popular radio heroes, little is available concerning government radio pioneers such as L. W. Austin, who directed the U.S. Navy's radio research for many years while situated physically at the Bureau of Standards, or J. H. Dellinger, long-time chief of the Radio Section and head spokesman on radio for the U.S. government until the 1930s.

  4. Developing a community-based flood resilience measurement standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Adriana; Szoenyi, Michael; Chaplowe, Scott; McQuistan, Colin; Campbell, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Given the increased attention to resilience-strengthening in international humanitarian and development work, there has been concurrent interest in its measurement and the overall accountability of "resilience strengthening" initiatives. The literature is reaching beyond the polemic of defining resilience to its measurement. Similarly, donors are increasingly expecting organizations to go beyond claiming resilience programing to measuring and showing it. However, key questions must be asked, in particular "Resilience of whom and to what?". There is no one-size-fits-all solution. The approach to measuring resilience is dependent on the audience and the purpose of the measurement exercise. Deriving a resilience measurement system needs to be based on the question it seeks to answer and needs to be specific. This session highlights key lessons from the Zurich Flood Resilience Alliance approach to develop a flood resilience measurement standard to measure and assess the impact of community based flood resilience interventions, and to inform decision-making to enhance the effectiveness of these interventions. We draw on experience in methodology development to-date, together with lessons from application in two case study sites in Latin America. Attention will be given to the use of a consistent measurement methodology for community resilience to floods over time and place; challenges to measuring a complex and dynamic phenomenon such as community resilience; methodological implications of measuring community resilience versus impact on and contribution to this goal; and using measurement and tools such as cost-benefit analysis to prioritize and inform strategic decision making for resilience interventions. The measurement tool follows the five categories of the Sustainable Livelihoods Framework and the 4Rs of complex adaptive systems - robustness, rapidity, redundancy and resourcefulness -5C-4R. A recent white paper by the Zurich Flood Resilience Alliance traces the

  5. [Measurement of CO diffusion capacity (II): Standardization and quality criteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo Posadas, A; Villa Asensi, J R; de Mir Messa, I; Sardón Prado, O; Larramona, H

    2015-08-01

    The diffusion capacity is the technique that measures the ability of the respiratory system for gas exchange, thus allowing a diagnosis of the malfunction of the alveolar-capillary unit. The most important parameter to assess is the CO diffusion capacity (DLCO). New methods are currently being used to measure the diffusion using nitric oxide (NO). There are other methods for measuring diffusion, although in this article the single breath technique is mainly referred to, as it is the most widely used and best standardized. Its complexity, its reference equations, differences in equipment, inter-patient variability and conditions in which the DLCO is performed, lead to a wide inter-laboratory variability, although its standardization makes this a more reliable and reproductive method. The practical aspects of the technique are analyzed, by specifying the recommendations to carry out a suitable procedure, the calibration routine, calculations and adjustments. Clinical applications are also discussed. An increase in the transfer of CO occurs in diseases in which there is an increased volume of blood in the pulmonary capillaries, such as in the polycythemia and pulmonary hemorrhage. There is a decrease in DLCO in patients with alveolar volume reduction or diffusion defects, either by altered alveolar-capillary membrane (interstitial diseases) or decreased volume of blood in the pulmonary capillaries (pulmonary embolism or primary pulmonary hypertension). Other causes of decreased or increased DLCO are also highlighted. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Intervenção nutricional sobre medidas antropométricas e glicemia de jejum de pacientes diabéticos Nutritional intervention on anthropometric measurements and fasting glycemia of diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júnia Maria Geraldo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o alcance das atividades desenvolvidas em um projeto de atendimento nutricional, promovido pela Universidade Federal de Viçosa (MG, sobre a glicemia de jejum, medidas antropométricas e de composição corporal de indivíduos diabéticos. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de um estudo de coorte, no qual pacientes diabéticos, recrutados do Projeto de Atendimento Nutricional a Diabéticos da Terceira Idade, da Universidade Federal de Viçosa, participaram de reuniões quinzenais, nas quais foram abordados temas relativos à ingestão de dietas saudáveis, e receberam atendimento nutricional individualizado. Os dados foram coletados a partir da aplicação de um roteiro clínico-nutricional, a 42 pacientes, contendo informações pessoais e itens referentes a: história clínica, inquérito dietético, dados antropométricos, de composição corporal e bioquímicos. Analisaram-se o peso, o índice de massa corporal, a circunferência da cintura, o percentual de gordura corporal e a glicemia de jejum antes de qualquer intervenção e após seis meses de acompanhamento. As análises estatísticas foram conduzidas utilizando-se o software Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, versão 12.5. O critério de significância estatística adotado foi pOBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the scope of a project of nutritional intervention, conducted by the Federal University of Viçosa (MG, on fasting glucose, anthropometric measurements and body composition of diabetic patients. METHODS: In this cohort study, diabetic patients recruited from the " Elderly Diabetics Nutritional Care" project, conducted at the Federal University of Viçosa, participated in meetings twice a month, where healthy diets were discussed and individual nutritional intervention was given. The data were collected by the application of a clinical-nutritional questionnaire to 42 patients containing personal information and information regarding clinical

  7. Grid-enabled measures: using Science 2.0 to standardize measures and share data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Richard P; Hesse, Bradford W; Shaikh, Abdul R; Courtney, Paul; Morgan, Glen; Augustson, Erik; Kobrin, Sarah; Levin, Kerry Y; Helba, Cynthia; Garner, David; Dunn, Marsha; Coa, Kisha

    2011-05-01

    Scientists are taking advantage of the Internet and collaborative web technology to accelerate discovery in a massively connected, participative environment--a phenomenon referred to by some as Science 2.0. As a new way of doing science, this phenomenon has the potential to push science forward in a more efficient manner than was previously possible. The Grid-Enabled Measures (GEM) database has been conceptualized as an instantiation of Science 2.0 principles by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) with two overarching goals: (1) promote the use of standardized measures, which are tied to theoretically based constructs; and (2) facilitate the ability to share harmonized data resulting from the use of standardized measures. The first is accomplished by creating an online venue where a virtual community of researchers can collaborate together and come to consensus on measures by rating, commenting on, and viewing meta-data about the measures and associated constructs. The second is accomplished by connecting the constructs and measures to an ontological framework with data standards and common data elements such as the NCI Enterprise Vocabulary System (EVS) and the cancer Data Standards Repository (caDSR). This paper will describe the web 2.0 principles on which the GEM database is based, describe its functionality, and discuss some of the important issues involved with creating the GEM database such as the role of mutually agreed-on ontologies (i.e., knowledge categories and the relationships among these categories--for data sharing). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. The gait standard deviation, a single measure of kinematic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeux, Morgan; Passmore, Elyse; Graham, H Kerr; Tirosh, Oren

    2016-05-01

    Measurement of gait kinematic variability provides relevant clinical information in certain conditions affecting the neuromotor control of movement. In this article, we present a measure of overall gait kinematic variability, GaitSD, based on combination of waveforms' standard deviation. The waveform standard deviation is the common numerator in established indices of variability such as Kadaba's coefficient of multiple correlation or Winter's waveform coefficient of variation. Gait data were collected on typically developing children aged 6-17 years. Large number of strides was captured for each child, average 45 (SD: 11) for kinematics and 19 (SD: 5) for kinetics. We used a bootstrap procedure to determine the precision of GaitSD as a function of the number of strides processed. We compared the within-subject, stride-to-stride, variability with the, between-subject, variability of the normative pattern. Finally, we investigated the correlation between age and gait kinematic, kinetic and spatio-temporal variability. In typically developing children, the relative precision of GaitSD was 10% as soon as 6 strides were captured. As a comparison, spatio-temporal parameters required 30 strides to reach the same relative precision. The ratio stride-to-stride divided by normative pattern variability was smaller in kinematic variables (the smallest for pelvic tilt, 28%) than in kinetic and spatio-temporal variables (the largest for normalised stride length, 95%). GaitSD had a strong, negative correlation with age. We show that gait consistency may stabilise only at, or after, skeletal maturity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Estudo antropométrico do crânio de recém-nascidos normais em Sergipe Anthropometric cranial measurements of normal newborn in Sergipe - Northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A. Oliveira

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available O estudo antropométrico do crânio é fundamental para a avaliação do recém-nascido. As medidas antropométricas usadas na atualidade são baseadas em resultados obtidos há mais de cinco décadas, os quais não são capazes de determinar um padrão nacional em decorrência de possíveis influências de algumas etnias. Realizamos estudo descritivo analítico em uma Maternidade em Aracaju-SE, com medidas de perímetro cefálico, distancia biauricular e anteroposterior, índice cefálico e medida da fontanela; foram examinadas 450 recém-nascidos com idade gestacional entre 37 e 42 semanas; 49,3% era do gênero masculino e 50,6% do feminino. O perímetro cefálico variou entre 30,0 cm e 39,8 cm com média de 34,14±2,48 com P50 34 cm. O índice cefálico variou entre 0,69 e 1,13 com média de 0,98±0,06 com P50 1. Foi feito uma comparação entre os estudos estrangeiros e brasileiros; o recém-nascido sergipano aproxima-se mais dos resultados obtidos nos estudos da região sudeste do que dos resultados da região nordeste, geograficamente semelhante. A possibilidade de influencias étnicas foi levantada, como também a necessidade de realizar um estudo multicêntrico para criar um perfil antropométrico do recém-nascido brasileiro.The anthropometric mesureaments of the skull is essential for the evaluation of the newborn. The anthropometrics measureaments utilized at the present time are based in the results obtained for more than five decades, which are not able to determine a national pattern mostly likely due to some ethnic influences. We carried out an analytical descriptive study in a maternity hospital in Aracaju-Sergipe, Northeast of Brazil. Measurements of cephalic perimeter, biauricular and anteroposterior distances, cephalic index and fontanels were obtained from 450 newborns with gestacional age from 37 and 42 weeks; 49.3% were male and 50.6% female. The cephalic perimeter ranged from 30.0 cm to 39.8 cm with mean value of 34.14±2

  10. Utilização de medidas antropométricas para a avaliação do acúmulo de gordura visceral The use of anthropometric measures to assess visceral fat accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Junqueira Vasques

    2010-02-01

    accurate and precise measurement of visceral fat. However, both are costly and inapplicable in routine clinical practice and epidemiological studies. Anthropometric parameters are an option for visceral fat assessment in these situations, since they are innocuous, easy to use and inexpensive. In this context, this work aimed to critically analyze studies that assessed anthropometric parameters as indicators of visceral fat. A bibliographic review of domestic and international articles found in the databases Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior, Scientific Electronic Library Online, Science Direct and Pubmed, published from 1947 to 2007 was done. Emphasis was given to anthropometric parameters, such as body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio and sagittal abdominal diameter.

  11. Multicenter Evaluation of Cystatin C Measurement after Assay Standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargnoux, Anne-Sophie; Piéroni, Laurence; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Kuster, Nils; Delanaye, Pierre; Carlier, Marie-Christine; Fellahi, Soraya; Boutten, Anne; Lombard, Christine; González-Antuña, Ana; Delatour, Vincent; Cavalier, Etienne

    2017-04-01

    Since 2010, a certified reference material ERM-DA471/IFCC has been available for cystatin C (CysC). This study aimed to assess the sources of uncertainty in results for clinical samples measured using standardized assays. This evaluation was performed in 2015 and involved 7 clinical laboratories located in France and Belgium. CysC was measured in a panel of 4 serum pools using 8 automated assays and a candidate isotope dilution mass spectrometry reference measurement procedure. Sources of uncertainty (imprecision and bias) were evaluated to calculate the relative expanded combined uncertainty for each CysC assay. Uncertainty was judged against the performance specifications derived from the biological variation model. Only Siemens reagents on the Siemens systems and, to a lesser extent, DiaSys reagents on the Cobas system, provided results that met the minimum performance criterion calculated according to the intraindividual and interindividual biological variations. Although the imprecision was acceptable for almost all assays, an increase in the bias with concentration was observed for Gentian reagents, and unacceptably high biases were observed for Abbott and Roche reagents on their own systems. This comprehensive picture of the market situation since the release of ERM-DA471/IFCC shows that bias remains the major component of the combined uncertainty because of possible problems associated with the implementation of traceability. Although some manufacturers have clearly improved their calibration protocols relative to ERM-DA471, most of them failed to meet the criteria for acceptable CysC measurements. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  12. The value of anthropometric indices for identifying women with features of metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    BMI is a widely used anthropometric measure for identifying CVD and metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk. Two new anthropometric indices are A Body Shape Index (ABSI) and Body Roundness Index (BRI) that may provide better correlations to features of MetS. Methods: Subject data were obtained from 91 over...

  13. Facial Anthropometric Norms of the Young Iranian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Mohammad; Shariati, Mahsa; Rajaeirad, Fatemeh; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Davoudmanesh, Zeinab

    2018-06-01

    Facial anthropometric measurement is considered an essential concern of surgeons, orthodontists, artists and forensic scientists. The aim of this study is to investigate facial anthropometric norms of the young Iranian population. The study participants consisted of 200 healthy Iranian students (100 males, 100 females) aged 18-25 years old. Twenty-three liner and four angular measurements were investigated twice by a dentist. Independent-samples t test was used to compare indices between males and females and also between countries. A p value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. It was found that the mean measurements of c'-sn' of both sides, nasolabial angle, trichion-gnathion, tragion-tragion and gnathion-gnathion were statistically greater in Iranian males than in females ( p  < 0.05). Comparing Iranian anthropometric norms with North American Whites, Malays, Turkish and African American women demonstrated that there were statistically significant differences in most anthropometric measurements between Iranians and other populations ( p  < 0.05). In Iranians, mean measurements of c'-sn' of the right and left sides, nasolabial angle, trichion-gnathion, tragion-tragion and gnathion-gnathion were greater in men than in women. Comparing Iranian males and females with different ethnicities indicated several interracial differences, which should be taken into consideration when dealing with patients or also practitioners originated in this region.

  14. Three-dimensional hindfoot alignment measurements based on biplanar radiographs: comparison with standard radiographic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutter, Reto; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Buck, Florian M.; Espinosa, Norman

    2013-01-01

    To establish a hindfoot alignment measurement technique based on low-dose biplanar radiographs and compare with hindfoot alignment measurements on long axial view radiographs, which is the current reference standard. Long axial view radiographs and low-dose biplanar radiographs of a phantom consisting of a human foot skeleton embedded in acrylic glass (phantom A) and a plastic model of a human foot in three different hindfoot positions (phantoms B1-B3) were imaged in different foot positions (20 internal to 20 external rotation). Two independent readers measured hindfoot alignment on long axial view radiographs and performed 3D hindfoot alignment measurements based on biplanar radiographs on two different occasions. Time for three-dimensional (3D) measurements was determined. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated. Hindfoot alignment measurements on long axial view radiographs were characterized by a large positional variation, with a range of 14 /13 valgus to 22 /27 varus (reader 1/2 for phantom A), whereas the range of 3D hindfoot alignment measurements was 7.3 /6.0 to 9.0 /10.5 varus (reader 1/2 for phantom A), with a mean and standard deviation of 8.1 ± 0.6/8.7 ± 1.4 respectively. Interobserver agreement was high (ICC = 0.926 for phantom A, and ICC = 0.886 for phantoms B1-B3), and agreement between different readouts was high (ICC = 0.895-0.995 for reader 1, and ICC = 0.987-0.994 for reader 2) for 3D measurements. Mean duration of 3D measurements was 84 ± 15/113 ± 15 s for reader 1/2. Three-dimensional hindfoot alignment measurements based on biplanar radiographs were independent of foot positioning during image acquisition and reader independent. In this phantom study, the 3D measurements were substantially more precise than the standard radiographic measurements. (orig.)

  15. Humidity correction in the standard measurement of exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibaraki, Yasuyuki; Katoh, Akira

    1980-01-01

    This paper deals with the humidity correction to be made in the standard measurement of the exposure to the measured ionization current in the humid air for the purpose of excluding the influence of the water vapour that is not included in the definition of the exposure. First, formulae giving the humidity correction factors for a parallel plate free air chamber and a cavity chamber have been derived respectively in the case where the contributions of air and water vapour to the ionization are independent. Next, in the case where the contributions are not independent, i.e., the Jesse effect is taken into account, a formula to obtain the W-value for humid air has been derived on the basis of the Niatel's experimental result. Using this formula, formulae to obtain the humidity correction factors for the free air chamber and the cavity chamber are derived. The humidity calculated by the latter formulae show good agreements with the results by Niatel and Guiho, respectively. (author)

  16. Standard Test Method for Measuring Binocular Disparity in Transparent Parts

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the amount of binocular disparity that is induced by transparent parts such as aircraft windscreens, canopies, HUD combining glasses, visors, or goggles. This test method may be applied to parts of any size, shape, or thickness, individually or in combination, so as to determine the contribution of each transparent part to the overall binocular disparity present in the total “viewing system” being used by a human operator. 1.2 This test method represents one of several techniques that are available for measuring binocular disparity, but is the only technique that yields a quantitative figure of merit that can be related to operator visual performance. 1.3 This test method employs apparatus currently being used in the measurement of optical angular deviation under Method F 801. 1.4 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not con...

  17. ANTHROPOMETRIC AND MOTORIC COMPARISONS BETWEEN THE TWO VOLLEYBALL TEAMS IN PRISHTINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malsor Gjonbalaj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The increase in sports results today not only identifies the quantity (volume and intensity of the work put in, but also the quality (changing the stereotypical notion of effort, eliminating redundant movements, rationalizing the sport in all elements etc. All of these circumstances and factors referred in this paper are stimulated through practical methods for processing positive results and aiming to present a realistic and factual reflection of the current condition, particularly emphasizing the evaluation of several anthropometric and motor characteristics of the players in both volleyball clubs from Prishtina. Methods: These methods are elaborated among arithmetic methods, variance, standard deviation and standard error of the arithmetic mean, the coefficient of variance, the maximum and minimum score test, the score in accordance to the Pearson correlation coefficient-whereas the instruments measured 14 variables such as anthropometric 8, 4 motors and 2 situational. The main purpose to which is addressed in this paper is verifying the situation and the differences between the players in two of the clubs by analyzing the results from the variables I have chosen. Results: The results show that there is a significant differentiation between one volleyball group to the other in terms of motor, anthropometric and situational. This is proven by the results of the data based on the parameters abovementioned. Discussion: Results acquired on in the research, verifies the hypotheses which sets forth previously, it helps to us to understand that the main goal in this research has largely been achieved. Statistical methods that have been processed results may explain the state of anthropometric and motor characteristics. Moreover, with the help of T-test we came to understand the valuable statistical differences between two clubs which have been subject to research. These results are best justified considering the fact that the first

  18. Assessment of insulin sensitivity/resistance and their relations with leptin concentrations and anthropometric measures in a pregnant population with and without gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ozgur; Kucuk, Mert; Ilgin, Aydin; Dagdelen, Muride

    2010-01-01

    Fifty-six pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and 42 normal glucose tolerant (NGT) pregnant women between 26 and 36 gestational weeks were included in the study prospectively. The body fat percentage (BFP) was calculated using the Siri formula from skinfold thickness (SFT) measurements. Both groups were comparable for gestational age, height, weight, and body mass index (P>.05). Insulin resistance assessed by homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) method was significantly higher in GDM patients compared to their NGT weight-matched control group. In contrast, the insulin sensitivity calculated from quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI-IS) equation was significantly lower in GDM group. Calculated lean body mass was found to be similar in between both groups. Body fat percentage derived from SFT parameters was significantly higher in women with GDM. Women with GDM had significantly higher levels of serum insulin and leptin concentrations when compared with the NGT group. All SFT measurements were higher in GDM group when compared to those in NGT women. We did not find any correlation between leptin levels and insulin resistance; we found negative correlation between leptin levels and insulin sensitivity. Thus, we observed that leptin may contribute development of GDM by decreasing insulin sensitivity but not increasing insulin resistance. Also, we observed that the BFP estimated by the Siri formula from SFT measurements correlated significantly with HOMA-IR and QUICKI-IS and leptin concentrations in pregnant women. We suggest that by simply evaluating SFT, we may hold a view about BFP and leptin concentrations and insulin sensitivity in pregnant women.

  19. Breast composition measurements using retrospective standard mammogram form (SMF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highnam, R; Pan, X; Warren, R; Jeffreys, M; Smith, G Davey; Brady, M

    2006-01-01

    The standard mammogram form (SMF) representation of an x-ray mammogram is a standardized, quantitative representation of the breast from which the volume of non-fat tissue and breast density can be easily estimated, both of which are of significant interest in determining breast cancer risk. Previous theoretical analysis of SMF had suggested that a complete and substantial set of calibration data (such as mAs and kVp) would be needed to generate realistic breast composition measures and yet there are many interesting trials that have retrospectively collected images with no calibration data. The main contribution of this paper is to revisit our previous theoretical analysis of SMF with respect to errors in the calibration data and to show how and why that theoretical analysis did not match the results from the practical implementations of SMF. In particular, we show how by estimating breast thickness for every image we are, effectively, compensating for any errors in the calibration data. To illustrate our findings, the current implementation of SMF (version 2.2β) was run over 4028 digitized film-screen mammograms taken from six sites over the years 1988-2002 with and without using the known calibration data. Results show that the SMF implementation running without any calibration data at all generates results which display a strong relationship with when running with a complete set of calibration data, and, most importantly, to an expert's visual assessment of breast composition using established techniques. SMF shows considerable promise in being of major use in large epidemiological studies related to breast cancer which require the automated analysis of large numbers of films from many years previously where little or no calibration data is available

  20. Anthropometric characteristics and nutritional status of older adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-08-27

    Aug 27, 2011 ... Keywords: older adults, anthropometric measurements, nutritional status, Lake Victoria Basin ... of good nutritional status are critical to health and functioning,15 and ... Conclusion: The findings suggest energy depletion and loss of muscle mass, ... Arm span was used to estimate height for individuals who.

  1. The introduction of anthropometrics into development and economics

    OpenAIRE

    Komlos, John; Meermann, Lukas

    2007-01-01

    'The authors trace the introduction and use of anthropometric indicators (height, weight, body mass index) into development and labor economics in the late 1970s. These biological markers are used as a proxy measure for health human capital, the degree of poverty or malnutrition, net nutritional status, and productive capacity. The use of these indicators has spread rapidly after the 1980s.' (author's abstract)

  2. Measurement uncertainties for vacuum standards at Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, S. S.; Shin, Y. H.; Chung, K. H.

    2006-01-01

    The Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science has three major vacuum systems: an ultrasonic interferometer manometer (UIM) (Sec. II, Figs. 1 and 2) for low vacuum, a static expansion system (SES) (Sec. III, Figs. 3 and 4) for medium vacuum, and an orifice-type dynamic expansion system (DES) (Sec. IV, Figs. 5 and 6) for high and ultrahigh vacuum. For each system explicit measurement model equations with multiple variables are, respectively, given. According to ISO standards, all these system variable errors were used to calculate the expanded uncertainty (U). For each system the expanded uncertainties (k=1, confidence level=95%) and relative expanded uncertainty (expanded uncertainty/generated pressure) are summarized in Table IV and are estimated to be as follows. For UIM, at 2.5-300 Pa generated pressure, the expanded uncertainty is -2 Pa and the relative expanded uncertainty is -2 ; at 1-100 kPa generated pressure, the expanded uncertainty is -5 . For SES, at 3-100 Pa generated pressure, the expanded uncertainty is -1 Pa and the relative expanded uncertainty is -3 . For DES, at 4.6x10 -3 -1.3x10 -2 Pa generated pressure, the expanded uncertainty is -4 Pa and the relative expanded uncertainty is -3 ; at 3.0x10 -6 -9.0x10 -4 Pa generated pressure, the expanded uncertainty is -6 Pa and the relative expanded uncertainty is -2 . Within uncertainty limits our bilateral and key comparisons [CCM.P-K4 (10 Pa-1 kPa)] are extensive and in good agreement with those of other nations (Fig. 8 and Table V)

  3. Prevalência de extremos antropométricos em crianças do estado de Alagoas Prevalencia de extremos antropométricos en niños del estado de Alagoas, Noreste de Brasil Prevalence of extreme anthropometric measurements in children from Alagoas, Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroldo da Silva Ferreira

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do artigo foi estimar a prevalência de extremos antropométricos indicativos do estado nutricional de crianças. Realizou-se estudo transversal com amostra probabilística de 1.386 crianças menores de cinco anos do estado de Alagoas. As prevalências de déficits (z El objetivo del artículo fue estimar la prevalencia de extremos antropométricos indicativos del estado nutricional de niños. Se realizó estudio transversal con muestra probabilística de 1.386 niños menores de cinco años del estado de Alagoas. Las prevalencias de déficit (zThe objective of the study was to estimate the prevalence of extreme anthropometric measurements in children indicative of their nutritional status. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a random sample of 1,386 children under five in the state of Alagoas, northeastern Brazil. The prevalence of deficits (z <-2; WHO-2006 standard for weight-for-age (underweight, weight-for-height (wasting and height-for-age (stunting were 2.9% (n = 40, 1.2% (n = 17, and 10.3% (n = 144, respectively. Excess of weight-for-height (overweight was seen in 135 children (9.7%. In conclusion, the prevalences of underweight and wasting are epidemiologically irrelevant and stunting and overweight have a similar prevalence.

  4. Adipokine serum concentrations, anthropometric measurements and socio-economic status in two ethnic groups with different prevalence levels for cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisberg, R; Paiker, J E; Crowther, N J

    2011-08-01

    Obesity is more common in African than Asian-Indian populations and yet type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases are more common in the latter populations. The main purpose of the current study was therefore to determine whether ethnic differences in body fat distribution, adipokine levels, and socio-economic status may explain population differences in the prevalence of these metabolic disorders. Leptin, IL-6, CRP, visceral fat, education level, and socio-economic status were measured in 50 African and the same number of Indian women residing in Johannesburg, South Africa. Serum leptin levels were significantly higher in Indian than African subjects (41.3±2.0 and 34.2±2.9 ng/ml, respectively; pAfrican group, (5.22±0.86 vs. 2.54±0.52 pg/ml; peconomic status (pAfrican subjects, however, adjusting for these variables in ANCOVA did not attenuate differences in adipokine or visceral fat levels. We hypothesise that one of the reasons for the higher prevalence of obesity in the African than Indian population may be related to lower leptin levels, whilst ethnic differences in the prevalence of metabolic disorders cannot be explained by differences in adipokine levels, but maybe related to higher visceral adiposity in the Indian group. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · NewYork.

  5. Biomechanical, anthropometric, and psychological determinants of barbell back squat strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigotsky, Andrew D; Bryanton, Megan A; Nuckols, Greg; Beardsley, Chris; Contreras, Bret; Evans, Jessica; Schoenfeld, Brad J

    2018-02-27

    Previous investigations of strength have only focused on biomechanical or psychological determinants, while ignoring the potential interplay and relative contributions of these variables. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative contributions of biomechanical, anthropometric, and psychological variables to the prediction of maximum parallel barbell back squat strength. Twenty-one college-aged participants (male = 14; female = 7; age = 23 ± 3 years) reported to the laboratory for two visits. The first visit consisted of anthropometric, psychometric, and parallel barbell back squat one-repetition maximum (1RM) testing. On the second visit, participants performed isometric dynamometry testing for the knee, hip, and spinal extensors in a sticking point position-specific manner. Multiple linear regression and correlations were used to investigate the combined and individual relationships between biomechanical, anthropometric, and psychological variables and squat 1RM. Multiple regression revealed only one statistically predictive determinant: fat free mass normalized to height (standardized estimate ± SE = 0.6 ± 0.3; t(16) = 2.28; p = 0.037). Correlation coefficients for individual variables and squat 1RM ranged from r = -0.79-0.83, with biomechanical, anthropometric, experiential, and sex predictors showing the strongest relationships, and psychological variables displaying the weakest relationships. These data suggest that back squat strength in a heterogeneous population is multifactorial and more related to physical rather than psychological variables.

  6. Anthropometric characterisation of elbow angles and lines among Indian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanu Awasthi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: For understanding injuries in paediatric elbow and checking the degree of reduction after manipulation, various radiological criteria using anthropometric parameters are used. Since anthropometric parameters of Caucasians are different from European and Mongoloids, their parameters cannot be applied on our population. Hence, there is a need to characterise anthropometric parameters of elbow among children in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: The study population comprised all cases of injury to the elbow joint between 3 and 13 years of age reporting to the Department of Orthopaedics during the study. The X-rays films were preserved, and the angles and lines (as anthropometric parameters were drawn on the radiographs. Results: Mean ± (standard deviation [SD] for Baumann angle in children included in this study was 75° ± 4.70°. Mean ± (SD of Baumann angle in males was 76° ± 4.44° and females was 74° ± 5.37°. Mean ± (SD for lateral capitellohumeral angle in children from 3 to 13 years of age was 49 ± 5.75. Conclusions: As the values of normal side have been found to affect the functional and cosmetic outcome of the affected extremity, slight changes in values of our population in comparison to that of the Western population can significantly affect the outcome.

  7. Anthropometric and Cardiovascular Variables of Elite Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyselovičová Oľga

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Synchronized swimming and aerobic gymnastics are competitive sports that have grown in popularity throughout the Slovakia and around the world. Unfortunately, a paucity of research exists either on anthropometric and physiological characteristics or physical benefits of these sports. The present study examined anthropometric and cardiovascular characteristics of control group - CO (n = 10 in comparison to competitive synchronized swimmers - SS (n = 11 and aerobic gymnasts - AG (n = 10 between the ages of 13 and 25 years. The physical measures were assessed per the protocols in the following order: height (BH, weight (BW, body mass index (BMI, and % body fat (% BF. The measurements of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max and maximum heart rate (HRmax were examined by spiroergometry via COSMED K4b2. All measurements were collected by trained data collection staff. An analysis of variance (Kruskal - Wallis with a Mann-Whitney U test for the significant effect among the three groups showed that aerobic gymnasts were taller than synchronized swimmers and control group (p = .02. Training and conditioning requirements specific for the two athletic groups caused that AG and SS have higher level of VO2max (p = .02 and VO2max.kg-1 (p = .00, and also lower level of the body weight (p= .01, BMI (p = .01 and the % BF (p = .00. These findings confirm that selected parameters are considered the bases for success in elite sports. This information could also help to design specific training and evaluate the adaptation to training stimuli with the aim to maximize sport performance.

  8. Early anthropometric indices predict short stature and overweight status in a cohort of Peruvians in early adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Robie; Miranda, J Jaime; Gilman, Robert H; Cabrera, Lilia; Sterling, Charles R; Bern, Caryn; Checkley, William

    2014-01-01

    While childhood malnutrition is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, less well understood is how early childhood growth influences height and body composition later in life. We revisited 152 Peruvian children who participated in a birth cohort study between 1995 and 1998, and obtained anthropometric and bioimpedance measurements 11 to 14 years later. We used multivariable regression models to study the effects of childhood anthropometric indices on height and body composition in early adolescence. Each standard deviation decrease in length-for-age at birth was associated with a decrease in adolescent height-for-age of 0.7 SD in both boys and girls (all poverweight in early adolescence. Linear growth retardation in early childhood is a strong determinant of adolescent stature, indicating that, in developing countries, growth failure in height during early childhood persists through early adolescence. Interventions addressing linear growth retardation in childhood are likely to improve adolescent stature and related-health outcomes in adulthood. PMID:22552904

  9. Anthropometric data as predictors of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, José Antonio; Godoy, Luciana Ballester de Mello; Marquis, Valéria Wanderley Pinto Brandão; Sonego, Thiago Branco; Leal, Carolina de Farias Aires; Artico, Marina Spadari

    2011-01-01

    The Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome is a chronic disease characterized by episodes upper airway collapse, and has been associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity. To correlate the neck, abdominal and pelvic circumference with the AHI and oxyhemoglobin saturation in OSA patients, and to correlate these values with disease severity. A prospective descriptive study of 82 patients evaluated complaints suggesting OSA, from July 2008 to March 2010. All patients underwent polysomnography, an ENT clinical exam, measures of the BMI, abdominal, pelvic, and cervical circumferences. The mean, standard deviations and Spearman's correlations were analyzed. The mean AHI in men was 39 events/hr; in women it was 21 events/hr in women. The mean neck circumference was 34. 5 cm in women and 41. 3 cm in men, the mean abdominal circumference was 94. 3 cm in women and 101. 5 cm in men, and the pelvic circumference was 105. 7 cm in men and 108. 7 cm in women. The neck circumference correlated more closely to the AHI in men (r = + 0. 389 p = 0. 001). The relationship between the abdominal circumference correlated more with AHI than with the BMI in men (AbC r = + 0. 358 p = 0. 003 BMI r = + 0. 321 p = 0. 009). The neck circumference is the best anthropometric measurement of respiratory disorder severity compared to the AbC or the BMI.

  10. Use and interpretation of anthropometric indicators of nutritional status*

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Studies carried out during the last decade have led to a better understanding of the value of anthropometric indicators of nutritional status. The present report concentrates on data concerning 0-5-year-old children and examines the indices of weight and height and the biological significance of ”wasting” and ”stunting”. The need for a reference population as well as for a standard or target is recognized and the advantages and disadvantages of local versus international reference populations...

  11. Anthropometric history of the Iberian world. Lessons we have learned

    OpenAIRE

    José Miguel Martínez-Carrión

    2011-01-01

    Recent research of anthropometric history within the Iberian world shed new light on trends in nutritional status, health, living standards, and biological welfare since ancient times. It has been shown that nutrition was not worse during the middle Ages than at the beginning of modern times, and that the height of the Portuguese and Spaniards did not differ much from that enjoyed by other Europeans in the Age of Enlightenment. At the beginning of industrialization height deteriorated in both...

  12. Radio Astronomers Set New Standard for Accurate Cosmic Distance Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    estimate of the age of the universe. In order to do this, you need an unambiguous, absolute distance to another galaxy. We are pleased that the NSF's VLBA has for the first time determined such a distance, and thus provided the calibration standard astronomers have always sought in their quest for accurate distances beyond the Milky Way," said Morris Aizenman, Executive Officer of the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Division of Astronomical Sciences. "For astronomers, this measurement is the golden meter stick in the glass case," Aizenman added. The international team of astronomers used the VLBA to measure directly the motion of gas orbiting what is generally agreed to be a supermassive black hole at the heart of NGC 4258. The orbiting gas forms a warped disk, nearly two light-years in diameter, surrounding the black hole. The gas in the disk includes water vapor, which, in parts of the disk, acts as a natural amplifier of microwave radio emission. The regions that amplify radio emission are called masers, and work in a manner similar to the way a laser amplifies light emission. Determining the distance to NGC 4258 required measuring motions of extremely small shifts in position of these masers as they rotate around the black hole. This is equivalent to measuring an angle one ten-thousandth the width of a human hair held at arm's length. "The VLBA is the only instrument in the world that could do this," said Moran. "This work is the culmination of a 20-year effort at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics to measure distances to cosmic masers," said Irwin Shapiro, Director of that institution. Collection of the data for the NGC 4258 project was begun in 1994 and was part of Herrnstein's Ph.D dissertation at Harvard University. Previous observations with the VLBA allowed the scientists to measure the speed at which the gas is orbiting the black hole, some 39 million times more massive than the Sun. They did this by observing the amount of change in the

  13. Anthropometric measurements among four Asian countries in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nurul Izzah Abd Rahman

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... ... designing sound work- stations and facilities for the betterment of the industrial environment. .... adopted from the database published by a research working ..... cess in creating a safe and healthy environment for the elderly.

  14. Implementation of a consolidated, standardized database of environmental measurements data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, T.L.

    1996-10-01

    This report discusses the benefits of a consolidated and standardized database; reasons for resistance to the consolidation of data; implementing a consolidated database, including attempts at standardization, deciding what to include in the consolidated database, establishing lists of valid values, and addressing quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) issues; and the evolution of a consolidated database, which includes developing and training a user community, resolving configuration control issues, incorporating historical data, identifying emerging standards, and developing pointers to other data. OREIS is used to illustrate these topics

  15. New measurements of G using the measurement standards laboratory torsion balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, T.R.; Fitzgerald, M.P.

    2003-01-01

    This Letter presents the results of a series of measurements of the Newtonian gravitational constant G using the compensated torsion balance developed at the Measurement Standards Laboratory. Since our last published result using the torsion balance in the compensated mode of operation [Meas. Sci. Technol. 10, 439 (1999)], several improvements have been made to reduce the uncertainty in the final result. The new measurements have used both stainless steel and copper large masses. The values of G for the two sets of masses are in good agreement. After combining all of the measurements we get a value of G=6.673 87(0.000 27)x10 -11 m 3 kg -1 s -2 . This new value is 5 parts in 10 5 smaller than our previous published values

  16. ANTHROPOMETRICAL PROFILE AND BIO-MOTOR ABILITIES OF YOUNG ELITE WRESTLERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Jafari Rahmat

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study investigated the association between motor performance and somatic type, anthropometric, body composition, physiologic and physical fitness profile in young wrestlers. Material: 16 young wrestlers aging 16-19 with a 4-year-experience of taking part in national championships were selected for the study. Following the standard methods in the testing center of Alborz province some tests like aerobic power, muscular endurance, flexibility and agility speed tests and 1RM were taken to integrate the participants. Also, it should be noted that the participants’ height, weight, the girth of thigh, elbow, calf and arm and skin thickness were measured. Results: Somatotype, Somatotype Attitudinal Distance (SAD, Height Weight ratio (HWR were calculated according to Carter and Heath anthropometric method. Body Fat Percentage (%BF, HWR and SAD resulted in 10.90±1.64, 43.27±0.87 and 0.94±0.87 respectively. Somatotype Standard Deviation and mean regarding endomorphic, mesomorphic and ectomorphic components were 2.16±0.46, 5.20±0.77 and 2.88±0.64 respectively. Physiologically, wrestlers VO2MAX (kg/min were 49.31±4.22 and their Resting Heart Rate (bpm were 68.31±6.64. Conclusion: As the present study illustrates, Somatotype of the Endomorphs, Mesomorphs and Ectomorphs were the same. As a result, coaches can plan wrestlers’ training programs and review of techniques based on anthropometric and physiologic data driven from their sports performances.Besides, wrestlers could be well-informed about their performance. Moreover, aforesaid information could be beneficial to wrestling federations and all other organizations contributing the wrestling federation while holding talent identification programs and recognizing young wrestlers.

  17. A Standardized Generalized Dimensionality Discrepancy Measure and a Standardized Model-Based Covariance for Dimensionality Assessment for Multidimensional Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Roy; Xu, Yuning; Yel, Nedim; Svetina, Dubravka

    2015-01-01

    The standardized generalized dimensionality discrepancy measure and the standardized model-based covariance are introduced as tools to critique dimensionality assumptions in multidimensional item response models. These tools are grounded in a covariance theory perspective and associated connections between dimensionality and local independence.…

  18. The effect of gender on foot anthropometrics in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva de Castro, Alessandra; Rebelatto, Jose Rubens; Aurichio, Thais Rabiatti

    2011-08-01

    Some questions remain regarding the anthropometric differences between the feet of young men and women, but the gap is much greater when dealing with older adults. No studies were found concerning these differences in an exclusively older adult population, which makes it difficult to manufacture shoes based on the specific anthropometric measurements of the older adult population and according to gender differences. To identify differences between the anthropometric foot variables of older men and women. Cross-sectional. 154 older women (69.0 ± 6.8 y) and 131 older men (69.0 ± 6.5 y). The foot evaluations comprised the variables of width, perimeter, height, length, 1st and 5th metatarsophalangeal angles, the Arch Index (AI), and the Foot Posture Index (FPI). A data analysis was performed using t test and a post hoc power analysis. Women showed significantly higher values for the width and perimeter of the toes, width of the metatarsal heads, and width of the heel and presented significantly lower values for the height of the dorsal foot after normalization of the data to foot length. The 1st and 5th metatarsophalangeal angles were smaller in the men. There were no differences between men and women with respect to AI and FPI. Overall, the current study shows evidence of differences between some of the anthropometric foot variables of older men and women that must be taken into account for the manufacture of shoes for older adults.

  19. Body image and anthropometric indicators in adolescents living with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Rodrigo Augustemak de Lima

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare body image and anthropometric indicators among adolescents living with HIV and healthy adolescents (control group. In addition, we verified the associations of anthropometric indicators, infection/treatment, sexual maturity, and sociodemographic characteristics with body image in adolescents living with HIV. One hundred and eleven adolescents aged 10 to 15 years were divided into those living with HIV (n = 57 and a control group (n = 54. Body image was investigated using an eight-point body silhouette scale. Body weight, height, circumferences, and skinfolds were measured. Body image dissatisfaction was found in 54.4% of the adolescents living with HIV, with 38.6% of them wishing to increase their body size. Conversely, body image dissatisfaction was due to the desire to reduce body size in the control group (40.7%. No difference between the HIV and control groups was found for the anthropometric indicators analyzed. Gender (β = -0.52, age (β = 0.18, body weight (β = 0.07, body mass index (β = -0.19, and upper arm muscle area (β = -0.08 explained 42% of the variation in the body image score of adolescents living with HIV. Thinness is the main reason for body image dissatisfaction in adolescents living with HIV. Almost half the body dissatisfaction of adolescents living with HIV was explained by demographic and anthropometric variables.

  20. Medidas antropométricas como preditoras de fatores de risco cardiovascular na população urbana do Irã Anthropometric measures as predictors of cardiovascular disease risk factors in the urban population of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Gharakhanlou

    2012-02-01

    are an important public health problem in society, due to their association with various chronic diseases. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence and distribution of overweight and obesity, using different anthropometric measurements and to identify the best anthropometric indicator which is most closely related to cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors in an Iranian urban population. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted with 991 men and 1188 women aged 15 to 64 years. Body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, waist-to-height ratio (WHtR and percentage of body fat were measured. A fasting blood specimen was obtained. CVD risk factors, including fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol (Tchol, low-density (LDL-C and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C were assessed. RESULTS: Based on BMI, more than 49% of men and 53% of women were either overweight or obese with 10.2% of men and 18.6% of women being obese. In both men and women, the prevalence of overweight was greater among 40-49 year olds and the prevalence of obesity was greater among those 50+ years. Using the multiple regression analysis, BMI, WHtR and WHR explained the highest percentage of variation of triglycerides, Tchol/HDL-C ratio and LDL-C in men, respectively, whereas WHR explained the highest percentage of variation of triglycerides and WC explained the highest percentage of variation of Tchol/HDL-C ratio and LDL-C in women. CONCLUSION: Our data indicated that WHR and WHtR were the anthropometric indicators that best predicted CVD risk factors in men and WHR and WC in women.

  1. Exhaust Gas Temperature Measurements in Diagnostics of Turbocharged Marine Internal Combustion Engines Part I Standard Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korczewski Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the problem of diagnostic informativeness of exhaust gas temperature measurements in turbocharged marine internal combustion engines. Theoretical principles of the process of exhaust gas flow in turbocharger inlet channels are analysed in its dynamic and energetic aspects. Diagnostic parameters are defined which enable to formulate general evaluation of technical condition of the engine based on standard online measurements of the exhaust gas temperature. A proposal is made to extend the parametric methods of diagnosing workspaces in turbocharged marine engines by analysing time-histories of enthalpy changes of the exhaust gas flowing to the turbocompressor turbine. Such a time-history can be worked out based on dynamic measurements of the exhaust gas temperature, performed using a specially designed sheathed thermocouple.

  2. Effect of measurement conditions on three-dimensional roughness values, and development of measurement standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabre, A; Brenier, B; Raynaud, S

    2011-01-01

    Friction or corrosion behaviour, fatigue lifetime for mechanical components are influenced by their boundary and subsurface properties. The surface integrity is studied on mechanical component in order to improve the service behaviour of them. Roughness is one of the main geometrical properties, which is to be qualified and quantified. Components can be obtained using a complex process: forming, machining and treatment can be combined to realize parts with complex shape. Then, three-dimensional roughness is needed to characterize these parts with complex shape and textured surface. With contact or non-contact measurements (contact stylus, confocal microprobe, interferometer), three-dimensional roughness is quantified using the calculation of pertinent parameters defined by the international standard PR EN ISO 25178-2:2008. An analysis will identify the influence of measurement conditions on three-dimensional parameters. The purpose of this study is to analyse the variation of roughness results using contact stylus or optical apparatus. The second aim of this work is to develop a measurement standard well adapted to qualify the contact and non-contact apparatus.

  3. Crane cabins' interior space multivariate anthropometric modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essdai, Ahmed; Spasojević Brkić, Vesna K; Golubović, Tamara; Brkić, Aleksandar; Popović, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    Previous research has shown that today's crane cabins fail to meet the needs of a large proportion of operators. Performance and financial losses and effects on safety should not be overlooked as well. The first aim of this survey is to model the crane cabin interior space using up-to-date crane operator anthropometric data and to compare the multivariate and univariate method anthropometric models. The second aim of the paper is to define the crane cabin interior space dimensions that enable anthropometric convenience. To facilitate the cabin design, the anthropometric dimensions of 64 crane operators in the first sample and 19 more in the second sample were collected in Serbia. The multivariate anthropometric models, spanning 95% of the population on the basis of a set of 8 anthropometric dimensions, have been developed. The percentile method was also used on the same set of data. The dimensions of the interior space, necessary for the accommodation of the crane operator, are 1174×1080×1865 mm. The percentiles results for the 5th and 95th model are within the obtained dimensions. The results of this study may prove useful to crane cabin designers in eliminating anthropometric inconsistencies and improving the health of operators, but can also aid in improving the safety, performance and financial results of the companies where crane cabins operate.

  4. [Mobile Health: IEEE Standard for Wearable Cuffless Blood Pressure Measuring Devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xia; Wu, Wenli; Bao, Shudi

    2015-07-01

    IEEE Std 1708-2014 breaks through the traditional standards of cuff based blood pressure measuring devices and establishes a normative definition of wearable cuffless blood pressure measuring devices and the objective performance evaluation of this kind of devices. This study firstly introduces the background of the new standard. Then, the standard details will be described, and the impact of cuffless blood pressure measuring devices with the new standard on manufacturers and end users will be addressed.

  5. Biopolitcs and education. Measurement, standardization and regularisation of the population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geo SAURA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes scholar standardized testing as a dispositif of educational biopolitics. It describes a theoretical review of biopolitics, an analytic of power of the economic agencies that legitimize global education policies and a socio- technical mapping of teacher control technologies. The dispositif of educational biopolitics causes the legitimizing of disciplinary logic in students, along with the perpetuation of dividing lines (normality/abnormality and the hegemony of standardization as regularization of population sets. The effects brought about in teachers are presented with in-depth interviews of empirical research, including two qualities: «comparability», of which the characteristics are computing/center and relationship with everything, and «dividuality» where the properties are competitiveness and subjection.

  6. Practical estimation of the uncertainty of analytical measurement standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, R.J.B.; Elbers, I.J.W.; Klijnstra, M.D.; Stolker, A.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, a lot of time and resources are used to determine the quality of goods and services. As a consequence, the quality of measurements themselves, e.g., the metrological traceability of the measured quantity values is essential to allow a proper evaluation of the results with regard to

  7. Standard guide for making quality nondestructive assay measurements

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This guide is a compendium of Quality Measurement Practices for performing measurements of radioactive material using nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments. The primary purpose of the guide is to assist users in arriving at quality NDA results, that is, results that satisfy the end user’s needs. This is accomplished by providing an acceptable and uniform basis for the collection, analysis, comparison, and application of data. The recommendations are not compulsory or prerequisites to achieving quality NDA measurements, but are considered contributory in most areas. 1.2 This guide applies to the use of NDA instrumentation for the measurement of nuclear materials by the observation of spontaneous or stimulated nuclear radiations, including photons, neutrons, or the flow of heat. Recommended calibration, operating, and assurance methods represent guiding principles based on current NDA technology. The diversity of industry-wide nuclear materials measurement applications and instrumentation precludes disc...

  8. Standards for chemical or NDA measurements for nuclear safeguards: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, C.D.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of various materials from all parts of the fuel cycle are required to be traceable to a national measurement system, primarily through standards. The availability of the standards is discussed, for nondestructive as well as destructive chemical analysis. Needs for improved standards (reference materials) and lowered uncertainty are discussed

  9. Damage measurement of structural material by electron backscatter diffraction. Quantification of measurement quality toward standardization of measurement procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    process, almost identical local misorientations distributions were obtained under different measurement conditions. Finally, for standardization of the measurement procedure of the local misorientation, present knowledge and points to note about measurements were summarized. (author)

  10. Measurement standards and the general problem of reference points in chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, W.; Dube, G.

    2002-01-01

    Besides the measurement standards available in general metrology in the form of the realisations of the units of measurement, measurement standards of chemical composition are needed for the vast field of chemical measurement (measurements of the chemical composition), because it is the main aim of such measurements to quantify non-isolated substances, often in complicated matrices, to which the 'classical' measurement standards and their lower- level derivatives are not directly applicable. At present, material artefacts as well as standard measurement devices serve as chemical measurement standards. These are measurement standards in the full metrological sense only, however, if they are firmly linked to the SI unit in which the composition represented by the standard is expressed. This requirement has the consequence that only a very restricted number of really reliable chemical measurement standards exist at present. Since it is very difficult and time consuming to increase this number substantially and, on the other hand, reliable reference points are increasingly needed for all kinds of chemical measurements, primary methods of measurement and high-level reference measurements will play an increasingly important role for the establishment of worldwide comparability and hence mutual acceptance of chemical measurement results. (author)

  11. Relationship between Anthropometric Indices and Dyslipidemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship between Anthropometric Indices and Dyslipidemia among Sudanese ... correlation was detected between waist circumference and total cholesterol. ... lipoprotein, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, and TC: HDL, while no ...

  12. comparative analysis of anthropometric dimensions of male

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    workplaces keeping in view of the anthropometric data ... ergonomics is the science of fitting work to the users; instead of forcing the ..... The weighing balance was used for body ..... Research Institute of Human Engineering for Quality Life. 1994.

  13. Relationship between Zinc Levels and Anthropometric Indices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-24

    Jan 24, 2018 ... Keywords: Anthropometric indices, female children, serum zinc, sickle cell anemia. Relationship ... with SCA have reduced weight, height, and BMI when compared with their .... to low self‑esteem and depression. There is ...

  14. New g-2 measurement deviates further from Standard Model

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "The latest result from an international collaboration of scientists investigating how the spin of a muon is affected as this type of subatomic particle moves through a magnetic field deviates further than previous measurements from theoretical predictions" (1 page).

  15. Standards for measurements and testing of wind turbine power quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, P [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Gerdes, G; Klosse, R; Santjer, F [DEWI, Wilhelmshaven (Germany); Robertson, N; Davy, W [NEL, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Koulouvari, M; Morfiadakis, E [CRES, Pikermi (Greece); Larsson, Aa [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1999-03-01

    The present paper describes the work done in power quality sub-task of the project `European Wind Turbine Testing Procedure Developments` funded by the EU SMT program. The objective of the power quality sub-task has been to make analyses and new recommendation(s) for the standardisation of measurement and verification of wind turbine power quality. The work has been organised in three major activities. The first activity has been to propose measurement procedures and to verify existing and new measurement procedures. This activity has also involved a comparison of the measurements and data processing of the participating partners. The second activity has been to investigate the influence of terrain, grid properties and wind farm summation on the power quality of wind turbines with constant rotor speed. The third activity has been to investigate the influence of terrain, grid properties and wind farm summation on the power quality of wind turbines with variable rotor speed. (au)

  16. [FRC measurement in intensive care patients. A definition of standards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauer, H J; Lorenz, B A; Kox, W J

    1998-10-01

    Determination of Functional Residual Capacity (FRC) can be performed through washout methods, indicator gas dilution or bodyplethysmography. Some of these techniques have been adapted for use in intensive care patients whilst being mechanically ventilated. However, most measurement setups are bulky, cumbersome to use and their running costs are high. Hence FRC measurement has not become a routine method in intensive care although it offers considerable advantages in the management of ventilated patients such as the determination of "best PEEP", the detection of progressive alveolar collapse in the course of acute lung injury and during weaning from mechanical ventilation. Up to now most efforts to improve and simplify FRC measurement were made at the expense of accuracy. An ideal method ought to be accurate, easy to handle and cost-effective. It should supply not only FRC data but also information about intrapulmonary gas distribution and dead space. These demands can be met using modern data acquisition software. The pros and cons of all methods available for FRC measurement are discussed in view of their suitability for intensive care patients. A conventional nitrogen washout using emission spectroscopy for measurement of nitrogen concentration gives satisfying exact values for the determination of the parameters mentioned above. The measurement error can be lowered under 5% by special corrections for flow and nitrogen signal (delay and rise times, changes of gas viscosity). For flow measurement a normal pneumotachograph can be used. Using a laptop computer for data acquisition the bed-side monitor fulfills most of the demands in intensive care. It is then also possible to measure indices of intrapulmonary gas distribution such as Alveolar Mixing Efficiency and Lung Clearance Index.

  17. Secondary standard neutron detector for measuring total reaction cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekharan, K.K.; Laumer, H.; Gabbard, F.

    1975-01-01

    A neutron detector has been constructed and calibrated for the accurate measurement of total neutron-production cross sections. The detector consists of a polyethylene sphere of 24'' diameter in which 8- 10 BF 3 counters have been installed radially. The relative efficiency of this detector has been determined for average neutron energies, from 30 keV to 1.5 MeV by counting neutrons from 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be. By adjusting the radial positions of the BF 3 counters in the polyethylene sphere the efficiency for neutron detection was made nearly constant for this energy range. Measurement of absolute efficiency for the same neutron energy range has been done by counting the neutrons from 51 V(p,n) 51 Cr and 57 Fe(p,n) 57 Co reactions and determining the absolute number of residual nuclei produced during the measurement of neutron yield. Details of absolute efficiency measurements and the use of the detector for measurement of total neutron yields from neutron producing reactions such as 23 Na(p,n) 23 Mg are given

  18. Using quasars as standard clocks for measuring cosmological redshift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, De-Chang; Starkman, Glenn D; Stojkovic, Branislav; Stojkovic, Dejan; Weltman, Amanda

    2012-06-08

    We report hitherto unnoticed patterns in quasar light curves. We characterize segments of the quasar's light curves with the slopes of the straight lines fit through them. These slopes appear to be directly related to the quasars' redshifts. Alternatively, using only global shifts in time and flux, we are able to find significant overlaps between the light curves of different pairs of quasars by fitting the ratio of their redshifts. We are then able to reliably determine the redshift of one quasar from another. This implies that one can use quasars as standard clocks, as we explicitly demonstrate by constructing two independent methods of finding the redshift of a quasar from its light curve.

  19. Anthropometric and physical fitness characteristics of young male soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Andrews Portes

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine anthropometric and physical fitnesscharacteristics of Brazilian male children and adolescents at the beginning of soccer training. Inthis study, 282 male soccer players ranging in age from 10 to 13 years were evaluated. The athletesparticipated in a formal soccer training program 3 times per week, with each training lasting 3hours. Anthropometric and physical fitness parameters were obtained. The boys were divided intoage classes and prevalence data were analyzed using Pearson’s chi-square test. Parametric datawere compared by one-way ANOVA or the Kruskal-Wallis test, when necessary. The resultsare expressed as the mean ± standard deviation and a p value <0.05 was considered to be significant.Growth, development, body adiposity and physical fitness characteristics were adequateand proportional to age among the boys studied (p<0.05. It was concluded that anthropometricand physical fitness characteristics of young male elite soccer players improve with and areproportional to age. Children and adolescents greatly benefit from regular physical activity. Thepresent results show that young male soccer players present adequate anthropometric conditionsand physical fitness prior to the initiation of formal training at soccer clubs.

  20. Standard guide for high-temperature static strain measurement

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1998-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers the selection and application of strain gages for the measurement of static strain up to and including the temperature range from 425 to 650°C (800 to 1200°F). This guide reflects some current state-of-the-art techniques in high temperature strain measurement, and will be expanded and updated as new technology develops. 1.2 This practice assumes that the user is familiar with the use of bonded strain gages and associated signal conditioning and instrumentation as discussed in Refs. (1) and (2). The strain measuring systems described are those that have proven effective in the temperature range of interest and were available at the time of issue of this practice. It is not the intent of this practice to limit the user to one of the gage types described nor is it the intent to specify the type of system to be used for a specific application. However, in using any strain measuring system including those described, the proposer must be able to demonstrate the capability of the proposed sy...

  1. Standardized voluntary force measurement in a lower extremity rehabilitation robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolliger Marc

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isometric force measurements in the lower extremity are widely used in rehabilitation of subjects with neurological movement disorders (NMD because walking ability has been shown to be related to muscle strength. Therefore muscle strength measurements can be used to monitor and control the effects of training programs. A new method to assess isometric muscle force was implemented in the driven gait orthosis (DGO Lokomat. To evaluate the capabilities of this new measurement method, inter- and intra-rater reliability were assessed. Methods Reliability was assessed in subjects with and without NMD. Subjects were tested twice on the same day by two different therapists to test inter-rater reliability and on two separate days by the same therapist to test intra-rater reliability. Results Results showed fair to good reliability for the new measurement method to assess isometric muscle force of lower extremities. In subjects without NMD, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC for inter-rater reliability ranged from 0.72 to 0.97 and intra-rater reliability from 0.71 to 0.90. In subjects with NMD, ICC ranged from 0.66 to 0.97 for inter-rater and from 0.50 to 0.96 for intra-rater reliability. Conclusion Inter- and intra- rater reliability of an assessment method for measuring maximal voluntary isometric muscle force of lower extremities was demonstrated. We suggest that this method is a valuable tool for documentation and controlling of the rehabilitation process in patients using a DGO.

  2. Advisory Committee for the Calibration Standards of Ionizing Radiation Measurement: Section 3. Neutron measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Section III (Mesures neutroniques) of the Comite Consultatif pour les Etalons de Mesure des Rayonnements Ionisants held its fifth meeting in May 1981. Recent work carried out at BIPM in the field of neutron measurements was reported. The status of a full-scale 252 Cf neutron source intercomparison (10 7 s - 1 ) and of several restricted comparisons was discussed. Intercomparisons of fast neutron fluence rates are in progress ( 115 In(n,n') 115 Insup(m); NB/Zr) or will take place in the near future ( 115 n(n,#betta#) 116 Insup(m); 235 U and 238 U fission chambers). An intercomparison of neutron dosimetry standards by circulating tissue-equivalent ion chambers will be prepared and organized by BIPM. Finally, there was a broad exchange of information on work in progress at the various laboratories represented at the meeting [fr

  3. Analysis of the most relevant anthropometric dimensions for school furniture selection based on a study with students from one Chilean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellucci, H I; Arezes, P M; Molenbroek, J F M

    2015-01-01

    Most of the worldwide standards used for furniture selection suggest the use of the Stature of the school children, assuming that all the other anthropometric characteristics will also be appropriate. However, it is important to consider that students' growth differ with age. The aim of this study is to determine if Popliteal Height can be used as a better, or more adequate, measure for classroom furniture selection when comparing with Stature. This study involved a representative group of 3046 students from the Valparaíso Region, in Chile. Regarding the methodology, eight anthropometric measures were gathered, as well as six furniture dimensions from the Chilean standard. After assigning the level of school furniture using Stature and Popliteal Height to each of the students, six mismatch equations were applied. The results show that when using Popliteal Height, higher levels of match were obtained for the two more important furniture dimensions. Additionally, it also presents a better cumulative fit than Stature. In conclusion, it seems that Popliteal Height can be the most accurate anthropometric measure for classroom furniture selection purposes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Guidelines for Member States concerning radiation measurement standards and Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In the early nineteen-sixties an acute need developed for higher dosimetric accuracy in radiation therapy, particularly in developing countries. This need led to the establishment of a number of dosimetry laboratories around the world, specializing in the calibration of radiation therapy dosimeters. In order to co-ordinate the provision of guidance and assistance to such laboratories, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) set up a Network of Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) under their joint aegis, as described in the IAEA booklet 'SSDLs: Development and Trends' (1985). This publication includes detailed criteria for the establishment of these laboratories. The present guidelines deal with the functions and status of SSDLs, in particular with the need for recognition and support by the competent national authorities. (author)

  5. Standardization of test conditions for gamma camera performance measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, K.

    1980-01-01

    The actual way of measuring gamma camera performance is to use point sources or flood sources in air, often in combination with bar phantoms. This method mostly brings best performance parameters for cameras but it has nothing in common with the use of a camera in clinical practice. Particular in the case of low energy emitters, like Tc-99m, the influence of scattered radiation over the performance of cameras is very high. Therefore it is important to have test conditions of radionuclide imaging devices, that will approach as best as practicable the measuring conditions in clinical applications. It is therefore a good news that the International Electrochemical Commission IEC has prepared a draft 'Characteristics and test conditions of radionuclide imaging devices' which is now submitted to the national committees for formal approval under the Six Months' Rule. Some essential points of this document are discussed in the paper. (orig.) [de

  6. Standardization of test conditions for gamma camera performance measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, K.

    1982-02-01

    The way of measuring gamma camera performance is to use point sources or flood sources in air, often in combination with bar phantoms. This method has nothing in common with the use of a camera in clinical practice. Particularly in the case of low energy emitters, like Tc-99m, the influence of scattered radiation over the performance of cameras is very high. The IEC document 'Characteristics and test conditions of radionuclide imaging devices' is discussed

  7. Deuterium lamps as transfer standards for spectral radiance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, P.J.; Nettleton, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the work carried out at NPL and PTB to improve the performance of a low pressure deuterium discharge lamp, so that it can be used as a transfer standard in the spectral range 120 to 350 nm. To this end it was necessary: - to replace the original quartz windows by magnesium fluoride single crystal plates, which were cut perpendicular to the c-axis of the crystal and which had to be free of impurities, - to construct the lamps in that way that the directional uniformity of the emitted radiation is within the demands, - to age the lamps and to preselect only those of which the irradiance was stable within ± 1% during a thirty minute period after warm-up, - to improve the commercially available electrical power supply to meet the operational needs of the lamps. Thus, the deuterium lamps drifted by about 3% over a period of 100 h at all wavelengths except at 250 nm, where the ageing increased to 4.5%. A liquid nitrogen trap has been developed which can be installed between the vacuum system and the lamp. This reduced to about 2% the decrease of the window's transmission during the first hour of operation, caused by the deposition of oil from the vacuum system

  8. Nutritional Status and Anthropometric Indices in High School Girls in Ilam, West Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jamalikandazi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adolescence is one of the most challenging periods for human growth and nutritional status. The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional status and anthropometric indices in high school girls in Ilam. Methods. This cross-sectional study was performed on 360 domestic high school girl students chosen randomly by cluster sampling. Data were gathered through interviews performed by a dietitian to fill 24-hour dietary recall and food frequency and demographic questionnaires. Then we performed the anthropometric measurements and we compared the results with CDC2000 standards. We analyzed our data by N4 food analyzer and SPSS16 software. Results. The prevalence of obesity and overweight was 5% and 10.8%, respectively. Simultaneously, the prevalence of underweight was 20.2%. The prevalence of stunting was 5.8%. We also showed that 50% of high school girls in Ilam suffered from severe food insecurity, 14.7% suffered from mild insecurity, and 4.7% get extra energy from foods. Food analysis showed that micronutrients such as zinc, iron, calcium, folate, fiber, magnesium, and vitamin B12 were less than what is recommended by the RDA. Conclusion. Undernutrition and overnutrition are completely prevalent among girls studied in Ilam. This needs further acts and investigations in the field and more nutritional and health educations.

  9. Anthropometric and functional characteristics of Colombian elite long-distance runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the anthropometric and physical performance characteristics of elite long-distance runners. Methods: A cross-sectional study in 19 male competitive long-distance runners of national level (age 28.2 ± 6.9 years. A total of 24 anthropometric variables were measured according to the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (ISAK statements. The Heath-Carter method and the formula proposed by Siri, Matiegka, Jackson and Pollock were used to calculate the somatotype and the body composition, respectively. Ergospirometry VO (2 max, Vertical Jump Test and the Wingate Test were used as functional indicators. Results: Regarding body composition, we found fat mass percentage 13.3 ± 3.2; muscle mass 47.3 ± 2.5%, and body adiposity index 24.1 ± 3.3. Somatotype profile was the mesomorphic-balanced (3.6-4.0-2.1. Mean values of functional tests with their standard deviations were: VO(2 máx (mL•kg-1•min-1 42.6 ± 8.1; anaerobic power 106.0 ± 31.8 kg•s-1, and anaerobic capacity 6501.0 ± 1831.6 K/jul. Conclusion: These results may provide a profile of long-distance runners that can be used as training targets for developing athletes. The results may also provide information for training and tactical emphasis.

  10. The nutritional and anthropometric status of Gaelic football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Sue; Collins, Kieran

    2003-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dietary intakes and anthropometric profiles of county and club Gaelic football players and compare them to soccer players and control subjects. Seven-day dietary records were analyzed and anthropometric measurements were taken midway through the Gaelic football competitive season. The county group with a mean height of 1.82 +/- 0.04 m were significantly taller (p soccer players and 159 +/- 8 kJ x kg(-1) x day(-1) for the controls, with 57 +/- 4% and 44.9 +/- 5% of their energy from carbohydrate. The nature of Gaelic football demands a balanced diet, rich in energy and carbohydrate and with adequate calcium is consumed; the subjects needed to increase these dietary components in order to meet the energetic demands of competition and training. Additional nutritional counseling was provided on an individual basis.

  11. Gamma-ray measurements for uranium enrichment standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, T.D.

    1979-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectroscopic measurement of uranium enrichment is one of the most widely used nondestructive analysis techniques. A study has been started of the precision and accuracy achievable with this technique and the physical parameters which affect it. The study was prompted by questions raised during the ongoing ESARDA-NBS experiment to produce uranium oxide reference counting materials for the technique. Results reported using a high-quality Ge(Li) spectrometer system show reproducibility comparable to that attainable with mass spectrometry

  12. Standardizing measurement, sampling and reporting for public exposure assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochedo, Elaine R.R. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Salvador Allende s/No. CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: elaine@ird.gov.br

    2008-11-15

    UNSCEAR assesses worldwide public exposure from natural and man-made sources of ionizing radiation based on information submitted to UNSCEAR by United Nations Member States and from peer reviewed scientific literature. These assessments are used as a basis for radiation protection programs of international and national regulatory and research organizations. Although UNSCEAR describes its assessment methodologies, the data are based on various monitoring approaches. In order to reduce uncertainties and improve confidence in public exposure assessments, it would be necessary to harmonize the methodologies used for sampling, measuring and reporting of environmental results.

  13. Measurement, Standards, and Peer Benchmarking: One Hospital's Journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Brian S; Arbore, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Peer-to-peer benchmarking is an important component of rapid-cycle performance improvement in patient safety and quality-improvement efforts. Institutions should carefully examine critical success factors before engagement in peer-to-peer benchmarking in order to maximize growth and change opportunities. Solutions for Patient Safety has proven to be a high-yield engagement for Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, with measureable improvement in both organizational process and culture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Anthropometric characteristics and motor abilities in 13-15 year old female volleyball players

    OpenAIRE

    Nešić, Goran; Majstorović, Nikola; Sikimić, Milan; Marković, Srđan; Ilić, Dejan; Grbić, Vladimir; Osmankač, Nedžad; Savić, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this research was to determine whether there is a difference in the manifestation of measured anthropometric characteristics and tested motor abilities of female volleyball players that are 13-15 years old. The sample of participants consists of 62 female volleyball players divided into three groups according to their age. The sample of variables has two sub-samples: 18 variables belonging to anthropometric space and 14 variables belonging to the space of motor skills. A variance ...

  15. Measuring the benefits of open standards standards : Beyond the motion Gerkens and the Dutch Court of Audit report1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egyedi, T.M.; Enserink, B.

    2013-01-01

    In 2010 the Dutch Parliament (motion Gerkens) requested the Court of Audit to measure the benefits of using open standards and open source software for government IT. In its report of 2011 the Dutch Court of Audit concluded that there were hardly any benefits to be gained. The Court's underlying

  16. Canyon air flow measurement utilizing ASME standard pitot tube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncrief, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Savannah River Site produces nuclear materials for national defense. In addition to nuclear reactors, the site has separation facilities for reprocessing irradiated nuclear fuel. The chemical separation of highly radioactive materials takes place by remote control in large buildings called canyons. Personnel in these buildings are shielded from radiation by thick concrete walls. Contaminated air is exhausted from the canyons and contaminants are removed by sand filters prior to release to the atmosphere through a stack. When these facilities were built on a crash basis in the early 1950's, inadequate means were provided for pressure and air flow measurement. This presentation describes the challenge we faced in retrofitting a highly radioactive, heavily shielded facility with instrumentation to provide this capability

  17. 38 CFR 21.7672 - Measurement of courses not leading to a standard college degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... not leading to a standard college degree. 21.7672 Section 21.7672 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... Assistance for Members of the Selected Reserve Course Assessment § 21.7672 Measurement of courses not leading to a standard college degree. (a) Overview. (1) Courses not leading to a standard college degree may...

  18. Accuracy of height estimation and tidal volume setting using anthropometric formulas in an ICU Caucasian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'her, Erwan; Martin-Babau, Jérôme; Lellouche, François

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of patients' height is essential for daily practice in the intensive care unit. However, actual height measurements are unavailable on a daily routine in the ICU and measured height in the supine position and/or visual estimates may lack consistency. Clinicians do need simple and rapid methods to estimate the patients' height, especially in short height and/or obese patients. The objectives of the study were to evaluate several anthropometric formulas for height estimation on healthy volunteers and to test whether several of these estimates will help tidal volume setting in ICU patients. This was a prospective, observational study in a medical intensive care unit of a university hospital. During the first phase of the study, eight limb measurements were performed on 60 healthy volunteers and 18 height estimation formulas were tested. During the second phase, four height estimates were performed on 60 consecutive ICU patients under mechanical ventilation. In the 60 healthy volunteers, actual height was well correlated with the gold standard, measured height in the erect position. Correlation was low between actual and calculated height, using the hand's length and width, the index, or the foot equations. The Chumlea method and its simplified version, performed in the supine position, provided adequate estimates. In the 60 ICU patients, calculated height using the simplified Chumlea method was well correlated with measured height (r = 0.78; ∂ ventilation, alternative anthropometric methods to obtain patient's height based on lower leg and on forearm measurements could be useful to facilitate the application of protective mechanical ventilation in a Caucasian ICU population. The simplified Chumlea method is easy to achieve in a bed-ridden patient and provides accurate height estimates, with a low bias.

  19. Standard test method for measurement of fatigue crack growth rates

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of fatigue crack growth rates from near-threshold to Kmax controlled instability. Results are expressed in terms of the crack-tip stress-intensity factor range (ΔK), defined by the theory of linear elasticity. 1.2 Several different test procedures are provided, the optimum test procedure being primarily dependent on the magnitude of the fatigue crack growth rate to be measured. 1.3 Materials that can be tested by this test method are not limited by thickness or by strength so long as specimens are of sufficient thickness to preclude buckling and of sufficient planar size to remain predominantly elastic during testing. 1.4 A range of specimen sizes with proportional planar dimensions is provided, but size is variable to be adjusted for yield strength and applied force. Specimen thickness may be varied independent of planar size. 1.5 The details of the various specimens and test configurations are shown in Annex A1-Annex A3. Specimen configurations other than t...

  20. GENETIC VARIATION IN THE BETA-3-ADRENORECEPTOR GENE (TRP64ARG POLYMORPHISM) AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON ANTHROPOMETRIC PARAMETERS AND INSULIN RESISTANCE AFTER A HIGH PROTEIN/LOW CARBOHYDRATE VERSUS A STANDARD HYPOCALORIC DIET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis, Daniel Antonio; Aller, Rocío; Izaola, Olatz; de la Fuente, Beatriz; Romero, Enrique

    2015-08-01

    the Trp64Arg variant in Beta receptor has been reported to be associated with increased body weight and insulin resistance Objective: the aim of our study was to investigate the influence of polymorphism (rs 4994) in Beta-3-adrenergic receptor gene on metabolic response and weight loss in a medium-term intervention study secondary's to a high protein/low carbohydrate vs. a standard hypocaloric diets (1000 kcal/day). a population of 284 obese subjects was analyzed in a randomized trial. A nutritional evaluation was performed at the beginning and at the end of a 9-month period in which subjects received 1 of 2 diets (diet HP: high protein/low carbohydrate vs diet S: standard diet). there were no significant differences between the positive effects (on weight, BMI, waist circumference, fat mass, systolic blood pressure and leptin levels) in either genotype group with both diets. With both diets and only in wild genotype (diet HP vs diet S), total cholesterol (-10.1 ± 3.9 mg/dl vs -10.1 ± 2.2 mg/dl;p>0.05), LDL cholesterol (-9.5 ± 2.1 mg/dl vs -8.5 ± 2.3 mg/dl;p>0.05) and triglycerides (-19.1 ± 2.1 mg/dl vs -14.3 ± 2.1 mg/dl;p>0.05) decreased. The improvement in these parameters was similar in subjects with diet HP than HS. With diet HP and only in wild genotype, insulin levels (-3.7 ± 1.9 UI/L;phypocaloric diets is the greatest in subjects with normal homozygous beta 3-AR gene. Improvement in total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, insulin and HOMA-R levels is better than in the heterozygous group. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  1. Motor abilities and anthropometrics in youth cross-country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöggl, R; Müller, E; Stöggl, T

    2015-02-01

    The purposes were to validate whether general motor abilities and anthropometrics are determinants of youth cross-country (XC) skiing performance; evaluate gender-specific differences; and to establish noninvasive diagnostics. Fifty-one youth XC skiers (34 boys; 13.8 ± 0.6 years and 17 girls; 13.4 ± 0.9 years) performed motor skill and laboratory tests, and anthropometric data were collected and correlated with XC skiing performance. Anthropometrics and maturity status were related to boys but not to girls XC skiing performance. Push-ups and 20-m sprint were correlated to XC skiing performance in both boys and girls. XC skiing performance of boys was predominantly influenced by upper body and trunk strength capacities (medicine ball throw, push-ups, and pull-ups) and jumping power (standing long and triple jump), whereas XC skiing of girls was mainly influenced by aerobic capacities (3000-m run). Laboratory measures did not reveal greater correlations to XC skiing performance compared with simple test concepts of speed, strength, and endurance. Maturity was a major confounding variable in boys but not girls. Use of noninvasive simple test concepts for determination of upper body strength, speed, and endurance represent practicable support for ski clubs, schools, or skiing federations in the guidance and evaluation of young talent, being aware of the effect of maturity especially in boys. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Physical fitness and anthropometric profile of mixed martial arts athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Ferreira Marinho

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the physical fitness and anthropometric profile of mixed martial arts (MMA athletes and the correlations between these variables.Subjects and methods: Thirteen male MMA athletes (30 ± 4 years-old participated in this study. They were submitted to anthropometric measurements and the following tests: adapted flexitest, sit-ups, push-ups, long jump, flexed arm hang, 1RM bench press and squat.Results: Main results are as follows: body mass (kg: 82.1 ± 10.9; body fat (%: 11.87 ± 5.11; flexibility (score: 18.38 ± 4.07; sit-ups (rep: 43 ± 11; push-ups (rep: 41 ± 9; long jump (m: 2.19 ± 0.25; flexed arm hang (s: 34 ± 11, 1RM bench- press (kg: 76 ± 23; 1RM squat (kg: 73 ± 15. Furthermore we observed results showed significant correlations between anthropometric variables and physical fitness: body fat and long jump (R = -0.75; body fat and flexed arm hang (R= -0.67; height and squat 1RM (R = 0.67; arm circumference and bench press 1RM (R = 0.77.Conclusion: MMA athletes involved in this investigation have showed poor neuromuscular performance. Body fat was negatively correlated with both power and strength endurance performance, while arm circumference was positively related to upper body maximum strength.

  3. Anthropometric and motor performance profile of elite futsal athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademar Avelar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2008v10n1p76 The purpose of the present study was to identify the anthropometric and motor performance profi le of futsal (indoor soccer athletes in the second and third-placed teams in the Parana state championships (Brazil. Anthropometric(body mass, stature and skinfolds thickness and motor performance (modified abdominal test, shuttle run, race of 30 m and 40 s measures were obtained from twenty-seven male athletes (24.7 ± 6.4 years; 73.6 ± 7.6 kg; 174.8 ± 6.6 cm. For data analysis, athletes were grouped according to game positions. ANOVA one-way was used for comparisons between different positions, followed by Scheffé’s post hoc test, with p < 0.05. Signifi cant differences were detected in body mass (midfielder < goalkeeper, p < 0.01, stature (midfielder < forward and goalkeeper, p < 0.01 and lean body mass (midfi elder < goalkeeper, p < 0.01. No significant differences in motor performance were detected between the athletes studied. The results of this study show that futsal athletes playing in different positions exhibit similar anthropometric and motor performance, in the majority of variables.

  4. First among Others? Cohen's "d" vs. Alternative Standardized Mean Group Difference Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahan, Sorel; Gamliel, Eyal

    2011-01-01

    Standardized effect size measures typically employed in behavioral and social sciences research in the multi-group case (e.g., [eta][superscript 2], f[superscript 2]) evaluate between-group variability in terms of either total or within-group variability, such as variance or standard deviation--that is, measures of dispersion about the mean. In…

  5. 48 CFR 9904.412 - Cost accounting standard for composition and measurement of pension cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... accounting standard for composition and measurement of pension cost. ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost accounting standard for composition and measurement of pension cost. 9904.412 Section 9904.412 Federal Acquisition...

  6. 38 CFR 21.7670 - Measurement of courses leading to a standard, undergraduate college degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Measurement of courses leading to a standard, undergraduate college degree. 21.7670 Section 21.7670 Pensions, Bonuses, and... leading to a standard, undergraduate college degree. Except as provided in § 21.7672, VA will measure a...

  7. Method for Estimating Evaporative Potential (IM/CLO) from ASTM Standard Single Wind Velocity Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-10

    IM/CLO) FROM ASTM STANDARD SINGLE WIND VELOCITY MEASURES DISCLAIMER The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the...USARIEM TECHNICAL REPORT T16-14 METHOD FOR ESTIMATING EVAPORATIVE POTENTIAL (IM/CLO) FROM ASTM STANDARD SINGLE WIND VELOCITY... ASTM STANDARD SINGLE WIND VELOCITY MEASURES Adam W. Potter Biophysics and Biomedical Modeling Division U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental

  8. Handgrip strength and its relation with anthropometric parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Luís Fischer Eichinger

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The handgrip strength (HS is related to ADL, when reduced can lead to significant functional limitations. Its measurement allows estimating the strength general state and is a health indicator. Objective: Analyze the correlation between HS and anthropometry in box genders. Methods: This is a descriptive correlational study with 100 healthy individuals, aged between 17 and 40 years, 50 men, mean age 28.0 years (± 7.0 and 50 women, mean age 23 years (± 4.2. We evaluated HS and forearm, wrist and hand perimeter. Statistical analyzes were obtained using means, standard deviations and Pearson Correlation Test. Results: Compared to women, men had higher HS mean values on both sides. Men showed 49.0 kgf (± 8.3 on the right and 46.0 kgf (± 8.5 on the left side; while women showed 26.0 kgf (± 5.4 on the right side and 24.0 kgf (± 5.3 on the left side. Discussion: The hand perimeter was the only anthropometric data that showed a significant correlation with the HS in both genders. The forearm and wrist perimeter was only significant in men, with a slight difference between the sides; the right side prevails over the left. Although women showed no significant correlations with the HS it was noted discrepancy of force in relation to laterality, with a predominance of HS on the right side. Conclusions: We conclude that there is a correlation between HS and anthropometry, and that laterality and gender are factors influencing HS.

  9. Anthropometric indices of failure to thrive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynor, P.; Rudolf, M.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To compare five anthropometric methods of classifying failure to thrive in order to ascertain their relative merits in predicting developmental, dietary, and eating problems.
METHODS—The five anthropometric methods were compared in 83 children with failure to thrive.
RESULTS—The methods were inconsistent in classification of severity, and no one method was superior in predicting problems.
CONCLUSIONS—Weight alone, being the simplest, is still the most reasonable marker for failure to thrive and associated problems.

 PMID:10799424

  10. Determinants of child anthropometric indicators in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Davod; Amarnani, Ekta; Sen, Akankasha; Ebadi, Narges; Cortbaoui, Patrick; Melgar-Quiñonez, Hugo

    2018-05-15

    Malnutrition is one of the major contributors to child mortality in Ethiopia. Currently established, child nutrition status is assessed by four anthropometric indicators. However, there are other factors affecting children's anthropometric statuses. Thus, the main objective of this paper is to explore some of the determinants of child anthropometric indicators in Ethiopia. Data from GROW (the Growing Nutrition for Mothers and Children), a survey including 1261 mothers and 1261 children was carried out in Ethiopia in 2016. Based on the data gathered, the goal of GROW is to improve the nutritional status of women of reproductive age (15-49), as well as boys and girls under 5 years of age in Ethiopia. In order to investigate the association between different factors and child anthropometric indicators, this study employs various statistical methods, such as ANOVA, T-test, and linear regressions. Child's sex (confidence intervals for (wasting = - 0.782, - 0.151; stunting = - 0.936,-0.243) (underweight = - 0.530, - 0.008), child's age (confidence intervals for (wasting = - 0.020, 0.007; stunting = - 0.042,-0.011) (underweight = - 0.025, - 0.002), maternal MUAC (confidence intervals for (wasting = 0.189, 0.985; BMI-for-age = 0.077, 0.895), maternal education (stunting = 0.095, 0.897; underweight = 0.120, 0.729), and open defecation (stunting = 0.055, 0.332; underweight = 0.042, 0.257) were found to be significantly associated with anthropometric indicators. Contrary to some findings, maternal dietary diversity does not present significance in aforementioned child anthropometric indicators. Depending on the choice of children anthropometric indicator, different conclusions were drawn demonstrating the association between each factor to child nutritional status. Results showed child's sex, age, region, open defecation, and maternal MUAC significantly increases the risk of child anthropometric indicators

  11. 77 FR 37409 - Request for Domains, Instruments, and Measures for Development of a Standardized Instrument for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... experience as well. On both issues, CMS is interested in instruments and items which can measure quality of... Measures for Development of a Standardized Instrument for Use in Public Reporting of Enrollee Satisfaction..., communication, coordination of care, customer service), instruments, and measures for measuring the level of...

  12. Standardization of Laser Methods and Techniques for Vibration Measurements and Calibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, Hans-Juergen von

    2010-01-01

    The realization and dissemination of the SI units of motion quantities (vibration and shock) have been based on laser interferometer methods specified in international documentary standards. New and refined laser methods and techniques developed by national metrology institutes and by leading manufacturers in the past two decades have been swiftly specified as standard methods for inclusion into in the series ISO 16063 of international documentary standards. A survey of ISO Standards for the calibration of vibration and shock transducers demonstrates the extended ranges and improved accuracy (measurement uncertainty) of laser methods and techniques for vibration and shock measurements and calibrations. The first standard for the calibration of laser vibrometers by laser interferometry or by a reference accelerometer calibrated by laser interferometry (ISO 16063-41) is on the stage of a Draft International Standard (DIS) and may be issued by the end of 2010. The standard methods with refined techniques proved to achieve wider measurement ranges and smaller measurement uncertainties than that specified in the ISO Standards. The applicability of different standardized interferometer methods to vibrations at high frequencies was recently demonstrated up to 347 kHz (acceleration amplitudes up to 350 km/s 2 ). The relative deviations between the amplitude measurement results of the different interferometer methods that were applied simultaneously, differed by less than 1% in all cases.

  13. Challenges in standardization of blood pressure measurement at the population level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Hanna; Koponen, Päivikki; Naska, Androniki; Männistö, Satu; Broda, Grazyna; Palosaari, Tarja; Kuulasmaa, Kari

    2015-04-10

    Accurate blood pressure measurements are needed in clinical practice, intervention studies and health examination surveys. Blood pressure measurements are sensitive: their accuracy can be affected by measurement environment, behaviour of the subject, measurement procedures, devices used for the measurement and the observer. To minimize errors in blood pressure measurement, a standardized measurement protocol is needed. The European Health Examination Survey (EHES) Pilot project was conducted in 2009-2012. A pilot health examination survey was conducted in 12 countries using a standardized protocol. The measurement protocols used in each survey, training provided for the measurers, measurement data, and observations during site visits were collected and evaluated to assess the level of standardization. The EHES measurement protocol for blood pressure was followed accurately in all 12 pilot surveys. Most of the surveys succeeded in organizing a quiet and comfortable measurement environment, and staff instructed survey participants appropriately before examination visits. In all surveys, blood pressure was measured three times, from the right arm in a sitting posture. The biggest variation was in the device used for the blood pressure measurement. It is possible to reach a high level of standardization for blood pressure measurements across countries and over time. A detailed, standardized measurement protocol, and adequate training and monitoring during the fieldwork and centrally organized quality assessment of the data are needed. The recent EU regulation banning the sale of mercury sphygmomanometer in European Union Member States has set new challenges for the standardization of measurement devices since the validity of oscillometric measurements is device-specific and performance of aneroid devices depends very much on calibration.

  14. Analysis and Comparison of Thickness and Bending Measurements from Fabric Touch Tester (FTT and Standard Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Atiyyah Binti Haji

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fabric Touch Tester (FTT is a relatively new device from SDL Atlas to determine touch properties of fabrics. It simultaneously measures 13 touch-related fabric physical properties in four modules that include bending and thickness measurements. This study aims to comparatively analyze the thickness and bending measurements made by the FTT and the common standard methods used in the textile industry. The results obtained with the FTT for 11 different fabrics were compared with that of standard methods. Despite the different measurement principle, a good correlation was found between the two methods used for the assessment of thickness and bending. As FTT is a new tool for textile comfort measurement and no standard yet exists, these findings are essential to determine the reliability of the measurements and how they relate to the well-established standard methods.

  15. Monitoring system for accuracy and reliability characteristics of standard temperature measurements in WWER-440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanc, S.; Repa, M.

    2001-01-01

    Description of a monitoring system for accuracy and reliability characteristics of standard temperature measurements in WWER-440 reactors and benefits obtained from its use are shown in the presentation. As standard reactor temperature measurement, coolant temperature measurement at fuel assembly outlets and in loops, entered into the In-Reactor Control System , are considered. Such systems have been implemented at two V-230 reactors and are under implementation at other four V-213 reactors. (Authors)

  16. The Czech national long distances measuring standard Koštice - State of play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Červinka

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This article gives information about new Czech national long distances measuring standard, which has been preparedat the distance base near the Koštice village. Submitter of the project is the Czech Office for Standards, Metrology and Testing.Research and document preparation for creation of the measuring standard were ensured by the Research Institute of Geodesy,Topography and Cartography. Interlaboratory comparisons were made by staff of the Bundeswehr University in Munich. The paperreports about works, which will be carried out on national standard in the second half of this year. Purpose of this works is to improvecharacteristics of accuracy of national etalon.

  17. Standard Test Method for Measuring Heat Flux Using a Water-Cooled Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of a steady heat flux to a given water-cooled surface by means of a system energy balance. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  18. Anthropometric characteristics of top-class Olympic race walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Ezeiza, Josu; Tam, Nicholas; Torres-Unda, Jon; Granados, Cristina; Santos-Concejero, Jordan

    2018-04-20

    Typical training programmes in elite race walkers involve high training volumes at low and moderate intensities, which have been reported to induce functional and structural adaptations at an anthropometric level. Since anthropometrical variables are closely related to movement efficiency and performance in endurance events, the aim of this study was to describe the anthropometric profile of world-class race walkers. Twenty-nine world-class race walkers (21 men & 8 women) participated in this study. Anthropometric characteristics, including height, body mass, eight skinfolds, five girths and four bone breadths were measured. Body composition, somatotype, somatotype dispersion mean, somatotype attitudinal mean and height to weight ratio, as well as skinfolds extremity to trunk ratio were also calculated. Mean height, body mass and body mass index were 177.1 ± 7.1 cm, 66.4 ± 5.8 kg, and21.2±1.3kg·m2 formenand165.6±4.5cm,53.6±3.7kg,and19.6±1.6kg·m2for women, respectively. Women presented greater body fat content (6.7 ± 0.6 vs. 12.2 ± 0.8%; very large effect), less muscle mass (65.6 ± 4.6 vs. 61.6 ± 2.6 kg; large effect), and were more endomorphic (large effect) than men. Men specialists in 20-km showed greater muscle mass (66.7 ± 4.9 vs. 64.4 ± 4.3 kg; moderate effect), and slightly higher skinfolds, girths, body fat content and were more mesomorphic than 50-km specialists (moderate effect). The present study expands the limited knowledge on the anthropometric characteristics and somatotype elements of elite top-class race walkers. The characterisation of the morphology of elite race walkers provides coaches a reference values to control the training development of the race walker, as well as providing reference values to improve talent identification.

  19. Anthropometric and physical fitness characteristics of female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These included 24 university-level, 17 provincial-level, and 14 national team players. Anthropometric data included age, stature, body mass, sum of seven skinfolds and percentage body fat. The fitness characteristics included flexibility, strength, explosive power, muscular endurance, agility, speed and aerobic endurance.

  20. Sports participation, anthropometric and physiological profiles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sports participation has been adjudged to enhance healthy living. This study described anthropometric and physiological (A-P) profiles of university athletes based on types of sports (ToS) and duration (in years) of participation (DoP). One hundred and twenty-nine athletes (69 males, 60 females), aged l5-36, who had ...

  1. Anthropometric, physical and motor performance determinants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most talented subjects (N = 39) were selected from 66 boys by means of a Talent Search testing protocol and then subjected to a sport specific test battery consisting of five anthropometric and 16 physical and motor variables. The results indicated that mean anaerobic power output, acceleration, body mass, reaction ...

  2. The influence of biological maturation on anthropometric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine whether biological maturation would significantly influence the anthropometric determinants of talent identification among U-14 provincial girl tennis players. Twenty-six of the top thirty-two provincial female players (mean age = 13.21± 0.72 years) from the Northern Gauteng and the ...

  3. Anthropometrical Profile, Skinfold Tickness and Subcutaneous Fat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The threatening health problems resulting from excess subcutaneous fat depositions have been reported by the world Health Organization. Also noteworthy is that childhood obesity is a pointer to adult obesity. This necessitated a study on the anthropometrical profiles of adolescents of Southeast Nigeria using ...

  4. Measurement of the depth of narrow slotted sections in eddy current reference standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Joo; Kim, Young-gil; Ahn, Bongyoung; Yoon, Dong-Jin

    2007-02-01

    The dimensions of the slots in eddy current (EC) reference standards are too narrow to be measured by general depth measurement methods such as the optical (laser) or stylus methods. However, measurement of the dimensions of the machined slots is a prerequisite to using the blocks as references. The present paper suggests a measurement method for the slotted section using an ultrasonic test. The width and depth of the slots measured in our study are roughly 0.1 mm and 0.5 mm, respectively. The time of flight (TOF) of the ultrasonic wave was measured precisely. The ultrasonic velocity in the material of the EC reference standard was calculated with the measured values of the TOF and its thickness. Reflected waves from the tip of the slot and the bottom surface of the EC standard were successfully classified. Using this method we have successfully determined the depth of the slotted section.

  5. Anthropometric Improvement among HIV Infected Pre-School Children Following Initiation of First Line Anti-Retroviral Therapy: Implications for Follow Up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atnafu Mekonnen Tekleab

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy (ART is a lifesaving intervention for HIV infected children. There is a scarcity of data on immunological recovery and its relation with growth indicators among HIV infected young children. The current study aims to assess the pattern of anthropometric Z-score improvement following initiation of first-line ART among under-five children and the relationship between anthropometric Z-score improvement and immunologic recovery.We included under-five children who were on first-line ART at five major hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. We measured anthropometry and collected clinical and laboratory data at follow up, and we retrieved clinical and anthropometric data at ART initiation from records. Z-scores for each of the anthropometric indices were calculated based on WHO growth standards using ENA for SMART 2011 software. Linear regression was used to assess the relationship between time on ART and anthropometric Z-score improvement; and the relationship between anthropometric Z-score improvement and immunologic recovery. Multiple linear regression was used to assess the independent predictors of anthropometric Z-score change.The median age of the participants was 4.1 (Interquartile range (IQR: 3.3-4.9 years. More than half (52.48% were female. The median duration of follow up was 1.69 (IQR: 1.08-2.63 years. There was a significant improvement in all anthropometric indices at any follow up after initiation of first-line ART (underweight; 39.5% vs16.5%, stunting; 71.3% vs 62.9% and wasting; 16.3% vs 1.0%; p-value< 0.0001. There was an inverse relationship between improvement in weight for age Z-score (WAZ and duration of ART (R2 = 0.04; F (1, 158; p = 0.013. Height for age Z-score (HAZ both at the time of ART initiation and follow up has a positive linear relationship with CD4 percentage at follow up (Coef. = 1.92; R2 = 0.05; p-value = 0.002. Duration on ART (Std. Err. = 0.206, t = -1.99, p-value = 0.049 and level of maternal

  6. Flowing-water optical power meter for primary-standard, multi-kilowatt laser power measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. A.; Hadler, J. A.; Cromer, C.; West, J.; Li, X.; Lehman, J. H.

    2018-06-01

    A primary-standard flowing-water optical power meter for measuring multi-kilowatt laser emission has been built and operated. The design and operational details of this primary standard are described, and a full uncertainty analysis is provided covering the measurement range from 1–10 kW with an expanded uncertainty of 1.2%. Validating measurements at 5 kW and 10 kW show agreement with other measurement techniques to within the measurement uncertainty. This work of the U.S. Government is not subject to U.S. copyright.

  7. ASTM international workshop on standards and measurements for tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Carl G; Yaszemski, Michael J; Ratcliffe, Anthony; Tomlins, Paul; Luginbuehl, Reto; Tesk, John A

    2015-07-01

    The "Workshop on Standards & Measurements for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds" was held on May 21, 2013 in Indianapolis, IN, and was sponsored by the ASTM International (ASTM). The purpose of the workshop was to identify the highest priority items for future standards work for scaffolds used in the development and manufacture of tissue engineered medical products (TEMPs). Eighteen speakers and 78 attendees met to assess current scaffold standards and to prioritize needs for future standards. A key finding was that the ASTM TEMPs subcommittees (F04.41-46) have many active "guide" documents for educational purposes, but few standard "test methods" or "practices." Overwhelmingly, the most clearly identified need was standards for measuring the structure of scaffolds, followed by standards for biological characterization, including in vitro testing, animal models and cell-material interactions. The third most pressing need was to develop standards for assessing the mechanical properties of scaffolds. Additional needs included standards for assessing scaffold degradation, clinical outcomes with scaffolds, effects of sterilization on scaffolds, scaffold composition, and drug release from scaffolds. Discussions highlighted the need for additional scaffold reference materials and the need to use them for measurement traceability. Workshop participants emphasized the need to promote the use of standards in scaffold fabrication, characterization, and commercialization. Finally, participants noted that standards would be more broadly accepted if their impact in the TEMPs community could be quantified. Many scaffold standard needs have been identified and focus is turning to generating these standards to support the use of scaffolds in TEMPs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Relationships between maximal strength of lower limb, anthropometric characteristics and fundamental explosive performance in handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermassi, Souhail; Chelly, Mohamed Souhaiel; Wagner, Herbert; Fieseler, Georg; Schulze, Stephan; Delank, Karl-Stefan; Shephard, Roy J; Schwesig, René

    2018-02-14

     The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between lower body muscular strength, anthropometric characteristics and several measures of explosive performance in elite team-handball players.  22 male elite team-handball players (age: 19.1 ± 1.7 years) were studied during the competitive season. Standard anthropometric and body composition measures included body mass index, lower limb and thigh muscle volume, and body fat percentage. Maximal leg strength was determined by a one-repetition maximum (1-RM) half back-squat. Vertical jump performance was assessed using a squat jump (SJ) and a counter movement jump (CMJ). Repeated shuttle-sprint ability (RSA) was tested by 6 (2 × 15 m) shuttle sprints with 20 s of active recovery intervals. The best time in a single shuttle sprint (30m; RSA best ), fastest total time (RSA TT ) and RSA test performance decrement (RSA dec ) were recorded. Agility was measured using a modified T-half test (MAT). Throwing velocities of jump shooting and 3-step throwing were recorded by digital video camera.  The explained variance of 1-RM half-back-squats ranged from 0.2 % (RSA% Fatigue Index) to 70.1 % (CMJ). Four out of 8 variables (RSA Best Time, CMJ, SJ, throwing velocity of jump shoot) demonstrated an r 2  > 0.5. Jump performances seemed closely related to 1-RM half-back-squats. Furthermore, 1-RM half-back-squats were positively correlated with leg and thigh muscle volumes (r = 0.652, r = 0.768).  The anthropometric characteristics and some physical performance tests are closely related to the maximal strength performance of handball players. Coaches should focus on maximal strength training programs for the lower limbs when seeking improvements in the throwing velocity and jump performance of handball players. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Head-and-face anthropometric survey of Chinese workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lili; Zhuang, Ziqing; Guan, Hongyu; Xing, Jingcai; Tang, Xianzhi; Wang, Limin; Wang, Zhenglun; Wang, Haijiao; Liu, Yuewei; Su, Wenjin; Benson, Stacey; Gallagher, Sean; Viscusi, Dennis; Chen, Weihong

    2008-11-01

    Millions of workers in China rely on respirators and other personal protective equipment to reduce the risk of injury and occupational diseases. However, it has been >25 years since the first survey of facial dimensions for Chinese adults was published, and it has never been completely updated. Thus, an anthropometric survey of Chinese civilian workers was conducted in 2006. A total of 3000 subjects (2026 males and 974 females) between the ages of 18 and 66 years old was measured using traditional techniques. Nineteen facial dimensions, height, weight, neck circumference, waist circumference and hip circumference were measured. A stratified sampling plan of three age strata and two gender strata was implemented. Linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the possible effects of gender, age, occupation and body size on facial dimensions. The regression coefficients for gender indicated that for all anthropometric dimensions, males had significantly larger measurements than females. As body mass index increased, dimensions measured increased significantly. Construction workers and miners had significantly smaller measurements than individuals employed in healthcare or manufacturing for a majority of dimensions. Five representative indexes of facial dimension (face length, face width, nose protrusion, bigonial breadth and nasal root breadth) were selected based on correlation and cluster analysis of all dimensions. Through comparison with the facial dimensions of American subjects, this study indicated that Chinese civilian workers have shorter face length, smaller nose protrusion, larger face width and longer lip length.

  10. Solution standards for quality control of nuclear-material analytical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical chemistry measurement control depends upon reliable solution standards. At the Savannah River Plant Control Laboratory over a thousand analytical measurements are made daily for process control, product specification, accountability, and nuclear safety. Large quantities of solution standards are required for a measurement quality control program covering the many different analytical chemistry methods. Savannah River Plant produced uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium metals or oxides are dissolved to prepare stock solutions for working or Quality Control Standards (QCS). Because extensive analytical effort is required to characterize or confirm these solutions, they are prepared in large quantities. These stock solutions are diluted and blended with different chemicals and/or each other to synthesize QCS that match the matrices of different process streams. The target uncertainty of a standard's reference value is 10% of the limit of error of the methods used for routine measurements. Standard Reference Materials from NBS are used according to special procedures to calibrate the methods used in measuring the uranium and plutonium standards so traceability can be established. Special precautions are required to minimize the effects of temperature, radiolysis, and evaporation. Standard reference values are periodically corrected to eliminate systematic errors caused by evaporation or decay products. Measurement control is achieved by requiring analysts to analyze a blind QCS each shift a measurement system is used on plant samples. Computer evaluation determines whether or not a measurement is within the +- 3 sigma control limits. Monthly evaluations of the QCS measurements are made to determine current bias correction factors for accountability measurements and detect significant changes in the bias and precision statistics. The evaluations are also used to plan activities for improving the reliability of the analytical chemistry measurements

  11. Precision analysis for standard deviation measurements of immobile single fluorescent molecule images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, Michael C; DeCenzo, Shawn H; Li, Je-Luen; Wang, Y M

    2010-03-29

    Standard deviation measurements of intensity profiles of stationary single fluorescent molecules are useful for studying axial localization, molecular orientation, and a fluorescence imaging system's spatial resolution. Here we report on the analysis of the precision of standard deviation measurements of intensity profiles of single fluorescent molecules imaged using an EMCCD camera.We have developed an analytical expression for the standard deviation measurement error of a single image which is a function of the total number of detected photons, the background photon noise, and the camera pixel size. The theoretical results agree well with the experimental, simulation, and numerical integration results. Using this expression, we show that single-molecule standard deviation measurements offer nanometer precision for a large range of experimental parameters.

  12. Best practices in selecting performance measures and standards for effective asset management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    "This report assesses and provides guidance on best practices in performance measurement, management and standards : setting for effective Transportation Asset Management (TAM). The study is conducted through a literature review, a : survey of the 50...

  13. Relationship between anthropometric variables and nutrient intake in apparently healthy male elderly individuals: A study from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawelec Graham

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elderly population is increasing worldwide, which warrants their nutritional status assessment more important. The present study was undertaken to establish the nutritional status of the least-studied elderly population in Pakistan. Methods This was a cross-sectional study with a sample of 526 generally healthy free-living elderly men (mean age: 68.9 yr; range: 50-98 yr from Peshawar, Pakistan. Anthropometric measurements (weight, height, WC were measured and BMI and WHR were calculated from these measurements following WHO standard procedures. Dietary intake was assessed by 24-hr dietary recall. Nutrients were calculated from the information on food intake. Nutrients in terms of % of RNI were calculated using WHO data on recommended intakes. Results Based on BMI, the numbers of obese, overweight and underweight elderly were 13.1, 3.1 and 10.8%, respectively. Age was negatively and significantly correlated with BMI (p = 0.0028. Energy (p = 0.0564 and protein intake (p = 0.0776 tended to decrease with age. There was a significant increase in % BF with age (p = p p Conclusions Malnutrition is common in apparently healthy elderly Pakistani men. Very few elderly have adequate nutrient intake. Obese and overweight had higher % BF as compared to normal weight elderly. Older age is associated with changes not only in anthropometrics and body composition but also in intake of key nutrients like energy and protein.

  14. Anthropometric Status and Nutritional Intake in Children (6-9 Years) in Valencia (Spain): The ANIVA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Suárez-Varela, María; Rubio-López, Nuria; Ruso, Candelaria; Llopis-Gonzalez, Agustín; Ruiz-Rojo, Elías; Redondo, Maximino; Pico, Yolanda

    2015-12-18

    The aim of our study was to assess nutritional intake and anthropometric statuses in schoolchildren to subsequently determine nutritional adequacy with Spanish Dietary Reference Intake (DRIs). The ANIVA study, a descriptive cross-sectional study, was conducted in 710 schoolchildren (6-9 years) in 2013-2014 in Valencia (Spain). Children's dietary intake was measured using 3-day food records, completed by parents. Anthropometric measures (weight and height) were measured according to international standards, and BMI-for-age was calculated and converted into z-scores by WHO-Anthro for age and sex. Nutrient adequacy was assessed using DRI based on estimated average requirement (EAR) or adequate intake (AI). Pearson's chi-square and Student's t-test were employed. Of our study group (47.61% boys, 52.39% girls), 53.1% were normoweight and the weight of 46.9% was inadequate; of these, 38.6% had excess body weight (19.6% overweight and 19.0% obesity). We found intakes were lower for biotin, fiber, fluoride, vitamin D (p nutritional adequacy to Spanish recommendations in overweight children. Our findings suggest that nutritional intervention and educational strategies are needed to promote healthy eating in these children and nutritional adequacies.

  15. Measuring the activity of BioBrick promoters using an in vivo reference standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Jason R

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The engineering of many-component, synthetic biological systems is being made easier by the development of collections of reusable, standard biological parts. However, the complexity of biology makes it difficult to predict the extent to which such efforts will succeed. As a first practical example, the Registry of Standard Biological Parts started at MIT now maintains and distributes thousands of BioBrick™ standard biological parts. However, BioBrick parts are only standardized in terms of how individual parts are physically assembled into multi-component systems, and most parts remain uncharacterized. Standardized tools, techniques, and units of measurement are needed to facilitate the characterization and reuse of parts by independent researchers across many laboratories. Results We found that the absolute activity of BioBrick promoters varies across experimental conditions and measurement instruments. We choose one promoter (BBa_J23101 to serve as an in vivo reference standard for promoter activity. We demonstrated that, by measuring the activity of promoters relative to BBa_J23101, we could reduce variation in reported promoter activity due to differences in test conditions and measurement instruments by ~50%. We defined a Relative Promoter Unit (RPU in order to report promoter characterization data in compatible units and developed a measurement kit so that researchers might more easily adopt RPU as a standard unit for reporting promoter activity. We distributed a set of test promoters to multiple labs and found good agreement in the reported relative activities of promoters so measured. We also characterized the relative activities of a reference collection of BioBrick promoters in order to further support adoption of RPU-based measurement standards. Conclusion Relative activity measurements based on an in vivoreference standard enables improved measurement of promoter activity given variation in measurement

  16. The relation between the anthropometric characteristics of fingers and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Mardanshahi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anthropometry is a science of human body measurement that could be used for manufacturing artificial limbs or prosthesis, investigating body differences between populations, utilizing in forensics and criminology, or even in the diagnosis of some diseases. Two of the most important anthropometric characteristics are dermatoglyphic patterns and finger length. Many studies have evaluated the relation between these two characteristics in different diseases such as cancers. It assumed that dermatoglyphic patterns and finger length could be used as predictors of some cancers such as gastric, ovarian, prostate, testicular, and breast cancers. In this review, we evaluated the relation between dermatoglyphic variability and finger length in different cancers more precisely.

  17. Design Of Measurements For Evaluating Readiness Of Technoware Components To Meet The Required Standard Of Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauzi, Ilham; Muharram Hasby, Fariz; Irianto, Dradjad

    2018-03-01

    Although government is able to make mandatory standards that must be obeyed by the industry, the respective industries themselves often have difficulties to fulfil the requirements described in those standards. This is especially true in many small and medium sized enterprises that lack the required capital to invest in standard-compliant equipment and machineries. This study aims to develop a set of measurement tools for evaluating the level of readiness of production technology with respect to the requirements of a product standard based on the quality function deployment (QFD) method. By combining the QFD methodology, UNESCAP Technometric model [9] and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), this model is used to measure a firm’s capability to fulfill government standard in the toy making industry. Expert opinions from both the governmental officers responsible for setting and implementing standards and the industry practitioners responsible for managing manufacturing processes are collected and processed to find out the technological capabilities that should be improved by the firm to fulfill the existing standard. This study showed that the proposed model can be used successfully to measure the gap between the requirements of the standard and the readiness of technoware technological component in a particular firm.

  18. Development of a Primary Standard for Calibration of [18F]FDG Activity Measurement Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capogni, M; Felice, P De; Fazio, A; Simonelli, F; Abbas, K

    2006-01-01

    The 18 F national primary standard was developed by the INMRI-ENEA using the 4πβ Liquid Scintillation Spectrometry Method with 3 H-Standard Efficiency Tracing. Measurements were performed at JRCIspra under a scientific collaboration between the Institute for Health and Consumer Production, the Amersham Health and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Prevention (ISPESL). The goal of the work was to calibrate, with minimum uncertainty, the INMRI-ENEA transfer standard portable well-type ionisation chamber as well as other JRC-Ispra and Amersham Health reference Ionising Chambers used for FDG activity measurement

  19. Development of a Primary Standard for Calibration of [{sup 18}F]FDG Activity Measurement Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capogni, M [ENEA Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti (INMRI), Centro Ricerche Casaccia, I-00060 Rome (Italy); Felice, P De [ENEA Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti (INMRI), Centro Ricerche Casaccia, I-00060 Rome (Italy); Fazio, A [ENEA Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti (INMRI), Centro Ricerche Casaccia, I-00060 Rome (Italy); Simonelli, F [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (JRC), European Commission, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,), Italy; D' Ursi, V [Amersham Health Srl (AH), I-13040 Saluggia (Saint Vincent and the Grenadines), Italy; Pecorale, A [Amersham Health Srl (AH), I-13040 Saluggia (Saint Vincent and the Grenadines), Italy; Giliberti, C [Istituto Superiore per la Prevenzione e la Sicurezza del Lavoro (ISPESL), I-00184 Rome (Italy); Abbas, K [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (JRC), European Commission, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,), Italy

    2006-05-15

    The {sup 18}F national primary standard was developed by the INMRI-ENEA using the 4{pi}{beta} Liquid Scintillation Spectrometry Method with {sup 3}H-Standard Efficiency Tracing. Measurements were performed at JRCIspra under a scientific collaboration between the Institute for Health and Consumer Production, the Amersham Health and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Prevention (ISPESL). The goal of the work was to calibrate, with minimum uncertainty, the INMRI-ENEA transfer standard portable well-type ionisation chamber as well as other JRC-Ispra and Amersham Health reference Ionising Chambers used for FDG activity measurement.

  20. Secondary standards (non-activation) for neutron data measurements above 20 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    In addition to H(n,p) scattering and 235,238 U(n,f) reactions, secondary standards for neutron flux determination may be useful for neutron energies above 20 MeV. For experiments where gamma rays are detected, reference gamma-ray production cross sections are relevant. For neutron-induced charged particle production, standard (n,p) and (n,alpha) cross sections would be helpful. Total cross section standards would serve to check the accuracy of these measurements. These secondary standards are desirable because they can be used with the same detector systems employed in measuring the quantities of interest. Uncertainties due to detector efficiency, geometrical effects, timing and length of flight paths can therefore be significantly reduced. Several secondary standards that do not depend on activation techniques are proposed. 14 refs

  1. Anthropometric indicators as screening instrument for falls in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drielly Soares Freitas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2016v18n5p530   Anthropometric indicators enable professionals for predicting risk of falls in the elderly; however, there is a gap in literature on reference values. This study analyzes anthropometric indicators such as screening tests for falls in the elderly. Cross-sectional population-based systematic sampling was conducted through a household survey and body composition assessment. Anthropometric measurements were performed using portable electronic scale and stadiometer. Bioimpedance device was used to measure body mass index, body fat and lean body mass. Falls were evaluated in the 12 months preceding the interview as a dependent variable. Discriminatory analysis was performed for falls through the ROC curve, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values. Overall, 275 older adults participated in this study, whose prevalence of falls was 23.6%. The average body mass index was 27.8kg/cm2 and 52.1% of individuals were overweight. Among older men, height (ROC=0.68; 95%CI 0.54-0.78 and lean body mass (ROC=0.63, 95%CI 0.58- 0.76 were associated to the occurrence of falls. When considering cutoff of 52.2kg and 166cm, sensitivity was obtained in 75% and high negative predictive values (88.1% and 89.1% respectively. For women, lean body mass (ROC=0.61, 95%CI 0.30-0.49 and body mass (ROC=0.60, 95%CI 0.53-0.72 were relevant from the optimal cutoff point of 28.9% and 57.2kg/m2. Lean body mass was more sensitive (63.2% and body mass little more specific (64.3%, both with high negative predictive values (82.0% and 83.0%. The indicators used were able to discriminate older adults who have suffered from falls.

  2. A Step Towards Electric Propulsion Testing Standards: Pressure Measurements and Effective Pumping Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John W.; Swiatek, Michael W.; Yim, John T.

    2012-01-01

    The electric propulsion community has been implored to establish and implement a set of universally applicable test standards during the research, development, and qualification of electric propulsion systems. Existing practices are fallible and result in testing variations which leads to suspicious results, large margins in application, or aversion to mission infusion. Performance measurements and life testing under appropriate conditions can be costly and lengthy. Measurement practices must be consistent, accurate, and repeatable. Additionally, the measurements must be universally transportable across facilities throughout the development, qualification, spacecraft integration and on-orbit performance. A preliminary step to progress towards universally applicable testing standards is outlined for facility pressure measurements and effective pumping speed calculations. The standard has been applied to multiple facilities at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Test results and analyses of universality of measurements are presented herein.

  3. Measurement of mental attention: Assessing a cognitive component underlying performance on standardized intelligence tests

    OpenAIRE

    Steven J. Howard; Janice Johnson; Juan Pascual-Leone

    2013-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of standardized IQ tests to measure human intelligence, problems with such measures have led some to suggest that better indices may derive from measurement of cognitive processes underlying performance on IQ tests (e.g., working memory capacity). However, measures from both approaches may exhibit performance biases in favour of majority groups, due to the influence of prior learning and experience. Mental attentional (M-) capacity is proposed to be a causal factor ...

  4. GDP per capita and the biological standard of living in contemporary developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, Henk-Jan; Drukker, J.W.; Slot, Brigitte

    1997-01-01

    This paper investigates whether a divergence between the biological standard of living (commonly measured by some anthropometric indicator) and GDP per capita during the early phases of industrialization, as observed for many now-developed countries in the nineteenth century, can also be found for

  5. Standard test method for measurement of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of soil

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure and related test equipment for measuring oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of soil samples removed from the ground. 1.2 The procedure in Section 9 is appropriate for field and laboratory measurements. 1.3 Accurate measurement of oxidation-reduction potential aids in the analysis of soil corrosivity and its impact on buried metallic structure corrosion rates. 1.4 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  6. Anthropometric evaluation and recommendation for primary schools classroom furniture design in Perlis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Lim Shaiu; Jing, Ewe Hui; Effendi, M. S. M.; Rosli, Muhamad Farizuan

    2017-09-01

    This study was carried out with the objective to obtain the anthropometric data of primary school children from Year 1 to Year 6 and evaluate the children's anthropometry with the current dimensions of classroom furniture (i.e. chair and table). In addition, this study also proposed the design dimensions for the improvement in classroom furniture design with the consideration of children's anthropometric data. A total of 390 children selected from 13 primary schools in Perlis, Malaysia were participated in this study. There were 11 anthropometric measurements of children have been measured in this study, which include stature (St), popliteal height (PH), knee height (KH), thigh thickness (TT), buttock popliteal length (BPL), hip breadth (HB), sitting shoulder height (SSH), sitting elbow height (SEH), forearm-hand length (FHL), height of lumbar point (HLP) and buttock clearance (BC). Besides that, 7 dimensions relating to current classroom chair have been measured, such as seat height (SH), seat depth (SD), seat width (SW), upper edge of backrest (UEB), lower edge of backrest (LEB), S point (SP), overall chair height (OCH). Another 5 dimensions of the existing classroom table have been measured too, which involve table height (TH), table depth (TD), table width (TW), under table height (UH) and seat to table clearance (STC). All the measurements were performed by using metal measuring tape. The anthropometric data of the children were analyzed with the help of Microsoft Excel 2013. Several equations with associated with the anthropometric data and furniture dimensions have been applied in this research. The new design dimensions for classroom furniture that proposed in this paper which based on the collected anthropometric data can be referred as a guideline for classroom furniture design. The implementation of these data may help to create comfortability, safety, suitability and improve performance of children in the classroom.

  7. Use of standardized outcome measures in physical therapist practice: perceptions and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, Diane U; Halbert, James; Iverson, Courtney; Miceli, Erin; Shah, Palak

    2009-02-01

    Standardized instruments for measuring patients' activity limitations and participation restrictions have been advocated for use by rehabilitation professionals for many years. The available literature provides few recent reports of the use of these measures by physical therapists in the United States. The primary purpose of this study was to determine: (1) the extent of the use of standardized outcome measures and (2) perceptions regarding their benefits and barriers to their use. A secondary purpose was to examine factors associated with their use among physical therapists in clinical practice. The study used an observational design. A survey questionnaire comprising items regarding the use and perceived benefits and barriers of standardized outcome measures was sent to 1,000 randomly selected members of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA). Forty-eight percent of participants used standardized outcome measures. The majority of participants (>90%) who used such measures believed that they enhanced communication with patients and helped direct the plan of care. The most frequently reported reasons for not using such measures included length of time for patients to complete them, length of time for clinicians to analyze the data, and difficulty for patients in completing them independently. Use of standardized outcome measures was related to specialty certification status, practice setting, and the age of the majority of patients treated. The limitations included an unvalidated survey for data collection and a sample limited to APTA members. Despite more than a decade of development and testing of standardized outcome measures appropriate for various conditions and practice settings, physical therapists have some distance to go in implementing their use routinely in most clinical settings. Based on the perceived barriers, alterations in practice management strategies and the instruments themselves may be necessary to increase their use.

  8. Evaluating standard airborne sound insulation measures in terms of annoyance, loudness, and audibility ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H K; Bradley, J S

    2009-07-01

    This paper reports the results of an evaluation of the merits of standard airborne sound insulation measures with respect to subjective ratings of the annoyance and loudness of transmitted sounds. Subjects listened to speech and music sounds modified to represent transmission through 20 different walls with sound transmission class (STC) ratings from 34 to 58. A number of variations in the standard measures were also considered. These included variations in the 8-dB rule for the maximum allowed deficiency in the STC measure as well as variations in the standard 32-dB total allowed deficiency. Several spectrum adaptation terms were considered in combination with weighted sound reduction index (R(w)) values as well as modifications to the range of included frequencies in the standard rating contour. A STC measure without an 8-dB rule and an R(w) rating with a new spectrum adaptation term were better predictors of annoyance and loudness ratings of speech sounds. R(w) ratings with one of two modified C(tr) spectrum adaptation terms were better predictors of annoyance and loudness ratings of transmitted music sounds. Although some measures were much better predictors of responses to one type of sound than were the standard STC and R(w) values, no measure was remarkably improved for predicting annoyance and loudness ratings of both music and speech sounds.

  9. Automatic Anthropometric System Development Using Machine Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long The Nguyen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The contactless automatic anthropometric system is proposed for the reconstruction of the 3D-model of the human body using the conventional smartphone. Our approach involves three main steps. The first step is the extraction of 12 anthropological features. Then we determine the most important features. Finally, we employ these features to build the 3D model of the human body and classify them according to gender and the commonly used sizes. 

  10. ANTHROPOMETRIC STUDY OF NASAL INDEX OF EGYPTIANS

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelmonem Awad Hegazy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The nasal index determination is one of the most commonly used anthropometric parameters in classifying human races. There are few reports in medical literature concerning nasal index that specifically address particular Egyptian populations. The objective of this study was to determine the normal parameters of external nose (width, height and nasal index) in Egyptians. Methods: The study was conducted randomly on healthy Egyptian subjects of both sexes. Nasal height and width ...

  11. Software database creature for investment property measurement according to international standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomareva, S. V.; Merzliakova, N. A.

    2018-05-01

    The article deals with investment property measurement and accounting problems at the international, national and enterprise levels. The need to create the software for investment property measurement according to International Accounting Standards was substantiated. The necessary software functions and the processes were described.

  12. Precision and accuracy, two steps towards the standardization of XRPD measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, G [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    1996-09-01

    Any standardization process requires to get at results comprehensible, reproducible and traceable. Precision and accuracy of the measurements play a key role in getting at these requirements. The adoption of either physical (standard) or mathematical models allows for describing the whole diffraction measurement process with the necessary physical significance. From an other hand, the adoption of procedure, which are capable of controlling the measurement process, renders it reproducible and traceable. The falling of those requirements make difficult to transfer or replicate elsewhere experiences which may give even excellent result in a given laboratory.

  13. Precision and accuracy, two steps towards the standardization of XRPD measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berti, G.

    1996-01-01

    Any standardization process requires to get at results comprehensible, reproducible and traceable. Precision and accuracy of the measurements play a key role in getting at these requirements. The adoption of either physical (standard) or mathematical models allows for describing the whole diffraction measurement process with the necessary physical significance. From an other hand, the adoption of procedure, which are capable of controlling the measurement process, renders it reproducible and traceable. The falling of those requirements make difficult to transfer or replicate elsewhere experiences which may give even excellent result in a given laboratory

  14. Anthropometric change: implications for office ergonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Claire C; Bradtmiller, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Well-designed office workspaces require good anthropometric data in order to accommodate variability in the worker population. The recent obesity epidemic carries with it a number of anthropometric changes that have significant impact on design. We examine anthropometric change among US civilians over the last 50 years, and then examine that change in a subset of the US population--the US military--as military data sets often have more ergonomic dimensions than civilian ones. The civilian mean stature increased throughout the period 1962 to 2006 for both males and females. However, the rate of increase in mean weight was considerably faster. As a result, the male obesity rate changed from 10.7% in 1962 to 31.3% in 2006. The female change for the same period was 15.8% to 33.2%. In the Army, the proportion of obesity increased from 3.6% to 20.9%, in males. In the absence of national US ergonomic data, we demonstrate one approach to tracking civilian change in these dimensions, applying military height/weight regression equations to the civilian population estimates. This approach is useful for population monitoring but is not suitable for establishing new design limits, as regression estimates likely underestimate the change at the ends of the distribution.

  15. Anthropometric profiles of children with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damayanti R. Sjarif

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Undernutrition is a common cause of morbidity in children with CHD. Previous data from developing country showed prevalence of preoperative undernutrition in children with CHD was up to 45%. The aim of this study are to determine the anthropometric profiles and prevalence of undernutrition in children with CHD by using the anthropometric measurement.Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in children aged 0-2 years old with CHD in Cipto Mangunkusumo hospital. All patients underwent an anthropometric evaluation (weight, length and head circumference at presentation. Undernutrition, failure to thrive /FTT, short stature and microcephaly were determined according to WHO, weight-for-length, weight-for-age at 2 points, length-for-age, head circumference-for-age z-score < -2SD accordingly.Results: We had total of 95 patients, 73 patients with acyanotic and 22 patients with cyanotic lesions. Prevalence of undernutrition in CHD was 51.1%, with 22.3% severe undernutrition. FTT was found in 64.9%, short stature in 49.5% and microcephaly in  37% patients. FTT was found higher in acyanotic (72.2% compared to cyanotic lesions (42.9%. In acyanotic, weight was affected more than length (72.2% vs 49.3%. In cyanotic, weight and length affected equally (42.9% vs 54.5%. Diet counseling were done in patients with undernutrition. Medicines, transcatheter or surgery intervention were indicated in selected patients.Conclusions: Prevalence of FTT was higher than undernutrition in children with CHD. FTT was found higher in acyanotic lesions. In acyanotic, weight was affected more than length. In cyanotic, weight and length affected equally. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:40-5Keywords: congenital heart disease, failure to thrive, short stature, undernutrition

  16. Relationship of age at menarche on anthropometric index and menstrual irregularity in late adolescent girls in Seoul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Eun Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available PurposeTo examine the relationship between menarcheal age and anthropometric indices and menstrual irregularity in late adolescent girls in Seoul.MethodsWe surveyed 4,218 fertile adolescent girls between the ages of 16 and 18 years to determine their anthropometric indices and menarcheal age. Measurements were taken from June 2008 to October 2009 at seven girl's high schools in Seoul, Korea. Participants were offered self-report questionnaire as a survey tool that included questions on anthropometric indices (height, weight, waist circumference, menarcheal age, menstrual pattern, frequency of menstruation per year.ResultsThe participants were categorized into three groups based on menarcheal age: early menarche group (younger than 2 standard deviations [SD], mid menarche group (within ±2 SD, late menarche group (older than 2 SD. The mean age of early menarche group was 9.9±0.2 years, mid menarche group 12.5±0.9 years, late menarche group 15.1±0.3 years (P < 0.001. Heights were recorded as 160.4±5.2 cm, 161.8±4.9 cm, 162.3±4.7 cm in early, mid, and late menarche group, respectively (P = 0.001. Body mass index (BMI and waist circumference significantly were lager in early menarche group than mid and late menarche ones (P < 0.001. The menarcheal age had a positive correlation with height and negative correlations with weight, BMI, waist circumference (P < 0.001. The prevalence of oligomenorrhea was more frequent in late menarche group than early and mid menarche group.ConclusionThe menarcheal age have positive relationship with height and inverse relationship with BMI and waist circumference in late adolescent girls in Seoul. Late menarcheal girls are disposed to have menstrual irregularity compared to early menarcheal girls.

  17. Role of Anthropometric Dimensions of Human Body in Identifying Temperament in Traditional Persian Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Vahedi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: From the viewpoint of Traditional Persian Medicine (TPM, temperament of each person influences his physical and physiological properties such as body dimensions. The aim of this study is to review the reasons behind the diversity of human anthropometric measurements and their status in identifying temperament of people. METHODS: In this descriptive study, we searched online databases such as Sid.ir, PubMed, Scopus, Magiran.com and Google Scholar for Persian key words such as "Anthropometry", "ergonomics" and "temperament" and their English equivalent. Authentic TPM books such as "The Canon of Medicine" by Avicenna, "Complete Book of the Medical Art" by al-Majusi, "al-Mansouri fi al-Tibb" (The book on medicine dedicated to al-Mansur by Zakariya al-Razi, " Kholasa't ol Hikma" (summary of wisdom by Aghili Khorasani, “Zakhireh kharazmshahi”(The treasure of Kharazm Shah by Ismail Jurjani and "Bahr al-jawahir" (sea jewels were also studied. FINDINGS: Results of the study demonstrated that there is a direct relationship between weight gain, BMI and dimensions of soft tissue which are primarily signs of obesity and fat gain and cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Since increase in the aforementioned indices can be a sign of coldness and wetness of temperament, one can argue that people with cold and wet temperament are more susceptible to such diseases. In references of TPM, temperament is mentioned as an agent that changes body dimensions and among the indices that identify temperament, "shape of organs" and "physique" is related to anatomic dimensions of body and obesity and thinness condition, receptively. Magnitude of chest and other organs is a sign of hotness; thinness is a sign of dryness; dominance of muscle tissue is a sign of hotness and wetness and dominance of adipose tissue is a sign of coldness and wetness of temperament. CONCLUSION: According to the results of the present study, variety of anthropometric

  18. Standard test method for measurement of web/roller friction characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the simulation of a roller/web transport tribosystem and the measurement of the static and kinetic coefficient of friction of the web/roller couple when sliding occurs between the two. The objective of this test method is to provide users with web/roller friction information that can be used for process control, design calculations, and for any other function where web/roller friction needs to be known. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  19. Standard test method for measurement of corrosion potentials of Aluminum alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for measurement of the corrosion potential (see Note 1) of an aluminum alloy in an aqueous solution of sodium chloride with enough hydrogen peroxide added to provide an ample supply of cathodic reactant. Note 1—The corrosion potential is sometimes referred to as the open-circuit solution or rest potential. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  20. Standard Test Method for Measuring Heat-Transfer Rate Using a Thermal Capacitance (Slug) Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the measurement of heat transfer rate using a thermal capacitance-type calorimeter which assumes one-dimensional heat conduction into a cylindrical piece of material (slug) with known physical properties. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. Note 1—For information see Test Methods E 285, E 422, E 458, E 459, and E 511.

  1. Advisory Committee for the Calibration Standards of Ionizing Radiation Measurement. Section 2. Radionucleide Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Section II (Mesure des radionucleides) of the Comite Consultatif pour les Etalons de Mesure des Rayonnements Ionisants held its sixth meeting in May 1981. The results of an international comparison of 55 Fe, organized by the National Physical Laboratory, and of a trial comparison of 133 Ba were discussed. A full-scale comparison of 137 Cs activity measurements and a repetition of the 133 Ba trial comparison are to take place within the next two years. A trial comparison of 109 Cd is also proposed. Recent work in radioactivity carried out at BIPM was reported. The usefulness of the international reference system for measuring the activity of gamma-ray emitters was generally acknowledged. The new ''selective sampling'' method which avoids measuring coincidences attracted much attention. The Working Party reports and a new monograph (BIPM-3) were presented. Finally, there was a broad exchange of information on work in progress at the various laboratories represented at the meeting [fr

  2. Determination of the Static Anthropometric Characteristics of Iranian Microscope Users Via Regression Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toktam Balandeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anthropometry is a branch of Ergonomics that considers the measurement and description of the human body dimensions. Accordingly, equipment, environments, and workstations should be designed using user-centered design processes. Anthropometric dimensions differ considerably across gender, race, ethnicity and age, taking into account ergonomic and anthropometric principles. The aim of this study was to determine anthropometric characteristics of microscope users and provide a regression model for anthropometric dimensions. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, anthropometric dimensions (18 dimensions of the microscope users (N=174; 78 males and 96 females in Shiraz were measured. Instruments included a Studio meter, 2 type calipers, adjustable seats, a 40-cm ruler, a tape measure, and scales. The study data were analyzed using SPSS, version 20. Results: The means of male and female microscope users’ age were 31.64±8.86 and 35±10.9 years, respectively and their height were 161.03±6.87cm and 174.81±5.45cm, respectively. The results showed that sitting and standing eye height and sitting horizontal range of accessibility had a significant correlation with stature. Conclusion: The established anthropometric database can be used as a source for designing workstations for working with microscopes in this group of users. The regression analysis showed that three dimensions, i.e. standing eye height, sitting eye height, and horizontal range of accessibility sitting had a significant correlation with stature. Therefore, given one’s stature, these dimensions can be obtained with less measurement.

  3. The primary exposure standard for Co-60 gamma radiation: characteristics and measurements procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laitano, R.F.; Toni, M.P.

    1983-01-01

    A description is given of a cavity ionization chamber used, as a primary exposure standard, at the Laboratorio di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti of the ENEA in Italy. The primary standard is designed to make absolute measurements of exposure due to the Co-60 gamma radiation. The procedures for the realizationof the exposure unit are also described. Finally results of some international comparisons are reported

  4. Physical fitness and anthropometric normative values among Colombian-Indian schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeison Alexander Ramos-Sepúlveda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substantial evidence indicates that children’s physical fitness levels are markers of their lifestyles and their cardio-metabolic health profile and are predictors of the future risk of chronic diseases such as obesity, cardiometabolic disease, skeletal health and mental health. However, fitness reference values for ethnic children and adolescents have not been published in a Latin-American population. Therefore, the aim of the study was to provide sex- and age-specific physical fitness and anthropometric reference standards among Colombian-Indian schoolchildren. Methods A sample of 576 participants (319 boys and 257 girls aged 10 to 17 years old was assessed using the FUPRECOL test battery. Four components of physical fitness were measured: 1 morphological component: height, weight, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, triceps skinfold, subscapular skinfold, and body fat (%; 2 musculoskeletal component: handgrip and standing long jump test; 3 motor component: speed/agility test (4 × 10 m shuttle run; and 4 cardiorespiratory component: course-navette 20 m, shuttle run test and estimation of maximal oxygen consumption by VO2max indirect. Centile smoothed curves for the 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th and 97th percentiles were calculated using Cole’s LMS method. Results Our results show that weight, height and BMI in each age group were higher in boys than in girls. In each groups, age showed a significant effect for BMI and WC. Boys showed better than girls in cardiorespiratory fitness, lower- and upper-limb strength and speed/agility and girls performed better in low back flexibility. Conclusion Our results provide for the first time sex- and age-specific physical fitness and anthropometric reference values for Colombian Nasa Indian children and adolescents aged 10–17.9 years.

  5. A standardization of the physical tests for external irradiation measuring detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    This report is the result of a standardization work, realized within the Radioprotection Services of the A.E.C., of the physical tests for dectors measuring external irradiations. Among the various tests mentionned, calibration and the establishment of the relative spectral response are treated in details. As far as calibration is concerned, the standardization refers to: the reference detector, the reference radiation source, the installation and calibration procedure. As for the relative spectral response the standardization refers to: the reference detector, the radiation sources to be used. High flux detectors and those for pulse electromagnetic radiations are also dealt with [fr

  6. Protocol of the COSMIN study: COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick DL

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Choosing an adequate measurement instrument depends on the proposed use of the instrument, the concept to be measured, the measurement properties (e.g. internal consistency, reproducibility, content and construct validity, responsiveness, and interpretability, the requirements, the burden for subjects, and costs of the available instruments. As far as measurement properties are concerned, there are no sufficiently specific standards for the evaluation of measurement properties of instruments to measure health status, and also no explicit criteria for what constitutes good measurement properties. In this paper we describe the protocol for the COSMIN study, the objective of which is to develop a checklist that contains COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments, including explicit criteria for satisfying these standards. We will focus on evaluative health related patient-reported outcomes (HR-PROs, i.e. patient-reported health measurement instruments used in a longitudinal design as an outcome measure, excluding health care related PROs, such as satisfaction with care or adherence. The COSMIN standards will be made available in the form of an easily applicable checklist. Method An international Delphi study will be performed to reach consensus on which and how measurement properties should be assessed, and on criteria for good measurement properties. Two sources of input will be used for the Delphi study: (1 a systematic review of properties, standards and criteria of measurement properties found in systematic reviews of measurement instruments, and (2 an additional literature search of methodological articles presenting a comprehensive checklist of standards and criteria. The Delphi study will consist of four (written Delphi rounds, with approximately 30 expert panel members with different backgrounds in clinical medicine, biostatistics, psychology, and epidemiology. The final checklist will

  7. Standardized Approach to Quantitatively Measure Residual Limb Skin Health in Individuals with Lower Limb Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Cameron L; Wernke, Matthew M; Powell, Heather M; Tornero, Mark; Gnyawali, Surya C; Schroeder, Ryan M; Kim, Jayne Y; Denune, Jeffrey A; Albury, Alexander W; Gordillo, Gayle M; Colvin, James M; Sen, Chandan K

    2017-07-01

    Objective: (1) Develop a standardized approach to quantitatively measure residual limb skin health. (2) Report reference residual limb skin health values in people with transtibial and transfemoral amputation. Approach: Residual limb health outcomes in individuals with transtibial ( n  = 5) and transfemoral ( n  = 5) amputation were compared to able-limb controls ( n  = 4) using noninvasive imaging (hyperspectral imaging and laser speckle flowmetry) and probe-based approaches (laser doppler flowmetry, transcutaneous oxygen, transepidermal water loss, surface electrical capacitance). Results: A standardized methodology that employs noninvasive imaging and probe-based approaches to measure residual limb skin health are described. Compared to able-limb controls, individuals with transtibial and transfemoral amputation have significantly lower transcutaneous oxygen tension, higher transepidermal water loss, and higher surface electrical capacitance in the residual limb. Innovation: Residual limb health as a critical component of prosthesis rehabilitation for individuals with lower limb amputation is understudied in part due to a lack of clinical measures. Here, we present a standardized approach to measure residual limb health in people with transtibial and transfemoral amputation. Conclusion: Technology advances in noninvasive imaging and probe-based measures are leveraged to develop a standardized approach to quantitatively measure residual limb health in individuals with lower limb loss. Compared to able-limb controls, resting residual limb physiology in people that have had transfemoral or transtibial amputation is characterized by lower transcutaneous oxygen tension and poorer skin barrier function.

  8. Standard guide for qualification of measurement methods by a laboratory within the nuclear industry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides guidance for selecting, validating, and qualifying measurement methods when qualification is required for a specific program. The recommended practices presented in this guide provide a major part of a quality assurance program for the laboratory data (see Fig. 1). Qualification helps to assure that the data produced will meet established requirements. 1.2 The activities intended to assure the quality of analytical laboratory measurement data are diagrammed in Fig. 1. Discussion and guidance related to some of these activities appear in the following sections: Section Selection of Measurement Methods 5 Validation of Measurement Methods 6 Qualification of Measurement Methods 7 Control 8 Personnel Qualification 9 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitati...

  9. On the road toward the development of clothing size standards and safety devices for Chilean workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oñate, Esteban; Meyer, Felipe; Espinoza, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The range of sizes used in Chile for clothing comes from criteria developed in continental Europe, mainly the EN 13402 standard. Any standard adopted by a country should consider the anthropometric dimensions of the user population, particularly to discern the ratio of garments for different size. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to propose standards for the size of clothing based on anthropometric characteristics of a sample of Chilean miners. The study was conducted in 447 male workers. The age and body weight were measured in each workers as well as their percentage of body fat. Anthropometric measurements for garments were made according to the criteria of the European Community (EN 13402-1) and ISO (8559- 1989). Body dimensions for the design of gloves, shoes, helmets and caps, clothes that cover the upper part of the body and clothes that cover the lower part were measured. The results obtained made it possible to establish the percentage of workers falling within the range of sizes that manufacturers consider as reference. One of the main conclusions of the study is the need to carefully consider a set of complementary anthropometric measures, which can help to improve the comfort of costumes, to the extent that the providers adapt their designs to the characteristics of Chilean workers.

  10. Standard practice for calculation of corrosion rates and related information from electrochemical measurements

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1989-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the providing of guidance in converting the results of electrochemical measurements to rates of uniform corrosion. Calculation methods for converting corrosion current density values to either mass loss rates or average penetration rates are given for most engineering alloys. In addition, some guidelines for converting polarization resistance values to corrosion rates are provided. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard.

  11. Acoustics. Measurement of sound insulation in buildings and of building elements. Laboratory measurements of the reduction of transmitted impact noise by floor coverings on a heavyweight standard floor

    CERN Document Server

    British Standards Institution. London

    1998-01-01

    Acoustics. Measurement of sound insulation in buildings and of building elements. Laboratory measurements of the reduction of transmitted impact noise by floor coverings on a heavyweight standard floor

  12. Standards, calibration and quality assurance of 222Rn measurements in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, R.; Hagberg, N.; Mjoenes, L.; Moere, H.; Nyblom, L.; Swedjemark, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    Inhaled decay products of 222 Rn are the dominant components of the natural radiation exposure to the general population. Limits have been introduced in Sweden, and recommendations were made in 1980 for decreasing indoor 222 Rn concentration. The need for the coordinated calibration of measuring instruments as well as for quality assurance was obvious for both health and economic reasons. 222 Rn measurements in Sweden are based on standards traceable to the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) through the use of standard reference material 226 Ra. Standards for both 222 Rn and short-lived 222 Rn progeny are described together with the reference instrument adopted for these studies. The calibration of field instruments was performed in a ''radon room'', a climate chamber in which it is possible to vary and monitor the concentration of 222 Rn as well as other characteristics of the indoor air such as temperature, humidity, ventilation rate and aerosol concentration. The rules and regulations for field measurements imply a calibration of the instruments yearly, as well as accreditation and training for the companies that carry out the measurements. Examples are given of the official measurement protocols used for the different types of instruments. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of measurement reproducibility using the standard-sites data, 1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautman, C.A.

    1996-02-01

    The US Department of Energy conducted the 1994 Fernald (Ohio) field characterization demonstration project to evaluate the performance of a group of both industry-standard and proposed alternative technologies in describing the nature and extent of uranium contamination in surficial soils. Detector stability and measurement reproducibility under actual operating conditions encountered in the field is critical to establishing the credibility of the proposed alternative characterization methods. Comparability of measured uranium activities to those reported by conventional, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-certified laboratory methods is also required. The eleven (11) technologies demonstrated included (1) EPA-standard soil sampling and laboratory mass-spectroscopy analyses, and currently-accepted field-screening techniques using (2) sodium-iodide scintillometers, (3) FIDLER low-energy scintillometers, and (4) a field-portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Proposed advanced characterization techniques included (5) alpha-track detectors, (6) a high-energy beta scintillometer, (7) electret ionization chambers, (8) and (9) a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer in two different configurations, (10) a field-adapted laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) technique, and (11) a long-range alpha detector. Measurement reproducibility and the accuracy of each method were tested by acquiring numerous replicate measurements of total uranium activity at each of two ''standard sites'' located within the main field demonstration area. Meteorological variables including temperature, relative humidity. and 24-hour rainfall quantities were also recorded in conjunction with the standard-sites measurements

  14. Agreement in cardiovascular risk rating based on anthropometric parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Endilly Maria da Silva; Pinto, Cristiane Jordânia; Freitas, Rodrigo Pegado de Abreu; Medeiros, Anna Cecília Queiroz de

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the agreement in evaluation of risk of developing cardiovascular diseases based on anthropometric parameters in young adults. The study included 406 students, measuring weight, height, and waist and neck circumferences. Waist-to-height ratio and the conicity index. The kappa coefficient was used to assess agreement in risk classification for cardiovascular diseases. The positive and negative specific agreement values were calculated as well. The Pearson chi-square (χ"2) test was used to assess associations between categorical variables (p<0.05). The majority of the parameters assessed (44%) showed slight (k=0.21 to 0.40) and/or poor agreement (k<0.20), with low values of negative specific agreement. The best agreement was observed between waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio both for the general population (k=0.88) and between sexes (k=0.93 to 0.86). There was a significant association (p<0.001) between the risk of cardiovascular diseases and females when using waist circumference and conicity index, and with males when using neck circumference. This resulted in a wide variation in the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk (5.5%-36.5%), depending on the parameter and the sex that was assessed. The results indicate variability in agreement in assessing risk for cardiovascular diseases, based on anthropometric parameters, and which also seems to be influenced by sex. Further studies in the Brazilian population are required to better understand this issue

  15. Gestational Age Assessment with Anthropometric Parameters in Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloy Kumar Das1,

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We sought to evaluate the relationship between gestational age (GA and neonatal anthropometric parameters, namely head circumference (HC and crown-heel length (CHL. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study in a tertiary care hospital with 530 consecutively live-born newborns of 28–41 weeks gestation. Anthropometric parameters were measured after three days of life. We summarized the variables using descriptive statistics, including percentile values, and the strength of association was determined through correlation analysis. The correlation was strong for HC and CHL, and linear regression analysis was done to develop predictive equations. Results: HC and CHL correlated well with GA with r-values of 0.863 and 0.859, respectively. The regression equations derived were GA (week = 9.2671 + [0.8616 × HC (cm] and GA (weeks = 7.2489 + [0.621 × CHL (cm]. Multiple regression gave the relationship as GA (weeks = 4.0244 + [0.4058 × HC (cm] + [0.4249× CHL (cm]. Application of this multiple regression equation to a test cohort of 30 babies for prediction of GA gave a mean margin of error of 2.9%, indicating that it is a satisfactory tool for prediction. Conclusions: HC and CHL can be used as simple tools for predicting GA in babies when this is in doubt. This can help in identification of high-risk newborns at primary care level without recourse to imaging modalities.

  16. Agreement in cardiovascular risk rating based on anthropometric parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, Endilly Maria da Silva; Pinto, Cristiane Jordânia; Freitas, Rodrigo Pegado de Abreu; Medeiros, Anna Cecília Queiroz de [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the agreement in evaluation of risk of developing cardiovascular diseases based on anthropometric parameters in young adults. The study included 406 students, measuring weight, height, and waist and neck circumferences. Waist-to-height ratio and the conicity index. The kappa coefficient was used to assess agreement in risk classification for cardiovascular diseases. The positive and negative specific agreement values were calculated as well. The Pearson chi-square (χ{sup 2}) test was used to assess associations between categorical variables (p<0.05). The majority of the parameters assessed (44%) showed slight (k=0.21 to 0.40) and/or poor agreement (k<0.20), with low values of negative specific agreement. The best agreement was observed between waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio both for the general population (k=0.88) and between sexes (k=0.93 to 0.86). There was a significant association (p<0.001) between the risk of cardiovascular diseases and females when using waist circumference and conicity index, and with males when using neck circumference. This resulted in a wide variation in the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk (5.5%-36.5%), depending on the parameter and the sex that was assessed. The results indicate variability in agreement in assessing risk for cardiovascular diseases, based on anthropometric parameters, and which also seems to be influenced by sex. Further studies in the Brazilian population are required to better understand this issue.

  17. THE IMPACT OF ANTHROPOMETRIC CHARACTERISTICS ON MANIFESTATION OF EXPLOSIVE STRENGTH IN VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS AGED 13 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Nesic

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available With the aim to investigate the plyometric training model used for the increase of explosive strength type (the vertical jump, an experimental research was carried out, drawing a sample of 40 volleyball players at the cadet level. For the purpose of this research, we applied nine anthropometric characteristics, which made the predictor system of variables. For the assessment of explosive strength, three tests were performed. The data were processed by descriptive and regression analyses. Based on the findings of the research and the discussion, one could unfailingly conclude that the applied system of anthropometric characteristics, as a predictor, has a significant impact on manifestation of explosive strength in volleyball players, aged 13 years, that is, it is possible to predict results of the tests of explosive strength based on the measures of anthropometric status of examinees.

  18. IMPACT OF PRENATAL MATERNAL FACTORS AND BIRTH ORDER ON THE ANTHROPOMETRIC STATUS OF NEWBORNS IN IRAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirouri, Sorayya; Alizadeh, Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    This cross-sectional study was carried out to capture possible maternal factors affecting newborns' anthropometric measurements. Data were collected from eight public health centres and referral university hospital records in Tabriz and Heriss districts, north-west Iran, for 807 mother-neonate pairs delivering live singleton births and their offspring during the two years up to August 2014. The incidence of low birth weight (LBW) was 5.1%. A close correlation was found between maternal anthropometry and birth order with neonatal anthropometric data. Birth order and maternal height and body mass index (BMI) positively affected neonates' birth size (weight, length and head circumference). The rate of LBW was significantly higher for older (≥35 years), taller (≥170 cm), underweight (BMIbirth neonates. The results indicate that maternal anthropometric indices, age, iron intake and birth order influence the risk of LBW in newborns.

  19. Body mass index and other anthropometric variables in children with sickle cell anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odetunde, Odutola Israel; Chinawa, Josephat Maduabuchi; Achigbu, Kingsley Ihedioha; Achigbu, Eberechukwu O

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the anthropometric variables of children with sickle cell anaemia and comparing it with those with normal haemoglobin genotype. A cross sectional study of anthropometric measurements was conducted over a period of six months. Children with sickle cell anaemia in steady state aged between 6-20 years were recruited. Nutritional assessment was done using anthropometrical variables. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences program (SPSS), version 20. The sickle cell patients comprised of 20 males and 20 females. There were an equal number of controls with an equal male to female ratio of 1:1. Forty eight percent (19) of the children with sickle cell anemia were underweight (sickle cell anemia were low when compared with children with normal Haemoglobin genotype.

  20. Association between routine and standardized blood pressure measurements and left ventricular hypertrophy among patients on hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khangura, Jaspreet; Culleton, Bruce F; Manns, Braden J; Zhang, Jianguo; Barnieh, Lianne; Walsh, Michael; Klarenbach, Scott W; Tonelli, Marcello; Sarna, Magdalena; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2010-06-24

    Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy is common among patients on hemodialysis. While a relationship between blood pressure (BP) and LV hypertrophy has been established, it is unclear which BP measurement method is the strongest correlate of LV hypertrophy. We sought to determine agreement between various blood pressure measurement methods, as well as identify which method was the strongest correlate of LV hypertrophy among patients on hemodialysis. This was a post-hoc analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial. We evaluated the agreement between seven BP measurement methods: standardized measurement at baseline; single pre- and post-dialysis, as well as mean intra-dialytic measurement at baseline; and cumulative pre-, intra- and post-dialysis readings (an average of 12 monthly readings based on a single day per month). Agreement was assessed using Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) and the Bland Altman method. Association between BP measurement method and LV hypertrophy on baseline cardiac MRI was determined using receiver operating characteristic curves and area under the curve (AUC). Agreement between BP measurement methods in the 39 patients on hemodialysis varied considerably, from a CCC of 0.35 to 0.94, with overlapping 95% confidence intervals. Pre-dialysis measurements were the weakest predictors of LV hypertrophy while standardized, post- and inter-dialytic measurements had similar and strong (AUC 0.79 to 0.80) predictive power for LV hypertrophy. A single standardized BP has strong predictive power for LV hypertrophy and performs just as well as more resource intensive cumulative measurements, whereas pre-dialysis blood pressure measurements have the weakest predictive power for LV hypertrophy. Current guidelines, which recommend using pre-dialysis measurements, should be revisited to confirm these results.

  1. Association between routine and standardized blood pressure measurements and left ventricular hypertrophy among patients on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walsh Michael

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Left ventricular (LV hypertrophy is common among patients on hemodialysis. While a relationship between blood pressure (BP and LV hypertrophy has been established, it is unclear which BP measurement method is the strongest correlate of LV hypertrophy. We sought to determine agreement between various blood pressure measurement methods, as well as identify which method was the strongest correlate of LV hypertrophy among patients on hemodialysis. Methods This was a post-hoc analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial. We evaluated the agreement between seven BP measurement methods: standardized measurement at baseline; single pre- and post-dialysis, as well as mean intra-dialytic measurement at baseline; and cumulative pre-, intra- and post-dialysis readings (an average of 12 monthly readings based on a single day per month. Agreement was assessed using Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (CCC and the Bland Altman method. Association between BP measurement method and LV hypertrophy on baseline cardiac MRI was determined using receiver operating characteristic curves and area under the curve (AUC. Results Agreement between BP measurement methods in the 39 patients on hemodialysis varied considerably, from a CCC of 0.35 to 0.94, with overlapping 95% confidence intervals. Pre-dialysis measurements were the weakest predictors of LV hypertrophy while standardized, post- and inter-dialytic measurements had similar and strong (AUC 0.79 to 0.80 predictive power for LV hypertrophy. Conclusions A single standardized BP has strong predictive power for LV hypertrophy and performs just as well as more resource intensive cumulative measurements, whereas pre-dialysis blood pressure measurements have the weakest predictive power for LV hypertrophy. Current guidelines, which recommend using pre-dialysis measurements, should be revisited to confirm these results.

  2. Performance Measurement Implementation Of Minimum Service Standards For Basic Education Based On The Balanced Scorecard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budiman Rusli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Policies Minimum Service Standards for Basic Education has rolled out since 2002 by the minister in accordance with the Decree No. 129a U 2004 About Minimum Service Standards Education is continually updated and lastly Regulation of the Minister of Education and Culture No. 23 of 2013. All of the district government town should achieve the target of achieving 100 per cent in each of the indicators listed in the minimum service standards for the end of 2014. achievement pad on each indicator is just one measure of the performance of the local government department of education. Unfortunately from the announced target for 27 indicators that exist almost all regions including local governments do not reach Tangerang Regency. It is necessary for measuring the performance of local authorities particularly the education department. One performance measure modern enough that measurements can be done that The Balance Scorecard BSc. In the Balanced Scorecard is a management tool contemporare complete measure company performance not only of the financial perspective but also non-financial performance such as Customer Perspective Internal Business Processes and Learning and Growth. This approach is actually ideally suited for multinational companies because this approach requires very expensive but can be used to measure the profit performance of the company in addition to the combination of a long-term strategic and short-strategic. Balanced Scorecard it can also be done in measuring the performance of public sector services as well by modifying a few things so it can be used to measure the performance of the public sector including the Performance Measurement Minimum Service Standards for Basic Education.

  3. Detailed examination of 'standard elementary particle theories' based on measurement with Tristan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamae, Tsuneyoshi

    1989-01-01

    The report discusses possible approaches to detailed analysis of 'standard elementary particle theories' on the basis of measurements made with Tristan. The first section of the report addresses major elementary particles involved in the 'standard theories'. The nature of the gauge particles, leptons, quarks and Higgs particle are briefly outlined. The Higgs particle and top quark have not been discovered, though the Higgs particle is essential in the Weiberg-Salam theory. Another important issue in this field is the cause of the collapse of the CP symmetry. The second section deals with problems which arise in universalizing the concept of the 'standard theories'. What are required to solve these problems include the discovery of supersymmetric particles, discovery of conflicts in the 'standard theories', and accurate determination of fundamental constants used in the 'standard theories' by various different methods. The third and fourth sections address the Weinberg-Salam theory and quantum chromodynamics (QCD). There are four essential parameters for the 'standard theories', three of which are associated with the W-S theory. The mass of the W and Z bosons measured in proton-antiproton collision experiments is compared with that determined by applying the W-S theory to electron-positron experiments. For QCD, it is essential to determine the lambda constant. (N.K.)

  4. Advisory Committee for the calibration standards of ionizing radiation measurement. Section 3. Neutron measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Section III (Neutron measurements) of the Comite Consultatif pour les Etalons de Mesure des Rayonnements ionisants held its fourth meeting in April 1979. After discussing the final report on the fast neutron fluence rate intercomparison, it requested BIPM to submit it for publication in Metrologia. Section III studied the state-of-the-art of an international comparison of a 252 Cf (10 7 s -1 ) source which is in progress. A new fast neutron fluence rate intercomparison is scheduled for 1980; the energies and the methods to be used have been investigated. Finally, Section III studied carefully and rewrote a proposal for a 14-MeV neutron dosimetry facility at BIPM, and added a Recommendation for CCEMRI [fr

  5. Parallelism measurement for base plate of standard artifact with multiple tactile approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiuling; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yiwen; Wang, Zhong; Fu, Luhua; Liu, Changjie

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, as workpieces become more precise and more specialized which results in more sophisticated structures and higher accuracy for the artifacts, higher requirements have been put forward for measuring accuracy and measuring methods. As an important method to obtain the size of workpieces, coordinate measuring machine (CMM) has been widely used in many industries. In order to achieve the calibration of a self-developed CMM, it is found that the parallelism of the base plate used for fixing the standard artifact is an important factor which affects the measurement accuracy in the process of studying self-made high-precision standard artifact. And aimed to measure the parallelism of the base plate, by using the existing high-precision CMM, gauge blocks, dial gauge and marble platform with the tactile approach, three methods for parallelism measurement of workpieces are employed, and comparisons are made within the measurement results. The results of experiments show that the final accuracy of all the three methods is able to reach micron level and meets the measurement requirements. Simultaneously, these three approaches are suitable for different measurement conditions which provide a basis for rapid and high-precision measurement under different equipment conditions.

  6. Comparison of the gold standard of hemoglobin measurement with the clinical standard (BGA) and noninvasive hemoglobin measurement (SpHb) in small children: a prospective diagnostic observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenmeier, Eva; Bellosevich, Sophia; Mauff, Susanne; Schmidtmann, Irene; Eli, Michael; Pestel, Gunther; Noppens, Ruediger R

    2015-10-01

    Collecting a blood sample is usually necessary to measure hemoglobin levels in children. Especially in small children, noninvasively measuring the hemoglobin level could be extraordinarily helpful, but its precision and accuracy in the clinical environment remain unclear. In this study, noninvasive hemoglobin measurement and blood gas analysis were compared to hemoglobin measurement in a clinical laboratory. In 60 healthy preoperative children (0.2-7.6 years old), hemoglobin was measured using a noninvasive method (SpHb; Radical-7 Pulse Co-Oximeter), a blood gas analyzer (clinical standard, BGAHb; ABL 800 Flex), and a laboratory hematology analyzer (reference method, labHb; Siemens Advia). Agreement between the results was assessed by Bland-Altman analysis and by determining the percentage of outliers. Sixty SpHb measurements, 60 labHb measurements, and 59 BGAHb measurements were evaluated. In 38% of the children, the location of the SpHb sensor had to be changed more than twice for the signal quality to be sufficient. The bias/limits of agreement between SpHb and labHb were -0.65/-3.4 to 2.1 g·dl(-1) . Forty-four percent of the SpHb values differed from the reference value by more than 1 g·dl(-1) . Age, difficulty of measurement, and the perfusion index (PI) had no influence on the accuracy of SpHb. The bias/limits of agreement between BGAHb and labHb were 1.14/-1.6 to 3.9 g·dl(-1) . Furthermore, 66% of the BGAHb values differed from the reference values by more than 1 g·dl(-1) . The absolute mean difference between SpHb and labHb (1.1 g·dl(-1) ) was smaller than the absolute mean difference between BGAHb and labHb (1.5 g·dl(-1) /P = 0.024). Noninvasive measurement of hemoglobin agrees more with the reference method than the measurement of hemoglobin using a blood gas analyzer. However, both methods can show clinically relevant differences from the reference method (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01693016). © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A Tool Measuring Remaining Thickness of Notched Acoustic Cavities in Primary Reaction Control Thruster NDI Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yushi; Sun, Changhong; Zhu, Harry; Wincheski, Buzz

    2006-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking in the relief radius area of a space shuttle primary reaction control thruster is an issue of concern. The current approach for monitoring of potential crack growth is nondestructive inspection (NDI) of remaining thickness (RT) to the acoustic cavities using an eddy current or remote field eddy current probe. EDM manufacturers have difficulty in providing accurate RT calibration standards. Significant error in the RT values of NDI calibration standards could lead to a mistaken judgment of cracking condition of a thruster under inspection. A tool based on eddy current principle has been developed to measure the RT at each acoustic cavity of a calibration standard in order to validate that the standard meets the sample design criteria.

  8. Measurement of cell respiration and oxygenation in standard multichannel biochips using phosphorescent O2-sensitive probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrashina, Alina V; Papkovsky, Dmitri B; Dmitriev, Ruslan I

    2013-09-07

    Measurement of cell oxygenation and oxygen consumption is useful for studies of cell bioenergetics, metabolism, mitochondrial function, drug toxicity and common pathophysiological conditions. Here we present a new platform for such applications which uses commercial multichannel biochips (μ-slides, Ibidi) and phosphorescent O2 sensitive probes. This platform was evaluated with both extracellular and intracellular O2 probes, several different cell types and treatments including mitochondrial uncoupling and inhibition, depletion of extracellular Ca(2+) and inhibition of V-ATPase and histone deacetylases. The results show that compared to the standard microwell plates currently used, the μ-slide platform provides facile O2 measurements with both suspension and adherent cells, higher sensitivity and reproducibility, and faster measurement time. It also allows re-perfusion and multiple treatments of cells and multi-parametric analyses in conjunction with other probes. Optical measurements are conducted on standard fluorescence readers and microscopes.

  9. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns for New Instrument Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Stratton, Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  10. EURATOM work on standard defects and dimensional measurements in neutron radiography of nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1981-10-01

    In 1979 a working group on neutron radiography was formed at Euratom. The purpose of this group is the standardization of neutron radiographic methods in the field of nuclear fuel. First priority was given to the development of image quality indicators and standard objects for the determination of accuracy of dimensional measurements from neutron radiographs. For that purpose beam purity and sensitivity indicators as well as a calibration fuel pin were designed and fabricated at Risoe. All the Euratom neutron radiography centers have recieved the above items for comparative neutron radiography. The measuring results obtained, using various measuring apparatus, will form the basis to formulate conclusions about the best measuring methods and instruments to be used in that field. (author)

  11. Reliability of linear distance measurement for dental implant length with standardized periapical radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakoh, Mamoru; Harada, Takuya; Otonari, Takamichi

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of distance measurements of implant length based on periapical radiographs compared with that of other modalities. We carried out an experimental trial to compare precision in distance measurement. Dental implant fixtures were buried in the canine and first molar regions. These were then subjected to periapical (PE) radiography, panoramic (PA) radiography conventional (CV) and medical computed (CT) tomography. The length of the implant fixture on each film was measured by nine observers and degree of precision was statistically analyzed. The precision of both PE radiographs and CT tomograms was closest at the highest level. Standardized PE radiography, in particular, was superior to CT tomography in the first molar region. This suggests that standardized PE radiographs should be utilized as a reliable modality for longitudinal and linear distance measurement, depending on implant length at local implantation site. (author)

  12. Standard Test Method for Electronic Measurement for Hydrogen Embrittlement From Cadmium-Electroplating Processes

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1996-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers an electronic hydrogen detection instrument procedure for measurement of plating permeability to hydrogen. This method measures a variable related to hydrogen absorbed by steel during plating and to the hydrogen permeability of the plate during post plate baking. A specific application of this method is controlling cadmium-plating processes in which the plate porosity relative to hydrogen is critical, such as cadmium on high-strength steel. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific hazard statement, see Section 8. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only.

  13. Calibration Standards for Surface Topography Measuring Systems down to Nanometric Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trumpold, H.; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    compression and injection moulded plastic negatives and Ni-negatives have been made from which again Ni-positives were produced. The replication processes showed negligible deviations from the Pt and Pa values compared to the primary standards. An important prerequisite is the cleanliness of the surfaces......Background For the precise and accurate measurement of surface topography a whole range of surface detection systems is available. With their application in research and production problems arise due to the lack of traceable standard artefacts for the instrument calibration in X, Y and Z directions...... and for the calibration of filters. Existing ISO standards on calibration specimens are inadequate and limited in that they only cover contacting instruments and only partially the measuring ranges for these instruments. The whole range of non-contacting instruments are not covered despite their increasing use...

  14. Standard test method for measurement of soil resistivity using the two-electrode soil box method

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the equipment and a procedure for the measurement of soil resistivity, for samples removed from the ground, for use in the control of corrosion of buried structures. 1.2 Procedures allow for this test method to be used n the field or in the laboratory. 1.3 The test method procedures are for the resistivity measurement of soil samples in the saturated condition and in the as-received condition. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. Soil resistivity values are reported in ohm-centimeter. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and to determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  15. Normal standards for kidney length as measured with US in premature infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, A.E.; Hedlund, G.L.; Pierson, W.P.; Null, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    In order to develop normal standards for kidney length in premature infants, the authors measured kidney length by US imaging in 39 (to date) premature infants less than 72 hours old and without known renal disease. Kidney length was compared with four different parameters of body size, including gestational age, birth weight, birth length, and body surface area. Similar standards have been generated previously for normal renal length as measured by US imaging in full-term infants and older children. These standards have proven utility in cases of congenital and acquired disorders that abnormally increase or decrease renal size. Scatter plots of kidney length versus body weight and kidney length versus body surface area conformed well to a logarithmic distribution, with a high correlation coefficient and close-fitting 95% confidence limits (SEE = 2.05)

  16. Standard Test Method for Measuring Optical Angular Deviation of Transparent Parts

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1996-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers measuring the angular deviation of a light ray imposed by transparent parts such as aircraft windscreens and canopies. The results are uncontaminated by the effects of lateral displacement, and the procedure may be performed in a relatively short optical path length. This is not intended as a referee standard. It is one convenient method for measuring angular deviations through transparent windows. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  17. Progress report on the IAEA programme on the standardization of reactor dosimetry measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertek, C.; Cross, B.; Chernyshev, V.

    1979-01-01

    This report briefly summarizes present activities, current status and procedures associated with neutron spectrum unfolding by activation technique within the IAEA programme on standardization of reactor radiation measurements. Experimental efforts and calculations related to unfolding are critically analyzed including the most recent techniques, interlaboratory cooperation, direct influence of recently measured cross-sections on the unfolded neutron flux density spectrum, re-evaluation of some cross-sections, neutron self-shielding factors and scattering effects. (author)

  18. Standardization in dust emission measurement; Mesure des emissions de poussieres normalisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, R. [INERIS, 60 - Verneuil-en-Halatte, (France)

    1996-12-31

    The European Standardization Committee (CEN TC 264WG5) is developing a new reference method for measuring particulate emissions, suitable for concentrations inferior to 20 mg/m{sup 3} and especially for concentrations around 5 mg/m{sup 3}; the measuring method should be applicable to waste incinerator effluents and more generally to industrial effluents. Testing protocols and data analysis have been examined and repeatability and reproducibility issues are discussed

  19. Calibration and consistency of results of an ionization-chamber secondary standard measuring system for activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrader, Heinrich

    2000-01-01

    Calibration in terms of activity of the ionization-chamber secondary standard measuring systems at the PTB is described. The measurement results of a Centronic IG12/A20, a Vinten ISOCAL IV and a radionuclide calibrator chamber for nuclear medicine applications are discussed, their energy-dependent efficiency curves established and the consistency checked using recently evaluated radionuclide decay data. Criteria for evaluating and transferring calibration factors (or efficiencies) are given

  20. Measurement of Standard Model VBS/VBF production with the ATLAS and CMS detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Proceeding for the poster presentation at Blois2017, France on the topic of "Measurements of Standard Model VBS/VBF productions with ATLAS+CMS detectors" (ATL-PHYS-SLIDE-2017-333 https://cds.cern.ch/record/2267458) Deadline: 15/10/2017

  1. Internationally Comparable Measures of Occupational Status for the 1988 International Standard Classification of Occupations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzeboom, H.B.G.; Treiman, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides operational procedures for coding internationally comparable measures of occupational status from the recently published International Standard Classification of Occupation 1988 (ISCO88) of the International Labor Office (ILO, 1990). We first discuss the nature of the ISCO88

  2. An International Standard Set of Patient-Centered Outcome Measures After Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salinas, J. (Joel); Sprinkhuizen, S.M. (Sara M.); Ackerson, T. (Teri); Bernhardt, J. (Julie); Davie, C. (Charlie); George, M.G. (Mary G.); Gething, S. (Stephanie); Kelly, A.G. (Adam G.); Lindsay, P. (Patrice); Liu, L. (Liping); Martins, S.C.O. (Sheila C.O.); Morgan, L. (Louise); B. Norrving (Bo); Ribbers, G.M. (Gerard M.); Silver, F.L. (Frank L.); Smith, E.E. (Eric E.); Williams, L.S. (Linda S.); Schwamm, L.H. (Lee H.)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:__ Value-based health care aims to bring together patients and health systems to maximize the ratio of quality over cost. To enable assessment of healthcare value in stroke management, an international standard set of patient-centered stroke outcome measures

  3. Measuring Course Competencies in a School of Business: The Use of Standardized Curriculum and Rubrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Jane Whitney

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the growing emphasis on measurement of course competencies by individual college students through two course examples, an undergraduate course in managing change and conflict and a graduate course in human resource management. The author explains how standardized curriculum and assignment rubrics are being used to measure…

  4. Standardized Effect Size Measures for Mediation Analysis in Cluster-Randomized Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Laura M.; Pituch, Keenan A.; Dion, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This article presents 3 standardized effect size measures to use when sharing results of an analysis of mediation of treatment effects for cluster-randomized trials. The authors discuss 3 examples of mediation analysis (upper-level mediation, cross-level mediation, and cross-level mediation with a contextual effect) with demonstration of the…

  5. Limitations of the relative standard deviation of win percentages for measuring competitive balance in sports leagues

    OpenAIRE

    P. Dorian Owen

    2009-01-01

    The relative standard deviation of win percentages, the most widely used measure of within-season competitive balance, has an upper bound which is very sensitive to variation in the numbers of teams and games played. Taking into account this upper bound provides additional insight into comparisons of competitive balance across leagues or over time.

  6. Magnet measurement interfacing to the G-64 Euro standard bus and testing G-64 modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogrefe, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Magnet Measurement system utilizes various modules with a G-64 Euro (Gespac) Standard Interface. All modules are designed to be software controlled, normally under the constraints of the OS-9 operating system with all data transfers to a host computer accomplished by a serial link

  7. Recent updates on the Standard Model Higgs boson measurements from the ATLAS and CMS experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Song-Ming

    2017-01-01

    This report presents the latest results from the ATLAS and CMS experiments on the measurements of the Standard Model Higgs boson by using the proton-proton collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider during the first two years of Run 2 data taking.

  8. Stability check source measurements with a secondary standard dosimeter in SSDL-Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salman, S.; Mahmoud, K.; Orfi, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    The stability check source is an integral part of a Secondary Standard Dosimetry System. The purpose of the stability check source is to confirm that the overall response of the dosimeter has not changed significantly since the instrument was calibrated. In case any change in the sensitivity of the ionization chamber or measuring assembly occurs the same is reflected in the reference check source measurements. Stability check source measurements are taken in a Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (PSDL) at the time of calibration of secondary standard dosimeter and mean time (in seconds) to the reference setting of 50 scale divisions with ambient conditions of air at 20 deg. C, 101.3 kPa and 50% RH is quoted in a calibration certificate. This quoted stability check source time figure is the basis for future confirmation of overall response of the secondary standard dosimeter system. This note presents the results of stability check source measurements carried out in SSDL Pakistan over a period of five years

  9. An assessment of cellulose filters as a standardized material for measuring litter breakdown in headwater streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    The decay rate of cellulose filters and associated chemical and biological characteristics were compared to those of white oak (Quercus alba) leaves to determine if cellulose filters could be a suitable standardized material for measuring deciduous leaf breakdown in headwater str...

  10. Procedure for the standardized measure of the detective quantum efficiency in digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Martin, G.; Garcia Castano, P.; Bermudez Luna, R.; Fernandez Bedoya, V.; Espana Lopez, M. L.; Miquelez Alonso, S.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a simple guide for determining the DQE, according to the CEI, in those having mammography flat panel detectors, and highlight the main difficulties that may be in the process of the standardized measurement.

  11. Development and Standardization of Inventory for Measuring Students' Integration into University Academic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esomonu, Nkechi Patricia-Mary; Okeaba, James Uzoma

    2016-01-01

    The study developed and standardized an Inventory for measuring Students' Integration into University Academic Culture named Inventory for Students' Integration into University Academic Culture (ISIUAC). The increase in dropout rates, substance use, cultism and other deviant behaviours in Nigerian universities makes it necessary for one to ask the…

  12. A comparison of oxygen saturation measurements obtained from a 'blue sensor' with a standard sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawson, Isabel E; Dawson, Jennifer A; Donath, Susan M; Davis, Peter G

    2011-10-01

    The study aims to investigate pulse oximetry measurements from a 'blue' pulse oximeter sensor against measurements from a 'standard' pulse oximeter sensor in newly born infants. Immediately after birth, both sensors were attached to the infant, one to each foot. SpO₂ measurements were recorded simultaneously from each sensor for 10 min. Agreement between pairs of SpO₂ measurements were calculated using Bland-Altman analysis. Thirty-one infants were studied. There was good correlation between simultaneous SpO₂ measurements from both sensors (r² = 0.75). However, the mean difference between 'blue' and 'standard' sensors was -1.6%, with wide 95% limits of agreement +18.4 to -21.6%. The range of mean difference between sensors from each infant ranged from -20 to +20. The mean difference between the blue and standard sensor SpO₂ measurements is not clinically important. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  13. "First among Others? Cohen's ""d"" vs. Alternative Standardized Mean Group Difference Measures"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorel Cahan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Standardized effect size measures typically employed in behavioral and social sciences research in the multi-group case (e.g., 2, f2 evaluate between-group variability in terms of either total or within-group variability, such as variance or standard deviation -' that is, measures of dispersion about the mean. In contrast, the definition of Cohen's d, the effect size measure typically computed in the two-group case, is incongruent due to a conceptual difference between the numerator -' which measures between-group variability by the intuitive and straightforward raw difference between the two group means -' and the denominator - which measures within-group variability in terms of the difference between all observations and the group mean (i.e., the pooled within-groups standard deviation, SW. Two congruent alternatives to d, in which the root square or absolute mean difference between all observation pairs is substituted for SW as the variability measure in the denominator of d, are suggested and their conceptual and statistical advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  14. Abstracts from the fourth annual meeting of the council on ionizing radiation measurements and standards (CIRMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The Council on Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards held its fourth annual meeting at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland on November 28-30, 1995. The organization represents thousands of users of ionizing radiation and radioactive sources engaged in industrial radiation processing and sterilization, medical radiation diagnostics and therapy, nuclear power, and worker radiation protection programs. CIRMS provides a forum for discussing ionizing radiation issues; identifying, defining and prioritizing needed work; disseminating information on standards; and organizing workshops and meetings to advance ionizing radiation technology. Over 100 participants attended the meeting, which highlighted advanced techniques in radiation dosimetry and radioactivity measurements for the different ionizing radiation communities. Representatives attended from 28 corporations, 10 federal agencies, 8 national laboratories, 12 universities, and 1 state. Advanced techniques and future measurement needs were discussed in four sessions: (I) Medical Dosimetry, Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, (II) Occupational and Radiation Protection Dosimetry, (III) Measurement Techniques for Public and Environmental Radiation Protection, and (IV) Measurement Techniques for Radiation Effects on Materials. An additional session (Session V) was added to this annual meeting on the implementation of ISO 9000 for those CIRMS members involved in instrument and product manufacturing, and those providing radiation measurement services. Abstracts are also included from the poster session (Session VI) held on the final day of the meeting. The 4th Annual Meeting was organized by the Chairman of the Science and Technology Committee, Mr. Joseph C. McDonald of the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory

  15. Inter-Investigator Reliability of Anthropometric Prediction of 1RM Bench Press in College Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Richard M; Arabas, Jana L; Mayhew, Jerry L; Brechue, William F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of inter-investigator differences in anthropometric assessments on the prediction of one-repetition maximum (1RM) bench press in college football players. Division-II players (n = 34, age = 20.4 ± 1.2 y, 182.3 ± 6.6 cm, 99.1 ± 18.4 kg) were measured for selected anthropometric variables and 1RM bench press at the conclusion of a heavy resistance training program. Triceps, subscapular, and abdominal skinfolds were measured in triplicate by three investigators and used to estimate %fat. Arm circumference was measured around a flexed biceps muscle and was corrected for triceps skinfold to estimate muscle cross-sectional area (CSA). Chest circumference was measured at mid-expiration. Significant differences among the testers were evident in six of the nine anthropometric variables, with the least experienced tester being significantly different from the other testers on seven variables, although average differences among investigators ranged from 1-2% for circumferences to 4-9% for skinfolds. The two more experienced testers were significantly different on only one variable. Overall agreement among testers was high (ICC>0.895) for each variable, with low coefficients of variation (CVbench press using a non-performance anthropometric equation. Minimal experience in anthropometry may not impede strength and conditioning specialists from accurately estimating 1RM bench press.

  16. Creation of the {pi} angle standard for the flat angle measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giniotis, V; Rybokas, M, E-mail: gi@ap.vtu.l, E-mail: MRybokas@gama.l [Department of Information Technologies, Vilnius Gediminas Technical University, Sauletekio al. 11, 10223 Vilnius-40 (Lithuania)

    2010-07-01

    Angle measurements are based mainly on multiangle prisms - polygons with autocollimators, rotary encoders for high accuracy and circular scales as the standards of the flat angle. Traceability of angle measurements is based on the standard of the plane angle - prism (polygon) calibrated at an appropriate accuracy. Some metrological institutions have established their special test benches (comparators) equipped with circular scales or rotary encoders of high accuracy and polygons with autocollimators for angle calibration purposes. Nevertheless, the standard (etalon) of plane angle - polygon has many restrictions for the transfer of angle unit - radian (rad) and other units of angle. It depends on the number of angles formed by the flat sides of the polygon that is restricted by technological and metrological difficulties related to the production and accuracy determination of the polygon. A possibility to create the standard of the angle equal to {pi} rad or half the circle or the full angle is proposed. It can be created by the circular scale with the rotation axis of very high accuracy and two precision reading instruments, usually, photoelectric microscopes (PM), placed on the opposite sides of the circular scale using the special alignment steps. A great variety of angle units and values can be measured and its traceability ensured by applying the third PM on the scale. Calibration of the circular scale itself and other scale or rotary encoder as well is possible using the proposed method with an implementation of {pi} rad as the primary standard angle. The method proposed enables to assure a traceability of angle measurements at every laboratory having appropriate environment and reading instruments of appropriate accuracy together with a rotary table with the rotation axis of high accuracy - rotation trajectory (runout) being in the range of 0.05 {mu}m. Short information about the multipurpose angle measurement test bench developed is presented.

  17. An ROC-type measure of diagnostic accuracy when the gold standard is continuous-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuchowski, Nancy A

    2006-02-15

    ROC curves and summary measures of accuracy derived from them, such as the area under the ROC curve, have become the standard for describing and comparing the accuracy of diagnostic tests. Methods for estimating ROC curves rely on the existence of a gold standard which dichotomizes patients into disease present or absent. There are, however, many examples of diagnostic tests whose gold standards are not binary-scale, but rather continuous-scale. Unnatural dichotomization of these gold standards leads to bias and inconsistency in estimates of diagnostic accuracy. In this paper, we propose a non-parametric estimator of diagnostic test accuracy which does not require dichotomization of the gold standard. This estimator has an interpretation analogous to the area under the ROC curve. We propose a confidence interval for test accuracy and a statistical test for comparing accuracies of tests from paired designs. We compare the performance (i.e. CI coverage, type I error rate, power) of the proposed methods with several alternatives. An example is presented where the accuracies of two quick blood tests for measuring serum iron concentrations are estimated and compared.

  18. Development and pilot of an internationally standardized measure of cardiovascular risk management in European primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szecsenyi Joachim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care can play an important role in providing cardiovascular risk management in patients with established Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD, patients with a known high risk of developing CVD, and potentially for individuals with a low risk of developing CVD, but who have unhealthy lifestyles. To describe and compare cardiovascular risk management, internationally valid quality indicators and standardized measures are needed. As part of a large project in 9 European countries (EPA-Cardio, we have developed and tested a set of standardized measures, linked to previously developed quality indicators. Methods A structured stepwise procedure was followed to develop measures. First, the research team allocated 106 validated quality indicators to one of the three target populations (established CVD, at high risk, at low risk and to different data-collection methods (data abstraction from the medical records, a patient survey, an interview with lead practice GP/a practice survey. Secondly, we selected a number of other validated measures to enrich the assessment. A pilot study was performed to test the feasibility. Finally, we revised the measures based on the findings. Results The EPA-Cardio measures consisted of abstraction forms from the medical-records data of established Coronary Heart Disease (CHD-patients - and high-risk groups, a patient questionnaire for each of the 3 groups, an interview questionnaire for the lead GP and a questionnaire for practice teams. The measures were feasible and accepted by general practices from different countries. Conclusions An internationally standardized measure of cardiovascular risk management, linked to validated quality indicators and tested for feasibility in general practice, is now available. Careful development and pilot testing of the measures are crucial in international studies of quality of healthcare.

  19. How Much Can Non-industry Standard Measurement Methodologies Benefit Methane Reduction Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risk, D. A.; O'Connell, L.; Atherton, E.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, energy sector methane emissions have been recorded in large part by applying modern non-industry-standard techniques. Industry may lack the regulatory flexibility to use such techniques, or in some cases may not understand the possible associated economic advantage. As progressive jurisdictions move from estimation and towards routine measurement, the research community should provide guidance to help regulators and companies measure more effectively, and economically if possible. In this study, we outline a modelling experiment in which we explore the integration of non-industry-standard measurement techniques as part of a generalized compliance measurement program. The study was not intended to be exhaustive, or to recommend particular combinations, but instead to explore the inter-relationships between methodologies, development type, compliance practice. We first defined the role, applicable scale, detection limits, working distances, and approximate deployment cost of several measurement methodologies. We then considered a variety of development types differing mainly in footprint, density, and emissions "profile". Using a Monte Carlo approach, we evaluated the effect of these various factors on the cost and confidence of the compliance measurement program. We found that when added individually, some of the research techniques were indeed able to deliver an improvement in cost and/or confidence when used alongside industry-standard Optical Gas Imaging. When applied in combination, the ideal fraction of each measurement technique depended on development type, emission profile, and whether confidence or cost was more important. Results suggest that measurement cost and confidence could be improved if energy companies exploited a wider range of measurement techniques, and in a manner tailored to each development. In the short-term, combining clear scientific guidance with economic information could benefit immediate mitigation efforts over

  20. Standard test method for calibration of surface/stress measuring devices

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    Return to Contents page 1.1 This test method covers calibration or verification of calibration, or both, of surface-stress measuring devices used to measure stress in annealed and heat-strengthened or tempered glass using polariscopic or refractometry based principles. 1.2 This test method is nondestructive. 1.3 This test method uses transmitted light, and therefore, is applicable to light-transmitting glasses. 1.4 This test method is not applicable to chemically tempered glass. 1.5 Using the procedure described, surface stresses can be measured only on the “tin” side of float glass. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  1. Veterinary antimicrobial-usage statistics based on standardized measures of dosage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vibeke Frøkjær; Jacobsen, Erik; Bager, Flemming

    2004-01-01

    In human medicine, the defined daily dose is used as a technical measure of drug usage, which is independent of the variations in the potency of the active compound and the formulation of the pharmaceutical product-therefore providing a measure of the relative importance of different drugs....... A national system of animal defined daily doses (ADD) for each age-group and species has been defined in VetStat (the Danish national system monitoring veterinary therapeutic drug use). The usage is further standardized according to the number of animals in the target population, acquired from production...... data on the national level or on herd size by species and age in the Danish central husbandry register (CHR). Statistics based on standardized measures of VetStat data can be used for comparison of drug usage between different herds, veterinary practices, or geographic regions (allowing subdivision...

  2. On the measurement of the neutrino velocity applying the standard time of the Global Positioning System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeivalas, J; Parseliunas, E

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of the neutrino velocity applying the standard time of the Global Positioning System (GPS) is presented in the paper. The practical data were taken from the OPERA experiment, in which neutrino emission from the CERN LHC accelerator to Gran Sasso detector was investigated. The distance between accelerator and detector is about 730 km. The time interval was measured by benchmark clocks, which were calibrated by the standard GPS time signals received from GPS satellites. The calculation of the accuracy of the GPS time signals with respect to changes of the signals' frequencies due to the Doppler effect is presented. It is shown that a maximum error of about 200 ns could occur when GPS time signals are applied for the calibration of the clocks for the neutrino velocity measurements. (paper)

  3. Standardization of radiation protection measurements in mixed fields of an extended energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.; Stevenson, G.R.

    1977-01-01

    The improved ICRU concept of dose equivalent index aims at standardizing both area and personnel dose measurements so that the results on the dosimetry of external irradiations in radiation protection become compatible. It seems that for photon and neutron energies up to 3 and 20 MeV respectively the realization of dose-equivalent index is straightforward, but the inclusion of higher energies and/or other types of radiation will lead both to conceptual and practical difficulties. It will be shown that practical measurements in mixed radiation fields of an extended energy range for protection purposes will overestimate the standardized quantity. While area measurements can be performed to represent a good approximation, greater uncertainties have to be accepted in personnel dosimetry for stray radiation fields around GeV proton accelerators

  4. Anthropometric outcome of sagittal craniosynostosis following surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Toshinori; Morota, Nobuhito; Ihara, Satoshi; Kaneko, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have shown good short-term outcomes after surgery for sagittal synostosis. However, the improvement in head shape usually regresses over the long term. The aim of this study was to compare anthropometric changes after surgery between osteoplastic expansion surgery and distraction osteogenesis for correcting sagittal synostosis. From November 2002 through December 2008, 17 patients with sagittal synostosis were analyzed. Anthropometric changes were assessed with cephalic indices obtained with computed tomography of the skull. The age of the patients at the time of surgery ranged from 2 to 25 months (mean, 8.2 months), and the follow-up period ranged from 6 to 63 months (mean, 17 months). In 16 patients, the cephalic index showed improvement immediately after surgery but gradually decreased in the follow-up period. The improving rate was decreased more after osteoplastic expansion surgery than after distraction osteogenesis (p<0.01). Although long-term follow-up is necessary, morphological improvement persists to a greater degree after distraction surgery. (author)

  5. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Nickel

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by the activation reaction 58Ni(n,p)58Co. 1.2 This activation reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies above approximately 2.1 MeV and for irradiation times up to about 200 days in the absence of high thermal neutron fluence rates (for longer irradiations, see Practice E 261). 1.3 With suitable techniques fission-neutron fluence rates densities above 107 cm−2·s−1 can be determined. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Note—The burnup corrections were com...

  6. Standard Test Method for Measuring Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Uranium-238

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by assaying a fission product (F.P.) from the fission reaction 238U(n,f)F.P. 1.2 The reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies from approximately 1.5 to 7 MeV and for irradiation times up to 30 to 40 years. 1.3 Equivalent fission neutron fluence rates as defined in Practice E 261 can be determined. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other unites of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. Standard Test Method for Measuring Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Neptunium-237

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by assaying a fission product (F.P.) from the fission reaction 237Np(n,f)F.P. 1.2 The reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies from approximately 0.7 to 6 MeV and for irradiation times up to 30 to 40 years. 1.3 Equivalent fission neutron fluence rates as defined in Practice E 261 can be determined. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  8. Standardized Symptom Measurement of Individuals with Early Lyme Disease Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, Kathleen T; Rebman, Alison W; Crowder, Lauren A; Johnson-Greene, Doug; Aucott, John N

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the Lyme disease (LD) literature is challenging given the lack of consistent methodology and standardized measurement of symptoms and the impact on functioning. This prospective study incorporates well-validated measures to capture the symptom picture of individuals with early LD from time of diagnosis through 6-months post-treatment. One hundred seven patients with confirmed early LD and 26 healthy controls were evaluated using standardized instruments for pain, fatigue, depressive symptoms, functional impact, and cognitive functioning. Prior to antibiotic treatment, patients experience notable symptoms of fatigue and pain statistically higher than controls. After treatment, there are no group differences, suggesting that symptoms resolve and that there are no residual cognitive impairments at the level of group analysis. However, using subgroup analyses, some individuals experience persistent symptoms that lead to functional decline and these individuals can be identified immediately post-completion of standard antibiotic treatment using well-validated symptom measures. Overall, the findings suggest that ideally-treated early LD patients recover well and experience symptom resolution over time, though a small subgroup continue to suffer with symptoms that lead to functional decline. The authors discuss use of standardized instruments for identification of individuals who warrant further clinical follow-up. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Standard test method for measuring pH of soil for use in corrosion testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1995-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for determining the pH of a soil in corrosion testing. The principle use of the test is to supplement soil resistivity measurements and thereby identify conditions under which the corrosion of metals in soil may be accentuated (see G 57 - 78 (1984)). 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  10. Predictive capacity of anthropometric indicators for dyslipidemia screening in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadros, Teresa Maria Bianchini; Gordia, Alex Pinheiro; Silva, Rosane Carla Rosendo; Silva, Luciana Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the predictive capacity of anthropometric indicators and their cut-off values for dyslipidemia screening in children and adolescents. This was a cross-sectional study involving 1139 children and adolescents, of both sexes, aged 6-18 years. Body weight, height, waist circumference, subscapular, and triceps skinfold thickness were measured. The body mass index and waist-to-height ratio were calculated. Children and adolescents exhibiting at least one of the following lipid alterations were defined as having dyslipidemia: elevated total cholesterol, low high-density lipoprotein, elevated low-density lipoprotein, and high triglyceride concentration. A receiver operating characteristic curve was constructed and the area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity was calculated for the parameters analyzed. The prevalence of dyslipidemia was 62.1%. The waist-to-height ratio, waist circumference, subscapular, body mass index, and triceps skinfold thickness, in this order, presented the largest number of significant accuracies, ranging from 0.59 to 0.78. The associations of the anthropometric indicators with dyslipidemia were stronger among adolescents than among children. Significant differences between accuracies of the anthropometric indicators were only observed by the end of adolescence; the accuracy of waist-to-height ratio was higher than that of subscapular (p=0.048) for females, and the accuracy of waist circumference was higher than that of subscapular (p=0.029) and body mass index (p=0.012) for males. In general, the cut-off values of the anthropometric predictors of dyslipidemia increased with age, except for waist-to-height ratio. Sensitivity and specificity varied substantially between anthropometric indicators, ranging from 75.6 to 53.5 and from 75.0 to 50.0, respectively. The anthropometric indicators studied had little utility as screening tools for dyslipidemia, especially in children. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria

  11. The Effect of Random Error on Diagnostic Accuracy Illustrated with the Anthropometric Diagnosis of Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background It is often thought that random measurement error has a minor effect upon the results of an epidemiological survey. Theoretically, errors of measurement should always increase the spread of a distribution. Defining an illness by having a measurement outside an established healthy range will lead to an inflated prevalence of that condition if there are measurement errors. Methods and results A Monte Carlo simulation was conducted of anthropometric assessment of children with malnutrition. Random errors of increasing magnitude were imposed upon the populations and showed that there was an increase in the standard deviation with each of the errors that became exponentially greater with the magnitude of the error. The potential magnitude of the resulting error of reported prevalence of malnutrition were compared with published international data and found to be of sufficient magnitude to make a number of surveys and the numerous reports and analyses that used these data unreliable. Conclusions The effect of random error in public health surveys and the data upon which diagnostic cut-off points are derived to define “health” has been underestimated. Even quite modest random errors can more than double the reported prevalence of conditions such as malnutrition. Increasing sample size does not address this problem, and may even result in less accurate estimates. More attention needs to be paid to the selection, calibration and maintenance of instruments, measurer selection, training & supervision, routine estimation of the likely magnitude of errors using standardization tests, use of statistical likelihood of error to exclude data from analysis and full reporting of these procedures in order to judge the reliability of survey reports. PMID:28030627

  12. Anthropometric record to be used in Centers for Family Health Support: possibilities and obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Fabiana Rossi Squarcini

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2015v17n2p248   A model of an anthropometric record to be used in the Núcleos de Apoio à Saúde da Família (Centers for Family Health Support in Brazil has been proposed in the literature, showing the logistics of use. The aim of this study was to discuss the anthropometric record, showing the potential and obstacles of its use. It was observed that, for adults, the screening measures (body mass index and waist circumference for the determination of the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases can be considered promising, although the Basic Health Care network already uses these measures. Nevertheless, the supplementary assessment (skinfold thickness and body circumferences could be another potential possibility, except for the time spent to perform this assessment and the lack of studies of the cost-benefit of these anthropometric techniques. It was concluded that the anthropometric record proposed is an important instrument for improving the quality of the service provided to users of the Basic Health Care System; however, some adjustments, such as the removal of skinfold measurements as part of primary care, should be taken into consideration.

  13. An anthropometric model to estimate neonatal fat mass using air displacement plethysmography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deierlein Andrea L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current validated neonatal body composition methods are limited/impractical for use outside of a clinical setting because they are labor intensive, time consuming, and require expensive equipment. The purpose of this study was to develop an anthropometric model to estimate neonatal fat mass (kg using an air displacement plethysmography (PEA POD® Infant Body Composition System as the criterion. Methods A total of 128 healthy term infants, 60 females and 68 males, from a multiethnic cohort were included in the analyses. Gender, race/ethnicity, gestational age, age (in days, anthropometric measurements of weight, length, abdominal circumference, skin-fold thicknesses (triceps, biceps, sub scapular, and thigh, and body composition by PEA POD® were collected within 1-3 days of birth. Backward stepwise linear regression was used to determine the model that best predicted neonatal fat mass. Results The statistical model that best predicted neonatal fat mass (kg was: -0.012 -0.064*gender + 0.024*day of measurement post-delivery -0.150*weight (kg + 0.055*weight (kg2 + 0.046*ethnicity + 0.020*sum of three skin-fold thicknesses (triceps, sub scapular, and thigh; R2 = 0.81, MSE = 0.08 kg. Conclusions Our anthropometric model explained 81% of the variance in neonatal fat mass. Future studies with a greater variety of neonatal anthropometric measurements may provide equations that explain more of the variance.

  14. Evaluation of Anthropometric and Metabolic Parameters in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaşar Yildirim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Sleep disorders have recently become a significant public health problem worldwide and have deleterious health consequences. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is the most common type of sleep-related breathing disorders. We aimed to evaluate anthropometric measurements, glucose metabolism, and cortisol levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Materials and Methods. A total of 50 patients with a body mass index ≥30 and major OSA symptoms were included in this study. Anthropometric measurements of the patients were recorded and blood samples were drawn for laboratory analysis. A 24-hour urine sample was also collected from each subject for measurement of 24-hour cortisol excretion. Patients were divided equally into 2 groups according to polysomnography results: control group with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI <5 (n=25 and OSA group with an AHI ≥5 (n=25. Results. Neck and waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, late-night serum cortisol, morning serum cortisol after 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test, and 24-hour urinary cortisol levels were significantly higher in OSA patients compared to control subjects. Newly diagnosed DM was more frequent in patients with OSA than control subjects (32% versus 8%, p=0.034. There was a significant positive correlation between AHI and neck circumference, glucose, and late-night serum cortisol. Conclusions. Our study indicates that increased waist and neck circumferences constitute a risk for OSA regardless of obesity status. In addition, OSA has adverse effects on endocrine function and glucose metabolism.

  15. Standard practice for examination of welds using the alternating current field measurement technique

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes procedures to be followed during alternating current field measurement examination of welds for baseline and service-induced surface breaking discontinuities. 1.2 This practice is intended for use on welds in any metallic material. 1.3 This practice does not establish weld acceptance criteria. 1.4 The values stated in either inch-pound units or SI units are to be regarded separately as standard. The values stated in each system might not be exact equivalents; therefore, each system shall be used independently of the other. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  16. Physics at the LHC - From Standard Model measurements to Searches for New Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobs, Karl [Freiburg University (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The successful operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during the past two years allowed to explore particle interaction in a new energy regime. Measurements of important Standard Model processes like the production of high-p{sub T} jets, W and Z bosons and top and b-quarks were performed by the LHC experiments. In addition, the high collision energy allowed to search for new particles in so far unexplored mass regions. Important constraints on the existence of new particles predicted in many models of physics beyond the Standard Model could be established. With integrated luminosities reaching values around 5 fb{sup −1} in 2011, the experiments reached as well sensitivity to probe the existence of the Standard Model Higgs boson over a large mass range. In the present report the major physics results obtained by the two general-purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS are summarized.

  17. Standard Reference Test Method for Making Potentiostatic and Potentiodynamic Anodic Polarization Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers an experimental procedure for checking experimental technique and instrumentation. If followed, this test method will provide repeatable potentiostatic and potentiodynamic anodic polarization measurements that will reproduce data determined by others at other times and in other laboratories provided all laboratories are testing reference samples from the same lot of Type 430 stainless steel. 1.2 Values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. Inch-pound units given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  18. Advances in absorbed dose measurement standards at the australian radiation laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boas, J.F.; Hargrave, N.J.; Huntley, R.B.; Kotler, L.H.; Webb, D.V.; Wise, K.N. [Australian Radiation Laboratory, Yallambie, VIC (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The applications of ionising radiation in the medical and industrial fields require both an accurate knowledge of the amount of ionising radiation absorbed by the medium in question and the capability of relating this to National and International standards. The most useful measure of the amount of radiation is the absorbed dose which is defined as the energy absorbed per unit mass. For radiotherapy, the reference medium is water, even though the measurement of the absorbed dose to water is not straightforward. Two methods are commonly used to provide calibrations in absorbed dose to water. The first is the calibration of the chamber in terms of exposure in a Cobalt-60 beam, followed by the conversion by a protocol into dose to water in this and higher energy beams. The other route is via the use of a graphite calorimeter as a primary standard device, where the conversion from absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose in water is performed either by theoretical means making use of cavity ionisation theory, or by experiment where the graphite calorimeter and secondary standard ionisation chamber are placed at scaled distances from the source of the radiation beam (known as the Dose-Ratio method). Extensive measurements have been made at Cobalt-60 at ARL using both the exposure and absorbed dose to graphite routes. Agreement between the ARL measurements and those based on standards maintained by ANSTO and NPL is within {+-} 0.3%. Absorbed dose measurements have also been performed at ARL with photon beams of nominal energy 16 and 19 MeV obtained from the ARL linac. The validity of the protocols at high photon energies, the validity of the methods used to convert from absorbed dose in graphite to absorbed dose in water and the validity of the indices used to specify the beams are discussed. Brief mention will also be made of the establishment of a calibration facility for neutron monitors at ARL and of progress in the development of ERP dosimetry.

  19. Optimising the Number of Replicate- Versus Standard Measurements for Carbonate Clumped Isotope Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocken, I.; Ziegler, M.

    2017-12-01

    Clumped isotope measurements on carbonates are a quickly developing and promising palaeothermometry proxy1-3. Developments in the field have brought down the necessary sample amount and improved the precision and accuracy of the measurements. The developments have included inter-laboratory comparison and the introduction of an absolute reference frame4, determination of acid fractionation effects5, correction for the pressure baseline6, as well as improved temperature calibrations2, and most recently new approaches to improve efficiency in terms of sample gas usage7. However, a large-scale application of clumped isotope thermometry is still hampered by required large sample amounts, but also the time-consuming analysis. In general, a lot of time is goes into the measurement of standards. Here we present a study on the optimal ratio between standard- and sample measurements using the Kiel Carbonate Device method. We also consider the optimal initial signal intensity. We analyse ETH-standard measurements from several months to determine the measurement regime with the highest precision and optimised measurement time management.References 1. Eiler, J. M. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 262, 309-327 (2007).2. Kelson, J. R., et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 197, 104-131 (2017).3. Kele, S. et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 168, 172-192 (2015).4. Dennis, K. J. et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 75, 7117-7131 (2011).5. Müller, I. A. et al. Chem. Geol. 449, 1-14 (2017).6. Meckler, A. N. et al. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 28, 1705-1715 (2014).7. Hu, B. et al. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 28, 1413-1425 (2014).

  20. Evaluation of uncertainties in femtoampere current measurement for the number concentration standard of aerosol nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Hiromu; Ehara, Kensei

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated uncertainties in current measurement by the electrometer at the current level on the order of femtoamperes. The electrometer was the one used in the Faraday-cup aerosol electrometer of the Japanese national standard for number concentration of aerosol nanoparticles in which the accuracy of the absolute current is not required, but the net current which is obtained as the difference in currents under two different conditions must be measured accurately. The evaluation was done experimentally at the current level of 20 fA, which was much smaller than the intervals between the electrometer's calibration points at +1, +0.5, −0.5 and −1 pA. The slope of the response curve for the relationship between the 'true' and measured current, which is crucial in the above measurement, was evaluated locally at many different points within the ±1 pA range for deviation from the slope determined by a linear regression of the calibration data. The sum of the current induced by a flow of charged particles and a bias current from a current-source instrument was measured by the electrometer while the particle current was toggled on and off. The net particle current was obtained as the difference in the measured currents between the toggling, while at the same time the current was estimated from the particle concentration read by a condensation particle counter. The local slope was calculated as the ratio of the measured to estimated currents at each bias current setting. The standard deviation of the local slope values observed at varied bias currents was about 0.003, which was calculated by analysis of variance (ANOVA) for the treatment of the bias current. The combined standard uncertainty of the slope, which was calculated from the uncertainty of the slope by linear regression and the variability of the slope, was calculated to be about 0.004

  1. A spectrum standardization approach for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhe, E-mail: zhewang@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Li Lizhi; West, Logan; Li Zheng, E-mail: lz-dte@tsinghua.edu.cn; Ni Weidou

    2012-02-15

    This paper follows and completes a previous presentation of a spectrum normalization method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements by converting the experimentally recorded line intensity at varying operational conditions to the intensity that would be obtained under a 'standard state' condition, characterized by a standard plasma temperature, electron number density, and total number density of the interested species. At first, for each laser shot and corresponding spectrum, the line intensities of the interested species are converted to the intensity at a fixed plasma temperature and electron number density, but with varying total number density. Under this state, if the influence of changing plasma morphology is neglected, the sum of multiple spectral line intensities for the measured element is proportional to the total number density of the specific element. Therefore, the fluctuation of the total number density, or the variation of ablation mass, can be compensated for by applying the proportional relationship. The application of this method to Cu in 29 brass alloy samples, showed an improvement over the commonly applied normalization method with regard to measurement precision and accuracy. The average relative standard deviation (RSD) value, average value of the error bar, R{sup 2}, root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP), and average value of the maximum relative error were: 5.29%, 0.68%, 0.98, 2.72%, 16.97%, respectively, while the above parameter values for normalization with the whole spectrum area were: 8.61%, 1.37%, 0.95, 3.28%, 29.19%, respectively. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intensity converted into an ideal standard plasma state for uncertainty reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ablated mass fluctuations compensated by variation of sum of multiple intensities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A spectrum standardization model established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results in both uncertainty

  2. Anthropometric survey of high-altitude Bolivian porters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatherman, T L; Thomas, R B; Greksa, L P; Haas, J D

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an anthropometric survey of 138 rural Aymaran high-altitude males who were working as porters in La Paz, Bolivia (3700 m). All subjects were measured for stature, weight, upper arm circumference, and triceps skinfolds. The body size and composition of the porters were then compared to an Aymaran rural population from the Bolivian highlands, and urban mestizo labourers from La Paz. The porters were smaller than the urban sample, but appeared to be generally representative of rural Aymaran natives with respect to body size and composition, and nutritional status. It is suggested that towards one extreme of nutritional variability, some degree of undernutrition may be indicated, which should be considered in future studies of adaptation to hypoxia among these Andean highlanders.

  3. Australian Rules football: an anthropometric study of participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, L M; Read, R S; Gollan, R A

    1985-06-01

    Anthropometric measurements and personal data were collected from 119 Australian Rules footballers from Victoria. A top level professional league team, a second level association team, and an A-grade amateur association team were observed, representing three levels of ability. The profile of physical features of these athletes at the beginning of the season is presented. A gradation of body size was observed between teams. The players in the top level team were slightly taller and heavier than those in the other teams. They had less body fat, as shown by lesser skinfold thicknesses, a smaller percentage body fat as determined by prediction equations, and a greater fat-free mass. The intermediate level team showed an intermediate level of body fat and the lower level team had the highest proportion of fat.

  4. Study of educational furniture conformity with students anthropometric dimensions of Isfahan university of medical sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mehdi Sadeghi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal disorders, early fatigue induced by static work and the same symptoms are caused by inappropriate designed tools, equipment, building and workplace. Inadequate educational furniture is taken to be the reason of severe posture problems such as low back pain, spinal disorders, fatigue, shoulder and neck pain, and disturbance circulation in legs. So ergonomic design of educational furniture should be carefully considered. Materials and Methods: The present research was a cross-sectional study. Samples included desks and chairs (n=150 chosen from reading rooms of dormitories and faculties of Isfahan university of medical sciences Isfahan- Iran. In the study 2 parameters from desk and 5 parameters from chairs were assessed using a tape-measure and a set-sqare. Data were analyzed by SPSS ver 10 software. Results: Comparing the results from the mean of measured values (for seating height, desk height and desk clearance indicated a significant difference between them (p<0. 00. Conclusion: Findings of the study showed that existing standard in Iran about chairs and tables for educational institutions should be reviewed. Also the most important problem with chairs and desks are seating height and desk surface height respectively. These two parameters didn’t match with anthropometric dimensions of the sudents of Isfahan university of medical sciences.

  5. The standard centrifuge method accurately measures vulnerability curves of long-vesselled olive stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacke, Uwe G; Venturas, Martin D; MacKinnon, Evan D; Jacobsen, Anna L; Sperry, John S; Pratt, R Brandon

    2015-01-01

    The standard centrifuge method has been frequently used to measure vulnerability to xylem cavitation. This method has recently been questioned. It was hypothesized that open vessels lead to exponential vulnerability curves, which were thought to be indicative of measurement artifact. We tested this hypothesis in stems of olive (Olea europea) because its long vessels were recently claimed to produce a centrifuge artifact. We evaluated three predictions that followed from the open vessel artifact hypothesis: shorter stems, with more open vessels, would be more vulnerable than longer stems; standard centrifuge-based curves would be more vulnerable than dehydration-based curves; and open vessels would cause an exponential shape of centrifuge-based curves. Experimental evidence did not support these predictions. Centrifuge curves did not vary when the proportion of open vessels was altered. Centrifuge and dehydration curves were similar. At highly negative xylem pressure, centrifuge-based curves slightly overestimated vulnerability compared to the dehydration curve. This divergence was eliminated by centrifuging each stem only once. The standard centrifuge method produced accurate curves of samples containing open vessels, supporting the validity of this technique and confirming its utility in understanding plant hydraulics. Seven recommendations for avoiding artefacts and standardizing vulnerability curve methodology are provided. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Application of simulated standard spectra in natural radioactivity measurements using gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayani, K.; Pant, A.D.; Bhosle, Nitin; Anilkumar, S.; Singh, Rajvir; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma ray spectrometry is one of the well known analytical techniques for environmental radioactivity measurements. Gamma spectrometer based on NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors is very popular since it offers high efficiency, low cost and case in handling. The poor energy resolution of the NaI(TI) detector is the major disadvantage making tile analysis of complex gamma ray spectra difficult. Least square method or the full spectrum analysis method is widely used for the analysis of complex spectra from scintillation detectors. The main requirement of this method is that the individual standard spectra of all nuclides expected in the complex spectrum in the same measurement geometry must be available. It is not always possible and feasible to have all the standards of nuclides in the desired geometry. A methodology based on the use of simulated standard spectra generated by Monte Carlo technique was proposed for analysis of complex spectra of nuclides. In the present work, for the analysis of 238 U, 233 Th and 40 K in soil samples, the same methodology was applied by using the simulated standard spectra in soil matrix. The details of the simulation method and results analysis of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K in environmental samples are discussed in this paper

  7. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Aluminum

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures measuring reaction rates by the activation reaction 27Al(n,α)24Na. 1.2 This activation reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies above approximately 6.5 MeV and for irradiation times up to about 2 days (for longer irradiations, see Practice E261). 1.3 With suitable techniques, fission-neutron fluence rates above 106