WorldWideScience

Sample records for standard adhesives giving

  1. Hydrazide-Derivatized Microgels Bond to Wet, Oxidized Cellulose Giving Adhesion Without Drying or Curing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong; Gustafsson, Emil; Stimpson, Taylor C; Esser, Anton; Pelton, Robert H

    2017-06-21

    Hydrazide-derivatized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) microgels gave strong adhesion to wet, TEMPO oxidized, regenerated cellulose membranes without a drying or heating step. Adhesion was attributed to hydrazone covalent bond formation with aldehyde groups present on the cellulose surfaces. This is one of only three chemistries we have found that gives significant never-dried adhesion between wet cellulose surfaces. By contrast, for cellulose joints that have been dried and heated before wet testing, the hydrazide-hydrazone chemistry offers no advantages over standard paper industry wet strength resins. The design rules for the hydrazide-microgel adhesives include: cationic microgels are superior to anionic gels; the lower the microgel cross-link density, the higher the adhesion; longer PEG-based hydrazide tethers offer no advantage over shorter attachments; and, adhesion is independent of microgel diameter. Many of these rules were in agreement with predictions of a simple adhesion model where the microgels were assumed to be ideal springs. We propose that the unexpected, high cohesion between neighboring microgels in multilayer films was a result of bond formation between hydrazide groups and residual NHS-carboxyl esters from the preparation of the hydrazide microgels.

  2. Adhesion properties of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR/Standard Malaysian Rubber (SMR L-based adhesives in the presence of phenol formaldehyde resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion properties, i. e. viscosity, tack and peel strength of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR/Standard Malaysian Rubber (SMR L-based pressure-sensitive adhesive was studied using phenol formaldehyde resin as the tackifying resin. Toluene was used as the solvent throughout the experiment. SBR composition in SBR/SMR L blend used was 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100%. Three different resin loadings, i. e. 40, 80 and 120 parts per hundred parts of rubber (phr were used in the adhesive formulation. The viscosity of adhesive was determined by a HAAKE Rotary Viscometer whereas loop tack and peel strength of paper/polyethylene terephthalate (PET film were measured using a Lloyd Adhesion Tester operating at 30 cm/min. Results indicate that the viscosity of adhesive decreases with increasing % SBR whereas loop tack passes through a maximum value at 20% SBR for all resin loadings. Except for the control sample (without resin, the peel strength shows a maximum value at 60% SBR for the three modes of peel tests. For a fixed % SBR, adhesive sample containing 40 phr phenol formaldehyde resin always exhibits the highest loop tack and peel strength, an observation which is associated to the optimum wettability of adhesive on the substrate.

  3. A prospective randomised study comparing the jubilee dressing method to a standard adhesive dressing for total hip and knee replacements.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Neil G

    2012-08-01

    It is important to reduce potential wound complications in total hip and total knee arthroplasty procedures. The purpose of this study was to compare the jubilee dressing method to a standard adhesive dressing.

  4. Accepted standards on how to give a Medical Research Presentation: a systematic review of expert opinion papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blome, Christine; Sondermann, Hanno; Augustin, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Background: This systematic review aimed to extract recommendations from expert opinion articles on how to give a medical research presentation on a scientific conference and to determine whether the experts agree on what makes an effective or poor presentation. Methods: Presentation-related terms were searched within article titles listed in PubMed, restricting the search to English-language articles published from January 1975 to July 2015. Recommendations were extracted from the articles, grouped by content, and analyzed for frequency. Ninety-one articles were included. Among 679 different recommendations, 29 were given in more than 20% of articles each. The five most frequent recommendations were to keep slides simple, adjust the talk to the audience, rehearse, not read the talk from slides or a manuscript, and make eye contact. Results: No article gave advice that was the complete opposite of the 29 most frequent recommendations with the exception of whether a light or dark background should be used for slides. Conclusions: Researchers should comply with these widely accepted standards to be perceived as effective presenters. PMID:28293678

  5. Accepted standards on how to give a Medical Research Presentation: a systematic review of expert opinion papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blome, Christine

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: This systematic review aimed to extract recommendations from expert opinion articles on how to give a medical research presentation on a scientific conference and to determine whether the experts agree on what makes an effective or poor presentation. Methods: Presentation-related terms were searched within article titles listed in PubMed, restricting the search to English-language articles published from January 1975 to July 2015. Recommendations were extracted from the articles, grouped by content, and analyzed for frequency. Ninety-one articles were included. Among 679 different recommendations, 29 were given in more than 20% of articles each. The five most frequent recommendations were to keep slides simple, adjust the talk to the audience, rehearse, not read the talk from slides or a manuscript, and make eye contact. Results: No article gave advice that was the complete opposite of the 29 most frequent recommendations with the exception of whether a light or dark background should be used for slides. Conclusions: Researchers should comply with these widely accepted standards to be perceived as effective presenters.

  6. Giving feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jane DeLima; Arnold, Robert M

    2011-02-01

    Giving feedback is a core element of medical education, one that is gaining attention but with a thin evidence base to guide medical educators. This review provides a definition of feedback and its purpose, selectively reviews the literature regarding educators' and learners' attitudes toward feedback, and provides an algorithm for giving feedback. The authors discuss the parallels between giving feedback and breaking bad news, emphasizing the importance of titrating the amount of information given, attending to affect, and making a plan for next steps. Special considerations for giving feedback in palliative care are highlighted, including the effect of heightened emotion in the clinical encounter and the difficulties of giving feedback about communication skills.

  7. Accepted standards on how to give a Medical Research Presentation: a systematic review of expert opinion papers

    OpenAIRE

    Blome, Christine; Sondermann, Hanno; Augustin, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Background: This systematic review aimed to extract recommendations from expert opinion articles on how to give a medical research presentation on a scientific conference and to determine whether the experts agree on what makes an effective or poor presentation. Methods: Presentation-related terms were searched within article titles listed in PubMed, restricting the search to English-language articles published from January 1975 to July 2015. Recommendations were extracted from the articles...

  8. Giving presentations

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Mark

    1997-01-01

    This is part of a series of books, which gives training in key business communication skills. Emphasis is placed on building awareness of language appropriateness and fluency in typical business interactions. This new edition is in full colour.

  9. Standard Biocompatibility Studies Do Not Predict All Effects of PVA/CMC Anti-Adhesive Gel in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freytag, Christiane; Odermatt, Erich K

    2016-01-01

    PVA/CMC (polyvinyl alcohol/carboxymethyl cellulose) hydrogel fulfills various physiochemical properties required for an adhesion barrier and has shown good anti-adhesion properties in previous in vivo studies. In this investigation, we assessed the in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of PVA/CMC gel and compared this to the functionality and promotion of wound healing for two surgical indications. Standardized ISO10993 in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility studies, comprising cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, acute systemic toxicity, delayed contact and maximization sensitization test, intracutaneous reactivity and local muscle implantation, were performed on PVA/CMC gel. In the functional studies, PVA/CMC gel was applied - on the one hand - to a rabbit abdominal wall model enforced with a polypropylene mesh for testing the anti-adhesion properties and - on the other hand - to an end- to-end anastomosis model that was selected for surveying potential influences of different dosages of PVA/CMC gel on anastomotic wound healing. The ISO10993 methods indicated generally good biocompatibility properties, such as the absence of cytotoxic and mutagenic effects as well as no signs of systemic toxicity and sensitization potentials. No irritation effects were observed after the intracutaneous injection of lipophilic PVA/CMC sesame oil extract. However, the injection of hydrophilic PVA/CMC physiologic saline extract induced slight irritation. Following rabbit muscle implantation of the PVA membrane for 2, 4, 12, 26 and 52 weeks, a slight irritant effect was observed at 12 weeks due to the peak of phagocytosis. In the functionality tests, PVA/CMC gel showed good anti-adhesive effects in the abdominal wall model enforced with the mesh, with significantly lower and less tense adhesions compared to the untreated control. However, moderate signs of inflammation, especially in the spleen were observed after the intra-abdominal implantation of 3.3 ml PVA/CMC gel per kg body weight. In

  10. Evaluation of tensile strength of tissue adhesives and sutures for clear corneal incisions using porcine and bovine eyes, with a novel standardized testing platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaja S

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Simon Kaja, Daryl L Goad, Fatima Ali, Ashley Abraham, R Luke Rebenitsch, Savak Teymoorian, Rohit Krishna, Peter KoulenVision Research Center and Department of Ophthalmology, University of Missouri-Kansas City, School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO, USABackground: Tissue adhesives for ophthalmologic applications were proposed almost 50 years ago, yet to date no adequate tissue glues have been identified that combine strong sealing properties with adequate safety and absence of postsurgical side effects. In recent years, cataract surgeries and Descemet's stripping with endothelial keratoplasty procedures have significantly increased the number of clear corneal incisions performed. One of the obstacles to discovery and development of novel tissue adhesives has been the result of nonstandardized testing of potential tissue glues.Methods: We developed an instrument capable of controlling intraocular pressure in explanted porcine and bovine eyes in order to evaluate sealants, adhesives, and surgical closure methods used in ophthalmic surgery in a controlled, repeatable, and validated fashion. We herein developed and validated our instrument by testing the adhesive properties of cyanoacrylate glue in both porcine and bovine explant eyes.Results: The instrument applied and maintained intraocular pressure through a broad range of physiological intraocular pressures. Cyanoacrylate-based glues showed significantly enhanced sealing properties of clear corneal incisions compared with sutured wounds.Conclusion: This study shows the feasibility of our instrument for reliable and standardized testing of tissue adhesive for ophthalmological surgery.Keywords: manometer, intraocular pressure, applanation tonometry, clear corneal incision, tissue adhesive, ocular surgery

  11. Adhesive wafer bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklaus, F.; Stemme, G.; Lu, J.-Q.; Gutmann, R. J.

    2006-02-01

    Wafer bonding with intermediate polymer adhesives is an important fabrication technique for advanced microelectronic and microelectromechanical systems, such as three-dimensional integrated circuits, advanced packaging, and microfluidics. In adhesive wafer bonding, the polymer adhesive bears the forces involved to hold the surfaces together. The main advantages of adhesive wafer bonding include the insensitivity to surface topography, the low bonding temperatures, the compatibility with standard integrated circuit wafer processing, and the ability to join different types of wafers. Compared to alternative wafer bonding techniques, adhesive wafer bonding is simple, robust, and low cost. This article reviews the state-of-the-art polymer adhesive wafer bonding technologies, materials, and applications.

  12. The procedure of evaluating the practical adhesion strength of new biocompatible nano- and micro-thin films in accordance with international standards

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutílek, P.; Mikšovský, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2011), s. 87-94 ISSN 1509-409X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : practical adhesion * strength * nano-layer * micro-layer * international standards * scratch test Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.449, year: 2011 http://382.indexcopernicus.com/abstracted.php?level=5&ICID=962671

  13. Dosage effect on uropathogenic Escherichia coli anti-adhesion activity in urine following consumption of cranberry powder standardized for proanthocyanidin content: a multicentric randomized double blind study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Ingestion of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) has traditionally been utilized for prevention of urinary tract infections. The proanthocyanidins (PACs) in cranberry, in particular the A-type linkages have been implicated as important inhibitors of primarily P-fimbriated E. coli adhesion to uroepithelial cells. Additional experiments were required to investigate the persistence in urine samples over a broader time period, to determine the most effective dose per day and to determine if the urinary anti-adhesion effect following cranberry is detected within volunteers of different origins. Methods Two separate bioassays (a mannose-resistant hemagglutination assay and an original new human T24 epithelial cell-line assay) have assessed the ex-vivo urinary bacterial anti-adhesion activity on urines samples collected from 32 volunteers from Japan, Hungary, Spain and France in a randomized, double-blind versus placebo study. An in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans model was used to evaluate the influence of cranberry regimen on the virulence of E. coli strain. Results The results indicated a significant bacterial anti-adhesion activity in urine samples collected from volunteers that consumed cranberry powder compared to placebo (p cranberry powder regimen. An in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans model showed that cranberry acted against bacterial virulence: E. coli strain presented a reduced ability to kill worms after a growth in urines samples of patients who took cranberry capsules. This effect is particularly important with the regimen of 72 mg of PAC. Conclusions Administration of PAC-standardized cranberry powder at dosages containing 72 mg of PAC per day may offer some protection against bacterial adhesion and virulence in the urinary tract. This effect may offer a nyctohemeral protection. PMID:20398248

  14. Short-and long-term bond strengths of a gold standard two-step self-etch adhesive system to dentin: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Safa; Tekce, Neslihan; Pashaev, Dial; Demirci, Mustafa; Baydemir, Canan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the micro tensile bond strength of a self-etch adhesive system following 1 year storage in water. 10 sound human molar teeth were used for micro tensile bond strength test. Twostep self-etch dentin adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond®) was applied to the flat dentin surfaces according to the manufacturer's instructions. Composite blocks (Z- 250; 3M ESPE) of 5 mm in height have been prepared by using layering technique. Teeth were stored in water for 24 hours at 37°C and longitudinally sectioned to obtain dentin sticks of 1 mm2.Randomly selected samples from half of the teeth were immediately subjected to micro tensile test and. Remaining specimens were tested after 1 year storage in water. Bond strengths were calculated in megapascal (MPa). Means and standard deviations of the Clearfil SE Bond® micro tensile bond strength values were, respectively, 37.31 ± 13.77 MPa and 24.78 ± 2.99 MPa after 24 h and 1 year of storage in water. The difference was statistically significant (p=0.031). Long-term storage in water decreased the micro tensile bond strength values of the twostep self-etch adhesive which has been accepted as the gold standard in bond strength tests.

  15. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-04

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  16. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well...... to rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  17. Protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2018-01-01

    Nature uses a wide variety of chemicals for providing adhesion internally (e.g., cell to cell) and externally (e.g., mussels to ships and piers). This adhesive bonding is chemically and mechanically complex, involving a variety of proteins, carbohydrates, and other compounds.Consequently,the effect of protein structures on adhesive properties is only partially...

  18. Giving Medicine to Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Articulos en Espanol Giving Medicine to Children Share Tweet ... right medicine and the right amount More in Articulos en Espanol Alimentos y Bebidas Cosméticos Dispositivos ...

  19. Give blood at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    ACCIDENTS and ILLNESSES don’t take a break! DO SOMETHING AMAZING - GIVE BLOOD! IT’S IN ALL OUR INTERESTS. 30 July 2008 from 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. CERN RESTAURANT NOVAE First floor - Salle des Pas Perdus After you have given blood, you are invited to partake of refreshments kindly offered by NOVAE.

  20. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  1. Bacterial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loosdrecht, van M.C.M.

    1988-01-01

    As mentioned in the introduction of this thesis bacterial adhesion has been studied from a variety of (mostly practice oriented) starting points. This has resulted in a range of widely divergent approaches. In order to elucidate general principles in bacterial adhesion phenomena, we felt it

  2. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2004-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well...

  3. Denture Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevent overuse if zinc is an ingredient. (Some companies include graphics of the amount of adhesive to ... and adequate directions for use or a clear definition of an unsafe dosage or methods or duration ...

  4. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  5. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Bernard, Craig; Rodrigo, Rochelle M.; Keith, Austin J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-03-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system’s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard surfaces has been extensively studied, little work has been done on soft surfaces. Here, we investigate for the first time the influence of macroscale and nanoscale substrate modulus on whole animal adhesion on two different substrates (cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane) in air and find that across 5 orders of magnitude in macroscale modulus, there is no change in adhesion. On the nanoscale, however, gecko adhesion is shown to depend on substrate modulus. This suggests that low surface-layer modulus may inhibit the gecko adhesion system, independent of other influencing factors such as macroscale composite modulus and surface energy. Understanding the limits of gecko adhesion is vital for clarifying adhesive mechanisms and in the design of synthetic adhesives for soft substrates (including for biomedical applications and wearable electronics).

  6. Is nonoperative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nonoperative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction gives good results in adults but there are scant studies on its outcome in children. This study reports outcomes and experiences with nonoperative and operative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction in children in a resource-poor country.

  7. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    reduce or delay bacterial biofilm formation of a range of urinary tract infectious E.coli and Klebsiella isolates. Several other proteinaceous coatings were also found to display anti-adhesive properties, possibly providing a measure for controlling the colonization of implant materials. Several other...... components. These substances may both mediate and stabilize the bacterial biofilm. Finally, several adhesive structures were examined, and a novel physiological biofilm phenotype in E.coli biofilms was characterized, namely cell chain formation. The autotransporter protein, antigen 43, was implicated...

  8. Structural adhesives directory and databook

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Jo

    1996-01-01

    A worldwide directory of commercially available adhesive products for use in a wide range of engineering disciplines. Along with product names and suppliers, basic property data are tabulated and cross-referenced. The book is subdivided according to class of adhesive, with introductions to each class followed by comparison tables and datasheets for each adhesive. The datasheets contain detailed information, from product codes to environmental properties and are therefore of interest across a broad readership. Standardized data will aid the user in cross-comparison between different manufacturers and in easily identifying the required information.

  9. Adhesive organ regeneration in Macrostomum lignano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengerer, Birgit; Hennebert, Elise; Flammang, Patrick; Salvenmoser, Willi; Ladurner, Peter

    2016-06-02

    Flatworms possess pluripotent stem cells that can give rise to all cell types, which allows them to restore lost body parts after injury or amputation. This makes flatworms excellent model systems for studying regeneration. In this study, we present the adhesive organs of a marine flatworm as a simple model system for organ regeneration. Macrostomum lignano has approximately 130 adhesive organs at the ventral side of its tail plate. One adhesive organ consists of three interacting cells: one adhesive gland cell, one releasing gland cell, and one modified epidermal cell, called an anchor cell. However, no specific markers for these cell types were available to study the regeneration of adhesive organs. We tested 15 commercially available lectins for their ability to label adhesive organs and found one lectin (peanut agglutinin) to be specific to adhesive gland cells. We visualized the morphology of regenerating adhesive organs using lectin- and antibody staining as well as transmission electron microscopy. Our findings indicate that the two gland cells differentiate earlier than the connected anchor cells. Using EdU/lectin staining of partially amputated adhesive organs, we showed that their regeneration can proceed in two ways. First, adhesive gland cell bodies are able to survive partial amputation and reconnect with newly formed anchor cells. Second, adhesive gland cell bodies are cleared away, and the entire adhesive organ is build anew. Our results provide the first insights into adhesive organ regeneration and describe ten new markers for differentiated cells and tissues in M. lignano. The position of adhesive organ cells within the blastema and their chronological differentiation have been shown for the first time. M. lignano can regenerate adhesive organs de novo but also replace individual anchor cells in an injured organ. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of organogenesis in flatworms and enable further molecular investigations of cell

  10. Adhesive plasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  11. Comparison of shear bond strength and microleakage of Scotchbond multi-purpose (MP adhesive system and an experimental dentin bonding agent based on standard of ISOTR 11405

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafarzadeh Kashi T.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Evaluation of shear bond strength and microleakage of bonding agents is important as these properties play main roles in adhesion of composite to dental tissues. Microleakage results in bacterial penetration into dentin tubules and enamel surfaces and causes sensitivity and recurrent caries followed by destruction of composite filling. Insufficient shear bond strength results in early failure of filling in low masticatory forces. The main goal of this study was to compare the microleakage and shear bond strength of an experimental adhesive and Scotchbond multi-purpose (MP adhesive system."nMaterials and Methods: In this experimental study, sixty extracted caries free human molar teeth were randomly assigned into 4 groups of 15 each for shear bond strength. Variables were bonding agents, enamel and dentin. Twenty teeth assigned into 2 groups of 10 each were used for valuation of the microleakage. Microleakage and shear bond strength were performed according to ISO TR 11405. All data were analyzed with parametric and non-parametric tests according to their normality distribution. Also, Weibull distribution performed on data."nResults: Data obtained from both microleakage and shear bond strength tests showed no significant difference between the experimental bonding and Scotchbond MP bonding (P>0.05. Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the microleakage of occlusal and gingival parts of both bondings (P>0.05."nConclusion: Experimental adhesive bonding showed acceptable results regarding microleakage and shear bond strength. It may be concluded that the experimental dentin bonding had a comparable performance quality with that of commercial system.

  12. Adhesion and Cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Anthony von Fraunhofer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  13. Advanced adhesives in electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, C

    2011-01-01

    Adhesives are widely used in the manufacture of electronic devices to act as passive and active components. Recently there has been considerable interest in the use of conductive adhesives. This book reviews key types of conductive adhesives, processing methods, properties and the way they can be modelled as well as potential applications.$bAdhesives for electronic applications serve important functional and structural purposes in electronic components and packaging, and have developed significantly over the last few decades. Advanced adhesives in electronics reviews recent developments in adhesive joining technology, processing and properties. The book opens with an introduction to adhesive joining technology for electronics. Part one goes on to cover different types of adhesive used in electronic systems, including thermally conductive adhesives, isotropic and anisotropic conductive adhesives and underfill adhesives for flip-chip applications. Part two focuses on the properties and processing of electronic ...

  14. Prevention and treatment of peritoneal adhesions in patients affected by vascular diseases following surgery: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocca Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra-abdominal adhesions are the most frequently occurring postoperative complication following abdomino-pelvic surgery. Abdominal and pelvic surgery can lead to peritoneal adhesion formation causing infertility, chronic pelvic pain, and intestinal obstruction. Laparoscopy today is considered the gold standard of care in the treatment of several abdominal pathologies as well as in a wide range of vascular diseases. Laparoscopy has several advantages in comparison to open surgery. These include rapid recovery times, shorter hospitalisation, reduced postoperative pain, as well as cosmetic benefits. The technological improvements in this particular surgical field along with the development of modern techniques and the acquisition of specific laparoscopic skills have allowed for its wider utilization in operations with fully intracorporeal anastomoses. Postoperative adhesions are caused by aberrant peritoneal healing and are the leading cause of postoperative bowel obstruction. The use of anti-adherence barriers is currently being advocated for their prevention. The outcome of the investigation showed adhesion formation inhibition without direct detrimental effects on anastomotic healing. Poor anasto-motic healing can provoke adhesions even in the presence of anti-adhesion barriers. This review gives a short overview on the current evidence on the pathophysiology and prevention of peritoneal adhesions.

  15. Adhesion in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    This comprehensive book will provide both fundamental and applied aspects of adhesion pertaining to microelectronics in a single and easily accessible source. Among the topics to be covered include; Various theories or mechanisms of adhesionSurface (physical or chemical) characterization of materials as it pertains to adhesionSurface cleaning as it pertains to adhesionWays to improve adhesionUnraveling of interfacial interactions using an array of pertinent techniquesCharacterization of interfaces / interphasesPolymer-polymer adhesionMetal-polymer adhesion  (metallized polymers)Polymer adhesi

  16. Characterizing phenolformaldehyde adhesive cure chemistry within the wood cell wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of wood using phenol-formaldehyde remains the industrial standard in wood product bond durability. Not only does this adhesive infiltrate the cell wall, it also is believed to form primary bonds with wood cell wall polymers, particularly guaiacyl lignin. However, the mechanism by which phenol-formaldehyde adhesive intergrally interacts and bonds to...

  17. The New Planned Giving Officer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Ronald R.; Quynn, Katelyn L.

    1994-01-01

    A planned giving officer is seen as an asset to college/university development for technical expertise, credibility, and connections. Attorneys, certified public accountants, bank trust officers, financial planners, investment advisers, life insurance agents, and real estate brokers may be qualified but probably also need training. (MSE)

  18. Characterization of Tape Adhesion to Chemical Agent Resistant Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Performance criterion for tape adhesion has been set by the CARC Commodity Manager at 80 inch ounce-force using IAW ASTM D 3330, Peel Adhesion of Pressure ...D3330M-04(2010). “Standard Test Method for Peel Adhesion of Pressure -Sensitive Tape ”. Aunnu. Book ASTM Stand. 2010. 14 Wave Matrix. Computer...ARL-RP-0517 ● JAN 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Characterization of Tape Adhesion to Chemical Agent Resistant Coatings by

  19. Postattachment neutralization of a primary strain of HIV type 1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is mediated by CD4-specific antibodies but not by a glycoprotein 120-specific antibody that gives potent standard neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, T L; Dimmock, N J

    2001-11-20

    De novo infecting HIV-1 or virus released from an infected cell in vivo attaches relatively quickly to a target cell, but the rate of fusion-entry of such virus is slow, with 50% entry taking > or =2 hr. It is thus desirable that antibodies stimulated by any vaccine or given in immunotherapy are able to neutralize not only free virus, but also virus attached to the target cell. Here we investigated postattachment neutralization (PAN) of a primary HIV-1 strain (JRCSF) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and of a T cell line-adapted strain (IIIB) in C8166 T lymphoblastoid cells, using the highly potent gp120-specific human monoclonal b12 monoclonal IgG, and monoclonal antibodies specific for the CD4 primary cell receptor. In addition, we improved the experimental protocols of related studies by using a pulse of antibody, thus avoiding the complication of neutralizing progeny virus. We found that b12 IgG PAN was inefficient, with PAN of IIIB needing a 1000-fold greater concentration of antibody than was required for standard neutralization, and PAN of JRCSF being detected erratically only at 4 degrees C and unphysiologically high concentrations (300 microg/ml). Nonetheless, under identical conditions a 10-microg/ml pulse of the CD4-specific MAb Q4120 gave up to 99% PAN of JRCSF, and more than 95% even when added 3 hr after infection at 37 degrees C. Possible mechanisms by which PAN by CD4- specific antibodies is mediated are discussed. We suggest that such anti-CD4 antibodies should be considered as a component of HIV-1 immunotherapy.

  20. Adhesion, growth, and matrix production by fibroblasts on laminin substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Höök, M; Rees, D A

    1983-01-01

    and laminin-coated substrates with the development of microfilament bundles and focal adhesions. Antibodies to laminin, but not fibronectin, will prevent or reverse fibroblast adhesion to laminin, whereas antibodies to fibronectin but not laminin will give similar results on fibronectin-coated substrates...

  1. Adhesive Elastomeric Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Mansour, Haefa; Liu, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Sutures and staples commonly used to close surgical wounds tend to be much stiffer than the surrounding tissue, often resulting in external tissue damage. Surgical adhesives provide a promising alternative to these sutures and staples. Ideal surgical adhesives are biocompatible, able to set well and remain sticky in moist conditions, possess strong adhesive and cohesive properties, and exhibit mechanical properties that mimic those of the surrounding tissue. Unfortunately, the adhesives avail...

  2. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  3. Underwater Adhesives Retrofit Pipelines with Advanced Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Houston-based Astro Technology Inc. used a partnership with Johnson Space Center to pioneer an advanced fiber-optic monitoring system for offshore oil pipelines. The company's underwater adhesives allow it to retrofit older deepwater systems in order to measure pressure, temperature, strain, and flow properties, giving energy companies crucial data in real time and significantly decreasing the risk of a catastrophe.

  4. Analysis gives sensibility two models gives migration and transport gives radionuclides in the geosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Berdeguez, M. B.; Gil Castillo, R.; Peralta Vidal, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    An sensibility analysis it was applied two models, the first one, a model compressible for the near field (I finish source) The second, a simple model gives migration and transport radionuclides in the geosphere. The study was developed varying the securities ed simultaneously at the same time each parameter and observing the results in changes in the output and input. The intention in analysis it is to determine the parameter that but it influences in the variation the concentration. The statistical technique Regression it was employee in the study. This statistical method is used to analyze the dependence between a dependent variable and an or but independent variables

  5. Particle adhesion and removal

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  6. Sundew adhesive: a naturally occurring hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Sun, Leming; Agrawal, Richa; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-06-06

    Bioadhesives have drawn increasing interest in recent years, owing to their eco-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. As a typical bioadhesive, sticky exudate observed on the stalked glands of sundew plants aids in the capture of insects and this viscoelastic adhesive has triggered extensive interests in revealing the implied adhesion mechanisms. Despite the significant progress that has been made, the structural traits of the sundew adhesive, especially the morphological characteristics in nanoscale, which may give rise to the viscous and elastic properties of this mucilage, remain unclear. Here, we show that the sundew adhesive is a naturally occurring hydrogel, consisting of nano-network architectures assembled with polysaccharides. The assembly process of the polysaccharides in this hydrogel is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions mediated with divalent cations. Negatively charged nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 231.9 ± 14.8 nm, are also obtained from this hydrogel and these nanoparticles are presumed to exert vital roles in the assembly of the nano-networks. Further characterization via atomic force microscopy indicates that the stretching deformation of the sundew adhesive is associated with the flexibility of its fibrous architectures. It is also observed that the adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive is susceptible to low temperatures. Both elasticity and adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive reduce in response to lowering the ambient temperature. The feasibility of applying sundew adhesive for tissue engineering is subsequently explored in this study. Results show that the fibrous scaffolds obtained from sundew adhesive are capable of increasing the adhesion of multiple types of cells, including fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells, a property that results from the enhanced adsorption of serum proteins. In addition, in light of the weak cytotoxic activity exhibited by these scaffolds towards a variety of

  7. Protein Modifiers Generally Provide Limited Improvement in Wood Bond Strength of Soy Flour Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    Soy flour adhesives using a polyamidoamine-epichlorohydrin (PAE) polymeric coreactant are used increasingly as wood adhesives for interior products. Although these adhesives give good performance, higher bond strength under wet conditions is desirable. Wet strength is important for accelerated tests involving the internal forces generated by the swelling of wood and...

  8. The adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-Min; Hong, Guang; Dilinuer, Maimaitishawuti; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Xin-Zhi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    To examine the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of modern denture adhesives in vitro. Three cream-type denture adhesives (Poligrip S, Corect Cream, Liodent Cream; PGS, CRC, LDC) and three powder-type denture adhesives (Poligrip Powder, New Faston, Zanfton; PGP, FSN, ZFN) were used in this study. The initial viscosity was measured using a controlled-stress rheometer. The adhesive strength was measured according to ISO-10873 recommended procedures. All data were analyzed independently by one-way analysis of variance combined with a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test at a 5% level of significance. The initial viscosity of all the cream-type denture adhesives was lower than the powder-type adhesives. Before immersion in water, all the powder-type adhesives exhibited higher adhesive strength than the cream-type adhesives. However, the adhesive strength of cream-type denture adhesives increased significantly and exceeded the powder-type denture adhesives after immersion in water. For powder-type adhesives, the adhesive strength significantly decreased after immersion in water for 60 min, while the adhesive strength of the cream-type adhesives significantly decreased after immersion in water for 180 min. Cream-type denture adhesives have lower initial viscosity and higher adhesive strength than powder type adhesives, which may offer better manipulation properties and greater efficacy during application.

  9. To give or not to give, that's the question: How methodology is destiny in Dutch giving data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, R.H.F.P.; Wiepking, P.

    2006-01-01

    In research on giving, methodology is destiny. The volume of donations estimated from sample surveys strongly depends on the length of the questionnaire used to measure giving. By comparing two giving surveys from the Netherlands, the authors show that a short questionnaire on giving not only

  10. To Give or Not to Give, That Is the Question : How Methodology Is Destiny in Dutch Giving Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, René; Wiepking, Pamala

    2006-01-01

    In research on giving, methodology is destiny. The volume of donations estimated from sample surveys strongly depends on the length of the questionnaire used to measure giving. By comparing two giving surveys from the Netherlands, the authors show that a short questionnaire on giving not only

  11. Synaptic Cell Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Missler, Markus; Südhof, Thomas C.; Biederer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Chemical synapses are asymmetric intercellular junctions that mediate synaptic transmission. Synaptic junctions are organized by trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules bridging the synaptic cleft. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules not only connect pre- and postsynaptic compartments, but also mediate trans-synaptic recognition and signaling processes that are essential for the establishment, specification, and plasticity of synapses. A growing number of synaptic cell adhesion molecules that inc...

  12. Wet adhesion with application to tree frog adhesive toe pads and tires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, B N J

    2007-01-01

    Strong adhesion between solids with rough surfaces is only possible if at least one of the solids is elastically very soft. Some lizards and spiders are able to adhere (dry adhesion) and move on very rough vertical surfaces due to very compliant surface layers on their attachment pads. Flies, bugs, grasshoppers and tree frogs have less compliant pad surface layers, and in these cases adhesion to rough surfaces is only possible because the animals inject a wetting liquid into the pad-substrate contact area, which generates a relative long-range attractive interaction due to the formation of capillary bridges. In this presentation I will discuss some aspects of wet adhesion for tree frogs and give some comments related to tire applications

  13. Friction and adhesion of hierarchical carbon nanotube structures for biomimetic dry adhesives: multiscale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shihao; Jiang, Haodan; Xia, Zhenhai; Gao, Xiaosheng

    2010-09-01

    With unique hierarchical fibrillar structures on their feet, gecko lizards can walk on vertical walls or even ceilings. Recent experiments have shown that strong binding along the shear direction and easy lifting in the normal direction can be achieved by forming unidirectional carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed tips similar to gecko's feet. In this study, a multiscale modeling approach was developed to analyze friction and adhesion behaviors of this hierarchical fibrillar system. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed segments at the end was simulated by coarse grained molecular dynamics. The effects of the laterally distributed segments on friction and adhesion strengths were analyzed, and further adopted as cohesive laws used in finite element analysis at device scale. The results show that the laterally distributed segments play an essential role in achieving high force anisotropy between normal and shear directions in the adhesives. Finite element analysis reveals a new friction-enhanced adhesion mechanism of the carbon nanotube array, which also exists in gecko adhesive system. The multiscale modeling provides an approach to bridge the microlevel structures of the carbon nanotube array with its macrolevel adhesive behaviors, and the predictions from this modeling give an insight into the mechanisms of gecko-mimicking dry adhesives.

  14. Soy protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2010-01-01

    In the quest to manufacture and use building materials that are more environmentally friendly, soy adhesives can be an important component. Trees fix and store carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. After the trees are harvested, machinery converts the wood into strands, which are then bonded together with adhesives to form strandboard, used in constructing long-lasting...

  15. Adhesive compositions and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Scott D.; Sendijarevic, Vahid; O' Connor, James

    2017-12-05

    The present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesive compositions comprising aliphatic polycarbonate chains. In one aspect, the present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesives derived from aliphatic polycarbonate polyols and polyisocyanates wherein the polyol chains contain a primary repeating unit having a structure:. In another aspect, the invention provides articles comprising the inventive polyurethane compositions as well as methods of making such compositions.

  16. adhesive intestinal obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-06-01

    Jun 1, 2006 ... ABSTRACT. Background: Adhesions after abdominal and pelvic surgery are a major cause of intestinal obstruction in the western world and the pathology is steadily gaining prominence in our practice. Objective: To determine the magnitude of adhesive intestinal obstruction; to determine the types.

  17. Instant acting adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. R.; Haines, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Adhesive developes 80 percent of minimum bond strength of 250 psi less than 30 sec after activation is required. Adhesive is stable, handles easily, is a low toxic hazard, and is useful in industrial and domestic prototype bonding and clamping operations.

  18. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach...... that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  19. 40 CFR 63.5740 - What emission limit must I meet for carpet and fabric adhesive operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... carpet and fabric adhesive operations? 63.5740 Section 63.5740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Manufacturing Standards for Carpet and Fabric Adhesive Operations § 63.5740 What emission limit must I meet for carpet and fabric adhesive operations? (a) You must use carpet and fabric adhesives that contain no more...

  20. Know Concentration Before Giving Acetaminophen to Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Know Concentration Before Giving Acetaminophen to Infants Share Tweet Linkedin ... infants has only been available in a stronger concentration that doesn’t require giving the infants as ...

  1. Income Tax Policy and Charitable Giving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Arthur C.

    2007-01-01

    Many studies over the past 20 years have looked at the response of charitable donations to tax incentives--the tax price elasticity of giving. Generally, authors have assumed this elasticity is constant across all types of giving. Using the 2001 Panel Study of Income Dynamics data on charitable giving, this paper estimates the tax price elasticity…

  2. EB curable laminating adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Asao; Kobayashi, Masahide; Gotoh, Sakiko

    1992-01-01

    New developed solvent free EB curable laminating adhesives have two liquid components, A with hydroxy and acryloyl group, B with isocyanate and acryloyl group in a molecule. These EB laminating adhesives do not need any aging process, which is a big advantage, and are very suitable for environment, safety, and health because of no heating process and solvent free formulas. And we have made basic research about the relation of peel strength or heat seal strength versus Tg of cured film, elongation at break, elastic modulus, and so on. Basic specifications of the new developed adhesives are shown. (author)

  3. Environmental Failure of Adhesive Bonding in Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    to give quantitative control of silane concentration. If the more normal method of applying the silane to the glass surface had been adopted , the...includes the t4-__e required for water to 0aa diffuse in sufficient concentration across th! -. L- interracial area. nhis time is known to be...demonstrates the extreme sensitivity of fracture I energy (both cohesive and adhesive) to this quantity. 1 -17 - 1 The method adopted to circunvent this

  4. Evidence for van der Waals adhesion in gecko setae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autumn, Kellar; Sitti, Metin; Liang, Yiching A; Peattie, Anne M; Hansen, Wendy R; Sponberg, Simon; Kenny, Thomas W; Fearing, Ronald; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Full, Robert J

    2002-09-17

    Geckos have evolved one of the most versatile and effective adhesives known. The mechanism of dry adhesion in the millions of setae on the toes of geckos has been the focus of scientific study for over a century. We provide the first direct experimental evidence for dry adhesion of gecko setae by van der Waals forces, and reject the use of mechanisms relying on high surface polarity, including capillary adhesion. The toes of live Tokay geckos were highly hydrophobic, and adhered equally well to strongly hydrophobic and strongly hydrophilic, polarizable surfaces. Adhesion of a single isolated gecko seta was equally effective on the hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces of a microelectro-mechanical systems force sensor. A van der Waals mechanism implies that the remarkable adhesive properties of gecko setae are merely a result of the size and shape of the tips, and are not strongly affected by surface chemistry. Theory predicts greater adhesive forces simply from subdividing setae to increase surface density, and suggests a possible design principle underlying the repeated, convergent evolution of dry adhesive microstructures in gecko, anoles, skinks, and insects. Estimates using a standard adhesion model and our measured forces come remarkably close to predicting the tip size of Tokay gecko seta. We verified the dependence on size and not surface type by using physical models of setal tips nanofabricated from two different materials. Both artificial setal tips stuck as predicted and provide a path to manufacturing the first dry, adhesive microstructures.

  5. Determination of the Strength of Adhesion between Lipid Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Mareš

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A commonly used method to determine the strength of adhesion between adhering lipid vesicles is measuring their effective contact angle from experimental images. The aim of this paper is to estimate the interobserver variations in vesicles effective contact angle measurements and to propose a new method for estimating the strength of membrane vesicle adhesion. Theoretical model shows for the old and for the new measure a monotonic dependence on the strength of adhesion. Results obtained by both measuring techniques show statistically significant correlation and high interobserver reliability for both methods. Therefore the conventional method of measuring the effective contact angle gives qualitatively relevant results as the measure of the lipid vesicle adhesion. However, the new measuring technique provides a lower variation of the measured values than the conventional measures using the effective contact angle. Moreover, obtaining the adhesion angle can be automatized more easily than obtaining the effective contact angle.

  6. Adhesion of streptococcus rattus and streptococcus mutans to metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branting, C.; Linder, L.E.; Sund, M.-L.; Oden, A.; Wiatr-Adamczak, E.

    1988-01-01

    The adhesion of Streptococcus rattus BHT and Streptococcus mutans IB to metal specimens of amalgam, silver, tin and copper was studied using (6-/sup 3/H) thymidine labeled cells. In the standard assay the metal specimens were suspended by a nylon thread in an adhesion solution containing a chemically defined bacterial growth medium (FMC), sucrose, and radiolabeled bacteria. Maximum amounts of adhering bacteria were obtained after about 100 min of incubation. Saturation of the metal specimens with bacteria was not observed. Both strains also adhered in the absence of sucrose, indicating that glucan formation was not necessary for adhesion. However, in the presence of glucose, adhesion was only 26-45% of that observed in the presence of equimolar sucrose. Sucrose-dependent stimulation of adhesion seemed to be due to increased cell-to-cell adhesion capacity. Isolated radiolabeled water-insoluble and water-soluble polysaccharides produced from sucrose by S. rattus BHT were not adsorbed to the metal surfaces.

  7. Adhesion of streptococcus rattus and streptococcus mutans to metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branting, C.; Linder, L.E.; Sund, M.-L.; Oden, A.; Wiatr-Adamczak, E.

    1988-01-01

    The adhesion of Streptococcus rattus BHT and Streptococcus mutans IB to metal specimens of amalgam, silver, tin and copper was studied using (6- 3 H) thymidine labeled cells. In the standard assay the metal specimens were suspended by a nylon thread in an adhesion solution containing a chemically defined bacterial growth medium (FMC), sucrose, and radiolabeled bacteria. Maximum amounts of adhering bacteria were obtained after about 100 min of incubation. Saturation of the metal specimens with bacteria was not observed. Both strains also adhered in the absence of sucrose, indicating that glucan formation was not necessary for adhesion. However, in the presence of glucose, adhesion was only 26-45% of that observed in the presence of equimolar sucrose. Sucrose-dependent stimulation of adhesion seemed to be due to increased cell-to-cell adhesion capacity. Isolated radiolabeled water-insoluble and water-soluble polysaccharides produced from sucrose by S. rattus BHT were not adsorbed to the metal surfaces. (author)

  8. The Practical Realities of Giving Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashton Bree Wesner

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this thematic section, authors consider practical ways of giving back to the communities in which they conduct research. Each author discusses their evolving thoughts on how to give back in these practical ways. Some of these authors discuss giving back by giving money, food, rides, parties, and water bottles. In other cases, authors discuss giving back by creating jobs in the short or long term, grant writing, advocacy, and education. Story-telling is also a theme that many of the authors in this section discuss. For some authors, non-material forms of giving back are critical—simply maintaining social ties to the communities in which they worked, or sharing humor. The authors consider the utility of their attempts at giving back, and in some cases present their personal philosophy or guidelines on the subject.

  9. Bioinspired pressure actuated adhesive system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paretkar, D.R.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Schneider, A.S.; Martina, D.; Creton, C.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a dry synthetic adhesive system inspired by gecko feet adhesion that can switch reversibly from adhesion to non-adhesion with applied pressure as external stimulus. Micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars of 30 µm length and 10 µm diameter were fabricated using

  10. Cohesion and Adhesion with Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2016-01-01

    With increasing interest in bio-based adhesives, research on proteins has expanded because historically they have been used by both nature and humans as adhesives. A wide variety of proteins have been used as wood adhesives. Ancient Egyptians most likely used collagens tobond veneer to wood furniture, then came casein (milk), blood, fish scales, and soy adhesives, with...

  11. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahn, J; Menon, C

    2013-01-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm 2 . (paper)

  12. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, J.; Menon, C.

    2013-08-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm2.

  13. Mapping the imaginary of charitable giving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajde, Domen

    2012-01-01

    The meaningfulness of charitable giving is largely owed to the imaginary conceptions that underpin this form of giving. Building on Taylor's notion of “social imaginary” and Godelier's work on “gift imaginary,” we theorize the imaginary of charitable giving. Through a combination of qualitative m...... across relatively stable assemblages of conceptions of poverty, donors, end-recipients and charitable giving. These assemblages are suggested to form a multifaceted imaginary that is both cultural (shared) and personal (individually performed)....... methods the charitable gift imaginary and its role in givers' meaning making are explored in a specific socio-cultural context. The theoretical foundation and the generated data enable us to map the imaginary of charitable giving across four distinct clusters and theorize meaning – making as navigation...

  14. Adhesive particle shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott [Dublin, CA; Rader, Daniel John [Albuquerque, NM; Walton, Christopher [Berkeley, CA; Folta, James [Livermore, CA

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  15. Tissue adhesives for simple traumatic lacerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Joel W

    2008-01-01

    Farion K, Osmond MH, Hartling L, et al. Tissue adhesives for traumatic lacerations in children and adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2001(4);CD003326. What is the clinical evidence base for tissue adhesives in the management of simple traumatic lacerations? Studies were identified by searches of the following databases: Cochrane Wounds Group Specialized Trials Register (September 2003), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (CDROM 2003, issue 3), MEDLINE (1966 to September 2003, week 1), EMBASE (1988 to 2003, week 36), Web of Science Science Citation Index (1975 to September 13, 2003) and various clinical trials registers (September 2003). Investigators and product manufacturers were contacted to identify additional eligible studies. The search terms included wounds and injuries, laceration, face injury, nose injury, tissue adhesives, and acrylates. Each study fulfilled the following criteria: (1) The study was a randomized controlled trial that compared tissue adhesives with standard wound closure (SWC) (sutures, staples, adhesive strips) or tissue adhesive with tissue adhesive. (2) The wounds were acute, linear lacerations less than 12 hours old, resulting from blunt or sharp trauma. (3) The wound length, width, and depth allowed for approximation of the edges with minimal tension after deep sutures were placed, if required. Studies were included with no language or publication status restriction, with participants of any age recruited in an emergency department, outpatient clinic, walk-in clinic, or other primary care setting. Studies were excluded if the wounds were stellate lacerations, puncture wounds, mammalian bites, infected, heavily contaminated or devitalized, crossing joints or mucocutaneous junctions, in hair-bearing areas, or in patients with keloid formation or chronic illness. The characteristics of the study and participants, interventions, outcome measures, and findings were extracted by one author and verified by a second

  16. Electrically Conductive Epoxy Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Bai

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Conductive adhesives are widely used in electronic packaging applications such as die attachment and solderless interconnections, component repair, display interconnections, and heat dissipation. The effects of film thickness as functions of filler volume fraction, conductive filler size, shape, as well as uncured adhesive matrix viscosity on the electrical conduction behavior of epoxy-based adhesives are presented in this work. For this purpose, epoxy-based adhesives were prepared using conductive fillers of different size, shape, and types, including Ni powder, flakes, and filaments, Ag powder, and Cu powder. The filaments were 20 μm in diameter, and 160 or 260 μm in length. HCl and H3PO4 acid solutions were used to etch and remove the surface oxide layers from the fillers. The plane resistance of filled adhesive films was measured using the four-point method. In all cases of conductive filler addition, the planar resistivity levels for the composite adhesive films increased when the film thickness was reduced. The shape of resistivity-thickness curves was negative exponential decaying type and was modeled using a mathematical relation. The relationships between the conductive film resistivities and the filler volume fractions were also derived mathematically based on the experimental data. Thus, the effects of surface treatment of filler particles, the type, size, shape of fillers, and the uncured epoxy viscosity could be included empirically by using these mathematical relations based on the experimental data. By utilizing the relations we proposed to model thickness-dependent and volume fraction-dependent conduction behaviors separately, we were able to describe the combined and coupled volume fraction-film thickness relationship mathematically based on our experimental data.

  17. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  18. Biomaterial based novel polyurethane adhesives for wood to wood and metal to metal bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Patel,Mitesh Ramanlal; Shukla,Jignesh Markandray; Patel,Natvarbhai Khodidas; Patel,Ketan Haribhai

    2009-01-01

    Polyurethane adhesives made from synthetic chemicals are non-biodegradable, costly and difficult to find raw materials from local market. To avoid solid pollution problem, cost effectiveness and easy availability of raw materials, biomaterials based polyurethane adhesives are used in current industrial interest. Direct use of castor oil in polyurethane adhesive gives limited hardness. Modification on active sites of castor oil to utilize double bond of unsaturated fatty acid and carboxyl grou...

  19. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  20. Influence of adhesion on random loose packings of binary micro-particle mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenwei; Chen, Sheng; Li, Shuiqing; Key Laboratory for Thermal Science; Power Engineering of Ministry of Education Team

    2017-11-01

    Binary adhesive packings of microspheres with certain size ratios are investigated via a 3D discrete-element method specially developed with adhesive contact mechanics. We found a novel phenomenon that the packing fraction of the binary adhesive mixtures decreases monotonically with the increase of the amount of small components. It was further divulged that this behavior results from the competition between a geometrical filling effect and an adhesion effect. The positive geometrical filling effect only depends on the size ratio, while a dimensionless adhesion parameter Ad is employed to characterize the negative adhesion effect, which comes to its maximum at Ad 10 . Structural properties, including contact network, partial coordination number, radial distribution function and angular distribution function, are analyzed in order to give a better understanding of such adhesive binary packings. National Key Basic Research Program of China (No. 2013CB228506) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51390491).

  1. George Stephanopoulos to give Cutchins Distinguished Lecture

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Sookhan

    2006-01-01

    ABC News' chief Washington correspondent and"This Week" anchor George Stephanopoulos will give the Cutchins Distinguished Lecture at Virginia Tech on Thursday, March 16, 7:30 p.m., in Burruss Auditorium.

  2. Washington. Will Tax Reform Affect Giving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, John Holt

    1974-01-01

    Examines considerations of tax reform and their impact on the ability of colleges and universities to attract private giving, frequently making the difference between institutional death and survival. (Author/PG)

  3. System for the chemical professing and evaluation gives the residual thickness the gives detecting for gives appearances LR115 type 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrazana Gonzalez, J.A.; Tomas Zerquera, J.; Prendes Alonso, M.

    1998-01-01

    In this work the system is described built in the CPHR for the homogeneous chemical processing gives detecting gives nuclear appearances. A new developed method is exposed, based on the application gives the technique optical densitometry, for the precise estimate gives the residual thickness, gives detecting, gives nuclear appearances LR115 type 2 after the process gives chemical engraving

  4. an Adhesive Patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mojtaba Taghizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-in-adhesive transdermal drug delivery systems  TDDSs containing stimulants, termed as energetic substances, such as caffeine and pantothenic acid, were studied. Caffeine is a white crystalline substance and a stimulant to central nervous system. In humans, caffeine acts as a central nervous system stimulant, temporarily warding off drowsiness and restoring alertness. Pantothenic acid, also recognized as vitamin B5, is a water-soluble vitamin. For many animals, pantothenic acid is an essential nutrient. Animals require pantothenic acid to synthesize and metabolize proteins, carbohydrates and fats. For this purpose caffeine and pantothenic acid were  used  as  drug  components with  6.32%  and  1.12%  loadings,  in  different functional and non-functional acrylic pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs of 52.89%, respectively. Ethylene glycol as a chemical enhancer was used in all TDDSs with 39.67%. The effect of PSAs  type on  in vitro  release and adhesion properties  (peel strength and tack values from drug delivery devices were evaluated. It was found that TDDS containing -COOH functional PSA showed  the  lowest steady state fux. The adhesion properties of the samples were improved by addition of functional acrylic PSA in formulations.

  5. The effect of Kombucha on post-operative intra-abdominal adhesion formation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghsoudi, Hemmat; Mohammadi, Hussein Benagozar

    2009-04-01

    Peritoneal adhesions are fibrous bands of tissues formed between organs that are normally separated and/or between organs and the internal body wall after peritoneal injury. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of intra-peritoneal administration of Kombucha on intra-peritoneal adhesions. Eighty Wistar rats were subjected to standardized lesion by scraping model and were randomly divided into two groups. Group I received no treatment, and Group II received 15 ml of Kombucha solution intra-peritoneally. On the post-operative 14th day adhesion intensity score, inflammatory cell reaction and number of adhesion bands were determined. In the control group, there were no rats with grade 0 and I adhesions. In the group II, there were 26 rats (78.8%) with grade 0-2 adhesions. Adhesion intensity was significantly less in group II (PKombucha might be useful for preventing peritoneal adhesions.

  6. Adhesive bonding of wood materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles B. Vick

    1999-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of wood components has played an essential role in the development and growth of the forest products industry and has been a key factor in the efficient utilization of our timber resource. The largest use of adhesives is in the construction industry. By far, the largest amounts of adhesives are used to manufacture building materials, such as plywood,...

  7. The Effect of Media on Charitable Giving and Volunteering: Evidence from the "Give Five" Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoruk, Baris K.

    2012-01-01

    Fundraising campaigns advertised via mass media are common. To what extent such campaigns affect charitable behavior is mostly unknown, however. Using giving and volunteering surveys conducted biennially from 1988 to 1996, I investigate the effect of a national fundraising campaign, "Give Five," on charitable giving and volunteering patterns. The…

  8. Phase diagram of the adhesive hard sphere fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, M.A.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    The phase behavior of the Baxter adhesive hard sphere fluid has been determined using specialized Monte Carlo simulations. We give a detailed account of the techniques used and present data for the fluid–fluid coexistence curve as well as parametrized fits for the supercritical equation of state and

  9. Interfacial fracture toughness of aged adhesive-dentin interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munck, Jan; Poitevin, André; Lührs, Anne-Katrin; Pongprueksa, Pong; Van Ende, Annelies; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2015-04-01

    To assess interfacial fracture toughness of different adhesive approaches and compare to a standard micro-tensile bond-strength (μTBS) test after 6 months water storage. Chevron-notched beam fracture toughness (CNB) was determined using a modified ISO 24370:2005 standard. Adhesive-dentin micro-specimens (1.0 mm × 1.0 mm × 8-10 mm) were stressed in tensile until failure to determine the micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS). The highest mean μTBS and interfacial fracture toughness were measured for the multi-step adhesives Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Noritake) and OptiBond FL (Kerr). While large differences were observed in the bond strength values (from 7.4 to 27.2 MPa) of the one-step self-etch adhesives tested, interfacial fracture toughness was less different (from 0.7 to 1.0 MPam(1/2)). The adhesive with the lowest mean toughness (All-bond Universal, Bisco) had however the highest Weibull reliability, which might be a better parameter in regard to more consistent clinical performance. The self-adhesive composite Vertise Flow (Kerr) scored significantly lower at all levels. Although the ranking of the adhesives tested using CNB and μTBS corresponded well, the outcome of CNB appeared more reliable and less variable. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Luxury of Igniting Change by Giving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llamas, Rosa; Uth Thomsen, Thyra

    2016-01-01

    of distant others by giving them valuable philanthropic gifts and thereby ultimately transforming the self of the giver. The paper shows how giving away economic capital (money and time), social capital (networks and influence), and cultural capital (skills and knowledge) to non-related others can provide...... the giver with a sense of luxury in terms of pleasure, purpose, and connection with humankind. Thus, the findings not only extend the traditional conceptualization of luxury from having to giving, but also challenge current conceptualizations of sharing out as a non-reciprocal pro-social behavior......This study investigates the phenomenon of luxury from a consumer perspective, by means of multisited phenomenological inquiry. The findings expand the pervasive view of luxury as accumulation of highly valued goods by offering a transformative perspective of luxury as transforming the life...

  11. VOC- and SVOC-emissions from adhesives, floor coverings and complete floor structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Olaf; Jann, Oliver; Brödner, Doris

    2004-01-01

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and semivolatile organic compounds (SVOC) from materials for flooring installation (primer, screed, adhesive, floor covering) were measured by means of emission test chambers and cells over a time period of at least 28 days at 23 degrees C, 50% relative humidity and an area specific air flow rate of q = 1.25 m(3)/m(2) h. Single components were tested in comparison to three complete structures (same concrete, primer, screed, adhesive) with different types of floor covering (PVC, carpet, linoleum). Sorption into concrete/screed and different permeability of flooring materials affected the emissions from the complete structures. The complete structures with linoleum and PVC showed the same types of emission and emission rates as the individual floor coverings themselves. Emissions from the carpet-covered structure resulted also from the lower layers. In all cases emissions from the complete structures were lower than the sum of emissions from the single components. For two adhesives the formation of secondary emissions (aldehydes and organic acids) was observed starting after the standard testing time of 28 days. This paper gives a survey of possible emissions of VOCs and SVOCs from flooring materials and adhesives. On the example of these materials it is shown that the determination of SVOC-emissions from materials is important because after a few weeks the emission rates for SVOCs might be higher than for VOCs. In the real indoor environment SVOCs will be probably adsorbed to dust but by means of emission test chambers or cells the determination of emission rates from materials is possible. With the knowledge of this "emission potential" it is possible to estimate also the release of SVOCs into the (indoor) environment.

  12. Biomaterial based novel polyurethane adhesives for wood to wood and metal to metal bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitesh Ramanlal Patel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane adhesives made from synthetic chemicals are non-biodegradable, costly and difficult to find raw materials from local market. To avoid solid pollution problem, cost effectiveness and easy availability of raw materials, biomaterials based polyurethane adhesives are used in current industrial interest. Direct use of castor oil in polyurethane adhesive gives limited hardness. Modification on active sites of castor oil to utilize double bond of unsaturated fatty acid and carboxyl group yields new modified or activated polyols, which can be utilized for polyurethane adhesive formulation. In view of this, we have synthesized polyurethane adhesives from polyester polyols, castor oil based polyols and epoxy based polyols with Isocyanate adducts based on castor oil and trimethylolpropane. To study the effects of polyurethane adhesive strength (i.e. lap shear strength on wood-to-wood and metal-to-metal bonding through various types of polyols, cross-linking density, isocyanate adducts and also to compare adhesive strength between wood to wood and metal to metal surface. These polyols and polyurethanes were characterized through GPC, NMR and IR-spectroscopy, gel and surface drying time. Thermal stability of PU adhesives was determined under the effect of cross-linking density (NCO/OH ratio. The NCO/OH ratio (1.5 was optimized for adhesives as the higher NCO/OH ratio (2.0 increasing cross-linking density and decreases adhesion. Lower NCO/OH ratio (1.0 provideslow cross-linking density and low strength of adhesives.

  13. Management of adhesive capsulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stupay KL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kristen L Stupay,1 Andrew S Neviaser2 1Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a condition of capsular contracture that reduces both active and passive glenohumeral motion. The cause of adhesive capsulitis is not known but it is strongly associated with endocrine abnormalities such as diabetes. Diverse terminology and the absence of definitive criteria for diagnosis make evaluating treatment modalities difficult. Many treatment methods have been reported, most with some success, but few have been proved to alter the natural course of this disease. Most afflicted patients will achieve acceptable shoulder function without surgery. Those who remain debilitated after 8–12 months are reasonable candidates for invasive treatments. Here, the various treatment methods and the data to support their use are reviewed. Keywords: frozen shoulder, stiff shoulder, periarthritis, painful shoulder 

  14. Syndecans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Chen, L; Woods, A

    2001-01-01

    Now that transmembrane signaling through primary cell-matrix receptors, integrins, is being elucidated, attention is turning to how integrin-ligand interactions can be modulated. Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans implicated as coreceptors in a variety of physiological processes, including...... cell adhesion, migration, response to growth factors, development, and tumorigenesis. This review will describe this family of proteoglycans in terms of their structures and functions and their signaling in conjunction with integrins, and indicate areas for future research....

  15. They Make Space and Give Time

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 3. They Make Space and Give Time The Engineer as Poet. Gangan Prathap. Book Review Volume 3 ... Author Affiliations. Gangan Prathap1. National Aerospace Laboratories and the Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research in Bangalore.

  16. Termination of Commercial Contracts by giving Notice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edlund, Hans Henrik

    2008-01-01

    Some long-term contracts are brought to an end if one of the parties gives notice. Usually, such a step is not considered a breach of contract. It causes the contract to end in accordance with the contract. When no express rules cover the situation, it is often not entirely clear whether or not t...

  17. Give and Take in Dictator Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappelen, Alexander W.; Nielsen, Ulrik Haagen; Sørensen, Erik Ø.

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that participants in the dictator game are less willing to give money to the other participant when their choice set also includes the option to take money. We examine whether this effect is due to the choice set providing a signal about entitlements in a setting where...

  18. Asian American Giving to US Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Kozue

    2010-01-01

    Asian Americans have had significant impacts on and within mainstream US society, and their great efforts and gifts in the name of charitable causes are no exception. This study aims to examine perceptions within American university development offices about Asian American giving to US higher education. The article begins with a literature review…

  19. Seeds That Give: Participatory Plant Breeding

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    in_focus. Seeds that give. PARTICIPATORY PLANT BREEDING. in_focus. IDRC's In_Focus Collection tackles current and pressing issues in sustainable international development. Each publication distills IDRC's research experience with an eye to drawing out important lessons, observations, and recommendations for ...

  20. Giving advice to agents with hidden goals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rosman, Benjamin S

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available on an approximation of the trade-off in utility between potential benefits to the exploring agent and the costs incurred in giving this advice. This model is evaluated on a maze world domain by providing advice to different types of agents, and we show that this leads...

  1. The Costs and Benefits of Deferred Giving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Norman S.; Metzler, Howard C.

    It is argued in this book that while there can be a significant payoff for deferred giving programs, it is important to determine their cost effectiveness. Modern business methods of cost accounting, benefits analysis, and actuarial and econometric forecasting are applied to the Pomona College plan, whose study was supported by Lilly Endowment,…

  2. SEEDS THAT GIVE: Participatory Plant Breeding

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC

    each other, and pay close attention to what the farmers told you? Revolutionary perhaps, but it's a revolution that has produced positive results. 1. Case study. Seeds. PARTICIPATORY PLANT BREEDING that give. ICARDA: S. Ceccarelli. Working together, researchers, farmers, breeders, and social scientists are increasing ...

  3. Seeds that give: Participatory plant breeding

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC

    Sometimes when we plant and we expect good results, we actually get poor results. And sometimes it is the other way around. But I can't just discard a variety because it doesn't perform well in one area. I should give it another chance.”.

  4. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: A quantitative proteomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-04-14

    Marine bioadhesives have unmatched performances in wet environments, being an inspiration for biomedical applications. In sea urchins specialized adhesive organs, tube feet, mediate reversible adhesion, being composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions, and a motile stem. After tube foot detachment, the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Sea urchin adhesive is composed by proteins and sugars, but so far only one protein, Nectin, was shown to be over-expressed as a transcript in tube feet discs, suggesting its involvement in sea urchin adhesion. Here we use high-resolution quantitative mass-spectrometry to perform the first study combining the analysis of the differential proteome of an adhesive organ, with the proteome of its secreted adhesive. This strategy allowed us to identify 163 highly over-expressed disc proteins, specifically involved in sea urchin reversible adhesion; to find that 70% of the secreted adhesive components fall within five protein groups, involved in exocytosis and microbial protection; and to provide evidences that Nectin is not only highly expressed in tube feet discs but is an actual component of the adhesive. These results give an unprecedented insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin adhesion, and opening new doors to develop wet-reliable, reversible, and ecological biomimetic adhesives. Sea urchins attach strongly but in a reversible manner to substratum, being a valuable source of inspiration for industrial and biomedical applications. Yet, the molecular mechanisms governing reversible adhesion are still poorly studied delaying the engineering of biomimetic adhesives. We used the latest mass spectrometry techniques to analyze the differential proteome of an adhesive organ and the proteome of its secreted adhesive, allowing us to uncover the key players in sea urchin reversible adhesion. We demonstrate, that Nectin, a protein previously pointed out as potentially

  5. Intergenerational Transmission of Religious Giving: Instilling Giving Habits across the Life Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Snell Herzog

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the research question: How do religious youth learn to give? While it is likely that youth learn religious financial giving from a variety of different sources, this investigation focuses primarily on how parents teach giving to their children. Supplementary data are also analyzed on the frequency in which youth hear extra-familial calls to give within their religious congregations. In focusing on parental transmission, the analysis identifies a number of approaches that parents report using to teach their children religious financial giving. It also investigates thoughts and feelings about religious financial giving by the children of these parents as a means of assessing the potential impacts of parental methods. Additionally, congregation member reflections on how they learned to give provide insights on giving as a process that develops across the life course, often instilled in childhood, but not appearing behaviorally until adulthood. As such, this paper contributes to a life course understanding of religious giving and has implications for giving across generations.

  6. Review of test methods for coating adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    The following report summarises the results of a literature search and a series of industrial surveys that have been conducted to determine the current status of test methods for the measurement of coating adhesion. The review consists of: a list of test methods that have been identified from current scientific literature; a short description of the methodologies used in industry; a review of applicable standards; a summary of recent scientific reviews; and the results from two recent industrial surveys conducted by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) into current industrial practice. (author)

  7. Evaluation of bond strength of self-adhesive cements to dentin with or without application of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos, Daphne Câmara; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Silva, Melissa Aline; Rangel, Patrícia Maria; Torres, Carlos Rocha; Fava, Marcelo

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the bond strength of indirect restorations to dentin using self-adhesive cements with and without the application of adhesive systems. Seventy-two bovine incisors were used, in which the buccal surfaces were ground down to expose an area of dentin measuring a minimum of 4 x 4 mm. The indirect resin composite Resilab was used to make 72 blocks, which were cemented onto the dentin surface of the teeth and divided into 4 groups (n = 18): group 1: self-adhesive resin cement BiFix SE, applied according to manufacturer's recommendations; group 2: self-adhesive resin cement RelyX Unicem, used according to manufacturer's recommendations; group 3: etch-and-rinse Solobond M adhesive system + BiFix SE; group 4: etch-and-rinse Single Bond 2 adhesive system + RelyX Unicem. The specimens were sectioned into sticks and subjected to microtensile testing in a universal testing machine (EMIC DL- 200 MF). Data were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). The mean values (± standard deviation) obtained for the groups were: group 1: 15.28 (± 8.17)a, group 2: 14.60 (± 5.21)a, group 3: 39.20 (± 9.98)c, group 4: 27.59 (± 6.57)b. Different letters indicate significant differences (ANOVA; p = 0.0000). The application of adhesive systems before self-adhesive cements significantly increased the bond strength to dentin. In group 2, RelyX Unicem associated with the adhesive system Single Bond 2 showed significantly lower mean tensile bond strengths than group 3 (BiFix SE associated with the etch-and-rinse Solobond M adhesive system).

  8. Carbon nanotube based gecko inspired self-cleaning adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Sunny; Ge, Liehui; Ajayan, Pulickel; Ali, Dhinojwala

    2008-03-01

    Wall climbing organisms like geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without use of any viscoelastic material. The hairy structure found in gecko feet allows them to obtain intimate contact over a large area thus allowing then to adhere using van der Waals interactions. Not only high adhesion, the geometry of the hairs makes gecko feet self cleaning, thus allowing them to walk continuously without worrying about loosing adhesive strength. Such properties if mimicked synthetically could form basis of a new class of materials, which, unlike conventional adhesives would show two contradictory properties, self cleaning and high adhesion. Such materials would form essential component of applications like wall climbing robot. We tried to synthesize such material using micropatterened vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. When dealing with large areas, probability of defects in the structure increase, forming patterns instead of using uniform film of carbon nanotubes helps to inhibit crack propagation, thus gives much higher adhesive strength than a uniform film. When carbon nanotube patterns with optimized aspect ratio are used, both high adhesion and self cleaning properties are observed.

  9. Adhesion of epoxy cataphoretic coatings on Zn alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JELENA B. BAJAT

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors in corrosion prevention by protective coatings is the loss of coating adhesion under environmental influence. In this work, the adhesion of epoxy cataphoretic coatings was examined on steel and steel modified by Zn–Fe and Zn–Co alloys. The dry and wet adhesions of epoxy primers were measured by the direct pull-off standardized procedure, as well as indirectly by the NMP test. The corrosion stability of the coated samples was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It was shown that under dry testing conditions all the samples exhibited very good adhesion. However, different trends of adhesion loss of different protective systems during exposure to a corrosive agent (3 % NaCl solution were observed. The lowest adhesion values were obtained for epoxy coating on the steel substrate. The change in adhesion of the epoxy coating on steel modified by Zn–Co alloy during immersion in 3 % NaCl solution for 24 days was the smallest of all the investigated samples. Electrochemical impedance measurements in 3 % NaCl solution confirmed the good protective properties of this protective system, i.e., greater values of pore resistance were obtained.

  10. Polymer Claw: Instant Underwater Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    glycerol is a well-known hygroscopic liquid and lubricant. In the Polymer Claw Progress Report -4- 9/24/12 The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics...the Polymer Claw adhesive partially solidified, while commercial adhesives were completely liquid after one hour. However, the curing rate was...is not valid for partial liquid adhesives, we will only test at later times, noting the minimum time for which the glass slides break. The time to

  11. Polyurethane adhesive ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Polyurethane adhesives are found in a large number of household products in the United States and are used for a variety of purposes. Several brands of these expanding wood glues (those containing diphenylmethane diisocyanate [MDI]) have the potential to form gastrointestinal (GI) foreign bodies if ingested. The ingested adhesive forms an expanding ball of glue in the esophagus and gastric lumen. This expansion is caused by a polymerization reaction using the heat, water, and gastric acids of the stomach. A firm mass is created that can be 4-8 times its original volume. As little as 2 oz of glue have been reported to develop gastric foreign bodies. The obstructive mass is reported to form within minutes of ingestion of the adhesive. The foreign body can lead to esophageal impaction and obstruction, airway obstruction, gastric outflow obstruction, mucosal hemorrhage, ulceration, laceration, perforation of the esophageal and gastric linings, and death. Clinical signs following ingestion include anorexia, lethargy, vomiting, tachypnea, and abdominal distention and pain, and typically develop within 12 hours. Clinical signs may depend upon the size of the mass. If left untreated, perforation and rupture of the esophagus or stomach can occur. The glue mass does not stick to the GI mucosa and is not always detectable on abdominal palpation. Radiographs are recommended to confirm the presence of the "glue-ball" foreign body, and radiographic evidence of the obstruction may be seen as early as 4-6 hours following ingestion. Emesis is contraindicated owing to the risk of aspiration of the glue into the respiratory tree or the subsequent lodging of the expanding glue mass in the esophagus. Likewise, efforts to dilute the glue and prevent the formation of the foreign body through administration of liquids, activated charcoal, or bulk-forming products to push the foreign body through the GI tract have proven ineffective. Even endoscopy performed to remove the foreign body has

  12. Role-modeling and conversations about giving in the socialization of adolescent charitable giving and volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottoni-Wilhelm, Mark; Estell, David B; Perdue, Neil H

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the monetary giving and volunteering behavior of adolescents and the role-modeling and conversations about giving provided by their parents. The participants are a large nationally-representative sample of 12-18 year-olds from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics' Child Development Supplement (n = 1244). Adolescents reported whether they gave money and whether they volunteered. In a separate interview parents reported whether they talked to their adolescent about giving. In a third interview, parents reported whether they gave money and volunteered. The results show that both role-modeling and conversations about giving are strongly related to adolescents' giving and volunteering. Knowing that both role-modeling and conversation are strongly related to adolescents' giving and volunteering suggests an often over-looked way for practitioners and policy-makers to nurture giving and volunteering among adults: start earlier, during adolescence, by guiding parents in their role-modeling of, and conversations about, charitable giving and volunteering. Copyright © 2013 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  14. The influence of stress on giving testimony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brkić Snežana S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper there are firstly some general observations about stress (the concept of stress, stressors, stress responses, consequences of stress. Then, the author examines the effect of stress on giving testimony, that is on two most important psychic functions of the importance for giving testimony: perception and memory. The impact of stress, on perception is discussed in the framework of the importance of affective tone of perception. The lower doses of stress can improve attention and perception, but with intense stress, attention rapidly decreases. Stress often causes erroneous perception of time and other errors in observation and can lead to illusions and hallucinations. The errors in face recognition are also possible in view of 'the phenomenon of focusing attention on weapon '. In relationship with memory, the author firstly gives some general considerations about this function. Then follows brief overview of memory for emotionally colored events. The negative influence of stress on memory is reflected in the possibility of psychogenic amnesia, which are often the escort of psychological trauma. Further, some events will be remembered with a lot of gaps, distortions and overemphasis. The paper points to a number of studies on (inaccuracies and (incomplete memories for traumatic events. Summarizing the main results of these studies it is concluded that memory for traumatic events has similar sharacteristics as memory for normal, nontraumatic events. Memory for traumatic events also follows the same cognitive principles. In that sense, both traumatic and nontraumatic memories can be equally powerful on the one hand, and on the other hand, there may be gaps or errors in memory as well as for the positive and negative life events.

  15. Studies on the Adhesive Property of Snail Adhesive Mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newar, Janu; Ghatak, Archana

    2015-11-10

    Many gastropod molluscs are known to secrete mucus which allow these animals to adhere to a substrate while foraging over it. While the mucus is known to provide strong adhesion to both dry and wet surfaces, including both horizontal and vertical ones, no systematic study has been carried out to understand the strength of such adhesion under different conditions. We report here results from preliminary studies on adhesion characteristics of the mucus of a snail found in eastern India, Macrochlamys indica. When perturbed, the snail was found to secrete its adhesive mucus, which was collected and subjected to regular adhesion tests. The hydrated mucus was used as such, and also as mixed with buffer of different pH. These experiments suggest that the mucus was slightly alkaline, and showed the maximum adhesion strength of 9 kPa when present in an alkaline buffer. Preliminary studies indicate that adhesive force is related to the ability of the mucus to incorporate water. In alkaline condition, the gel like mass that it forms, incorporate water from a wet surface and enable strong adhesion.

  16. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, A. R.; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M. S. Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding.

  17. Stretchable, Adhesion-Tunable Dry Adhesive by Surface Wrinkling

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2010-02-16

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (∼10.8 N/cm2) and shear adhesion (∼14.7 N/cm2) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of∼3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of ∼0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  18. Characterization of adhesive from oysters: A structural and compositional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Erik

    The inability for man-made adhesives to set in wet or humid environments is an ongoing challenging the design of biomedical and marine adhesive materials. However, we see that nature has already overcome this challenge. Mussels, barnacles, oysters and sandcastle worms all have unique mechanisms by which they attach themselves to surfaces. By understanding what evolution has already spent millions of years perfecting, we can design novel adhesive materials inspired by nature's elegant designs. The well-studied mussel is currently the standard for design of marine inspired biomimetic polymers. In the work presented here, we aim to provide new insights into the adhesive produced by the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica. Unlike the mussel, which produces thread-like plaques comprised of DOPA containing-protein, the oyster secretes an organic-inorganic hybrid adhesive as it settles and grows onto a surface. This form of adhesion renders the oyster to be permanently fixed in place. Over time, hundreds of thousands of oyster grow and agglomerate to form extensive reef structures. These reefs are not only essential to survival of the oyster, but are also vital to intertidal ecosystems. While the shell of the oyster has been extensively studied, curiously, only a few conflicting insights have been made into the nature of the adhesive and contact zone between shell and substrate, and even lesfs information has been ascertained on organic and inorganic composition. In this work, we provide microscopy and histochemical studies to characterize the structure and composition of the adhesive, using oyster in the adult and juvenile stages of life. Preliminary work on extracting and characterizing organic components through collaborative help with solid-state NMR (SSNMR) and proteomics are also detailed here. We aim to provide a full, comprehensive characterization of oyster adhesive so that in the future, we may apply what we learn to the design of new materials.

  19. Effect of Saline Environment on Mechanical Properties of Structural Adhesive Bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Müller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study brings new pieces of knowledge about a utilization of an inorganic filler in an area of steel adhesive bonds exposed to a degradation environment. The filler in the form of glass beads with a fraction size 90 ± 20 μm was used within the research. The aim of the research was to evaluate an influence of the degradation environment on a strength of structural two‑component epoxy adhesives and a composite material. A preparation of adhesive bonds and a process of testing of the adhesive bonds were in accordance with the modified standard ČSN EN 1465. The degradation environment in a form of 5 % saline solution was used within this experiment. Adhesive bonded testing samples were subjected to a cyclic loading of the saline solution. The adhesive bonds with the filler reached up to 16 % higher adhesive bond strength than the unfilled adhesive bonds. The bonds adhesive bonded with the tested composite adhesive better resisted to the degradation process of ca. 9 %. The cyclic exposure, i.e. dipping of the testing samples into the saline solution and consequent drying significantly decreases the strength of the adhesive bond (up to 67 % in 6 weeks.

  20. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...

  1. Syndecans, signaling, and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1996-01-01

    structures within the heparan sulfate chains, leaving the roles of chondroitin sulfate chains and extracellular portion of the core proteins to be elucidated. Evidence that syndecans are a class of receptor involved in cell adhesion is mounting, and their small cytoplasmic domains may link...... transmembrane signaling from matrix to cytoskeleton, as proposed for other classes of adhesion receptors....

  2. Controlling adhesive behavior during recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl Houtman; Karen Scallon; Jihui Guo; XinPing Wang; Steve Severtson; Mark Kroll; Mike Nowak

    2004-01-01

    Adhesives can be formulated to facilitate their removal by typical paper recycling unit operations. The investigations described in this paper are focused on determining fundamental properties that control particle size during pulping. While pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) with high elastic moduli tend to survive pulping with larger particles, facestock and...

  3. Effect of fibril shape on adhesive properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Daniel; Hill, Ginel; Parness, Aaron; Esparza, Noé; Cutkosky, Mark; Kenny, Tom

    2010-08-01

    Research into the gecko's adhesive system revealed a unique architecture for adhesives using tiny hairs. By using a stiff material (β-keratin) to create a highly structured adhesive, the gecko's system demonstrates properties not seen in traditional pressure-sensitive adhesives which use a soft, unstructured planar layer. In contrast to pressure sensitive adhesives, the gecko adhesive displays frictional adhesion, in which increased shear force allows it to withstand higher normal loads. Synthetic fibrillar adhesives have been fabricated but not all demonstrate this frictional adhesion property. Here we report the dual-axis force testing of single silicone rubber pillars from synthetic adhesive arrays. We find that the shape of the adhesive pillar dictates whether frictional adhesion or pressure-sensitive behavior is observed. This work suggests that both types of behavior can be achieved with structures much larger than gecko terminal structures. It also indicates that subtle differences in the shape of these pillars can significantly influence their properties.

  4. Surface science. Adhesion and friction in mesoscopic graphite contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Elad; Lörtscher, Emanuel; Rawlings, Colin; Knoll, Armin W; Duerig, Urs

    2015-05-08

    The weak interlayer binding in two-dimensional layered materials such as graphite gives rise to poorly understood low-friction characteristics. Accurate measurements of the adhesion forces governing the overall mechanical stability have also remained elusive. We report on the direct mechanical measurement of line tension and friction forces acting in sheared mesoscale graphite structures. We show that the friction is fundamentally stochastic in nature and is attributable to the interaction between the incommensurate interface lattices. We also measured an adhesion energy of 0.227 ± 0.005 joules per square meter, in excellent agreement with theoretical models. In addition, bistable all-mechanical memory cell structures and rotational bearings have been realized by exploiting position locking, which is provided solely by the adhesion energy. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Regulative mechanisms of chondrocyte adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Fehrenbach, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    Interaction between chondrocytes and extracellular matrix is considered a key factor in the generation of grafts for matrix-associated chondrocyte transplantation. Therefore, our objective was to study the influence of differentiation status on cellular attachment. Adhesion of chondrocytes...... to collagen type II increased after removal from native cartilage up to the third day in monolayer in a dose-dependent manner. Following dedifferentiation after the second passage, adhesion to collagen types I (-84%) and II (-46%) decreased, whereas adhesion to fibrinogen (+59%) and fibronectin (+43......%) increased. A cartilage construct was developed based on a clinically established collagen type I scaffold. In this matrix, more than 80% of the cells could be immobilized by mechanisms of adhesion, filtration, and cell entrapment. Confocal laser microscopy revealed focal adhesion sites as points of cell...

  6. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neviaser, Andrew S; Neviaser, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is characterized by painful, gradual loss of active and passive shoulder motion resulting from fibrosis and contracture of the joint capsule. Other shoulder pathology can produce a similar clinical picture, however, and must be considered. Management is based on the underlying cause of pain and stiffness, and determination of the etiology is essential. Subtle clues in the history and physical examination can help differentiate adhesive capsulitis from other conditions that cause a stiff, painful shoulder. The natural history of adhesive capsulitis is a matter of controversy. Management of true capsular restriction of motion (ie, true adhesive capsulitis) begins with gentle, progressive stretching exercises. Most patients improve with nonsurgical treatment. Indications for surgery should be individualized. Failure to obtain symptomatic improvement and continued functional disability following ≥6 months of physical therapy is a general guideline for surgical intervention. Diligent postoperative therapy to maintain motion is required to minimize recurrence of adhesive capsulitis.

  7. 30 CFR 75.1204-1 - Places to give notice and file maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 75.1204-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 75.1204-1 Places to give notice and file maps. Operators shall give notice of mine closures and file copies of maps with the Coal...

  8. Still Giving Thanks for Good Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Still Giving Thanks for Good Health (QTVR) NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this full-circle panorama of the region near 'Husband Hill' (the peak just to the left of center) over the Thanksgiving holiday, before ascending farther. Both the Spirit and Opportunity rovers are still going strong, more than a year after landing on Mars. This 360-degree view combines 243 images taken by Spirit's panoramic camera over several martian days, or sols, from sol 318 (Nov. 24, 2004) to sol 325 (Dec. 2, 2004). It is an approximately true-color rendering generated from images taken through the camera's 750-, 530-, and 480-nanometer filters. The view is presented here in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction. Spirit is now driving up the slope of Husband Hill along a path about one-quarter of the way from the left side of this mosaic.

  9. Giving Devices the Ability to Exercise Reason

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Keeley

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the capabilities that separates humans from computers has been the ability to exercise "reason / judgment". Computers and computerized devices have provided excellent platforms for following rules. Computer programs provide the scripts for processing the rules. The exercise of reason, however, is more of an image processing function than a function composed of a series of rules. The exercise of reason is more right brain than left brain. It involves the interpretation of information and balancing inter-related alternatives. This paper will discuss a new way to define and process information that will give devices the ability to exercise human-like reasoning and judgment. The paper will discuss the characteristics of a "dynamic graphical language" in the context of addressing judgment, since judgment is often required to adjust rules when operating in a dynamic environment. The paper will touch on architecture issues and how judgment is integrated with rule processing.

  10. Adhesive tape exfoliation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Single-crystal graphite can be cleaved by the use of an adhesive tape. This was also the initial route for obtaining graphene, a one-layer thick graphite slab. In this letter a few simple and fun considerations are presented in an attempt to shed some light on why this procedure is successful....... In particular on the nature of the surprisingly small number of repetitive steps that are needed in order to obtain a single-layer slab. Two frameworks for exfoliation are investigated: parallel exfoliation involving repetitive simultaneous cleaving, the other, serial exfoliation, which involves the repetitive...... cleaving of a single chunk of graphite. For both cases, parallel and serial exfoliation, it is investigated how many generations of cleavages are needed. An approximate model with the probability distribution expressed as a simple closed form is presented and compared with the simulations....

  11. Organosolv Lignin-Based Wood Adhesive. Influence of the Lignin Extraction Conditions on the Adhesive Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issam Dababi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol organosolv alfa grass lignins were extracted in the presence of sulfuric acid or Lewis acids (Sc(OTf3, FeCl3 as catalysts and subjected to a comprehensive structural characterization by solid state 13C NMR, GPC, MALDI-TOF, and ASAP-MS/MS. The impact of the severity of the treatment and of the nature of the acid catalyst on the recovered lignin structure was investigated. The lignins isolated at high severity were highly recondensed and partly composed of regular structures composed of furan-like rings. The alfa (Stipa tenacissima L. organosolv lignins were used for the preparation of formaldehyde-free adhesives which were characterized by TMA and used for the preparation of particleboard without any addition of synthetic resin. It has been demonstrated for the first time that: (1 the addition of 10% to 30% of organosolv alfa lignin in a tannin-based adhesive improved the adhesive performance; and (2 the conditions of the lignin extraction strongly impact the lignin-based adhesive performances. The highly recondensed lignin extracted with sulfuric acid as a catalyst allowed the production of resins with improved performances. Formulations composed of 50% glyoxalated alfa lignin and 50% of Aleppo Pine tannins yielded good internal bond strength results for the panels (IB = 0.45 MPa and satisfied relevant international standard specifications for interior-grade panels.

  12. Mouse lung adhesion assay for Bordetella pertussis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, K.A.; Freer, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The ability of Bordetella pertussis to adhere to cell surfaces has been demonstrated by adhesion to tissue culture cells and adhesion to chicken, hamster or rabbit trachea in organ culture. In this report a mouse lung assay for adhesion is described and the results obtained using two virulent strains of B. pertussis and their avirulent counterparts. These were a C modulation of one of the original virulent strains and a phase IV variant of the other virulent strain. Organisms were radiolabelled by adding 1 μCi (37 K Bq) of [ 14 C]glutamic acid per 10 ml of culture medium before inoculation and incubation for 5 days. The lungs were washed by perfusion in situ with at least two volumes (1 ml) of sterile 1% (w/v) casamino acids. The percentage of the inoculated organisms retained in the lungs was determined, after removal of the lungs, by one of the following two methods: viable count or radioactive count. Results for both methods were expressed as the percentage of the inoculum retained in the lungs plus or minus one standard deviation. (Auth.)

  13. Effect on adhesion of a nanocapsules-loaded adhesive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Genari

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the in situ degree of conversion, contact angle, and immediate and long-term bond strengths of a commercial primer and an experimental adhesive containing indomethacin- and triclosan-loaded nanocapsules (NCs. The indomethacin- and triclosan-loaded NCs, which promote anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects through controlled release, were incorporated into the primer at a concentration of 2% and in the adhesive at concentrations of 1, 2, 5, and 10%. The in situ degree of conversion (DC, n=3 was evaluated by micro-Raman spectroscopy. The contact angle of the primer and adhesive on the dentin surface (n = 3 was determined by an optical tensiometer. For the microtensile bond strength µTBS test (12 teeth per group, stick-shaped specimens were tested under tensile stress immediately after preparation and after storage in water for 1 year. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA, three-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc tests with α=0.05. The use of the NC-loaded adhesive resulted in a higher in situ degree of conversion. The DC values varied from 75.07 ± 8.83% to 96.18 ± 0.87%. The use of NCs in only the adhesive up to a concentration of 5% had no influence on the bond strength. The contact angle of the primer remained the same with and without NCs. The use of both the primer and adhesive with NCs (for all concentrations resulted in a higher contact angle of the adhesive. The longitudinal μTBS was inversely proportional to the concentration of NCs in the adhesive system, exhibiting decreasing values for the groups with primer containing NCs and adhesives with increasing concentrations of NCs. Adhesives containing up to 5% of nanocapsules and primer with no NCs maintained the in situ degree of conversion, contact angle, and immediate and long-term bond strengths. Therefore, the NC-loaded adhesive can be an alternative method for combining the bond performance and therapeutic effects. The use of an

  14. Wet adhesion and adhesive locomotion of snails on anti-adhesive non-wetting surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil J Shirtcliffe

    Full Text Available Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted, texture (smooth, rough or granular or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces.

  15. Wet adhesion and adhesive locomotion of snails on anti-adhesive non-wetting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces.

  16. Adhesive capsulitis and dynamic splinting: a controlled, cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Paul D; Willis, F Buck

    2009-01-01

    Background Adhesive Capsulitis (AC) affects patient of all ages, and stretching protocols are commonly prescribed for this condition. Dynamic splinting has been shown effective in contracture reduction from pathologies including Trismus to plantar fasciitis. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of dynamic splinting on patients with AC. Methods This controlled, cohort study, was conducted at four physical therapy, sports medicine clinics in Texas and California. Sixty-two patients diagnosed with Stage II Adhesive Capsulitis were grouped by intervention. The intervention categories were as follows: Group I (Control); Group II (Physical Therapy exclusively with standardized protocols); Group III; (Shoulder Dynasplint system exclusively); Group IV (Combined treatment with Shoulder Dynasplint and standardized Physical Therapy). The duration of this study was 90 days for all groups, and the main outcome measures were change in active, external rotation. Results Significant difference was found for all treatment groups (p adhesive Capsulitis. Trial Registration Trial Number: NCT00873158 PMID:19735563

  17. Bacterial Adhesion Forces to Ag-Impregnated Contact Lens Cases and Transmission to Contact Lenses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qu, Wenwen; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.

    Purpose: To measure adhesion forces of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Serratia marcescens to a rigid contact lens (CL), standard polypropylene, and Ag-impregnated lens cases using atomic force microscopy and determine bacterial transmission from lens case to CL. Methods: Adhesion

  18. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-09

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications.

  19. Methods to study microbial adhesion on abiotic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Meireles

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms are a matrix of cells and exopolymeric substances attached to a wet and solid surface and are commonly associated to several problems, such as biofouling and corrosion in industries and infectious diseases in urinary catheters and prosthesis. However, these cells may have several benefits in distinct applications, such as wastewater treatment processes, microbial fuel cells for energy production and biosensors. As microbial adhesion is a key step on biofilm formation, it is very important to understand and characterize microbial adhesion to a surface. This study presents an overview of predictive and experimental methods used for the study of bacterial adhesion. Evaluation of surface physicochemical properties have a limited capacity in describing the complex adhesion process. Regarding the experimental methods, there is no standard method or platform available for the study of microbial adhesion and a wide variety of methods, such as colony forming units counting and microscopy techniques, can be applied for quantification and characterization of the adhesion process.

  20. Maintaining clinical governance when giving telephone advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazawi, William; Agarwal, Kosh; Suddle, Abid; Aluvihare, Varuna; Heneghan, Michael A

    2013-10-01

    Delivering excellent healthcare depends on accurate communication between professionals who may be in different locations. Frequently, the first point of contact with the liver unit at King's College Hospital (KCH) is through a telephone call to a specialist registrar or liver fellow, for whom no case notes are available in which to record information. The aim of this study was to improve the clinical governance of telephone referrals and to generate contemporaneous records that could be easily retrieved and audited. An electronic database for telephone referrals and advice was designed and made securely available to registrars in our unit. Service development in a tertiary liver centre that receives referrals from across the UK and Europe. Demographic and clinical data were recorded prospectively and analysed retrospectively. Data from 350 calls were entered during 5 months. The information included the nature and origin of the call (200 from 75 different institutions), disease burden and severity of disease among the patients discussed with KCH, and outcome of the call. The majority of cases were discussed with consultants or arrangements were made for formal review at KCH. A telephone referrals and advice database provides clinical governance, serves as a quality indicator and forms a contemporaneous record at the referral centre. Activity data and knowledge of disease burden help to tailor services to the needs of referrers and commissioners. We recommend implementation of similar models in other centres that give extramural verbal advice.

  1. Cultivating gratitude and giving through experiential consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jesse; Kumar, Amit; Gilovich, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Gratitude promotes well-being and prompts prosocial behavior. Here, we examine a novel way to cultivate this beneficial emotion. We demonstrate that 2 different types of consumption-material consumption (buying for the sake of having) and experiential consumption (buying for the sake of doing)-differentially foster gratitude and giving. In 6 studies we show that reflecting on experiential purchases (e.g., travel, meals out, tickets to events) inspires more gratitude than reflecting on material purchases (e.g., clothing, jewelry, furniture), and that thinking about experiences leads to more subsequent altruistic behavior than thinking about possessions. In Studies 1-2b, we use within-subject and between-subjects designs to test our main hypothesis: that people are more grateful for what they've done than what they have. Study 3 finds evidence for this effect in the real-world setting of online customer reviews: Consumers are more likely to spontaneously mention feeling grateful for experiences they have bought than for material goods they have bought. In our final 2 studies, we show that experiential consumption also makes people more likely to be generous to others. Participants who contemplated a significant experiential purchase behaved more generously toward anonymous others in an economic game than those who contemplated a significant material purchase. It thus appears that shifting spending toward experiential consumption can improve people's everyday lives as well as the lives of those around them. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. TANNIN ADHESIVES AS AN ALTENATIVE TO THE SYNTHETIC PHENOLIC ADHESIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Çolak

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, increasing attention has been paid industrially to the use of tannin formaldehyde adhesives in production of wood based panel products such as particleboard, fiber board and plywood. The researches on the use of tannin extracts as a wood adhesive started in 1950, however, they proceeded very slowly since the problems associated with the application of them. The idea which tannin extract can be used replace the oil-based phenolic adhesive was the base of several studies after the oil crisis of the 1970s. In the past, the economical aspects were important in the researches on the tannin-based adhesives. Nowadays, however, both economical and ecological factors should have taken into consideration in wood bonding.

  3. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  4. Adhesion of laser deposited films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhovannik, E.V.; Nikolaev, I.N.; Utochkin, Yu.A.; Stavkin, D.G.

    1996-01-01

    The method of thin solid films (Ni, Cu, Al, Pd, Si, InSb, Ta 2 O 5 ) formation on different substrates (Cu, Fe, Si, SiO 2 , Ta 2 O 5 , carbon, glass, mica, teflon) with higher adhesion strength (∼ 10 7 Pa) without preliminary treatment of substrate surface was discribed. The method is based on laser evaporation of solid in vacuum. Adhesion was measured by means of a direct pull technique using a pin soldered to buffer film evaporated by laser on the investigated film. Possible reasons for higher adhesion of films fabricated by laser deposition were discussed. 10 refs.; 3 figs

  5. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Susan [Manhattan, KS; Wang, Donghai [Manhattan, KS; Zhong, Zhikai [Manhattan, KS; Yang, Guang [Shanghai, CN

    2008-08-26

    The present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  6. Single Cell Adhesion Assay Using Computer Controlled Micropipette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today’s techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5–10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub

  7. Single cell adhesion assay using computer controlled micropipette.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Salánki

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day. Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min. We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a

  8. Comparing Soy Flour Wood Adhesives to Purified Soy Protein Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    While economics dictate that soy-based wood adhesives be made with soy flour, much of the recent literature on soy-based wood adhesives has involved using soy protein isolate. The obvious assumption is that the additional carbohydrates in the flour but not in the isolate only serve as inert diluents. Our studies have shown that the isolate can provide 10 times the wet...

  9. Bacterial endotoxin adhesion to different types of orthodontic adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Coutinho ROMUALDO

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacterial endotoxin (LPS adhesion to orthodontic brackets is a known contributing factor to inflammation of the adjacent gingival tissues. Objective The aim of this study was to assess whether LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems, comparing two commercial brands. Material and Methods Forty specimens were fabricated from Transbond XT and Light Bond composite and bonding agent components (n=10/component, then contaminated by immersion in a bacterial endotoxin solution. Contaminated and non-contaminated acrylic resin samples were used as positive and negative control groups, respectively. LPS quantification was performed by the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate QCL-1000™ test. Data obtained were scored and subjected to the Chi-square test using a significance level of 5%. Results There was endotoxin adhesion to all materials (p0.05. There was no significant difference (p>0.05 among commercial brands. Affinity of endotoxin was significantly greater for the bonding agents (p=0.0025. Conclusions LPS adhered to both orthodontic adhesive systems. Regardless of the brand, the endotoxin had higher affinity for the bonding agents than for the composites. There is no previous study assessing the affinity of LPS for orthodontic adhesive systems. This study revealed that LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems. Therefore, additional care is recommended to orthodontic applications of these materials.

  10. From the Cover: Evidence for van der Waals adhesion in gecko setae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autumn, Kellar; Sitti, Metin; Liang, Yiching A.; Peattie, Anne M.; Hansen, Wendy R.; Sponberg, Simon; Kenny, Thomas W.; Fearing, Ronald; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Full, Robert J.

    2002-09-01

    Geckos have evolved one of the most versatile and effective adhesives known. The mechanism of dry adhesion in the millions of setae on the toes of geckos has been the focus of scientific study for over a century. We provide the first direct experimental evidence for dry adhesion of gecko setae by van der Waals forces, and reject the use of mechanisms relying on high surface polarity, including capillary adhesion. The toes of live Tokay geckos were highly hydrophobic, and adhered equally well to strongly hydrophobic and strongly hydrophilic, polarizable surfaces. Adhesion of a single isolated gecko seta was equally effective on the hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces of a microelectro-mechanical systems force sensor. A van der Waals mechanism implies that the remarkable adhesive properties of gecko setae are merely a result of the size and shape of the tips, and are not strongly affected by surface chemistry. Theory predicts greater adhesive forces simply from subdividing setae to increase surface density, and suggests a possible design principle underlying the repeated, convergent evolution of dry adhesive microstructures in gecko, anoles, skinks, and insects. Estimates using a standard adhesion model and our measured forces come remarkably close to predicting the tip size of Tokay gecko seta. We verified the dependence on size and not surface type by using physical models of setal tips nanofabricated from two different materials. Both artificial setal tips stuck as predicted and provide a path to manufacturing the first dry, adhesive microstructures.

  11. Modeling and experiments of the adhesion force distribution between particles and a surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Siming; Wan, Man Pun

    2014-06-17

    Due to the existence of surface roughness in real surfaces, the adhesion force between particles and the surface where the particles are deposited exhibits certain statistical distributions. Despite the importance of adhesion force distribution in a variety of applications, the current understanding of modeling adhesion force distribution is still limited. In this work, an adhesion force distribution model based on integrating the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness distribution (i.e., the variation of RMS roughness on the surface in terms of location) into recently proposed mean adhesion force models was proposed. The integration was accomplished by statistical analysis and Monte Carlo simulation. A series of centrifuge experiments were conducted to measure the adhesion force distributions between polystyrene particles (146.1 ± 1.99 μm) and various substrates (stainless steel, aluminum and plastic, respectively). The proposed model was validated against the measured adhesion force distributions from this work and another previous study. Based on the proposed model, the effect of RMS roughness distribution on the adhesion force distribution of particles on a rough surface was explored, showing that both the median and standard deviation of adhesion force distribution could be affected by the RMS roughness distribution. The proposed model could predict both van der Waals force and capillary force distributions and consider the multiscale roughness feature, greatly extending the current capability of adhesion force distribution prediction.

  12. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony) and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives. PMID:26983080

  13. Lap Shear and Impact Testing of Ochre and Beeswax in Experimental Middle Stone Age Compound Adhesives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P R B Kozowyk

    Full Text Available The production of compound adhesives using disparate ingredients is seen as some of the best evidence of advanced cognition outside of the use of symbolism. Previous field and laboratory testing of adhesives has shown the complexities involved in creating an effective Middle Stone Age glue using Acacia gum. However, it is currently unclear how efficient different adhesive recipes are, how much specific ingredients influence their performance, and how difficult it may have been for those ingredients to be combined to maximum effect. We conducted a series of laboratory-based lap shear and impact tests, following modern adhesion testing standards, to determine the efficacy of compound adhesives, with particular regard to the ingredient ratios. We tested rosin (colophony and gum adhesives, containing additives of beeswax and ochre in varying ratios. During both lap shear and impact tests compound rosin adhesives performed better than single component rosin adhesives, and pure acacia gum was the strongest. The large difference in performance between each base adhesive and the significant changes in performance that occur due to relatively small changes in ingredient ratios lend further support to the notion that high levels of skill and knowledge were required to consistently produce the most effective adhesives.

  14. Integrative systems and synthetic biology of cell-matrix adhesion sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamir, Eli

    2016-09-02

    The complexity of cell-matrix adhesion convolves its roles in the development and functioning of multicellular organisms and their evolutionary tinkering. Cell-matrix adhesion is mediated by sites along the plasma membrane that anchor the actin cytoskeleton to the matrix via a large number of proteins, collectively called the integrin adhesome. Fundamental challenges for understanding how cell-matrix adhesion sites assemble and function arise from their multi-functionality, rapid dynamics, large number of components and molecular diversity. Systems biology faces these challenges in its strive to understand how the integrin adhesome gives rise to functional adhesion sites. Synthetic biology enables engineering intracellular modules and circuits with properties of interest. In this review I discuss some of the fundamental questions in systems biology of cell-matrix adhesion and how synthetic biology can help addressing them.

  15. Adhesive capsulitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Anthony

    2011-02-15

    Adhesive capsulitis is a common, yet poorly understood, condition causing pain and loss of range of motion in the shoulder. It can occur in isolation or concomitantly with other shoulder conditions (e.g., rotator cuff tendinopathy, bursitis) or diabetes mellitus. It is often self-limited, but can persist for years and may never fully resolve. The diagnosis is usually clinical, although imaging can help rule out other conditions. The differential diagnosis includes acromioclavicular arthropathy, autoimmune disease (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis), biceps tendinopathy, glenohumeral osteoarthritis, neoplasm, rotator cuff tendinopathy or tear (with or without impingement), and subacromial and subdeltoid bursitis. Several treatment options are commonly used, but few have high-level evidence to support them. Because the condition is often self-limited, observation and reassurance may be considered; however, this may not be acceptable to many patients because of the painful and debilitating nature of the condition. Nonsurgical treatments include analgesics (e.g., acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), oral prednisone, and intra-articular corticosteroid injections. Home exercise regimens and physical therapy are often prescribed. Surgical treatments include manipulation of the joint under anesthesia and capsular release.

  16. Foreign material in postoperative adhesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Luijendijk; D.C.D. de Lange (Diederik); C.C. Wauters; W.C.J. Hop (Wim); J.J. Duron; J.L. Pailler; B.R. Camprodon; L. Holmdahl; H.J. van Geldorp; J. Jeekel (Hans)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: The authors determined the prevalence of foreign body granulomas in intra-abdominal adhesions in patients with a history of abdominal surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a cross-sectional, multicenter, multinational study, adult patients with a

  17. Underwater adhesion: The barnacle way

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.

    silicone substrata. For both materials, significant variation among maternal families in the proportion of barnacles producing a thick adhesive plaque was observed, which suggests the presence of genetic variation, or maternal environmental effects...

  18. Adhesion induced by mobile binders: Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochard-Wyart, F.; de Gennes, P. G.

    We consider a vesicle bilayer loaded with molecules that can bind (upon contact) with a solid surface, following the classical model of Bell, Dembo, and Bongrand. We are interested in situations where the contact area varies with time: we assume that binders can then migrate via diffusion. The resulting dissipation and lag create a retarded force on the contact line, which could be significant squeezing or rolling experiments. However, there are two cases where we expect the lag force to be ineffective: (i) separation shrinking of an adhesive patch (where the Evans "tear out" process turns out to be less costly) and (ii) spontaneous growth of a patch from a point contact. In this last case, the lag force is weak, and we give detailed predictions for the growth laws.

  19. Shear Adhesive Connections for Glass Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machalická, K.; Horčičková, I.; Eliášová, M.

    2015-11-01

    Unique aesthetical properties of glass - not only transparency but also smooth, glossy and primarily reflective surface - give this material special importance in the contemporary architecture. In every structural application of glass it is necessary to solve the problem associated with connections between glass pane and other part from a different material or between two glass elements. Moreover, there are many types of hybrid structures that combine glass and different materials to achieve safe failure behaviour and high degree of transparency at the same time. Connection of brittle glass and reinforcing material is an essential part of these structures, where composite action between two parts is beneficially ensured by a glued joint. The current paper deals with the experimental analysis focused on the determination of mechanical characteristics of adhesives applied in planar connections under shear loading.

  20. 21 CFR 878.4010 - Tissue adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue adhesive. 878.4010 Section 878.4010 Food... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4010 Tissue adhesive. (a) Tissue adhesive for the topical approximation of skin—(1) Identification. A tissue adhesive for the topical...

  1. Mechanisms of adhesion in geckos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autumn, Kellar; Peattie, Anne M

    2002-12-01

    The extraordinary adhesive capabilities of geckos have challenged explanation for millennia, since Aristotle first recorded his observations. We have discovered many of the secrets of gecko adhesion, yet the millions of dry, adhesive setae on the toes of geckos continue to generate puzzling new questions and valuable answers. Each epidermally-derived, keratinous seta ends in hundreds of 200 nm spatular tips, permitting intimate contact with rough and smooth surfaces alike. Prior studies suggested that adhesive force in gecko setae was directly proportional to the water droplet contact angle (θ) , an indicator of the free surface energy of a substrate. In contrast, new theory suggests that adhesion energy between a gecko seta and a surface (W(GS)) is in fact proportional to (1 + cosθ), and only for θ > 60°. A reanalysis of prior data, in combination with our recent study, support the van der Waals hypothesis of gecko adhesion, and contradict surface hydrophobicity as a predictor of adhesion force. Previously, we and our collaborators measured the force production of a single seta. Initial efforts to attach a seta failed because of improper 3D orientation. However, by simulating the dynamics of gecko limbs during climbing (based on force plate data) we discovered that, in single setae, a small normal preload, combined with a 5 μm displacement yielded a very large adhesive force of 200 microNewton (μN), 10 times that predicted by whole-animal measurements. 6.5 million setae of a single tokay gecko attached maximally could generate 130 kg force. This raises the question of how geckos manage to detach their feet in just 15 ms. We discovered that simply increasing the angle that the setal shaft makes with the substrate to 30° causes detachment. Understanding how simultaneous attachment and release of millions of setae are controlled will require an approach that integrates levels ranging from molecules to lizards.

  2. Possibilities of Belzona Adhesive Joints Application for Austenitic Steel Used in Ship Constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Jurczak

    2017-12-01

    Adhesive joints of 304 and 2xx steel using Hysol 9466 adhesive made in laboratory conditions showed better durability properties than the ones made with the use of Belzona 1111 composite. However, in case of emergency connections the bonding strength as well as the bonding time (hardening are important factors. The use of the special Belzona 1212 (for wet surfaces gives a relatively good durability of approx. 20MPa with a much shorter (up to 20 minutes hardening time and does not require such an accurate surface preparation as the adhesive joints made with the use of Hysol 9466.

  3. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  4. Quality of semantic standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folmer, E.J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Little scientific literature addresses the issue of quality of semantic standards, albeit a problem with high economic and social impact. Our problem survey, including 34 semantic Standard Setting Organizations (SSOs), gives evidence that quality of standards can be improved, but for improvement a

  5. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the

  6. Adhesive dental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unlu, N.

    2005-01-01

    Two main classes of material are involved, the glass-ionomer cements and the composite resins. This investigation describes the way they are bonded to the tooth and highlights their differences. Glass ionomers develop a zone of interaction with the tooth as they age which ultimately gives an extremely strong bond, and results in excellent retention rates. By contrast, bonding of composite resins is more complicated and possibly less effective, though these materials have better wear resistance and better aesthetics than glass ionomers. Assessment of bond durability is difficult. This is because a dental restorative can fail by a number of mechanisms apart from de bonding: for example, through wear or fracture

  7. On Obtaining Design Allowables for Adhesives Used in the Bonded-Composite Repair of Aircraft

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chalkley, Peter

    1998-01-01

    A technique is documented, along with its experimental validation, for obtaining engineering-standard design allowables for structural adhesives used in the bonded/composite repair of aircraft structure...

  8. Analysis gives the use he/she gives radioactive sources declared in disuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez Cruz, R.; Merayo Rodriguez, A.; Perez Gonzalez, F.

    1998-01-01

    Presently work is carried out an analysis the different factors that impact in the possibility for application the radioactive sources declared in disuse in the oriental territory entities in Cuba. With the objective to define the feasibility application sources declared in disuse, valuing the technical characteristics, the requirements give radiological protection, convenience use in other technological processes and the cost for those localized ones in the territory

  9. Optimizing Adhesive Design by Understanding Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Daniel R; Crosby, Alfred J

    2015-12-23

    Adhesives have long been designed around a trade-off between adhesive strength and releasability. Geckos are of interest because they are the largest organisms which are able to climb utilizing adhesive toepads, yet can controllably release from surfaces and perform this action over and over again. Attempting to replicate the hierarchical, nanoscopic features which cover their toepads has been the primary focus of the adhesives field until recently. A new approach based on a scaling relation which states that reversible adhesive force capacity scales with (A/C)(1/2), where A is the area of contact and C is the compliance of the adhesive, has enabled the creation of high strength, reversible adhesives without requiring high aspect ratio, fibrillar features. Here we introduce an equation to calculate the compliance of adhesives, and utilize this equation to predict the shear adhesive force capacity of the adhesive based on the material components and geometric properties. Using this equation, we have investigated important geometric parameters which control force capacity and have shown that by controlling adhesive shape, adhesive force capacity can be increased by over 50% without varying pad size. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that compliance of the adhesive far from the interface still influences shear adhesive force capacity. Utilizing this equation will allow for the production of adhesives which are optimized for specific applications in commercial and industrial settings.

  10. Rethinking the social and cultural dimensions of charitable giving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajde, Domen

    2009-01-01

    Gifts to distant others, such as charitable giving, represent an important segment of contemporary gift-giving that has often been overlooked due to the excessive focus on dyadic giving between intimate individuals. In response, this paper adopts a sociological systemic perspective on gift......-giving and focuses on charitable gifts as an emblem of postmodern gift-giving to distant others. Historical evidence and sociological theory on postmodern solidarity are combined to shed light on the fluid duality of contemporary giving and the importance of the imaginary in charitable giving. The outlined socially...... symbolic dimensions of charitable giving are critically examined in light of postmodern consumer culture and the recent social corporate responsibility trends. By openly engaging the proposed complexities of gift-giving, our vocabulary and understanding of postmodern giving can be revised so as to invite...

  11. What is "Standard" About the Standard Deviation

    OpenAIRE

    Newberger, Florence; Safer, Alan M.; Watson, Saleem

    2010-01-01

    The choice of the formula for standard deviation is explained in elementary statistics textbooks in various ways. We give an explanation for this formula by representing the data as a vector in $\\mathbb R^n$ and considering its distance from a central tendency vector. In this setting the "standard" formula represents a shortest distance in the standard metric. We also show that different metrics lead to different measures of central tendency.

  12. Adhesive Characterization and Progressive Damage Analysis of Bonded Composite Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2014-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  13. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  14. Polyurethane adhesives in flat roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogárová Markéta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to stabilize individual layers of flat roofs, mainly because of wind suction. Apart from anchoring and surcharge, these layers can be secured by bonding. At present gluing is an indispensable and widely used stabilization method. On our market we can found many types of adhesives, most widely used are based on polyurethane. This paper focuses on problematic about stabilization thermal insulation from expanded polystyrene to vapor barrier from bitumen. One of the main issues is to calculate the exact amount of adhesive, which is required to guarantee the resistance against wind suction. In this problematic we can not find help neither in technical data sheets provided by the manufactures. Some of these data sheets contain at least information about amount of adhesive depending on location in roof plane and building height, but they do not specify the strength of such connection. It was therefore resorted to select several representatives polyurethane adhesives and their subsequent testing on specimens simulating the flat roof segment. The paper described the test methodology and results for two types of polyurethane adhesives.

  15. Development and characteristics of an adhesion bioassay for ectocarpoid algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evariste, Emmanuelle; Gachon, Claire M M; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A

    2012-01-01

    Species of filamentous brown algae in the family Ectocarpaceae are significant members of fouling communities. However, there are few systematic studies on the influence of surface physico-chemical properties on their adhesion. In the present paper the development of a novel, laboratory-based adhesion bioassay for ectocarpoid algae, at an appropriate scale for the screening of sets of experimental samples in well-replicated and controlled experiments is described. The assays are based on the colonization of surfaces from a starting inoculum consisting of multicellular filaments obtained by blending the cultured alga Ectocarpus crouaniorum. The adhesion strength of the biomass after 14 days growth was assessed by applying a hydrodynamic shear stress. Results from adhesion tests on a set of standard surfaces showed that E. crouaniorum adhered more weakly to the amphiphilic Intersleek® 900 than to the more hydrophobic Intersleek® 700 and Silastic® T2 coatings. Adhesion to hydrophilic glass was also weak. Similar results were obtained for other cultivated species of Ectocarpus but differed from those obtained with the related ectocarpoid species Hincksia secunda. The response of the ectocarpoid algae to the surfaces was also compared to that for the green alga, Ulva.

  16. Competition between adhesion and inertia during stick-slip peeling of Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbe, M.-J.; Villey, R.; Ciccotti, M.; Cortet, P.-P.; Santucci, S.; Vanel, L.

    2015-03-01

    We consider the classical problem of the instable stick-slip dynamics often observed when peeling a pressure sensitive adhesive, quantifying for the first time experimentally the influence of the peeling angle. This instability is known to be the consequence of a decreasing fracture energy of the adhesive-substrate joint over a certain range of driving velocity: we focus here on the important case where the instability develops at large driving velocity. We show that the shape of the peeling front velocity fluctuations progressively changes from typical stick-slip relaxation oscillations to nearly sinusoidal oscillations as the peeling angle and/or the driving velocity is increased. This transition is accompanied with a change in the dependencies of the limit cycles' period on the control parameters. We show that it results from the competition, in the dynamical equation, between the standard fracture energy and a term -considered here for the first time- associated to the freestanding tape elasticity and inertia. We manage to predict quantitatively the transition of the instability amplitude and period from the classical Barquins-Maugis quasistatic regime to a purely inertial regime in which the adhesion energy is no more at play in setting the instability limit cycles.

  17. Vascular adhesion molecules in oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, J A; Dekker, N P; MacPhail, L A; Lozada-Nur, F; McCalmont, T H

    1996-06-01

    Because recruitment and retention of lymphoid cells appear to be critical components of the pathogenesis of lichen planus, we have compared the expression and distribution of a panel of vascular adhesion molecules (ELAM-1, P-selectin, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, PECAM-1, CD34) and leukocyte adhesion molecule ligands (LFA-1, Mac-1, VLA4, L-selectin) in biopsies of this disease. Frozen sections of 12 clinically and histologically confirmed cases of lichen planus and 9 normal control tissues were evaluated immunohistochemically with a standard 1-day avidin-biotin peroxidase technique. Staining intensity of vascular endothelium was evaluated semiquantitatively. Three microvascular zones or compartments were defined and evaluated separately. Generally, different staining patterns were observed in association with the various endothelium-associated adhesion molecules. In normal controls, PECAM was intensely expressed and VCAM-1 was weakly expressed. Intermediate staining was associated with ELAM-1, P-selectin, ICAM-1, and CD34. Staining within the three microvascular compartments frequently showed variations in intensity. In lichen planus, increased staining for ELAM-1, P-selectin, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 was evident in one or more of the microvascular compartments. In the subepithelial vascular compartment where the infiltrate was the most dense, VCAM-1 appeared to show the greatest positive change. Almost all cells in the lichen planus infiltrates stained positive for ICAM-1, L-selectin, LFA-1, and VLA4, and large numbers of cells also exhibited VCAM-1, PECAM-1, and Mac-1 immunoreactivity. It appears that upregulation of ELAM-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 (especially by endothelial cells in the subepithelial vascular plexus) could play a role in the pathogenesis of lichen planus. The expression of leukocyte receptors L-selectin, LFA-1, and VLA4 by most of the cells in the lichen planus infiltrate suggest that these molecules may be responsible for recruitment as well as retention in the active

  18. Environment-friendly adhesives for surface bonding of wood-based flooring using natural tannin to reduce formaldehyde and TVOC emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sumin

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop environment-friendly adhesives for face fancy veneer bonding of engineered flooring using the natural tannin form bark in the wood. The natural wattle tannin adhesive were used to replace UF resin in the formaldehyde-based resin system in order to reduce formaldehyde and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from the adhesives used between plywoods and fancy veneers. PVAc was added to the natural tannin adhesive to increase viscosity of tannin adhesive for surface bonding. For tannin/PVAc hybrid adhesives, 5%, 10%, 20% and 30% of PVAc to the natural tannin adhesives were added. tannin/PVAc hybrid adhesives showed better bonding than the commercial natural tannin adhesive with a higher level of wood penetration. The initial adhesion strength was sufficient to be maintained within the optimum initial tack range. The standard formaldehyde emission test (desiccator method), field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) and VOC analyzer were used to determine the formaldehyde and VOC emissions from engineered flooring bonded with commercial the natural tannin adhesive and tannin/PVAc hybrid adhesives. By desiccator method and FLEC, the formaldehyde emission level of each adhesive showed the similar tendency. All adhesives satisfied the E(1) grade (below 1.5 mg/L) and E(0) grade (below 0.5 mg/L) with UV coating. VOC emission results by FLEC and VOC analyzer were different with the formaldehyde emission results. TVOC emission was slightly increased as adding PVAc.

  19. Lignin-Furfural Based Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajakta Dongre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lignin recovered from the hot-water extract of sugar maple (Acer saccharum is used in this study to synthesize adhesive blends to replace phenol-formaldehyde (PF resin. Untreated lignin is characterized by lignin content and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis. The molecular weight distribution of the lignin and the blends are characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC. The effect of pH (0.3, 0.65 and 1, ex situ furfural, and curing conditions on the tensile properties of adhesive reinforced glass fibers is determined and compared to the reinforcement level of commercially available PF resin. The adhesive blend prepared at pH = 0.65 with no added furfural exhibits the highest tensile properties and meets 90% of the PF tensile strength.

  20. Adhesive backing foil interactions affecting the elasticity, adhesion strength of laminates, and how to interpret these properties of branded transdermal patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauth, C; Wiedersberg, S; Neubert, R H H; Dittgen, M

    2002-11-01

    Standard tensile strength and peel adhesion tests were carried out to investigate interactions of pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) with several backing foils used for transdermal patches. Seven branded transdermal patches (Alora, Cutanum, Estraderm MX 50, Estraderm TTS 50, Fem7 -50 micrograms, Menorest, Oesclim) were included in the investigation. Their skin adhesion measured in several clinical trials was compared with the results of the laboratory measurements according to PSTC-1 (Peel Adhesion for Single Coated Tapes 180 degrees Angle, Pressure Sensitive Tape Council, Illinois, 1996), such as Young's modulus at 3% elongation and peel adhesion to stainless steel. Data obtained for the PSA-coated backings (laminates) show increasing elasticity with increasing PSA thickness. Interactions of PSAs with backing foil became evident in significant changes in Young's modulus by low PSA thickness, as seen for the silicone adhesive. The Young's moduli of the laminates were found to be influenced not only by the elasticity of the backing foil but also by the chemical structure of the PSA. There was no correlation between the elasticity and peel adhesion of both the laminates and the branded patches. Likewise, for the branded patches the peel adhesion to stainless steel does not correlate with skin adhesion values obtained from clinical trials. The Young's modulus of the branded patches was between 4 N/mm2 (Oesclim) and 501 N/mm2 (Fem7). For the branded transdermal patches no correlation was found between Young's modulus and both the peel force on stainless steel and the skin adhesion reported in studies.

  1. Adhesion of Antireflective Coatings in Multijunction Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, Ryan; Miller, David C.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2016-11-21

    The development of a new composite dual cantilever beam (cDCB) thin-film adhesion testing method is reported, which allows the measurement of adhesion on the fragile thin substrates used in multijunction photovoltaics. We address the adhesion of several antireflective coating systems on multijunction cells. By varying interface chemistry and morphology, we demonstrate the ensuing effects on adhesion and help to develop an understanding of how high adhesion can be achieved, as adhesion values ranging from 0.5 J/m2 to 10 J/m2 were measured. Damp Heat (85 degrees C/85% RH) was used to invoke degradation of interfacial adhesion. We show that even with germanium substrates that fracture easily, quantitative measurements of adhesion can still be made at high test yield. The cDCB test is discussed as an important new methodology, which can be broadly applied to any system that makes use of thin, brittle, or otherwise fragile substrates.

  2. Focal adhesions and cell-matrix interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1988-01-01

    Focal adhesions are areas of cell surfaces where specializations of cytoskeletal, membrane and extracellular components combine to produce stable cell-matrix interactions. The morphology of these adhesions and the components identified in them are discussed together with possible mechanisms...

  3. Creep behaviour of flexible adhesives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straalen, IJ.J. van; Botter, E.; Berg, A. van den; Beers, P. van

    2004-01-01

    Since flexible adhesives are used more and more in structural applications, designers should have a better understanding of its behaviour under various conditions as ultimate load, fatigue load, long-term load and environmental conditions. This paper focuses on long-term load conditions and its

  4. Syndecan proteoglycans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Oh, E S; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, the syndecans, have important roles in cell adhesion. They participate through binding of matrix ligand to their glycosaminoglycan chains, clustering, and the induction of signaling cascades to modify the internal microfilament...

  5. Foreign material in postoperative adhesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Luijendijk; D.C.D. de Lange (Diederik C.); C.C.A.P. Wauters (C. C A P); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); J.J. Duron; J.L. Pailler; B.R. Camprodon; L. Holmdahl; H.J. van Geldorp (H.); J. Jeekel (Hans)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractObjective: The authors determined the prevalence of foreign body granulomas in intra-abdominal adhesions in patients with a history of abdominal surgery. Patients and Methods: In a cross sectional, multicenter, multinational study, adult patients with a history of one or more previous

  6. Ovalbumin as a Wood Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Holly Satori; Zhu Rongxian; Michael J. Birkeland

    2014-01-01

    Use of proteins to bond wood dominated industrial production until the middle of the 20th century (1). The ensuing creation of the plywood and glulam beam industries allowed for more efficient use of wood resources than is possible with solid wood products. Many protein sources have been used as adhesives, including plant (soybean) and animal (blood, fish scales,...

  7. Molecular interfacial engineering of adhesion between polyfluorene and indium-tin oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, K.W. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Physics and the Materials Science and Technology Research Centre, Shatin, Hong Kong (China); Chinese University of Hong Kong, Institute of Precision Engineering, Shatin, Hong Kong (China); Sin, L.Y.; Yeung, M.K.; Hark, S.K. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Physics and the Materials Science and Technology Research Centre, Shatin, Hong Kong (China); Lau, W.M. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Physics and the Materials Science and Technology Research Centre, Shatin, Hong Kong (China); Chinese University of Hong Kong, Institute of Precision Engineering, Shatin, Hong Kong (China); University of Western Ontario, Surface Science Western, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-04-15

    A self-assembly monolayer (SAM) selected from alkyl- and phenyl-silanes was inserted between polyfluorene (PFO) and indium-tin oxide (ITO). The relative changes in adhesion energy of PFO/SAM/ITO were semi-quantitatively measured. These relative changes are calculated by dividing the gains in adhesion energy by the adhesion energy of PFO/ITO with no SAM. The values for five alkyl-silanes with varying chain lengths are in the range of 1.0{+-}0.2 to 1.8{+-}0.5, and those for five selected phenyl-silanes are 1.8{+-}0.5 to 4.1{+-}1.1. Phenyl-silanes with a unit larger than that of benzene, together with appropriate tail-group functionality, give the best enhancement in adhesion. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of non-specular reflecting silvered Teflon and filled adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourland, G.; Cox, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    A non-specular silver-Teflon tape thermal control coating was tested to provide the data necessary to qualify it for use on the Space Shuttle Orbiter radiators. Effects of cure cycle temperature and pressure on optical and mechanical properties on the silver-Teflon tape were evaluated. The baseline Permacel P-223 adhesive, used with the specular silver-Teflon tape initially qualified for the Orbiter radiators, and four alternate metal-filled and unfilled adhesives were evaluated. Tests showed the cure process has no effect on the silver-Teflon optical properties, and that the baseline adhesive cure cycle gives best results. In addition the P-223 adhesive bond is more reproducible than the alternates, and the non-specular tape meets both the mechanical and the optical requirements of the Orbiter radiator coating specification. Existing Orbiter coating techniques were demonstrated to be effective in aplying the non-specular tape to a curved panel simulating the radiators. Author

  9. A new look at the steel cord-rubber adhesive interphase by chemical depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, G.E.

    2001-01-01

    The adhesive interphase formed between brass plated steel cord and sulfur crosslinked rubber is known to be a complex layer of metal oxides, sulfides, and rubber. Hostile aging of this system produces changes in the structure, morphology, thickness, and mechanical properties of this layer. In a previous publication it has been shown that the overall thickness of the sulfide layer as measured by depth profiling with Auger electron spectroscopy could be used to characterize the degradation of the adhesive bond [G. E. Hammer et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 12, 2388 (1994)]. In this work multivariate statistical analysis of the sulfur Auger electron spectra was used to produce chemical depth profiles of the individual copper and zinc sulfide layers. These chemical depth profiles give new insight into the adhesion degradation mechanism on the nanometer scale. Particularly, the percentage of copper sulfide in the layer was found to be an accurate predictor of adhesion degradation

  10. Reliability Analysis of Adhesive Bonded Scarf Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimiaeifar, Amin; Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Lund, Erik

    2012-01-01

    A probabilistic model for the reliability analysis of adhesive bonded scarfed lap joints subjected to static loading is developed. It is representative for the main laminate in a wind turbine blade subjected to flapwise bending. The structural analysis is based on a three dimensional (3D) finite...... element analysis (FEA). For the reliability analysis a design equation is considered which is related to a deterministic code-based design equation where reliability is secured by partial safety factors together with characteristic values for the material properties and loads. The failure criteria...... are formulated using a von Mises, a modified von Mises and a maximum stress failure criterion. The reliability level is estimated for the scarfed lap joint and this is compared with the target reliability level implicitly used in the wind turbine standard IEC 61400-1. A convergence study is performed to validate...

  11. Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces polyurethane adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseland, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces the adhesive properties of a polyurethane adhesive that fastens hardware to exterior surfaces of aluminum tanks. The mat is embedded in the uncured adhesive. It ensures good control of the bond line and increases the peel strength.

  12. Potential for Biobased Adhesives in Wood Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2016-01-01

    There has been a resurgence of interest and research on using bio-based materials as wood adhesives; however, they have achieved only limited market acceptance. To better understand this low level of replacement, it is important to understand why adhesives work or fail in moisture durability tests. A holistic model for wood adhesives has been developed that clarifies...

  13. Current dental adhesives systems. A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, Egle; Cumbo, Enzo; Cardoso, Rielson Jose A; Gallina, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry is based on the development of materials which establish an effective bond with the tooth tissues. In this context, adhesive systems have attracted considerable research interest in recent years. Successful adhesive bonding depends on the chemistry of the adhesive, on appropriate clinical handling of the material as well as on the knowledge of the morphological changes caused on dental tissue by different bonding procedures. This paper outlines the status of contemporary adhesive systems, with particular emphasis on chemical characteristics and mode of interaction of the adhesives with enamel and dentinal tissues. Dental adhesives are used for several clinical applications and they can be classified based on the clinical regimen in "etch-and-rinse adhesives" and "self-etch adhesives". Other important considerations concern the different anatomical characteristics of enamel and dentine which are involved in the bonding procedures that have also implications for the technique used as well as for the quality of the bond. Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems generally perform better on enamel than self-etching systems which may be more suitable for bonding to dentine. In order to avoid a possible loss of the restoration, secondary caries or pulp damage due to bacteria penetration or due to cytotoxicity effects of eluted adhesive components, careful consideration of several factors is essential in selecting the suitable bonding procedure and adhesive system for the individual patient situation.

  14. Recharging "Hot-Melt" Adhesive Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Progar, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Technique for recharging surface with "hot-melt" film makes use of one sided, high-temperature, pressure-sensitive adhesive tape. Purpose of the one-sided tape is to hold hot-melt charge in place until fused to surface. After adhesive has fused to surface and cooled, tape is removed, leaving adhesive on surface.

  15. Aspirin augments hyaluronidase induced adhesion inhibition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative adhesions occur after virtually all abdomino-pelvic surgery and are the leading cause of intestinal obstruction and other gynaecologic problems. We used an animal model to test the efficacy of combined administration of aspirin and hyaluronidase on adhesion formation. Adhesions were induced using ...

  16. 21 CFR 878.4380 - Drape adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drape adhesive. 878.4380 Section 878.4380 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4380 Drape adhesive. (a) Identification. A drape adhesive is a device intended to be placed on the skin to attach a surgical drape. (b...

  17. Initial Homotypic Cell Pair Adhesion in Regenerating Hydra Facilitates Subsequent Adhesion of Homotypic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Y.; Hariyama, T.; Tsukahara, Y.

    In Hydra vulgaris at the level of dissociated single cells endodermal cells adhere to each other more readily than to ectodermal cells at the initial adhesion. The time required for adhesion to occur between two adjacent cells is shorter for both endodermal and ectodermal homotypic cell adhesions once the initial adhesion of the first pair of cells has been established. It is confirmed that contact of an aggregated pair with additional homotypic cells facilitates the occurrence of homotypic adhesions; heterotypic adhesions are discouraged. This suggests that adhesion of homotypic cells contributes to an increased readiness for subsequent homotypic cells to adhere.

  18. Ethics of trial drug use: to give or not to give?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebunoluwa, Oduwole O; Kareem, Fayemi A

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 outbreak of Ebola viral disease in some West African countries, which later spread to the USA and Spain, has continued to be a subject of global public health debate. While there is no approved vaccine or drug for Ebola cure yet, moral questions of bioethical significance are emerging even as vaccine studies are at different clinical trial phases. This paper, through a normative and critical approach, focuses on the question of whether it is ethical to give any experimental drugs to Ebola victims in West Africa or not. Given the global panic and deadly contagious nature of Ebola, this paper argues on three major compassionate grounds that it is ethical to use experimental drugs on the dying African victims of Ebola. Besides respecting patients and family consent in the intervention process, this paper argues that the use of Ebola trial drugs on West African population will be ethical if it promotes the common good, and does not violate the fundamental principles of transparency and integrity in human research ethics. Using Kantian ethical framework of universality as a basis for moral defense of allowing access to yet approved drugs. This paper provides argument to strengthen the compassionate ground provisional recommendation of the WHO's Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization (SAGE) on Ebola vaccines and vaccination.

  19. Who gives? Multilevel effects of gender and ethnicity on workplace charitable giving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Lisa M; Snyder, Mark; Glomb, Theresa M

    2013-01-01

    Research on diversity in organizations has largely focused on the implications of gender and ethnic differences for performance, to the exclusion of other outcomes. We propose that gender and ethnic differences also have implications for workplace charitable giving, an important aspect of corporate social responsibility. Drawing from social role theory, we hypothesize and find that gender has consistent effects across levels of analysis; women donate more money to workplace charity than do men, and the percentage of women in a work unit is positively related to workplace charity, at least among men. Alternatively and consistent with social exchange theory, we hypothesize and find that ethnicity has opposing effects across levels of analysis; ethnic minorities donate less money to workplace charity than do Whites, but the percentage of minorities in a work unit is positively related to workplace charity, particularly among minorities. The findings provide a novel perspective on the consequences of gender and ethnic diversity in organizations and highlight synergies between organizational efforts to increase diversity and to build a reputation for corporate social responsibility. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Functional cine MR imaging for the detection and mapping of intraabdominal adhesions: method and surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhmann-Kirchhoff, Sonja; Reiser, Maximilian; Lienemann, Andreas [University Hospital Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Lang, Reinhold; Steitz, Heinrich O.; Jauch, Karl W. [University Hospital Munich-Grosshadern, Department of Surgery, Munich (Germany); Kirchhoff, Chlodwig [University Hospital Munich-Innenstadt, Department of Surgery, Munich (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence and localization of intraabdominal adhesions using functional cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to correlate the MR findings with intraoperative results. In a retrospective study, patients who had undergone previous abdominal surgery with suspected intraabdominal adhesions were examined. A true fast imaging with steady state precession sequence in transverse/sagittal orientation was used for a section-by-section dynamic depiction of visceral slide on a 1.5-Tesla system. After MRI, all patients underwent anew surgery. A nine-segment abdominal map was used to document the location and type of the adhesions. The intraoperative results were taken as standard of reference. Ninety patients were enrolled. During surgery 71 adhesions were detected, MRI depicted 68 intraabdominal adhesions. The most common type of adhesion in MRI was found between the anterior abdominal wall and small bowel loops (n = 22, 32.5%) and between small bowel loops and pelvic organs (n = 14, 20.6%). Comparing MRI with the intraoperative findings, sensitivity varied between 31 and 75% with a varying specificity between 65 and 92% in the different segments leading to an overall MRI accuracy of 89%. Functional cine MRI proved to be a useful examination technique for the identification of intraabdominal adhesions in patients with acute or chronic pain and corresponding clinical findings providing accurate results. However, no differentiation for symptomatic versus asymptomatic adhesions is possible. (orig.)

  1. Condensed tannin-sulfonate derivatives in cold-setting wood-laminating adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland E. Kreibich; Richard W. Hemingway

    1987-01-01

    Extraction of southern pine bark with 4.0 percent sodium sulfite and 0.4-percent sodium carbonate(based on ovendry bark weight) gives epicatechin-(4β)-sulfonate and oligomeric procyanidin-4-sulfonatee that show great promise to replace about 50 percent of the phenol-resorcinol-formaldehyde resin in coldsetting wood-laminating adhesives. Bonds in Douglas-fir...

  2. Beyond the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilczek, F.

    1993-01-01

    The standard model of particle physics is highly successful, although it is obviously not a complete or final theory. In this presentation the author argues that the structure of the standard model gives some quite concrete, compelling hints regarding what lies beyond. Essentially, this presentation is a record of the author's own judgement of what the central clues for physics beyond the standard model are, and also it is an attempt at some pedagogy. 14 refs., 6 figs

  3. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesika, Noshir S.; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  4. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesika, Noshir S [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Zeng Hongbo [Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2V4 (Canada); Kristiansen, Kai; Israelachvili, Jacob [Chemical Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Zhao, Boxin [Chemical Engineering Department and Waterloo Institute of Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Tian Yu [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Autumn, Kellar, E-mail: npesika@tulane.ed [Department of Biology, Lewis and Clark College, Portland, OR 97219 (United States)

    2009-11-18

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  5. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesika, Noshir S; Zeng Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Israelachvili, Jacob; Zhao, Boxin; Tian Yu; Autumn, Kellar

    2009-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  6. Photochemical tissue bonding with chitosan adhesive films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piller Sabine C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB is a promising sutureless technique for tissue repair. PTB is often achieved by applying a solution of rose bengal (RB between two tissue edges, which are irradiated by a green laser to crosslink collagen fibers with minimal heat production. In this study, RB has been incorporated in chitosan films to create a novel tissue adhesive that is laser-activated. Methods Adhesive films, based on chitosan and containing ~0.1 wt% RB were manufactured and bonded to calf intestine by a solid state laser (λ = 532 nm, Fluence~110 J/cm2, spot size~0.5 cm. A single-column tensiometer, interfaced with a personal computer, tested the bonding strength. K-type thermocouples recorded the temperature (T at the adhesive-tissue interface during laser irradiation. Human fibroblasts were also seeded on the adhesive and cultured for 48 hours to assess cell growth. Results The RB-chitosan adhesive bonded firmly to the intestine with adhesion strength of 15 ± 2 kPa, (n = 31. The adhesion strength dropped to 0.5 ± 0.1 (n = 8 kPa when the laser was not applied to the adhesive. The average temperature of the adhesive increased from 26°C to 32°C during laser exposure. Fibroblasts grew confluent on the adhesive without morphological changes. Conclusion A new biocompatible chitosan adhesive has been developed that bonds photochemically to tissue with minimal temperature increase.

  7. give us this day our daily bread” – clergy's lived religion in pretoria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    project” has evolved into engagement with manifold challenges that are linked to the locality and the time ..... to prevent burnout. Denominational gatherings are full of such well-meaning but unhelpful workshops. Yet, despite knowing this, most busy clergy cannot take the advice that they freely give to others. The standard.

  8. Platelet adhesion onto artificial red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, N; Kondo, T

    1980-05-01

    Several kinds of polyamide microcapsules containing mammalian hemolysate were prepared by making use of the interfacial polycondensation reaction between diamines and terephthaloyl dichloride and their blood compatibility in terms of platelet adhesion was examined aiming at their ultimate clinical use as artificial red blood cells. It was found that rabbit platelets adhere onto the hemolysate-loaded microcapsules in the presence of the plasma, while no platelet adhesion takes place in the absence of the plasma. This was interpreted as indicating an important role of plasma components in platelet adhesion. Moreover, platelet adhesion was observed to be facilitated by negative charges on the surface of the hemolysate-loaded microcapsules; the more negatively the surface was charge, the more easily the platelets adhered onto the surface. Finally, the present method of assessing platelet adhesion suggested the possibility of its use for kinetic study of platelet adhesion since it allowedus to make numerical evaluation of platelet adhesion as a function of time.

  9. Adhesive capsulitis and dynamic splinting: a controlled, cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willis F Buck

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adhesive Capsulitis (AC affects patient of all ages, and stretching protocols are commonly prescribed for this condition. Dynamic splinting has been shown effective in contracture reduction from pathologies including Trismus to plantar fasciitis. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of dynamic splinting on patients with AC. Methods This controlled, cohort study, was conducted at four physical therapy, sports medicine clinics in Texas and California. Sixty-two patients diagnosed with Stage II Adhesive Capsulitis were grouped by intervention. The intervention categories were as follows: Group I (Control; Group II (Physical Therapy exclusively with standardized protocols; Group III; (Shoulder Dynasplint system exclusively; Group IV (Combined treatment with Shoulder Dynasplint and standardized Physical Therapy. The duration of this study was 90 days for all groups, and the main outcome measures were change in active, external rotation. Results Significant difference was found for all treatment groups (p Conclusion The difference for the combined treatment group was attributed to patients' receiving the best PT combined with structured "home therapy" that contributed an additional 90 hours of end-range stretching. This adjunct should be included in the standard of care for adhesive Capsulitis. Trial Registration Trial Number: NCT00873158

  10. Nanoleakage of Class V Resin Restorations Using Two Nanofilled Adhesive Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Agha, Ebaa I; Alagha, Mustafa I

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was carried out to evaluate the nanoleakage of two types of nanofilled adhesive systems in Class V composite resin restorations. Materials and Methods: Totally 60 human premolars were randomly assigned to two groups (n = 30). Standardized round Class V cavities (enamel and dentin margins) were prepared. A total-etch (N-Bond total etch) (Ivoclar Vivadent) and self-etching (N-Bond self-etch) (Ivoclar Vivadent) adhesive system were evaluated. The cavities were restored inc...

  11. Surface energy and viscoelasticity influence caramel adhesiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Ty B; Foegeding, Edward Allen

    2017-08-26

    Adhesion is an important textural attribute that directs consumer eating patterns and behaviors and can be a negative attribute during food processing. The objectives of this study were to modify caramel formulation and compare adhesion to different materials to quantify the influence of surface energetics and viscoelasticity on caramel adhesiveness. Mechanical adhesion was viewed in the context of pressure sensitive tack theory, where adhesion is controlled by viscoelasticity of the adhesive material and the surface energy relationship of material and probe. Caramel samples varied in total amount of fat and protein, and mechanical adhesion was measured using a series of materials with total surface energies of 39.7-53.2 mJ/m 2 . Adhesiveness decreased as fat and protein content increased, with a significant effect of total surface energy. Viscoelasticity was modeled using creep recovery data fit to a four-element Burger mechanistic model. Burger model parameters representing retarded elasticity correlated strongly with adhesiveness. The results suggest two zones of adhesion based on formulation, one driven by both surface energy relationships-most notably dispersive and total surface energy-and viscoelasticity, and the other driven solely by viscoelasticity. Relationships between mechanical properties and adhesion have been explored but are still not well understood, and could aid in the design of food products with a controlled level of adhesion. The results of this study indicate the importance of considering material surface energy when measuring mechanical adhesion or texture profile analysis. Understanding the relationships between viscoelastic behavior and adhesion can be used to make inferences on perceived texture. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandall, N A; Millett, D T; Mattick, C R; Hickman, J; Macfarlane, T V; Worthington, H V

    2003-01-01

    Bonding of orthodontic brackets to teeth is important to enable effective and efficient treatment with fixed appliances. The problem is bracket failure during treatment which increases operator chairside time and lengthens treatment time. A prolonged treatment is likely to increase the oral health risks of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances one of which is irreversible enamel decalcification. To evaluate the effectiveness of different orthodontic adhesives for bonding. Electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE. Date of most recent searches: August 2002 (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2002). Trials were selected if they met the following criteria: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing two different adhesive groups. Participants were patients with fixed orthodontic appliances. The interventions were adhesives that bonded stainless steel brackets to all teeth except the molars. The primary outcome was debond or bracket failure. Data were recorded on decalcification as a secondary outcome, if present. Information regarding methods, participants, interventions, outcome measures and results were extracted in duplicate by pairs of reviewers (Nicky Mandall (NM) and Rye Mattick (CRM); Declan Millett (DTM) and Joy Hickman (JH2)). Since the data were not presented in a form that was amenable to meta-analysis, the results of the review are presented in narrative form only. Three trials satisfied the inclusion criteria. A chemical cured composite was compared with a light cure composite (one trial), a conventional glass ionomer cement (one trial) and a polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer) (one trial). The quality of the trial reports was generally poor. It is difficult to draw any conclusions from this review, however, suggestions are made for methods of improving future research involving

  13. DIABETES AND SHOULDER ADHESIVE CAPSULITIS

    OpenAIRE

    J. Mohanakrishnan; Bhanumathy Mohanakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adhesive capsulitis (AC) of shoulder is a common condition encountered by physical therapists in their routine outpatient care services; AC of shoulder is as by itself being a self limiting disorder lasts from months to years causing pain and discomfort to the patients. The condition is commonly associated with Diabetes mellitus or other co morbidities. The incidence of AC is high among diabetic individuals and it becomes mandatory on the part of physical therapists and other heal...

  14. Polymer nanocarriers for dentin adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, R; Osorio, E; Medina-Castillo, A L; Toledano, M

    2014-12-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP- N : Active nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days' immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be incorporated into dental adhesive systems to provide the appropriate environment in which dentin MMP collagen degradation is inhibited and mineral growth can occur. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  15. Culinary Medicine—Jalebi Adhesions

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor, Vinay K

    2015-01-01

    Culinary terms have been used to describe anatomy (bean-shaped kidneys), pathology (strawberry gall bladder), clinical signs (café-au-lait spots), radiological images (sausage-shaped pancreas), etc. While Indian cuisine is popular all over the world, no Indian dish finds mention in medical terminology. In intra-abdominal adhesions, sometimes, the intestinal loops are so densely adherent that it is difficult to make out proximal from distal and it is impossible to separate them without injurin...

  16. Polyurethane adhesives in flat roofs

    OpenAIRE

    Bogárová Markéta; Stodůlka Jindřich; Šuhajda Karel

    2017-01-01

    It is necessary to stabilize individual layers of flat roofs, mainly because of wind suction. Apart from anchoring and surcharge, these layers can be secured by bonding. At present gluing is an indispensable and widely used stabilization method. On our market we can found many types of adhesives, most widely used are based on polyurethane. This paper focuses on problematic about stabilization thermal insulation from expanded polystyrene to vapor barrier from bitumen. One of the main issues is...

  17. Opto-acoustic microscopy reveals adhesion mechanics of single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Ghanem, Maroun; Dehoux, Thomas; Liu, Liwang; Le Saux, Guillaume; Plawinski, Laurent; Durrieu, Marie-Christine; Audoin, Bertrand

    2018-01-01

    Laser-generated GHz-ultrasonic-based technologies have shown the ability to image single cell adhesion and stiffness simultaneously. Using this new modality, we here demonstrate quantitative indicators to investigate contact mechanics and adhesion processes of the cell. We cultured human cells on a rigid substrate, and we used an inverted pulsed opto-acoustic microscope to generate acoustic pulses containing frequencies up to 100 GHz in the substrate. We map the reflection of the acoustic pulses at the cell-substrate interface to obtain images of the acoustic impedance of the cell, Zc, as well as of the stiffness of the interface, K, with 1 μm lateral resolution. Our results show that the standard deviation ΔZc reveals differences between different cell types arising from the multiplicity of local conformations within the nucleus. From the distribution of K-values within the nuclear region, we extract a mean interfacial stiffness, Km, that quantifies the average contact force in areas of the cell displaying weak bonding. By analogy with classical contact mechanics, we also define the ratio of the real to nominal contact areas, Sr/St. We show that Km can be interpreted as a quantitative indicator of passive contact at metal-cell interfaces, while Sr/St is sensitive to active adhesive processes in the nuclear region. The ability to separate the contributions of passive and active adhesion processes should allow gaining insight into cell-substrate interactions, with important applications in tissue engineering.

  18. Blood coagulation and platelet adhesion on polyaniline films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humpolíček, Petr; Kuceková, Zdenka; Kašpárková, Věra; Pelková, Jana; Modic, Martina; Junkar, Ita; Trchová, Miroslava; Bober, Patrycja; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Lehocký, Marián

    2015-09-01

    Polyaniline is a promising conducting polymer with still increasing application potential in biomedicine. Its surface modification can be an efficient way how to introduce desired functional groups and to control its properties while keeping the bulk characteristics of the material unchanged. The purpose of the study was to synthetize thin films of pristine conducting polyaniline hydrochloride, non-conducting polyaniline base and polyaniline modified with poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid) (PAMPSA) and investigate chosen parameters of their hemocompatibility. The modification was performed either by introduction of PAMPSA during the synthesis or by reprotonation of polyaniline base. The polyaniline hydrochloride and polyaniline base had no impact on blood coagulation and platelet adhesion. By contrast, the polyaniline reprotonated with PAMPSA completely hindered coagulation thanks to its interaction with coagulation factors Xa, Va and IIa. The significantly lower platelets adhesion was also found on this surface. Moreover, this film maintains its conductivity at pH of 6, which is an improvement in comparison with standard polyaniline hydrochloride losing most of its conductivity at pH of 4. Polyaniline film with PAMPSA introduced during synthesis had an impact on platelet adhesion but not on coagulation. The combined conductivity, anticoagulation activity, low platelet adhesion and improved conductivity at pH closer to physiological, open up new possibilities for application of polyaniline reprotonated by PAMPSA in blood-contacting devices, such as catheters or blood vessel grafts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A review of our development of dental adhesives--effects of radical polymerization initiators and adhesive monomers on adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Kunio; Endo, Takeshi

    2010-03-01

    This paper reviews the development of dental adhesives by collating information of related studies from original scientific papers, reviews, and patent literatures. Through our development, novel radical polymerization initiators, adhesive monomers, and microcapsules were synthesized, and their effects on adhesion were investigated. It was found that 5-monosubstituted barbituric acid (5-MSBA)-containing ternary initiators in conjunction with adhesive monomers contributed to effective adhesion with good polymerization reactivity. Several kinds of novel adhesive monomers bearing carboxyl group, phosphonic acid group or sulfur-containing group were synthesized, and investigated their multi-purpose bonding functions. It was suggested that the flexible methylene chain in the structure of adhesive monomers played a pivotal role in their enhanced bonding durability. It was found that the combination of acidic monomers with sulfur-containing monomer markedly improved adhesion to enamel, dentin, porcelain, alumina, zirconia, non-precious metals and precious metals. A new poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-type adhesive resin comprising microencapsulated polymerization initiators was also found to exhibit both good formulation stability and excellent adhesive property.

  20. Emerging economies a new force in international giving | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-03-04

    Mar 4, 2014 ... Emerging economies' increasing engagement in overseas philanthropy, private investment, and government aid is transforming the landscape of international giving, a groundbreaking study reports.

  1. Culinary Medicine-Jalebi Adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Vinay K

    2016-02-01

    Culinary terms have been used to describe anatomy (bean-shaped kidneys), pathology (strawberry gall bladder), clinical signs (café-au-lait spots), radiological images (sausage-shaped pancreas), etc. While Indian cuisine is popular all over the world, no Indian dish finds mention in medical terminology. In intra-abdominal adhesions, sometimes, the intestinal loops are so densely adherent that it is difficult to make out proximal from distal and it is impossible to separate them without injuring the bowel resulting in spill of contents-resection is the only option (Fig. 1). Jalebi, an Indian dessert, has a single long tubular strip of fried batter filled with sugary syrup so intertwined that it is impossible to discern its ends; if broken, the syrup spills out-the best way to relish it is to chew the whole piece (Fig. 2). Because of these similarities between them, I propose to name dense intra-abdominal adhesions as 'jalebi adhesions.'

  2. Modeling of Sylgard Adhesive Strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Ralph Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-03

    Sylgard is the name of a silicone elastomeric potting material manufactured by Dow Corning Corporation.1 Although the manufacturer cites its low adhesive strength as a feature of this product, thin layers of Sylgard do in fact have a non-negligible strength, which has been measured in recent tensile and shear debonding tests. The adhesive strength of thin layers of Sylgard potting material can be important in applications in which components having signi cantly di erent thermal expansion properties are potted together, and the potted assembly is subjected to temperature changes. The tensile and shear tractions developed on the potted surfaces of the components can cause signi cant internal stresses, particularly for components made of low-strength materials with a high area-to-volume ratio. This report is organized as follows: recent Sylgard debonding tests are rst brie y summarized, with particular attention to the adhesion between Sylgard and PBX 9501, and also between Sylgard and aluminum. Next, the type of numerical model that will be used to simulate the debonding behavior exhibited in these tests is described. Then the calibration of the debonding model will be illustrated. Finally, the method by which the model parameters are adjusted (scaled) to be applicable to other, non- tested bond thicknesses is summarized, and all parameters of the model (scaled and unscaled) are presented so that other investigators can reproduce all of the simulations described in this report as well as simulations of the application of interest.

  3. TRIM15 is a focal adhesion protein that regulates focal adhesion disassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchil, Pradeep D.; Pawliczek, Tobias; Reynolds, Tracy D.; Ding, Siyuan; Hinz, Angelika; Munro, James B.; Huang, Fang; Floyd, Robert W.; Yang, Haitao; Hamilton, William L.; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Xiong, Yong; Calderwood, David A.; Mothes, Walther

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Focal adhesions are macromolecular complexes that connect the actin cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. Dynamic turnover of focal adhesions is crucial for cell migration. Paxillin is a multi-adaptor protein that plays an important role in regulating focal adhesion dynamics. Here, we identify TRIM15, a member of the tripartite motif protein family, as a paxillin-interacting factor and a component of focal adhesions. TRIM15 localizes to focal contacts in a myosin-II-independent manner by an interaction between its coiled-coil domain and the LD2 motif of paxillin. Unlike other focal adhesion proteins, TRIM15 is a stable focal adhesion component with restricted mobility due to its ability to form oligomers. TRIM15-depleted cells display impaired cell migration and reduced focal adhesion disassembly rates, in addition to enlarged focal adhesions. Thus, our studies demonstrate a cellular function for TRIM15 as a regulatory component of focal adhesion turnover and cell migration. PMID:25015296

  4. Functional Peptides from Laminin-1 Improve the Cell Adhesion Capacity of Recombinant Mussel Adhesive Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Ji, Lina; Hua, Zichun

    2017-01-01

    Since cell adhesion is important for cell processes such as migration and proliferation, it is a crucial consideration in biomaterial design and development. Based on the fusion of mussel adhesive protein fp151 with laminin-1-originated functional peptides we designed fusion proteins (fLA4, fLG6 and fAG73) and explored their cell adhesion properties. In our study, cell adhesion analysis showed that protein fLG6 and fLA4 had a significantly higher cell adhesion property for A549 than fp151. Moreover, protein fAG73 also displayed a strong adhesion capacity for Hela cells. In conclusion, the incorporation of functional peptides with integrin and heparin/heparan sulphate binding capacity into mussel adhesive protein will promote the application of mussel adhesive protein as cell adhesion biomaterial. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Bond durability of universal adhesive to bovine enamel using self-etch mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Soshi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Imai, Arisa; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Sai, Keiichi; Takimoto, Masayuki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-08-31

    The purpose of this study was to examine the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives in the self-etch mode under 2-year water storage and thermal cycling conditions. Three commercially available universal adhesives and a gold standard two-step self-etch adhesive were used. Ten specimens of bovine enamel were prepared per test group, and shear bond strength (SBS) was measured to determine the bonding durability after thermal cycling (TC) or long-term water storage (WS). The bonded specimens were divided into three groups: (1) specimens subjected to TC, where the bonded specimens were stored in 37 °C distilled water for 24 h before being subjected to 3000, 10,000, 20,000 or 30,000 TC; (2) specimens stored in 37 °C distilled water for 3 months, 6 months, 1 year or 2 year; and (3) specimens stored in 37 °C distilled water for 24 h, serving as a baseline. The two-step self-etch adhesive showed significantly higher SBS than the universal adhesives tested, regardless of the type of degradation method. All universal adhesives showed no significant enamel SBS reductions in TC and WS, when compared to baseline and the other degradation conditions. Compared to the bond strengths obtained with the two-step self-etch adhesive, significantly lower bond strengths were obtained with universal adhesives. However, the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives was relatively stable under both degradation conditions tested. The present data indicate that the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives in the self-etch mode might be sufficient for clinical use.

  6. Handbook of Adhesion, 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packham, D. E.

    2005-06-01

    This second edition of the successful Handbook of Adhesion provides concise and authoritative articles covering many aspects of the science and technology associated with adhesion and adhesives. It is intended to fill a gap between the necessarily simplified treatment of the student textbook and the full and thorough treatment of the research monograph and review article. The articles are structured in such a way, with internal cross-referencing and external literature references, that the reader can build up a broader and deeper understanding, as their needs require. This second edition includes many new articles covering developments which have risen in prominence in the intervening years, such as scanning probe techniques, the surface forces apparatus and the relation between adhesion and fractal surfaces. Advances in understanding polymer - polymer interdiffusion are reflected in articles drawing out the implications for adhesive bonding. In addition, articles derived from the earlier edition have been revised and updated where needed. Throughout the book there is a renewed emphasis on environmental implications of the use of adhesives and sealants. The scope of the Handbook, which features nearly 250 articles from over 60 authors, includes the background science - physics, chemistry and material science - and engineering, and also aspects of adhesion relevant to the use of adhesives, including topics such as: Sealants and mastics Paints and coatings Printing and composite materials Welding and autohesion Engineering design The Handbook of Adhesion is intended for scientists and engineers in both academia and industry, requiring an understanding of the various facets of adhesion.

  7. Large Deformation and Adhesive Contact Studies of Axisymmetric Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprade, Evan J.; Long, Rong; Pham, Jonathan; Lawrence, Jimmy; Emrick, Todd; Crosby, Alfred; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Shull, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    A model membrane contact system consisting of an acrylic copolymer membrane and polydimethyl-siloxane substrate was utilized to evaluate a recently developed nonlinear large-deformation adhesive contact analysis. Direct measurements of the local membrane apex strain during non-contact inflation indicated that the neo-Hookean model provides an accurate measure of membrane strain and supports its use as the strain energy function for the analysis. A time dependent modulus emerges from the analysis, with principal tensions obtained from a comparison of predicted and experimental membrane profiles. A displacement controlled geometry was more easily modeled than the pressure controlled geometry, the applicability of the analysis was limited by wrinkling instabilities. The substantial viscoelastic behavior of these membranes made it difficult to describe the entire membrane with a single modulus, given the nonuniform deformation history of the membranes. Given the difficulty in determining membrane tension from the measured pressure and profile fits using the model, the peel energy was used as a simpler measure of adhesion. Using an analytical balance in the displacement controlled geometry, the membrane tension at the contact line was directly measured. Coupled with contact angle imaging, the peel energy was determined. For the model membranes studied, this peel energy described the membrane/substrate adhesive interactions quite well, giving well-defined peel energies that were independent of the detailed strain state of the membrane. PMID:23289644

  8. Adhesion enhancement of biomimetic dry adhesives by nanoparticle in situ synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz Téllez, J P; Harirchian-Saei, S; Li, Y; Menon, C

    2013-01-01

    A novel method to increase the adhesion strength of a gecko-inspired dry adhesive is presented. Gold nanoparticles are synthesized on the tips of the microfibrils of a polymeric dry adhesive to increase its Hamaker constant. Formation of the gold nanoparticles is qualitatively studied through a colour change in the originally transparent substance and quantitatively analysed using ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry. A pull-off force test is employed to quantify the adhesion enhancement. Specifically, adhesion forces of samples with and without embedded gold nanoparticles are measured and compared. The experimental results indicate that an adhesion improvement of 135% can be achieved. (paper)

  9. 14 CFR 221.140 - Method of giving concurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Conflicting authority to be avoided. Care should be taken to avoid giving authority to two or more carriers... Aviation shall be used by a carrier to give authority to another carrier to issue and file with the... used as authority to file joint fares or charges in which the carrier to whom the concurrence is given...

  10. Modeling the probability of giving birth at health institutions among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although ante natal care and institutional delivery is effective means for reducing maternal morbidity and mortality, the probability of giving birth at health institutions among ante natal care attendants has not been modeled in Ethiopia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to model predictors of giving birth at ...

  11. Ethics and Epistemology: Giving Back in the Klamath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Reid Sarna-Wojcicki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This research note is part of the thematic section, Giving Back Through Collaboration in Practice, in the special issue titled “Giving Back in Field Research,” published as Volume 10, Issue 2 in the Journal of Research Practice.

  12. A Pilot Study of Nurses' Experience of Giving Spiritual Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Belinda

    2010-01-01

    Using spiritual and religious resources gives patients and families strength to cope during a crisis, but nurses often do not offer spiritual care (Kloosterhouse & Ames, 2002). The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore nurses" lived experience of giving spiritual care. A descriptive phenomenological approach was used to…

  13. Characterization of a multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica give ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salmonella enterica Give is one of the serotypes that have been incriminated in Salmonella infections; sometimes associated with hospitalization and mortalities in humans and animals in some parts of the world. In this work, we characterized one Salmonella Give isolated from cloaca swab of an Agama agama lizard ...

  14. OPINION GIVING SERVICES AS A SOURCE OF CONSUMER INFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Wyrwisz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article is to determine the place and role of opinion giving services in consumer behaviours. The discussion is conducted around the thesis saying that in the information society, opinion giving services constitute an important source of information for consumers in the process of selecting and purchasing both products and services. In the article the research approach based on the theoretical and empirical examinations was presented. The discussion starts with presenting a defi nition and types of opinion giving services which constitute the base for the characteristics of activities and usefulness of web portals collecting consumers opinions. The use of opinion giving services provided in the purchase process was evaluated. An essential interest in other consumers opinions, placed in Internet, was observed together with perceiving them as credible. Positive assessment of the functionality of opinion giving services was noticed.

  15. Human climbing with efficiently scaled gecko-inspired dry adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkes, Elliot W.; Eason, Eric V.; Christensen, David L.; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the mechanism of adhesion in geckos, many synthetic dry adhesives have been developed with desirable gecko-like properties such as reusability, directionality, self-cleaning ability, rough surface adhesion and high adhesive stress. However, fully exploiting these adhesives in practical applications at different length scales requires efficient scaling (i.e. with little loss in adhesion as area grows). Just as natural gecko adhesives have been used as a benchmark for syn...

  16. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lebesgue

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc versus the non-adhesive part (the stem, and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue. This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article “Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach” (Lebesgue et al., 2016 [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold, likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  17. The influence of adhesive thickness on the microtensile bond strength of three adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Vanini, Lorenzo; Prosperi, Gianni Domenico; Di Bussolo, Giulia; De Angelis, Francesco; D'Amario, Maurizio; Caputi, Sergio

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of multiple adhesive layers of three etch-and-rinse adhesives on both adhesive thickness and microtensile bond strength (microTBS). Midcoronal occlusal dentin of 36 extracted human molars was used. Teeth were randomly assigned to 3 groups (EB, XP, PQ) according to the adhesive system to be used: PQ1 (Ultradent) (PQ), EnaBond (Micerium) (EB), or XP Bond (Dentsply/DeTrey) (XP). Specimens from each group were further divided into three subgroups according to the number of adhesive coatings (1, 2, or 3). In all subgroups, each adhesive layer was light cured before application of each additional layer. After bonding procedures, composite crowns were incrementally built up. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the adhesive interface to produce multiple beams, approximately 1 mm2 in area. Beams were tested under tension at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Adhesive thicknesses and failure modes were evaluated with SEM. The microTBS data and mean adhesive thickness were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and multiple-comparison Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). The mean bond strength (in MPa (SD)) of group EB gradually increased from 1 to 3 consecutive coatings (27.02 (9.38) to 44.32 (4.93), respectively) (p adhesive coatings. The mean thickness of the adhesive layer (in microm (SD)) significantly increased with the number of coatings (p adhesive failure between adhesive and dentin. The XP3 and PQ3 subgroups showed a greater number of total cohesive failure in adhesive. Multiple adhesive coats significantly affected bond strength to dentin. An excess of adhesive layer thickness can negatively influence the strength and the quality of adhesion.

  18. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-06-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article "Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach" (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  19. Cooperative Research and Development Agreement Final Report for Cooperative Research and Development Agreement Number ORNL93-0237 Adhesive Bonding Technologies for Automotive Structural Composites; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeman, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    In 1993, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) to conduct research and development that would overcome technological hurdles to the adhesive bonding of current and future automotive materials. This effort is part of a larger Department of Energy (DOE) program to promote the use of lighter weight materials in automotive structures for the purpose of increasing fuel efficiency and reducing environmental pollutant emissions. In accomplishing this mission, the bonding of similar and dissimilar materials was identified as being of primary importance to the automotive industry since this enabling technology would give designers the freedom to choose from an expanded menu of low mass materials for component weight reduction. The research undertaken under this CRADA addresses the following areas of importance: bulk material characterization, structural fracture mechanics, modeling/characterization, process control and nondestructive evaluation (PC/NDE), manufacturing demonstration, and advanced processing. For the bulk material characterization task, the individual material properties of the adherends and adhesives were characterized. This included generating a database of mechanical and physical properties, after identifying and developing standard test methods to obtain properties. The structural fracture mechanics task concentrated on test development to characterize the fracture toughness of adhesively bonded joints subjected to Mode I, Mode II and mixed-mode conditions. Standard test procedures for quantifying an adhesive/adherend system's resistance to crack growth were developed for use by industry. In the modeling/characterization task, fracture mechanics-based design guidelines and predictive methodologies have been developed which will facilitate iteration on design concepts for bonded joints while alleviating the need for extensive testing

  20. A computational study of adhesion between rubber and metal sulfides at rubber–brass interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Chian Ye; Hirvi, Janne T.; Suvanto, Mika; Bazhenov, Andrey S.; Ajoviita, Tommi; Markkula, Katriina; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An atomic level model for brass–rubber interactions has been presented. • The main adhesion force has been tracked to the rubber sulfur–brass zinc or brass copper interaction. • The model gives new understanding of the adhesion and can be used for further developments of the system. - Abstract: Computational study at level of density functional theory has been carried out in order to investigate the adhesion between rubber and brass plated steel cord, which has high importance in tire manufacturing. Adsorption of natural rubber based adsorbate models has been studied on zinc sulfide, ZnS(1 1 0), and copper sulfide, Cu 2 S(1 1 1) and CuS(0 0 1), surfaces as the corresponding phases are formed in adhesive interlayer during rubber vulcanization. Saturated hydrocarbons exhibited weak interactions, whereas unsaturated hydrocarbons and sulfur-containing adsorbates interacted with the metal atoms of sulfide surfaces more strongly. Sulfur-containing adsorbates interacted with ZnS(1 1 0) surface stronger than unsaturated hydrocarbons, whereras both Cu 2 S(1 1 1) and CuS(0 0 1) surfaces showed opposite adsorption preference as unsaturated hydrocarbons adsorbed stronger than sulfur-containing adsorbates. The different interaction strength order can play role in rubber–brass adhesion with different relative sulfide concentrations. Moreover, Cu 2 S(1 1 1) surface exhibits higher adsorption energies than CuS(0 0 1) surface, possibly indicating dominant role of Cu 2 S in the adhesion between rubber and brass

  1. Islam, Standards, and Technoscience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    Halal (literally, "permissible" or "lawful") production, trade, and standards have become essential to state-regulated Islam and to companies in contemporary Malaysia and Singapore, giving these two countries a special position in the rapidly expanding global market for halal products: in these n......Halal (literally, "permissible" or "lawful") production, trade, and standards have become essential to state-regulated Islam and to companies in contemporary Malaysia and Singapore, giving these two countries a special position in the rapidly expanding global market for halal products...

  2. Classification of OPP adhesive tapes according to pyrogram of adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumooka, Y

    2011-03-20

    Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) of colorless and transparent oriented polypropylene (OPP) adhesive tapes were analyzed by pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py/GC/MS). The PSAs were acrylic and rubber-based PSAs and the tapes were classified according to total ion current (TIC) chromatograms of the PSAs. The main pyrolyzates of the acrylic PSAs were decomposition products of monomers, monomers, dimmers and trimers. Those of the rubber-based PSAs were the monomers of elastomers, and subtle peaks observed were the pyrolyzates of tackifiers and volatile additives in the TIC chromatograms. Small differences were observed among the classifications of the acrylic PSAs by Py/GC/MS, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) and Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI/MS). The classification of the rubber-based PSAs by Py/GC/MS and that by ATR FT-IR were the same, and a slight difference was observed between those by Py/GC/MS and MALDI MS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hypertonic saline impedes tumor cell-endothelial cell interaction by reducing adhesion molecule and laminin expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hypertonic saline infusion dampens inflammatory responses and suppresses neutrophil-endothelial interaction by reducing adhesion molecule expression. This study tested the hypothesis that hypertonic saline attenuates tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium through a similar mechanism. METHODS: Human colon cancer cells (LS174T) were transfected with green fluorescent protein and exposed to lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-6 under hypertonic and isotonic conditions for 1 and 4 hours. Confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells were similarly exposed. Cellular apoptosis and expression of adhesion molecules and laminin were measured by flow cytometry. Tumor cell adhesion to endothelium and laminin was assessed with fluorescence microscopy. Data are represented as mean +\\/- standard error of mean, and an ANOVA test was performed to gauge statistical significance, with P <.05 considered significant. RESULTS: Hypertonic exposure significantly reduced tumor cell adhesion despite the presence of the perioperative cell stressors (42 +\\/- 2.9 vs 172.5 +\\/- 12.4, P <.05), attenuated tumor cell beta-1 integrin (14.43 vs 23.84, P <.05), and endothelial cell laminin expression (22.78 +\\/- 2.2 vs 33.74 +\\/- 2.4, P <.05), but did not significantly alter cell viability. CONCLUSION: Hypertonic saline significantly attenuates tumor cell adhesion to endothelium by inhibiting adhesion molecule and laminin expression. This may halt the metastatic behavior of tumor cells shed at surgery.

  4. Nanoleakage of Class V Resin Restorations Using Two Nanofilled Adhesive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Agha, Ebaa I; Alagha, Mustafa I

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was carried out to evaluate the nanoleakage of two types of nanofilled adhesive systems in Class V composite resin restorations. Materials and Methods: Totally 60 human premolars were randomly assigned to two groups (n = 30). Standardized round Class V cavities (enamel and dentin margins) were prepared. A total-etch (N-Bond total etch) (Ivoclar Vivadent) and self-etching (N-Bond self-etch) (Ivoclar Vivadent) adhesive system were evaluated. The cavities were restored incrementally with nanohybird composite resin (Tetric N-Ceram). The teeth were sectioned into a series of 1 mm thick beams then they were immersed in the prepared ammoniacal silver nitrate tracer solution for 24 h in a black photo-film container to ensure total darkness. The beams were then rinsed with distilled water, and immersed in photo-developing solution for eight hours then they were subjected to the nanoleakage evaluation. The specimens were analyzed in the environmental scanning electron operated with backscattered electron mode at ×1000 magnification. Results: Self-etch adhesive recorded higher nanoleakage % mean value than the total-etch adhesive. The difference in nanoleakage % mean values between total and self-etch adhesive was statistically significant. Conclusion: The self-etch adhesive had statistically significant higher nanoleakage mean values than the total-etch adhesive. PMID:26229363

  5. Efficacy of adhesive strips to reduce postoperative periorbital edema and ecchymosis following rhinoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, Sedat; Bulam, Mehmet Hakan; Özmen, Selahattin

    2018-02-23

    Background/aim: Periorbital edema and ecchymosis may develop following rhinoplasty. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of adhesive strip application on the upper and lower eyelids to reduce postoperative edema and ecchymosis following rhinoplasty. Materials and methods: The eyelids of one side were randomly selected, and an adhesive strip of standard size and number was applied at the end of the operation. The strips were removed at postoperative day 3; photos of the eyes were taken at days 3 and 7. Edema and ecchymosis were graded on a scale from 1 to 4. The ecchymosis areas on the lower and upper eyelids were measured and compared in square centimeters. Results: The mean ecchymosis area of the lower eyelid on the side of the adhesive strip and on the side without the strip was 1.63 cm2 and 3.32 cm2 in the early period, respectively. It was 1.15 cm2 on the upper eyelid on the side of the adhesive strip, and 1.87 cm2 on the side without the strip. It was 0.224 cm2 on the side of the adhesive strip, and 0.498 cm2 on the side without the adhesive strip in the late period. Conclusion: Applying adhesive strips reduces periorbital edema and ecchymosis.

  6. Requirements of quality standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.

    1977-01-01

    The lecture traces the development of nuclear standards, codes, and Federal regulations on quality assurance (QA) for nuclear power plants and associated facilities. The technical evolution of the last twelve years, especially in the area of nuclear technology, led to different activities and regulatory initiatives, and the present result is: several nations have their own homemade standards. The lecture discusses the former and especially current activities in standard development, and gives a description of the requirements of QA-standards used in USA and Europe, especially Western Germany. Furthermore the lecture attempts to give a comparison and an evaluation of the international quality standards from the author's viewpoint. Finally the lecture presents an outlook for the future international implications of QA-standards. There is an urgent need within the nuclear industry for simplification and standardization of QA-standards. The relationship between the various standards, and the applicability of the standards need clarification and a better transparancy. To point out these problems is the purpose of the lecture. (orig.) [de

  7. Adhesive Strength of dry Adhesive Structures Depending on the Thickness of Metal Coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gyu Hye; Kwon, Da Som; Kim, Mi Jung; Kim, Su Hee; Yoon, Ji Won; An, Tea Chang; Hwang, Hui Yun

    2016-01-01

    Recently, engineering applications have started to adopt solutions inspired by nature. The peculiar adhesive properties of gecko skin are an example, as they allow the animal to move freely on vertical walls and even on ceilings. The high adhesive forces between gecko feet and walls are due to the hierarchical microscopical structure of the skin. In this study, the effect of metal coatings on the adhesive strength of synthetic, hierarchically structured, dry adhesives was investigated. Synthetic dry adhesives were fabricated using PDMS micro-molds prepared by photolithography. Metal coatings on synthetic dry adhesives were formed by plasma sputtering. Adhesive strength was measured by pure shear tests. The highest adhesion strengths were found with coatings composed of 4 nm thick layers of Indium, 8 nm thick layers of Zinc and 6 nm thick layers of Gold, respectively

  8. Influence of composition on the adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-min; Hong, Guang; Hayashida, Kentaro; Maeda, Takeshi; Murata, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of composition on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength between denture adhesives and the denture base. Two types of water-soluble polymers (methoxy ethylene maleic anhydride copolymer [PVM-MA] and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose [CMC]) were used. Samples were divided into three groups. Group 1 contained only PVM-MA; Group 2 contained only CMC; and Group 3 contained PVM-MA and CMC. The initial viscosity and adhesive strength were measured. For Group 1, the initial viscosity increased significantly as PVM-MA content increased. The adhesive strength of Group 1 lasted longer than Group 2. The adhesive strength of Group 3 varied greatly. The ratio of CMC and PVM-MA has a significant effect on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of denture adhesives. Our results suggest that it is possible to improve the durability of a denture adhesive by combining different water-soluble polymers.

  9. Adhesion of rhodium films on metallic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marot, L.; Covarel, G.; Tuilier, M.-H.; Steiner, R.; Oelhafen, P.

    2008-01-01

    Rhodium coated metallic films were prepared by magnetron sputtering on metallic substrates. All films were elaborated in same conditions on copper, molybdenum and stainless steel. Adhesion strength tests were carried out by scratch test. The results reveal that the adhesion strength between the film and the substrate is influenced by the hardness of the substrate. Increase of deposition temperature improves the adhesion of the coating. In addition, pre-treatment of substrates by a filtered cathodic vacuum arc and the layer thickness have has some effects on the final adhesion strength

  10. Autologous fibrin adhesive in experimental tubal anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, S; Rusia, U; Agarwal, S; Agarwal, N

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate autologous fibrin in rabbit oviduct anastomosis versus 7-0 vikryl, a conventional suture material used in tubal anastomosis. Thrombin was added to the autologous fibrinogen at the site of anastomosis to obtain a tissue adhesive. The anastomotic time, pregnancy rate, and litter size were evaluated. Three months later, a relaparotomy was done to evaluate patency and degree of adhesions, and a tubal biopsy was taken from the site of anastomosis. Analysis of results showed a statistically significant (P < .001) shortened anastomotic time and superior histopathological union in the tissue adhesive group. Patency rate, pregnancy rate, and degree of adhesions were comparable in both groups.

  11. Nucleation and growth of cadherin adhesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Mireille; Thoumine, Olivier; Brevier, Julien; Choquet, Daniel; Riveline, Daniel; Mege, Rene-Marc

    2007-01-01

    Cell-cell contact formation relies on the recruitment of cadherin molecules and their anchoring to actin. However, the precise chronology of events from initial cadherin trans-interactions to adhesion strengthening is unclear, in part due to the lack of access to the distribution of cadherins within adhesion zones. Using N-cadherin expressing cells interacting with N-cadherin coated surfaces, we characterized the formation of cadherin adhesions at the ventral cell surface. TIRF and RIC microscopies revealed streak-like accumulations of cadherin along actin fibers. FRAP analysis indicated that engaged cadherins display a slow turnover at equilibrium, compatible with a continuous addition and removal of cadherin molecules within the adhesive contact. Association of cadherin cytoplasmic tail to actin as well as actin cables and myosin II activity are required for the formation and maintenance of cadherin adhesions. Using time lapse microscopy we deciphered how cadherin adhesions form and grow. As lamellipodia protrude, cadherin foci stochastically formed a few microns away from the cell margin. Neo-formed foci coalesced aligned and coalesced with preformed foci either by rearward sliding or gap filling to form cadherin adhesions. Foci experienced collapse at the rear of cadherin adhesions. Based on these results, we present a model for the nucleation, directional growth and shrinkage of cadherin adhesions

  12. Wood adhesives from Eucalyptus tar and creosote

    OpenAIRE

    Pimenta, AS; Vital, BR; Fujiwara, FY

    1997-01-01

    This study has shown that Eucalyptus tar and creosote can be used in phenolic adhesive formulations (resols) for wood products bonding. Some adhesives were prepared substituting 0; 17.7; 35.0 and 67.0% of the phenol by anhydrous tar and 0; 15.0 e 28.5% by creosote. In gluing Brazilian pine veneers, eucalypt tar and creosote based adhesives required longer pressing times for curing than conventional phenol-formaldehyde adhesives. By using C-13 NMR, the number of carbons in side chains and hydr...

  13. Adhesive bonds for optics: analysis and trade-offs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, John G.; Hawk, Matthew D.

    2017-08-01

    Fastening optical elements with adhesives presents challenges when dissimilar materials (almost always the case) are encountered and environmental exposures from temperature changes, shock and vibration must be met. A brief review of standard processes will be followed by a selection criteria for the optic, its substrate, the bond geometry, surface preparation, application and cure. Common analysis practices will be compared to Finite Element models. The impact of stress in terms of distortion and level of risk of bond failure is highlighted. Trade-offs will be presented as aids in determination of the best approach. Some areas addressed will be different adhesive types, matching CTE's, stress effects, athermal bonds, monolithic designs, and the use of flexures.

  14. Secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Md Saion bin Salikin.

    1983-01-01

    A secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory has been established in the Tun Ismail Research Centre, Malaysia as a national laboratory for reference and standardization purposes in the field of radiation dosimetry. This article gives brief accounts on the general information, development of the facility, programmes to be carried out as well as other information on the relevant aspects of the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory. (author)

  15. Properties of pressure sensitive adhesives found in paper recycling operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan F. Verhulst; Steven J. Severtson; Jihui Guo; Carl J. Houtman

    2006-01-01

    Hot melt and water-based adhesives are very different materials with similar physical properties. Their ability to act as adhesives is due to physical bonds and mechanical interlocks which form as adhesive flows into topographical features on the substrate surface. Hot-melt adhesives are based on soft, rubbery polymers while water-based adhesives are usually acrylic...

  16. The accompanying adult: authority to give consent in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Seema Madhur Lata; Parekh, Susan; Mason, Carol; Roberts, Graham

    2007-05-01

    Children may be accompanied by various people when attending for dental treatment. Before treatment is started, there is a legal requirement that the operator obtain informed consent for the proposed procedure. In the case of minors, the person authorized to give consent (parental responsibility) is usually a parent. To ascertain if accompanying persons of children attending the Department of Paediatric Dentistry at the Eastman Dental Hospital, London were empowered to give consent for the child's dental treatment. A total of 250 accompanying persons of children attending were selected, over a 6-month period. A questionnaire was used to establish whether the accompanying person(s) were authorized to give consent. The study showed that 12% of accompanying persons had no legal authority to give consent for the child's dental treatment. Clinicians need to be aware of the status of persons accompanying children to ensure valid consent is obtained.

  17. Adhesive capsulitis: one sonographic-guided injection of 20 mg triamcinolon into the rotator interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juel, Niels Gunnar; Oland, Gunnar; Kvalheim, Synnøve; Løve, Tormod; Ekeberg, Ole Marius

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a method for injecting corticosteroid into the rotator interval under sonographic guidance and to measure the effect on function, pain and range of motion after 4 and 12 weeks. This study involved a multicenter cohort trial and carried out at outpatient clinics of the physical medicine and rehabilitation departments in Oslo and Porsgrunn, Norway. 39 patients with adhesive capsulitis lasting between 3 and 12 months. Sonographic-guided corticosteroid and lidocaine injection into the rotator interval medial to the biceps tendon using 20 mg triamcinolon hexacetat and 3 ml 20 mg/ml xylocain. Change in the shoulder pain and disability index score (SPADI) after 12 weeks. The change in SPADI was 42 points (95 % confidence interval, 33-51). Changes in the secondary outcomes shoved highly statistically significant increase in active and passive range of motion. One ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection into the rotator interval seems to give significant improvement in SPADI and active range of motion after 12 weeks. The protocol was evaluated by the research faculty at Oslo university hospital, dept of physical medicine. The study was regarded as regular clinical procedure as injections with triamcinolon already is standard treatment. No trial registration was obtained but the protocol presented the local ethics committee without comments.

  18. Effect of inorganic fillers in paper on the adhesion of pressure-sensitive adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weixu Chen; Xiaoyan Tang; John Considine; Kevin T. Turner

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic fillers are inexpensive materials used to increase the density, smoothness and other properties of paper that are important for printing. In the current study, the adhesion of pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs), a common type of adhesive used in labels and tapes, to papers containing varying amounts and types of fillers is investigated. Papers with three...

  19. Adhesive Bonding and Corrosion Performance Investigated as a Function of Aluminum Oxide Chemistry and Adhesives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrahami, S.T.; Hauffman, T.; de Kok, John M.M.; Terryn, H.A.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    The long-term strength and durability of an adhesive bond is dependent on the stability of the oxide-adhesive interface. As such, changes in the chemistry of the oxide and/or the adhesive are expected to modify the interfacial properties and affect the joint performance in practice. The upcoming

  20. Adhesion improvement of glass-fibre-reinforced polyester composites by gliding arc discharge treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Sørensen, Bent F.; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom

    2013-01-01

    A gliding arc is a plasma that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and applied for plasma surface treatment for adhesion improvement. In the present work, glass-fibre-reinforced polyester plates were treated using an atmospheric pressure gliding arc discharge with an air flow to improve...... adhesion with a vinylester adhesive. The treatment improved wettability and increased the polar component of the surface energy and the density of oxygen-containing polar functional groups at the surfaces. Double cantilever beam specimens were prepared for fracture mechanics characterisation (fracture...... resistance as a function of nominal mode mixity) of the laminate adhesive interface. It was found that gliding arc treatment significantly increases the interfacial fracture energy and fracture resistance in comparison with a standard peel ply treatment, although the mixed mode fracture energy of the gliding...

  1. Donor misreporting:conceptualizing social desirability bias in giving surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Zoe; Woodliffe, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    Although survey research is one of the most frequently used methods for studying charitable giving, the quality of the data is seldom stated or known. In particular, social desirability bias (SDB) has been found to distort data validity where respondents tend to over-report what is socially desirable and vice versa. We argue that this phenomenon has not been fully understood in the nonprofit context as existing social desirability scales are not appropriate to be used in giving surveys. Thus,...

  2. Characterization of macrophage adhesion molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remold-O'Donnell, E.; Savage, B.

    1988-01-01

    Macrophage adhesion molecule (MAM), an abundant surface molecule which functions in the adhesion and spreading of guinea pig macrophages on surfaces, is characterized as a heterodimer of the trypsin- and plasmin-sensitive glycopeptide gp160 (MAM-α) and the glycopeptide gp93 (MAM-β). The density of MAM molecules is estimated at 630,000 per macrophage on the basis of quantitative binding of 125 I-labeled monoclonal antibody. The glycopeptide subunits display microheterogeneity on isoelectrofocusing; the pI is 5.8-6.3 for gp160 (MAM-α) and 6.4-7.0 for gp93 (MAM-β). A neutrophil gp160, gp93 molecule was shown to be indistinguishable from macrophage MAM on the basis of electrophoresis, isoelectrofocusing, and reactivity with 10 monoclonal antibodies. A related heterodimer of gp93 associated with a larger, antigenically different glycopeptide (gp180, gp93)was identified on circulating lymphocytes. Cumulative properties indicate that MAM is the guinea pig analog of human Mo1 and mouse Mac-1

  3. DIABETES AND SHOULDER ADHESIVE CAPSULITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mohanakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adhesive capsulitis (AC of shoulder is a common condition encountered by physical therapists in their routine outpatient care services; AC of shoulder is as by itself being a self limiting disorder lasts from months to years causing pain and discomfort to the patients. The condition is commonly associated with Diabetes mellitus or other co morbidities. The incidence of AC is high among diabetic individuals and it becomes mandatory on the part of physical therapists and other health professionals to approach this issue on a holistic manner. This paper deals with the importance of a physiotherapist role in prevention and dealing with the causative factors of AC and not merely its symptom. Methods: Extensive literature review was done from the electronic data bases, Systematic reviews and critical reviews from Pub med indexed journals and other peer reviewed publications across the globe. Results: It was not the type of diabetes but the duration of the disease and the glycemic index, marking the causative factor for adhesive capsulitis of shoulder. Conclusion: It may be concluded that physiotherapist play a vital role in identifying the pre-diabetic or a diabetic state of an individual reporting in a multi disciplinary set up with a AC of shoulder, and also has a role in the prevention of AC by helping the individual to maintain a good glycemic control with a holistic approach which includes aerobic exercises, General Flexibility exercises, Weight management and Yoga therapy.

  4. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  5. Adverse effects of salivary contamination for adhesives in restorative dentistry. A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Pooja; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2017-06-01

    To review and critically analyze the literature concerning the influence of salivary contamination on the bond quality of adhesives used in restorative materials by comparing and contrasting the different adhesive materials. A detailed search on PUBMED, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar and Web of Science was carried out to identify publications on salivary contamination and dental adhesive materials, from 1990-2017 (March) which resulted in a total of 6,202 web-identified publications. After screening titles/abstracts and de-duplicating, 54 publications were selected that matched the requirements for this review. The condition for selection was English literature concerning the effect of salivary contamination on the adhesives used in restorative dentistry. The obtained articles were systematically evaluated. Salivary contamination of adhesives during restorative procedures statistically (64.6%) showed an adverse effect on adhesives, occurring either at one or many stages of restoration. Methodological dissimilarities impeded the direct comparison of the selected studies. Nevertheless, the 2-step etch and rinse adhesives were relatively less vulnerable to salivary contamination than the others. 65% of the evaluated studies for decontamination achieved improved bonding when the contaminated surface was subjected to some kind of decontamination procedure. However, the duration and other specificities were not standard in all the evaluations and need further research to assess the course of action. It is necessary to do long term studies to evaluate the effectiveness of contaminated adhesive over time. Salivary contamination is a potential cause for poor bond quality of adhesive systems during restorative procedures and to provide a successful treatment, proper care must be taken to ensure the operating area is free from contamination. Understanding the properties of the materials and its constituents as well as considering measures to manage the potential

  6. Application of acetylated nanocrystalline cellulose in modified soy-based adhesive for plywood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Eslah

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aimed to develop a formaldehyde-free adhesive that can compete with conventional adhesives in wood industry, soy flour (SF, an abundant, environmentally friendly and renewable material, was used. Using sodium hydroxide (NaOH, polyethylene imine (PEI and acetylated nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC at two levels (one and three percent by weight of the dry weight of SF / PEI as modifying agents, different formulations were prepared. Modifying agents help to improvement of soy adhesive properties. Physical properties of synthesized adhesives such as the solid content, pH, gel time and viscosity of adhesives were measured. Beech (Fagus orientaleis plywood samples were made by each formulation and their water resistance, dry and wet shear strength were measured in accordance with related standards. The results were compared with those of PF samples. Adhesive structural changes were evaluated with FTIR spectroscopy. With evaluation of acetylated NCC, modification of hydroxyl groups and replacing them to ester groups confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy, and the DS determined by titration was 0.34. X-ray analysis showed that the acetylation process reduced the crystallinity. Solid content and viscosity of adhesives were increased by adding modifying materials. Plywood samples with formulation of SF/PEI/NaOH/NCC in both two levels of acetylated NCC had shear strength and water resistance similar to PF adhesive. FTIR analysis indicated that NaOH denatures SF; amino groups buried inside the compact protein structure become available. Compared to SF/NaOH, SF/PEI/NaOH showed small shifts in absorbance peaks. Primary and secondary amines in SF/PEI/NaOH diminished or disappeared. Considering functional groups of SF and amino groups of PEI which have potential to react hydroxyl and carbonyl groups of acetylated NCC, hydrogen bonds within adhesive component developed.

  7. Influence of superconductor film composition on adhesion strength of coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesgin, Ibrahim; Khatri, Narayan; Liu, Yuhao; Delgado, Louis; Galstyan, Eduard; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2015-11-20

    The effect of high temperature superconductor (HTS) film composition on the adhesion strength of rare- earth barium copper oxide coated conductors (CCs) has been studied. It has been found that the mechanical integrity of the superconductor layer is very susceptible to the defects especially those along the ab plane, probably due to the weak interfaces between the defects and the matrix. Gd and Y in the standard composition were substituted with Sm and the number of in-plane defects was drastically reduced. Consequently, a four-fold increase in adhesion or peeling strength in Sm-based CCs was achieved compared to the standard GdYBCO samples.

  8. Influence of superconductor film composition on adhesion strength of coated conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesgin, Ibrahim; Khatri, Narayan; Liu, Yuhao; Delgado, Louis; Galstyan, Eduard; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2016-01-01

    The effect of high temperature superconductor (HTS) film composition on the adhesion strength of rare-earth barium copper oxide coated conductors (CCs) has been studied. It has been found that the mechanical integrity of the superconductor layer is very susceptible to the defects especially those along the ab plane, probably due to the weak interfaces between the defects and the matrix. Gd and Y in the standard composition were substituted with Sm and the number of in-plane defects was drastically reduced. Consequently, a four-fold increase in adhesion or peeling strength in Sm-based CCs was achieved compared to the standard GdYBCO samples. (paper)

  9. Adhesion mechanism of a gecko-inspired oblique structure with an adhesive tip for asymmetric detachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Yu; Sato, Chiaki; Takahashi, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    An adhesion model of an oblique structure with an adhesive tip is proposed by considering a limiting stress for adhesion to describe the detachment mechanism of gecko foot hairs. When a force is applied to the root of the oblique structure, normal and shear stresses are generated at contact and the adhesive tip is detached from the surface when reaching the limiting stress. An adhesion criterion that considers both the normal and shear stresses is introduced, and the asymmetric detachment of the oblique structure is theoretically investigated. In addition, oblique beam array structures are manufactured, and an inclination effect of the structure on the asymmetric detachment is experimentally verified. (paper)

  10. Prenatal diagnostic procedure for leukocyte adhesion deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weening, R. S.; Bredius, R. G.; Wolf, H.; van der Schoot, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder which leads to recurrent severe infections due to impaired leukocyte functions. The disorder is caused by an absence or deficiency of leukocyte cell adhesion molecules (LeuCAMs) on the leukocyte membranes. The diagnosis is

  11. Predicting Failure Initiation in Structural Adhesive Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Elastoplástico de Adhesivos – Modeling, characterization and simulation of the elastoplastic behavior of adhesives. Maestría en Ciencia de Materiales...adhesive and a 1018 steel”. Maestría en Ciencia de Materiales. Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C. May 2012.  Abstract: In the

  12. Mechanisms of temporary adhesion in benthic animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dodou, D.; Breedveld, P.; Winter, J.C.F.; Dankelman, J.; Leeuwen, van J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive systems are ubiquitous in benthic animals and play a key role in diverse functions such as locomotion, food capture, mating, burrow building, and defence. For benthic animals that release adhesives, surface and material properties and external morphology have received little attention

  13. Switchable adhesion by chemical functionality and topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamperman, M.M.G.; Synytska, A.

    2012-01-01

    Progress in adhesion technology over the last few decades has led to widespread replacement of mechanical fasteners with adhesive bonds. Despite the advances, it remains challenging to produce materials that are sticky on demand. In this feature article we highlight recent efforts to develop

  14. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Abstract. A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction a-Si solar cells on polyimide sub- strates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and ...

  15. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction -Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex), and the ...

  16. Age Increases Monocyte Adhesion on Collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaji, Samira; Zondler, Lisa; Kleinjan, Fenneke; Nolte, Ulla; Mulaw, Medhanie A.; Danzer, Karin M.; Weishaupt, Jochen H.; Gottschalk, Kay-E.

    2017-05-01

    Adhesion of monocytes to micro-injuries on arterial walls is an important early step in the occurrence and development of degenerative atherosclerotic lesions. At these injuries, collagen is exposed to the blood stream. We are interested whether age influences monocyte adhesion to collagen under flow, and hence influences the susceptibility to arteriosclerotic lesions. Therefore, we studied adhesion and rolling of human peripheral blood monocytes from old and young individuals on collagen type I coated surface under shear flow. We find that firm adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is elevated in old individuals. Pre-stimulation by lipopolysaccharide increases the firm adhesion of monocytes homogeneously in older individuals, but heterogeneously in young individuals. Blocking integrin αx showed that adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is specific to the main collagen binding integrin αxβ2. Surprisingly, we find no significant age-dependent difference in gene expression of integrin αx or integrin β2. However, if all integrins are activated from the outside, no differences exist between the age groups. Altered integrin activation therefore causes the increased adhesion. Our results show that the basal increase in integrin activation in monocytes from old individuals increases monocyte adhesion to collagen and therefore the risk for arteriosclerotic plaques.

  17. Influence of Blood Contamination During Multimode Adhesive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The present study evaluated the effects of blood contamination performed at different steps of bonding on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of multimode adhesives to dentin when using the self-etch approach. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five molars were randomly assigned to three adhesive groups ...

  18. Hot-Melt Adhesive Attachment System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, R. L.; Frizzell, A. W.; Little, B. D.; Progar, D. J.; Coultrip, R. H.; Couch, R. H.; Stein, B. A.; Buckley, J. D.; St. Clair, T. L.; Gleason, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Adhesive system is as effective on Earth as in space. Fiberglass cloth mounted in head assembly. When adhesive reaches melt temperature head is attached to metals composites, ceramics, and other materials. Once attached, head cooled rapidly for quick stick. Used to tether tools or attach temporary scaffolding to walls, buildings, or beams.

  19. Adhesion rings surround invadopodia and promote maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Branch

    2012-06-01

    Invasion and metastasis are aggressive cancer phenotypes that are highly related to the ability of cancer cells to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM. At the cellular level, specialized actin-rich structures called invadopodia mediate focal matrix degradation by serving as exocytic sites for ECM-degrading proteinases. Adhesion signaling is likely to be a critical regulatory input to invadopodia, but the mechanism and location of such adhesion signaling events are poorly understood. Here, we report that adhesion rings surround invadopodia shortly after formation and correlate strongly with invadopodium activity on a cell-by-cell basis. By contrast, there was little correlation of focal adhesion number or size with cellular invadopodium activity. Prevention of adhesion ring formation by inhibition of RGD-binding integrins or knockdown (KD of integrin-linked kinase (ILK reduced the number of ECM-degrading invadopodia and reduced recruitment of IQGAP to invadopodium actin puncta. Furthermore, live cell imaging revealed that the rate of extracellular MT1-MMP accumulation at invadopodia was greatly reduced in both integrin-inhibited and ILK-KD cells. Conversely, KD of MT1-MMP reduced invadopodium activity and dynamics but not the number of adhesion-ringed invadopodia. These results suggest a model in which adhesion rings are recruited to invadopodia shortly after formation and promote invadopodium maturation by enhancing proteinase secretion. Since adhesion rings are a defining characteristic of podosomes, similar structures formed by normal cells, our data also suggest further similarities between invadopodia and podosomes.

  20. Adhesions and Adhesiolysis: The Role of Laparoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavic, Suzanne M.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Adhesions commonly result from abdominal and pelvic surgical procedures and may result in intestinal obstruction, infertility, chronic pain, or complicate subsequent operations. Laparoscopy produces less peritoneal trauma than does conventional laparotomy and may result in decreased adhesion formation. We present a review of the available data on laparoscopy and adhesion formation, as well as laparoscopic adhesiolysis. We also review current adjuvant techniques that may be used by practicing laparoscopists to prevent adhesion formation. Database: A Medline search using “adhesions,” “adhesiolysis,” and “laparoscopy” as key words was performed for English-language articles. Further references were obtained through cross-referencing the bibliography cited in each work. Discussion: The majority of studies indicate that laparoscopy may reduce postoperative adhesion formation relative to laparotomy. However, laparoscopy by itself does not appear to eliminate adhesions completely. A variety of adjuvant materials are available to surgeons, and the most recent investigation has demonstrated significant potential for intraperitoneal barriers. Newer technologies continue to evolve and should result in clinically relevant reductions in adhesion formation. PMID:12113430

  1. Biobased adhesives and non-conventional bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles Frihart

    2010-01-01

    Biobased adhesives fall into several major classes based upon their chemical structures. Starches are used in large volume, especially in the paper products industries, but cellulosics generally do not have the strength and water resistance needed for most wood products. Several authors have covered cellulosics adhesives (Baumann and Conner 2002, Pizzi 2006). However...

  2. Scaling Principles for Understanding and Exploiting Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Alfred

    A grand challenge in the science of adhesion is the development of a general design paradigm for adhesive materials that can sustain large forces across an interface yet be detached with minimal force upon command. Essential to this challenge is the generality of achieving this performance under a wide set of external conditions and across an extensive range of forces. Nature has provided some guidance through various examples, e.g. geckos, for how to meet this challenge; however, a single solution is not evident upon initial investigation. To help provide insight into nature's ability to scale reversible adhesion and adapt to different external constraints, we have developed a general scaling theory that describes the force capacity of an adhesive interface in the context of biological locomotion. We have demonstrated that this scaling theory can be used to understand the relative performance of a wide range of organisms, including numerous gecko species and insects, as well as an extensive library of synthetic adhesive materials. We will present the development and testing of this scaling theory, and how this understanding has helped guide the development of new composite materials for high capacity adhesives. We will also demonstrate how this scaling theory has led to the development of new strategies for transfer printing and adhesive applications in manufacturing processes. Overall, the developed scaling principles provide a framework for guiding the design of adhesives.

  3. Chapter 16: Soy Proteins as Wood Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Christopher G. Hunt; Michael J. Birkeland

    2014-01-01

    Protein adhesives allowed the development of bonded wood products such as plywood and glulam in the early 20th century. Petrochemical-based adhesives replaced proteins in most wood bonding applications because of lower cost, improved production efficiencies, and enhanced durability. However, several technological and environmental factors have led to a resurgence of...

  4. What drives the gender gap in charitable giving? Lower empathy leads men to give less to poverty relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willer, Robb; Wimer, Christopher; Owens, Lindsay A

    2015-07-01

    We draw upon past research on gender and prosocial emotions in hypothesizing that empathy can help explain the gender gap in charitable giving. In a nationally representative survey, we found that men reported less willingness to give money or volunteer time to a poverty relief organization, gaps that were mediated by men's lower reported feelings of empathy toward others. We also experimentally tested how effective a variety of different ways of framing poverty relief were for promoting giving. Framing poverty as an issue that negatively affects all Americans increased men's willingness to donate to the cause, eliminating the gender gap. Mediation analysis revealed that this "aligned self-interest" framing worked by increasing men's reported poverty concern, not by changing their understanding of the causes of poverty. Thus, while men were generally less motivated by empathy, they responded to a framing that recast charitable giving as consistent with their self-interest. Exposure to the same framing, however, led women to report lower willingness to volunteer time for poverty relief, suggesting that framing giving as consistent with self-interest may discourage those who give because of an empathic response to poverty. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Care-giving as a Canadian-Vietnamese tradition: 'it's like eating, you just do it'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Rhonda; Williams, Allison M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine how Vietnamese family caregivers (FCGs) perceive, manage and experience end-of-life care-giving for seriously ill family members. Using an instrumental case study design, this longitudinal qualitative research employed the use of cultural brokers/language interpreters to help ensure that the research was conducted in a culturally-appropriate manner. Participants (n = 18) discussed their experiences of care-giving within the context of a traditional cultural framework, which was found to influence their motivations and approaches to care-giving, as well as their propensities towards the use of various supports and services. The study was carried out in southern Ontario, Canada, and participants were providing home-based care-giving in the community. Data were collected throughout 2010 and 2011. The ways in which care-giving was perceived and expressed are reflected in three themes: (i) Natural: identity and care work; (ii) Intentional: whole-person care; and (iii) Intensive: standards, struggle and the context of care. This research confirms the need for culturally-appropriate services and supports while illustrating that Vietnamese FCGs not only value, but are also likely to use healthcare and social services if they are language-accessible, built on trust and demonstrate respect for their values as individuals, regardless of culture. © 2014 The Authors. Health and Social Care in the Community published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 Printable PDF Open All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 is a disorder that ...

  7. Interpenetrating Polymer Network (IPN) Adhesives for Electron Beam Cure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sands, James

    2000-01-01

    Electron beam (e-beam)-processed polymer adhesives have historically performed poorly compared to traditional adhesive technologies due to a lack of toughness engineered into these new types of adhesive materials...

  8. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component of the high-strength adhesive secreted by English ivy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Tan, Li; Sun, Leming; Petrosino, Jennifer; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-06-01

    Over 130 y have passed since Charles Darwin first discovered that the adventitious roots of English ivy (Hedera helix) exude a yellowish mucilage that promotes the capacity of this plant to climb vertical surfaces. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in elucidating the adhesion mechanisms underlying this high-strength adhesive. In the previous studies, spherical nanoparticles were observed in the viscous exudate. Here we show that these nanoparticles are predominantly composed of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), a superfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins present in the extracellular spaces of plant cells. The spheroidal shape of the AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles results in a low viscosity of the ivy adhesive, and thus a favorable wetting behavior on the surface of substrates. Meanwhile, calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and the pectic acids give rise to the cross-linking of the exuded adhesive substances, favor subsequent curing (hardening) via formation of an adhesive film, and eventually promote the generation of mechanical interlocking between the adventitious roots of English ivy and the surface of substrates. Inspired by these molecular events, a reconstructed ivy-mimetic adhesive composite was developed by integrating purified AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles with pectic polysaccharides and calcium ions. Information gained from the subsequent tensile tests, in turn, substantiated the proposed adhesion mechanisms underlying the ivy-derived adhesive. Given that AGPs and pectic polysaccharides are also observed in bioadhesives exuded by other climbing plants, the adhesion mechanisms revealed by English ivy may forward the progress toward understanding the general principles underlying diverse botanic adhesives.

  9. In vitro evaluation of the mucin-adhesion ability and probiotic potential of Lactobacillus mucosae LM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriano, V D; Parungao-Balolong, M M; Kang, D-K

    2014-08-01

    In this report, we characterized the probiotic potential of Lactobacillus mucosae LM1, focusing on its in vitro mucin-adhesion abilities. Screening assays were used to evaluate LM1. Previous studies on Lact. mucosae species have been performed, but few have examined the ability of this species to adhere to and colonize the intestinal mucosa. Thus, adhesion, aggregation and pathogen inhibition assays of LM1 along with microbial adhesion to solvents (MATS) assay were carried out in comparison with another putative probiotic, Lactobacillus johnsonii PF01, and the commercial strain, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Based on MATS assay, the cell surfaces of the lactobacilli strains were found to be hydrophobic and highly electron-donating, but the average hydropathy (GRAVY) index of predicted surface-exposed proteins in the LM1 genome indicated that most were hydrophilic. LM1 showed the highest adhesion, aggregation and hydrophobicity among the strains tested and significantly inhibited the adhesion of Escherichia coli K88 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium KCCM 40253. Correlations among adhesion, aggregation and hydrophobicity, as well as between coaggregation and displacement of E. coli, were observed. Increased adhesion may not always correlate with increased pathogen inhibition due to various strain-specific mechanisms. Nevertheless, LM1 has promising probiotic properties that can be explored further using a genomics approach. Our data on adhesion of LM1 strain showed a significant correlation between adhesion, hydrophobicity of cell surface and autoaggregation. This study gives basic knowledge for the elucidation of the adhesion mechanism of Lactobacillus sp. and prediction of its adherence in specific host models. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Do uniform tangential interfacial stresses enhance adhesion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menga, Nicola; Carbone, Giuseppe; Dini, Daniele

    2018-03-01

    We present theoretical arguments, based on linear elasticity and thermodynamics, to show that interfacial tangential stresses in sliding adhesive soft contacts may lead to a significant increase of the effective energy of adhesion. A sizable expansion of the contact area is predicted in conditions corresponding to such scenario. These results are easily explained and are valid under the assumptions that: (i) sliding at the interface does not lead to any loss of adhesive interaction and (ii) spatial fluctuations of frictional stresses can be considered negligible. Our results are seemingly supported by existing experiments, and show that frictional stresses may lead to an increase of the effective energy of adhesion depending on which conditions are established at the interface of contacting bodies in the presence of adhesive forces.

  11. Adhesive Joints in Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jeppe Bjørn

    The industrial goal of this PhD project is to enable manufacturing of larger wind turbine blades by improving the existing design methods for adhesive joints. This should improve the present joint design such that more efficient wind turbine blades can be produced. The main scientific goal...... of the project is to develop new- and to improve the existing design rules for adhesive joints in wind turbine blades. The first scientific studies of adhesive joints were based on stress analysis, which requires that the bond-line is free of defects, but this is rarely the case for a wind turbine blade. Instead...... curing and test temperatures) on the formation of transverse cracks in the adhesive were tested experimentally. It was assumed that the transverse cracks evolved due to a combination of mechanical- and residual stresses in the adhesive. A new approach was developed that allows the residual stress...

  12. Testing for altruism and social pressure in charitable giving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaVigna, Stefano; List, John A; Malmendier, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Every year, 90% of Americans give money to charities. Is such generosity necessarily welfare enhancing for the giver? We present a theoretical framework that distinguishes two types of motivation: individuals like to give, for example, due to altruism or warm glow, and individuals would rather not give but dislike saying no, for example, due to social pressure. We design a door-to-door fund-raiser in which some households are informed about the exact time of solicitation with a flyer on their doorknobs. Thus, they can seek or avoid the fund-raiser. We find that the flyer reduces the share of households opening the door by 9% to 25% and, if the flyer allows checking a Do Not Disturb box, reduces giving by 28% to 42%. The latter decrease is concentrated among donations smaller than $10. These findings suggest that social pressure is an important determinant of door-to-door giving. Combining data from this and a complementary field experiment, we structurally estimate the model. The estimated social pressure cost of saying no to a solicitor is $3.80 for an in-state charity and $1.40 for an out-of-state charity. Our welfare calculations suggest that our door-to-door fund-raising campaigns on average lower the utility of the potential donors.

  13. Adhesives for orthodontic bracket bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah Daniella Diniz Fonseca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of acid etching, introduced by Buonocore in 1955, brought the possibility of bonding between the bracket base and enamel, contributing to more esthetic and conservative orthodontics. This direct bracket bonding technique has brought benefits such as reduced cost and time in performing the treatment, as well as making it easier to perform oral hygiene. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of published studies on orthodontic bracket bonding to dental enamel. It was verified that resin composites and glass ionomer are the most studied and researched materials for this purpose. Resin-modified glass ionomer, with its biocompatibility, capacity of releasing fluoride and no need for acid etching on the tooth structure, has become increasingly popular among dentists. However, due to the esthetic and mechanical properties of light polymerizable resin composite, it continues to be one of the adhesives of choice in the bracket bonding technique and its use is widely disseminated.

  14. Collective philanthropy: describing and modeling the ecology of giving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottesman, William L; Reagan, Andrew James; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2014-01-01

    Reflective of income and wealth distributions, philanthropic gifting appears to follow an approximate power-law size distribution as measured by the size of gifts received by individual institutions. We explore the ecology of gifting by analysing data sets of individual gifts for a diverse group of institutions dedicated to education, medicine, art, public support, and religion. We find that the detailed forms of gift-size distributions differ across but are relatively constant within charity categories. We construct a model for how a donor's income affects their giving preferences in different charity categories, offering a mechanistic explanation for variations in institutional gift-size distributions. We discuss how knowledge of gift-sized distributions may be used to assess an institution's gift-giving profile, to help set fundraising goals, and to design an institution-specific giving pyramid.

  15. 24 CFR 200.954 - Supplementary specific requirements under the HUD building product standard and certification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... under the HUD building product standard and certification program for construction adhesives for wood... program for construction adhesives for wood floor systems. (a) Applicable standards. (1) All construction...) concerning labeling of a product, the administrator's validation mark and the manufacturer's certification of...

  16. Shear bond strength of hydrophilic adhesive systems to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, A T; Amaral, C M; Pimenta, L A; Sinhoreti, M A

    1999-08-01

    To compare the enamel shear bond strength of four hydrophilic adhesive systems: one multiple-bottle (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus), two one-bottle (Stae, Single Bond) and one self-etching (Etch & Prime). 120 bovine incisor teeth were obtained, embedded in polyester resin, polished to 600 grit to form standardized enamel surfaces, and randomly assigned to four groups (n = 30). Each adhesive system was used on enamel according to the manufacturer's instructions, and resin-based composite (Z100) cylinders with 3 mm diameter and 5 mm height were bonded. Specimens were stored in humid environment for 1 week, and bond strength was determined using a universal testing machine, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The mean shear bond strength values (MPa +/- SD) were: Single Bond: 24.28 +/- 5.27 (a); Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus: 21.18 +/- 4.35 (ab); Stae: 19.56 +/- 4.71 (b); Etch & Prime 3.0: 15.13 +/- 4.92 (c). ANOVA revealed significant difference in means (P < 0.01) and Tukey's test showed the statistical differences that are expressed by different letters for each group. It could be concluded that the self-etching adhesive system did not provide as good a bond to enamel surface, as did the one- and multiple-bottle systems.

  17. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical pre-bonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  18. Adhesion protein protocols [Methods in molecular biology, v. 96

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dejana, Elisabetta; Corada, Monica

    1999-01-01

    "An international corps of expert investigators describe their optimized techniques for both the identification of new cell adhesion proteins and for the characterization of novel adhesive structures...

  19. Gift-giving in the medical student--patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Yassar Abdullah S

    2012-08-01

    There is paucity in the published literature that provides any ethical guidance guiding gift-giving within the student--patient relationship. This is perhaps because the dynamics of the medical student--patient relationship have not yet been explored as extensively as the doctor--patient relationship. More importantly, however, gift--giving in the doctor-patient relationship has traditionally been from the patient to the doctor and not vice versa. This article examines the literature published in this vicinity reflecting on an encounter with a patient.

  20. Authorization gives the personnel he/she gives the center he/she gives Isotopes for the acting he/she gives tied functions with the security and the radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Pijuan, S.; Hernandez Alvarez, R.; Peres Reyes, Y.; Venegas Bernal, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    The conception is described used in a center production labelled compound and radiopharmaceuticals for the authorization to the support, operation and supervision personnel The approaches are exposed used to define the excellent positions for the security the installation. The are described the training programs, designed starting from the indentification the specific competitions for each duty station and with particular emphasis in the development gives abilities you practice. It is used for the administration and evaluation gives the programs training the Automated System Administration Programs Training (GESAT)

  1. Attachment of MEM piezoresistive silicon pressure sensor dies using different adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Vesna B.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives comparison and discussion of adhesives used for attachment of silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor dies. Special attention is paid on low pressure sensor dies because of their extreme sensitivity on stresses, which can arise from packaging procedure and applied materials. Commercially available adhesives “Scotch Weld 2214 Hi-Temp” from “3M Co.” and “DM2700P/H848” from “DIEMAT”, USA, were compared. First of them is aluminum filled epoxy adhesive and second is low melting temperature (LMT glass paste. Comparing test results for low pressure sensor chips we found that LMT glass (glass frit is better adhesive for this application. Applying LMT glass paste minimizes internal stresses caused by disagreement of coefficients of thermal expansions between sensor die and housing material. Also, it minimizes stresses introduced during applying external loads in the process of pressure measuring. Regarding the measurements, for the sensors installed with filled epoxy paste, resistor for compensation of temperature offset change had negative values in all cases, which means that linear temperature compensation, of sensors installed this way, would be impossible. In the sensors installed with LMT glass paste, all results, without exception, were in their common limits (values, which give the possibility of passive temperature compensation. Furthermore, LMT glass attachment can broaden temperature operating range of MEM silicon pressure sensors towards higher values, up to 120 ºC.

  2. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghans, Ann

    Understanding the structure and functionality of biological systems on a nanometer-resolution and short temporal scales is important for solving complex biological problems, developing innovative treatment, and advancing the design of highly functionalized biomimetic materials. For example, adhesion of cells to an underlying substrate plays a crucial role in physiology and disease development, and has been investigated with great interest for several decades. In the talk, we would like to highlight recent advances in utilizing neutron scattering to study bio-related structures in dynamic conditions (e . g . under the shear flow) including in-situ investigations of the interfacial properties of living cells. The strength of neutron reflectometry is its non-pertubative nature, the ability to probe buried interfaces with nanometer resolution and its sensitivity to light elements like hydrogen and carbon. That allows us to study details of cell - substrate interfaces that are not accessible with any other standard techniques. We studied the adhesion of human brain tumor cells (U251) to quartz substrates and their responses to the external mechanical forces. Such cells are isolated within the central nervous system which makes them difficult to reach with conventional therapies and therefore making them highly invasive. Our results reveal changes in the thickness and composition of the adhesion layer (a layer between the cell lipid membrane and the quartz substrate), largely composed of hyaluronic acid and associated proteoglycans, when the cells were subjected to shear stress. Further studies will allow us to determine more conditions triggering changes in the composition of the bio-material in the adhesion layer. This, in turn, can help to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness, which can have significant medical impact for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies.

  3. Silane adhesion mechanism in dental applications and surface treatments: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Lung, Christie Ying Kei; Tsoi, James Kit Hon

    2018-01-01

    To give a current review of silane adhesion chemistry, applications of silane coupling agents and related surface pretreatment methods in contemporary dentistry. Silane coupling agents are adhesion promoters to chemically unify dissimilar materials used in dentistry. Silanes are very effective in adhesion promotion between resin composites and silica-based or silica-coated indirect restorative materials. It is generally accepted that for non-silica-based restorations, surface pretreatment is a mandatory preliminary step to increase the silica content and then, with help of silane, improve resin bonding. This review discusses the silane-based adhesion chemistry, silane applications in dentistry, surface pretreatment methods, and presents the recent development of silane coupling agents. A silane coupling agent is considered a reliable, good adhesion promoter to silica-based (or silica-coated) indirect restorations. Surface pre-treatment steps, e.g., acid etching for porcelain and tribo-chemical silica-coating for metal alloys, is used before silanization to attain strong, durable bonding of the substrate to resin composite. In clinical practice, however, the main problem of resin bonding using silanes and other coupling agents is the weakening of the bond (degradation) in the wet oral environment over time. A silane coupling agent is a justified and popular adhesion promoter (adhesive primer) used in dentistry. The commercial available silane coupling agents can fulfil the requirements in clinical practice for durable bonding. Development of new silane coupling agents, their optimization, and surface treatment methods are in progress to address the long term resin bond durability and are highly important. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Is nonoperative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction applicable to children in a resource-poor country?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osifo Osarumwense

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nonoperative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction gives good results in adults but there are scant studies on its outcome in children. This study reports outcomes and experiences with nonoperative and operative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction in children in a resource-poor country. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of records of children who were managed with adhesive intestinal obstruction at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital between January 2002 and December 2008. Results: Adhesive intestinal obstruction accounted for 21 (8.8% of 238 children managed with intestinal obstruction. They were aged between 7 weeks and 16 years (mean 3 ± 6.4 years, comprising 13 males and eight females (ratio 1.6:1. Prior laparotomy for gangrenous/perforated intussusception (seven, 33.3%, perforated appendix (five, 23.8%, perforated volvulus (three, 14.3%, penetrating abdominal trauma (two, 9.5% and perforated typhoid (two, 9.5% were major aetiologies. Adhesive obstruction occurred between 6 weeks and 7 years after the index laparotomies. All the 21 children had initial nonoperative management without success, owing to lack of total parenteral nutrition and monitoring facilities. Outcomes of open adhesiolysis performed between 26 and 48 h in six (28.6% children due to poor response to nonoperative management, 11-13 days in 12 (57.1% who responded minimally and 2-5 weeks in three (14.3% who had relapse of symptoms were encouraging. Exploration of the 21 adhesive obstructions confirmed small bowel obstruction due to solitary bands (two, 9.5%, multiple bands/adhesions (13, 61.9% and encasement, including one bowel gangrene (six, 28.6%. Postoperatively, the only child who had recurrence during 1-6 years of follow-up did well after a repeat adhesiolysis. Conclusion: Nonoperative management was unsuccessful in this setting. Open adhesiolysis may be adopted in children to prevent avoidable morbidities and

  5. Role of Adhesion Molecules in Eosinophil Activation: A Comparative Study on the Effect of Adhesion Molecules on Eosinophil Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoshi Yamaguchi

    2004-01-01

    Conclusions: The regulation of adhesion molecules, by not only preventing eosinophil adhesion but also eosinophil activation, may be a potential target in the treatment of allergic inflammatory disorders.

  6. Mensurations give the radioactivity natural gamma, radon in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamarra, J.; Stuardo, E.

    1998-01-01

    In this work, are presented the methods for measurement, calculate and you discusses the results, in each studied area, in the mark the respective world averages. None the averages evaluated annual effective dose they surpassed these world averages effective dose or level gives intervention, corresponding

  7. Education Philanthropy Catching a Chill as Economy Cools Charitable Giving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports that the recession tearing into the U.S. economy is not only straining the public coffers that support K-12 schooling, it's also taking a toll on education philanthropy. From family foundations to corporate philanthropies, charitable giving to K-12 education appears to be facing a downturn. Although no national figures are…

  8. Nursing and philanthropy: both about giving and joy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Joseph V

    2014-01-01

    There is a surprising intersection between nursing and charitable giving, and it is not about the money. Some nurses I know would find that statement to be a bit off-kilter. Maybe a few of them would find it even a bit off-putting. But there is, indeed, a strong case to be made that the two are of the same cloth.

  9. A Childhood Rich in Culture Gives a Socioeconomic Bonus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austring, Bennye Düranc

    2015-01-01

    Artiklen ridser den nyeste forskning op inden for feltet 'art rich learning', altså æstetiske læreprocesser af god kvalitet. In the book ”Art and Culture Give Children a Life that Works” 60 (Danish and non-Danish) experts, practitioners, artists and several Ministers from the Danish Government...

  10. Improving Evidence on Private Giving in Emerging Economies ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Findings to improve private giving This three-year project will: -develop a critical mass of data on philanthropic and other private flows to developing countries from ... enabling environment for philanthropy exists; -promote research uptake and outreach by research teams in emerging economies and by the Centre for Global ...

  11. Improving Evidence on Private Giving in Emerging Economies ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Despite growing philanthropy in emerging economies, there are significant data gaps on amounts and sources. There is also a lack of research on regulations and policies that support or discourage private giving. This research project will explore philanthropic cooperation in emerging and developing country contexts by ...

  12. A Conversation Model Enabling Intelligent Agents to Give Emotional Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Zwaan, J.M.; Dignum, V.; Jonker, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    In everyday life, people frequently talk to others to help them deal with negative emotions. To some extent, everybody is capable of comforting other people, but so far conversational agents are unable to deal with this type of situation. To provide intelligent agents with the capability to give

  13. Why do firms give away their patents for free?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ziegler, Nicole; Gassmann, Oliver; Friesike, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    Within the trend of increasing patent commercialisation and open innovation, a recent phenomenon where firms give away their patents free of charge can be observed. This seems contradictory to the original intention of the patent system (enabling firms to create temporary monopolies to appropriate

  14. Nonverbal support giving induces nonverbal support seeking in depressed patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, E; Bouhuys, AL; Bloem, GM

    Nonverbal support seeking behavior of 11 mildly depressed patients was studied in relation to the nonverbal support giving behavior of a female interviewer. The patients were interviewed for 20 minutes during which the interviewer gave high and low nonverbal support for 10 minutes in a cross-over

  15. When may doctors give nurses telephonic treatment instructions?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    legal proxy cannot give consent, emergency treatment may be given without consent – provided it is not against a previous directive issued by a patient refusing treatment, e.g. a refusal to accept a blood transfusion for religious reasons.[8]. Before issuing telephonic instructions doctors should consider whether telephone ...

  16. Developing skills of giving and receiving feedbacks between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the strategies to improve quality of teaching and learning at training institutes could be by developing the skill of giving and receiving feedbacks among the individuals involved in the training. This action research is then done as a final work for HDP in Jimma University (JU) to develop the skill of mutual ...

  17. Characterization of a Multidrug Resistant Salmonella Enterica Give

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    levofloxacin resistant Salmonella Give that possessed gyrA mutation encoding histidine to Tyrosine conversion at amino acid 150(150His→Tyr) had been earlier isolated and characterized, one from septic poultry and one from asymptomatic pig (Ogunleye et al., 2011). The pig isolate possessed an additional (83Tyr→Ser) ...

  18. Motivation and the Power of Not Giving Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Motivation and the Power of Not Giving Up KidsHealth / ...

  19. [Clinical evaluation of a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive and a one-step self-etch adhesive in non-carious cervical lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fu-cong; Wang, Xiao-yan; Gao, Xue-jun

    2014-02-18

    To compare the clinical effectiveness of the two-step etch-and-rinse with the one-step self-etch adhesive in non-carious cervical lesions. Fifty patients were selected, each with at least two wedge-shaped defects in the mouth. The paired defects were randomly bonded either with the two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive α or the one-step self-etch adhesive β and then restored with resin composite. The treatment was carried out by one practitioner according to standard procedures. The evaluation was performed by another practitioner according to modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria at one week, six months and eighteen months after treatment. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Fifty restorations were placed for each group. Forty-eight patients attended the six months recall, with two restorations loss for each group. Forty-four patients attended the eighteen months recall, with accumulative four restorations loss for adhesive α and six restorations loss for adhesive β. The retention rate was 90.0% for group α and 86.4% for group β. Marginal adaptation of three restorations in group α and five restorations in group β were scored Bravo; while for marginal discoloration, two restorations in group α and three restorations in group β were scored Bravo respectively. No secondary caries and post-operative sensitivity occurred for any of the restorations after eighteen months. No significant difference was detected between the groups for any evaluation criteria (P > 0.05). Within the observation period of this study, the two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive and the one-step self-etch adhesive showed similar clinical performance. The long term follow-up is still warranted.

  20. The Role of Immunoglobulin Superfamily Cell Adhesion Molecules in Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Wai Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is a major clinical problem and results in a poor prognosis for most cancers. The metastatic pathway describes the process by which cancer cells give rise to a metastatic lesion in a new tissue or organ. It consists of interconnecting steps all of which must be successfully completed to result in a metastasis. Cell-cell adhesion is a key aspect of many of these steps. Adhesion molecules belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (Ig-SF commonly play a central role in cell-cell adhesion, and a number of these molecules have been associated with cancer progression and a metastatic phenotype. Surprisingly, the contribution of Ig-SF members to metastasis has not received the attention afforded other cell adhesion molecules (CAMs such as the integrins. Here we examine the steps in the metastatic pathway focusing on how the Ig-SF members, melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM, L1CAM, neural CAM (NCAM, leukocyte CAM (ALCAM, intercellular CAM-1 (ICAM-1 and platelet endothelial CAM-1 (PECAM-1 could play a role. Although much remains to be understood, this review aims to raise the profile of Ig-SF members in metastasis formation and prompt further research that could lead to useful clinical outcomes.

  1. Relationships between surface coverage ratio and powder mechanics of binary adhesive mixtures for dry powder inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudén, Jonas; Frenning, Göran; Bramer, Tobias; Thalberg, Kyrre; Alderborn, Göran

    2018-04-25

    The aim of this paper was to study relationships between the content of fine particles and the powder mechanics of binary adhesive mixtures and link these relationships to the blend state. Mixtures with increasing amounts of fine particles (increasing surface coverage ratios (SCR)) were prepared using Lactopress SD as carrier and micro particles of lactose as fines (2.7 µm). Indicators of unsettled bulk density, compressibility and flowability were derived and the blend state was visually examined by imaging. The powder properties studied showed relationships to the SCR characterised by stages. At low SCR, the fine particles predominantly gathered in cavities of the carriers, giving increased bulk density and unchanged or improved flow. Thereafter, increased SCR gave a deposition of particles at the enveloped carrier surface with a gradually more irregular adhesion layer leading to a reduced bulk density and a step-wise reduced flowability. The mechanics of the mixtures at a certain stage were dependent on the structure and the dynamics of the adhesion layer and transitions between the stages were controlled by the evolution of the adhesion layer. It is advisable to use techniques based on different types of flow in order to comprehensively study the mechanics of adhesive mixtures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Modulation of adhesion molecules by cholesterol-lowering therapy in mononuclear cells from hypercholesterolemic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda, Alvaro; Rodrigues, Alice Cristina; Alves, Camila; Genvigir, Fabiana Dalla Vecchia; Fajardo, Cristina Moreno; Dorea, Egidio Lima; Gusukuma, Maria Cecilia; Pinto, Gelba Almeida; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Hirata, Rosario Dominguez Crespo

    2015-08-01

    Cholesterol-lowering therapy has been related with several pleiotropic effects including anti-inflammatory action in vascular endothelium; however, their influence on monocyte adhesion molecules is poorly described. To investigate the effect of inhibitors of synthesis (statins) and absorption (ezetimibe) of cholesterol on expression of adhesion molecules L-selectin, PSGL-1, VLA-4, LFA-1, and Mac-1 in mononuclear cells in vivo and in vitro using THP-1 cells. The influence of simvastatin (10 mg/day), ezetimibe (10 mg/day), and their combination (10 mg each/day) on mRNA expression of adhesion molecules was analyzed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from hypercholesterolemics. The effects of atorvastatin, simvastatin, and ezetimibe on mRNA and protein expression of adhesion molecules were also evaluated in THP-1 cells. Simvastatin/ezetimibe combination, but not the monotherapies, reduced the mRNA expression of the PSGL-1, LFA-1, and Mac-1 genes in PBMC from hypercholesterolemics. Total and LDL cholesterol in serum correlated with PSGL-1 mRNA expression, whereas HDL cholesterol negatively correlated with mRNA levels of L-selectin and VLA-4 genes (P molecules in PBMC from hypercholesterolemics and THP-1 cells. Simvastatin/ezetimibe combination gives more benefits by reducing to a larger extent the expression of adhesion molecules in mononuclear cells. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Radiation curable adhesive compositions and composite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, W.

    1984-01-01

    This disclosure relates to novel adhesive compositions and composite structures utilizing the same, wherein said adhesive compositions contain an elastomer, a chemically compatible ethylenically unsaturated monomer, a tackifier, an adhesion promoter, and optionally, pigments, fillers, thickeners and flow control agents which are converted from the liquid to the solid state by exposure to high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam. A particularly useful application for such adhesive compositions comprises the assembly of certain composite structures or laminates consisting of, for example, a fiber flocked rubber sheet and a metal base with the adhesive fulfilling the multiple functions of adhering the flocked fiber to the rubber sheet as well as adhering the rubber sheet to the metal base. Optionally, the rubber sheet itself may also be cured at the same time as the adhesive composition with all operations being carried out at ambient temperatures and in the presence of air, with exposure of said assembly to selected dosages of high energy ionizing radiation. These adhesive compositions contain no solvents thereby almost eliminating air pollution or solvent toxicity problems, and offer substantial savings in energy and labor as they are capable of curing in very short time periods without the use of external heat which might damage the substrate

  4. Adhesion Control between Resist and Photomask Blank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Masaaki; Hatakeyama, Sho; Yoshida, Kouji; Abe, Makoto; Totsukawa, Daisuke; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hoga, Morihisa; Hayashi, Naoya; Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Fujihira, Masamichi

    2009-06-01

    Most problems in photomask fabrication such as pattern collapse, haze, and cleaning damage are related to the behavior of surfaces and interfaces of resists, opaque layers, and quartz substrates. Therefore, it is important to control the corresponding surface and interface energies in photomask fabrication processes. In particular, adhesion analysis in microscopic regions is strongly desirable to optimize material and process designs in photomask fabrication. We applied the direct peeling (DP) method with a scanning probe microscope (SPM) tip and measured the adhesion of resist patterns on Cr and quartz surfaces for photomask process optimization. We also studied the effect of tip shape on the reproducibility of adhesion measurements and the dependence of collapse behavior on the resist profile. We measured lateral forces between the resulting collapsed resist pillar and the Cr or the quartz surface before and after the sliding and related these observed lateral forces to the static and kinetic frictional forces, respectively. We also studied the effect of surface modification of the Cr and quartz surfaces with silanization reagents on adhesion measured with the DP method. Resist adhesion could be controlled by surface modification using silanes. We also discuss the relationship between the adhesion observed with the DP method and the properties of the modified surfaces including water contact angles and local adhesive forces measured from force-distance curves with an SPM.

  5. Metformin and atorvastatin reduce adhesion formation in a rat uterine horn model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Bulent; Aksakal, Orhan; Gungor, Tayfun; Sirvan, Levent; Sut, Necdet; Kelekci, Sefa; Soysal, Sunullah; Mollamahmutoglu, Leyla

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether atorvastatin and metformin are effective in preventing adhesions in a rat uterine horn model. A total of 40 non-pregnant, female Wistar albino rats, weighing 180-210 g, were used as a model for post-operative adhesion formation. The rats were randomized into four groups after seven standard lesions were inflicted in each uterine horn and lower abdominal sidewall using bipolar cauterization. The rats were given atorvastatin 2.5 mg/kg/day, p.o. (10 rats), atorvastatin 30 mg/kg/day, p.o. (10 rats), metformin 50 mg/kg/day, p.o. (10 rats) and no treatment was applied in the control group (10 rats). The animals were killed 2 weeks later and adhesions were scored both clinically and pathologically by authors blinded to groups. One rat in the control group died before the end of the 2 week period. Total clinical adhesion scores regarding extent, severity and degree of adhesions and histopathological findings including inflammation and fibrosis were significantly lower in the metformin (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively) and atorvastatin 30 mg/kg/day (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively) groups when compared with control group. Metformin and atorvastatin are both effective for prevention of adhesion formation in a rat uterine horn model.

  6. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist pretreatment did not decrease postoperative adhesion formation after abdominal myomectomy in a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddington, Charles C; Grow, Daniel R; Ahmed, Mohamed S; Toner, James P; Cook, Elizabeth; Diamond, Michael P

    2009-05-01

    To determine if 3 months of preoperative gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) treatment decreases postoperative uterine adhesions after open abdominal surgery for the removal of uterine fibroids. Prospective, randomized, clinical study. A tertiary care medical center. Women of reproductive age with symptomatic uterine fibroids not amenable to hysteroscopic removal. Twenty patients underwent an initial abdominal myomectomy followed by a second-look laparoscopy for evaluating uterine adhesions after random allocation to groups receiving either GnRH analog or placebo for 3 months before the initial surgery. Adhesion formation between treatment groups and by incision number and aggregate length. Presurgical GnRH-a treatment did not decrease adhesion formation compared with placebo. For every additional centimeter of incision length, the total adhesion area over the uterine serosal surface increased by 0.55 cm(2). The number of myomas removed and the number of incisions were positively correlated with total adhesion area. Preoperative treatment with GnRH-a for 3 months before open abdominal myomectomy did not decrease postoperative uterine adhesions. Following the standards of good surgical technique, adhesions are minimized with fewer and smaller incisions.

  7. Adhesion property of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-based adhesives containing calcium carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion property (i.e. viscosity, loop tack and peel strength of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR 25 and ENR 50 grade-based pressure-sensitive adhesive was studied in the presence of calcium carbonate. The range of calcium carbonate loaded was from 10 to 50 parts per hundred parts of rubber (phr. Coumarone-indene resin was used as the tackifier and its concentration was fixed at 80 phr. Toluene was chosen as the solvent throughout the investigation. The substrates (PET film/paper were coated with the adhesive using a SHEEN hand coater at a coating thickness of 60 µm. Viscosity of the adhesive was measured by a HAAKE Rotary Viscometer whereas loop tack and peel strength were determined by a Llyod Adhesion Tester operating at 30 cm/min. Results show that viscosity of ENR-based adhesives increases gradually with increase in calcium carbonate loading due to the concentration effect of the filler. However, for loop tack and peel strength, it passes through a maximum at 30 phr calcium carbonate, an observation which is attributed to the optimum wettability of adhesive on the substrate at this adhesive composition. ENR 25-based adhesive consistently exhibits higher adhesion property than ENR 50 for all calcium carbonate loadings studied.

  8. Comparison of Allevyn Adhesive and Biatain Adhesive in the management of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amione, P; Ricci, E; Topo, F; Izzo, L; Pirovano, R; Rega, V; Cocci, C; Masina, M

    2005-09-01

    The primary objective was to assess dressing delamination and the ensuing potential consequences during wear and/or removal, as well as the effect of residue remaining in the ulcer following foam breakdown. In this prospective multicentre study, 32 patients with a grade II or III pressure ulcer were randomised to receive either Allevyn Adhesive or Biatain Adhesive dressing. The performance of the dressings was assessed over seven dressing changes or a maximum of six weeks. The primary efficacy variable was the proportion of patients with at least one delaminated dressing (delamination being defined as the falling apart of a dressing during wear or removal, or the presence of residue from the dressing in the ulcer). Allevyn Adhesive was significantly less likely to delaminate than Biatain Adhesive: 83% of patients given Biatain Adhesive had a dressing that delaminated compared with 14% for Allevyn Adhesive (p = 0.014). Furthermore, a greater proportion of the Biatain Adhesive dressings delaminated compared with the Allevyn Adhesive dressings: 50% versus 4% (p < 0.001). Allevyn Adhesive performed significantly better in the following parameters: handling exudate (p = 0.044), comfort (p = 0.007), ease of application (p = 0.004), conformability during application (p = 0.003) and removal (p < 0.0001), and adherence to the skin during application (p = 0.003) and prior to removal (p = 0.011). Three patients given Allevyn Adhesive (21%) reported three adverse events; six patients given Biatain Adhesive (33%) reported eight adverse events. Allevyn Adhesive is effective and well tolerated in the management of pressure ulcers and less likely to delaminate than Biatain Adhesive.

  9. Informal care giving to more disabled people with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Robert J; Radin, Dagmar; Chakravorty, Bonnie J; Tyry, Tuula

    2009-01-01

    About 30% of the people with multiple sclerosis (MS) require some form of home care assistance and 80% of that assistance is provided by informal or unpaid care givers. This study focusses on the care givers for 530 more disabled people with MS, with the objective of learning more about informal care giving to people with greater dependency and need for assistance. The data presented in this study were collected in a national survey of 530 people who provided informal care to more disabled people with MS. Almost half of these care givers reported that they provided more than 20 h of care per week to the person with MS, with more than 9 in 10 shopping for groceries, doing indoor housework, preparing meals or providing transportation for the person with MS. More than 4 in 10 employed care givers reduced the amount of time worked in the previous 12 months because of their care giving responsibilities. Although more than half of the MS care givers in our study reported that care giving was demanding, time consuming or challenging, about 90% of these MS care givers were happy that they could help. About two in three of these MS care givers found that care giving was rewarding, with more than 8 in 10 proud of the care they provided. More than a quarter of the informal care givers to people with MS thought they would benefit from treatment or counselling provided by mental health professionals. Not only it is necessary to provide access to mental health services for people with MS, but it is also important to assure that their informal care givers also have access to appropriate mental health care, given the scope of their care giving responsibilities.

  10. Adhesion Between Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    Different adhesion methods of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) layers were studied with respect to adhesional force and the resulting rheology of the two-layered PDMS films were investigated. The role of adhesion between PDMS layers on the performances of two-layer structures was studied with peel s...... strength test and by SEM pictures. The rheology of the double-layered compared to the monolayer films changed in some cases which indicates that the adhesion process needs to be carefully introduced in order not to alter the final properties....

  11. Embedded adhesive connection for laminated glass plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Poulsen, S.H.; Bagger, A.

    2012-01-01

    The structural behavior of a new connection design, the embedded adhesive connection, used for laminated glass plates is investigated. The connection consists of an aluminum plate encapsulated in-between two adjacent triple layered laminated glass plates. Fastening between glass and aluminum...... is ensured using a structural adhesive. At first, the elastic and viscoelastic material properties of the adhesive are identified where the influence of load-rate and failure properties are also examined. Through an inverse analysis using the finite element method, the experimental observations...... usage in a design situation. The embedded connection shows promising potential as a future fastening system for load-carrying laminated glass plates....

  12. Molybdenum protective coatings adhesion to steel substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesman, A. I.; Postnikov, D. V.; Polonyankin, D. A.; Teplouhov, A. A.; Tyukin, A. V.; Tkachenko, E. A.

    2017-06-01

    Protection of the critical parts, components and assemblies from corrosion is an urgent engineering problem and many other industries. Protective coatings’ forming on surface of metal products is a promising way of corrosionprevention. The adhesion force is one of the main characteristics of coatings’ durability. The paper presents theoretical and experimental adhesion force assessment for coatings formed by molybdenum magnetron sputtering ontoa steel substrate. Validity and reliability of results obtained by simulation and sclerometry method allow applying the developed model for adhesion force evaluation in binary «steel-coating» systems.

  13. Surgical wound management with adhesive polyurethane membrane: a preferred method for routine usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinckler, L.

    1983-01-01

    The author gives an account of his experience of the use in some 1600 patients of adhesive polyurethane membrane, marketed as Op-site, both for skin closure and wound dressing, in combination, as a routine method of surgical wound management in a wide variety of surgical operations. The technique of utilising this method is described in detail, as also are the advantages for patients, nursing and medical staff. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6870136

  14. Soy Flour Adhesive Strength Compared with That of Purified Soy Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda Lorenz; Michael Birkeland; Chera Daurio; Charles R. Frihart

    2015-01-01

    Except for the substitution of soy flour in phenolic resins (Frihart et al. 2013) and the use of soy flour at high pHs (Lambuth 2003), the literature on soy protein properties for adhesives has mainly focused on soy protein isolate and specific protein fractions (Sun 2005b). The assumption is that proteins are the main portion of soy flour giving bond strength and the...

  15. Processes give selection location like fundamental approach gives the security for the repositories radioactive waste (radioactive installation) in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peralta Vidal, J.L.; Gil Castillo, R.O.; Chales Suarez, G.; Rodriguez Reyes, A.

    1998-01-01

    On the base for the best international practice, the requirements given by the IAEA, specialized national experience, the technician economic conditions and social matters give Cuba, it has been documented in the country the process the documented location for evacuation and storage the worn-out fuel lingeringly

  16. Quantitative proteomic profiling identifies DPYSL3 as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma-associated molecule that regulates cell adhesion and migration by stabilization of focal adhesion complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Kawahara

    Full Text Available Elucidation of how pancreatic cancer cells give rise to distant metastasis is urgently needed in order to provide not only a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms, but also to identify novel targets for greatly improved molecular diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. We employed combined proteomic technologies including mass spectrometry and isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification peptide tagging to analyze protein profiles of surgically resected human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues. We identified a protein, dihydropyrimidinase-like 3, as highly expressed in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues as well as pancreatic cancer cell lines. Characterization of the roles of dihydropyrimidinase-like 3 in relation to cancer cell adhesion and migration in vitro, and metastasis in vivo was performed using a series of functional analyses, including those employing multiple reaction monitoring proteomic analysis. Furthermore, dihydropyrimidinase-like 3 was found to interact with Ezrin, which has important roles in cell adhesion, motility, and invasion, while that interaction promoted stabilization of an adhesion complex consisting of Ezrin, c-Src, focal adhesion kinase, and Talin1. We also found that exogenous expression of dihydropyrimidinase-like 3 induced activating phosphorylation of Ezrin and c-Src, leading to up-regulation of the signaling pathway. Taken together, the present results indicate successful application of combined proteomic approaches to identify a novel key player, dihydropyrimidinase-like 3, in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tumorigenesis, which may serve as an important biomarker and/or drug target to improve therapeutic strategies.

  17. Quantitative proteomic profiling identifies DPYSL3 as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma-associated molecule that regulates cell adhesion and migration by stabilization of focal adhesion complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Takeo; Hotta, Naoe; Ozawa, Yukiko; Kato, Seiichi; Kano, Keiko; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Nagino, Masato; Takahashi, Takashi; Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Elucidation of how pancreatic cancer cells give rise to distant metastasis is urgently needed in order to provide not only a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms, but also to identify novel targets for greatly improved molecular diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. We employed combined proteomic technologies including mass spectrometry and isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification peptide tagging to analyze protein profiles of surgically resected human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues. We identified a protein, dihydropyrimidinase-like 3, as highly expressed in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues as well as pancreatic cancer cell lines. Characterization of the roles of dihydropyrimidinase-like 3 in relation to cancer cell adhesion and migration in vitro, and metastasis in vivo was performed using a series of functional analyses, including those employing multiple reaction monitoring proteomic analysis. Furthermore, dihydropyrimidinase-like 3 was found to interact with Ezrin, which has important roles in cell adhesion, motility, and invasion, while that interaction promoted stabilization of an adhesion complex consisting of Ezrin, c-Src, focal adhesion kinase, and Talin1. We also found that exogenous expression of dihydropyrimidinase-like 3 induced activating phosphorylation of Ezrin and c-Src, leading to up-regulation of the signaling pathway. Taken together, the present results indicate successful application of combined proteomic approaches to identify a novel key player, dihydropyrimidinase-like 3, in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tumorigenesis, which may serve as an important biomarker and/or drug target to improve therapeutic strategies.

  18. Vaginal epithelial cells regulate membrane adhesiveness to co-ordinate bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Jessica A; Klappe, Karin; Kok, Jan Willem; Busscher, Henk J; Reid, Gregor; van der Mei, Henny C

    2016-04-01

    Vaginal epithelium is colonized by different bacterial strains and species. The bacterial composition of vaginal biofilms controls the balance between health and disease. Little is known about the relative contribution of the epithelial and bacterial cell surfaces to bacterial adhesion and whether and how adhesion is regulated over cell membrane regions. Here, we show that bacterial adhesion forces with cell membrane regions not located above the nucleus are stronger than with regions above the nucleus both for vaginal pathogens and different commensal and probiotic lactobacillus strains involved in health. Importantly, adhesion force ratios over membrane regions away from and above the nucleus coincided with the ratios between numbers of adhering bacteria over both regions. Bacterial adhesion forces were dramatically decreased by depleting the epithelial cell membrane of cholesterol or sub-membrane cortical actin. Thus, epithelial cells can regulate membrane regions to which bacterial adhesion is discouraged, possibly to protect the nucleus. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Application of atmospheric pressure plasma on polyethylene for increased prosthesis adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Vrekhem, S., E-mail: stijn.vanvrekhem@ugent.be [Research Unit Plasma Technology (RUPT), Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41 B4, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Cools, P. [Research Unit Plasma Technology (RUPT), Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41 B4, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Declercq, H. [Research Unit Plasma Technology (RUPT), Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41 B4, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185 6B3, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Tongel, A. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185 13K12, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Vercruysse, C.; Cornelissen, M. [Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185 6B3, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); De Geyter, N.; Morent, R. [Research Unit Plasma Technology (RUPT), Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41 B4, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-12-01

    Biopolymers are often subjected to surface modification in order to improve their surface characteristics. The goal of this study is to show the use of plasma technology to enhance the adhesion of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) shoulder prostheses. Two different plasma techniques (low pressure plasma activation and atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization) are performed on UHMWPE to increase the adhesion between (1) the polymer and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement and (2) the polymer and osteoblast cells. Both techniques are performed using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). A previous paper showed that low pressure plasma activation of UHMWPE results in the incorporation of oxygen-containing functional groups, which leads to an increased surface wettability. Atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of methylmethacrylate (MMA) on UHMWPE results in a PMMA-like coating, which could be deposited with a high degree of control of chemical composition and layer thickness. The thin film also proved to be relatively stable upon incubation in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS). This paper discusses the next stage of the study, which includes testing the adhesion of the plasma-activated and plasma-polymerized samples to bone cement through pull-out tests and testing the cell adhesion and proliferation on the samples. In order to perform the pull-out tests, all samples were cut to standard dimensions and fixed in bone cement in a reproducible way with a sample holder specially designed for this purpose. The cell adhesion and proliferation were tested by means of an MTS assay and live/dead staining after culturing MC3T3 osteoblast cells on UHMWPE samples. The results show that both plasma activation and plasma polymerization significantly improve the adhesion to bone cement and enhance cell adhesion and proliferation. In conclusion, it can be stated that the use of plasma technology can lead to an implant with improved quality and a subsequent

  20. Effects of neutrons and gamma radiation on high polymer epoxy adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, H.W.; Bui, V.T.; Poirier, P.E.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of irradiation in a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor on the adhesive strength of epoxy resins was studied using the ASTM D897 standard testing procedure. Initial weakening, up to 50%, ascribed to chain-scission, is followed by strengthening, ascribed to radiation-induced crosslinking. 7 refs., 1 tab., 14 figs

  1. Nanoindentation and Microindentation Studies of Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Adriana; Foster, Mark; Crosby, Alfred; Shull, Kenneth

    2000-03-01

    The area of pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs), how they work, how they age and the mechanisms by which tackifiers give tacky properties to elastomeric based adhesives is an area where fundamental understanding is still lacking. To better understand the behavior of PSAs characterization of local mechanical properties by microindentation and nanoindentation was done in this research. While nanoindentation was performed by using the tip of an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and allowed the study of changes over time on a highly local scale, microindentation was done with a spherical indenter and complemented this approach by probing the samples at a somewhat larger length scale. Model systems are being studied in which polyethylene-propylene (PEP) and polyisoprene (PI) are used as the rubbery component. The tackifiers used are wood rosin derivatives with different molecular weights and glass transition temperatures. These model PSAs include one and two phase systems. Experiments were made at several aging times and temperatures. The results indicate that the decrease in performance with aging may be related to surface enrichment of tackifier, which stiffens the surface of the PSA.

  2. Large deformation and adhesive contact studies of axisymmetric membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprade, Evan J; Long, Rong; Pham, Jonathan T; Lawrence, Jimmy; Emrick, Todd; Crosby, Alfred J; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Shull, Kenneth R

    2013-02-05

    A model membrane contact system consisting of an acrylic copolymer membrane and a PDMS substrate was utilized to evaluate a recently developed nonlinear large-deformation adhesive contact analysis. Direct measurements of the local membrane apex strain during noncontact inflation indicated that the neo-Hookean model provides an accurate measure of membrane strain and supports its use as the strain energy function for the analysis. Two membrane contact geometries, exhibiting significantly different strain distributions during withdrawal, were investigated. The first examines the wet contact of an air pressurized membrane. The second looks at the dry contact of a fluid deformed membrane in which a stepper motor controls membrane-substrate separation. A time-dependent modulus emerges from the analysis, with principal tensions obtained from a comparison of predicted and experimental membrane profiles. The applicability of this numerical analysis for determining membrane tension, however, is limited by wrinkling instabilities and viscoelasticity. For this reason, a conceptually simpler method, based on the direct measurement of the membrane tension and contact angle, was also utilized. The traditional peel energy defined with this direct measurement accurately described the membrane/substrate adhesive interactions, giving well-defined peel energies that were independent of the detailed strain state of the membrane.

  3. Framing charitable donations as exceptional expenses increases giving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Abigail B; Sharma, Eesha; Alter, Adam L

    2015-06-01

    Many articles have examined the psychological drivers of charitable giving, but little is known about how people mentally budget for charitable gifts. The present research aims to address this gap by investigating how perceptions of donations as exceptional (uncommon and infrequent) rather than ordinary (common and frequent) expenses might affect budgeting for and giving to charity. We provide the first demonstration that exceptional framing of an identical item can directly influence mental budgeting processes, and yield societal benefits. In 5 lab and field experiments, exceptional framing increased charitable behavior, and diminished the extent to which people considered the effect of the donation on their budgets. The current work extends our understanding of mental accounting and budgeting for charitable gifts, and demonstrates practical techniques that enable fundraisers to enhance the perceived exceptionality of donations. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Handbook of adhesive bonded structural repair

    CERN Document Server

    Wegman, Raymond F

    1992-01-01

    Provides repair methods for adhesive bonded and composite structures; identifies suitable materials and equipment for repairs; describes damage evaluation criteria and techniques, and methods of inspection before and after repair.

  5. Recent advances in nanostructured biomimetic dry adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras ePattantyus-Abraham

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The relatively large size of the gecko and its ability to climb a multitude of structures with ease has often been cited as the inspiration upon which the field of dry adhesives is based. Since 2010, there have been many advances in the field of dry adhesives with much of the new research focusing on developing nanoscale and hierarchical features in a concentrated effort to develop synthetic gecko-like dry adhesives which are strong, durable and self-cleaning. A brief overview of the geckos and the hairs which it uses to adhere to many different surfaces is provided before delving into the current methods and materials used to fabricate synthetic gecko hairs. A summary of the recently published literature on bio-inspired, nanostructured dry adhesives is presented with an emphasis being placed on fabrication techniques.

  6. Hierarchical capillary adhesion of microcantilevers or hairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianlin; Feng Xiqiao; Xia Re; Zhao Hongping

    2007-01-01

    As a result of capillary forces, animal hairs, carbon nanotubes or nanowires of a periodically or randomly distributed array often assemble into hierarchical structures. In this paper, the energy method is adopted to analyse the capillary adhesion of microsized hairs, which are modelled as clamped microcantilevers wetted by liquids. The critical conditions for capillary adhesion of two hairs, three hairs or two bundles of hairs are derived in terms of Young's contact angle, elastic modulus and geometric sizes of the beams. Then, the hierarchical capillary adhesion of hairs is addressed. It is found that for multiple hairs or microcantilevers, the system tends to take a hierarchical structure as a result of the minimization of the total potential energy of the system. The level number of structural hierarchy increases with the increase in the number of hairs if they are sufficiently long. Additionally, we performed experiments to verify our theoretical solutions for the adhesion of microbeams

  7. Synthesis of LTA zeolite for bacterial adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belaabed, R.; Eabed, S.; Addaou, A.; Laajab, A.; Rodriguez, M.A.; Lahsini, A.

    2016-07-01

    High affinity and adhesion capacity for Gram-positive bacteria on minerals has been widely studied. In this work the adhesion of bacteria on synthesized zeolite has been studied. The Zeolite Linde Type A (LTA) has been synthesized using hydrothermal route using processing parameters to obtain low cost materials. For adhesion studies Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis were used as Gram-positive bacteria, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are used as Gram-negative bacteria. X-ray diffraction, environmental scanning electron microscope and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the synthesized zeolite. To evaluate the bacterial adhesion to zeolite LTA the hydrophobicity and surface properties are examined using contact angle measurement. (Author)

  8. Development of LARC-13 adhesive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggatt, J. T.

    1979-01-01

    Various adhesive formulations were evaluated and the effects of various environments upon different titanium bond surface treatments were noted. Initial data show LARC-13 to possess good 589K (600 F) stability as compared to other high temperature stable systems.

  9. Proteomic analysis of integrin adhesion complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Bass, Mark D; Knight, David; Humphries, Martin J

    2011-04-05

    Integrin receptors regulate cell fate by coupling the binding of extracellular adhesion proteins to the assembly of intracellular cytoskeletal and signaling complexes. A detailed, integrative view of adhesion complexes will provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that control cell morphology, survival, movement, and differentiation. To date, membrane receptor-associated signaling complexes have been refractory to proteomic analysis because of their inherent lability and inaccessibility. We developed a methodology to isolate ligand-induced integrin adhesion complexes, and we used this technique to analyze the composition of complexes associated with multiple receptor-ligand pairs and define core and receptor-specific subnetworks. In particular, we identified regulator of chromosome condensation-2 (RCC2) as a component of fibronectin-activated signaling pathways that regulate directional cell movement. The development of this proteomics pipeline provides the means to investigate the molecular composition and function of various adhesion complexes.

  10. Anti-adhesive properties of fish tropomyosins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Bernbom, Nete; Gram, Lone

    2008-01-01

    Aims: We have recently found that preconditioning of stainless steel surfaces with an aqueous fish muscle extract can significantly impede bacterial adhesion. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize the primary components associated with this bacteria-repelling effect. Methods...... to the formation of a proteinaceous conditioning film composed primarily of fish tropomyosins. These fibrous proteins formed a considerable anti-adhesive conditioning layer on and reduced bacterial adhesion to several different materials including polystyrene, vinyl plastic, stainless steel and glass. The protein...... the importance of substratum's physiochemical properties and exposure time with regards to protein adsorption/elution efficiency and subsequent bacterial adhesion. Significance and Impact of the Study: Fish tropomyosin-coatings could potentially offer a nontoxic and relatively inexpensive measure of reducing...

  11. Laser techniques for radioactive decontamination gives metallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar Alracon, L.; Molina, G.; Vizuet Gonzalez, J.

    1998-01-01

    In this work it presented the prototype for system decontamination at diverse component with removable superficial contamination, using the technique gives laser ablation, for the evaporation at the pollutant. It discusses the principle in the fact that system, as well as the different elements that compose it. The are presented the obtained results when irradiating with a laser a surface without radioactive contamination to verify the system operation

  12. Giving away used injection equipment: missed prevention message?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anstice Susan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our objective was to examine factors associated with distributive injection equipment sharing and how needle exchange programs (NEPs can help reduce distributive sharing among injection drug users (IDUs. Methods 145 English speaking Canadian IDUs ages 16 years and over who had injected in the past 30 days were recruited for a cross-sectional survey. Participants were asked about their socio-demographic characteristics, HIV risk behaviours, social support, drug treatment readiness, program satisfaction, health and social service use and NEP drug use. Bivariate statistics and logistic regression were used to characterize the population and examine correlates of sharing behaviour. Results More IDUs reported distributive sharing of cookers (45% than needles (36% or other types of equipment (water 36%; filters 29%; swabs 8%. Regression analyses revealed the following factors associated with distributing used cookers: a history of cocaine/crack injection, an Addiction Severity Index (ASI score indicative of a mental health problem, and older than 30 years of age. Factors associated with giving away used water included: male, injected methadone, injected other stimulants and moved 3+ times in the past 6 months. Factors associated with giving away used filters included: injected cocaine/crack or stayed overnight on the street or other public place. Factors associated with giving away swabs included: an ASI mental health score indicative of a mental health problem, and HCV negative status. Conclusions Our findings show that more IDUs give away cookers than needles or other injection equipment. While the results showed that correlates of sharing differed by piece of equipment, each point to distributive sharing by the most marginalized IDUs. Targeting prevention efforts to reduce equipment sharing in general, and cookers in particular is warranted to reduce use of contaminated equipment and viral transmission.

  13. Adhesive contact between a cylinder and a half-space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jiunn-Jong, E-mail: jjw5277@ms19.hinet.ne, E-mail: jjwu@mail.cgu.edu.t [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China)

    2009-08-07

    Numerical simulation for the adhesive contact between a sphere and a half-space is employed. The numerical simulation is performed for a realistic surface force law based on the Lennard-Jones potential between molecules with the Derjaguin approximation. The result is compared with the two-dimensional Maugis model, which uses the Dugdale law. It is found that the Maugis model gives good results, approximating those obtained by the numerical simulation. It is also found that the usual Maugis parameter governs the transition from the two-dimensional JKR model to the two-dimensional rigid cylinder contact. But the rigid body limit found using the Maugis model is different from that found using the numerical simulation.

  14. Adhesive contact between a cylinder and a half-space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2009-08-01

    Numerical simulation for the adhesive contact between a sphere and a half-space is employed. The numerical simulation is performed for a realistic surface force law based on the Lennard-Jones potential between molecules with the Derjaguin approximation. The result is compared with the two-dimensional Maugis model, which uses the Dugdale law. It is found that the Maugis model gives good results, approximating those obtained by the numerical simulation. It is also found that the usual Maugis parameter governs the transition from the two-dimensional JKR model to the two-dimensional rigid cylinder contact. But the rigid body limit found using the Maugis model is different from that found using the numerical simulation.

  15. Stability analysis of rough surfaces in adhesive normal contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Valentine; Bleyer, Jeremy

    2018-03-01

    This paper deals with adhesive frictionless normal contact between one elastic flat solid and one stiff solid with rough surface. After computation of the equilibrium solution of the energy minimization principle and respecting the contact constraints, we aim at studying the stability of this equilibrium solution. This study of stability implies solving an eigenvalue problem with inequality constraints. To achieve this goal, we propose a proximal algorithm which enables qualifying the solution as stable or unstable and that gives the instability modes. This method has a low computational cost since no linear system inversion is required and is also suitable for parallel implementation. Illustrations are given for the Hertzian contact and for rough contact.

  16. Adhesion in hydrogels and model glassy polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvendiren, Murat

    Two main topics are addressed in this dissertation: (1) adhesion in hydrogels; (2) interfacial interactions between model glassy polymers. A self-assembly technique for the formation of hydrogels from acrylic triblock copolymer solutions was developed, based on vapor phase solvent exchange. Structure formation in the gels was characterized by small angle X-ray scattering, and swelling was measured in controlled pH buffer solutions. Strong gels are formed with polymer weight fractions between 0.01 and 0.15, and with shear moduli between 0.6 kPa and 3.5 kPa. Adhesive functionality, based on 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (DOPA) was also incorporated into the triblock copolymers. The effect of DOPA concentration on gel formation and swelling was investigated in detail. The adhesive properties of DOPA-functionalized hydrogels on TiO2 were investigated with an axisymmetric adhesion method. It was shown that the presence of DOPA enhances the adhesive properties of the hydrogels, but that the effect is minimized at pH values below 10, where the DOPA groups are hydrophobic. Thin film membranes were produced in order to study the specific interactions between DOPA and TiO2 and DOPA and tissue, using a membrane inflation method. The presence of DOPA in the membranes enhances the adhesion on TiO 2 and tissue, although adhesion to tissue requires that the DOPA groups be oxidized while in contact with the tissue of interest. Porous hydrogel scaffolds for tissue engineering applications were formed by adding salt crystals to the triblock copolymer solution prior to solvent exchange. Salt was then leached out by immersing the gel into water. Structures of the porous hydrogels were characterized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. These hydrogels were shown to be suitable for tissue regeneration and drug delivery applications. Diffusion-mediated adhesion between two component miscible polymer systems having very different glassy temperatures was also investigated. Axisymmetric

  17. Giving an account of one's pain in the anthropological interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, Mara

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, I analyze the illness stories narrated by a mother and her 13-year-old son as part of an ethnographic study of child chronic pain sufferers and their families. In examining some of the moral, relational and communicative challenges of giving an account of one's pain, I focus on what is left out of some accounts of illness and suffering and explore some possible reasons for these elisions. Drawing on recent work by Judith Butler (Giving an Account of Oneself, 2005), I investigate how the pragmatic context of interviews can introduce a form of symbolic violence to narrative accounts. Specifically, I use the term "genre of complaint" to highlight how anthropological research interviews in biomedical settings invoke certain typified forms of suffering that call for the rectification of perceived injustices. Interview narratives articulated in the genre of complaint privilege specific types of pain and suffering and cast others into the background. Giving an account of one's pain is thus a strategic and selective process, creating interruptions and silences as much as moments of clarity. Therefore, I argue that medical anthropologists ought to attend more closely to the institutional structures and relations that shape the production of illness narratives in interview encounters.

  18. 21 CFR 175.125 - Pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pressure-sensitive adhesives. 175.125 Section 175... Substances for Use Only as Components of Adhesives § 175.125 Pressure-sensitive adhesives. Pressure-sensitive adhesives may be safely used as the food-contact surface of labels and/or tapes applied to food, in...

  19. Platelet adhesiveness: the effect of centrifugation on the measurement of adhesiveness in platelet-rich plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    Platelet adhesiveness has been measured in citrated whole blood and in platelet-rich plasma obtained from normal subjects, splenectomized patients, and from patients in whom the diagnosis of recurrent venous thrombosis had been made. The duration of centrifugation used in the preparation of platelet-rich plasma was found to have a profound effect on the measurement of platelet adhesiveness because the figure for platelet adhesiveness measured in platelet-rich plasma obtained by centrifugation was considerably lower than that found in citrated whole blood. This effect was particularly marked when platelet-rich plasma was obtained from subjects in whom platelet adhesiveness measured in whole blood was increased. PMID:5699080

  20. Elimination of the reactivation process in the adhesion of chlorinated SBS rubber with polychloroprene adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Chlorination treatment of a thermoplastic styrene-butadiene-styrene rubber (SBS with a 3 wt% solution of trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCI in methyl ethyl ketone (MEK introduces chlorinated and oxidized moieties on the rubber surface which increase its surface energy and produces surface microroughness. Consequently adhesion properties, evaluated by T-peel strength measurements in chlorinated SBS/solvent based-polyurethane adhesive/leather joints, are enhanced. In this study, two solvent-based polychloroprene adhesives (PCP0 and PCP30R have been considered as an alternative to the commonly used solvent-based polyurethane adhesive (PU. A thermoreactive phenolic resin was added to one of the polychloroprene adhesive formulations (PCP30R. This tackifier resin favors chlorination of the adhesive and reinforces the interface between the chlorinated adhesive and the chlorinated rubber surface. Besides, PCP30R adhesive does not need adhesive reactivation and considerable high T-peel strength value (5.7±0.3 kN/m was obtained. Elimination of the reactivation process implies a considerable improvement of the manufacturing process in the footwear industry.

  1. Properties of pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes with soft adhesives to human skin and their mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokumura, Fumio; Homma, Takeyasu; Tomiya, Toshiki; Kobayashi, Yuko; Matsuda, Tetsuaki

    2007-05-01

    The use of soft adhesives in the manufacture of pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes has recently increased. The dermal peeling force of adhesive tapes with soft adhesives was studied. Four kinds of adhesive tapes with adhesives of different softness were made, by adding varying amounts of isopropyl myristate as a softener. The tapes were applied on the flexor side of the forearm of six healthy male volunteers. The dermal peeling force, the amount of stripped corneocytes, the level of pain when the tapes were removed and the degree of penetration of adhesives into the sulcus cutis (skin furrows) were evaluated at 1 and 24 h after application of the tapes. Furthermore, a skin model panel (a sulcus cutis and crista cutis model panel) and a crista cutis model panel were constructed from a general stainless-steel panel, and the peeling force of the tapes against the model panels was measured. As the softness of adhesives increased, the peeling force against a general stainless-steel panel with a flat surface decreased, although the peeling force against human skin did not significantly change. The amount of stripped corneocytes on the removed tapes and the level of pain when the tapes were removed decreased with the increase in softness of the adhesives. These results suggest that adhesive tapes with soft adhesives that contain isopropyl myristate as a softener are suitable for the skin. Furthermore, the degree of penetration of adhesive into the sulcus cutis increased as the softness of adhesives increased. Upon evaluation of the peeling force against the model panels, as the softness of adhesives increased, there was a slight decrease in the peeling force against the skin model panel, while there was a remarkable decrease in the peeling force against the crista cutis model panel. These results suggest that the lack of change in the dermal peeling force as the softness of adhesives increased was caused by penetration of soft adhesive into the sulcus cutis, and that the

  2. Influence of Application Time and Etching Mode of Universal Adhesives on Enamel Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Keiichi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Imai, Arisa; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Ishii, Ryo; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the influence of application time and etching mode of universal adhesives on enamel adhesion. Five universal adhesives, Adhese Universal, Bondmer Lightless, Clearfil Universal Bond Quick, G-Premio Bond, and Scotchbond Universal, were used. Bovine incisors were prepared and divided into four groups of ten teeth each. SBS, Ra, and SFE were determined after the following procedures: 1. self-etch mode with immediate air blowing after application (IA); 2. self-etch mode with prolonged application time (PA); 3. etch-and-rinse mode with IA; 4. etch-and-rinse mode with PA. After 24-h water storage, the bonded assemblies were subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) tests. For surface roughness (Ra) and surface free energy (SFE) measurements, the adhesives were simply applied to the enamel and rinsed with acetone and water before the measurements were carried out. Significantly higher SBS and Ra values were obtained with etch-and-rinse mode than with self-etch mode regardless of the application time or type of adhesive. Although most adhesives showed decreased SFE values with increased application time in self-etch mode, SFE values in etch-and-rinse mode were dependent on the adhesive type and application time. Etching mode, application time, and type of adhesive significantly influenced the SBS, Ra, and SFE values.

  3. Adhesive capsulitis: review of imaging and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Guy; Bou-Haider, Pascal; Harris, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is one of the most common conditions affecting the shoulder; however, early clinical diagnosis can be challenging. Treatment is most effective when commenced prior to the onset of capsular thickening and contracture; consequently, the role of imaging is increasing. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the typical imaging appearances of adhesive capsulitis and to examine some of the evidence regarding each of these imaging modalities. An evaluation of the various management options available to the clinician is also presented.

  4. Compressive modulus of adhesive bonded rubber block

    OpenAIRE

    Wiriya Thongruang; Charoenyut Dechwayukul

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of a thin adhesive layer on the modulus of an elastic rubber block bonded between two plates. The plates were assumed to be rigid, both in extension and flexure, and subjected to vertical compression loading. The Gent’s approach was used to obtain the analytic deformations of the rubber and adhesive. The analytic deformations were then validated with the finite element model. There was a good agreement between both methods. The modulus of the bonded rubbe...

  5. Photochemical tissue bonding with chitosan adhesive films

    OpenAIRE

    Lauto, Antonio; Mawad, Damia; Barton, Matthew; Gupta, Abhishek; Piller, Sabine C; Hook, James

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) is a promising sutureless technique for tissue repair. PTB is often achieved by applying a solution of rose bengal (RB) between two tissue edges, which are irradiated by a green laser to crosslink collagen fibers with minimal heat production. In this study, RB has been incorporated in chitosan films to create a novel tissue adhesive that is laser-activated. Methods Adhesive films, based on chitosan and containing ~0.1 wt% RB were manufact...

  6. Tooth surface treatment strategies for adhesive cementation

    OpenAIRE

    Rohr, Nadja; Fischer, Jens

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth surface pre-treatment steps on shear bond strength, which is essential for understanding the adhesive cementation process. MATERIALS AND METHODS Shear bond strengths of different cements with various tooth surface treatments (none, etching, priming, or etching and priming) on enamel and dentin of human teeth were measured using the Swiss shear test design. Three adhesives (Permaflo DC, Panavia F 2.0, and Panavia V5) and one sel...

  7. Advances in modeling and design of adhesively bonded systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, S

    2013-01-01

    The book comprehensively charts a way for industry to employ adhesively bonded joints to make systems more efficient and cost-effective Adhesively bonded systems have found applications in a wide spectrum of industries (e.g., aerospace, electronics, construction, ship building, biomedical, etc.) for a variety of purposes. Emerging adhesive materials with improved mechanical properties have allowed adhesion strength approaching that of the bonded materials themselves. Due to advances in adhesive materials and the many potential merits that adhesive bonding offers, adhesive bonding has replac

  8. Model of moisture absorption by adhesive joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla Mora, Veronica; Mieloszyk, Magdalena; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw

    2018-01-01

    Adhesive joints offer many advantages over traditional mechanical joining systems. Nonetheless, their use is limited since they can be adversely affected by extreme temperatures and humidity conditions. Moisture contamination (even 1-3% of the sample weight) in an adhesive can alter its tensile strength and compromise the structural integrity of the joint. Moisture absorption processes can be monitored using methods based on fibre Bragg grating sensors embedded in the adhesive material. In the present paper, a finite element model of an adhesive joint between composite elements was analysed using the commercial code Abaqus™. The investigation contains two main parts: a thermal analysis and a hygro-mechanical analysis. The achieved results were verified using experimental investigation results for a sample with embedded fibre Bragg grating sensors that were applied to monitor the moisture-induced strains in the adhesive joint. The achieved numerical results show good agreement with the experimental ones for all considered analyses. The presented models can also be used for the determination of moisture content in an adhesive layer especially in a range of 1.5-2.5% of the water content.

  9. Adhesion toughness of multilayer graphene films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Joseph D; Harvey, Christopher M; Wang, Simon

    2017-12-05

    Interface adhesion toughness between multilayer graphene films and substrates is a major concern for their integration into functional devices. Results from the circular blister test, however, display seemingly anomalous behaviour as adhesion toughness depends on number of graphene layers. Here we show that interlayer shearing and sliding near the blister crack tip, caused by the transition from membrane stretching to combined bending, stretching and through-thickness shearing, decreases fracture mode mixity G II /G I , leading to lower adhesion toughness. For silicon oxide substrate and pressure loading, mode mixity decreases from 232% for monolayer films to 130% for multilayer films, causing the adhesion toughness G c to decrease from 0.424 J m -2 to 0.365 J m -2 . The mode I and II adhesion toughnesses are found to be G Ic  = 0.230 J m -2 and G IIc  = 0.666 J m -2 , respectively. With point loading, mode mixity decreases from 741% for monolayer films to 262% for multilayer films, while the adhesion toughness G c decreases from 0.543 J m -2 to 0.438 J m -2 .

  10. Use of Adhesion Promoters in Asphalt Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihlářová Denisa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of asphalt binder as a significant binder in road constructions is to permanently bind aggregates of different compositions and grain sizes. The asphalt binder itself does not have suitable adhesiveness, so after a period of time, bare grains can appear. This results in a gradual separation of the grains from an asphalt layer and the presence of potholes in a pavement. Adhesion promoters or adhesive agents are important and proven promoters in practice. They are substances mainly based on the fatty acids of polyamides which should increase the reliability of the asphalt’s binder adhesion to the aggregates, thus increasing the lifetime period of the asphalt mixture as well as its resistance to mechanical strain. The amount of a promoter or agent added to the asphalt mixture is negligible and constitutes about 0.3% of the asphalt’s binder weight. Nevertheless, even this quantity significantly increases the adhesive qualities of an asphalt binder. The article was created in cooperatation with the Slovak University of Technology, in Bratislava, Slovakia, and focuses on proving the new AD2 adhesive additive and comparing it with the Addibit and Wetfix BE promoters used on aggregates from the Skuteč - Litická and Bystřec quarries.

  11. Absolute Quantitation of Bacterial Biofilm Adhesion and Viscoelasticity by Microbead Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Peter C.Y.; Dutcher, John R.; Beveridge, Terry J.; Lam, Joseph S.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are the most prevalent mode of bacterial growth in nature. Adhesive and viscoelastic properties of bacteria play important roles at different stages of biofilm development. Following irreversible attachment of bacterial cells onto a surface, a biofilm can grow in which its matrix viscoelasticity helps to maintain structural integrity, determine stress resistance, and control ease of dispersion. In this study, a novel application of force spectroscopy was developed to characterize the surface adhesion and viscoelasticity of bacterial cells in biofilms. By performing microbead force spectroscopy with a closed-loop atomic force microscope, we accurately quantified these properties over a defined contact area. Using the model gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we observed that the adhesive and viscoelastic properties of an isogenic lipopolysaccharide mutant wapR biofilm were significantly different from those measured for the wild-type strain PAO1 biofilm. Moreover, biofilm maturation in either strain also led to prominent changes in adhesion and viscoelasticity. To minimize variability in force measurements resulting from experimental parameter changes, we developed standardized conditions for microbead force spectroscopy to enable meaningful comparison of data obtained in different experiments. Force plots measured under standard conditions showed that the adhesive pressures of PAO1 and wapR early biofilms were 34 ± 15 Pa and 332 ± 47 Pa, respectively, whereas those of PAO1 and wapR mature biofilms were 19 ± 7 Pa and 80 ± 22 Pa, respectively. Fitting of creep data to a Voigt Standard Linear Solid viscoelasticity model revealed that the instantaneous and delayed elastic moduli in P. aeruginosa were drastically reduced by lipopolysaccharide deficiency and biofilm maturation, whereas viscosity was decreased only for biofilm maturation. In conclusion, we have introduced a direct biophysical method for simultaneously quantifying

  12. Mast cells facilitate local VEGF release as an early event in the pathogenesis of postoperative peritoneal adhesions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Ronan A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Peritoneal injury sustained at laparotomy may evoke local inflammatory responses that result in adhesion formation. Peritoneal mast cells are likely to initiate this process, whereas vascular permeability\\/endothelial growth factor (VEGF) may facilitate the degree to which subsequent adhesion formation occurs. METHODS: Mast cell deficient mice (WBB6F1-\\/-), along with their mast cell sufficient counterparts (WBB6F1+\\/+), underwent a standardized adhesion-inducing operation (AIS) with subsequent sacrifice and adhesion assessment 14 days later in a blinded fashion. Additional CD-1 and WBB6F1+\\/+, and WBB6F1-\\/- mice were killed 2, 6, 12, and 24 hours after operation for measurement of VEGF by ELISA in systemic serum and peritoneal lavage fluid. Two further groups of CD-1 mice underwent AIS and received either a single perioperative dose of anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody (10 mug\\/mouse) or a similar volume of IgG isotypic antibody and adhesion formation 2 weeks later was evaluated. RESULTS: WBB6F1-\\/- mice had less adhesions then did their WBB6F1+\\/+ counterparts (median [interquartile range] adhesion score 3[3-3] vs 1.5[1-2] respectively; P < .003). Local VEGF release peaked 6 hours after AIS in both WBB6F1+\\/+ and CD-1 mice whereas levels remained at baseline in WBB6F1-\\/- mice. CD-1 mice treated with a single dose of anti-VEGF therapy during operation had less adhesions than controls (2[1.25-2] vs 3[2.25-3], P = .0002). CONCLUSIONS: Mast cells and VEGF are central to the formation of postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions with mast cells being responsible, either directly or indirectly, for VEGF release into the peritoneal cavity after operation. In tandem with the recent clinical success of anti-VEGF monoclonal antibodies in oncologic practice, our observations suggest an intriguing avenue for research and development of anti-adhesion strategy.

  13. Pull-test adhesion measurements of diamondlike carbon films on silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, and zirconium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erck, R.A.; Nichols, F.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dierks, J.F. [North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films or diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were formed by ion-beam deposition of 400 eV methane (CH{sub 4}) ions on several smooth and rough ceramics, as well as on ceramics coated with a layer of Si and Ti. Adhesion was measured by the pin-pull method. Excellent adhesion was measured for smooth SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, but adhesion of DLC to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} was negligible. The use of a Si bonding interlayer produced good adhesion to all the substrates, but a Ti layer was ineffective because bonding between the DLC film and Ti was poor. The presence of surface roughness appeared to greatly increase the measured adhesion in all cases. Bulk thermodynamic calculations are not directly applicable to bonding at the interface. If the standard enthalpy of formation for reaction between CH{sub 4} and substrate is calculated assumpting a carbide or carbon phase is produced, a relation is seen between reaction enthalpy and relative adhesion. Large positive enthalpies are associated with poor adhesion; negative or small positive enthalpies are associated with good adhesion. This relation between enthalpy and adhesion was also observed for DLC deposited on Si. Lack of adhesion to Ti was attributed to inadvertent formation of a surface oxide layer that rendered the enthalpy for reaction with CH{sub 4} strongly positive and similar in magnitude to that for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2}.

  14. Reliability Analysis for Adhesive Bonded Composite Stepped Lap Joints Loaded in Fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimiaeifar, Amin; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Lund, Erik

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a probabilistic approach to calculate the reliability of adhesive bonded composite stepped lap joints loaded in fatigue using three- dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). A method for progressive damage modelling is used to assess fatigue damage accumulation and residual...... by the wind turbine standard IEC 61400-1. Finally, an approach for the assessment of the reliability of adhesive bonded composite stepped lap joints loaded in fatigue is presented. The introduced methodology can be applied in the same way to calculate the reliability level of wind turbine blade components...

  15. Dependency of micro particle adhesion of dispersive and nondispersive interactions analyzed by atomic force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kawal, A; Andoh, E

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion behaviour of a micro semi-sphere tip (radius of curvature of 18 nm) after making contact with various inorganic solid surfaces is analyzed. Measurement force by the AFM tip corresponds to the interactive force estimated $9 using surface energy components, dispersion and nondispersion, based on van der Waal's interaction. These components can be obtained by measuring the contact angle of standard liquids on a material surface. By using two kinds of tip $9 with different component values, analysis of the interactive mechanism and prediction of macro tip (particle) adhesion can be made. (6 refs).

  16. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, Marcus A.; List, Martina S.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Hopkins, John W.; Connell, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesively bonded structures are potentially lighter in weight than mechanically fastened ones, but existing surface treatments are often considered unreliable. Two main problems in achieving reproducible and durable adhesive bonds are surface contamination and variability in standard surface preparation techniques. In this work three surface pretreatments were compared: laser etching with and without grit blasting and conventional Pasa-Jell treatment. Ti-6Al-4V surfaces were characterized by contact angle goniometry, optical microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Laser -etching was found to produce clean surfaces with precisely controlled surface topographies and PETI-5 lap shear strengths and durabilities were equivalent to those produced with Pasa-Jell.

  17. Contact studies of weak adhesive interactions in water with membrane enhanced surface acoustic wave analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brass, David Alan

    The measurement of weak adhesive energies has previously been difficult to obtain. To measure these energies, I designed a technique that uses the combined sensitivities of both a quartz crystal resonator and the inflation of an elastomeric polymer membrane. The surfaces of the quartz crystal and/or the membrane are modified with water swollen polymer brushes, which are used to eliminate nonspecific adhesion. These brushes are then end-modified with adhesive functional groups. An analysis is developed for the frequency response of a quartz crystal resonator as the membrane layer is placed in contact with the surface of these swollen brushes. The shear wave generated at the resonator surface couples into the membrane layer with an efficiency that is strongly dependent on the thickness of the swollen brush layer. The calculated shift decreases substantially for increases in the brush thickness of ten to twenty nanometers, giving a net frequency response that is extremely sensitive to the degree of swelling of the brush. An optimum capping layer thickness is determined by balancing the resonant frequency shift against dissipative effects that weaken the crystal resonance. Detailed calculations are presented for the specific case of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) brushes swollen by water and capped by a poly(styrene-ethylene/butene-styrene) (SEBS) elastomeric, water-permeable membrane. These calculations show that the method is sensitive to the properties of the brush layer. This surface acoustic wave technique was coupled with an inflation method that enabled quantification of the adhesion between the membrane and the brush coated surface. This adhesive interaction is obtained from the contact angle made between the quartz and membrane surfaces and the tension on the membrane. An analysis of the membrane profile based on the numerical solution of the axisymmetric Laplace equation is developed and used to investigate both adhesive and non-adhesive situations with both an

  18. What are the impacts of giving up the driving licence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siren, Anu Kristiina; Haustein, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    in their activities after giving up their licence. In travel frequency, neither the differences between renewers and non-renewers nor the changes over time within the groups were pronounced. The groups differed in their use of transport modes already at the baseline: the renewers drove, while nonrenewers travelled...... as passengers, used public transport, walked or cycled. Not renewing the licence was a strong predictor of unmet mobility needs, especially in relation to leisure activities. The present study indicates that younger seniors’ mobility is not likely to be affected by the strict renewal policies. However, given...

  19. Indirect MR arthrographic findings of adhesive capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyoung Doo; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoon, Young Cheol; Choi, Sang-Hee

    2011-12-01

    The objective of our study was to compare the indirect MR arthrographic findings of patients with adhesive capsulitis and patients without adhesive capsulitis. Indirect MR arthrograms of 35 patients (21 women, 14 men; mean age, 50.1 years) diagnosed with adhesive capsulitis clinically were compared with indirect MR arthrograms of 45 patients (23 women, 22 men; mean age, 48.9 years) without adhesive capsulitis. Joint capsule thickness in the axillary recess and the thicknesses of the enhancing portion of the axillary recess and the rotator interval were, respectively, evaluated on coronal T2-weighted images and coronal and sagittal fat-suppressed enhanced T1-weighted images by two radiologists independently. Reliability was studied using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were compared. Patients with adhesive capsulitis had significantly thickened joint capsules in the axillary recess and a thickened enhancing portion in the axillary recess and in the rotator interval. The difference in the thicknesses of the enhancing portion in the axillary recess and in the rotator interval were significantly greater than the difference in joint capsule thicknesses in the axillary recess between the adhesive capsulitis group and the control group (p capsule in the axillary recess and the thicknesses of the enhancing portion of the axillary recess and the rotator interval were 0.797, 0.861, and 0.847, respectively. An abundance of enhancing tissue in the rotator interval and thickening and enhancement of the axillary recess are signs suggestive of adhesive capsulitis on indirect MR arthrography.

  20. Adhesive performance of precoated brackets after expiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloud, Cayce C; Trojan, Terry M; Suliman, Sam N; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate adhesive performance in terms of debonding forces of precoated metal and ceramic brackets 4 years after expiration. Buccal and lingual surfaces of embedded extracted maxillary premolars were etched with 34% Tooth Conditioner Gel (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del), rinsed, and dried. Transbond MIP (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) was applied prior to placing adhesive precoated brackets (APC II Victory stainless steel and APC Plus Clarity ceramic brackets, 3M Unitek). The preexpiration brackets had 29-35 months before, and the postexpiration brackets were 45-52 months past, their expiration dates. Sample size was 17-21 per group. Debonding forces were determined by subjecting the bonded brackets to a shear force in a universal testing machine. Debonding forces were compared using two-way ANOVA. Debonded surfaces were examined under a stereomicroscope to determine failure modes, which were compared using the chi-square test. No statistically significant difference was found in debonding forces (P  =  .8581) or failure modes (P  =  .4538) between expired and unexpired brackets. Metal brackets required statistically significantly higher debonding forces than did ceramic brackets (P  =  .0001). For both expired and unexpired brackets, failure modes were mostly cohesive in the adhesive layer for ceramic brackets, and mixed between adhesive and cohesive failure in the adhesive layer for metal brackets. Adhesive precoated brackets did not have any reduction in enamel-adhesion properties up to 4 years after their expiration date. Extended shelf life testing for precoated dental brackets may be worth considering.

  1. Standard for metric practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This standard gives guidance for application of the modernized metric system in the United States. The International System of Units, developed and maintained by the General Conference on Weights and Measures (abbreviated CGPM from the official French name Conference Generale des Poids et Measures) is intended as a basis for worldwide standardization of measurement units. The name International System of Units and the international abbreviation SI 2 were adopted by the 11th CGPM in 1960. SI is a complete, coherent system that is being universally adopted

  2. The bio-tribological properties of anti-adhesive agents commonly used during tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonagle, Lorcan; Jones, Michael D; Dowson, Duncan; Theobald, Peter S

    2012-05-01

    Frictional resistance to tendon gliding is minimized by surrounding loose areolar tissue. During periods of prolonged immobilization, for example, post-tendon-repair, adhesions can form between these two adjacent tissues, thereby limiting tendon function. Anti-adhesive agents can be applied during surgery to prevent adhesion formation, whilst reportedly providing some reduction in friction during in vitro tendon-bony pulley investigations. This bio-tribological study evaluates whether application of these agents can improve the lubrication between the tendon and surrounding tissue, thus potentially reducing the risk of re-rupturing the tendon at the repair site. The use of bovine synovial fluid (BSF) enabled an approximation of the in vivo lubrication regime, and subsequent comparison of the performance of three synthetic agents (50 mg/ml 5-fluorouracil; 5 mg/ml hyaluronic acid; ADCON-T/N). Coefficient of friction data was recorded and then compared with the Stribeck curve. BSF generated a fluid film that separated the two surfaces, giving rise to optimal lubrication conditions. This efficient regime was also generated following application of each anti-adhesion agent. The use of phosphate-buffered saline solution in generating only a boundary lubrication regime highlighted the effectiveness of the agents in reducing friction. Hyaluronic acid (5 mg/ml) was marginally deemed the most effective anti-adhesive agent at lubricating the tendon. Subsequently, it is concluded that the application of anti-adhesive agents post-surgery has secondary, tribological benefits that serve to reduce friction, and thus potentially the risk of failure, at the tendon repair site. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  3. Enhanced cell adhesion on bioinert ceramics mediated by the osteogenic cell membrane enzyme alkaline phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminian, Alieh; Shirzadi, Bahareh; Azizi, Zahra; Maedler, Kathrin; Volkmann, Eike; Hildebrand, Nils; Maas, Michael; Treccani, Laura; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2016-12-01

    Functional bone and dental implant materials are required to guide cell response, offering cues that provide specific instructions to cells at the implant/tissue interface while maintaining full biocompatibility as well as the desired structural requirements and functions. In this work we investigate the influence of covalently immobilized alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an enzyme involved in bone mineralization, on the first contact and initial cell adhesion. To this end, ALP is covalently immobilized by carbodiimide-mediated chemoligation on two highly bioinert ceramics, alpha-alumina (Al2O3) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) that are well-established for load-bearing applications. The physicochemical surface properties are evaluated by profilometry, zeta potential and water contact angle measurements. The initial cell adhesion of human osteoblasts (HOBs), human osteoblast-like cells (MG-63) and mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) was investigated. Cell adhesion was assessed at serum free condition via quantification of percentage of adherent cells, adhesion area and staining of the focal adhesion protein vinculin. Our findings show that after ALP immobilization, the Al2O3 and Y-TZP surfaces gained a negative charge and their hydrophilicity was increased. In the presence of surface-immobilized ALP, a higher cell adhesion, more pronounced cell spreading and a higher number of focal contact points were found. Thereby, this work gives evidence that surface functionalization with ALP can be utilized to modify inert materials for biological conversion and faster bone regeneration on inert and potentially load-bearing implant materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis gives the penal treatment in Cuba to the tied infractions to the use and conservation gives radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Gonzalez, F.; Perez Velazquez, R.S.; Fornet, R.O.; Reyes Fajardo, E.

    1998-01-01

    The work refers the realized analysis to the Law 62 the Cuban penal code that with establishing to the treatment of the infractions referred standard's to the uses and conservation the radioactive substances and other ionizing radiations sources

  5. Epoxy-resin adhesive and method for bonding using such an epoxy resin adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhowmik, S.; Poulis, J.A.; Benedictus, R.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to an epoxy resin adhesive comprising a dotation of nano-substances, wherein the nano- substances are selected from the group comprising carbon-fibre nanotubes, carbon nano-fibres, silicate nano powders, and wherein the nano-substances are dispersed in the adhesive with a

  6. New impact specimen for adhesives: optimization of high-speed-loaded adhesive joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, A.A.; Guyt, C.B.; Vlot, A.

    1998-01-01

    A new kind of joint specimen has been developed to load the adhesive in pure shear on impact. The specimen is tested with three adhesives at five layer thicknesses, and at three test speeds. From these tests it can be concluded that the rod-ring specimen is suitable for use in impact tests at high

  7. Focal adhesion kinase maintains, but not increases the adhesion of dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yuyan; Shao, Meiying; Zou, Wenlin; Wang, Linyan; Cheng, Ran; Hu, Tao

    2017-04-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) functions as a key enzyme in the integrin-mediated adhesion-signalling pathway. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of FAK on adhesion of human dental pulp (HDP) cells. We transfected lentiviral vectors to silence or overexpress FAK in HDP cells ex vivo. Early cell adhesion, cell survival and focal contacts (FCs)-related proteins (FAK and paxillin) were examined. By using immunofluorescence, the formation of FCs and cytoskeleton was detected, respectively. We found that both adhesion and survival of HDP cells were suppressed by FAK inhibition. However, FAK overexpression slightly inhibited cell adhesion and exhibited no change in cell survival compared with the control. A thick rim of cytoskeleton accumulated and smaller dot-shaped FCs appeared in FAK knockdown cells. Phosphorylation of paxillin (p-paxillin) was inhibited in FAK knockdown cells, verifying that the adhesion was inhibited. Less cytoskeleton and elongated FCs were observed in FAK-overexpressed cells. However, p-paxillin had no significant difference compared with the control. In conclusion, the data suggest that FAK maintains cell adhesion, survival and cytoskeleton formation, but excessive FAK has no positive effects on these aspects.

  8. Adhesion force imaging in air and liquid by adhesion mode atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Kees; Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1994-01-01

    A new imaging mode for the atomic force microscope(AFM), yielding images mapping the adhesion force between tip and sample, is introduced. The adhesion mode AFM takes a force curve at each pixel by ramping a piezoactuator, moving the silicon‐nitride tip up and down towards the sample. During the

  9. Scrutinising safety standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietersen, C.M. [Safety Service Center BV (Netherlands)

    2001-01-01

    Until the introduction of the International Electrotechnical Commission's standard IEC 61508, there was no provision for relating risks to people and the environment, to the risks of financial loss. Although IEC 61508 fills most of the gaps in the process industry, there are still some loopholes. Four points covered by the standard are listed. It is expected that the standard will lead to an optimum cost-benefit situation with 'fit-for-purpose' safety and minimum nuisance shutdowns, or process plant disturbances. It should give clear guidance on 'how safe is safe enough.' IEC 61508 can be implemented through various routes. Insurance companies and regulators are starting to require implementation of the new standard. Five points which need to be ascertained for implementation are listed and diagrams illustrate the IEC 61508 safety lifecycle and the risk-reduction requirements.

  10. ['Gold standard', not 'golden standard'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, J.A.H.R.

    2005-01-01

    In medical literature, both 'gold standard' and 'golden standard' are employed to describe a reference test used for comparison with a novel method. The term 'gold standard' in its current sense in medical research was coined by Rudd in 1979, in reference to the monetary gold standard. In the same

  11. The influence of relationship beliefs on gift giving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rai Dipankar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available People have fundamental beliefs about what constitutes a good relationship, known as implicit theories of relationship, where some people have destiny beliefs whereas others have growth beliefs. People with destiny beliefs believe that potential partners are meant either for each other or not, whereas people with growth beliefs believe that successful relationships are cultivated and developed. This research shows that different implicit theories of relationship influence consumers’ gift choice to their significant others. We demonstrate, through two studies, that consumers with destiny beliefs prefer giving gifts that are more feasible in nature, whereas consumers with growth beliefs prefer giving gifts that are more desirable in nature. We show that this effect is mediated by desirability-feasibility considerations. Specifically, consumers with destiny beliefs focus on feasibility considerations, which leads them to choose a highly feasible gift. Conversely, consumers with growth beliefs focus on desirability considerations, which leads them to choose a highly desirable gift. We also discuss the theoretical and managerial implications of our research.

  12. Reasons women give for abortion: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Maggie; Rowe, Heather; Hardiman, Annarella; Mallett, Shelley; Rosenthal, Doreen

    2009-12-01

    The aim was to identify from empirical research that used quantitative or qualitative methods the reasons women give for having an abortion. A search was conducted of peer-reviewed, English language publications indexed in eight computerized databases with publication date 1996-2008, using keywords 'abortion' and 'reason' (Medline: 'induced abortion' OR 'termination of pregnancy' OR 'elective abortion' and 'reason'). Inclusion criteria were empirical research on humans that identified women's reasons for undergoing an abortion, conducted in 'high-income' countries. 19 eligible papers were found. Despite variation in methods of generating, collecting, and analysing reasons, and the inadequacy of methodological detail in some papers, all contributed to a consistent picture of the reasons women give for having an abortion, with three main categories ('Woman-focused', 'Other-focused', and 'Material') identified. Ambivalence was often evident in women's awareness of reasons for continuing the pregnancy, but abortion was chosen because continuing with the pregnancy was assessed as having adverse effects on the life of the woman and significant others. Women's reasons were complex and contingent, taking into account their own needs, a sense of responsibility to existing children and the potential child, and the contribution of significant others, including the genetic father.

  13. Slip Interface Imaging Predicts Tumor-Brain Adhesion in Vestibular Schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ziying; Glaser, Kevin J; Manduca, Armando; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Link, Michael J; Hughes, Joshua D; Romano, Anthony; Ehman, Richard L; Huston, John

    2015-11-01

    To test the clinical feasibility and usefulness of slip interface imaging (SII) to identify and quantify the degree of tumor-brain adhesion in patients with vestibular schwannomas. S With institutional review board approval and after obtaining written informed consent, SII examinations were performed in nine patients with vestibular schwannomas. During the SII acquisition, a low-amplitude mechanical vibration is applied to the head with a pillow-like device placed in the head coil and the resulting shear waves are imaged by using a phase-contrast pulse sequence with motion-encoding gradients synchronized with the applied vibration. Imaging was performed with a 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) system in less than 7 minutes. The acquired shear motion data were processed with two different algorithms (shear line analysis and calculation of octahedral shear strain [OSS]) to identify the degree of tumor-brain adhesion. Blinded to the SII results, neurosurgeons qualitatively assessed tumor adhesion at the time of tumor resection. Standard T2-weighted, fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA), and T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging were reviewed to identify the presence of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) clefts around the tumors. The performance of the use of the CSF cleft and SII to predict the degree of tumor adhesion was evaluated by using the κ coefficient and McNemar test. Among the nine patients, SII agreed with the intraoperative assessment of the degree of tumor adhesion in eight patients (88.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 57%, 98%), with four of four, three of three, and one of two cases correctly predicted as no adhesion, partial adhesion, and complete adhesion, respectively. However, the T2-weighted, FIESTA, and T2-weighted FLAIR images that used the CSF cleft sign to predict adhesion agreed with surgical findings in only four cases (44.4% [four of nine]; 95% CI: 19%, 73%). The κ coefficients indicate good agreement (0

  14. International standards for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosi, P.

    2011-01-01

    International standards for radiation protection are issued by many bodies. These bodies differ to a large extent in their organisation, in the way the members are designated and in the way the international standards are authorised by the issuing body. Large differences also exist in the relevance of the international standards. One extreme is that the international standards are mandatory in the sense that no conflicting national standard may exist, the other extreme is that national and international standards conflict and there is no need to resolve that conflict. Between these extremes there are some standards or documents of relevance, which are not binding by any formal law or contract but are de facto binding due to the scientific reputation of the issuing body. This paper gives, for radiation protection, an overview of the main standards issuing bodies, the international standards or documents of relevance issued by them and the relevance of these documents. (authors)

  15. Investigation of the influence of process parameters on adhesive wear under hot stamping conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingenschlögl, P.; Weldi, M.; Merklein, M.

    2017-09-01

    Current challenges like increasing safety standards and reducing fuel consumption motivate lightweight construction in modern car bodies. Besides using lightweight workpiece materials like aluminum, hot stamping has been established as a key technology for producing safety relevant components. Producing hot stamped parts out of ultra-high strength steels offers the possibility to improve the crash performance. At the same time the weight of car structure is reduced by using thinner sheet thicknesses. In order to avoid oxide scale formation and ensure corrosion protection, AlSi coatings are commonly deposited on the sheet surfaces used for direct hot stamping. This workpiece coating has a critical impact on the tribological conditions within the forming process and, as a consequence, influences the quality of hot stamped parts as well as tool wear. AlSi coatings have been identified as major reason for adhesive wear, which represents the main wear mechanism in hot stamping. Within this study, the influence of the process parameters on adhesive wear are investigated in dependency of workpiece and tool temperatures, drawing velocities and contact pressures. The tribological behavior is analyzed based on strip drawing experiments under direct hot stamping conditions. The experiments are performed with AlSi coated 22MnB5 in contact with the hot working tool steel 1.2367. For analyzing the amount of adhesion on the friction jaws, the surfaces are characterized by optical measurements. The experiments indicate that higher workpiece temperatures cause severe adhesive wear on the tool surface, while an increase of drawing velocity or contact pressure led to reduced adhesion. The measured friction coefficients decreased with rising amount of adhesion and remained at a constant level after a certain adhesive layer was built up on the tool surface.

  16. Prediction of residual valvular lesions in rheumatic heart disease: role of adhesion molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Mona; Yahia, Sohier; Eldars, Waleed; Eldegla, Heba; Matter, Mohamed; Attia, Gehan; Hawas, Samia

    2013-03-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a chronic condition characterized by fibrosis and scarring of the cardiac valves and damage to the heart muscle, leading to congestive heart failure and death. This prospective cohort study was conducted to investigate the possible relation between the levels of serum adhesion molecules and acute rheumatic fever (ARF) carditis, valvular insult severity, and residual valvular lesion after improvement of rheumatic activity. Serum levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and E-selectin were assayed by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) for 50 children with ARF carditis during activity and after improvement and for 50 healthy children as control subjects. After the acute attack, patients were followed up regularly to detect residual valvular lesion. The serum levels of these adhesion molecules were significantly higher in the patients than in the control group (p valvular lesion (ICAM-1, >1,032.3 μg/ml; VCAM-1, >3,662.3 μg/ml; E-selectin, >104.8 μg/ml). Finally, by combining the three adhesion molecules in a single prediction model, the highest area under the curve (AUC) ± standard error (SE) was obtained (0.869 ± 0.052), and the positive likelihood ratio for having a residual valvular lesion was increased (17.33). Levels of serum adhesion molecules could predict residual valvular lesions in RHD patients. The authors recommend that the serum level of adhesion molecules be measured in all cases of ARF carditis.

  17. Comparison of performance coatings thermally sprayed subject to testing adhesive wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marangoni, G.F.; Arnt, A.B.C.; Rocha, M.R. da

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the microstructural changes and wear resistance adhesive coatings obtained from powders thermally sprayed by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) were evaluated. Based coatings chrome-nickel and tungsten-cobalt are applied in conditions subject to intense wear especially abrasive. With the aim of evaluate the performance of these coatings under conditions of adhesive wear, these coatings samples were tested by the standard ASTM G99. As test parameters were used: Tungsten carbide pin (SAE 52100) with 6 mm diameter, normal load of 50N and a tangential velocity of 0.5 m / s. The worn surfaces of the coatings were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results indicate that the performance front wear is related to the conditions of adhesion and uniformity of the coating applied. (author)

  18. The adhesion of epoxy cataphoretic coating on phosphatized hot-dip galvanized steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajat Jelena B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of hot-dip galvanized steel surface pretreatment on the adhesion of epoxy cataphoretic coating was investigated. Phosphate coatings were deposited on hot-dip galvanized steel and the influence of fluoride ions in the phosphating plating bath, as well as the deposition temperature of the plating bath, were investigated. The dry and wet adhesion of epoxy coating were measured by a standard pull-off method. The surface roughness of phosphatized galvanized steel was determined, as well as the wettability of the metal surface by emulsion of the epoxy resin in water. The adhesion of epoxy coatings on phosphatized hot-dip galvanized steel was investigated in 3wt.%NaCI.

  19. The use of thermally expandable microcapsules for increasing the toughness and heal structural adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiaki Sato

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effect of thermally expandable microcapsules (TEMs on mode I fracture toughness of structural adhesives were investigated. The single-edge-notch bending (SENB test was used. Firstly, a standard toughness test was performed on adhesives with microcapsules. Secondly, since TEMs start their expansion at approximately 60ºC, the next specimens were fatigue tested expecting a local heating in the notch leading to the desired expansion before being statically loaded for fracture toughness determination. Thirdly, a manual local heating at 90ºC was applied in the notch before the fracture static test. The experimental results were successfully cross-checked through a numerical analysis using the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT based on linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM. The major conclusion is that fracture toughness of the modified adhesives increased as the mass fraction of the TEMs increased.

  20. Dentin pretreatment and adhesive temperature as affecting factors on bond strength of a universal adhesive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Gabrielle da Silva Sutil

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: To evaluate the effects of dentin pretreatment and temperature on the bond strength of a universal adhesive system to dentin. Material and Methods: Ninety-six extracted non-carious human third molars were randomly divided into 12 groups (n=8 according to Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SbU applied in self-etch (SE and etch-and-rinse (ER mode, adhesive temperature (20°C or 37°C and sodium bicarbonate or aluminum oxide air abrasion. After composite build up, bonded sticks with cross-sectional area of 1 mm2 were obtained to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS. The specimens were tested at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min on a testing machine until failure. Fractured specimens were analyzed under stereomicroscope to determine the failure patterns in adhesive, cohesive (dentin or resin and mixed fractures. The microtensile bond strength data was analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=5%. Results: Interaction between treatment and temperature was statistically significant for SbU applied in self-etch technique. Both dentin treatments showed higher bond strength for ER mode, regardless of adhesive temperature. When compared to control group, sodium bicarbonate increased bond strength of SbU in SE technique. Adhesive temperature did not significantly affect the μTBS of tested groups. Predominantly, adhesive failure was observed for all groups. Conclusions: Dentin surface treatment with sodium bicarbonate air abrasion improves bond strength of SbU, irrespective of adhesive application mode, which makes this approach an alternative to increase adhesive performance of Scotchbond Universal Adhesive to dentin.

  1. Adhesive curing options for photonic packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Steven C.; Hubert, Manfred; Tam, Robin

    2002-06-01

    Varying the intensity of illumination used to cure photoactivated adhesives has been applied in medical and dental applications to improve the performance of polymer materials. For example, it has been observed that dental polymer composite materials express reduced shrinkage, important for durability of non-amalgam restorations, by introducing a phased time-intensity cure schedule. This work identified that curing conditions could influence the final properties of materials, and suggested the possibility of extending the characteristics that could be influenced beyond shrinkage to humidity resistance, Tg, outgassing and other important material properties. Obviously, these results have important ramifications for the photonic industry, with current efforts focused on improved manufacturing techniques. Improvement in low cost packaging solutions, including adhesives, will have to be made to bring the component cost down to address the needs of Metro and similar markets. However, there are perceived problems with the widespread use of adhesives, the most prevalent of these involving long term durability of the bond. Devices are typically aligned to sub-micron precision using active feedback and then must be locked in position to maintain performance. In contrast to traditional fastening methods, adhesive bonding is a highly attractive option due to the ease of deployment, lower equipment costs, and improved flexibility. Moreover, using methods analogous to those employed in dental applications, materials properties of photonic adhesives may be tailored using a programmed cure approach.

  2. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives.

  3. Human climbing with efficiently scaled gecko-inspired dry adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Elliot W; Eason, Eric V; Christensen, David L; Cutkosky, Mark R

    2015-01-06

    Since the discovery of the mechanism of adhesion in geckos, many synthetic dry adhesives have been developed with desirable gecko-like properties such as reusability, directionality, self-cleaning ability, rough surface adhesion and high adhesive stress. However, fully exploiting these adhesives in practical applications at different length scales requires efficient scaling (i.e. with little loss in adhesion as area grows). Just as natural gecko adhesives have been used as a benchmark for synthetic materials, so can gecko adhesion systems provide a baseline for scaling efficiency. In the tokay gecko (Gekko gecko), a scaling power law has been reported relating the maximum shear stress σmax to the area A: σmax ∝ A(-1/4). We present a mechanical concept which improves upon the gecko's non-uniform load-sharing and results in a nearly even load distribution over multiple patches of gecko-inspired adhesive. We created a synthetic adhesion system incorporating this concept which shows efficient scaling across four orders of magnitude of area, yielding an improved scaling power law: σmax ∝ A(-1/50). Furthermore, we found that the synthetic adhesion system does not fail catastrophically when a simulated failure is induced on a portion of the adhesive. In a practical demonstration, the synthetic adhesion system enabled a 70 kg human to climb vertical glass with 140 cm(2) of adhesive per hand. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Design and fabrication of gecko-inspired adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kejia; Tian, Yu; Erickson, Jeffrey S; Puthoff, Jonathan; Autumn, Kellar; Pesika, Noshir S

    2012-04-03

    Recently, there has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure-sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties; the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this study, we present an easy, scalable method, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques, to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provides anisotropic adhesion properties. We measured the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function. Consistent with the peel zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. The tribological properties of the synthetic arrays were highly anisotropic, reminiscent of the frictional adhesion behavior of gecko setal arrays. When a 60° tilt sample was actuated in the gripping direction, a static adhesion strength of ~1.4 N/cm(2) and a static friction strength of ~5.4 N/cm(2) were obtained. In contrast, when the dry adhesive was actuated in the releasing direction, we measured an initial repulsive normal force and negligible friction.

  5. Advice-giving in the English lingua franca classroom

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    including Italian, Spanish, and French, mixed with elements of Greek, Turkish, Arabic and. Persian to create the ... become global citizens must also speak the global language; therefore, English – whether the standard form or some ... Inner Circle university settings where English is taught by native-speaking instructors, an.

  6. Quality Assurance in Services that gives the SSDL of Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davila Dieguez, L.E.

    2000-01-01

    A brief account of the activities on quality assurance carried out by the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory, General Directorate of Energy is presented. The activities are reported under facilities and equipment, audit and procedures. Also describes the facilites and equipment of the SSDL of Guatemala

  7. To Give Good Science: Doing Qualitative Research in the Afterward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lather, Patti

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the "afterward" for qualitative research in the ruins of NCLB and its failure to deliver. In the space opened up "after" the dominance of the gold standard bullying and "metric mania" of neo-positivism, I articulate a post-retirement project on the weight of sports in U.S. secondary schools out…

  8. Postprandial lipaemia and endothelial adhesion molecules in pre- and postmenopausal Spanish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoppen, S; Pérez-Granados, A M; Navas-Carretero, S; Vaquero, M P

    2010-01-01

    Postprandial hyperlipaemia is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis. To compare postprandial lipaemia and fasting adhesion molecules levels in healthy young premenopausal(PrW) and postmenopausal (PoW) Spanish women. Twenty healthy PrW and 18 healthy PoW participated in a postprandial 7-hour intervention study. All participants were given a fat-rich standard meal (11.8% saturated, 39.7% monounsaturated, and 6.6% polyunsaturated) after a 12 h fast. Blood samples were taken at baseline and at 60, 120, 240, 360 and 420 min after eating. Triacylglycerols (TAG), total cholesterol (Chol), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) were determined in fasting serum samples and TAG and total Chol postprandial levels were measured. Anthropometric data, serum lipid and sICAM-1 presented significant higher values in PoW compared to PrW, but sVCAM-1 did not significantly differ between groups. Postprandial TAG and Chol concentrations in PoW were significantly higher than in PrW (p postprandial response to a fat rich meal and soluble intercellular adhesion molecules concentrations indicate a higher cardiovascular risk pattern in postmenopausal compared to premenopausal women. Soluble vascular adhesion molecule levels seem to be influenced not only by age and menopause, but also other factors like usual diet.

  9. Biocompatibility and adhesion formation of different endoloop ligatures in securing the base of the appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delibegović, Samir; Katica, Muhamed; Latić, Ferid; Jakić-Razumović, Jasminka; Koluh, Anhel; Njoum, Mahmoud T M

    2013-01-01

    The common technique used in securing the base of the appendix is Endoloop ligature (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ, USA). Vicryl (polyglactin 910) (Ethicon) and polydioxanone (PDS) (Ethicon) Endoloop ligatures can be used. There are potential benefits of the use of PDS Plus (Ethicon) Endoloop ligature. However, the use of different materials may vary in terms of inflammation, foreign-body reaction, rate of infection in the surgical area, or rate of adhesion formation. An ideal suture would induce minimal inflammatory response and adhesion formation. Ninety rats were randomized into 3 groups: group I, in which appendectomy was performed with Vicryl ligature; group II, in which appendectomy was performed with PDS ligature; and group III, in which appendectomy was performed with PDS Plus ligature. The animals were killed on the seventh, 28th, and 60th days after surgery. The secured stump was used for histopathologic and immunohistochemistry analysis, as well as evaluation of the formation of adhesions. Mild and moderate inflammation was more frequent in the PDS and PDS Plus groups than in the Vicryl group on the seventh postoperative day. There were no significant differences in the degree of inflammation on the 28th and 60th postoperative days. The lowest degree of postoperative adhesions was observed in the PDS group. Milder postoperative inflammatory changes and a lower degree of postoperative adhesions were seen in the PDS ligature group, suggesting that this could be the standard Endoloop used to secure the base of the appendix.

  10. Smear layer-deproteinizing improves bonding of one-step self-etch adhesives to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanatvarakorn, Ornnicha; Prasansuttiporn, Taweesak; Thittaweerat, Suppason; Foxton, Richard M; Ichinose, Shizuko; Tagami, Junji; Hosaka, Keiichi; Nakajima, Masatoshi

    2018-03-01

    Smear layer deproteinizing was proved to reduce the organic phase of smear layer covered on dentin surface. It was shown to eliminate hybridized smear layer and nanoleakage expression in resin-dentin bonding interface of two-step self-etch adhesive. This study aimed to investigate those effects on various one-step self-etch adhesives. Four different one-step self-etch adhesives were used in this study; SE One (SE), Scotchbond™ Universal (SU), BeautiBond Multi (BB), and Bond Force (BF). Flat human dentin surfaces with standardized smear layer were prepared. Smear layer deproteinizing was carried out by the application of 50ppm hypochlorous acid (HOCl) on dentin surface for 15s followed by Accel ® (p-toluenesulfinic acid salt) for 5s prior to adhesive application. No surface pretreatment was used as control. Microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and nanoleakage under TEM observation were investigated. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test and t-test at the significant level of 0.05. Smear layer deproteinizing significantly improved μTBS of SE, SU, and BB (pself-etch adhesives, resulting in the improving μTBS, eliminating hybridized smear layer and preventing reticular nanoleakage formation in resin-dentin bonding interface. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of thymoquinone coating on adhesive properties of polypropylene mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Oktay; Aydinuraz, Kuzey; Agalar, Fatih; Sahiner, I Tayfun; Agalar, Canan; Bayram, Cem; Denkbas, Emir Baki; Atasoy, Pinar

    2017-04-17

    An incisional hernia is a common complication following abdominal surgery. Polypropylene mesh is frequently used in the repair of such defects and has nearly become the standard surgical treatment modality. Though they are very effective in reducing recurrence, mesh materials exhibit a strong stimulating effect for intraabdominal adhesion. The thymoquinone (TQ) extracted from Nigella sativa seeds has potential medical properties. TQ has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antibacterial properties. The aim of this study is to coat polypropylene mesh with TQ in order to investigate the effect of surface modification on intraabdominal adhesions. TQ-coated polypropylene mesh material was tested for cytotoxicity, contact angle, surface spectroscopy, TQ content, sterility, and electron microscopic surface properties. An experimental incisional hernia model was created in study groups, each consisting of 12 female Wistar rats. The defect was closed with uncoated mesh in control group, with polylactic acid (PLA) coated mesh and PLA-TQ coated mesh in study groups. Adhesion scores and histopathologic properties were evaluated after sacrifice on postoperative 21th day. Granuloma formation, lymphocyte and polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration, histiocyte fibroblast and giant cell formation, capillary infiltration, collagen content were significantly reduced in the PLA-TQ coated mesh group (p < 0.05). Though not statistically significant, likely due to the limited number of study animals, adhesion formation was also reduced in the PLA-TQ coated mesh group (p: 0.067). TQ coated mesh is shown to reduce adhesion formation and TQ is a promising coating material for mesh surface modification.

  12. TransvaginaI Sonoperitoneography for Detecting Pelvic Adhesions in lnfertile Women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Sook; Lee, Eun Ju; Ji, Hoon; Suh, Jung Ho [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyuk Chan [Ajou University College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-15

    To assess the usefulness of transvaginal sonoperitoneography(TVSP) in detection of pelvic adhesion sin patients with infertility. Thirty-five patients underwent TVSP prior to laparoscopy to investigate infertility. A Foley catheter was placed into the uterus and sterile saline was infused into the pelvic cavity through the uterine cavity for sonographic visualization of the pelvic organs. The TVSP findings were compared with those of laparoscopic evaluation. With laparoscopic findings as the standard,sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value of TVSP were 88%, 60%, 80%. 85%, 67%, respectively. The distribution, severity, and extent of pelvic adhesions were easily identified by TVSP and well correlated with laparoscopy. Of 103 lesions in 22 patients confirmed by laparoscopy, the distribution of pelvic adhesions was peritubal(23%), periovarian(20%), and tubo-ovarian(18%). In severity, 84% of lesions showed thick bands. In extent,23% of patients showed pelvic adhesions confined to 2 or 3 lesions. TVSP is an useful and noninvasive method of detecting pelvic adhesions in patients with infertility

  13. Microleakage and marginal gap of adhesive cements for noble alloy full cast crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, T; Mohajerfar, M; Keshvad, A; Motahhary, P

    2011-01-01

    Very limited comparative information about the microleakage in noble alloy full cast crowns luted with different types of adhesive resin cements is available. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microleakage and marginal gap of two self-adhesive resin cements with that of other types of adhesive luting cements for noble alloy full cast crowns. Fifty noncarious human premolars and molars were prepared in a standardized manner for full cast crown restorations. Crowns were made from a noble alloy using a standardized technique and randomly cemented with five cementing agents as follows: 1) GC Fuji Plus resin-modified glass ionomer cement, 2) Panavia F 2.0 resin cement, 3) Multilink Sprint self-adhesive resin cement, 4), Rely X Unicem self-adhesive resin cement with pretreatment, and 5) Rely X Unicem with no pretreatment. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for two weeks and then subjected to thermocycling. They were then placed in a silver nitrate solution, vertically cut in a mesiodistal direction and evaluated for microleakage and marginal gap using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using a nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn multiple range test at a pcement and cement-crown interfaces. The greatest amount of microleakage was found for Panavia F 2.0 resin cement followed by GC Fuji Plus at both interfaces. No statistically significant difference in the marginal gap values was found between the cementing agents evaluated (p>0.05). The self-adhesive resin cements provided a much better marginal seal for the noble alloy full cast crowns compared with the resin-modified glass ionomer or dual-cured resin-based cements.

  14. Electrodes as social glue: measuring heart rate promotes giving in the trust game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lange, Paul A M; Finkenauer, Catrin; Popma, Arne; van Vugt, Mark

    2011-06-01

    While physiological measures are increasingly used to help us understand the workings of interpersonal trust (and related behaviors), we know very little about the effects of such measures on trust. We examined the effects of a classic measure, the measurement of heart rate using a standard protocol, on behavioral trust in dyads of women who did not know each other. Behavioral trust was assessed in the trust game, in which the trustor decides how much money from their subject payment to give to a trustee, while knowing that the experimenter triples that amount before giving it to the trustee, after which the trustee decides how much money to return to the trustor. As predicted, we found greater levels of behavioral trust in the trust game, as well as greater returns by the trustees (which were accounted for by trustor's giving), in the heart rate (HR) than in no heart rate (NHR) measurement condition. Parallel findings were observed for self-reported trust. Findings are discussed in terms of the idea that the elusive effects of a protocol for measuring heart rate can cause pronounced effects on subsequent social interactions via enhanced interpersonal trust. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Preference and strategy in proposer's prosocial giving in the ultimatum game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Misato; Inoue, Yumi; Akutsu, Satoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamagishi, Toshio

    2018-01-01

    The accumulation of findings that most responders in the ultimatum game reject unfair offers provides evidence that humans are driven by social preferences such as preferences for fairness and prosociality. On the other hand, if and how the proposer's behavior is affected by social preferences remains unelucidated. We addressed this question for the first time by manipulating the knowledge that the proposer had about the responder's belief concerning the intentionality of the proposer. In a new game called the "ultimatum game with ambiguous intentions of the proposer (UGAMB)," we made the intentionality of the proposer ambiguous to the recipient. We expected and found that the proposer would make more unfair offers in this new game than in the standard ultimatum game. This expectation can be derived from either the preference-based model or the strategy model of the proposer's giving decision. The additional finding that more unfair giving in the UGAMB was not mediated by the proposer's expectation that the recipient would be more willing to accept unfair offers provided support for the preference-based model. Using a psychological measure of cognitive control, the preference-based model received additional support through a conceptual replication of the previous finding that cognitive control of intuitive drive for prosociality in the dictator game, rather than mind reading in the ultimatum game, is responsible for the difference in giving between the two games.

  16. Who Is Giving Feedback To Whom In Entrepreneurship Education?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle Elmholdt, Stine; Warhuus, Jan; Blenker, Per

    evaluate and provide feedback on, with regard to both the teaching and the learning that takes place in these types of courses. We therefore ask: Who is giving feedback to whom in entrepreneurship education - and for what purpose?The intent of the paper is to develop and explore the system of feedback......The question we care about (objectives):When entrepreneurship is taught through the process of practicing entrepreneurship and based on experiential learning, a need arises for different forms of assessment, evaluation, and feedback procedures than those applied to traditional forms of higher...... is at play that involves both feedback among educators and students and between educators and students;3. that the complexity is further increased when it is acknowledged that the subject of the feedback may concern the learning, the teaching, the process, the object of the process (the entrepreneurial...

  17. Giving the influenza jab: a review of the law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Richard

    2004-10-01

    District nursing sister June Harris recently completed the administration of 30 'flu jabs to frail older residents of a local care home. June encountered a number of problems when administering the vaccinations. Relatives of five residents with advanced dementia did not want them to have the injection, mainly because they had heard that it would give the recipient the 'flu. An 85-year-old resident has complained that while she agreed to have a 'flu jab it now appears she also had a pneumococcal vaccination as well that no one told her about. More seriously, June has recently heard that one resident is in hospital having contracted Guillian-Barre Syndrome as a result of the vaccination. June remembers that this reluctant resident specifically asked if the 'flu jab would leave her paralysed and June had laughingly replied that she had not paralysed anyone to date. The residents and their families are now threatening legal action.

  18. The Effect of Giving Feedback to Students' Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mochamad Zainuddin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Although writing is as important as other skills such as listening, speaking, and reading, it needs more special attention. In order to write well, students need a long process to learn to write and they need continous feedback. The aim of this article is to know whether giving feedback to students' writing has a significant effect or not. Two groups of students, experimental and control, were involved. The compositions of the first group were given feedback, while those of the second group were not given feedback. The study shows that provision of feedback improves student's writing. In light of the result of the study, it is recommended that teachers provide feedback on students' writing.

  19. Paedomorphic facial expressions give dogs a selective advantage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget M Waller

    Full Text Available How wolves were first domesticated is unknown. One hypothesis suggests that wolves underwent a process of self-domestication by tolerating human presence and taking advantage of scavenging possibilities. The puppy-like physical and behavioural traits seen in dogs are thought to have evolved later, as a byproduct of selection against aggression. Using speed of selection from rehoming shelters as a proxy for artificial selection, we tested whether paedomorphic features give dogs a selective advantage in their current environment. Dogs who exhibited facial expressions that enhance their neonatal appearance were preferentially selected by humans. Thus, early domestication of wolves may have occurred not only as wolf populations became tamer, but also as they exploited human preferences for paedomorphic characteristics. These findings, therefore, add to our understanding of early dog domestication as a complex co-evolutionary process.

  20. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: genome editing gives new hope for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispi, Vassili; Matsakas, Antonios

    2018-01-31

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive wasting disease of skeletal and cardiac muscles, representing one of the most common recessive fatal inherited genetic diseases with 1:3500-1:5000 in yearly incidence. It is caused by mutations in the DMD gene that encodes the membrane-associated dystrophin protein. Over the years, many have been the approaches to management of DMD, but despite all efforts, no effective treatment has yet been discovered. Hope for the development of potential therapeutics has followed the recent advances in genome editing and gene therapy. This review gives an overview to DMD and summarises current lines of evidence with regard to treatment and disease management alongside the appropriate considerations. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Conditions needed to give meaning to rad-equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latarjet, R.

    1980-01-01

    To legislate on mutagenic chemical pollution the problem to be faced is similar to that tackled about 30 years ago regarding pollution by ionizing radiations. It would be useful to benefit from the work of these 30 years by establishing equivalences, if possible, between chemical mutagens and radiations. Inevitable mutagenic pollutions are considered here, especially those associated with fuel based energy production. As with radiations the legislation must derive from a compromise between the harmful and beneficial effects of the polluting system. When deciding on tolerance doses it is necessary to safeguard the biosphere without inflicting excessive restrictions on industry and on the economy. The present article discusses the conditions needed to give meaning to the notion of rad-equivalence. Some examples of already established equivalences are given, together with the first practical consequences which emerge [fr

  2. What are the impacts of giving up the driver license?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siren, Anu Kristiina; Haustein, Sonja

    -being, and modal choices and transportation patterns. Results: Non-renewers had poorer health already at baseline. However, they did become more dependent on others in their out-of-home activities after giving up their license. In travel frequency, neither the differences between renewers and non-renewers nor...... the changes over time within the groups were pronounced. Non-renewers reported more unmet mobility needs both in 2009 and 2012, especially in relation to leisure activities. The groups differed significantly in their use of transport modes. The renewers drove more often as the main transport mode, while non......-renewers traveled in the car as passengers, used public transport, walked or cycled. Discussion: The present study indicates that younger seniors’ mobility is probably not affected by the renewal policies. However, given the positive economic and safety consequences of independent mobility in old age, society...

  3. Uranium oxide recycling to give more sustainable power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagger, R.; Garner, D.S.J.; Beaumont, D.M.; Hesketh, K.

    2001-01-01

    In broad terms there are two routes for irradiated nuclear fuel, the closed cycle involving recycling and the open cycle culminating in direct disposal. The benefits of following the closed cycle are presented. The environmental burdens associated with open and closed cycles are compared using Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) for non-active burdens and human irradiation. Consideration is given to the extension of the nuclear fuel cycle to include a proportion of MOX fuel elements within a reactor core, and the impact in terms of total activity, waste volumes and Integrated Toxic Potential (ITP) discussed. The potential of moving to a fast reactor cycle is also raised in support of the recycling of spent nuclear fuel giving sustainable power generation. (author)

  4. IMPACT OF THE “GIVING CIGARETTES IS GIVING HARM” CAMPAIGN ON KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES OF CHINESE SMOKERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Ling; Thrasher, James F.; Jiang, Yuan; Li, Qiang; Fong, Geoffrey T.; Chang, Yvette; Walsemann, Katrina M.; Friedman, Daniela B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To date there is limited published evidence on the efficacy of tobacco control mass media campaigns in China. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a mass media campaign “Giving Cigarettes is Giving Harm” (GCGH) on Chinese smokers’ knowledge of smoking-related harms and attitudes toward cigarette gifts. Methods Population-based, representative data were analyzed from a longitudinal cohort of 3,709 adult smokers who participated in the International Tobacco Control China Survey conducted in six Chinese cities before and after the campaign. Logistic regression models were estimated to examine associations between campaign exposure and attitudes about cigarettes as gifts measured post-campaign. Poisson regression models were estimated to assess the effects of campaign exposure on post-campaign knowledge, adjusting for pre-campaign knowledge. Findings Fourteen percent (n=335) of participants recalled the campaign within the cities where the GCGH campaign was implemented. Participants in the intervention cities who recalled the campaign were more likely to disagree that cigarettes are good gifts (71% vs. 58%, pcampaign-targeted knowledge than those who did not recall the campaign (Mean=1.97 vs. 1.62, pcampaign-targeted knowledge were similar in both cities, perhaps due to a secular trend, low campaign recall, or contamination issues. Conclusions These findings suggest that the GCGH campaign increased knowledge of smoking harms, which could promote downstream cessation. Findings provide evidence to support future campaign development to effectively fight the tobacco epidemic in China. PMID:24813427

  5. The difference between "giving a rose" and "giving a kiss": Sustained neural activity to the light verb construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, Eva; Paczynski, Martin; Wiese, Heike; Jackendoff, Ray; Kuperberg, Gina

    2014-05-01

    We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the neurocognitive mechanisms associated with processing light verb constructions such as "give a kiss". These constructions consist of a semantically underspecified light verb ("give") and an event nominal that contributes most of the meaning and also activates an argument structure of its own ("kiss"). This creates a mismatch between the syntactic constituents and the semantic roles of a sentence. Native speakers read German verb-final sentences that contained light verb constructions (e.g., "Julius gave Anne a kiss"), non-light constructions (e.g., "Julius gave Anne a rose"), and semantically anomalous constructions (e.g., *"Julius gave Anne a conversation"). ERPs were measured at the critical verb, which appeared after all its arguments. Compared to non-light constructions, the light verb constructions evoked a widely distributed, frontally focused, sustained negative-going effect between 500 and 900 ms after verb onset. We interpret this effect as reflecting working memory costs associated with complex semantic processes that establish a shared argument structure in the light verb constructions.

  6. Accounting standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stellinga, B.; Mügge, D.

    2014-01-01

    The European and global regulation of accounting standards have witnessed remarkable changes over the past twenty years. In the early 1990s, EU accounting practices were fragmented along national lines and US accounting standards were the de facto global standards. Since 2005, all EU listed

  7. Water-cooled non-thermal gliding arc for adhesion improvement of glass-fibre-reinforced polyester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Sørensen, Bent F.; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom

    2013-01-01

    A non-equilibrium quenched plasma is prepared using a gliding-arc discharge generated between diverging electrodes and extended by a gas flow. It can be operated at atmospheric pressure and applied to plasma surface treatment to improve adhesion properties of material surfaces. In this work, glass......-fibre-reinforced polyester plates were treated using an atmospheric pressure gliding-arc discharge with air flow to improve adhesion with a vinylester adhesive. The electrodes were water-cooled so as to operate the gliding arc continually. The treatment improved wettability and increased the density of oxygen......-containing polar functional groups on the surfaces. Double cantilever beam specimens were prepared for fracture mechanic characterization of the laminate adhesive interface. It was found that gliding-arc treatment significantly increases the fracture resistance in comparison with a standard peel-ply treatment....

  8. A brief review of techniques used to seal corneal perforation using cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, M; Savant, V

    2013-08-01

    There are many modalities in use to treat corneal perforations. One of most commonly used modality these days is the use of tissue adhesive. Cyanoacrylate adhesive is the commonest type of tissue adhesive used. To describe various techniques used for corneal glueing with cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive and to suggest a new technique for the same. We describe here a brief review of different techniques of tissue glue application and suggest a modified new technique to apply tissue glue over the area of corneal perforation to achieve a nice smooth and stable seal. The importance of good glueing technique is to provide a stable and a closed wound so that it can help the epithelium grow and close the perforation. We present three different techniques of corneal glueing to seal corneal perforations. These different techniques of glueing can be used to seal corneal perforations. It is up to the reader to try all three techniques and then follow whichever gives the best and smooth results. Copyright © 2013 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Adhesive capsulitis of the hip: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, Colin G; Raynor, Brett; Lowe, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Adhesive capsulitis of the hip (ACH) is a rare clinical entity. Similar to adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, ACH is characterized by a painful decrease in active and passive range of motion as synovial inflammation in the acute stages of the disease progresses to capsular fibrosis in the chronic stages. Once other diagnoses have been ruled out, management of ACH is tailored to reduce inflammation in the acute stages with NSAIDs, intra-articular steroid injections, and targeted physical therapy while biomechanical dysfunction in the spine, hip, sacroiliac joint, or lower limb joints is addressed. In chronic stages of the disease, intervention should focus on decreasing the progression of fibrotic changes and regaining range of motion through aggressive physical therapy. Interventions described for chronic ACH include manipulation under anesthesia; pressure dilatation; and open or arthroscopic synovectomy, lysis of adhesions, and capsular release. Surgical intervention should be considered only after failure of a minimum 3-month course of nonsurgical treatment.

  10. Surface tension and deformation in soft adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Katharine

    Modern contact mechanics was originally developed to account for the competition between adhesion and elasticity for relatively stiff deformable materials like rubber, but much softer sticky materials are ubiquitous in biology, engineering, and everyday consumer products. In such soft materials, the solid surface tension can also play an important role in resisting shape change, and significantly modify the physics of contact with soft matter. We report indentation and pull-off experiments that bring small, rigid spheres into adhesive contact with compliant silicone gel substrates, varying both the surface functionalization of the spheres and the bulk elastic properties of the gels. We map the resulting deformation profiles using optical microscopy and image analysis. We examine the substrate geometry in light of capillary and elastic theories in order to explore the interplay of surface tension and bulk elasticity in governing soft adhesion.

  11. Coatings for rubber bonding and paint adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, M. S.; Petschel, M.

    1997-08-01

    Conversion coatings form an important base for the adhesion of paint to metal substrates and for the bonding of rubber to metal parts. Four types of conversion coatings were assessed as base treatments for the bonding of rubber to steel and for the corrosion protection of metal substrates under paint: amorphous iron phosphate, heavy zinc phosphate, and three types of modified zinc phosphates that utilized one or more metal cations in addition to zinc. When applied, these conversion coatings formed a thin film over the metal substrate that was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and chemical methods. The performance of the coatings was assessed using physical methods such as dry adhesion, conical mandrel, impact, and stress adhesion for the rubber-bonded parts, and by corrosion resistance methods such as humidity, salt spray, and cyclic corrosion. Coating characterization and performance were correlated.

  12. Bonding Durability of Four Adhesive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed Tabai, Elaheh; Mohammadi Basir, Mahshid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the durability of four adhesive systems by assessing their microtensile bond strength (MTBS) and microleakage during six months of water storage. Materials and Methods: A total of 128 human third molars were used. The adhesives tested were Scotch Bond Multipurpose (SBMP), Single Bond (SB), Clearfil-SE bond (CSEB), and All-Bond SE (ABSE). After sample preparation for MTBS testing, the microspecimens were subjected to microtensile tester after one day and six months of water storage. For microleakage evaluation, facial and lingual class V cavities were prepared and restored with composite. After thermocycling, microleakage was evaluated. Bond strength values were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tamhane’s test, and the microleakage data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn, Mann Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (Pself-etch adhesives at the gingival margin or MTBS of CSEB and SB. PMID:27123015

  13. Fracture of composite-adhesive-composite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripling, E. J.; Santner, J. S.; Crosley, P. B.

    1984-01-01

    This program was undertaken to initiate the development of a test method for testing adhesive joints in metal-adhesive-composite systems. The uniform double cantilever beam (UDCB) and the width tapered beam (WTB) specimen geometries were evaluated for measuring Mode I fracture toughness in these systems. The WTB specimen is the preferred geometry in spite of the fact that it is more costly to machine than the UDCB specimen. The use of loading tabs attached to thin sheets of composites proved to be experimentally unsatisfactory. Consequently, a new system was developed to load thin sheets of adherends. This system allows for the direct measurement of displacement along the load line. In well made joints separation occurred between the plies rather than in the adhesive.

  14. Leukocyte Adhesion Molecules in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kousuke Noda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a systemic disease that causes a number of metabolic and physiologic abnormalities. One of the major microvascular complications of diabetes is diabetic retinopathy (DR, a leading cause of blindness in people over age 50. The mechanisms underlying the development of DR are not fully understood; however, extensive studies have recently implicated chronic, low-grade inflammation in the pathophysiology of DR. During inflammation leukocytes undergo sequential adhesive interactions with endothelial cells to migrate into the inflamed tissues, a process known as the “leukocyte recruitment cascade” which is orchestrated by precise adhesion molecule expression on the cell surface of leukocytes and the endothelium. This paper summarizes the recent clinical and preclinical works on the roles of leukocyte adhesion molecules in DR.

  15. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Adhesion Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Molchanova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture presents the materials of foreign studies on the mechanisms responsible for the formation of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS. The hypotheses accounting for the occurrence of SIRS in emergencies are described. Adhesion molecules (AM and endothelial dysfunction are apparent to be involved in the inflammatory process, no matter what the causes of SIRS are. The current classification of AM and adhesion cascades with altered blood flow is presented. There are two lines in the studies of AM. One line is to measure the concentration of AM in the plasma of patients with emergencies of various etiology. The other is to study the impact of antiadhesion therapy on the alleviation of the severity of terminal state and its outcome. The studies provide evidence for that an adhesive process is a peculiar prelude to a systemic inflammatory response.

  16. Melting Can Hinder Impact-Induced Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani-Gangaraj, Mostafa; Veysset, David; Nelson, Keith A.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2017-10-01

    Melting has long been used to join metallic materials, from welding to selective laser melting in additive manufacturing. In the same school of thought, localized melting has been generally perceived as an advantage, if not the main mechanism, for the adhesion of metallic microparticles to substrates during a supersonic impact. Here, we conduct the first in situ supersonic impact observations of individual metallic microparticles aimed at the explicit study of melting effects. Counterintuitively, we find that under at least some conditions melting is disadvantageous and hinders impact-induced adhesion. In the parameter space explored, i.e., ˜10 μ m particle size and ˜1 km /s particle velocity, we argue that the solidification time is much longer than the residence time of the particle on the substrate, so that resolidification cannot be a significant factor in adhesion.

  17. Adhesion, Deformation, Rolling, and Detachment of a Liquid Capsule on An Adhesive Surface In Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappu, Vijay; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2008-11-01

    3D computational modeling and simulation are presented on adhesion, deformation, rolling and detachment of a liquid capsule on adhesive surfaces in shear flow with an objective to understand the adhesive rolling motion of biological cells, such as leukocyte and cancel cells, and the coupling between cell deformation and biophysics of the adhesive bonds. The computational model is based on an immersed boundary method for deformable capsules, and a finite difference-Fourier transform technique for solving the complete Navier-Stokes equations. The flow solver is coupled with a Monte Carlo simulation representing random process for bond formation and breakage between the capsule and the adhesive surface. Becuase of the stochastic process of bond formation and breakage, the roling motion is comprised of intermittent ``stops-and-runs'' which is well-known for biological cells such as leukocytes, which is reproduced in our simulations. The major objective of this talk is to present phase diagrams for cell adhesion which are obtained in terms of the critical bond strength as a function of cell deformability and biophysical parameters of the adhesion bonds. Through these phase diagrams, we elucidate the role of the hydrodynamic lift force, that exists on an wall- bounded deformable particle in shear flow, in the process of cell capture. Funded by NSF (BES-0603035 and CTS-0625936).

  18. Adhesive properties and adhesive joints strength of graphite/epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudawska, Anna; Stančeková, Dana; Cubonova, Nadezda; Vitenko, Tetiana; Müller, Miroslav; Valášek, Petr

    2017-05-01

    The article presents the results of experimental research of the adhesive joints strength of graphite/epoxy composites and the results of the surface free energy of the composite surfaces. Two types of graphite/epoxy composites with different thickness were tested which are used to aircraft structure. The single-lap adhesive joints of epoxy composites were considered. Adhesive properties were described by surface free energy. Owens-Wendt method was used to determine surface free energy. The epoxy two-component adhesive was used to preparing the adhesive joints. Zwick/Roell 100 strength device were used to determination the shear strength of adhesive joints of epoxy composites. The strength test results showed that the highest value was obtained for adhesive joints of graphite-epoxy composite of smaller material thickness (0.48 mm). Statistical analysis of the results obtained, the study showed statistically significant differences between the values of the strength of the confidence level of 0.95. The statistical analysis of the results also showed that there are no statistical significant differences in average values of surface free energy (0.95 confidence level). It was noted that in each of the results the dispersion component of surface free energy was much greater than polar component of surface free energy.

  19. Syndecans: synergistic activators of cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    Cell-surface proteoglycans participate in cell adhesion, growth-factor signalling, lipase activity and anticoagulation. Until recently, only the roles of the glycosaminoglycan chains were investigated. Now, with molecular characterization of several core proteins, the roles of each individual...... proteoglycan species in cellular signalling pathways are being determined. This review describes some of the recent advances in our understanding of the major transmembrane group of heparan sulfate proteoglycans, the syndecans, including evidence that they play an important role as accessory signalling...... molecules modulating integrin-based adhesion....

  20. Adhesive capsulitis: review of imaging and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Guy; Bou-Haidar, Pascal; Harris, Craig

    2013-12-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is one of the most common conditions affecting the shoulder; however, early clinical diagnosis can be challenging. Treatment is most effective when commenced prior to the onset of capsular thickening and contracture; consequently, the role of imaging is increasing. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the typical imaging appearances of adhesive capsulitis and to examine some of the evidence regarding each of these imaging modalities. An evaluation of the various management options available to the clinician is also presented. © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  1. Surgical Adhesives in Facial Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriumi, Dean M; Chung, Victor K; Cappelle, Quintin M

    2016-06-01

    In facial plastic surgery, attaining hemostasis may require adjuncts to traditional surgical techniques. Fibrin tissue adhesives have broad applications in surgery and are particularly useful when addressing the soft tissue encountered in facial plastic surgery. Beyond hemostasis, tissue adhesion and enhanced wound healing are reported benefits associated with a decrease in operating time, necessity for drains and pressure dressings, and incidence of wound healing complications. These products are clinically accessible to most physicians who perform facial plastic surgery, including skin grafts, flaps, rhytidectomy, and endoscopic forehead lift. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment of adhesive capsulitis: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Orsi, Giovanni Maria; Via, Alessio Giai; Frizziero, Antonio; Oliva, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Summary Adhesive capsulitis is a condition “difficult to define, difficult to treat and difficult to explain from the point of view of pathology”. This Codman’s assertion is still actual because of a variable nomenclature, an inconsistent reporting of disease staging and many types of treatment. There is no consensus on how the best way best to manage patients with this condition, so we want to provide an evidence-based overview regarding the effectiveness of conservative and surgical interventions to treat adhesive capsulitis. PMID:23738277

  3. Coatings against corrosion and microbial adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telegdi, J.; Szabo, T.; Al-Taher, F.; Pfeifer, E.; Kuzmann, E.; Vertes, A. [Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1025 Budapest, Pusztaszeri ut 59/67 (Hungary)

    2010-12-15

    A systematic study on anti-corrosion and anti-fouling effect of hydrophobic Langmuir-Blodgett and self-assembled molecular layers deposited on metal surfaces, as well as anti-microbial adhesion properties of coatings with biocide is presented. Both types of efficiencies produced by LB films are enhanced by Fe{sup 3+} ions built in the molecular film. The quaternary ammonium type biocide embedded into the cross-linked gelatin decreased significantly the microbial adhesion, the biofilm formation. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Islam, Standards, and Technoscience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    Halal (literally, "permissible" or "lawful") production, trade, and standards have become essential to state-regulated Islam and to companies in contemporary Malaysia and Singapore, giving these two countries a special position in the rapidly expanding global market for halal products: in these n......Halal (literally, "permissible" or "lawful") production, trade, and standards have become essential to state-regulated Islam and to companies in contemporary Malaysia and Singapore, giving these two countries a special position in the rapidly expanding global market for halal products......, this book provides an exploration of the role of halal production, trade, and standards. Fischer explains how the global markets for halal comprise divergent zones in which Islam, markets, regulatory institutions, and technoscience interact and diverge. Focusing on the "bigger institutional picture......" that frames everyday halal consumption, Fischer provides a multisited ethnography of the overlapping technologies and techniques of production, trade, and standards that together warrant a product as "halal," and thereby help to format the market. Exploring global halal in networks, training, laboratories...

  5. Nature's Mechanisms for Tough, Self-healing Polymers and Polymer Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansma, Paul

    2007-03-01

    Spider silk^2 and the natural polymer adhesives in abalone shells^3 and bone^4,5 can give us insights into nature's mechanisms for tough, self-healing polymers and polymer adhesives. The natural polymer adhesives in biomaterials have been optimized by evolution. An optimized polymer adhesive has five characteristics. 1) It holds together the strong elements of the composite. 2) It yields just before the strong elements would otherwise break. 3) It dissipates large amounts of energy as it yields. 4) It self heals after it yields. 5) It takes just a few percent by weight. Both natural polymer adhesives and silk rely on sacrificial bonds and hidden length for toughness and self-healing.^6 A relatively large energy, of order 100eV, is required to stretch a polymer molecule after a weak bond, a sacrificial bond, breaks and liberates hidden length, which was previously hidden, typically in a loop or folded domain, from whatever was stretching the polymer. The bond is called sacrificial if it breaks at forces well below the forces that could otherwise break the polymer backbone, typically greater than 1nN. In many biological cases, the breaking of sacrificial bonds has been found to be reversible, thereby also providing a ``self-healing'' property to the material.^2-4 Individual polymer adhesive molecules based on sacrificial bonds and hidden length can supply forces of order 300pN over distances of 100s of nanometers. Model calculations show that a few percent by weight of adhesives based on these principles could be optimized adhesives for high performance composite materials including nanotube and graphene sheet composites. ^2N. Becker, E. Oroudjev, S. Mutz et al., Nature Materials 2 (4), 278 (2003). ^3B. L. Smith, T. E. Schaffer, M. Viani et al., Nature 399 (6738), 761 (1999). ^4J. B. Thompson, J. H. Kindt, B. Drake et al., Nature 414 (6865), 773 (2001). ^5G. E. Fantner, T. Hassenkam, J. H. Kindt et al., Nature Materials 4, 612 (2005). ^6G. E. Fantner, E. Oroudjev, G

  6. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, CD54) is increased in adhesive capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yang-Soo; Kim, Jung-Man; Lee, Yun-Gyoung; Hong, Oak-Kee; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Ji, Jong-Hoon

    2013-02-20

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in shoulders with adhesive capsulitis ("frozen shoulder"). Glenohumeral capsular tissue was obtained from twenty-six patients (seventeen with adhesive capsulitis and nine controls), and ICAM-1 was evaluated with use of oligonucleotide arrays, real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and immunohistochemistry. ICAM-1 was also evaluated in synovial fluid with use of western blotting (six patients with adhesive capsulitis and two controls) and in peripheral blood with use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (thirty-two patients with adhesive capsulitis, twenty with diabetes mellitus, and fourteen controls). The effect of ICAM-1 treatment on gene expression of cytokines related to inflammation and fibrosis was evaluated in cultured normal human synovial cells. The level of ICAM-1 was significantly greater in capsular tissue from the glenohumeral joint of patients with adhesive capsulitis compared with controls as measured by oligonucleotide array analysis (0.12 ± 0.01 compared with 0.09 ± 0.00 arbitrary units) (p = 0.001), real-time RT-PCR (1.70 ± 0.19 compared with 0.67 ± 0.24 arbitrary units) (p adhesive capsulitis (1.70 ± 0.18 arbitrary units) compared with normal controls (0.48 ± 0.17) (p adhesive capsulitis (633.22 ± 59.14 ng/mL) and patients with diabetes mellitus (671.25 ± 27.08 ng/mL) compared with controls (359.86 ± 44.29 ng/mL) (p adhesive capsulitis, similar to the increase that has been reported in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  7. Altered interface adhesion molecules in oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Amador, V; Dekker, N P; Lozada-Nur, F; Mirowski, G W; MacPhail, L A; Regezi, J A

    1996-09-01

    To evaluate expression of key epithelial-connective tissue interface adhesion molecules (basal keratinocyte integrins and extracellular matrix receptors) in oral lichen planus (LP). Integrins alpha 3, alpha 6, beta 1, beta 4 and basement membrane proteins laminin 1, laminin 5, collagen IV, and collagen VII were immunohistochemically identified in frozen biopsy specimens (14 oral LP and II matched controls) using a standard avidin-biotin-peroxidase technique. An increased staining intensity of all antigens in LP was shown, as compared to controls. Integrin expression by LP keratinocytes was generally more intense and appeared on more upper level cells. Staining for basement membrane-associated extracellular matrix proteins was also generally more intense, although fragmentation and gaps were typically seen. Reactions for alpha 6, beta 4, laminin 5, and collagen VII stains were particularly intense along the basement membrane. In LP, strands of laminin 5, collagen IV, and collagen VII appeared in the submucosa approximating or duplicating the basement membrane. The apparent increased expression of the interface-associated adhesion molecules may be reflective of a keratinocyte compensatory response (due to lymphocyte-mediated damage) that would functionally help resist epithelial separation (ulceration). Expression of alpha 3 beta 1 and alpha 6 beta 4 would also assist in epithelial migration associated with wound repair. We interpret the submucosal extensions and deposits of basement membrane proteins as representing remnants of basement membrane, indicating recent remodeling or atrophy of epithelial rete ridges.

  8. Cell adhesion and proliferation on polyethylene grafted with Au nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasálková, N. Slepičková; Slepička, P.; Kolská, Z.; Sajdl, P.; Bačáková, L.; Rimpelová, S.; Švorčík, V.

    2012-02-01

    Plasma treatment and subsequent Au nano-particles grafting of polyethylene (PE) lead to changes in surface morphology, roughness and wettability, significantly increasing the attractiveness of the material for cells. The PE samples were exposed to argon plasma. Plasma modified PE was chemically grafted by immersion to biphenyldithiol and consequently into solution of Au nano-particles. Changes in chemical structure of the modified PE were studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and electrokinetic analysis ( ζ-potential). The surface wettability of the modified PE samples was examined by measurement of the contact angle by standard goniometry. The surface morphology of the plasma modified PE and that grafted with Au nano-particles was studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The modified PE samples were seeded with rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and their adhesion and proliferation were studied. Chemically bounded biphenyldithiol increases the number of the incorporated gold nano-particles and changes sample surface properties. The presence of the biphenyldithiol and the gold nano-particles on the PE surface influences dramatically adhesion and proliferation of VSMCs.

  9. Aluminum and steel adhesion with polyurethanes from castor oil adhesives submitted to gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Elaine C.; Assumpcao, Roberto L.; Nascimento, Eduardo M. do; Claro Neto, Salvador; Soboll, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    Polyurethanes adhesive from castor oil is used to join aluminum and steel pieces. The effect of gamma radiation on the resistance to tension tests is investigated. The aluminum and steel pieces after being glued with the adhesive were submitted to gamma irradiation in doses of 1 kGy, 25 kGy and 100 kGy. The rupture strength of the joints after irradiation have a slightly increase or remains practically unchanged indicating that the adhesive properties is not affected by the gamma radiation. (author)

  10. Nanosecond laser ablated copper superhydrophobic surface with tunable ultrahigh adhesion and its renewability with low temperature annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, An; Liu, Wenwen; Xue, Wei; Yang, Huan; Cao, Yu

    2018-03-01

    Recently, metallic superhydrophobic surfaces with ultrahigh adhesion have got plentiful attention on account of their significance in scientific researches and industrial applications like droplet transport, drug delivery and novel microfluidic devices. However, the long lead time and transience hindered its in-depth development and industrial application. In this work, nanosecond laser ablation was carried out to construct grid of micro-grooves on copper surface, whereafter, by applying fast ethanol assisted low-temperature annealing, we obtained surface with superhydrophobicity and ultrahigh adhesion within hours. And the ultrahigh adhesion force was found tunable by varying the groove spacing. Using ultrasonic cleaning as the simulation of natural wear and tear in service, the renewability of superhydrophobicity was also investigated, and the result shows that the contact angle can rehabilitate promptly by the processing of ethanol assisted low-temperature annealing, which gives a promising fast and cheap circuitous strategy to realize the long wish durable metallic superhydrophobic surfaces in practical applications.

  11. Standards and quality

    CERN Document Server

    El-Tawil, Anwar

    2015-01-01

    The book brings together a number of subjects of prime importance for any practicing engineer and, students of engineering. The book explains the concepts and functions of voluntary standards, mandatory technical regulations, conformity assessment (testing and measurement of products), certification, quality and quality management systems as well as other management systems such as environmental, social responsibility and food safety management systems.The book also gives a comprehensive description of the role of metrology systems that underpin conformity assessment. A description is given of typical national systems of standards, quality and metrology and how they relate directly or through regional structures to international systems. The book also covers the relation between standards and trade and explains the context and stipulations of the Technical Barriers to Trade Agreement of the World Trade Organization (WTO).

  12. Does friendship give us non-derivative partial reasons ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Reisner

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available One way to approach the question of whether there are non-derivative partial reasons of any kind is to give an account of what partial reasons are, and then to consider whether there are such reasons. If there are, then it is at least possible that there are partial reasons of friendship. It is this approach that will be taken here, and it produces several interesting results. The first is a point about the structure of partial reasons. It is at least a necessary condition of a reason’s being partial that it has an explicit relational component. This component, technically, is a relatum in the reason relation that itself is a relation between the person to whom the reason applies and the person whom the action for which there is a reason concerns. The second conclusion of the paper is that this relational component is also required for a number of types of putatively impartial reasons. In order to avoid trivialising the distinction between partial and impartial reasons, some further sufficient condition must be applied. Finally, there is some prospect for a way of distinguishing between impartial reasons that contain a relational component and partial reasons, but that this approach suggests that the question of whether ethics is partial or impartial will be settled at the level of normative ethical discourse, or at least not at the level of discourse about the nature of reasons for action.

  13. Sliding Adhesion Dynamics of Isolated Gecko Setal Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponberg, Simon; Autumn, Kellar

    2003-03-01

    The tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) can adhere to nearly any surface through van der Waals interactions of the specialized setae (b-keratin "hairs") of its toe pads. Our recent research has suggested that a gecko is substantially overbuilt for static adhesion requiring as little as 0.03of its theoretical adhesive capacity. We performed the first sliding adhesion experiments on this novel biological adhesive to determine its response to dynamic loading. We isolated arrays of setae and constructed a precision controlled Robo-toe to study sliding effects. Our results indicate that, unlike many typical adhesives, gecko setal arrays exhibit an increased frictional force upon sliding (mk > ms) which further increases with velocity, suggesting that perturbation rejection may be an evolutionary design principle underlying the evolution of the gecko adhesive. We compare these dynamic properties with those of other adhesives and explore the impacts of these results on the design of artificial adhesives.

  14. Bacterial adhesion to host tissues : mechanisms and consequences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Michael, 1947

    2002-01-01

    "This book is about the adhesion of bacteria to their human hosts. Although adhesion is essential for maintaining members of the normal microflora in/on their host, it is also the crucial first stage in any infectious disease...

  15. Role of flexural stiffness of leukocyte microvilli in adhesion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tai-Hsien; Qi, Dewei

    2018-03-01

    Previous work reported that microvillus deformation has an important influence on dynamics of cell adhesion. However, the existing studies were limited to the extensional deformation of microvilli and did not consider the effects of their bending deformation on cell adhesion. This Rapid Communication investigates the effects of flexural stiffness of microvilli on the rolling process related to adhesion of leukocytes by using a lattice-Boltzmann lattice-spring method (LLM) combined with adhesive dynamics (AD) simulations. The simulation results reveal that the flexural stiffness of microvilli and their bending deformation have a profound effect on rolling velocity and adhesive forces. As the flexural stiffness of the microvilli decreases, their bending angles increase, resulting in an increase in the number of receptor-ligand bonds and adhesive bonding force and a decrease in the rolling velocity of leukocytes. The effects of flexural stiffness on deformation and adhesion represent crucial factors involved in cell adhesion.

  16. Primerless RTV Silicone Sealants/Adhesives PP-1135

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martinelli, Dean; Brescia, Joseph; Kerwien, Stacey; Rorabaugh, Donald; Osterndorf, John; Sullivan, Francis; Mao, David; Forch, Brad; Beyer, Richard; Tira, James

    2003-01-01

    ...) funded project PP1135, Primeless RTV Silicone Sealants/Adhesives. The objective of the project, the development of primerless addition curable silicone sealants/adhesives, was met for all three phases of the program...

  17. Adhesive interactions between medically important yeasts and bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Millsap, KW; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Bos, R.R.M.

    Yeasts are being increasingly identified as important organisms in human infections. Adhesive interactions between yeasts and bacteria may contribute to yeast retention al body sites. Methods for studying adhesive interactions between bacterial strains are well known, and range from simple

  18. [Osteosynthesis of mandible by means of solcoseryl dental adhesive paste].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalyan, G; Zalyan, G

    2006-12-01

    The author presents the method of mandibular fractures treatment--osteosynthesis by means of solcoseryl dental adhesive paste. The use of solcoseryl dental adhesive paste accelerates the incarnation of wound and prevents the surgical complications.

  19. Adhesion of Antireflective Coatings in Multijunction Photovoltaics: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, Ryan; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.; Miller, David C.

    2016-06-16

    The development of a new composite dual cantilever beam (cDCB) thin-film adhesion testing method is reported, which allows the measurement of adhesion on the fragile thin substrates used in multijunction photovoltaics. We address the adhesion of several antireflective coating systems on multijunction cells. By varying interface chemistry and morphology, we demonstrate the ensuing effects on adhesion and help to develop an understanding of how high adhesion can be achieved, as adhesion values ranging from 0.5 J/m2 to 10 J/m2 were measured. Damp Heat (85 degrees C/85% RH) was used to invoke degradation of interfacial adhesion. We show that even with germanium substrates that fracture easily, quantitative measurements of adhesion can still be made at high test yield. The cDCB test is discussed as an important new methodology, which can be broadly applied to any system that makes use of thin, brittle, or otherwise fragile substrates.

  20. Bacterial adhesion of porphyromonas gingivalis on provisional fixed prosthetic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Zortuk

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion : The quantity of bacterial adhesion and surface roughness differed among the assessed provisional fixed prosthodontic materials. The light-polymerized provisional material Revotek LC had rougher surface and more bacterial adhesion compared with the others.

  1. A Novel Electrostatic/Microstructured Adhesive with Dust Mitigation Capabilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work will develop a novel electrostatic/gecko-like adhesive that will demonstrate an order-of-magnitude improvement of electrostatic adhesion pressure coupled...

  2. Development and In vitro Evaluation of Betahistine Adhesive-Type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop a transdermal betahistine (BTH) delivery system using different pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) including acrylics, polyisobutylene and styrenic rubber solution. Methods: Formulations were prepared by solvent casting and adhesive transfer method. PSAs - acrylate vinylacetate (AVA), hydrophilic ...

  3. Advanced microscopic methods for the detection of adhesion barriers in immunology in medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Shane

    2017-07-01

    Advanced methods of microscopy and advanced techniques of analysis stemming therefrom have developed greatly in the past few years.The use of single discrete methods has given way to the combination of methods which means an increase in data for processing to progress to the analysis and diagnosis of ailments and diseases which can be viewed by each and any method.This presentation shows the combination of such methods and gives example of the data which arises from each individual method and the combined methodology and suggests how such data can be streamlined to enable conclusions to be drawn about the particular biological and biochemical considerations that arise.In this particular project the subject of the methodology was human lactoferrin and the relation of the adhesion properties of hlf in the overcoming of barriers to adhesion mainly on the perimeter of the cellular unit and how this affects the process of immunity in any particular case.

  4. Adhesion of composite carbon/hydroxyapatite coatings on AISI 316L medical steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gawroński

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are contains the results of studies concerning the problems associated with increased of hydroxyapatite (HAp adhesion, manufactured by using Pulse Laser Deposition (PLD method, to the austenitic steel (AISI 316L through the coating of carbon interlayer on it. Carbon coating was deposited by Radio Frequency Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (RF PACVD method.Test results unequivocally showed that the intermediate carbon layer in a determined manner increase the adhesion of hydroxyapatite to the metallic substrate. Obtained results give rise to deal with issues of manufacturing composite bilayer – carbon film/HAp – on ready implants, casted from austenitic cast steel by lost-wax process method as well as in gypsum forms.

  5. Optimization and characterization of adhesion properties of DLC coatings on different substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waseem, B; Alam, S; Irfan, M; Shahid, M; Soomro, B D; Hashim, S; Iqbal, R

    2014-01-01

    The Diamond Like Carbon coatings (DLC) are gaining prime importance in the field of surface engineering especially cutting tools technology. The self lubricating property of these coatings makes them unique among other coatings like TiN, TiAlN, CrN etc. Unlike other coatings, DLC coatings give better surface finish and their self lubrication reduces the wear of a part to large extent. In present work, different substrates were selected to study the wear and adhesion behavior of DLC coatings. The coating was produced by physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) technique and the adhesive properties of DLC coatings were analyzed under ambient conditions using nano Scratch testing. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe the scratches and their mechanisms

  6. Optimization and characterization of adhesion properties of DLC coatings on different substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waseem, B.; Alam, S.; Irfan, M.; Shahid, M.; Soomro, B. D.; Hashim, S.; Iqbal, R.

    2013-01-01

    The Diamond Like Carbon coatings (DLC) are gaining prime importance in the field of surface engineering especially cutting tools technology. The self lubricating property of these coatings makes them unique among other coatings like TiN, TiAlN, CrN etc. Unlike other coatings, DLC coatings give better surface finish and their self lubrication reduces the wear of a part to large extent. In present work, different substrates were selected to study the wear and adhesion behavior of DLC coatings. The coating was produced by physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) technique and the adhesive properties of DLC coatings were analyzed under ambient conditions using nano Scratch testing. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe the scratches and their mechanisms. (author)

  7. Communications standards

    CERN Document Server

    Stokes, A V

    1986-01-01

    Communications Standards deals with the standardization of computer communication networks. This book examines the types of local area networks (LANs) that have been developed and looks at some of the relevant protocols in more detail. The work of Project 802 is briefly discussed, along with a protocol which has developed from one of the LAN standards and is now a de facto standard in one particular area, namely the Manufacturing Automation Protocol (MAP). Factors that affect the usage of networks, such as network management and security, are also considered. This book is divided into three se

  8. Introduction: History of the Adhesion GPCR Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamann, Jörg; Petrenko, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Development of the aGPCR scientific field based on PubMed-listed research articles and selected key findings Since the discovery of adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) 20 years ago, reverse genetics approaches have dominated the elucidation of their function and work mechanisms. Seminal

  9. Adhesion molecule expression in basal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaegh, M.; Beljaards, R.; Veraart, J.; Hoekzema, R.; Neumann, M.

    1998-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are frequently associated with a peritumoral mononuclear infiltrate. Until now, the function of this inflammatory infiltrate and its possible role in the control of tumor growth is unclear. Mechanisms controlling endothelial and target cell adhesiveness for leukocytes

  10. Antibodies against Shigella flexneri adhesion molecule outer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Milliana et al. Trop J Pharm Res, February 2017; 16(2): 256. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) include proteins that mediate the attachment of bacteria to the host cell more closely than do pili [6,7]. A 49.8. kDa Shigella dysenteriae hemagglutinin pili protein that serves as an adhesion protein was found previously [8]. Oral.

  11. Chitosan adhesive for laser tissue repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauto, A.; Stoodley, M.; Avolio, A.; Foster, L. J. R.

    2006-02-01

    Background. Laser tissue repair usually relies on haemoderivate solders, based on serum albumin. These solders have intrinsic limitations that impair their widespread use, such as limited repair strength, high solubility, brittleness and viral transmission. Furthermore, the solder activation temperature (65-70 °C) can induce significant damage to tissue. In this study, a new laser-activated biomaterial for tissue repair was developed and tested in vitro and in vivo to overcome some of the shortcomings of traditional solders. Materials and Methods. Flexible and insoluble strips of chitosan adhesive (surface area ~34 mm2, thickness ~20 μm) were developed and bonded on sheep intestine with a laser fluence and irradiance of 52 +/- 2 J/cm2 and ~15 W/cm2 respectively. The temperature between tissue and adhesive was measured using small thermocouples. The strength of repaired tissue was tested by a calibrated tensiometer. The adhesive was also bonded in vivo to the sciatic nerve of rats to assess the thermal damage induced by the laser (fluence = 65 +/- 11 J/cm2, irradiance = 15 W/cm2) four days post-operatively. Results. Chitosan adhesives successfully repaired intestine tissue, achieving a repair strength of 0.50 +/- 0.15 N (shear stress = 14.7 +/- 4.7 KPa, n=30) at a temperature of 60-65 °C. The laser caused demyelination of axons at the operated site; nevertheless, the myelinated axons retained their normal morphology proximally and distally.

  12. Calcitonin effects on shoulder adhesive capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhani, Alireza; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Bazavar, Mohammadreza; Barzgar, Mahmood; Tabrizi, Ali; Hashemi-Motlagh, Keyvan; Saheb-Ekhtiari, Khashayar

    2016-08-01

    Adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder) is a relatively prevalent disease of shoulder and affects soft tissue of glenohumeral joint. Signs include painful restricted motion and disability of the patient in daily activities. Calcitonin is a thyroid hormone, and its effectiveness has been demonstrated in painful conditions. The presents study aims to evaluate the effect of calcitonin in treating shoulder adhesive capsulitis. This double-blinded randomized clinical trial was conducted on 64 patients suffering from shoulder adhesive capsulitis. The intervention and control groups were given intranasal calcitonin and placebo for 6 weeks, respectively. For both groups, physiotherapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were administered correspondingly. The patients were evaluated pre- and post-treatment for shoulder pain and shoulder range of motion (ROM). Shoulder functional outcome (secondary outcome) was evaluated using Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, and Health Assessment Questionnaire disability criteria. The mean age of patients in calcitonin and control group was 52.4 ± 4.6 and 53.2 ± 4.9, respectively. Demographic characteristics and pre-treatment scores were similar in both groups (all P > 0.05). In post-treatment follow-up, shoulder pain, ROM, and the patients' functional scores were significantly improved in both groups (P adhesive capsulitis with regard to the efficiency in alleviating pain and improving functional outcome. II.

  13. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    flexible triple junction, amorphous silicon solar cells. At the Malaysia Energy Centre (MEC), we fabricated triple junction amorphous silicon solar cells (up to 12⋅7% efficiency (Wang et al 2002)) and laser-interconnected modules on steel, glass and polyimide substrates. A major issue encountered is the adhesion of thin film ...

  14. Epoxy adhesive plays crucial role at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Epoxy adhesives are set to play a vital role in Europe's biggest-ever scientific experiment at the European Centrefor Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, thereby helping scientists gain a better understanding of the origins of the universe." (1/2 page)

  15. Diagnosis and management of adhesive capsulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Manske, Robert C.; Prohaska, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is a musculoskeletal condition that has a disabling capability. This review discusses the diagnosis and both operative and nonoperative management of this shoulder condition that causes significant morbidity. Issues related to medications, rehabilitation, and post surgical considerations are discussed.

  16. Adhesive contact of randomly rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastewka, Lars; Robbins, Mark

    2012-02-01

    The contact area, stiffness and adhesion between rigid, randomly rough surfaces and elastic substrates is studied using molecular statics and continuum simulations. The surfaces are self-affine with Hurst exponent 0.3 to 0.8 and different short λs and long λL wavelength cutoffs. The rms surface slope and the range and strength of the adhesive potential are also varied. For parameters typical of most solids, the effect of adhesion decreases as the ratio λL/λs increases. In particular, the pull-off force decreases to zero and the area of contact Ac becomes linear in the applied load L. A simple scaling argument is developed that describes the increase in the ratio Ac/L with increasing adhesion and a corresponding increase in the contact stiffness [1]. The argument also predicts a crossover to finite contact area at zero load when surfaces are exceptionally smooth or the ratio of surface tension to bulk modulus is unusually large, as for elastomers. Results that test this prediction will be presented and related to the Maugis-Dugdale [2] theories for individual asperities and the more recent scaling theory of Persson [3]. [1] Akarapu, Sharp, Robbins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 204301 (2011) [2] Maugis, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 150, 243 (1992) [3] Persson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 75420 (2006)

  17. Epoxy adhesive plays crucial role at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "Epoxy adhesives are set to play a vital role in Europe's biggest-ever scientific experiment at the European Centre for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, thereby helping scientists gain a better understanding of the origins of the universe." (1 page)

  18. The contribution of adhesion signaling to lactogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Bethanie; Cutler, Mary Lou

    2010-10-01

    The mammary gland undergoes hormonally controlled cycles of pubertal maturation, pregnancy, lactation, and involution, and these processes rely on complex signaling mechanisms, many of which are controlled by cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. The adhesion of epithelial cells to the extracellular matrix initiates signaling mechanisms that have an impact on cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation throughout lactation. The control of integrin expression on the mammary epithelial cells, the composition of the extracellular matrix and the presence of secreted matricellular proteins all contribute to essential adhesion signaling during lactogenesis. In vitro and in vivo studies, including the results from genetically engineered mice, have shed light on the regulation of these processes at the cell and tissue level and have led to increased understanding of the essential signaling components that are regulated in temporal and cell specific manner during lactogenesis. Recent studies suggest that a secreted matricellular protein, CTGF/CCN2, may play a role in lactogenic differentiation through binding to β1 integrin complexes, enhancing the production of extracellular matrix components and contributions to cell adhesion signaling.

  19. Adhesive Bioactive Coatings Inspired by Sea Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, Sónia J; Vale, Ana C; Luz, Gisela M; Mano, João F; Alves, Natália M

    2016-01-19

    Inspired by nature, in particular by the marine mussels adhesive proteins (MAPs) and by the tough brick-and-mortar nacre-like structure, novel multilayered films are prepared in the present work. Organic-inorganic multilayered films, with an architecture similar to nacre based on bioactive glass nanoparticles (BG), chitosan, and hyaluronic acid modified with catechol groups, which are the main components responsible for the outstanding adhesion in MAPs, are developed for the first time. The biomimetic conjugate is prepared by carbodiimide chemistry and analyzed by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. The buildup of the multilayered films is monitored with a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, and their topography is characterized by atomic force microscopy. The mechanical properties reveal that the films containing catechol groups and BG present an enhanced adhesion. Moreover, the bioactivity of the films upon immersion in a simulated body fluid solution is evaluated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. It was found that the constructed films promote the formation of bonelike apatite in vitro. Such multifunctional mussel inspired LbL films, which combine enhanced adhesion and bioactivity, could be potentially used as coatings of a variety of implants for orthopedic applications.

  20. Corrosion, haemocompatibility and bacterial adhesion behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bacterial adhesion, haemocompatibility and corrosion behaviour of TiZrN coating were examined in order to evaluate the coating's compatibility for ideal implant. Results revealed that TiZrN coatings exhibited less bacterial attachment against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria, negligible platelets ...

  1. Photolithography of polytetrafluoroethylene for tailored adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rye, R.R.; Martinez, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Irradiation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with Mg (Kα) x-rays is shown to protect the surface against the chemical etching steps used to prepare PTFE for adhesion. Pre-irradiated etched samples of PTFE have adhesions strengths of less than 3% of that for non-irradiated etched samples. The major portion of this decrease in adhesion strength occurs for x-ray exposures of less than 10 min ∼4.8 x10 3 mrads) and failure in every case occurs in PTFE and not in the bonded transition region. XPS measurements (20 angstrom sampling depth) show little difference in F content between irradiated and non-irradiated samples, but thermal desorption shows increasing fluorocarbon desorption with irradiation time. These results are consistent with the known radiation chemistry of PTFE. Irradiation produced free radicals lead to branching and/ or cross-linking, and a surface rich in low molecular weight fluorocarbons. The more rigid cross-linked surface is resistant to deep (10,000 angstrom chemical attack and the bond formed is with a surface rich in short chain flurocarbons. Both a thin boundary region and bonding to short chain species is expected to lead to weak adhesive bonding. Electron irradiation is shown to lead to protection against chemical etching comparable to that obtained with X-rays. With electrons one has the patterns with resolution limited by the beam diameter

  2. Antibodies against Shigella flexneri adhesion molecule outer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OMP) as an adhesion factor and examine its ability to cross-react with the OMPs of other Shigella species. Methods: OMP was isolated from the bacterium S. flexneri after shaving the pili using a pili bacterial cutter in a solution of 0.5 ...

  3. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the shear adhesion strength of biomass ash deposits on superheater tubes. Artificial biomass ash deposits were prepared on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000°C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off with the help of an electrically...

  4. Wood adhesives containing proteins and carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years there has been resurgent interest in using biopolymers as sustainable and environmentally friendly ingredients in wood adhesive formulations. Among them, proteins and carbohydrates are the most commonly used. In this chapter, an overview is given of protein-based and carbohydrate-...

  5. ADHESION OF BIOCOMPATIBLE TiNb COATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Kolegar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of a coating with a high quality requires good adhesion of the film to the substrate. The paper deals with the adhesion of biocompatible TiNb coating with different base materials. Several materials such as titanium CP grade 2, titanium alloys Ti6Al4V and stainless steel AISI 316L were measured. Testing samples were made in the shape of small discs. Those samples were coated with a TiNb layer by using the PVD method (magnetron sputtering. Onto the measured layer of TiNb an assistant cylinder was stuck using a high strength epoxy adhesive E1100S. The sample with the assistant cylinder was fixed into a special fixture and the whole assembly underwent pull-off testing for adhesion. The main result of this experiment was determining the strength needed to peel the layer and morphology and size of the breakaway. As a result, we will be able to determine the best base material and conditions where the coating will be remain intact with the base material.

  6. High Temperature Graphene-PEEK Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-03

    position, policy, or decision, unless so designated by other documentation. The citation in this report of the names of commercial firms or...thermoplastics as reusable adhesives has been researched by DoE for application in automobiles [1]. However, that work is focused on thermoplastics

  7. Focal adhesions and assessment of cytotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kooten, TG; Klein, CL; Wagner, M; Kirkpatrick, CJ

    Focal adhesions are highly ordered assemblies of transmembrane receptors, extracellular matrix proteins, and a large number of cytoplasmic proteins, including structural proteins, as well as tyrosine kinases, phosphatases, and their substrates. They are now accepted as a prime component of signal

  8. Tackifier Mobility in Model Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Adriana; Li, Xiaoqing

    1997-03-01

    A systematic study of the molecular mobility of tackifier in a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) has been done for the first time. The objective is to relate changes in adhesive performance with tackifier loading to tackifier mobility. Study focused first on a model PSA consisting of anionically polymerized polyisoprene (PI) (Mw=300,000 Mw/Mn 1.05) and a single simple tackifier, n-butyl ester of abietic acid. This model system is fully miscible at room temperature, and its tack performance has been studied. Tackifier mobility was measured using Pulsed-Gradient Spin-Echo NMR as a function of tackifier concentration and temperature. The concentration dependence observed for this adhesive with modestly enhanced performance was weak, indicating the tackifier neither acts to plasticize or antiplasticize appreciably. Diffusion in a two-phase system of hydrogenated PI with the same tackifier is similar, though the tack of that adhesive varies much more markedly with composition. In contrast, tackifier mobility varies strongly with composition in a PSA composed of PI with a commercial tackifier chemically similar to the model tackifier, but having a higher molecular weight and glass transition temperature. * Supported in part by US DOD: ARO(DAAH04-93-G-0410)

  9. Plasma treatment of polymers for improved adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelber, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of plasma treatments of polymer sufaces for improved adhesion are reviewed: noble and reactive has treatment of fluoropolymers; noble and reactive treatment of polyolefins, and plasma-induced amination of polymer fibers. The plasma induced surface chemical and morphological changer are discussed, as are the mechanisms of adhersion to polymeric adhesives, particularly epoxy. Noble has plasma eching of fluoropolymers produces a partially defluorinated, textured surface. The mechanical interlocking of this textured surface is the primary cause of improved adhsion to epoxy. Reactive has plasma also induce defluorination, but oxygen containing gases cause continual ablation of the fluoropolymer surface. Noble and reactive gas (except for hydrogen) etching of polyolefins results in surface oxidation and imrprove adhesion via hydrogen bonding of these exygen containing groups across the interface. The introduction of amine groups to a polymer surface by ammonia or amine plasma treatment generally results in improved adhesion to epoxy. However, amine-epoxy ring interactions can be severely effected by steric factors due to chemical group surrounding the amine

  10. Radiation polymerized hot melt pressure sensitive adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, S.D.; Skoultchi, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    Hot melt pressure sensitive adhesive compositions formed by copolymerizing at least one 3-(chlorinated aryloxy)-2-hydroxypropyl ester of an alpha, beta unsaturated carboxylic acid with acrylate based copolymerizable monomers, are described. The resultant ethylenically saturated prepolymer is heated to a temperature sufficient to render it fluid and flowable. This composition is coated onto a substrate and exposed to ultraviolet radiation

  11. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geim, A. K.; Dubonos, S. V.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Zhukov, A. A.; Shapoval, S. Yu.

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force ~10-7 N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of ~10 N cm-2: sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  12. Influence of Blood Contamination During Multimode Adhesive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... However, differing acidic monomer type, ratio, pH, and some new monomers may change bond ... systems, contamination (from saliva, blood, astringents, water, or hand piece lubricant) during the ..... adhesives to enamel and dentin under normal and contaminated conditions. Dent Mater 1993;9:295‑9.

  13. Two Models of Adhesive Debonding of Sylgard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Ralph Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-14

    This report begins with a brief summary of the range of modeling methods used to simulate adhesive debonding. Then the mechanical simulation of the blister debonding test, and the thermomechanical simulation of the potted hemisphere problem are described. For both simulations, details of the chosen modeling techniques, and the reasons for choosing them (and rejecting alternate modeling approaches) will be discussed.

  14. Corrosion, haemocompatibility and bacterial adhesion behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TiZrN coating was deposited on 316L stainless steel (SS) by the reactive magnetron co-sputtering technique. Cubic phase of TiZrN with uniform surface morphology was observed by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Bacterial adhesion, haemocompatibility and corrosion behaviour of TiZrN coating were ...

  15. Synthesis of LTA zeolite for bacterial adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Belaabed

    2016-07-01

    X-ray diffraction, environmental scanning electron microscope and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the synthesized zeolite. To evaluate the bacterial adhesion to zeolite LTA the hydrophobicity and surface properties are examined using contact angle measurement.

  16. Curing of natural rubber and epoxy adhesive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matawie, A.M.; Sadek, E.M.

    2001-01-01

    Low molecular weight epoxy resin based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A was synthesized and mixed at constant percentages with natural rubber. The rubber epoxy system was cured with various types of curing agents such as ethylene diamine, maleic anhydride as well as the prepared resole phenol formaldehyde. A study of the photo-induced crosslinking of the prepared elastic adhesives and film samples was carried out by exposure to ultraviolet lamp (300 w) for 2 weeks at 20 deg. C. Samples containing ethylene diamine were cured at 25 + - 1 deg. C. for 24 h while samples containing maleic anhydride or resole phenol formaldehyde resins were thermally cured at 150-170 deg. C. for 10 min. Cured adhesive compositions were tested mechanically and physically and evaluated as wood adhesives. While hardness, chemical resistance as well as heat stability of the prepared cured film sample were investigated. The obtained data indicate that the highest epoxy resin content and the presence of resole phenol formaldehyde resin in composition improve the tensile strength and adhesion properties on wood. While their cured film sample have the best hardness properties, chemical resistance and heat stability. (author)

  17. Surface Modifications in Adhesion and Wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longley, Jonathan

    Advances in surface modification are changing the world. Changing surface properties of bulk materials with nanometer scale coatings enables inventions ranging from the familiar non-stick frying pan to advanced composite aircraft. Nanometer or monolayer coatings used to modify a surface affect the macro-scale properties of a system; for example, composite adhesive joints between the fuselage and internal frame of Boeing's 787 Dreamliner play a vital role in the structural stability of the aircraft. This dissertation focuses on a collection of surface modification techniques that are used in the areas of adhesion and wetting. Adhesive joints are rapidly replacing the familiar bolt and rivet assemblies used by the aerospace and automotive industries. This transition is fueled by the incorporation of composite materials into aircraft and high performance road vehicles. Adhesive joints have several advantages over the traditional rivet, including, significant weight reduction and efficient stress transfer between bonded materials. As fuel costs continue to rise, the weight reduction is accelerating this transition. Traditional surface pretreatments designed to improve the adhesion of polymeric materials to metallic surfaces are extremely toxic. Replacement adhesive technologies must be compatible with the environment without sacrificing adhesive performance. Silane-coupling agents have emerged as ideal surface modifications for improving composite joint strength. As these coatings are generally applied as very thin layers (compression of a water drop between two gradient surfaces. This inchworm type motion is studied in detail and offers an alternative method to surface vibration for moving drops in microfluidic devices. The final surface modification considered is the application of a thin layer of rubber to a rigid surface. While this technique has many practical uses, such as easy release coatings in marine environments, it is applied herein to enable spontaneous

  18. Evidence for van der Waals adhesion in gecko setae

    OpenAIRE

    Autumn, Kellar; Sitti, Metin; Liang, Yiching A.; Peattie, Anne M.; Hansen, Wendy R.; Sponberg, Simon; Kenny, Thomas W.; Fearing, Ronald; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Full, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Geckos have evolved one of the most versatile and effective adhesives known. The mechanism of dry adhesion in the millions of setae on the toes of geckos has been the focus of scientific study for over a century. We provide the first direct experimental evidence for dry adhesion of gecko setae by van der Waals forces, and reject the use of mechanisms relying on high surface polarity, including capillary adhesion. The toes of live Tokay geckos were highly hydrophobic, and adhered equally well ...

  19. Fracture mechanics characterisation of medium-size adhesive joint specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Jacobsen, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    Medium-size specimens (adhesive layer were tested in four point bending to determine their load carrying capacity. Specimens having different thickness were tested. Except for onespecimen, the cracking occurred as cracking...... along the adhesive layer; initially cracking occurred along the adhesive/laminate interface, but after some crack extension the cracking took place inside the laminate (for one specimen the later part of thecracking occurred unstably along the adhesive/ laminate interface). Crack bridging by fibres...

  20. Performance Evaluation and Durability Studies of Adhesive Bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Ranade, Shantanu Rajendra

    2014-01-01

    In this dissertation, four test approaches were developed to characterize the adhesion performance and durability of adhesive bonds for specific applications in areas spanning from structural adhesive joints to popular confectionaries such as chewing gum. In the first chapter, a double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen geometry is proposed for combinatorial fracture studies of structural adhesive bonds. This specimen geometry enabled the characterization of fracture energy vs. bondline thickness...