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Sample records for stamina walk test

  1. Stamina in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colerick, E J

    1985-01-01

    Patterns of aging raise a number of important questions concerning the paths to successful adaptation. What gives some older individuals their staying power in the face of misfortune? What causes others to function less effectively when stressed, to resist change? Clearly, the margin of safety, the degree of elasticity and resilience varies across individuals in the later years. This study focuses on event histories and current behavior of 62 elderly men and women (Phase I) and reports by their confidants (N = 62; Phase II). A central proposition, that stamina in later life depends, in part, on the appraisal of previous events involving loss is investigated using a model that incorporates aspects of earlier life, cognitive appraisal and clinically judged dimensions of stamina in old age. Multivariate (particularly path analytic) techniques are used to test the links between variable foci. Results suggest that antecedents of stamina involve the interaction of social resources and cognitive orientations. Specifically, stamina in later life is contingent, for the most part, on a triumphant, positive outlook during periods of adversity. Elderly so oriented are also those with robust health histories and marked educational accomplishments. Conversely, persons who view situations involving loss as threatening, overwhelming and potentially defeating experience no such outcome; low levels of stamina mark their later years. Interestingly, quality childhood ties matter for stamina in old age only by increasing the likelihood of perceptions of a supportive environment during hard times. The findings corroborate the general pattern of research documenting the importance of cognitive orientations in adaptive processes.

  2. [The stamina case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The Stamina method is proposed by the non-profit Stamina Foundation and envisages the conversion of mesenchymal stem cells, which normally generate bone, cartilage and adipose tissue, into neurons after brief exposure to ethanol and retinoic acid. The reactions of the scientific community and the implications of the case are briefly explored.

  3. Evaluation of Ratnaprash for its effect on strength, stamina and fatigue using swim endurance test and biochemical estimation in swiss albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arun; Kumar, Satyendra; Rajput, Rashmi; Srivastava, Ruchi; Rai, Rajiv K; Sastry, J L N

    2015-01-01

    Traditional medicines have been considered as important resources for postponing fatigue, accelerating elimination of fatigue related metabolites and improving physical ability. Rasāyanās or rejuvenative therapies are mentioned as one of the eight clinical specialties in Ayurveda for attaining longevity, healthy life and regulation of bodily balance. Eventhough more detailed studies are needed to confirm the claims of benefits in the light of evidence based research, Ratnaprash, a herbo-mineral rasāyana formulation, is proposed here to be an antifatigue supplement that is good in promoting strength and stamina. In the present study, anti fatigue, strength and stamina enhancing properties of Ratnaprash were examined based on swim endurance capacity and the change in biochemical parameters in Swiss Albino mice. Treatment groups were orally administered Ratnaprash at various test doses (500, 1000, 2000 mg/Kg per day), while the control group received distilled water at similar dose volumes. Effect of therapy was evaluated after 28 days of treatment. At the end of study period, the swimming times to exhaustion were longer in the treated groups than in the control group. Plasma lactate levels of treated groups were lower than those of the control group (P stamina and contributing anti-fatigue activity.

  4. Evaluation of Ratnaprash for its effect on strength, stamina and fatigue using swim endurance test and biochemical estimation in swiss albino mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arun; Kumar, Satyendra; Rajput, Rashmi; Srivastava, Ruchi; Rai, Rajiv K.; Sastry, J. L. N.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Traditional medicines have been considered as important resources for postponing fatigue, accelerating elimination of fatigue related metabolites and improving physical ability. Rasāyanās or rejuvenative therapies are mentioned as one of the eight clinical specialties in Ayurveda for attaining longevity, healthy life and regulation of bodily balance. Eventhough more detailed studies are needed to confirm the claims of benefits in the light of evidence based research, Ratnaprash, a herbo-mineral rasāyana formulation, is proposed here to be an antifatigue supplement that is good in promoting strength and stamina. Materials and Methods: In the present study, anti fatigue, strength and stamina enhancing properties of Ratnaprash were examined based on swim endurance capacity and the change in biochemical parameters in Swiss Albino mice. Treatment groups were orally administered Ratnaprash at various test doses (500, 1000, 2000 mg/Kg per day), while the control group received distilled water at similar dose volumes. Effect of therapy was evaluated after 28 days of treatment. Results: At the end of study period, the swimming times to exhaustion were longer in the treated groups than in the control group. Plasma lactate levels of treated groups were lower than those of the control group (P increased tissue ATP levels in preclinical models in comparison to vehicle control, exhibiting possible role in increasing strength and stamina and contributing anti-fatigue activity. PMID:26600664

  5. The Six Minute Walk Test Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, M.

    2017-12-01

    Background and Purpose: Heart failure is the leading cause of death and often alters or severely restricts human mobility, an essential life function. Motion capture is an emerging tool for analyzing human movement and extremity articulation, providing quantitative information on gait and range of motion. This study uses BioStamp mechanosensors to identify differences in motion for the duration of the Six Minute Walk Test and signature patterns of muscle contraction and posture in patients with advanced heart failure compared to healthy subjects. Identification and close follow up of these patterns may allow enhanced diagnosis and the possibility for early intervention before disease worsening. Additionally, movement parameters represent a new family of potential biomarkers to track heart failure onset, progression and therapy. Methods: Prior to the Six Minute Walk Test, BioStamps (MC10) were applied to the chest, upper and lower extremities of heart failure and healthy patients and data were streamed and recorded revealing the pattern of movement in three separate axes. Conjointly, before and after the Six Minute Walk Test, the following vitals were measured per subject: heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, dyspnea and leg fatigue (self-reported with Borg scale). During the test, patients were encouraged to walk as far as they can in 6 minutes on a 30m course, as we recorded the number of laps completed and oxygen saturation every minute. Results and Conclusions: The sensors captured and quantified whole body and regional motion parameters including: a. motion extent, position, acceleration and angle via incorporated accelerometers and gyroscopes; b. muscle contraction via incorporated electromyogram (EMG). Accelerometry and gyroscopic data for the last five steps of a healthy and heart failure patient are shown. While significant differences in motion for the duration of the test were not found, each category of patients had a distinct

  6. Seven Salutary Suggestions for Counselor Stamina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Cynthia J.

    2004-01-01

    Counselor stamina is deemed essential in the midst of a consistently challenging, complex, and changing mental health care environment. Rather than perpetuating conversations about "burnout" and "burnout prevention," this article provides a salutary or health-promoting perspective. Seven suggestions for counselor stamina are presented and…

  7. Cardiac and Metabolic Physiology of Early Larval Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Reflects Parental Swimming Stamina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Matthew; Burggren, Warren W

    2012-01-01

    Swimming stamina in adult fish is heritable, it is unknown if inherited traits that support enhanced swimming stamina in offspring appear only in juveniles and/or adults, or if these traits actually appear earlier in the morphologically quite different larvae. To answer this question, mature adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) were subjected to a swimming performance test that allowed separation into low swimming stamina or high swimming stamina groups. Adults were then bred within their own performance groups. Larval offspring from each of the two groups, designated high (L(HSD)) and low stamina-derived larvae (L(LSD)), were then reared at 27°C in aerated water (21% O(2)). Routine (f(H),r) and active (f(H),a) heart rate, and routine [Formula: see text] and active [Formula: see text] mass-specific oxygen consumption were recorded from 5 days post fertilization (dpf) through 21 dpf, and gross cost of transport and factorial aerobic metabolic scope were derived from [Formula: see text] measurements. Heart rate generally ranged between 150 and 225 bpm in both L(HSD) and L(LSD) populations. However, significant (P stamina in adult parents also appear in their larval offspring well before attainment of juvenile or adult features.

  8. The Dickey-Fuller test for exponential random walks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davies, P.L.; Krämer, W.

    2003-01-01

    A common test in econometrics is the Dickey–Fuller test, which is based on the test statistic . We investigate the behavior of the test statistic if the data yt are given by an exponential random walk exp(Zt) where Zt = Zt-1 + [sigma][epsilon]t and the [epsilon]t are independent and identically

  9. A comparison of at-home walking and 10-meter walking test parameters of individuals with post-stroke hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Katsuhito; Hori, Hideaki; Muramatsu, Ken

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the difference in gait parameters of at-home walking and the 10-meter walking test results of individuals with hemiparesis. [Subjects] A total of 14 hemiparetic stroke recovery patients participated in this study. Inclusion criteria were: living at home, the ability to walk independently, and demonstrated low extremity on recovery stages III-V on the Brunnstrom Approach. The average age of the subjects was 66 years. [Methods] We used video surveillance and the inked footprint technique to record usual walking speed and maximum speed patterns both in subjects' homes and during the 10-meter walking test. From these methods, walking speed, stride length, and step rate were calculated. [Results] While both usual and maximum walking speeds of the 10-meter walking test correlated with stride length and step rate, at-home walking speeds only significantly correlated with stride length. [Conclusion] Walking patterns of the 10-meter walking test are quantifiably distinct from those demonstrated in patients' homes, and this difference is mainly characterized by stride length. In order to enhance in-home walking ability, exercises that improve length of stride rather than step rate should be recommended.

  10. [Objective evaluation of arterial intermittent claudication by the walking tolerance test. Comparative study of physiological walking and walking on a conveyor belt (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, J Y; Franco, A; Morzol, B; Beani, J C

    1980-01-01

    Two methods are used to evaluate the walking distance: physiological walking along a standard path (0% - 6 mk/h) and walking on a tread mill (10% - 3 km/h). In both tests, four data are checked: -- initial trouble distance, -- cramp or walking-distance, -- localisation of pain, -- recovery time. These tests are dependable for the diagnosis of arterial claudication, reproducible and well tolerated. Their results have been compared: there is no correlation between the initial trouble distance and the cramp distance. However there is a correlation between the cramp distance by physiological walking and on treadmill. Recovery time, if long, is a criteria of gravity. Interests of both methods are discussed.

  11. Herbkines increases physical stamina in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyun-Na; Lee, Jai-Kyoo; Hong, Seung-Heon; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-01-01

    Herbkines has been used for the purpose of development of physical strength. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Herbkines on performance of the forced swimming test (FST) and on blood biochemical parameters related to fatigue: blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatine kinase (CK), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), glucose (Glc), and total protein (TP). Herbkines were orally administered to mice, 10 ml/kg, continuously once per day for 2 weeks using a feeding atraumatic needle. After 2 d, on FST, the immobility time was decreased in the Herbkines-fed group (178+/-8.2 s) in comparison with the control group (189+/-22 s); however, the statistical difference was very weak (p=0.596). After 2 weeks, the immobility time was significantly decreased in the Herbkines-fed group (196+/-4.5 s) in comparison with the control group (221+/-6.2 s). In addition, the content of BUN in the blood serum was significantly decreased. However, the levels of CK, LDH, Glc, and TP did not show a significant change. The results predict a potential benefit of Herbkines as an anti-fatigue treatment and for improving physical stamina.

  12. The six-minute walk test in paediatric populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janke de Groot

    2011-01-01

    The six-minute walk test (6MWT) is a self-paced, submaximal exercise test used to assess functional exercise capacity in patients with chronic diseases (Chang 2006, Solway et al 2001). It has been used widely in adults, and is being utilised increasingly in paediatric populations; it has been used

  13. [Six-minute walk test in children with neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Anleu, Israel Didier; Baños-Mejía, Benjamín Omar; Galicia-Amor, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Background: neuromuscular diseases affect the motor unit. When they evolve, respiratory complications are common; the six-minute walk test plays an important role in the assessment of functional capacity. Methods: prospective, transversal, descriptive and observational study. We studied seven children with a variety of neuromuscular diseases and spontaneous ambulation. We tested their lung function, and administered a six-minute walk test and a test of respiratory muscle strength to these children. Results: the age was 9.8 ± 2.4 years. All patients were males. Forced vital capacity decreased in three patients (42.8 %), forced expiratory volume during the first second (2.04 ± 1.4 L) and peak expiratory flow (4.33 ± 3.3 L/s) were normal. The maximum strength of respiratory muscles was less than 60 % of predicted values. The distance covered in the six-minute walk test was lower when compared with healthy controls (29.9 %). Conclusions: the six-minute walk test can be a useful tool in early stages of this disease, since it is easy to perform and well tolerated by the patients.

  14. Stamina and Clout Define This Rare Breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1991-01-01

    Takeover artists are a rare breed. Persons hired to put bankrupt school systems back on the road to academic solvency need stamina, clout, and plenty of experience. For all their state-given powers, takeover superintendents must identify key constituencies, build bridges, and promote belief in change from within. (MLH)

  15. Speed and stamina trade-off in lacertid lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhooydonck, B; Van Damme, R; Aerts, P

    2001-05-01

    Morphological and physiological considerations suggest that sprinting ability and endurance capacity put conflicting demands on the design of an animal's locomotor apparatus and therefore cannot be maximized simultaneously. To test this hypothesis, we correlated size-corrected maximal sprint speed and stamina of 12 species of lacertid lizards. Phylogenetically independent contrasts of sprint speed and stamina showed a significant negative relationship, giving support to the idea of an evolutionary trade-off between the two performance measures. To test the hypothesis that the trade-off is mediated by a conflict in morphological requirements, we correlated both performance traits with snout-vent length, size-corrected estimates of body mass and limb length, and relative hindlimb length (the residuals of the relationship between hind- and forelimb length). Fast-running species had hindlimbs that were long compared to their forelimbs. None of the other size or shape variables showed a significant relationship with speed or endurance. We conclude that the evolution of sprint capacity may be constrained by the need for endurance capacity and vice versa, but the design conflict underlying this trade-off has yet to be identified.

  16. Why the null matters: statistical tests, random walks and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, H D; Mitchell, C E

    2001-01-01

    A number of statistical tests have been developed to determine what type of dynamics underlie observed changes in morphology in evolutionary time series, based on the pattern of change within the time series. The theory of the 'scaled maximum', the 'log-rate-interval' (LRI) method, and the Hurst exponent all operate on the same principle of comparing the maximum change, or rate of change, in the observed dataset to the maximum change expected of a random walk. Less change in a dataset than expected of a random walk has been interpreted as indicating stabilizing selection, while more change implies directional selection. The 'runs test' in contrast, operates on the sequencing of steps, rather than on excursion. Applications of these tests to computer generated, simulated time series of known dynamical form and various levels of additive noise indicate that there is a fundamental asymmetry in the rate of type II errors of the tests based on excursion: they are all highly sensitive to noise in models of directional selection that result in a linear trend within a time series, but are largely noise immune in the case of a simple model of stabilizing selection. Additionally, the LRI method has a lower sensitivity than originally claimed, due to the large range of LRI rates produced by random walks. Examination of the published results of these tests show that they have seldom produced a conclusion that an observed evolutionary time series was due to directional selection, a result which needs closer examination in light of the asymmetric response of these tests.

  17. Reliability of the 6-min walk test after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Kehlet, Henrik; Bandholm, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The 6-min walk test is a simple clinical outcome measure, which has been used frequently to assess functional performance in many different patient groups, including patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The 6-min walk test measures the maximal distance a subject is able to walk i...

  18. Sacubitril/Valsartan: Effect on Walking Test and Physical Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgorbini, Luca; Rossetti, Antonella; Galati, Alfonso

    The 6-min walk test (6MWT) is a simple and inexpensive exercise test to evaluate physical functional capacity that is widely used in heart failure (HF) patients. With the 6MWT, a distance 50 m is considered clinically relevant. To our knowledge, information on improvement in physical functional capacity with sacubitril/valsartan, as assessed by the 6MWT, is still scant. In our daily practice, we apply this test to all patients whenever possible; therefore, we report here the findings observed in a small series of 5 patients with HF with reduced ejection fraction after a 1-month treatment with sacubitril/valsartan at full dose. The mean distance walked on the 6MWT at baseline was 129 m (±64 SD), and this value increased to 436 m (±156) after 1 month of therapy with sacubitril/valsartan 97/103 mg b.i.d. The mean difference from baseline was 305 m (±110). According to these preliminary findings, in clinical practice, a 1-month therapy of sacubitril/valsartan optimized at a 97/103-mg b.i.d. dose appears to be associated with a relevant improvement in the 6MWT. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Validity and reliability of the 10-m walk test and the 6-min walk test in spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scivoletto, G; Tamburella, F; Laurenza, L; Foti, C; Ditunno, J F; Molinari, M

    2011-06-01

    The 10-m walk test (10MWT) and the 6-min walk test (6MWT) have been recommended for assessment of walking in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. The study was designed on test-retest analysis of the 10MWT and 6MWT. The objective of this study was to assess validity/reliability of different methods of performing the tests. The study was set at an SCI unit of a rehabilitation hospital. A total of 37 patients; whose median age was 58.5 years (interquartile range 40-66, full range 19-77); median time since onset of SCI was 24 months (interquartile range 16.25-70.5, full range 6-109). Non-traumatic etiology in 20 out of 37 patients; level: 12C, 14T and 11L; American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grade: 35D/2C. Assessment with the 10MWT (with or without dynamic start) and the 6MWT (short or long track) by two blinded raters to evaluate inter/intra-rater reliabilities. The 10MWT was performed in a median of 19 s (25th-75th interquartile range 13-28) with the dynamic start and of 18.4 s (25th-75th interquartile range 12.6-29.9) with the static start (P=0.092). The correlation between the results of the two methods was between 0.98 and 0.99. The inter- and intra-rater reliabilities were between 0.95 and 0.99 for both the methods. The 6MWT showed significant differences according to the track length: patients walked a median of 226.7 m (25th-75th interquartile range 123.2-319) on the longer track and of 187.6 m (25th-75th interquartile range 69.7-240.6) on the short one (P<0.001). The correlation between the results of the two methods was between 0.91 and 0.93. The inter- and intra-rater reliabilities were between 0.98 and 0.99. The 10MWT shows high inter/intra-rater reliability and shows comparable results with both dynamic and static start. The different testing conditions of the 6MWT (track/turns) results in significant differences that need standardization for use in future trials.

  20. Stamina in adults: is attachment style a factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, R J; Hicks, R A; Roundtree, T; Inman, G M

    2000-10-01

    The study was designed to extend inquiry on adult attachment style to include the variable of personal stamina. The data were derived from an anonymous survey administered to 163 college students (82 women and 81 men) in introductory psychology classes. Attachment style was measured by the Close Relationship Questionnaire, based on a four-category scheme suggested by Bartholomew. Stamina was evaluated with a self-report scale developed by R. A. Hicks. The pattern of statistically significant differences (p stamina scores than did those who self-endorsed the fearful or preoccupied alternatives in that categorical measure. No other pairwise comparisons of stamina scores were statistically significant. The results provide preliminary support for the hypothesis that secure attachment is more facilitative of personal stamina than are insecure styles. Methodological limits on inferences and corresponding alternative interpretations, the potential effectiveness of defensive suppression of the attachment system in dismissing-avoidant adults, and directions for research are discussed.

  1. Walking to health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J N; Hardman, A E

    1997-05-01

    Walking is a rhythmic, dynamic, aerobic activity of large skeletal muscles that confers the multifarious benefits of this with minimal adverse effects. Walking, faster than customary, and regularly in sufficient quantity into the 'training zone' of over 70% of maximal heart rate, develops and sustains physical fitness: the cardiovascular capacity and endurance (stamina) for bodily work and movement in everyday life that also provides reserves for meeting exceptional demands. Muscles of the legs, limb girdle and lower trunk are strengthened and the flexibility of their cardinal joints preserved; posture and carriage may improve. Any amount of walking, and at any pace, expends energy. Hence the potential, long term, of walking for weight control. Dynamic aerobic exercise, as in walking, enhances a multitude of bodily processes that are inherent in skeletal muscle activity, including the metabolism of high density lipoproteins and insulin/glucose dynamics. Walking is also the most common weight-bearing activity, and there are indications at all ages of an increase in related bone strength. The pleasurable and therapeutic, psychological and social dimensions of walking, whilst evident, have been surprisingly little studied. Nor has an economic assessment of the benefits and costs of walking been attempted. Walking is beneficial through engendering improved fitness and/or greater physiological activity and energy turnover. Two main modes of such action are distinguished as: (i) acute, short term effects of the exercise; and (ii) chronic, cumulative adaptations depending on habitual activity over weeks and months. Walking is often included in studies of exercise in relation to disease but it has seldom been specifically tested. There is, nevertheless, growing evidence of gains in the prevention of heart attack and reduction of total death rates, in the treatment of hypertension, intermittent claudication and musculoskeletal disorders, and in rehabilitation after heart

  2. Walk test and school performance in mouth-breathing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, Ana Paula Dias Vilas; Marson, Fernando Augusto de Lima; Ribeiro, Maria Angela Gonçalves de Oliveira; Sakano, Eulália; Conti, Patricia Blau Margosian; Toro, Adyléia Dalbo Contrera; Ribeiro, José Dirceu

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, many studies on mouth breathing (MB) have been published; however, little is known about many aspects of this syndrome, including severity, impact on physical and academic performances. Compare the physical performance in a six minutes walk test (6MWT) and the academic performance of MB and nasal-breathing (NB) children and adolescents. This is a descriptive, cross-sectional, and prospective study with MB and NB children submitted to the 6MWT and scholar performance assessment. We included 156 children, 87 girls (60 NB and 27 MB) and 69 boys (44 NB and 25 MB). Variables were analyzed during the 6MWT: heart rate (HR), respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, distance walked in six minutes and modified Borg scale. All the variables studied were statistically different between groups NB and MB, with the exception of school performance and HR in 6MWT. MB affects physical performance and not the academic performance, we noticed a changed pattern in the 6MWT in the MB group. Since the MBs in our study were classified as non-severe, other studies comparing the academic performance variables and 6MWT are needed to better understand the process of physical and academic performances in MB children.

  3. Tandem walking as a quick screening test for vestibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Helen S; Stitz, Jasmine; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Williams, Susan P; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Peters, Brian T; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2017-12-11

    Although many screening tests of balance are available, few of them have been well validated for clinical or research uses. The goal of this study was to test an updated version of an old test, Tandem Walking, to determine how useful it is for screening patients with vestibular disorders. Case-control study. Subjects were 90 adult patients with vestibular disorders and 292 healthy adult controls. They were tested on the number of correct tandem steps they could perform with arms crossed and eyes closed in a series of 10 steps. Correct steps could be nonconsecutive. Subjects were given one practice trial with eyes open and three experimental trials with eyes closed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC), and sensitivity and specificity were calculated. ROC values, sensitivity, and specificity were, at best, only moderate, no matter how the age range was cut. Even for subjects in the age group with the highest ROC value (i.e., age less than 50 years), ROC = 0.8, sensitivity = 0.77, and specificity = 0.72. These results indicate that 23% of patients will not be identified. Therefore, we recommend that if this test is used for screening patients in the clinic or healthy volunteers, the result should be interpreted with care. 3b Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Comparison of functional ramp walk test and 6-min walk test in healthy volunteers: A new approach in functional capacity evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manivel Arumugam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Inclined surfaces or ramps are the common obstacles faced by elderly and cardiopulmonary disabled in accessing public amenities. Ramp walking is one of the most common functional demands to be met by a common man in the industrialized world. To assess the functional (uphill walking capacity, we need a different functional stress test over the routinely used 6-min walk test (6MWT. Hence, a new 3-min steep ramp walk test (3MRWT was constructed to meet the demands similar to an uphill walk and to provide more functional stress than routinely used 6MWT. Methodology: The observational, crossover study design was adopted for this study. Fifteen healthy participants (8 males, 7 females performed both tests in a randomized order with a washout time of 6 h in between the tests. Walking distance to both ramp and ground, heart rate, blood pressure, saturation (SpO2, dyspnea, and fatigue with Borg exertion scale were compared prior and after the two walk tests. Results: The average distances covered in 6MWT were 510.5 ± 55.06 and 440.65 ± 25.08 meters and in 3MRWT were 270.18 ± 30.8, 230.05 ± 15.06 meters for male and female respectively. The difference between 3MRWT and 6MWT distances covered by the participants was statistically significant (t = 0.893. The mean difference between the heart rate, saturation and perceptions were highly significant (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The study results show that 3MRWT is valid over routinely administered 6MWT and may provide greater functional stress (uphill or ramp walk capacity in a shorter duration in healthy individuals in assessing the maximal functional capacity in a ramp or uphill walking.

  5. Within-day variability on short and long walking tests in persons with multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feys, P.; Bibby, B.; Romberg, A.; Santoyo, C.; Gebara, B.; de Noordhout, B.M.; Knuts, K.; Bethoux, F.; Skjerbaek, A.; Jensen, E.; Baert, I.; Vaney, C.; de Groot, V.; Dalgas, U.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare within-day variability of short (10 m walking test at usual and fastest speed; 10MWT) and long (2 and 6-minute walking test; 2MWT/6MWT) tests in persons with multiple sclerosis. Design Observational study. Setting MS rehabilitation and research centers in Europe and US within

  6. Effects of Microphallus turgidus (Trematoda: Microphallidae) on the predation, behavior, and swimming stamina of the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Alyssa K; Pung, Oscar J

    2004-06-01

    The effect of the trematode Microphallus turgidus on its second intermediate host, the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, was tested. To do so, we measured the susceptibility of infected and uninfected shrimp to predation by the mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus. Shrimp behavior was compared in the presence and absence of a fish predator, and the swimming stamina and backthrust escape responses of infected and uninfected shrimp were measured. Infected shrimp were more likely to be eaten by a predator than uninfected shrimp, had lower swimming stamina, and spent more time swimming and less time motionless in the presence of a predator. There was no difference between backthrust distances traveled in response to a stimulus by either infected or uninfected shrimp. Thus, M. turgidus may increase the predation of P. pugio in the wild, possibly by affecting the swimming stamina and predator avoidance responses of the shrimp.

  7. Alternatives to the Six-Minute Walk Test in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Mainguy, Vincent; Malenfant, Simon; Neyron, Anne-Sophie; Saey, Didier; Maltais, François; Bonnet, Sébastien; Provencher, Steeve

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The physiological response during the endurance shuttle walk test (ESWT), the cycle endurance test (CET) and the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) remains unknown in PAH. We tested the hypothesis that endurance tests induce a near-maximal physiological demand comparable to incremental tests. We also hypothesized that differences in respiratory response during exercise would be related to the characteristics of the exercise tests. METHODS: Within two weeks, twenty-one PAH pati...

  8. Cardiac and metabolic physiology of early larval zebrafish (Danio rerio reflects parental swimming stamina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren W Burggren

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Swimming stamina in adult fish is heritable, it is unknown if inherited traits that support enhanced swimming stamina in offspring appear only in juveniles and/or adults, or if these traits actually appear earlier in the morphologically quite different larvae. To answer this question, mature adult zebrafish (Danio rerio were subjected to a swimming performance test that allowed separation into low swimming stamina or high swimming stamina groups. Adults were then bred within their own performance groups. Larval offspring from each of the two groups, designated high (LHSD and low stamina-derived larvae (LLSD, were then reared at 27°C in aerated water (21% O2. Routine (fH,r and active (fH,a heart rate, and routine (M.O2,r and active (M.O2,a mass-specific oxygen consumption were recorded from 5 days post fertilization (dpf through 21 dpf, and gross cost of transport and factorial aerobic metabolic scope were derived from M.O2 measurements. Heart rate generally ranged between 150 and 225 b•min-1 in both LHSD and LLSD populations. However, significant (P<0.05 differences existed between the LLSD and LHSD populations at 5 and 14 dpf in fH,r and at days 10 and 15 dpf in fH,a. M.O2,r was 0.04 to 0.32 μmol•mg-1•hr-1, while M.O2,a was 0.2 to 1.2 μmol•mg-1•hr-1. Significant (P<0.05 differences between the LLSD and LHSD populations in M.O2,r occurred at 7, 10 and 21 dpf and in M.O2,a at 7 dpf. Gross cost of transport was ~6-10 µmol O2 . µg-1 . m-1 at 5 dpf, peaking at 14-19 µmol O2 . µg-1 . m-1 at 7-10 dpf, before falling again to 5-6 µmol O2 . µg-1 . m-1 at 21 dpf, with gross cost of transport significantly higher in the LLSD population at 7 dpf. Collectively, these data indicate that inherited physiological differences contributing to enhanced stamina in adult parents appear in their larval offspring well before attainment of juvenile or adult features.

  9. Prevalence of Walking-Related Motor Fatigue in Persons With Multiple Sclerosis: Decline in Walking Distance Induced by the 6-Minute Walk Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Carmela; Severijns, Deborah; Doležalová, Vendula; Baert, Ilse; Dalgas, Ulrik; Romberg, Anders; Bethoux, Francois; Gebara, Benoit; Santoyo Medina, Carmen; Maamâgi, Heigo; Rasova, Kamila; Maertens de Noordhout, Benoît; Knuts, Kathy; Skjerbaek, Anders; Jensen, Ellen; Wagner, Joanne M; Feys, Peter

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the individual occurrence of walking-related motor fatigue in persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), according to disability level and disease phenotype.Study design This was a cross-sectional, multinational study.Participants They were 208 PwMS from 11 centers with Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores up to 6.5. The percentage change in distance walked (distance walked index, DWI) was calculated between minute 6 and 1 (DWI(6-1)) of the 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT). Its magnitude was used to classify participants into 4 subgroups: (1) DWI(6-1)[≥5%], (2) DWI(6-1)[5%; -5%], (3) DWI(6-1)[-5%; > -15%], and (4) DWI(6-1)[≤-15%]. The latter group was labeled as having walking-related motor fatigue. PwMS were stratified into 5 subgroups based on the EDSS (0-2.5, 3-4, 4.5-5.5, 6, 6.5) and 3 subgroups based on MS phenotype (relapsing remitting [RR], primary progressive [PP], and secondary progressive [SP]). The DWI6-1was ≥5% in 16 PwMS (7.7%), between 5% and -5% in 70 PwMS (33.6%), between -5% and -15% in 58 PwMS (24%), and ≤-15% in 64 PwMS (30.8%). The prevalence of walking-related motor fatigue (DWI(6-1)[≤-15%]) was significantly higher among the progressive phenotype (PP = 50% and SP = 39%; RR = 15.6%) and PwMS with higher disability level (EDSS 4.5-5.5 = 48.3%, 6 = 46.3% and 6.5 = 51.5%, compared with EDSS 0-2.5 = 7.8% and 3-4 = 16.7%;P< .05). Stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated that EDSS, but not MS phenotype, explained a significant part of the variance in DWI(6-1)(R(2)= 0.086;P< .001). More than one-third of PwMS showed walking-related motor fatigue during the 6MWT, with its prevalence greatest in more disabled persons (up to 51%) and in those with progressive MS phenotype (up to 50%). Identification of walking-related motor fatigue may lead to better-tailored interventions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Six-minute-walk test in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polkey, Michael I; Spruit, Martijn A; Edwards, Lisa D

    2013-01-01

    Outcomes other than spirometry are required to assess nonbronchodilator therapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Estimates of the minimal clinically important difference for the 6-minute-walk distance (6MWD) have been derived from narrow cohorts using nonblinded intervention....

  11. Development of 1-Mile Walk Tests to Estimate Aerobic Fitness in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hoyong; Collier, David N.; DuBose, Katrina D.; Kemble, C. David; Mahar, Matthew T.

    2018-01-01

    To examine the reliability and validity of 1-mile walk tests for estimation of aerobic fitness (VO[subscript 2max]) in 10- to 13-year-old children and to cross-validate previously published equations. Participants (n = 61) walked 1-mile on two different days. Self-reported physical activity, demographic variables, and aerobic fitness were used in…

  12. Knuckle-walking anteater: a convergence test of adaptation for purported knuckle-walking features of African Hominidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Caley M

    2005-11-01

    Appeals to synapomorphic features of the wrist and hand in African apes, early hominins, and modern humans as evidence of knuckle-walking ancestry for the hominin lineage rely on accurate interpretations of those features as adaptations to knuckle-walking locomotion. Because Gorilla, Pan, and Homo share a relatively close common ancestor, the interpretation of such features is confounded somewhat by phylogeny. The study presented here examines the evolution of a similar locomotor regime in New World anteaters (order Xenarthra, family Myrmecophagidae) and uses the terrestrial giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) as a convergence test of adaptation for purported knuckle-walking features of the Hominidae. During the stance phase of locomotion, Myrmecophaga transmits loads through flexed digits and a vertical manus, with hyperextension occurring at the metacarpophalangeal joints of the weight-bearing rays. This differs from the locomotion of smaller, arboreal anteaters of outgroup genera Tamandua and Cyclopes that employ extended wrist postures during above-branch quadrupedality. A number of features shared by Myrmecophaga and Pan and Gorilla facilitate load transmission or limit extension, thereby stabilizing the wrist and hand during knuckle-walking, and distinguish these taxa from their respective outgroups. These traits are a distally extended dorsal ridge of the distal radius, proximal expansion of the nonarticular surface of the dorsal capitate, a pronounced articular ridge on the dorsal aspects of the load-bearing metacarpal heads, and metacarpal heads that are wider dorsally than volarly. Only the proximal expansion of the nonarticular area of the dorsal capitate distinguishes knuckle-walkers from digitigrade cercopithecids, but features shared with digitigrade primates might be adaptive to the use of a vertical manus of some sort in the stance phase of terrestrial locomotion. The appearance of capitate nonarticular expansion and the dorsal ridge of the

  13. Test-retest reliability and sensitivity of the 20-meter walk test among patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motyl, Jillian M; Driban, Jeffrey B; McAdams, Erica; Price, Lori Lyn; McAlindon, Timothy E

    2013-05-10

    The 20-meter walk test is a physical function measure commonly used in clinical research studies and rehabilitation clinics to measure gait speed and monitor changes in patients' physical function over time. Unfortunately, the reliability and sensitivity of this walk test are not well defined and, therefore, limit our ability to evaluate real changes in gait speed not attributable to normal variability. The aim of this study was to assess the test-restest reliability and sensitivity of the 20-meter walk test, at a self-selected pace, among patients with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to suggest a standardized protocol for future test administration. This was a measurement reliability study. Fifteen consecutive people enrolled in a randomized-controlled trial of intra-articular corticosteroid injections for knee OA participated in this study. All participants completed 4 trials on 2 separate days, 7 to 21 days apart (8 trials total). Each day was divided into 2 sessions, which each involved 2 walking trials. We compared walk times between trials with Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Similar analyses compared average walk times between sessions. To confirm these analyses, we also calculated Spearman correlation coefficients to assess the relationship between sessions. Finally, smallest detectable differences (SDD) were calculated to estimate the sensitivity of the 20-meter walk test. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests between trials within the same session demonstrated that trials in session 1 were significantly different and in the subsequent 3 sessions, the median differences between trials were not significantly different. Therefore, the first session of each day was considered a practice session, and the SDD between the second session of each day were calculated. SDD was -1.59 seconds (walking slower) and 0.15 seconds (walking faster). Practice trials and a standardized protocol should be used in administration of the 20-meter walk test. Changes in walk time

  14. Which walking capacity tests to use in multiple sclerosis? A multicentre study providing the basis for a core set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijbels, D.; Dalgas, U.; Romberg, A.; de Groot, V.; Bethoux, F.; Vaney, C.; Gebara, B.; Santoyo, C.; Maamagi, H.; Rasova, K.; de Maertens, N.B.; Knuts, K.; Feys, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Many different walking capacity test formats are being used. It is unclear whether walking speed, obtained from short tests, and walking distance, obtained from long tests, provide different clinical information. Objectives: To determine the differential effect of various short and long

  15. Mobility limitation in self-described well-functioning older adults : importance of endurance walk testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simonsick, Eleanor M; Newman, Anne B; Visser, Marjolein; Goodpaster, Bret; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Rubin, Susan; Nevitt, Michael C; Harris, Tamara B

    BACKGROUND: Mobility limitations are prevalent, potentially reversible precursors to mobility loss that may go undetected in older adults. This study evaluates standardized administration of an endurance walk test for identifying unrecognized and impending mobility limitation in community elders.

  16. Can the Cheetach Catch the Warthog? Reading stamina in EFL

    OpenAIRE

    山本, 昭夫

    2009-01-01

    This paper emphasizes the importance of stamina in the EFL context and makes an attempt to seek a way of doing research on‘reading stamina’in the future. First, we will give an overview of the present situation of reading class in Japan and leam that we might have underestimated stamina in EFL. Second,‘reading stamina’will be introduced. Third, the way to develop reading stamina will be proposed by clarifying the type of knowledge we need to have in EFL, claiming the efficacy of extensive rea...

  17. Six-minute walking distance and decrease in oxygen saturation during the six-minute walk test in pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douwes, Johannes M.; Hegeman, Anneke K.; van der Krieke-van der Horst, Merel; Roofthooft, Marcus T. R.; Hillege, Hans L.; Berger, Rolf M. F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prognostic value of the 6-minute walking distance (6-MWD), transcutaneous saturation (tcSO2) and heart rate (HR) obtained during the 6-minute walk test (6-MWT) in pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Methods: This was an observational study with forty-seven

  18. 10 CFR 431.304 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy consumption of walk-in coolers and walk-in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Uniform test method for the measurement of energy consumption of walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers. 431.304 Section 431.304 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY... measuring, pursuant to EPCA, the energy consumption of refrigerated bottled or canned beverage vending...

  19. STAMINA - Model description. Standard Model Instrumentation for Noise Assessments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreurs EM; Jabben J; Verheijen ENG; CMM; mev

    2010-01-01

    Deze rapportage beschrijft het STAMINA-model, dat staat voor Standard Model Instrumentation for Noise Assessments en door het RIVM is ontwikkeld. Het instituut gebruikt dit standaardmodel om omgevingsgeluid in Nederland in kaart te brengen. Het model is gebaseerd op de Standaard Karteringsmethode

  20. Alternatives to the six-minute walk test in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Mainguy

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The physiological response during the endurance shuttle walk test (ESWT, the cycle endurance test (CET and the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT remains unknown in PAH. We tested the hypothesis that endurance tests induce a near-maximal physiological demand comparable to incremental tests. We also hypothesized that differences in respiratory response during exercise would be related to the characteristics of the exercise tests. METHODS: Within two weeks, twenty-one PAH patients (mean age: 54(15 years; mean pulmonary arterial pressure: 42(12 mmHg completed two cycling exercise tests (incremental cardiopulmonary cycling exercise test (CPET and CET and three field tests (ISWT, ESWT and six-minute walk test (6MWT. Physiological parameters were continuously monitored using the same portable telemetric device. RESULTS: Peak oxygen consumption (VO(2peak was similar amongst the five exercise tests (p = 0.90 by ANOVA. Walking distance correlated markedly with the VO(2peak reached during field tests, especially when weight was taken into account. At 100% exercise, most physiological parameters were similar between incremental and endurance tests. However, the trends overtime differed. In the incremental tests, slopes for these parameters rose steadily over the entire duration of the tests, whereas in the endurance tests, slopes rose sharply from baseline to 25% of maximum exercise at which point they appeared far less steep until test end. Moreover, cycling exercise tests induced higher respiratory exchange ratio, ventilatory demand and enhanced leg fatigue measured subjectively and objectively. CONCLUSION: Endurance tests induce a maximal physiological demand in PAH. Differences in peak respiratory response during exercise are related to the modality (cycling vs. walking rather than the progression (endurance vs. incremental of the exercise tests.

  1. Alternatives to the six-minute walk test in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainguy, Vincent; Malenfant, Simon; Neyron, Anne-Sophie; Saey, Didier; Maltais, François; Bonnet, Sébastien; Provencher, Steeve

    2014-01-01

    The physiological response during the endurance shuttle walk test (ESWT), the cycle endurance test (CET) and the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) remains unknown in PAH. We tested the hypothesis that endurance tests induce a near-maximal physiological demand comparable to incremental tests. We also hypothesized that differences in respiratory response during exercise would be related to the characteristics of the exercise tests. Within two weeks, twenty-one PAH patients (mean age: 54(15) years; mean pulmonary arterial pressure: 42(12) mmHg) completed two cycling exercise tests (incremental cardiopulmonary cycling exercise test (CPET) and CET) and three field tests (ISWT, ESWT and six-minute walk test (6MWT)). Physiological parameters were continuously monitored using the same portable telemetric device. Peak oxygen consumption (VO(2peak)) was similar amongst the five exercise tests (p = 0.90 by ANOVA). Walking distance correlated markedly with the VO(2peak) reached during field tests, especially when weight was taken into account. At 100% exercise, most physiological parameters were similar between incremental and endurance tests. However, the trends overtime differed. In the incremental tests, slopes for these parameters rose steadily over the entire duration of the tests, whereas in the endurance tests, slopes rose sharply from baseline to 25% of maximum exercise at which point they appeared far less steep until test end. Moreover, cycling exercise tests induced higher respiratory exchange ratio, ventilatory demand and enhanced leg fatigue measured subjectively and objectively. Endurance tests induce a maximal physiological demand in PAH. Differences in peak respiratory response during exercise are related to the modality (cycling vs. walking) rather than the progression (endurance vs. incremental) of the exercise tests.

  2. Walking ability in patients with glioblastoma: prognostic value of the Berg Balance Scale and the 10 meter walk test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljehult, Monique Mesot; Buus, Lise; Liljehult, Jacob; Rasmussen, Birthe Krogh

    2017-11-01

    Primary brain tumors frequently cause considerable functional impairments and the survival time when diagnosed with glioblastoma is 14.6 months. The aim of this study was to examine if baseline postural control and walking ability in patients with glioblastoma could predict long term walking ability and 1 year mortality. Data were gathered from prospective recordings in a brain cancer database supplemented by retrospective review of electronic patient records. We included 109 patients with glioblastoma, 47 women and 62 men with mean age 65 years. At admission 84 patients were tested with Berg Balance Scale and 57 were tested with 10 meter walk test. Binary logistic regression analysis showed no statistical significance in favour of the 10 meter walk test. Berg Balance Scale showed an ability to predict walking ability 4-8 months after admission. The risk of dying within a year was 6.9 times higher in patients who lost their ability to walk within 4-8 months of the first admission. This study showed that Berg Balance Scale has some ability to predict the loss of walking ability 4-8 months after admission. This could be an important indicator pin pointing patients most in need of more intensive specialized neurorehabilitation efforts early in the disease course.

  3. Predicting maintenance of attendance at walking groups: testing constructs from three leading maintenance theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassavou, Aikaterini; Turner, Andrew; Hamborg, Thomas; French, David P

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about the processes and factors that account for maintenance, with several theories existing that have not been subject to many empirical tests. The aim of this study was to test how well theoretical constructs derived from the Health Action Process Approach, Rothman's theory of maintenance, and Verplanken's approach to habitual behavior predicted maintenance of attendance at walking groups. 114 participants, who had already attended walking groups in the community for at least 3 months, completed a questionnaire assessing theoretical constructs regarding maintenance. An objective assessment of attendance over the subsequent 3 months was gained. Multilevel modeling was used to predict maintenance, controlling for clustering within walking groups. Recovery self-efficacy predicted maintenance, even after accounting for clustering. Satisfaction with social outcomes, satisfaction with health outcomes, and overall satisfaction predicted maintenance, but only satisfaction with health outcomes significantly predicted maintenance after accounting for clustering. Self-reported habitual behavior did not predict maintenance despite mean previous attendance being 20.7 months. Recovery self-efficacy, and satisfaction with health outcomes of walking group attendance appeared to be important for objectively measured maintenance, whereas self-reported habit appeared not to be important for maintenance at walking groups. The findings suggest that there is a need for intervention studies to boost recovery self-efficacy and satisfaction with outcomes of walking group attendance, to assess impact on maintenance.

  4. Comparing Types of Financial Incentives to Promote Walking: An Experimental Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Rachel J; Rothman, Alexander J

    2018-04-19

    Offering people financial incentives to increase their physical activity is an increasingly prevalent intervention strategy. However, little is known about the relative effectiveness of different types of incentives. This study tested whether incentives based on specified reinforcement types and schedules differentially affected the likelihood of meeting a walking goal and explored if observed behavioural changes may have been attributable to the perceived value of the incentive. A 2 (reinforcement type: cash reward, deposit contract) × 2 (schedule: fixed, variable) between-subjects experiment with a hanging control condition was conducted over 8 weeks (n = 153). Although walking was greater in the incentive conditions relative to the control condition, walking did not differ across incentive conditions. Exploratory analyses indicated that the perceived value of the incentive was associated with the likelihood of meeting the walking goal, but was not affected by reinforcement type or schedule. The reinforcement type and schedule manipulations tested in this study did not differentially affect walking. Given that walking behaviour was associated with perceived value, designing incentive strategies that optimise the perceived value of the incentive may be a promising avenue for future research. © 2018 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  5. Feasibility and Reliability of Two Different Walking Tests in People With Severe Intellectual and Sensory Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waninge, Aly; Evenhuis, I.E.; Van Wijck, R.; van der Schans, Cees

    2011-01-01

    Background  The purpose of this study is to describe feasibility and test–retest reliability of the six-minute walking distance test (6MWD) and an adapted shuttle run test (aSRT) in persons with severe intellectual and sensory (multiple) disabilities. Materials and Methods  Forty-seven persons with

  6. The Six-Minute Walk Test in Chronic Pediatric Conditions: A Systematic Review of Measurement Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bart Bartels; Janke de Groot; Caroline Terwee

    2013-01-01

    Background The Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) is increasingly being used as a functional outcome measure for chronic pediatric conditions. Knowledge about its measurement properties is needed to determine whether it is an appropriate test to use. Purpose The purpose of this study was to systematically

  7. The six-minute walk test in chronic pediatric conditions: a systematic review of measurement properties.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, B.; Groot, J.F. de; Terwee, C.B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) is increasingly being used as a functional outcome measure for chronic pediatric conditions. Knowledge about its measurement properties is needed to determine whether it is an appropriate test to use. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to

  8. Screening for physical inactivity among adults: the value of distance walked in the six-minute walk test. A cross-sectional diagnostic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperandio, Evandro Fornias; Arantes, Rodolfo Leite; da Silva, Rodrigo Pereira; Matheus, Agatha Caveda; Lauria, Vinícius Tonon; Bianchim, Mayara Silveira; Romiti, Marcello; Gagliardi, Antônio Ricardo de Toledo; Dourado, Victor Zuniga

    2016-01-01

    Accelerometry provides objective measurement of physical activity levels, but is unfeasible in clinical practice. Thus, we aimed to identify physical fitness tests capable of predicting physical inactivity among adults. Diagnostic test study developed at a university laboratory and a diagnostic clinic. 188 asymptomatic subjects underwent assessment of physical activity levels through accelerometry, ergospirometry on treadmill, body composition from bioelectrical impedance, isokinetic muscle function, postural balance on a force platform and six-minute walk test. We conducted descriptive analysis and multiple logistic regression including age, sex, oxygen uptake, body fat, center of pressure, quadriceps peak torque, distance covered in six-minute walk test and steps/day in the model, as predictors of physical inactivity. We also determined sensitivity (S), specificity (Sp) and area under the curve of the main predictors by means of receiver operating characteristic curves. The prevalence of physical inactivity was 14%. The mean number of steps/day (≤ 5357) was the best predictor of physical inactivity (S = 99%; Sp = 82%). The best physical fitness test was a distance in the six-minute walk test and ≤ 96% of predicted values (S = 70%; Sp = 80%). Body fat > 25% was also significant (S = 83%; Sp = 51%). After logistic regression, steps/day and distance in the six-minute walk test remained predictors of physical inactivity. The six-minute walk test should be included in epidemiological studies as a simple and cheap tool for screening for physical inactivity.

  9. Are stamina and fatigue polar opposites? A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Suzanna; Evans, Meredyth; Jason, Leonard A; Brown, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    Most individuals with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) (Carruthers et al., 2003 ), Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) (Carruthers et al., 2011 ), and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) (Fukuda et al., 1994 ) indicate that they experience fatigue and sharp decreases in energy levels, which hinder the ability to engage in physical activities (Friedberg & Jason, 1998 ). However, there are some individuals who reduce activity engagement in order to avoid a worsening of symptoms; thus these individuals may endorse lower levels of fatigue. Accordingly, those with low levels of fatigue but low endurance/stamina might be inadvertently excluded from some criteria based on the fatigue requirement. The current study serves as an exploration of the relationship between fatigue and stamina and the effects of these constructs on illness symptomology and their implications for assessment and diagnosis.

  10. Test of Random Walk Behavior in Karachi Stock Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mudassar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Study was carried out to check the random behavior of the Karachi Stock Exchange (KSE 100 Index during the period of past three financial years to know whether investors could generate abnormal profits during the period or otherwise. Tests used were Runs Test, ADF Test, PP Test and Autocorrelation Function Test. During the study it was found that the performance of KSE 100 Index remained in weak form of inefficiency and investors have been able to generate excessive returns on their investment most of the times.

  11. The six-spot-step test - a new method for monitoring walking ability in patients with chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzfeldt, Melissa; Jensen, Henrik B; Ravnborg, Mads

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the Six-Spot-Step-Test (SSST) is more suitable for monitoring walking ability in patients with chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy than the Timed-25-Foot-Walking test (T25FW). METHOD: In the SSST, participants have to walk as quickly as possible across a field...... of effect size, standardized response means and relative efficiency. Both ambulation tests correlated moderately to PGIC. CONCLUSION: The SSST may be superior to the T25FW in terms of dynamic range, floor effect and responsiveness which makes the SSST a possible alternative for monitoring walking ability...

  12. Within-day variability on short and long walking tests in persons with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feys, Peter; Bibby, Bo; Romberg, Anders; Santoyo, Carme; Gebara, Benoit; de Noordhout, Benoit Maertens; Knuts, Kathy; Bethoux, Francois; Skjerbæk, Anders; Jensen, Ellen; Baert, Ilse; Vaney, Claude; de Groot, Vincent; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2014-03-15

    To compare within-day variability of short (10 m walking test at usual and fastest speed; 10MWT) and long (2 and 6-minute walking test; 2MWT/6MWT) tests in persons with multiple sclerosis. Observational study. MS rehabilitation and research centers in Europe and US within RIMS (European network for best practice and research in MS rehabilitation). Ambulatory persons with MS (Expanded Disability Status Scale 0-6.5). Subjects of different centers performed walking tests at 3 time points during a single day. 10MWT, 2MWT and 6MWT at fastest speed and 10MWT at usual speed. Ninety-five percent limits of agreement were computed using a random effects model with individual pwMS as random effect. Following this model, retest scores are with 95% certainty within these limits of baseline scores. In 102 subjects, within-day variability was constant in absolute units for the 10MWT, 2MWT and 6MWT at fastest speed (+/-0.26, 0.16 and 0.15m/s respectively, corresponding to +/-19.2m and +/-54 m for the 2MWT and 6MWT) independent on the severity of ambulatory dysfunction. This implies a greater relative variability with increasing disability level, often above 20% depending on the applied test. The relative within-day variability of the 10MWT at usual speed was +/-31% independent of ambulatory function. Absolute values of within-day variability on walking tests at fastest speed were independent of disability level and greater with short compared to long walking tests. Relative within-day variability remained overall constant when measured at usual speed. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Do exchange rates follow random walks? A variance ratio test of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The random-walk hypothesis in foreign-exchange rates market is one of the most researched areas, particularly in developed economies. However, emerging markets in sub-Saharan Africa have received little attention in this regard. This study applies Lo and MacKinlay's (1988) conventional variance ratio test and Wright's ...

  14. Development and Psychometric Testing of the Dogs and WalkinG Survey (DAWGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Elizabeth A.; McDonough, Meghan H.; Edwards, Nancy E.; Lyle, Roseann M.; Troped, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Dog owners represent 40% of the population, a promising audience to increase population levels of physical activity. The purpose of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of a new instrument to assess social-cognitive theory constructs related to dog walking. Method: Dog owners ("N" = 431) completed the…

  15. Oral administration of hot water extracts of Chlorella vulgaris increases physical stamina in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hyo-Jin; Choi, Hyun-Myung; Park, Hyeung-Suk; Han, Jae-Gab; Lee, Eun-Hee; Park, Young-Sig; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2006-01-01

    A unicellular algae, Chlorella vulgaris, was used as a biological response modifier. Although hot water extracts of C. vulgaris (CVE) are thought to augment immune responses, the effect of CVE on fatigue and physical stamina has not been studied. In the present study, we investigated the effect of CVE on forced swimming test and blood biochemical parameters related to fatigue, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatine kinase (CK), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), glucose (Glc), and total protein (TP). CVE (0.05-0.15 g/kg/day) was orally administered to mice. After 7 days, the immobility time was decreased in the 0.1- and 0.15-g/kg CVE-treated groups (179 +/- 8.3 and 175 +/- 2.1 s) in comparison with the control group (223 +/- 5.4 s). In addition, the contents of BUN, CK, and LDH in the blood serum were decreased in the CVE-fed group. However, they had no effect on the elevation of Glc and TP level. The results predict a potential benefit of CVE for enhancing immune function and improving physical stamina. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Reliability and feasibility of the six minute walk test in subjects with myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, Marie; Tollbäck, Anna

    2007-12-01

    The objective was to describe test-retest reliability and feasibility of the six minute walk test in adult subjects with myotonic dystrophy type 1. Twelve subjects (28-68 years, mean 44) performed three six minute walk tests on two occasions, one week apart. Relative reliability was high (ICC(2.1)=0.99) and absolute reliability values were low (standard error of measurement 12 m, repeatability 33 m). Feasibility was investigated in a sample of 64 subjects (19-70 years, mean 43). Fifty-two subjects were able to perform two tests on the same day. Subjects with severe proximal weakness had difficulties performing repeated tests. A practice trial followed by a second test on the same day can be recommended for most subjects, and the best test should be used for evaluations. In conclusion, even though the study sample was small, the present study indicates that the six minute walk test is reliable and feasible in subjects with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

  17. Clinical tests of ankle plantarflexor strength do not predict ankle power generation during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Michelle; Williams, Gavin

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between a clinical test of ankle plantarflexor strength and ankle power generation (APG) at push-off during walking. This is a prospective cross-sectional study of 102 patients with traumatic brain injury. Handheld dynamometry was used to measure ankle plantarflexor strength. Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed to quantify ankle power generation at push-off during walking. Ankle plantarflexor strength was only moderately correlated with ankle power generation at push-off (r = 0.43, P < 0.001; 95% confidence interval, 0.26-0.58). There was also a moderate correlation between ankle plantarflexor strength and self-selected walking velocity (r = 0.32, P = 0.002; 95% confidence interval, 0.13-0.48). Handheld dynamometry measures of ankle plantarflexor strength are only moderately correlated with ankle power generation during walking. This clinical test of ankle plantarflexor strength is a poor predictor of calf muscle function during gait in people with traumatic brain injury.

  18. Dynamic physiological responses to the incremental shuttle walk test in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Fornias Sperandio

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Understanding the normal dynamic physiological responses to the incremental shuttle walk test might enhance the interpretation of walking performance in clinical settings. Objective: To assess dynamic physiological responses to the incremental shuttle walk test and its predictors in healthy adults. Methods: We assessed the simultaneous rates of changes of Δoxygen uptake/Δwalking velocity (ΔVO 2 /ΔWV, Δheart rate/Δoxygen uptake (ΔHR/ΔVO 2 , Δventilation/Δcarbon dioxide production (ΔVE/ΔVCO 2 , and Δtidal volume/Δlinearized ventilation (ΔVT/ΔlnVE during the incremental shuttle walk test in 100 men and women older than 40 years. Fat and lean body masses (bioimpedance were also evaluated. Results: We found that the dynamic relationships were not sex-dependent. Participants aged ≥ 70 presented declines in ΔVO 2 /ΔWV slope compared to those aged 40-49 (215 ± 69 vs. 288 ± 84 mL.min-1.km.h-1. Obese participants presented shallower slopes for ΔVO 2 /ΔWV (2.94 ± 0.90 vs. 3.84 ± 1.21 mL.min-1.kg-1.km.h-1 and ΔVT/ΔlnVE (0.57 ± 0.20 vs. 0.67 ± 0.26. We found negative influence of fat body mass on ΔVT/ΔlnVE (R2 = 0.20 and positive influence of lean body mass on ΔVO 2 /ΔWV (R2 = 0.31, ΔHR/ΔVO2 (R2 = 0.25, and ΔVT/ΔlnVE (R2 = 0.44. Conclusion: Dynamic relationships during walking were slightly influenced by age, but not sex-dependent. Body composition played an important role in these indices. Our results may provide better interpretation of walking performance in patients with chronic diseases.

  19. Stamina pistilloida: a new mutation induced in pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, L M; Devreux, M

    1969-01-01

    After diethylsulphate treatment of seeds of the pea variety 'Parvus', a new floral mutation was isolated in the second generation. This mutation, named stamina pistilloida, is characterized by a partial fusion of the androecium with the gynoecium; the two marginal stamens of the staminal column are transformed in rudimentary carpels more or less differentiated according to ecoclimatic conditions. The genetic analysis has shown the monogenic and recessive behaviour of the mutation (gene proposed stp) and its linkage with the gene oh in the chromosome II.

  20. Screening for physical inactivity among adults: the value of distance walked in the six-minute walk test. A cross-sectional diagnostic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Fornias Sperandio

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES: Accelerometry provides objective measurement of physical activity levels, but is unfeasible in clinical practice. Thus, we aimed to identify physical fitness tests capable of predicting physical inactivity among adults. DESIGN AND SETTING: Diagnostic test study developed at a university laboratory and a diagnostic clinic. METHODS: 188 asymptomatic subjects underwent assessment of physical activity levels through accelerometry, ergospirometry on treadmill, body composition from bioelectrical impedance, isokinetic muscle function, postural balance on a force platform and six-minute walk test. We conducted descriptive analysis and multiple logistic regression including age, sex, oxygen uptake, body fat, center of pressure, quadriceps peak torque, distance covered in six-minute walk test and steps/day in the model, as predictors of physical inactivity. We also determined sensitivity (S, specificity (Sp and area under the curve of the main predictors by means of receiver operating characteristic curves. RESULTS: The prevalence of physical inactivity was 14%. The mean number of steps/day (≤ 5357 was the best predictor of physical inactivity (S = 99%; Sp = 82%. The best physical fitness test was a distance in the six-minute walk test and ≤ 96% of predicted values (S = 70%; Sp = 80%. Body fat > 25% was also significant (S = 83%; Sp = 51%. After logistic regression, steps/day and distance in the six-minute walk test remained predictors of physical inactivity. CONCLUSION: The six-minute walk test should be included in epidemiological studies as a simple and cheap tool for screening for physical inactivity.

  1. Usefulness of a 50-meter round walking test for fall prediction in the elderly requiring long-term care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachiya, Mizuki; Murata, Shin; Otao, Hiroshi; Ihara, Takehiko; Mizota, Katsuhiko; Asami, Toyoko

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to verify the usefulness of a 50-m round walking test developed as an assessment method for walking ability in the elderly. [Subjects] The subjects were 166 elderly requiring long-term care individuals (mean age, 80.5 years). [Methods] In order to evaluate the factors that had affected falls in the subjects in the previous year, we performed the 50-m round walking test, functional reach test, one-leg standing test, and 5-m walking test and measured grip strength and quadriceps strength. [Results] The 50-m round walking test was selected as a variable indicating fall risk based on the results of multiple logistic regression analysis. The cutoff value of the 50-m round walking test for determining fall risk was 0.66 m/sec. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.64. The sensitivity of the cutoff value was 65.7%, the specificity was 63.6%, the positive predictive value was 55.0%, the negative predictive value was 73.3%, and the accuracy was 64.5%. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the 50-m round walking test is a potentially useful parameter for the determination of fall risk in the elderly requiring long-term care. PMID:26834327

  2. Construct Validity and Test-Retest Reliability of the Walking Questionnaire in People With a Lower Limb Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Fred A.; Rommers, Gerardus M.; Geertzen, Jan H.; Roorda, Leo D.

    Objective: To investigate the construct validity and test-retest reliability of the Walking Questionnaire, a patient-reported measure of activity limitations in walking in people with a lower limb amputation. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Outpatient department of a rehabilitation center.

  3. Validity and reliability of the one-mile walk test (the Rockport Fitness Walk Test among 70-to-79 year old women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Marques

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to verify the reliability and concurrent validity of the One-Mile Walk Test (OMWT (The Rockport Fitness Walk Test, Kline et al., 1987, as a preditor of the maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max among women aged 70 to 79 years. The study used a convenient sample, composed by 30 healthy seniors from Florianópolis, SC. Data collection was structured in three phases: 1 answering questionnaires on sociodemographics, on readiness for physical activity (PAR-Q and on physical activity level (IPAQ. Anthropometric variables were measured and the participant performed the first evaluation of the RFWT. Afterwards, the subject visited the laboratory for a treadmill walk and for a trial of the equipments (K4 b2 - COSMED to be used during the stress test (ST for directly measuring the VO2max; 2 the seniors performed the ST following an incremental test protocol, from 2.4 km.h-1 to 5.6 km.h-1 with grades varying from 0% to 15%; 3 the second RFWT. The statistical analyses included the criteria suggested by Lohman (1992 for validity and the procedures were performed using the SPSS (v. 7.5 and MedCalc (v. 9.1. The level of significance was established at 5%. For reliability, the generalized (GE and sex-specific equations (SSE presented high intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC=0.942 and 0.948, p < 0,001 for predicted VO2max and low standard error of the estimate (1.14 and 1.48 ml O2.kg-1.min-1. For validity, the predicted VO2max was underestimated by both equations (GE=17.11±5.97 ml O2.kg-1.min-1; SSE=17.15±4.99 ml O2.kg-1.min-1 vs measured VO2max=26.67±3.53 ml O2.kg-1.min-1 (p < 0.001, and low correlation coeficients (r=0.488 and 0.471 between predicted and measured VO2max were observed. The equations presented high constant error (-9.56 and –9.53 ml O2.kg-1.min-1, with only 16.7% of agreement between the methods. Therefore, the RFWT was reliable, however, not valid for predicting VO2max among active elderly women aged 70 to

  4. Validity and reliability of the one-mile walk test (the Rockport Fitness Walk Test among 70-to-79 year old women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Marques

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2009v11n3p364   The purpose of this study was to verify the reliability and concurrent validity of the One-Mile Walk Test (OMWT (The Rockport Fitness Walk Test, Kline et al., 1987, as a preditor of the maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max among women aged 70 to 79 years. The study used a convenient sample, composed by 30 healthy seniors from Florianópolis, SC. Data collection was structured in three phases: 1 answering questionnaires on sociodemographics, on readiness for physical activity (PAR-Q and on physical activity level (IPAQ. Anthropometric variables were measured and the participant performed the first evaluation of the RFWT. Afterwards, the subject visited the laboratory for a treadmill walk and for a trial of the equipments (K4 b2 - COSMED to be used during the stress test (ST for directly measuring the VO2max; 2 the seniors performed the ST following an incremental test protocol, from 2.4 km.h-1 to 5.6 km.h-1 with grades varying from 0% to 15%; 3 the second RFWT. The statistical analyses included the criteria suggested by Lohman (1992 for validity and the procedures were performed using the SPSS (v. 7.5 and MedCalc (v. 9.1. The level of significance was established at 5%. For reliability, the generalized (GE and sex-specific equations (SSE presented high intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC=0.942 and 0.948, p < 0,001 for predicted VO2max and low standard error of the estimate (1.14 and 1.48 ml O2.kg-1.min-1. For validity, the predicted VO2max was underestimated by both equations (GE=17.11±5.97 ml O2.kg-1.min-1; SSE=17.15±4.99 ml O2.kg-1.min-1 vs measured VO2max=26.67±3.53 ml O2.kg-1.min-1 (p < 0.001, and low correlation coeficients (r=0.488 and 0.471 between predicted and measured VO2max were observed. The equations presented high constant error (-9.56 and –9.53 ml O2.kg-1.min-1, with only 16.7% of agreement between the methods. Therefore, the RFWT was reliable, however, not valid for

  5. Factors associated with the 6-minute walk test in nursing home residents and community-dwelling older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballer, Vicent-Benavent; Lisón, Juan Francisco; Rosado-Calatayud, Pedro; Amer-Cuenca, Juan José; Segura-Orti, Eva

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The main objective of this study was to determine the contributions and extent to which certain physical measurements explain performance in the 6-minute walk test in healthy older adults living in a geriatric nursing home and for older adults dwelling in the community. [Subjects] The subjects were 122 adults aged 65 and older with no cognitive impairment who were independent in their daily activities. [Methods] The 6-minute walk test, age, body mass index, walking speed, chair stand test, Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up-and-Go test, rectus femoris cross-sectional area, Short Physical Performance Battery, and hand-grip strength were examined. [Results] Strong significant associations were found between mobility, lower-limb function, balance, and the 6-minute walk test. A stepwise multiple regression on the entire sample showed that lower-limb function was a significant and independent predictor for the 6-minute walk test. Additionally, lower-limb function was a strong predictor for the 6-minute walk test in our nursing home group, whereas mobility was found to be the best predictor in our community-dwelling group. [Conclusion] Better lower-limb function, balance, and mobility result in a higher distance covered by healthy older adults. Lower-limb function and mobility appeared to best determine walking performance in the nursing home and community-dwelling groups, respectively. PMID:26696740

  6. 76 FR 21579 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Walk-In Coolers and Walk-In Freezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ...-in: the wall and ceiling panels (hereafter referred to as non-floor panels); floor panels; the... requirements for wall, ceiling, door, and floor insulation panels used in walk-ins. See 42 U.S.C. 6313(f... entirely or partially comprised of glass, a transparent material, or both and is used for display purposes...

  7. 75 FR 186 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Walk-In Coolers and Walk-In Freezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    .... Measuring the U Value of glass 10. Floor R Value 11. Electrical Duty Cycle 12. Normalization Factor 13... coolers and freezers. The walk-in envelope includes, but may not be limited to, walls, floor, ceiling... performance (this process is also known as ``aging''). This diffusion process causes foam to lose insulating...

  8. 75 FR 55067 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Walk-In Coolers and Walk-In Freezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... submitted using any of the following methods: 1. Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov... Proposal III. Discussion A. Overall Issues 1. Definition of Walk-In Cooler or Freezer: Temperature Limit 2.... Description and Estimated Number of Small Entities Regulated 4. Description and Estimate of Compliance...

  9. Norepinephrine remains increased in the six-minute walking test after heart transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Veiga Guimarães

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We sought to evaluate the neurohormonal activity in heart transplant recipients and compare it with that in heart failure patients and healthy subjects during rest and just after a 6-minute walking test. INTRODUCTION: Despite the improvements in quality of life and survival provided by heart transplantation, the neurohormonal profile is poorly described. METHODS: Twenty heart transplantation (18 men, 49±11 years and 8.5±3.3 years after transplantation, 11 heart failure (8 men, 43±10 years, and 7 healthy subjects (5 men 39±8 years were included in this study. Blood samples were collected immediately before and during the last minute of the exercise. RESULTS: During rest, patients' norepinephrine plasma level (659±225 pg/mL was higher in heart transplant recipients (463±167 pg/mL and heathy subjects (512±132, p<0.05. Heart transplant recipient's norepinephrine plasma level was not different than that of healthy subjects. Just after the 6-minute walking test, the heart transplant recipient's norepinephrine plasma level (1248±692 pg/mL was not different from that of heart failure patients (1174±653 pg/mL. Both these groups had a higher level than healthy subjects had (545±95 pg/mL, p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Neurohormonal activity remains increased after the 6-minute walking test after heart transplantation.

  10. Six minute walk test in respiratory diseases: A university hospital experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Ameri Hatem

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Six minutes walk test (6MWT, is a sub-maximal exercise test, used as a clinical indicator of the functional capacity, in patients with cardiopulmonary diseases. Its safety, validity, reliability and its correlation with several physiological instruments, are well studied. However, there are no published data on 6MWT, in the Saudi population. We are reviewing our experience with 6MWT and assessing its safety and its correlation with pulmonary function variables, in patients with pulmonary diseases, in our local population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We consecutively studied patients with pulmonary diseases, who underwent 6MWT and pulmonary function test in King Khalid University Hospital, from June 2003 to December 2004. The 6MWTs were conducted according to the American Thoracic Society guidelines. Spirometry, lung volumes and diffusion capacity measurements were correlated with the absolute walked distance. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty nine tests were performed. All patients were of the Saudi community (59% female, with mean age of 43±15 years. Out of 129 patients, 65 patients had proven respiratory diagnosis. In all patients, the test were performed with no serious complications. The six minute walk distance (6MWD had correlation with patient′s height (r=+0.40, P < 0.001, but not with patients′ weight, BMI, borg scale, or oxygen saturation. The 6MWD correlated significantly with Dlco (r=+0.52, P < 0.01, FVC (r=+0.46, r< 0.001 and had a weaker relation with FEV1 (r=+0.31, P < 0.05. The test had no significant correlation with lung volumetric parameters (TLC, FRC and RV. CONCLUSION: 6MWT is simple and safe test in evaluating patients with chronic pulmonary diseases in the Saudi population. In our study, 6MWD showed correlation with spirometric parameters and diffusion capacity. Further studies are needed to evaluate 6MWT in a more homogenous patients′ population.

  11. Assessment of physical performance using the 6-minute walk test in children receiving treatment for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, Mary C; Garwick, Ann W; Neglia, Joseph P

    2013-01-01

    The study of physical performance in children with cancer is emerging as an important variable in symptom research. Studies have shown that children with cancer experience deficits in physical performance during treatment that may be present years after therapy. The aim of this study was to determine if distance on the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) changed in children during the first 3 cycles of cancer treatment and to compare the distances walked with healthy norms. This is a secondary data analysis of 19 boys and 10 girls, aged 6 to 17 years, who were newly diagnosed with cancer and were part of a larger study that measured changes in fatigue and physical performance during the first 3 cycles of chemotherapy. Participants performed the 6MWT between days 15 and 29 of the first and third cycles of chemotherapy. Pediatric cancer patients did not have a significant change in the distance walked at cycle 3 of chemotherapy compared with cycle 1. When compared with 2 different normative data sets for healthy children, most children with cancer performed significantly below their peers. Children had poor strength and endurance after 3 cycles of chemotherapy even when their disease was responding to treatment. Interventions are needed to promote rehabilitation and maintenance of physical performance, as both are important to quality of life and ongoing child development. Children receiving cancer treatment who are ambulatory may appear to be functioning normally but are in fact severely deconditioned compared with their healthy peers.

  12. Il "caso Stamina" nella prospettiva della sociologia medica

    OpenAIRE

    Campa, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Debata związana z terapeutycznym zastosowaniem komórek macierzystych, od dość dawna prowadzona w atmosferze sporów, w ostatnich jednak dwóch latach skoncentrowała się wokół tzw. "przypadku Stamina", włoskiego zjawiska, które przybrało wymiar światowy. Władze i autorytety włoskie dokonały autoryzacji terapii bazującej na wstrzykiwaniu mezenchymalnych komórek macierzystych, która w uznaniu międzynarodowej społeczności naukowej miałaby być "pozbawioną podstaw naukowych". Ta wyjątkowa sytuacja pr...

  13. North Star Ambulatory Assessment, 6-minute walk test and timed items in ambulant boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Elena; Martinelli, Diego; Berardinelli, Angela; Messina, Sonia; D'Amico, Adele; Vasco, Gessica; Main, Marion; Doglio, Luca; Politano, Luisa; Cavallaro, Filippo; Frosini, Silvia; Bello, Luca; Carlesi, Adelina; Bonetti, Anna Maria; Zucchini, Elisabetta; De Sanctis, Roberto; Scutifero, Marianna; Bianco, Flaviana; Rossi, Francesca; Motta, Maria Chiara; Sacco, Annalisa; Donati, Maria Alice; Mongini, Tiziana; Pini, Antonella; Battini, Roberta; Pegoraro, Elena; Pane, Marika; Pasquini, Elisabetta; Bruno, Claudio; Vita, Giuseppe; de Waure, Chiara; Bertini, Enrico; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2010-11-01

    The North Star Ambulatory Assessment is a functional scale specifically designed for ambulant boys affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Recently the 6-minute walk test has also been used as an outcome measure in trials in DMD. The aim of our study was to assess a large cohort of ambulant boys affected by DMD using both North Star Assessment and 6-minute walk test. More specifically, we wished to establish the spectrum of findings for each measure and their correlation. This is a prospective multicentric study involving 10 centers. The cohort included 112 ambulant DMD boys of age ranging between 4.10 and 17 years (mean 8.18±2.3 DS). Ninety-one of the 112 were on steroids: 37/91 on intermittent and 54/91 on daily regimen. The scores on the North Star assessment ranged from 6/34 to 34/34. The distance on the 6-minute walk test ranged from 127 to 560.6 m. The time to walk 10 m was between 3 and 15 s. The time to rise from the floor ranged from 1 to 27.5 s. Some patients were unable to rise from the floor. As expected the results changed with age and were overall better in children treated with daily steroids. The North Star assessment had a moderate to good correlation with 6-minute walk test and with timed rising from floor but less with 10 m timed walk/run test. The 6-minute walk test in contrast had better correlation with 10 m timed walk/run test than with timed rising from floor. These findings suggest that a combination of these outcome measures can be effectively used in ambulant DMD boys and will provide information on different aspects of motor function, that may not be captured using a single measure. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Timed up & go test score in patients with hip fracture is related to the type of walking aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten T; Bandholm, Thomas; Holm, Bente

    2009-01-01

    Kristensen MT, Bandholm T, Holm B, Ekdahl C, Kehlet H. Timed Up & Go test score in patients with hip fracture is related to the type of walking aid. OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationship between Timed Up & Go (TUG) test scores and type of walking aid used during the test, and to determine...... the feasibility of using the rollator as a standardized walking aid during the TUG in patients with hip fracture who were allowed full weight-bearing (FWB). DESIGN: Prospective methodological study. SETTING: An acute orthopedic hip fracture unit at a university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Patients (N=126; 90 women......, 36 men) with hip fracture with a mean age +/- SD of 74.8+/-12.7 years performed the TUG the day before discharge from the orthopedic ward. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The TUG was performed with the walking aid the patient was to be discharged with: a walker (n=88) or elbow...

  15. [Benefits of using rapid HIV testing at the PMU-FLON walk-in clinic in Lausanne].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilgien, W; Aubert, J; Bischoff, T; Herzig, L; Perdrix, J

    2012-05-16

    Lab tests are frequently used in primary care to guide patient care. This is particularly the case when a severe disorder, or one that will affect patients' initial care, needs to be excluded rapidly. At the PMU-FLON walk-in clinic the use of HIV testing as recommended by the Swiss Office of Public Health was hampered by the delay in obtaining test results. This led us to introduce rapid HIV testing which provides results within 30 minutes. Following the first 250 tests the authors discuss the results as well as the benefits of rapid HIV testing in an urban walk-in clinic.

  16. GENETIC BASIS OF ACTIVITY METABOLISM. I. INHERITANCE OF SPEED, STAMINA, AND ANTIPREDATOR DISPLAYS IN THE GARTER SNAKE THAMNOPHIS SIRTALIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Theodore

    1988-03-01

    Recent conceptual advances in physiological ecology emphasize the potential selective importance of whole-animal performance. Empirical studies of locomotor performance in reptiles have revealed surprising amounts of individual variation in speed and stamina. The present study is the first in a series examining the genetic basis of variation in locomotor performance, activity metabolism, and associated behaviors in garter snakes. Maximal sprint crawling speed, treadmill endurance, and antipredator displays (Arnold and Bennett, 1984; exhibited as snakes reached exhaustion on the treadmill) were measured for approximately six offspring (presumed to be full siblings) from each of 46 wild-caught gravid garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis). Each character was measured on two days; all were individually repeatable. Correlations of these characters with body mass, snout-vent length, age at testing, litter size, dam mass, and dam snout-vent length were removed by computing residuals from multiple-regression equations. These residuals were used in subsequent genetic analyses. Approximate coefficients of variation of residuals were 17% for speed, 48% for endurance, and 31% for antipredator displays. Broad-sense heritabilities were significant for all characters: speed h 2 = 0.58; stamina h 2 = 0.70; antipredator display h 2 = 0.42. All three residual characters showed positive and statistically significant phenotypic correlations (r = 0.19-0.36). Genetic correlations (estimated and tested by restricted maximum likelihood) among residuals were positive and highly significant between speed and endurance (0.58), but nonsignificant between speed and antipredator display (0.43), and between endurance and antipredator display (0.26). All environmental correlations were nonsignificant. These data suggest that, contrary to expectations based on previous physiological studies, there may be no necessary evolutionary trade-off between speed and stamina in these animals. This tentative

  17. The six-minute walk test in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhamad, Esam H

    2009-01-01

    The 6-min walk test (6MWT) is a useful tool to assess prognosis and functional impairment in various pulmonary diseases. To evaluate functional capacity during various stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis and develop a scoring system clinical radiological physiological score (CRP) that can potentially be used to assess the functional status among patients with sarcoidosis. We performed a retrospective study on 26 patients diagnosed with pulmonary sarcoidosis from 2001 to 2007. All patients completed the 6MWT. The parameters assessed during the test included spirometry, arterial blood gas, 6-min walk distance (6MWD), Borg dyspnea score, and initial and end oxygen saturation. Females covered a significantly shorter distance than males (343 m (223-389) vs. 416.5 m (352-500); P < 0.0001). In addition, females had a significantly lower SpO 2 at the end of the 6MWT than males (90.5 (61-99) vs. 96 (75-98); P < 0.03). The 6MWD was inversely correlated with the final Borg score (r = ?0.603, P = 0.004) and the CRP score (r = -0.364, P = 0.047) and positively correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ) % (r 0.524, P = 0.006) and forced vital capacity (FVC) % (r = 0.407, P = 0.039). Female gender, FEV 1 %, final Borg score, FVC%, CRP score, and SpO 2 at the end of the 6MWT are associated with reduced 6MWD. It appears that Saudi patients diagnosed with sarcoidosis have a markedly reduced walking distance compared with other races. The effect of race and ethnicity and the utility of the CRP score as a potential marker to assess functional status require further exploration. (author)

  18. Testing self-regulation interventions to increase walking using factorial randomized N-of-1 trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sniehotta, Falko F; Presseau, Justin; Hobbs, Nicola; Araújo-Soares, Vera

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the suitability of N-of-1 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) as a means of testing the effectiveness of behavior change techniques based on self-regulation theory (goal setting and self-monitoring) for promoting walking in healthy adult volunteers. A series of N-of-1 RCTs in 10 normal and overweight adults ages 19-67 (M = 36.9 years). We randomly allocated 60 days within each individual to text message-prompted daily goal-setting and/or self-monitoring interventions in accordance with a 2 (step-count goal prompt vs. alternative goal prompt) × 2 (self-monitoring: open vs. blinded Omron-HJ-113-E pedometer) factorial design. Aggregated data were analyzed using random intercept multilevel models. Single cases were analyzed individually. The primary outcome was daily pedometer step counts over 60 days. Single-case analyses showed that 4 participants significantly increased walking: 2 on self-monitoring days and 2 on goal-setting days, compared with control days. Six participants did not benefit from the interventions. In aggregated analyses, mean step counts were higher on goal-setting days (8,499.9 vs. 7,956.3) and on self-monitoring days (8,630.3 vs. 7,825.9). Multilevel analyses showed a significant effect of the self-monitoring condition (p = .01), the goal-setting condition approached significance (p = .08), and there was a small linear increase in walking over time (p = .03). N-of-1 randomized trials are a suitable means to test behavioral interventions in individual participants.

  19. ENGINEERING DESIGN OPTIMIZATION OF HEEL TESTING EQUIPMENT IN THE EXPERIMENTAL VALIDATION OF SAFE WALKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Fragassa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental test methods for the evaluation of the resistance of heels of ladies' shoes in the case of impact loads are fully defined by International Organization for Standardization (ISO procedures that indicate all the conditions of experiment. A first Standard (ISO 19553 specifies the test method for determining the strength of the heels in the case of single impact. The result offers a valuation of the liability to fail under the sporadic heavy blows. A second Standard (ISO 19556 details a method for testing the capability of heels of women' shoes to survive to the repetition of small impacts provoked by normal walking. These Standards strictly define the features for two different testing devices (with specific materials, geometries, weights, etc. and all the experimental procedures to be followed during tests. On the contrary, this paper describes the technical solutions adopted to design one single experimental device able to perform impact testing of heels in both conditions. Joining the accuracy of mechanic movements with the speed of an electronic control system, a new and flexible equipment for the complete characterization of heels respect to (single or fatigue impacts was developed. Moreover a new level of performances in experimental validation of heel resistance was introduced by the versatility of the user-defined software control programs, able to encode every complex time-depending cycle of impact loads. Dynamic simulations permitted to investigate the impacts on heel in different conditions of testing, optimizing the machine design. The complexity of real stresses on shoes during an ordinary walk and in other common situations (as going up and downstairs was considered for a proper dimensioning.

  20. Stamina paneb liikuma / Urmo Raiend ; küsis Ülli Pink

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raiend, Urmo

    2009-01-01

    Spordiklubi Stamina korraldatavatest rahvaspordi üritustest ja -sarjadest: Mayeri Järvejooksud, Eesti Energia kepikõnnisari, Swedbanki Tervisejooksusari, Deloitte'i rahvatriatlonisari, rulluisusari, SL Õhtulehe Rahvajooks

  1. Lung function and six-minute walk test performance in individuals with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela G. Ohara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sickle Cell Disease (SCD, which is characterized by a mutation in the gene encoding beta hemoglobin, causes bodily dysfunctions such as impaired pulmonary function and reduced functional capacity. Objective : To assess changes in pulmonary function and functional capacity in patients with SCD and to identify the relationships between these variables. Method: We evaluated sociodemographic, anthropometric, lung function (spirometry, respiratory (manovacuometer, peripheral muscle strength (Handgrip strength - HS and functional capacity (i.e., the six-minute walk test parameters in 21 individuals with SCD (average age of 29±6 years. Shapiro-Wilk, paired Student's, Wilcoxon, Pearson and Spearman correlation tests were used for statistical analyses, and the significance threshold was set at p<0.05. Results : A total of 47.6% of the study subjects exhibited an altered ventilation pattern, 42.8% had a restrictive ventilatory pattern (RVP and 4.8% exhibited a mixed ventilatory pattern (MVP. The observed maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP values were below the predicted values for women (64 cmH2O, and the maximum expiratory pressure (MEP values, HS values and distance walked during the 6MWT were below the predicted values for both men (103 cmH2O, 39 Kgf and 447 m, respectively and women (64 cmH2O; 27 Kgf; 405 m, respectively. Positive correlations were observed between maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV and MEP (r=0.4; p=0.046; MVV and BMI (r=0.6; p=0.003; and between HS and MIP (r=0.7; p=0.001, MEP (r=0.6; p=0.002, MVV (r=0.5; p=0.015, distance walked in the 6MWT (r=0.4; p=0.038 and BMI (r=0.6; p=0.004. Conclusions : SCD promoted changes in lung function and functional capacity, including RVPs and a reduction in the distance walked in the 6MWT when compared to the predictions. In addition, significant correlations between the variables were observed.

  2. Home-based walking improves cardiopulmonary function and health-related QOL in community-dwelling adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, N; Nakatani, T; Morita, N; Saeki, K; Kurumatani, N

    2007-12-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate the effects of a home-based walking program on physical fitness and QOL among community residents. Subjects (n = 200, mean age: 64.2 years, range: 42 - 75 years) who participated in the 32-week trial were randomly allocated to one of two groups: an exercise (E) group and a control (C) group. The E group was instructed to increase the number of steps a day that they walked and to perform aerobic walking at a target heart rate for 20 minutes or more daily, 2 or more days a week. The C group was told to continue their normal level of activity. Outcome measures were the 3-minute shuttle stamina walk test (SSWT), 30-second chair-stand test (CS-30), and SF-36. Increases in SSWT values were significantly greater in the E group than in the C group (men 24.1 m vs. 6.3 m; women 8.8 m vs. 2.4 m), as were increases in CS-30 values (men 5.9 vs. 2.6; women 4.5 vs. - 0.1). On the SF-36, the scores in the E group for vitality and mental health increased significantly. Home-based walking is considered to be an effective and feasible method to improve physical fitness and QOL among community residents.

  3. Increasing the number of steps walked each day improves physical fitness in Japanese community-dwelling adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, N; Nakatani, T; Okamoto, Y; Iwamoto, J; Saeki, K; Kurumatani, N

    2010-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of increasing the number of steps each day on physical fitness, and the change in physical fitness according to the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotype. A total of 174 participants were randomly assigned to two groups. Subjects in group A were instructed for 24-week trial to increase the number of steps walked each day, while subjects in group B were instructed to engage in brisk walking, at a target heart rate, for 20 min or more a day on two or more days a week. The values of the 3-min shuttle stamina walk test (SSWT) and the 30-s chair-stand test (CS-30) significantly increased, but no differences in increase were found between the groups. A significant relationship was found between the percentage increase in SSWT values and the increase in the number of steps walked by 1 500 steps or more per day over their baseline values. Our results suggest that increasing the number of steps walked daily improves physical fitness. No significant relationships were observed between the change in physical fitness and ACE genotypes. Copyright Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York.

  4. Pengaruh Minyak Kelapa Murni Terhadap Peningkatan Stamina Pada Mencit (Mus Musculus)

    OpenAIRE

    Pertiwi, Dwi

    2015-01-01

    Virgin coconut oil is an oil which composed of fatty acid and dominated by medium chain triglyceride (MCT) different from palm oil which dominated by long chain triglyceride (LCT). Virgin coconut oil is rapidly digested and quickly absorbed then go into liver so that it can increase metabolism and stamina. The purpose of this research is to know stamina enhancement effect from virgin coconut oil which compared palm oil with various dose and be given in acute. In this research is use AZMI® ...

  5. Spatio-temporal gait disorder and gait fatigue index in a six-minute walk test in women with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia-Jimenez, Jose; Latorre-Roman, Pedro; Santos-Campos, Maria; Orantes-Gonzalez, Eva; Soto-Hermoso, Victor M

    2016-03-01

    Gait disorders in fibromyalgia patients affect several gait parameters and different muscle recruitment patterns. The aim of this study was to assess the gait differences observed during a six-minute walk test between fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls. Forty-eight women with fibromyalgia and 15 healthy women were evaluated. Fibromyalgia patients met the American College of Rheumatology criteria for fibromyalgia selected of an ambulatory care. Both patients and controls had a negative history of musculoskeletal disease, neurological disorders, and gait abnormalities. The 15 controls were healthy women matched to the patients in age, height and body weight. Spatio-temporal gait variables and the rate of perceived exertion during the six-minute walk test (all subjects) and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (fibromyalgia subjects) were evaluated. All walking sets on the GaitRITE were collected and the gait variables were selected at three stages during the six-minute walk test: two sets at the beginning, two sets at 3 min and two sets at the end of the test. In addition, the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire was used for the fibromyalgia patients. Fibromyalgia patients showed a significant decrease in all spatio-temporal gait variables at each of the three stages and had a lower walk distance covered in the six-minute walk test and higher rate of perceived exertion. No correlations were found between the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and gait variables. The fibromyalgia and control subjects showed lower gait fatigue indices between the middle and last stages. Gait analysis during a six-minute walk test is a good tool to assess the fatigue and physical symptoms of patients with fibromyalgia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Reliability and Concurrent Validity of the Narrow Path Walking Test in Persons With Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Uri; Melzer, Itshak

    2017-01-01

    About 90% of people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) have gait instability and 50% fall. Reliable and clinically feasible methods of gait instability assessment are needed. The study investigated the reliability and validity of the Narrow Path Walking Test (NPWT) under single-task (ST) and dual-task (DT) conditions for PwMS. Thirty PwMS performed the NPWT on 2 different occasions, a week apart. Number of Steps, Trial Time, Trial Velocity, Step Length, Number of Step Errors, Number of Cognitive Task Errors, and Number of Balance Losses were measured. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC2,1) were calculated from the average values of NPWT parameters. Absolute reliability was quantified from standard error of measurement (SEM) and smallest real difference (SRD). Concurrent validity of NPWT with Functional Reach Test, Four Square Step Test (FSST), 12-item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale (MSWS-12), and 2 Minute Walking Test (2MWT) was determined using partial correlations. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for most NPWT parameters during ST and DT ranged from 0.46-0.94 and 0.55-0.95, respectively. The highest relative reliability was found for Number of Step Errors (ICC = 0.94 and 0.93, for ST and DT, respectively) and Trial Velocity (ICC = 0.83 and 0.86, for ST and DT, respectively). Absolute reliability was high for Number of Step Errors in ST (SEM % = 19.53%) and DT (SEM % = 18.14%) and low for Trial Velocity in ST (SEM % = 6.88%) and DT (SEM % = 7.29%). Significant correlations for Number of Step Errors and Trial Velocity were found with FSST, MSWS-12, and 2MWT. In persons with PwMS performing the NPWT, Number of Step Errors and Trial Velocity were highly reliable parameters. Based on correlations with other measures of gait instability, Number of Step Errors was the most valid parameter of dynamic balance under the conditions of our test.Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, available at: http

  7. Minimal important difference in field walking tests in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis following exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A L; Hill, C J; Cecins, N; Jenkins, S; McDonald, C F; Burge, A T; Rautela, L; Stirling, R G; Thompson, P J; Holland, A E

    2014-09-01

    The 6-min walk distance (6MWD) and incremental shuttle walk distance (ISWD) are clinically meaningful measures of exercise capacity in people with non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis, but the change in walking distance which constitutes clinical benefit is undefined. This study aimed to determine the minimal important difference for the 6MWD and ISWD in non-CF bronchiectasis. Thirty-seven participants with mean FEV1 70% predicted completed both field walking tests before and after an 8-week exercise program. The minimal important difference was calculated using a distribution-based and anchor-based method, with the global rating of change scale used. The mean change in 6MWD in participants who reported themselves to be unchanged was 10 m, compared to 36 m (small change) and 45 m (substantial change) (p = 0.01). For the ISWD, the mean change in participants who reported themselves to be unchanged was 33 m, compared to 54 m (small change) and 73 m (substantial change) (p = 0.04). The anchor-based method defined the minimal important difference for 6MWD as 24.5 m (AUC 0.76, 95% CI 0.61-0.91) and for ISWD as 35 m (AUC 0.88, 95% CI 0.73-0.99), based on participant's global rating of change. The distribution-based method indicated a value of 22.3 m for the 6MWD and 37 m for the ISWD. There was excellent agreement between the two methods for the 6MWD (kappa = 0.91) and the ISWD (kappa = 0.92). Small changes in 6MWD and ISWD may represent clinically important benefits in people with non-CF bronchiectasis. These data are likely to assist in the interpretation of change in exercise capacity following intervention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Correlation of levels of obstruction in COPD with lactate and six-minute walk test

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    Dante Brasil Santos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a leading cause of morbid-mortality world wide, leading not only to pulmonary damage but also to multisystemic impairment, with repercussions on skeletal muscles and the ability to undertake effort, as measured in the six-minute walk test (6-MWT. Aims: To correlate the level of obstruction in COPD with lactate concentration and heart rate (HR at rest, and distance walked. To correlate distance walked with blood gas analysis and correlate desaturation in 6-MWT with post 6-MWT lactate concentration and heart rate. Methods: COPD patients underwent spirometry, blood gas analysis and 6-MWT to evaluate distance walked, heart rate, capillary lactate (CL concentration pre– and post 6MWT, and desaturation with 6-MWT. Results: 91 patients with all levels of obstruction were evaluated. HR and CL increased significantly post 6-MWT. The decrease in peripheral saturation of haemoglobin to oxygen observed with 6-MWT was also significant. The distance walked was shorter the greater the obstruction. The correlation analysis was significantly positive between FEV1 and distance walked, negative between FEV1 and HR at rest and negative between distance walked and PaCO2, and not significant for the other variables. Conclusions: Increased obstruction in COPD and higher PaCO2 values contribute to a reduction in distance walked in 6-MWT. The level of obstruction in COPD leads to a haemodynamic impairment with increased HR at rest of these patients. Resumo: Contextualização: A doença pulmonar obstrutiva crónica (DPOC, importante causa de morbimortalidade em todo mundo, leva não só ao comprometimento pulmonar, mas também a alterações sistémicas, com repercussões sobre músculos esqueléticos e a capacidade de realizar esforços, mensurável pelo teste de caminhada de seis minutos (TC6’. Objectivos: correlacionar obstrução da DPOC com lactato de repouso, frequ

  9. The CHOICE study: a "taste-test" of utilitarian vs. leisure walking among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekler, Eric B; Castro, Cynthia M; Buman, Matthew P; King, Abby C

    2012-01-01

    Utilitarian walking (e.g., walking for transport) and leisure walking (e.g., walking for health/recreation) are encouraged to promote health, yet few studies have explored specific preferences for these two forms of physical activity or factors that impact such preferences. A quasi-experimental crossover design was used to evaluate how training underactive midlife and older adults in each type of walking impacted total steps taken and how it was linked to their subsequent choice of walking types. Participants (N = 16) were midlife and older adults (M age = 64 ± 8 years) who were mostly women (81%) and white (75%). To control for order effects, participants were randomized to instruction in either utilitarian or leisure walking for 2 weeks and then the other type for 2 weeks. Participants then entered a 2-week "free choice" phase in which they chose any mixture of the walking types. Outcome variables included walking via OMRON pedometer and the ratio of utilitarian versus leisure walking during the free-choice phase. Participants completed surveys about their neighborhood (NEWS) and daily travel to multiple locations. Instruction in leisure-only, utilitarian-only, and a freely chosen mixture of the two each resulted in significant increases in steps taken relative to baseline (ps traveling greater distances to locations were associated with engagement in more utilitarian walking. In contrast, good walking paths, neighborhood aesthetics, easy access to exercise facilities, and perceiving easier access to neighborhood services were associated with more leisure walking. Results from this pilot study suggest that midlife and older adults may most easily meet guidelines through either leisure only or a mixture of leisure and utilitarian walking, and tailored suggestions based on the person's neighborhood may be useful.

  10. Strong correlation between the 6-minute walk test and accelerometry functional outcomes in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Zoe E; Ryan, Monique M; Kornberg, Andrew J; Walker, Karen Z; Truby, Helen

    2015-03-01

    Accelerometry provides information on habitual physical capability that may be of value in the assessment of function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This preliminary investigation describes the relationship between community ambulation measured by the StepWatch activity monitor and the current standard of functional assessment, the 6-minute walk test, in ambulatory boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (n = 16) and healthy controls (n = 13). All participants completed a 6-minute walk test and wore the StepWatch™ monitor for 5 consecutive days. Both the 6-minute walk test and StepWatch accelerometry identified a decreased capacity for ambulation in boys with Duchenne compared to healthy controls. There were strong, significant correlations between 6-minute walk distance and all StepWatch parameters in affected boys only (r = 0.701-0.804). These data proffer intriguing observations that warrant further exploration. Specifically, accelerometry outcomes may compliment the 6-minute walk test in assessment of therapeutic interventions for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Assessment of Cardiovascular Fitness of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis Using Six Minute Walk Test

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    Taofeek Oluwole Awotidebe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB tends to have limited exercise tolerance and a significant disability affecting their activities of daily living. The importance of exercise in the management of these patients has not been well investigated. This study was designed to assess the cardiovascular fitness of patients with pulmonary TB using the six-minute walk test (6-MWT. METHOD: Sixty five consented patients with Pulmonary TB were consecutively recruited into the study. The patients performed 6-MWT over a 30 meter course on a level walkway at a speed as fast as they could. Data were obtained on participants’ physical characteristics, pre and post exercise blood pressure and heart rate, and maximum oxygen consumption. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics of mean and standard deviation and paired t-test. RESULTS: The post walk test cardiovascular parameters were significantly higher than the resting cardiovascular parameters. The mean VO2 max and MET of the participants were 11.7±0.97 (ml O2kg -1min-1 and 3.35±0.28 (mL/Kg respectively. The means 6-MWT distance for male and female participants were 502.0±43.0m 481.7±68.3m respectively. CONCLUSION: The result implies that the 6-MWT is capable of evoking a significant cardiovascular change among patients with pulmonary TB. The 6-MWT may be useful in the assessment of functional capacity of patients with pulmonary TB. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(2.000: 99-106

  12. Field Test: Results of Tandem Walk Performance Following Long-Duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M. J. F.; Reschke, M. F.; Cerisano, J. M.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Gadd, N. E.; May-Phillips, T. R.; Lee, S. M. C.; Laurie, S. S.; Stenger, M. B.; hide

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coordinated locomotion has proven to be challenging for many astronauts following long duration spaceflight. As NASA's vision for spaceflight points toward interplanetary travel, we must prepare for unassisted landings, where crewmembers may need to perform mission critical tasks within minutes of landing. Thus, it is vital to develop a knowledge base from which operational guidelines can be written that define when astronauts can be expected to safely perform certain tasks. Data obtained during the Field Test experiment (FT) will add important insight to this knowledge base. Specifically, we aim to develop a recovery timeline of functional sensorimotor performance during the first 24 hours and several days after landing. METHODS: FT is an ongoing study of 30 long-duration ISS crewmembers. Thus far, 9 have completed the full FT (5 U.S. Orbital Segment [USOS] astronauts and 4 Russian cosmonauts) and 4 more consented and launching within the next year. This is in addition to the eighteen crewmembers that participated in the pilot FT (11 USOS and 7 Russian crewmembers). The FT is conducted three times preflight and three times during the first 24 hours after landing. All crewmembers were tested in Kazakhstan in either the medical tent at the Soyuz landing site (one hour post-landing), or at the airport (four hours post-landing). The USOS crewmembers were also tested at the refueling stop (12 hours post-landing) and at the NASA Johnson Space Center (24 hours post-landing) and a final session 7 days post-landing. Crewmembers are instrumented with 9 inertial measurement unit sensors that measure acceleration and angular displacement (APDM's Emerald Sensors) and foot pressure-sensing insoles that measure force, acceleration, and center of pressure (Moticon GmbH, Munich, Germany) along with heart rate and blood pressure recording instrumentation. The FT consists of 12 tasks, but here we will focus on the most challenging task, the Tandem Walk, which was also

  13. Some Tests of Random Walk Hypothesis for Bulgarian Foreign Exchange Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolai Gueorguiev

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to check if the exchange rate in newly emerged, relatively thin foreign exchange markets, follows a random walk pattern. The findings of the current study cast doubts on random walk presence in Bulgarian exchange rates against major international currencies. It turns out that the series of daily returns are stationary but correlated and therefore can be modelled better by higher-order ARIMA processes than by random walk.

  14. Test-retest reliability of the soleus H-reflex excitability measured during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate with what accuracy the soleus H-reflex modulation and excitability could be measured during human walking on two occasions separated by days. The maximal M-wave (Mmax) was measured at rest in the standing position. During treadmill walking every stimulus...... elicited an M-wave of 25+/-10% of Mmax in the soleus muscle and a supra-maximal stimulus elicited a maximal M-wave 60ms after the first stimulus. Both Mmax during rest and during walking were later used for normalization. When normalized to resting Mmax, the peak reflex amplitude during walking was 5...

  15. Reduction and technical simplification of testing protocol for walking based on repeatability analyses: An Interreg IVa pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejc Sarabon

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to define the most appropriate gait measurement protocols to be used in our future studies in the Mobility in Ageing project. A group of young healthy volunteers took part in the study. Each subject carried out a 10-metre walking test at five different speeds (preferred, very slow, very fast, slow, and fast. Each walking speed was repeated three times, making a total of 15 trials which were carried out in a random order. Each trial was simultaneously analysed by three observers using three different technical approaches: a stop watch, photo cells and electronic kinematic dress. In analysing the repeatability of the trials, the results showed that of the five self-selected walking speeds, three of them (preferred, very fast, and very slow had a significantly higher repeatability of the average walking velocity, step length and cadence than the other two speeds. Additionally, the data showed that one of the three technical methods for gait assessment has better metric characteristics than the other two. In conclusion, based on repeatability, technical and organizational simplification, this study helped us to successfully define a simple and reliable walking test to be used in the main study of the project.

  16. 76 FR 33631 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Walk-In Coolers and Walk-In Freezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-09

    ... these exceptions: (1) Test Sample Geometry Requirements (i) Two (2) panels, 8 ft. 1 ft. long and 4 ft. 1...)(i), above. (4) Direct solar irradiance = 0 W/m\\2\\ (Btu/h-ft\\2\\). (b) Required Test Measurements (i...

  17. Reliability of 4-meter and 10-meter walk tests after lower extremity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unver, Bayram; Baris, Refik Hilmi; Yuksel, Ertugrul; Cekmece, Senol; Kalkan, Serpil; Karatosun, Vasfi

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the test-retest reliability of the 4-meter walk test (4 MWT) and 10-meter walk test (10 MWT) in patients undergoing lower extremity surgery during inpatient rehabilitation. In all, 102 patients with total hip arthroplasty (THA), total knee arthroplasty (TKA), lower extremity fracture (LEF) and soft tissue operation were recruited. Patients performed two 4 MWT and two 10 MWT trials on the same day. The same researcher performed all the measurements to avoid inter-rater variability. The 4 MWT and 10 MWT were shown to have excellent test-retest reliability. The ICCs for the 4 MWT and 10 MWT were found as 0.94 and 0.95, respectively. The SEMs for the 4 MWT and 10 MWT were 2.0 and 5.5 seconds, respectively. The smallest real difference at the 95% confidence level (SRD95) was 5.5 seconds for the 4 MWT and 12.2 seconds for 10 MWT and SRD95 percentage was 31.2 for the 4 MWT and 28.5 for the 10 MWT. Both the 4 MWT and the 10 MWT have excellent reliability in patients undergoing lower extremity surgery such as TKA, THA, LEF and soft tissue operation during inpatient rehabilitation. Clinicians and researchers can be confident that changes above the SRD95s for the different patient groups, for both sexes and with regard to weight-bearing status, represent a real clinical change in rehabilitation process. Implications for Rehabilitation The 4 MWT and the 10 MWT are simple methods and were also shown to be reliable measurement methods in many patient groups. This study illustrates that the test-retest reliability of the 4 MWT and 10 MWT are excellent in patients undergoing lower extremity surgery during inpatient rehabilitation (ICC: 0.94 for 4 MWT, ICC: 0.95 for 10 MWT). Clinicians and researchers can be confident that changes above the SRD95s for the different patient groups, for both sexes and with regard to weight-bearing status represent a real clinical change in rehabilitation process.

  18. Validation of the Narrowing Beam Walking Test in Lower Limb Prosthesis Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawers, Andrew; Hafner, Brian

    2018-04-11

    To evaluate the content, construct, and discriminant validity of the Narrowing Beam Walking Test (NBWT), a performance-based balance test for lower limb prosthesis users. Cross-sectional study. Research laboratory and prosthetics clinic. Unilateral transtibial and transfemoral prosthesis users (N=40). Not applicable. Content validity was examined by quantifying the percentage of participants receiving maximum or minimum scores (ie, ceiling and floor effects). Convergent construct validity was examined using correlations between participants' NBWT scores and scores or times on existing clinical balance tests regularly administered to lower limb prosthesis users. Known-groups construct validity was examined by comparing NBWT scores between groups of participants with different fall histories, amputation levels, amputation etiologies, and functional levels. Discriminant validity was evaluated by analyzing the area under each test's receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. No minimum or maximum scores were recorded on the NBWT. NBWT scores demonstrated strong correlations (ρ=.70‒.85) with scores/times on performance-based balance tests (timed Up and Go test, Four Square Step Test, and Berg Balance Scale) and a moderate correlation (ρ=.49) with the self-report Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale. NBWT performance was significantly lower among participants with a history of falls (P=.003), transfemoral amputation (P=.011), and a lower mobility level (P.50 (ie, chance). The results provide strong evidence of content, construct, and discriminant validity for the NBWT as a performance-based test of balance ability. The evidence supports its use to assess balance impairments and fall risk in unilateral transtibial and transfemoral prosthesis users. Copyright © 2018 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Minimum Performance on Clinical Tests of Physical Function to Predict Walking 6,000 Steps/Day in Knee Osteoarthritis: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Hiral; Thoma, Louise M; Christiansen, Meredith B; Polakowski, Emily; Schmitt, Laura A; White, Daniel K

    2018-07-01

    Evidence of physical function difficulties, such as difficulty rising from a chair, may limit daily walking for people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to identify minimum performance thresholds on clinical tests of physical function predictive to walking ≥6,000 steps/day. This benchmark is known to discriminate people with knee OA who develop functional limitation over time from those who do not. Using data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative, we quantified daily walking as average steps/day from an accelerometer (Actigraph GT1M) worn for ≥10 hours/day over 1 week. Physical function was quantified using 3 performance-based clinical tests: 5 times sit-to-stand test, walking speed (tested over 20 meters), and 400-meter walk test. To identify minimum performance thresholds for daily walking, we calculated physical function values corresponding to high specificity (80-95%) to predict walking ≥6,000 steps/day. Among 1,925 participants (mean ± SD age 65.1 ± 9.1 years, mean ± SD body mass index 28.4 ± 4.8 kg/m 2 , and 55% female) with valid accelerometer data, 54.9% walked ≥6,000 steps/day. High specificity thresholds of physical function for walking ≥6,000 steps/day ranged 11.4-14.0 seconds on the 5 times sit-to-stand test, 1.13-1.26 meters/second for walking speed, or 315-349 seconds on the 400-meter walk test. Not meeting these minimum performance thresholds on clinical tests of physical function may indicate inadequate physical ability to walk ≥6,000 steps/day for people with knee OA. Rehabilitation may be indicated to address underlying impairments limiting physical function. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  20. Evaluation of exercise tolerance patients in cardiac rehabilitation D model based on 6 Minute Walk Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielawa Lukasz.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the results of 6-minute walk test depending on gender, age, left ventricular ejection fraction, the primary disease and BMI. Patients underwent assessment of Cardiac Rehabilitation Department in Szymbark in 2012 (80 people. Duration of rehabilitation for all patients was 21 days. The test was performed at the beginning and end of the cycle. Following the 3-week cardiac rehabilitation in the model D in a group of 80 patients with a mean age of 72 years achieved a statistically significant improvement in exercise capacity, expressed in the increase in test 6MWT distance by an average of 52 meters. In the study, men received final results statistically superior to women. The largest increase in the distance gained to patients after aortic valve prosthesis. People who are obese with a body mass index BMI over 30 have an average trip distance underperform both at baseline, final, and in the resulting increase of the distance than those with a BMI under 30. Prevention of obesity, one of the modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease should be the goal of training during cardiac rehabilitation patient education.

  1. Two-minute walk test performance by adults 18 to 85 years: normative values, reliability, and responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Richard W; Wang, Ying-Chih; Gershon, Richard C

    2015-03-01

    To provide (1) normative reference values for the 2-minute walk test (2MWT), (2) reference equations for the 2MWT, and (3) information on the reliability and responsiveness of the 2MWT across the adult lifespan. Cross-sectional study. General community settings. A population-based sample of adult participants (N=1137) contributed data to this study, which was part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function Norming Project. Not applicable. 2MWT. Overall, the distance participants walked ranged from 64.6 to 300.8m (mean, 180.9m). Men walked farther than did women (189.4m vs 176.0m; t=6.8; df=1,135; PRehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ichthyophonus-induced cardiac damage: a mechanism for reduced swimming stamina in salmonids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocan, R; Lapatra, S; Gregg, J; Winton, J; Hershberger, P

    2006-09-01

    Swimming stamina, measured as time-to-fatigue, was reduced by approximately two-thirds in rainbow trout experimentally infected with Ichthyophonus. Intensity of Ichthyophonus infection was most severe in cardiac muscle but multiple organs were infected to a lesser extent. The mean heart weight of infected fish was 40% greater than that of uninfected fish, the result of parasite biomass, infiltration of immune cells and fibrotic (granuloma) tissue surrounding the parasite. Diminished swimming stamina is hypothesized to be due to cardiac failure resulting from the combination of parasite-damaged heart muscle and low myocardial oxygen supply during sustained aerobic exercise. Loss of stamina in Ichthyophonus-infected salmonids could explain the poor performance previously reported for wild Chinook and sockeye salmon stocks during their spawning migration.

  3. The Importance of the 6 Minute Walk test in the assessment of Romanian teenagers with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ornela O. Cluci

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of lung function is the central part of the patients with cystic fibrosis assessment but we consider that exercise testing become an important tool in the continuous evaluation which is an indicative of prognosis and functional capacity and care of these patients. The 6 minute walk test is used to assess the individual’s response to exercise. The aim of the study is to design an exercise training program, based on 6 minute walk test and to evaluate the effects of this complex protocol including incentive therapy, individualized supervised training program: swimming, trampoline, walking, jogging, aerobic gymnastic, cycling 3 times per week and airway clearance techniques. Material and method: We conducted a 6-month study, on 20 patients from the Romanian National Cystic Fibrosis Center, aged between 12 and 18. The inclusion criteria were: FEV1 or FVC lower than 60% of predicted, SpO2 lower than 94% at rest. Results and discussions: The initial assessment showed limitations of exercise due to poor skeletal muscle mass, pulmonary status and respiratory muscle strength. After combining airway clearance techniques, incentive therapy and individualized physical training, we observed improvements regarding pulmonary function, ease of breathing and significant increased of fitness (6 minutes walking distance increased from 518.2±108.9 meters to 604.9±68 meters. A positive correlation was observed between skeletal muscle mass and distance achieved to 6 minute walk test, at the end of the study. Conclusion: The proposed rehabilitation protocol of young cystic fibrosis patients is efficient and creates pleasure and joy during physiotherapy which enhanced the patient’s adherence to the program.

  4. Measuring Steady-State Oxygen Uptake during the 6-Min Walk Test in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: Feasibility and Construct Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltais, Desiree B.; Robitaille, Nancy-Michelle; Dumas, Francine; Boucher, Normand; Richards, Carol L.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of measuring steady-state oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O[subscript 2]) during the 6-min walk test (6MWT) in adults with cerebral palsy (CP) who walk without support and whether there is construct validity for net 6MWT V[Combining Dot Above]O[subscript 2] as a measure of their walking ability.…

  5. Does the incremental shuttle walk test require maximal effort in young obese women?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P. Jürgensen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic disease with a multifaceted treatment approach that includes nutritional counseling, structured exercise training, and increased daily physical activity. Increased body mass elicits higher cardiovascular, ventilatory and metabolic demands to varying degrees during exercise. With functional capacity assessment, this variability can be evaluated so individualized guidance for exercise training and daily physical activity can be provided. The aim of the present study was to compare cardiovascular, ventilatory and metabolic responses obtained during a symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPX on a treadmill to responses obtained by the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT in obese women and to propose a peak oxygen consumption (VO2 prediction equation through variables obtained during the ISWT. Forty obese women (BMI ≥30 kg/m2 performed one treadmill CPX and two ISWTs. Heart rate (HR, arterial blood pressure (ABP and perceived exertion by the Borg scale were measured at rest, during each stage of the exercise protocol, and throughout the recovery period. The predicted maximal heart rate (HRmax was calculated (210 – age in years (16 and compared to the HR response during the CPX. Peak VO2 obtained during CPX correlated significantly (P<0.05 with ISWT peak VO2 (r=0.79 as well as ISWT distance (r=0.65. The predictive model for CPX peak VO2, using age and ISWT distance explained 67% of the variability. The current study indicates the ISWT may be used to predict aerobic capacity in obese women when CPX is not a viable option.

  6. Usefulness of the 6-minute walk test as a screening test for pulmonary arterial enlargement in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oki Y

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Yutaro Oki,1,2 Masahiro Kaneko,3 Yukari Fujimoto,1 Hideki Sakai,2 Shogo Misu,1,2 Yuji Mitani,1,4 Takumi Yamaguchi,1,2 Hisafumi Yasuda,1 Akira Ishikawa1 1Department of Community Health Sciences, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 2Department of Rehabilitation, 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kobe City Medical Center West Hospital, Kobe, 4Department of Rehabilitation, Sapporo Nishimaruyama Hospital, Sapporo, Japan Purpose: Pulmonary hypertension and exercise-induced oxygen desaturation (EID influence acute exacerbation of COPD. Computed tomography (CT-detected pulmonary artery (PA enlargement is independently associated with acute COPD exacerbations. Associations between PA to aorta (PA:A ratio and EID in patients with COPD have not been reported. We hypothesized that the PA:A ratio correlated with EID and that results of the 6-minute walk test (6MWT would be useful for predicting the risk associated with PA:A >1.Patients and methods: We retrospectively measured lung function, 6MWT, emphysema area, and PA enlargement on CT in 64 patients with COPD. The patients were classified into groups with PA:A ≤1 and >1. Receiver-operating characteristic curves were used to determine the threshold values with the best cutoff points to predict patients with PA:A >1.Results: The PA:A >1 group had lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC, FEV1:FVC ratio, diffusion capacity of lung carbon monoxide, 6MW distance, and baseline peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2, lowest SpO2, highest modified Borg scale results, percentage low-attenuation area, and history of acute COPD exacerbations ≤1 year, and worse BODE (Body mass index, airflow Obstruction, Dyspnea, and Exercise index results (P<0.05. Predicted PA:A >1 was determined for SpO2 during 6MWT (best cutoff point 89%, area under the curve 0.94, 95% confidence interval 0.88–1. SpO2 <90% during 6MWT showed a sensitivity of 93.1, specificity of 94

  7. The 1-Minute Sit-to-Stand Test in Adults With Cystic Fibrosis: Correlations With Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test, 6-Minute Walk Test, and Quadriceps Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruet, Mathieu; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre; Mely, Laurent; Vallier, Jean-Marc

    2016-12-01

    Exercise testing is part of the regular assessment of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). We aimed to evaluate (1) the convergent validity of the 1-min sit-to-stand (STS) test in CF by investigating its relationships with peak oxygen uptake (peak V̇ O 2 ), quadriceps strength, and quality of life and (2) to compare these associations with those of the 6-min walk test (6MWT). Twenty-five adults with CF (FEV 1 = 59 ± 24%) performed the STS test, the 6MWT, quadriceps strength assessment, and cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET). Physical activity level, quality of life, and self-esteem were assessed by questionnaires. STS repetitions, 6-min walk distance, quadriceps strength, and peak V̇ O 2 were, respectively, 71 ± 12, 90 ± 10, 93 ± 29, and 62 ± 16% of predicted. The STS test had moderate associations with peak V̇ O 2 (r = 0.56, P = .004), quadriceps strength (r = 0.52, P = .008), and some questionnaire items (eg, perceived physical strength, r = 0.67, P test was strongly associated with oxygen desaturation during CPET (r = 0.80, P test as compared with CPET (P test cannot be used as a replacement for CPET to accurately assess peak exercise capacity in CF. The STS test may have utility in detecting patients with CF who may exhibit a high level of oxygen desaturation during heavy exercise. Further studies should identify the factors contributing to STS performance to confirm the potential interest of STS repetitions × body weight outcome as a useful submaximal exercise parameter in CF. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  8. [Interpretation and use of routine pulmonary function tests: Spirometry, static lung volumes, lung diffusion, arterial blood gas, methacholine challenge test and 6-minute walk test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokov, P; Delclaux, C

    2016-02-01

    Resting pulmonary function tests (PFT) include the assessment of ventilatory capacity: spirometry (forced expiratory flows and mobilisable volumes) and static volume assessment, notably using body plethysmography. Spirometry allows the potential definition of obstructive defect, while static volume assessment allows the potential definition of restrictive defect (decrease in total lung capacity) and thoracic hyperinflation (increase in static volumes). It must be kept in mind that this evaluation is incomplete and that an assessment of ventilatory demand is often warranted, especially when facing dyspnoea: evaluation of arterial blood gas (searching for respiratory insufficiency) and measurement of the transfer coefficient of the lung, allowing with the measurement of alveolar volume to calculate the diffusing capacity of the lung for CO (DLCO: assessment of alveolar-capillary wall and capillary blood volume). All these pulmonary function tests have been the subject of an Americano-European Task force (standardisation of lung function testing) published in 2005, and translated in French in 2007. Interpretative strategies for lung function tests have been recommended, which define abnormal lung function tests using the 5th and 95th percentiles of predicted values (lower and upper limits of normal values). Thus, these recommendations need to be implemented in all pulmonary function test units. A methacholine challenge test will only be performed in the presence of an intermediate pre-test probability for asthma (diagnostic uncertainty), which is an infrequent setting. The most convenient exertional test is the 6-minute walk test that allows the assessment of walking performance, the search for arterial desaturation and the quantification of dyspnoea complaint. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Factors Shaping the Decision of College Students to Walk or Drive under the Influence of Alcohol: A Test of Rational Choice Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Ashley; Monk-Turner, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Rational Choice theory was tested to better understand the differences in behaviour regarding walking and driving under the influence of alcohol. Methods: Students at a residential college campus in Virginia were surveyed. Findings: Results show that students were less likely to walk or drive while intoxicated if they believed such behaviour…

  10. Heart Rate Recovery After 6-Min Walk Test Predicts Survival in Patients With Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swigris, Jeffrey J.; Swick, Jeff; Wamboldt, Frederick S.; Sprunger, David; du Bois, Roland; Fischer, Aryeh; Cosgrove, Gregory P.; Frankel, Stephen K.; Fernandez-Perez, Evans R.; Kervitsky, Dolly; Brown, Kevin K.

    2009-01-01

    Background: In patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), our objectives were to identify predictors of abnormal heart rate recovery (HRR) at 1 min after completion of a 6-min walk test (6MWT) [HRR1] and 2 min after completion of a 6MWT (HRR2), and to determine whether abnormal HRR predicts mortality. Methods: From 2003 to 2008, we identified IPF patients who had been evaluated at our center (n = 76) with a pulmonary physiologic examination and the 6MWT. We used logistic regression to identify predictors of abnormal HRR, the product-limit method to compare survival in the sample stratified on HRR, and Cox proportional hazards analysis to estimate the prognostic capability of abnormal HRR. Results: Cutoff values were 13 beats for abnormal HRR1 and 22 beats for HRR2. In a multivariable model, predictors of abnormal HRR1 were diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (odds ratio [OR], 0.4 per 10% predicted; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.2 to 0.7; p = 0.003), change in heart rate from baseline to maximum (OR, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.8 to 0.97; p = 0.01), and having a right ventricular systolic pressure > 35 mm Hg as determined by transthoracic echocardiogram (OR, 12.7; 95% CI, 2.0 to 79.7; p = 0.01). Subjects with an abnormal HRR had significantly worse survival than subjects with a normal HRR (for HRR1, p = 0.0007 [log-rank test]; for HRR2, p = 0.03 [log-rank test]); these results held for the subgroup of 30 subjects without resting pulmonary hypertension (HRR1, p = 0.04 [log-rank test]). Among several candidate variables, abnormal HRR1 appeared to be the most potent predictor of mortality (hazard ratio, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.8 to 15.2; p = 0.004). Conclusion: Abnormal HRR after 6MWT predicts mortality in IPF patients. Research is needed to confirm these findings prospectively and to examine the mechanisms of HRR in IPF patients. PMID:19395579

  11. Anxiety sensitivity predicts increased perceived exertion during a 1-mile walk test among treatment-seeking smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Samantha G; Uebelacker, Lisa A; Brown, Richard A; Price, Lawrence H; Desaulniers, Julie; Abrantes, Ana M

    2017-12-01

    Smoking increases risk of early morbidity and mortality, and risk is compounded by physical inactivity. Anxiety sensitivity (fear of anxiety-relevant somatic sensations) is a cognitive factor that may amplify the subjective experience of exertion (effort) during exercise, subsequently resulting in lower engagement in physical activity. We examined the effect of anxiety sensitivity on ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and physiological arousal (heart rate) during a bout of exercise among low-active treatment-seeking smokers. Adult daily smokers (n = 157; M age  = 44.9, SD = 11.13; 69.4% female) completed the Rockport 1.0 mile submaximal treadmill walk test. RPE and heart rate were assessed during the walk test. Multi-level modeling was used to examine the interactive effect of anxiety sensitivity × time on RPE and on heart rate at five time points during the walk test. There were significant linear and cubic time × anxiety sensitivity effects for RPE. High anxiety sensitivity was associated with greater initial increases in RPE during the walk test, with stabilized ratings towards the last 5 min, whereas low anxiety sensitivity was associated with lower initial increase in RPE which stabilized more quickly. The linear time × anxiety sensitivity effect for heart rate was not significant. Anxiety sensitivity is associated with increasing RPE during moderate-intensity exercise. Persistently rising RPE observed for smokers with high anxiety sensitivity may contribute to the negative experience of exercise, resulting in early termination of bouts of prolonged activity and/or decreased likelihood of future engagement in physical activity.

  12. Metabolic and clinical comparative analysis of treadmill six-minute walking test and cardiopulmonary exercise testing in obese and eutrophic women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Di Thommazo-Luporini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Impaired exercise tolerance is directly linked to decreased functional capacity as a consequence of obesity. OBJECTIVES: To analyze and compare the cardiopulmonary, metabolic, and perceptual responses during a cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPX and a treadmill six-minute walking test (tread6MWT in obese and eutrophic women. METHOD: Twenty-nine female participants, aged 20-45 years were included. Fourteen were allocated to the obese group and 15 to the eutrophic group. Anthropometric measurements and body composition assessment were performed. RESULTS: In both tests, obese women presented with significantly higher absolute oxygen uptake, minute ventilation, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure; they also presented with lower speed, distance walked, and oxygen uptake corrected by the weight compared to eutrophics. During the maximal exercise test, perceived dyspnea was greater and the respiratory exchange ratio was lower in obese subjects compared to eutrophics. During the submaximal test, carbon dioxide production, tidal volume, and heart rate were higher in obese subjects compared to eutrophic women. When analyzing possible correlations between the CPX and the tread6MWT at peak, there was a strong correlation for the variable heart rate and a moderate correlation for the variable oxygen uptake. The heart rate obtained in the submaximal test was able to predict the one obtained in the maximal test. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated the agreement between both tests to identify metabolic and physiological parameters at peak exercise. CONCLUSIONS: The six-minute walking test induced ventilatory, metabolic, and cardiovascular responses in agreement with the maximal testing. Thus, the six-minute walking test proves to be important for functional evaluation in the physical therapy routine.

  13. Relation of exercise capacity with lung volumes before and after 6-minute walk test in subjects with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibmer, Thomas; Rüdiger, Stefan; Kropf-Sanchen, Cornelia; Stoiber, Kathrin M; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Schumann, Christian

    2014-11-01

    There is growing evidence that exercise-induced variation in lung volumes is an important source of ventilatory limitation and is linked to exercise intolerance in COPD. The aim of this study was to compare the correlations of walk distance and lung volumes measured before and after a 6-min walk test (6MWT) in subjects with COPD. Forty-five subjects with stable COPD (mean pre-bronchodilator FEV1: 47 ± 18% predicted) underwent a 6MWT. Body plethysmography was performed immediately pre- and post-6MWT. Correlations were generally stronger between 6-min walk distance and post-6MWT lung volumes than between 6-min walk distance and pre-6MWT lung volumes, except for FEV1. These differences in Pearson correlation coefficients were significant for residual volume expressed as percent of total lung capacity (-0.67 vs -0.58, P = .043), percent of predicted residual volume expressed as percent of total lung capacity (-0.68 vs -0.59, P = .026), inspiratory vital capacity (0.65 vs 0.54, P = .019), percent of predicted inspiratory vital capacity (0.49 vs 0.38, P = .037), and percent of predicted functional residual capacity (-0.62 vs -0.47, P = .023). In subjects with stable COPD, lung volumes measured immediately after 6MWT are more closely related to exercise limitation than baseline lung volumes measured before 6MWT, except for FEV1. Therefore, pulmonary function testing immediately after exercise should be included in future studies on COPD for the assessment of exercise-induced ventilatory constraints to physical performance that cannot be adequately assessed from baseline pulmonary function testing at rest. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  14. Efficient tests for equivalence of hidden Markov processes and quantum random walks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    U. Faigle; A. Schönhuth (Alexander)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractWhile two hidden Markov process (HMP) resp.~quantum random walk (QRW) parametrizations can differ from one another, the stochastic processes arising from them can be equivalent. Here a polynomial-time algorithm is presented which can determine equivalence of two HMP parametrizations

  15. Is outdoor use of the six-minute walk test with a global positioning system in stroke patients' own neighbourhoods reproducible and valid?

    OpenAIRE

    Wevers, L.E.; Kwakkel, G.; Port, van de, I.G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the reproducibility, responsiveness and concurrent validity of the six-minute walk test (6MWT) when tested outdoors in patients' own neighbourhoods using a global positioning system (GPS) or a measuring wheel. Methods: A total of 27 chronic stroke patients, discharged to their own homes, were tested twice, within 5 consecutive days. The 6MWT was conducted using a GPS and an measuring wheel simultaneously to determine walking distance. Reproducibility was determined as te...

  16. Comparison of six-minute walk test in children with moderate/severe asthma with reference values for healthy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Barboza de Andrade

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:to compare physical performance and cardiorespiratory responses in the six-minute walk test (6MWT in asthmatic children with reference values for healthy children in the same age group, and to correlate them with intervening variables.METHODS:this was a cross-sectional, prospective study that evaluated children with moderate/severe asthma, aged between 6 and 16 years, in outpatient follow-up. Demographic and spirometric test data were collected. All patients answered the pediatric asthma quality of life (QoL questionnaire (PAQLQ and level of basal physical activity. The 6MWT was performed, following the American Thoracic Society recommendations. Comparison of means was performed using Student's t-test and Pearson's correlation to analyze the 6MWT with study variables. The significance level was set at 5%.RESULTS:40 children with moderate or severe asthma were included, 52.5% males, 70% with normal weight and sedentary. Mean age was 11.3 ± 2.1 years, mean height was 1.5 ± 0.1 m, and mean weight was 40.8 ± 12.6 Kg. The mean distance walked in the 6MWT was significantly lower, corresponding to 71.9% ± 19.7% of predicted values; sedentary children had the worst values. The difference between the distance walked on the test and the predicted values showed positive correlation with age (r = 0.373, p = 0.018 and negative correlation with cardiac rate at the end of the test (r = -0.518, p < 0.001. Regarding QoL assessment, the values in the question about physical activity limitations showed the worst scores, with a negative correlation with walked distance difference (r = -0.311, p = 0.051.CONCLUSIONS:asthmatic children's performance in the 6MWT evaluated through distance walked is significantly lower than the predicted values for healthy children of the same age, and is directly influenced by sedentary life style.

  17. Effects of aquatic exercises in a rat model of brainstem demyelination with ethidium bromide on the beam walking test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Cíntia Cristina Souza; Bondan, Eduardo Fernandes; Alouche, Sandra Regina

    2009-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system associated with varied levels of disability. The impact of early physiotherapeutic interventions in the disease progression is unknown. We used an experimental model of demyelination with the gliotoxic agent ethidium bromide and early aquatic exercises to evaluate the motor performance of the animals. We quantified the number of footsteps and errors during the beam walking test. The demyelinated animals walked fewer steps with a greater number of errors than the control group. The demyelinated animals that performed aquatic exercises presented a better motor performance than those that did not exercise. Therefore aquatic exercising was beneficial to the motor performance of rats in this experimental model of demyelination.

  18. Prognostic value of the six-minute walk test in end-stage renal disease life expectancy: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro de Moraes Kohl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The six-minute walk test has been widely used to evaluate functional capacity and predict mortality in several populations. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of the six-minute walk test for the life expectancy of end-stage renal disease patients. METHODS: Patients over 18 years old who underwent hemodialysis for at least six months were included. Patients with hemodynamic instability, smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, physical incapacity and acute myocardial stroke in the preceding three months were excluded. RESULTS: Fifty-two patients (54% males; 36+11 years old were followed for 144 months. The distance walked in the six-minute walk test was a survival predictor for end-stage renal disease patients. In the multivariate analysis, for each 100 meters walked with a 100-meter increment, the hazard ratio was 0.53, with a 95% confidence interval of 0.37-0.74. There was a positive correlation between the distance walked in the six-minute walk test and peak oxygen consumption (r = 0.508. In the multivariate analysis, each year of dialysis treatment represented a 10% increase in death probability; in the severity index analysis, each point on the scale represented an 11% increase in the death risk. CONCLUSIONS: We observed that survival increased approximately 5% for every 100 meters walked in the six-minute walk test, demonstrating that the test is a viable option for evaluating the functional capacity in patients with end-stage renal disease.

  19. Reliability of the Timed Up and Go test and Ten-Metre Timed Walk Test in Pregnant Women with Pelvic Girdle Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evensen, Natalie M; Kvåle, Alice; Braekken, Ingeborg H

    2015-09-01

    There is a lack of functional objective tests available to measure functional status in women with pelvic girdle pain (PGP). The purpose of this study was to establish test-retest and intertester reliability of the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test and Ten-metre Timed Walk Test (10mTWT) in pregnant women with PGP. A convenience sample of women was recruited over a 4-month period and tested on two occasions, 1 week apart to determine test-retest reliability. Intertester reliability was established between two assessors at the first testing session. Subjects were instructed to undertake the TUG and 10mTWT at maximum speed. One practise trial and two timed trials for each walking test was undertaken on Day 1 and one practise trial and one timed trial on Day 2. Seventeen women with PGP aged 31.1 years (SD [standard deviation] = 2.3) and 28.7 weeks pregnant (SD = 7.4) completed gait testing. Test-retest reliability using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was excellent for the TUG (0.88) and good for the 10mTWT (0.74). Intertester reliability was determined in the first 13 participants with excellent ICC values being found for both walking tests (TUG: 0.95; 10mTWT: 0.94). This study demonstrated that the TUG and 10mTWT undertaken at fast pace are reliable, objective functional tests in pregnant women with PGP. While both tests are suitable for use in the clinical and research settings, we would recommend the TUG given the findings of higher test-retest reliability and as this test requires less space and time to set up and score. Future studies in a larger sample size are warranted to confirm the results of this study. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Reference equation for prediction of a total distance during six-minute walk test using Indonesian anthropometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusdwinuringtyas, Nury; Widjajalaksmi; Yunus, Faisal; Alwi, Idrus

    2014-04-01

    to develop a reference equation for prediction of the total distance walk using Indonesian anthropometrics of sedentary healthy subjects. Subsequently, the prediction obtained was compared to those calculated by the Caucasian-based Enright prediction equation. the cross-sectional study was conducted among 123 healthy Indonesian adults with sedentary life style (58 male and 65 female subjects in an age range between 18 and 50 years). Heart rate was recorded using Polar with expectation in the sub-maximal zone (120-170 beats per minute). The subjects performed two six-minute walk tests, the first one on a 15-meter track according to the protocol developed by the investigator. The second walk was carried out on Biodex®gait trainer as gold standard. an average total distance of 547±54.24 m was found, not significantly different from the gold standard of 544.72±54.11 m (p>0.05). Multiple regression analysis was performed to develop the new equation. the reference equation for prediction of the total distance using Indonesian anthropometrics is more applicable in Indonesia.

  1. Quantum centrality testing on directed graphs via P T -symmetric quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izaac, J. A.; Wang, J. B.; Abbott, P. C.; Ma, X. S.

    2017-09-01

    Various quantum-walk-based algorithms have been proposed to analyze and rank the centrality of graph vertices. However, issues arise when working with directed graphs: the resulting non-Hermitian Hamiltonian leads to nonunitary dynamics, and the total probability of the quantum walker is no longer conserved. In this paper, we discuss a method for simulating directed graphs using P T -symmetric quantum walks, allowing probability-conserving nonunitary evolution. This method is equivalent to mapping the directed graph to an undirected, yet weighted, complete graph over the same vertex set, and can be extended to cover interdependent networks of directed graphs. Previous work has shown centrality measures based on the continuous-time quantum walk provide an eigenvectorlike quantum centrality; using the P T -symmetric framework, we extend these centrality algorithms to directed graphs with a significantly reduced Hilbert space compared to previous proposals. In certain cases, this centrality measure provides an advantage over classical algorithms used in network analysis, for example, by breaking vertex rank degeneracy. Finally, we perform a statistical analysis over ensembles of random graphs, and show strong agreement with the classical PageRank measure on directed acyclic graphs.

  2. Testing constitutive relations by running and walking on cornstarch and water suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek; Allen, Benjamin; Brown, Eric

    2018-05-01

    The ability of a person to run on the surface of a suspension of cornstarch and water has fascinated scientists and the public alike. However, the constitutive relation obtained from traditional steady-state rheology of cornstarch and water suspensions has failed to explain this behavior. In another paper we presented an averaged constitutive relation for impact rheology consisting of an effective compressive modulus of a system-spanning dynamically jammed structure [R. Maharjan et al., this issue, Phys. Rev. E 97, 052602 (2018), 10.1103/PhysRevE.97.052602]. Here we show that this constitutive model can be used to quantitatively predict, for example, the trajectory and penetration depth of the foot of a person walking or running on cornstarch and water. The ability of the constitutive relation to predict the material behavior in a case with different forcing conditions and flow geometry than it was obtained from suggests that the constitutive relation could be applied more generally. We also present a detailed calculation of the added mass effect to show that while it may be able to explain some cases of people running or walking on the surface of cornstarch and water for pool depths H >1.2 m and foot impact velocities VI>1.7 m/s, it cannot explain observations of people walking or running on the surface of cornstarch and water for smaller H or VI.

  3. Is one trial enough for repeated testing? Same-day assessments of walking, mobility and fine hand use in people with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, Marie; Petitclerc, Emilie; Hébert, Luc J; Gagnon, Cynthia

    2017-02-01

    Performance-based assessments of physical function are essential in people with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) to monitor disease progression and evaluate interventions. Commonly used are the six-minute walk test, the 10 m-walk test, the timed up-and-go test, the timed-stands test, grip strength tests and the nine-hole peg test. The number of trials needed on a same-day test occasion and whether the first, best or average of trials should be reported as result is unknown. Thus, the aim was to describe and explore differences between trials in these measures of walking, mobility and fine hand use in 70 adults with DM1. Three trials were performed for each test except for the six-minute walk test where two trials were allowed. There were statistical significant differences over trials in all tests except for the 10 m-walk test and grip strength tests. Pair-wise comparisons showed that the second and third trials were in general better than the first, although effect sizes were small. At which trial the individuals performed their best differed between individuals and tests. People with severe muscular impairment had difficulties to perform repeated trials. Intraclass correlation coefficients were all high in analyses exploring how to report results. The conclusion and clinical implication is that, for a same-day test occasion, one trial is sufficient for the 10 m-walk test and grip strength tests, and that repeated trials should be allowed in the timed up-and-go test, timed-stands test and nine-hole peg tests. We recommend that two trials are performed for these latter tests as such a protocol could accommodate people with various levels of impairments and physical limitations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hand grip endurance test relates to clinical state and prognosis in COPD patients better than 6-minute walk test distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovarik M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Miroslav Kovarik,1,2 Vera Joskova,1,2 Anna Patkova,1,2 Vladimir Koblizek,3 Zdenek Zadak,2 Miloslav Hronek1,2 1Department of Biological and Medical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove, Charles University, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic; 2Department of Research and Development, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic; 3Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic Purpose: Patients with COPD present peripheral muscle dysfunction and atrophy, expressed as muscle strength and endurance reduction. The goal of this study was direct dynamometric assessment of hand grip endurance and strength in relation to the stage of disease, multidimensional predictors of mortality, and 6-minute walk test (6MWT. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no previous study determining these parameters.Patients and methods: In this observational study, 58 consecutive outpatients with stable COPD and 25 volunteers without respiratory problems were compared. All COPD subjects underwent a comprehensive examination to determine COPD severity, prognostic scales, and 6MWT. Body composition, basic spirometric parameters, and hand grip strength and endurance were determined in all study participants.Results: Patients in the COPD group had a 15% decrease in maximum strength (P=0.012 and a 28% decrease in area under the force/time curve (AUC of the endurance test (P<0.001 compared to the control group. Dynamometric parameters were significantly negatively associated with the stage of disease and values of multivariable prediction indexes, and positively associated with the results of 6MWT. In most cases, closer associations were found with AUC than with 6MWT and in the gender-specific groups.Conclusion: Both hand grip strength and endurance are impaired in COPD patients in comparison with the control group. In particular, AUC could be considered as an attractive option not only to

  5. On the Implications of Sense of Control over Bicycling : Design of a Physical Stamina-Aware Bike

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chao-Lung; Lee, Da; Cheng, Yun-Maw; Sandnes, Frode Eika; Chen, Li-Chieh; Chen, Wei-Chia

    2010-01-01

    Bicycling has become a mainstream activity among the environmental aware generation. Bicycling communities have gradually shown interests in quantitative data of the bicycling experiences such as road roughness, inclination, pollution, etc. Bikers utilize these data to infer the possible stamina cost and quality of surroundings. This supports them to make a better decision. This study assumes that fitness level indexed by stamina cost could enhance a biker's sense of c...

  6. Environmental and Physiological Factors Associated With Stamina in Dogs Exercising in High Ambient Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Robbins, Patrick J.; Ramos, Meghan T.; Zanghi, Brian M.; Otto, Cynthia M.

    2017-01-01

    This IACUC approved study was performed to evaluate the environmental, physiological, and hematological components that contribute to stamina following successive bouts of exercise that included searching (5-min), agility (5-min), and ball retrieve (<10-min). Regularly exercised dogs (N = 12) were evaluated on five separate occasions. The population consisted of eight males and four females ranging in age from 8 to 23 months, which included six Labrador retrievers, three German shepherds, ...

  7. Nine Walks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Based on studies of, among others, the Situationists and their theories regarding walks as an artistic method and expression nine master students from “Studio Constructing an Archive”, Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark performed nine walks as part of the exhibition. These walks relate...... to the students’ individual mappings of Behind the Green Door, its structure and content. They highlight a number of motifs found in the exhibition which are of particular interest to the students. The walks represented reflections on the walk as an artistic method and expression. Each walk is an individual...

  8. Silk amino acids improve physical stamina and male reproductive function of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sunhee; Yeon, Seongho; Park, Dongsun; Oh, Jiyoung; Kang, Hyomin; Kim, Sunghyun; Joo, Seong Soo; Lim, Woo-Taek; Lee, Jeong-Yong; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Ki Yon; Kim, Seung Up; Kim, Jong-Choon; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a silk amino acid (SAA) preparation on the physical stamina and male reproductive function of mice were investigated. Eight-week-old male ICR mice (29-31 g) were orally administered SAA (50, 160 or 500 mg/kg) for 44 d during 30-min daily swimming exercise. The mice were subjected to a weight-loaded (5% of body weight) forced swimming on the 14th, 28th and 42nd day to determine maximum swimming time, and after a 2-d recovery period (treated with SAA without swimming exercise), parameters related to fatigue and reproductive function were analyzed from blood, muscles and reproductive organs. Repeated swimming exercise increased the maximum swimming time to some extent, in spite of a marked reduction in body weight gain, and SAA further enhanced the stamina in a dose-dependent manner. Forced swimming exercises increased blood parameters of tissue injury, but depleted blood glucose and tissue glycogen, which were substantially prevented by SAA treatment. In addition, SAA significantly reduced the muscular thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and blood corticosterone content increased by forced swimming. Swimming exercise decreased the blood testosterone level, which was recovered by SAA, leading to enhanced sperm counts. These combined results indicate that SAA not only enhances physical stamina by minimizing damage to tissues, including muscles, as well as preventing energy depletion caused by swimming stress, but also improves male reproductive function by increasing testosterone and sperm counts.

  9. Chest tcpO2 changes during constant-load treadmill walking tests in patients with claudication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouedraogo, N; Leftheriotis, G; Abraham, P; Feuilloy, M; Mahe, G; Saumet, J-L

    2011-01-01

    Changes in chest transcutaneous-pO 2 at rest (ΔtcpO 2 ) mimic absolute changes in arterial-pO 2 during moderate exercise, although the absolute starting values may dramatically differ. We retrospectively studied 485 patients (group 1), prospectively studied 292 new patients (group 2) and estimated the intra-test and the test–retest reproducibility of ΔtcpO 2 during constant-load treadmill tests: 3.2 km h −1 , 10% grade, using the cross correlation technique. Patients were classified into groups according to their best fit to nine pre-defined mathematic models. Respectively, 71% and 76% of patients of groups 1 and 2 fitted with a model showing a ΔtcpO 2 increase during and a decrease following exercise. Another 18% and 12% of the patients of groups 1 and 2 respectively fitted with a model that showed an abrupt decrease at exercise onset, a slow increase during walking and an overshoot in the recovery period, referred here as a walking-induced transcutaneous hack (WITH) profile. The mean r max value for the cross-correlation analysis was 0.919 ± 0.091 and 0.800 ± 0.129 for intra-test and test–retest reproducibility. Most profiles show the expected ΔtcpO 2 exercise-induced increase. Future studies are needed to confirm and explain the WITH profiles that we found, and screen for potential-associated diseases

  10. Improved Leg Tracking Considering Gait Phase and Spline-Based Interpolation during Turning Motion in Walk Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayanori Yorozu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Falling is a common problem in the growing elderly population, and fall-risk assessment systems are needed for community-based fall prevention programs. In particular, the timed up and go test (TUG is the clinical test most often used to evaluate elderly individual ambulatory ability in many clinical institutions or local communities. This study presents an improved leg tracking method using a laser range sensor (LRS for a gait measurement system to evaluate the motor function in walk tests, such as the TUG. The system tracks both legs and measures the trajectory of both legs. However, both legs might be close to each other, and one leg might be hidden from the sensor. This is especially the case during the turning motion in the TUG, where the time that a leg is hidden from the LRS is longer than that during straight walking and the moving direction rapidly changes. These situations are likely to lead to false tracking and deteriorate the measurement accuracy of the leg positions. To solve these problems, a novel data association considering gait phase and a Catmull–Rom spline-based interpolation during the occlusion are proposed. From the experimental results with young people, we confirm   that the proposed methods can reduce the chances of false tracking. In addition, we verify the measurement accuracy of the leg trajectory compared to a three-dimensional motion analysis system (VICON.

  11. Inter-Rater Reliability and Agreement of the 6-Minute Walk Test in Women With Hip Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla Marie; Overgaard, Jan; Tange Kristensen, Morten

    MWT in individuals with hip fractures. Methods: Two senior physiotherapy students independently examined (randomized order) a convenient sample of 20 participants; their assessments were separated by two days, and testing followed instructions from the American Thoracic Society(1). Hip pain...... was assessed with the Verbal Ranking Scale. Results: Participants (all women) with a mean (SD) age of 78.1 ± 5.9 years performed the test within a mean of 31.5 ± 5.8 days post-surgery; 10 had a cervical and 10 a trochanteric fracture. Excellent inter-rater reliability; ICC2.1 =0.92 (95% CI, 0.81 - 0...... = -0.196, P = 0.41). On the contrary, participants walked a mean of 21.7 ± 22.6 meters longer, at the second trial (P = 0.002). Participants with moderate hip fracture- related pain walked a shorter distance than those with no or light pain during the first test (P = 0.04), while this was not the case...

  12. Evidence for the different physiological significance of the 6- and 2-minute walk tests in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motl Robert W

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Researchers have recently advocated for the 2-minute walk (2MW as an alternative for the 6-minute walk (6MW to assess long distance ambulation in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS. This recommendation has not been based on physiological considerations such as the rate of oxygen consumption (V·O2 over the 6MW range. Objective This study examined the pattern of change in V·O2 over the range of the 6MW in a large sample of persons with MS who varied as a function of disability status. Method Ninety-five persons with clinically-definite MS underwent a neurological examination for generating an Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS score, and then completion of the 6MW protocol while wearing a portable metabolic unit and an accelerometer. Results There was a time main effect on V·O2 during the 6MW (p = .0001 such that V·O2 increased significantly every 30 seconds over the first 3 minutes of the 6MW, and then remained stable over the second 3 minutes of the 6MW. This occurred despite no change in cadence across the 6MW (p = .84. Conclusions The pattern of change in V·O2 indicates that there are different metabolic systems providing energy for ambulation during the 6MW in MS subjects and steady state aerobic metabolism is reached during the last 3 minutes of the 6MW. By extension, the first 3 minutes would represent a test of mixed aerobic and anaerobic work, whereas the second 3 minutes would represent a test of aerobic work during walking.

  13. [Trail walking test for assessment of motor cognitive interference in older adults. Development and evaluation of the psychometric properties of the procedure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Nadja

    2015-12-01

    Activities of daily living (ADL), such as walking, often involve the added complexity of walking while doing other activities (i.e. dual task walking). A complex walking task may require a greater motor and mental capacity, resulting in decrements in gait performance not seen for simple walking tasks. The purpose of this study was to determine if the trail walking test (TWT), the mobile adaptation of the trail making test (TMT), could be a reliable and valid early detection tool to discriminate between non-fallers and fallers. This study examined dual task costs of a cognitive and a sensorimotor task (walking) in 94 older adults aged 50-81 years (average age M = 67.4 years, SD ± 7.34). Based on the idea of the paper and pencil TMT, participants walked along a fixed pathway (TWT-1), stepped on targets with increasing sequential numbers (i.e. 1, 2, 3, TWT-2), and increasing sequential numbers and letters (i.e. 1, A, 2, B, 3, C, TWT-3). The dual task costs were calculated for each task. Additionally, the following tests were conducted: TMT, block tapping test (BTT), timed up and go (TUG) test, 30s chair rising test, 10 m walking time test with and without head turns, German physical activity questionnaire (German PAQ-50 +) and the activities-specific balance confidence (ABC-D) scale. The TWT performance times as well as errors increased with increasing age. Reliability coefficients were high (interclass correlation ICC > 0.90). Correlations between the different TWT conditions and potential falls-related predictors were moderate to high (r = -0.430 to 0.699). Of the participants 34 % reported falling in the past year. The stepwise logistic regression analysis revealed that the dual task costs for the numbers and letters (odds ratio OR 1.162, 95 % confidence interval CI 1.058-1.277, p = 0.002), the ABC-D (OR 0.767, 95 % CI 0.651-0.904, p = 0.002) and exercise (OR 1.027, 95 % CI 1.008-1.046, p = 0.006) were significantly related to

  14. Random walk on random walks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilário, M.; Hollander, den W.Th.F.; Sidoravicius, V.; Soares dos Santos, R.; Teixeira, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study a random walk in a one-dimensional dynamic random environment consisting of a collection of independent particles performing simple symmetric random walks in a Poisson equilibrium with density ¿¿(0,8). At each step the random walk performs a nearest-neighbour jump, moving to

  15. Shuttle Walking Test as Predictor of Survival in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients Enrolled in a Rehabilitation Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringbæk, Thomas; Martinez, Gerd; Brøndum, Eva

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Incremental Shuttle Walking Test (ISWT) is used to assess exercise capacity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is employed as an outcome measure for pulmonary rehabilitation. We studied the value of this test in predicting survival in COPD patients enrolled...... in a rehabilitation program. METHODS: A total of 416 patients performed an ISWT before entering a 7-week outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program. Their survival was observed over a mean period of 4.5 years (range = 1.2-7.2 years). RESULTS: During the observation period, 169 (40.6%) patients died. Univariate...... analyses showed that the ISWT as well as age, gender, present and previous tobacco smoking, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, body mass index, oxygen saturation at rest, long-term oxygen therapy, Medical Research Council dyspnea score, and treatment with oral corticosteroids were significantly...

  16. The 6-minute walk test in female fibromyalgia patients: relationship with tenderness, symptomatology, quality of life, and coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell-Baeza, Ana; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Aparicio, Virginia A; Ortega, Francisco B; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the 6-minute walk test (6-MWT) and tenderness, symptomatology, quality of life, and coping strategies in women with fibromyalgia. One hundred eighteen women with fibromyalgia aged 51.9 ± 7.3 years participated in the study. The examination included the 6-MWT, tender points, and the following questionnaires: Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Short-Form Health Survey 36 (SF-36), and Vanderbilt Pain Management Inventory. Fair correlations between the 6-MWT and the subscales of physical impairment (FIQ) and physical function (SF-36) were observed (ρ -0.365 and 0.347, respectively, both p fibromyalgia shows significant relationships, ranging from weak to fair, between the 6-MWT and tenderness, symptomatology, quality of life, and coping strategies. These findings indicate that functional capacity, as assessed by the distance walked in 6 minutes, might be important when planning the assessment, treatment, and monitoring of patients with fibromyalgia. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Six-minute walk test and respiratory muscle strength in patients with uncontrolled severe asthma: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Luiz Fernando Ferreira; Mancuzo, Eliane Viana; Rezende, Camila Farnese; Côrrea, Ricardo de Amorim

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate respiratory muscle strength and six-minute walk test (6MWT) variables in patients with uncontrolled severe asthma (UCSA). This was a cross-sectional study involving UCSA patients followed at a university hospital. The patients underwent 6MWT, spirometry, and measurements of respiratory muscle strength, as well as completing the Asthma Control Test (ACT). The Mann-Whitney test was used in order to analyze 6MWT variables, whereas the Kruskal-Wallis test was used to determine whether there was an association between the use of oral corticosteroids and respiratory muscle strength. We included 25 patients. Mean FEV1 was 58.8 ± 21.8% of predicted, and mean ACT score was 14.0 ± 3.9 points. No significant difference was found between the median six-minute walk distance recorded for the UCSA patients and that predicted for healthy Brazilians (512 m and 534 m, respectively; p = 0.14). During the 6MWT, there was no significant drop in SpO2. Mean MIP and MEP were normal (72.9 ± 15.2% and 67.6 ± 22.2%, respectively). Comparing the patients treated with at least four courses of oral corticosteroids per year and those treated with three or fewer, we found no significant differences in MIP (p = 0.15) or MEP (p = 0.45). Our findings suggest that UCSA patients are similar to normal subjects in terms of 6MWT variables and respiratory muscle strength. The use of oral corticosteroids has no apparent impact on respiratory muscle strength.

  18. Reproducibility for Heart Rate Variability Analysis during 6-Min Walk Test in Patients with Heart Failure and Agreement between Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Lays Magalhães; Prado, Gustavo Faibischew; Umeda, Iracema Ioco Kikuchi; Kawauchi, Tatiana Satie; Taboada, Adriana Marques Fróes; Azevedo, Raymundo Soares; Pereira Filho, Horacio Gomes; Grupi, César José; Souza, Hayala Cristina Cavenague; Moreira, Dalmo Antônio Ribeiro; Nakagawa, Naomi Kondo

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is a useful method to assess abnormal functioning in the autonomic nervous system and to predict cardiac events in patients with heart failure (HF). HRV measurements with heart rate monitors have been validated with an electrocardiograph in healthy subjects but not in patients with HF. We explored the reproducibility of HRV in two consecutive six-minute walk tests (6MW), 60-minute apart, using a heart rate monitor (PolarS810i) and a portable electrocardiograph (called Holter) in 50 HF patients (mean age 59 years, NYHA II, left ventricular ejection fraction ~35%). The reproducibility for each device was analysed using a paired t-test or the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Additionally, we assessed the agreement between the two devices based on the HRV indices at rest, during the 6MW and during recovery using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC), 95% confidence intervals and Bland-Altman plots. The test-retest for the HRV analyses was reproducible using Holter and PolarS810i at rest but not during recovery. In the second 6MW, patients showed significant increases in rMSSD and walking distance. The PolarS810i measurements had remarkably high concordance correlation [0.86

  19. Correlation of six minute walk test with spirometric indices in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients: A tertiary care hospital experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Kundu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Six-minute walk test (6MWT is a simple, objective, reproducible test which correlated well with different spirometric indices, and thus able to predict severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and can replace spirometry in resource poor set-up. Aims and Objectives: To find out correlation between spirometric indices (forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 , forced vital capacity (FVC, and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR and 6-minute walk distance (6MWD in COPD patients, and thus to assess whether 6MWT can replace spirometry. Settings and Design: Institution based cross-sectional observational study. Materials and Methods: Eighty patients of COPD (diagnosis confirmed by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD 2010 criteria were enrolled for the study after applying exclusion criteria. All patients underwent spirometric measurement of FEV 1 , FVC, PEFR, and ratio of FEV 1 and FVC and test repeated after bronchodilation by 200-400 μg of salbutamol. 6MWT was performed following American Thoracic Society (ATS protocol of 6MWT and distance was measured in meters. Results: We found significant linear correlation of 6MWT with post-FEV 1 (r = 0.478, P < 0.001, post-FVC (r = 0.454, P < 0.001, and post-PEFR (r = 0.408, P < 0.001, but no correlation with FEV 1 /FVC (r = 0.250, P = 0.025. We also found significant correlation of 6MWT with BODE (body mass index (BMI, airway obstruction, dyspnea, and exercise capacity index (r = −0.419, P < 0.001. Conclusions: 6MWT can be a useful replacement of spirometry in assessment of severity of COPD.

  20. Is outdoor use of the six-minute walk test with a global positioning system in stroke patients' own neighbourhoods reproducible and valid?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wevers, L.E.; Kwakkel, G.; van de Port, I.G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the reproducibility, responsiveness and concurrent validity of the six-minute walk test (6MWT) when tested outdoors in patients' own neighbourhoods using a global positioning system (GPS) or a measuring wheel. Methods: A total of 27 chronic stroke patients, discharged to their

  1. Resting and exercise haemodynamics in relation to six-minute walk test in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Emil; Kaye, David; Borlaug, Barry A

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) are characterized by functional impairment and an abnormal haemodynamic response to exercise. The six-minute walk test (6MWT) serves as a standardized test for functional capacity quantification in heart failure patients, a...

  2. Supplementation with Silk Amino Acids improves physiological parameters defining stamina in elite fin-swimmers

    OpenAIRE

    Zubrzycki, Igor Z; Ossowski, Zbigniew; Przybylski, Stanislaw; Wiacek, Magdalena; Clarke, Anna; Trabka, Bartosz

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous animal study has shown that supplementation with silk amino acid hydrolysate (SAA) increases stamina in mice. The presented study was the first formal evaluation of the influence of SAA supplementation on parameters defining physiological fitness level in humans. Methods It was a randomized controlled trial with a parallel-group design on elite male fin-swimmers. The experimental group was supplemented with 500 mg of SAA per kg of body mass, dissolved in 250 ml of a Carbor...

  3. Multimodel inference applied to oxygen recovery kinetics after 6-min walk tests in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baty, Florent; Ritz, Christian; Jensen, Signe Marie

    2017-01-01

    6-min walk tests (6MWT) are routinely performed in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]) kinetics during 6MWT can be modeled and derived parameters provide indicators of patients' exercise capacity. Post-exercise [Formula: see text] recovery...... also provides important parameters of patients' fitness which has not been extensively investigated in COPD. Several nonlinear regression models with different underlying biological assumptions may be suitable for describing recovery kinetics. Multimodel inference (model averaging) can then be used...... to capture the uncertainty in considering several models. Our aim was to apply multimodel inference in order to better understand the physiological underpinnings of [Formula: see text] recovery after 6MWT in patients with COPD. 61 patients with COPD (stages 2 to 4) were included in this study. Oxygen...

  4. Gender and age related predictive value of walk test in heart failure: do anthropometrics matter in clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenstein, L; Remppis, A; Graham, J; Schellberg, D; Sigg, C; Nelles, M; Katus, H A; Zugck, C

    2008-07-21

    The six-minute walk test (6 WT) is a valid and reliable predictor of morbidity and mortality in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients, frequently used as an endpoint or target in clinical trials. As opposed to spiroergometry, improvement of its prognostic accuracy by correction for height, weight, age and gender has not yet been attempted comprehensively despite known influences of these parameters. We recorded the 6 WT of 1035 CHF patients, attending clinic from 1995 to 2005. The 1-year prognostic value of 6 WT was calculated, alone and after correction for height, weight, BMI and/or age. Analysis was performed on the entire cohort, on males and females separately and stratified according to BMI (30 kg/m(2)). 6 WT weakly correlated with age (r=-0.32; p<0.0001), height (r=0.2; p<0.0001), weight (r=0.11; p<0.001), not with BMI (r=0.01; p=ns). The 6 WT was a strong predictor of 1-year mortality in both genders, both as a single and age corrected parameter. Parameters derived from correction of 6 WT for height, weight or BMI did not improve the prognostic value in univariate analysis for either gender. Comparison of the receiver operated characteristics showed no significant gain in prognostic accuracy from any derived variable, either for males or females. The six-minute walk test is a valid tool for risk prediction in both male and female CHF patients. In both genders, correcting 6 WT distance for height, weight or BMI alone, or adjusting for age, does not increase the prognostic power of this tool.

  5. Reference values for the incremental shuttle walk test in patients with cardiovascular disease entering exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Fernando M F; Almodhy, Meshal; Pepera, Garyfalia; Stasinopoulos, Dimitrios M; Sandercock, Gavin R H

    2017-01-01

    The incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) is used to assess functional capacity of patients entering cardiac rehabilitation. Factors such as age and sex account for a proportion of the variance in test performance in healthy individuals but there are no reference values for patients with cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to produce reference values for the ISWT. Participants were n = 548 patients referred to outpatient cardiac rehabilitation who underwent a clinical examination and performed the ISWT. We used regression to identify predictors of performance and produced centile values using the generalised additive model for location, scale and shape model. Men walked significantly further than women (395 ± 165 vs. 269 ± 118 m; t = 9.5, P < 0.001) so data were analysed separately by sex. Age (years) was the strongest predictor of performance in men (β = -5.9; 95% CI: -7.1 to -4.6 m) and women (β = -4.8; 95% CI: -6.3 to 3.3). Centile curves demonstrated a broadly linear decrease in expected ISWT values in males (25-85 years) and a more curvilinear trend in females. Patients entering cardiac rehabilitation present with highly heterogeneous ISWT values. Much of the variance in performance can be explained by patients' age and sex. Comparing absolute values with age-and sex-specific reference values may aid interpretation of ISWT performance during initial patient assessment at entry to cardiac rehabilitation.

  6. Cardiorespiratory Responses and Prediction of Peak Oxygen Uptake during the Shuttle Walking Test in Healthy Sedentary Adult Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Camila D. C.; Lacerda, Ana Cristina Rodrigues; Lage, Vanessa K. S.; Lima, Liliana P.; Fonseca, Sueli F.; de Avelar, Núbia C. P.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Mendonça, Vanessa A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The application of the Shuttle Walking Test (SWT) to assess cardiorespiratory fitness and the intensity of this test in healthy participants has rarely been studied. This study aimed to assess and correlate the cardiorespiratory responses of the SWT with the cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CEPT) and to develop a regression equation for the prediction of peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) in healthy sedentary adult men. Methods In the first stage of this study, 12 participants underwent the SWT and the CEPT on a treadmill. In the second stage, 53 participants underwent the SWT twice. In both phases, the VO2 peak, respiratory exchange ratio (R), and heart rate (HR) were evaluated. Results Similar results in VO2 peak (P>0.05), R peak (P>0.05) and predicted maximum HR (P>0.05) were obtained between the SWT and CEPT. Both tests showed strong and significant correlations of VO2 peak (r = 0.704, P = 0.01) and R peak (r = 0.737, P0.05) was found. Conclusions The SWT produced maximal cardiorespiratory responses comparable to the CEPT, and the developed equation showed viability for the prediction of VO2 peak in healthy sedentary men. PMID:25659094

  7. Walk a Mile in My Shoes: Stakeholder Accounts of Testing Experience with a Computer-Administered Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Janna; Cheng, Liying

    2015-01-01

    In keeping with the trend to elicit multiple stakeholder responses to operational tests as part of test validation, this exploratory mixed methods study examines test-taker accounts of an Internet-based (i.e., computer-administered) test in the high-stakes context of proficiency testing for university admission. In 2013, as language testing…

  8. Effects of nasal positive expiratory pressure on dynamic hyperinflation and 6-minute walk test in patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibmer, Thomas; Rüdiger, Stefan; Heitner, Claudia; Kropf-Sanchen, Cornelia; Blanta, Ioanna; Stoiber, Kathrin M; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Schumann, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation is an important target in the treatment of COPD. There is increasing evidence that positive expiratory pressure (PEP) could reduce dynamic hyperinflation during exercise. PEP application through a nasal mask and a flow resistance device might have the potential to be used during daily physical activities as an auxiliary strategy of ventilatory assistance. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of nasal PEP on lung volumes during physical exercise in patients with COPD. Twenty subjects (mean ± SD age 69.4 ± 6.4 years) with stable mild-to-severe COPD were randomized to undergo physical exercise with nasal PEP breathing, followed by physical exercise with habitual breathing, or vice versa. Physical exercise was induced by a standard 6-min walk test (6 MWT) protocol. PEP was applied by means of a silicone nasal mask loaded with a fixed-orifice flow resistor. Body plethysmography was performed immediately pre-exercise and post-exercise. Differences in mean pre- to post-exercise changes in total lung capacity (-0.63 ± 0.80 L, P = .002), functional residual capacity (-0.48 ± 0.86 L, P = .021), residual volume (-0.56 ± 0.75 L, P = .004), S(pO2) (-1.7 ± 3.4%, P = .041), and 6 MWT distance (-30.8 ± 30.0 m, P = .001) were statistically significant between the experimental and the control interventions. The use of flow-dependent expiratory pressure, applied with a nasal mask and a PEP device, might promote significant reduction of dynamic hyperinflation during walking exercise. Further studies are warranted addressing improvements in endurance performance under regular application of nasal PEP during physical activities.

  9. Inter-rater reliability and agreement of the 6-minute walk test in females with hip fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jan; Larsen, Camilla Marie; Tange Kristensen, Morten

    physiotherapy students independently examined (randomized order) a convenient sample of 20 participants; their assessments were separated by two days, and testing followed instructions from the American Thoracic Society. Hip pain was assessed with the Verbal Ranking Scale. Participants (all women) with a mean...... (SD) age of 78.1 ± 5.9 years performed the test within a mean of 31.5 ± 5.8 days post-surgery; 10 had a cervical and 10 a trochanteric fracture. Excellent inter-rater reliability; ICC2.1 = 0.92 (95% CI, 0.81 - 0.97) was found, and the standard error of measurement (SEM) and smallest real difference.......6 meters longer, at the second trial (P = 0.002). Participants with moderate hip fracture-related pain walked a shorter distance than those with no or light pain during the first test (P = 0.04), while this was not the case during the second (P = 0.25). Excellent inter-rater reliability was found...

  10. Confiabilidade do teste da caminhada de seis minutos em pacientes com miastenia gravis generalizada Reliability of the six-minute walk test in patients with generalized myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Regiane Resqueti

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo objetivou determinar a confiabilidade do teste da caminhada de seis minutos (TC6M como um teste de capacidade funcional em pacientes com miastenia gravis generalizada (MG. Foram selecionados 11 pacientes com MG - 5 homens, 6 mulheres - com idade de 55±9 anos, avaliados inicialmente quanto à função fulmonar, que se submeteram a três TC6M em dias diferentes. Durante e/ou após cada teste foram medidas freqüência cardíaca e saturação de oxigênio (por oxímetro portátil, sensação de dispnéia (pela escala de Borg e distância percorrida. Nos três testes as distâncias percorridas foram 498 m, 517 m e 520 m (respectivamente 99%, 103% e 104% do valor predito. Em média, a freqüência cardíaca, dispnéia e saturação de oxigênio mostraram comportamento constante nos três testes. Foram encontradas alta confiabilidade relativa, com coeficiente de correlação interclasse maior que 0,90 entre os testes (TC6M1-TC6M2, 0,960; TC6M1-TC6M3, 0,945; e TC6M2-TC6M3, 0,970 e confiabilidade absoluta de 4%, 3,5% e 4,8%, com reprodutibilidade de 11%, 9,8% e 13,4%, respectivamente para o primeiro, segundo e terceiro testes. Os limites superiores e inferiores de concordância e o valor médio das médias das diferenças (bias calculados pelo teste de Bland-Altman mostraram-se clinicamente aceitáveis. Conclui-se que o TC6M se mostrou seguro, confiável e reprodutível, podendo ser aplicado para avaliação e seguimento da tolerância ao exercício em pacientes com MG generalizada.The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of the six minutes walking test (6MWT as a functional capacity test for patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (MG. Eleven patients with generalized MG (5 men, six women, aged 55±9 years, were first assessed as to pulmonary function and then submitted to three 6MWT in different days. Heart rate and oxygen saturation were measured (by means of portable oxymeter during, and dyspnea (by the Borg scale and

  11. SF36 physical functioning scale and 2-minute walk test advocated as core qualifiers to evaluate physical functioning in patients with late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolwijk-Swüste, Janneke M.; Beelen, Anita; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J.; Nollet, Frans; Stolwijk-Swüste, J. M.; Lankhorst, G. J.; Dekker, J.; van Dijk, G. M.; van den Ende, C. H. M.; Post, B.; de Haan, R. J.; Speelman, H.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To select a questionnaire and walking capacity test based on comparison of clinimetric properties and mutual association to be used as "core" qualifiers for physical functioning in patients with late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis. DESIGN: Repeated-measures at 3-week intervals. SUBJECTS:

  12. Sf36 physical functioning scale and 2-minute walk test advocated as core qualifiers to evaluate physical functioning in patients with late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolwijk-Swuste, J.M.; Beelen, J.A.J.M.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Nollet, F.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To select a questionnaire and walking capacity test based on comparison of clinimetric properties and mutual association to be used as "core" qualifiers for physical functioning in patients with late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis. Design: Repeated-measures at 3-week intervals. Subjects:

  13. Comparison of six-minute walking tests conducted with and without supplemental oxygen in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and exercise-induced oxygen desaturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozalevli, S.; Ozden, A.; Gocen, Z.; Cimrin, Arif Hikmet

    2007-01-01

    There are contradictory reports in the literature on the supplemental oxygen administered before or after exercise tests. In light of this, we compared the results of 6-minute walking tests performed in room-air conditions (A6MWT) in patients with supplemental oxygen (O6MWT) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and exercise-induced oxygen desaturation. Thirty-one patients with COPD were included in the study. The A6MWT and O6MWT were performed in randomized order on each patient. During the tests, severity dyspenia and tiring of the leg were evaluated by the Modified Borg Scale. Heart rate and pulsed oxygen saturation and blood pressure were measured by pulse oximeter. Walking distance was longer with the O6MWT than with the A6MWT (P=0.001). The O6MWT resulted in a smaller increase in dyspnea, leg fatigue and heart rate and a smaller drop in pulsed saturation than the A6MWT (P<0.05). The walking distance with O6MWT correlated with respiratory function and hemodynamic parameters (P<0.05). The O6MWT, which produced less hemodynamic stress and was safer than the A6MWT, might provide more accurate information on exercise limitations for patients with COPD. These results suggest that the O6MWT can be used as a standard walking exercise test for patients with COPd and exercise-induced oxygen desaturation. (author)

  14. Exercise training improves breathing strategy and performance during the six-minute walk test in obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Monique; Michallet, Anne-Sophie; Perrin, Claudine; Levy, Patrick; Wuyam, Bernard; Flore, Patrice

    2014-08-15

    We aimed to examine ventilatory responses during the six-minute walk test in healthy-weight and obese adolescents before and after exercise training. Twenty obese adolescents (OB) (age: 14.5±1.7 years; BMI: 34.0±4.7kg·m(-2)) and 20 age and gender-matched healthy-weight adolescents (HW) (age: 15.5±1.5 years; BMI: 19.9±1.4kg·m(-2)) completed six-minute walk test during which breath-by-breath gas analysis and expiratory flow limitation (expFL) were measured. OB participated in a 12-week exercise-training program. Comparison between HW and OB participants showed lower distance achieved during the 6MWT in OB (-111.0m, 95%CI: -160.1 to 62.0, p<0.05) and exertional breathlessness was greater (+0.78 a.u., 95%CI: 0.091-3.27, p=0.039) when compared with HW. Obese adolescents breathed at lower lung volumes, as evidenced by lower end expiratory and end inspiratory lung volumes during exercise (p<0.05). Prevalence of expFL (8 OB vs 2 HW, p=0.028) and mean expFL (14.9±21.9 vs 5.32±14.6% VT, p=0.043, in OB and HW) were greater in OB. After exercise training, mean increase in the distance achieved during the 6MWT was 64.5 meters (95%CI: 28.1-100.9, p=0.014) and mean decrease in exertional breathlessness was 1.62 (95%CI: 0.47-2.71, p=0.05). Obese adolescents breathed at higher lung volumes, as evidenced by the increase in end inspiratory lung volume from rest to 6-min exercise (9.9±13.4 vs 20.0±13.6%TLC, p<0.05). Improved performance was associated with improved change in end inspiratory lung volume from rest to 6-min exercise (r=0.65, p=0.025). Our results suggest that exercise training can improve breathing strategy during submaximal exercise in obese adolescents and that this increase is associated with greater exercise performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. MRC chronic Dyspnea Scale: Relationships with cardiopulmonary exercise testing and 6-minute walk test in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roussos Charis

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exertional dyspnea is the most prominent and disabling feature in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. The Medical Research Chronic (MRC chronic dyspnea score as well as physiological measurements obtained during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET and the 6-minute walk test (6MWT are shown to provide information on the severity and survival of disease. Methods We prospectively recruited IPF patients and examined the relationship between the MRC score and either CPET or 6MWT parameters known to reflect physiologic derangements limiting exercise capacity in IPF patients Results Twenty-five patients with IPF were included in the study. Significant correlations were found between the MRC score and the distance (r = -.781, p 2 at the initiation and the end (r = -.542, p = 0.005 and r = -.713, p VO2 peak/kg (r = -.731, p 2 at peak exercise (r = -. 682, p 2 slope (r = .731, p 2 at AT (r = .630, p = 0.002 and the Borg scale at peak exercise (r = .50, p = 0.01 for the CPET. In multiple logistic regression analysis, the only variable independently related to the MRC is the distance walked at the 6MWT. Conclusion In this population of IPF patients a good correlation was found between the MRC chronic dyspnoea score and physiological parameters obtained during maximal and submaximal exercise testing known to reflect ventilatory impairment and exercise limitation as well as disease severity and survival. This finding is described for the first time in the literature in this group of patients as far as we know and could explain why a simple chronic dyspnea score provides reliable prognostic information on IPF.

  16. The Role of Christian Education in the Development of Spiritual Stamina in Young Adult Graduates of Christian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Violet E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative grounded theory study was to investigate the personal development of spiritual stamina in graduates of Christian high schools who attend secular universities or colleges. Participants are comprised of a theoretical sampling of 16 young adult graduates of one of four Christian schools in Southeastern United States.…

  17. Respiratory muscle strength and pulmonary function in children with rhinitis and asthma after a six-minute walk test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ana Alice de Almeida; Barros, Camila Moraes; Santos, Cássia Giulliane Costa; Dos Santos, Maria Renata Aragão; Silva, José Rodrigo Santos; Silva Junior, Walderi Monteiro da; Simões, Silvia de Magalhães

    2018-03-01

    Rhinitis and asthma decrease quality of life. Few studies have assessed the performance of children with asthma or rhinitis under submaximal exercise. We evaluated maximal respiratory pressures, spirometric parameters, and ability to sustain submaximal exercise in these children before and after the 6-minute walk test (6MWT), compared to healthy children. This cross-sectional, analytical study included 89 children aged 6-12 years in outpatient follow-up: 27 healthy (H), 31 with rhinitis (R), and 31 with mild asthma under control (A). Pulmonary function parameters and maximal respiratory pressures were measured before and 5, 10, and 30 minutes after the 6MWT. Wilcoxon test was used to compare numerical numerical variables between two groups and analysis of variance or Kruskal-Wallis test for comparison among three groups. Total distance traveled in the 6MWT was similar among the three groups. Compared to pre-test values, VEF1 (Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second), VEF0.75 (Forced Expiratory Volume in 0.75 second), and FEF25-75 (Forced Expiratory Flow 25-75% of the Forced Vital Capacity - CVF - curve) decreased significantly after the 6MWT in group A, and VEF0.75, FEF25-75, and VEF1/CVF decreased significantly in group R. Groups A and R had lower Maximum Inspiratory Pressure values than group H before and after the 6MWT at all time points assessed. The findings suggest that children with rhinitis and mild asthma present with alterations in respiratory muscle strength and pulmonary function not associated with clinical complaints, reinforcing the concept of the united airways.

  18. Environmental and Physiological Factors Associated With Stamina in Dogs Exercising in High Ambient Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Robbins

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This IACUC approved study was performed to evaluate the environmental, physiological, and hematological components that contribute to stamina following successive bouts of exercise that included searching (5-min, agility (5-min, and ball retrieve (<10-min. Regularly exercised dogs (N = 12 were evaluated on five separate occasions. The population consisted of eight males and four females ranging in age from 8 to 23 months, which included six Labrador retrievers, three German shepherds, and one each English springer spaniel, German wirehaired pointer, and Dutch shepherd. The exercise period was up to 30 min with 5 min of intermittent rest between the exercise bouts or until a designated trainer determined that the dog appeared fatigued (e.g., curled tongue while panting, seeking shade, or voluntary reluctance to retrieve. At the end of the exercise period, pulse rate (PR, core temperature, blood lactate, and venous blood gas were collected. The median outdoor temperature was 28.9°C (84°F (IQR; 27.2–30°C/81–86°F and median humidity was 47% (IQR; 40–57%. Median duration of exercise was 27 min (IQR; 25–29. No dog showed signs of heat stress that required medical intervention. The components used to measure stamina in this study were total activity, post-exercise core body temperature (CBT, and increase in CBT. When controlling for breed, total activity, as measured by omnidirectional accelerometer device, could be predicted from a linear combination of the independent variables: pre-exercise activity (p = 0.008, post-exercise activity (p < 0.001, outdoor temperature (p = 0.005, reduction in base excess in extracellular fluid compartment (BEecf (p = 0.044, and decrease in TCO2 (p = 0.005. When controlling for breed and sex, increase in CBT could be predicted from a linear combination of the independent variables: study day (p = 0.005, increase in PR (p < 0.001, increase in lactate (p = 0

  19. Environmental and Physiological Factors Associated With Stamina in Dogs Exercising in High Ambient Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Patrick J; Ramos, Meghan T; Zanghi, Brian M; Otto, Cynthia M

    2017-01-01

    This IACUC approved study was performed to evaluate the environmental, physiological, and hematological components that contribute to stamina following successive bouts of exercise that included searching (5-min), agility (5-min), and ball retrieve (dogs ( N  = 12) were evaluated on five separate occasions. The population consisted of eight males and four females ranging in age from 8 to 23 months, which included six Labrador retrievers, three German shepherds, and one each English springer spaniel, German wirehaired pointer, and Dutch shepherd. The exercise period was up to 30 min with 5 min of intermittent rest between the exercise bouts or until a designated trainer determined that the dog appeared fatigued (e.g., curled tongue while panting, seeking shade, or voluntary reluctance to retrieve). At the end of the exercise period, pulse rate (PR), core temperature, blood lactate, and venous blood gas were collected. The median outdoor temperature was 28.9°C (84°F) (IQR; 27.2-30°C/81-86°F) and median humidity was 47% (IQR; 40-57%). Median duration of exercise was 27 min (IQR; 25-29). No dog showed signs of heat stress that required medical intervention. The components used to measure stamina in this study were total activity, post-exercise core body temperature (CBT), and increase in CBT. When controlling for breed, total activity, as measured by omnidirectional accelerometer device, could be predicted from a linear combination of the independent variables: pre-exercise activity ( p  = 0.008), post-exercise activity ( p  temperature ( p  = 0.005), reduction in base excess in extracellular fluid compartment (BEecf) ( p  = 0.044), and decrease in TCO 2 ( p  = 0.005). When controlling for breed and sex, increase in CBT could be predicted from a linear combination of the independent variables: study day ( p  = 0.005), increase in PR ( p  temperature, pre- and post-exercise activity, and the metabolic parameters are important

  20. Comparison of six-minute walk test in children with moderate/severe asthma with reference values for healthy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Barboza de Andrade

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: asthmatic children's performance in the 6MWT evaluated through distance walked is significantly lower than the predicted values for healthy children of the same age, and is directly influenced by sedentary life style.

  1. Sacubitril/valsartan and short-term changes in the 6-minute walk test: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, Paola; Palau, Patricia; Domínguez, Eloy; Faraudo, Mercedes; Núñez, Eduardo; Guri, Olga; Mollar, Anna; Sanchis, Juan; Bayés-Genís, Antoni; Núñez, Julio

    2018-02-01

    Impaired exercise capacity is the most disabling symptom in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Despite sacubitril/valsartan showing reduced long-term morbidity and mortality over enalapril in HFrEF, its effects on short-term functional capacity remain uncertain. We sought to evaluate the effects of sacubitril/valsartan on a 30-day six-minute walk test in eligible patients with HFrEF. From November 1, 2016 to February 1, 2017, a total of 58 stable symptomatic patients with HFrEF were eligible for sacubitril/valsartan and underwent 6-MWT before and 30days after initiation of sacubitril/valsartan therapy. A mixed-effects model for repeated-measures was used to analyze the changes. Mean age was 70±11years. 72.4% males, 46.6% with ischemic heart disease, and 51.7% on NYHA functional class III were included. The mean (SD) values of baseline LVEF and 6MWT were 30±7%, and 300±89m, respectively. The median (IQR) of NT-proBNP at baseline was 2701pg/ml (1087-4200). Compared with baseline, the 6-MWT distance increased significantly at 30days by 13.9% (+∆=41.8m (33.4-50.2); psacubitril/valsartan was associated with an improvement in exercise tolerance in symptomatic patients with HFrEF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Development and Preliminary Test of a Powered Alternately Walking Exoskeleton With the Wheeled Foot for Paraplegic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingchuan; Ji, Linhong; Wang, Rencheng

    2018-02-01

    Upright walking has both physical and social meanings for paraplegic patients. The main purpose of this paper is to reduce the automatic functioning of the powered exoskeleton and enable the user to fully control the walking procedure in real-time, aiming to further improve the engagement of the patient during rehabilitation training. For this prototype, a custom-made hub motor was placed at the bottom of the exoskeleton's foot, and a pair of crutches with the embedded wireless controller were utilized as the auxiliary device. The user could alternatively press the button of the crutch to control the movement of the leg and by repeating this procedure, the user could complete a continuous walking motion. For safety, an automatic brake and mechanical limitation for maximum step length were implemented. A gait analysis was performed to evaluate the exoskeleton's motion capability and corresponding response of user's major muscles. The kinematic results of this paper showed that this exoskeleton could assist the user to walk in a motion trend close to the normally walk, especially for ankle joint. The electromyography results indicated that this exoskeleton could decrease the loading burden of the user's lower limb while requiring more involvements of upper-limb muscles to maintain balance while walking.

  3. Supplementation with Silk Amino Acids improves physiological parameters defining stamina in elite fin-swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycki, Igor Z; Ossowski, Zbigniew; Przybylski, Stanislaw; Wiacek, Magdalena; Clarke, Anna; Trabka, Bartosz

    2014-01-01

    Previous animal study has shown that supplementation with silk amino acid hydrolysate (SAA) increases stamina in mice. The presented study was the first formal evaluation of the influence of SAA supplementation on parameters defining physiological fitness level in humans. It was a randomized controlled trial with a parallel-group design on elite male fin-swimmers. The experimental group was supplemented with 500 mg of SAA per kg of body mass, dissolved in 250 ml of a Carborade Drink®; the control group with Carborade Drink® alone; 3 times a day, 30 minutes prior to the training session. Changes discerned in the experimental group were more pronounced than those observed in the control group. For example, the change in the serum lactic acid concentration observed in the experimental group was sevenfold less than in the control group [21.8 vs. -3.7 L% for the control and experimental groups, respectively]. An analysis of a lactate profile as a function of a maximal swimming velocity exposed a statistically significant positive shift in the swimming velocity of 0.05 m/s, at the lactate concentration of 4 mmol/L in the experimental group. There was also a positive, although statistically insignificant, increase of 2.6 L% in serum testosterone levels in the experimental group. This study showed that a 12-day SAA supplementation combined with an extensive and rigorous training schedule was sufficient to increase an aerobic stamina. However, this phenomenon was associated with an augmented level of muscular damage (an increased level of creatine phosphokinase in the experimental group).

  4. Right to try? Fosfoetanolamina, di bella e stamina: uma análise ítalo-brasileira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARBOSA, Elina Magnan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho possui como objetivo a análise do fornecimento judicial de medicamentos em fase de teste laboratorial, por meio de um estudo comparado dos casos italianos di Bella e Stamina e do caso brasileiro da fosfoetanolamina da Universidade de São Paulo. Para tanto, foram considerados os percursos judiciais dos três casos, as opiniões doutrinárias e repercussões médicas anunciadas pela mídia e pelos órgãos oficiais interessados. Como resultado, observou-se, no Brasil, uma tendência jurisprudencial que desponta, ainda que não confirmada, no sentido de que a realização do direito à saúde não pode prescindir da segurança médica, afastando-se, em princípio, a obrigação do Estado de fornecer tratamentos experimentais por meio de sua rede de saúde. Na Itália, por outro lado, após a experiência judicial e médica negativa decorrente de dois casos emblemáticos, a Corte Constitucional italiana (Corte Costituzionale parece ter mudado de orientação, no sentido da não obrigação do fornecimento de tratamento experimental por parte do Servizio Sanitario Nazionale. No âmbito das ações com pretensão de curas compassivas, as normas técnicas, representadas pelas boas práticas clínicas, surgem como zíper de união entre o direito, a ciência e a ética.

  5. The 6-minute walk test, motor function measure and quantitative thigh muscle MRI in Becker muscular dystrophy: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Dirk; Hafner, Patricia; Rubino, Daniela; Schmid, Maurice; Neuhaus, Cornelia; Jung, Hans; Bieri, Oliver; Haas, Tanja; Gloor, Monika; Fischmann, Arne; Bonati, Ulrike

    2016-07-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) has an incidence of 1 in 16 000 male births. This cross-sectional study investigated the relation between validated functional scores and quantitative MRI (qMRI) of thigh muscles in 20 ambulatory BMD patients, aged 18.3-60 years (mean 31.2; SD 11.1). Clinical assessments included the motor function measure (MFM) and its subscales, as well as timed function tests such as the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and the timed 10-m run/walk test. Quantitative MRI of the thigh muscles included the mean fat fraction (MFF) using a 2-point Dixon (2-PD) technique, and transverse relaxation time (T2) measurements. The mean MFM value was 80.4%, SD 9.44 and the D1 subscore 54.5%, SD 19.9. The median 6MWT was 195m, IQR 160-330.2. The median 10-m run/walk test was 7.4 seconds, IQR 6.1-9.3. The mean fat fraction of the thigh muscles was 55.6%, SD 17.4%, mean T2 relaxation times of all muscles: 69.9 ms, SD 14.4. The flexors had the highest MFF and T2 relaxation times, followed by the extensors and the adductors. MFF and global T2 relaxation times were highly negatively correlated with the MFM total, D1-subscore and 6MWT, and positively correlated with the 10 m run/walk test time (p < 0.01). Age was not correlated with MFF, global T2 relaxation time or clinical assessments. Both MFF and T2 measures in the thigh muscle were well correlated with clinical function in BMD and may serve as a surrogate outcome measure in clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of functional capacity for exercise in children and adolescents with sickle-cell disease through the six-minute walk test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostyn, Sandro V; Carvalho, Werther B de; Johnston, Cíntia; Braga, Josefina A P

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate lung functional capacity (FC) for physical exercise in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD) through the six-minute walk test (6MWT). A cross-sectional prospective study was performed to evaluate the FC of 46 patients with SCD through the 6MWT. The following parameters were assessed: heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), peripheral pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2), peak expiratory flow (PEF), blood pressure (systolic and diastolic), dyspnea, and leg fatigue (modified Borg scale) at rest, in the end of the test, and ten minutes after the 6MWT. The total distance walked was also recorded. For statistical analysis, the parametric variables were analyzed using the paired Student's t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Bonferroni multiple comparisons, with a significance level set at p ≤ 0.05. The 46 patients were aged age 9.15±3.06 years, presented baseline Hb of 9.49±1.67g/dL, and walked 480.89±68.70 m. SCD diagnosis was as follows: group 1- HbSS (n=20)/HbSβ(0)-thalassemia (n=3) and group 2 - HbSC (n=20)/HbSβ(+)-thalassemia (n=3). Regarding total distance walked, patients in group 1 walked a shorter distance than patients in group 2 (459.39±57.19 vs. 502.39±73.60 m; p=0.032). There was no statistical difference regarding PEF in the three moments of evaluation. The SpO2 in ambient air and SpO2 with O2 differed between groups 1 and 2 (p<0.001 vs. p=0.002), as well as the RR (p=0.001). These patients showed a lower FC for exercise than that predicted for the age range in the literature. Patients diagnosed with HbSS/Sβ0-thalassemia had a lower performance in the test than those with HbSC/Sβ(+)-thalassemia regarding total distance walked, RR, and SpO2 after the 6MWT. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. [Distance covered in walking test after heart surgery in patients over 70 years of age: outcome indicator for the assessment of quality of care in intensive rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Feo, Stefania; Mazza, Antonio; Camera, Federica; Maestri, Antonella; Opasich, Cristina; Tramarin, Roberto

    2003-06-01

    For quality-of-care assessment of rehabilitation programs after cardiac surgery, measures of functional recovery have been proposed as outcome indicators. Aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, the safety and the informative content of the 6-min walking test (6 WT) performed in elderly patients soon after admission in an intensive rehabilitation program after cardiac surgery. Population consists of 115 consecutive over-70 patients admitted to an in-hospital rehabilitation program after cardiac surgery. Within 7 days of admission, in 107 patients (93%) clinical conditions allowed the execution of a 6 WT, on ECG telemetry monitoring. Resting and exertional heart rate, score of fatigue (Borg Scale 1 divided by 20), symptoms, ECG alterations and arrhythmias were recorded. Other considered variables were: comorbidity (Charlson index), length of stay and complications occurring during the whole surgical and rehabilitation in-hospitalisation stay, disability (nursing needs: Maslow and nursing chart), functional status at discharge, left ventricular ejection fraction, number of exercise treatment sessions, self-perceived health-status at admission and at discharge (EuroQoL questionnaire). The mean walked distance was 194 +/- 93 m. No complication neither ECG alteration occurred during the 6 WT; only isolated premature ventricular beats were recorded in 26 pts. Heart rate increased from 86 +/- 13 at rest to 95 +/- 17 bpm at the end of the 6 WT (p needs, self-perceived health-status and functional capacity at discharge differed between patients who performed the 6 WT within 4 days compared with those who did it later, and between patients who walked < or = 120 m (lower quartile) compared with those who walked more. In elderly patients after cardiac surgery the 6 WT performed within the first week of admission in rehabilitation unit is feasible and safe. Simple cut-offs like timing of the 6 WT and walking performance identify more severe patients with lower

  8. Haemodynamic effects of dual-chamber pacing versus ventricular pacing during a walk test in patients with depressed or normal left ventricular function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro, Adele; Salvatore, Marco; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Institute of Biostructure and Bioimages of the National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); Duilio, Carlo; Santomauro, Maurizio [University Federico II, Department of Clinical Medicine, Cardiovascular and Immunological Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2005-09-01

    Dual-chamber rate-modulated pacing provides haemodynamic benefits compared with ventricular pacing at rest, but it is unclear whether this also holds true during physical exercise in patients with heart failure. This study assessed the haemodynamic response to a walk test during dual-chamber pacing and ventricular pacing in patients with depressed or normal left ventricular (LV) function. Twelve patients with an LV ejection fraction <50% and 11 patients with an LV ejection fraction {>=}50% underwent two randomised 6-min walk tests under dual-chamber rate-modulated pacing and ventricular pacing at a fixed rate of 70 beats/min. All patients had a dual-chamber pacemaker implanted for complete heart block. LV function was monitored by a radionuclide ambulatory system. In patients with depressed LV function, the change from dual-chamber pacing to ventricular pacing induced a decrease in end-systolic volume at the peak of the walk test (P<0.05), with no difference in end-diastolic volume. As a consequence, higher increases in LV ejection fraction (P<0.0001) and stroke volume (P<0.01) were observed during ventricular pacing. No difference in cardiac output was found between the two pacing modes. In patients with normal LV function, the change from dual-chamber pacing to ventricular pacing induced a significant decrease in cardiac output (P<0.005 at rest and P<0.05 at the peak of the walk test). Compared with dual-chamber rate-modulated pacing, ventricular pacing improves cardiac function and does not affect cardiac output during physical activity in patients with depressed LV function, whereas it impairs cardiac output in those with normal function. (orig.)

  9. Gender disparity of changes in heart rate during the six-minute walk test among patients with chronic obstructive airway disease

    OpenAIRE

    Esmaeil Alibakhshi; Luis Lores Obradors; Raffaele Fiorillo; Mostafa Ghaneii; Ali Qazvini

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of chronic morbidity and mortality worldwide. Clarify; COPD is the fifth leading cause of death and disease burden globally. Aims The purpose of this study is to compare the gender disparity of changes in heart rate during 6-minute walk test (6MWT) among patients with chronic obstructive airway disease (COPD). We also aimed to assess the relationship between change in heart rate and body mas...

  10. Correlation of 6-min walk test with left ventricular function and quality of life in heart failure due to Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambela, Mayara C; Mediano, Mauro F F; Ferreira, Roberto R; Japiassú, André M; Waghabi, Mariana C; da Silva, Gilberto M S; Saraiva, Roberto M

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the correlation of the total distance walked during the six-minute walk test (6MWT) with left ventricular function and quality of life in patients with Chagas Disease (ChD) complicated by heart failure. This is a cross-sectional study of adult patients with ChD and heart failure diagnosed based on Framingham criteria. 6MWT was performed following international guidelines. New York Heart Association functional class, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) serum levels, echocardiographic parameters and quality of life (SF-36 and MLHFQ questionnaires) were determined and their correlation with the distance covered at the 6MWT was tested. Forty adult patients (19 male; 60 ± 12 years old) with ChD and heart failure were included in this study. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 35 ± 12%. Only two patients (5%) ceased walking before 6 min had elapsed. There were no cardiac events during the test. The average distance covered was 337 ± 105 metres. The distance covered presented a negative correlation with BNP (r = -0.37; P = 0.02), MLHFQ quality-of-life score (r = -0.54; P = 0.002), pulmonary artery systolic pressure (r = -0.42; P = 0.02) and the degree of diastolic dysfunction (r = -0.36; P = 0.03) and mitral regurgitation (r = -0.53; P = 0.0006) and positive correlation with several domains of the SF-36 questionnaire. The distance walked during the 6MWT correlates with BNP, quality of life and parameters of left ventricular diastolic function in ChD patients with heart failure. We propose this test to be adopted in endemic areas with limited resources to aid in the identification of patients who need referral for tertiary centres for further evaluation and treatment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Haemodynamic effects of dual-chamber pacing versus ventricular pacing during a walk test in patients with depressed or normal left ventricular function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro, Adele; Salvatore, Marco; Cuocolo, Alberto; Duilio, Carlo; Santomauro, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Dual-chamber rate-modulated pacing provides haemodynamic benefits compared with ventricular pacing at rest, but it is unclear whether this also holds true during physical exercise in patients with heart failure. This study assessed the haemodynamic response to a walk test during dual-chamber pacing and ventricular pacing in patients with depressed or normal left ventricular (LV) function. Twelve patients with an LV ejection fraction <50% and 11 patients with an LV ejection fraction ≥50% underwent two randomised 6-min walk tests under dual-chamber rate-modulated pacing and ventricular pacing at a fixed rate of 70 beats/min. All patients had a dual-chamber pacemaker implanted for complete heart block. LV function was monitored by a radionuclide ambulatory system. In patients with depressed LV function, the change from dual-chamber pacing to ventricular pacing induced a decrease in end-systolic volume at the peak of the walk test (P<0.05), with no difference in end-diastolic volume. As a consequence, higher increases in LV ejection fraction (P<0.0001) and stroke volume (P<0.01) were observed during ventricular pacing. No difference in cardiac output was found between the two pacing modes. In patients with normal LV function, the change from dual-chamber pacing to ventricular pacing induced a significant decrease in cardiac output (P<0.005 at rest and P<0.05 at the peak of the walk test). Compared with dual-chamber rate-modulated pacing, ventricular pacing improves cardiac function and does not affect cardiac output during physical activity in patients with depressed LV function, whereas it impairs cardiac output in those with normal function. (orig.)

  12. Updated assessment of the six-minute walk test as predictor of acute radiation-induced pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Jingfang; Zhang Junan; Zhou Sumin; Das, Shiva; Hollis, Donna R.; Folz, Rodney J.; Wong, Terence Z.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the utility of the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) as a predictor of symptomatic radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP). Methods: As part of a prospective trial to study radiation-induced lung injury, 53 patients receiving thoracic radiotherapy (RT) underwent a pre-RT 6MWT, pulmonary function tests (PFTs), and had ≥3-month follow-up for prospective assessment of Grade 2 or worse RP (requiring medications or worse). Dosimetric parameters (e.g., the percentage of lung receiving ≥30 Gy) were extracted from the lung dose-volume histogram. The correlations between the 6MWT and PFT results were assessed using Pearson's correlation. The receiver operating characteristic technique was used in patient subgroups to evaluate the predictive capacities for RP of the dosimetric parameters, 6MWT results, and PFT results, or the combination (using discriminant analysis) of all three metrics. ROCKIT software was used to compare the receiver operating characteristic areas between each predictive model. The association of the decline in 6MWT with the development of RP was evaluated using Fisher's exact test. Results: The pre-RT PFT and 6MWT results correlated weakly (r = 0.44-0.57, p ≤ 0.001), suggesting that they measure somewhat different physiologic functions. Of the 53 patients, 9 (17%) developed RP. The dose-volume histogram-based dosimetric parameters were the best single-metric model for predicting RP (e.g., percentage of lung receiving ≥30 Gy, receiver operating characteristic area 0.73, p = 0.03). Including the PFT or 6MWT results with the percentage of lung receiving ≥30 Gy did not improve the predictions. The predictive abilities of dosimetric-based models improved when the analysis was restricted to those patients whose tumors were not causing regional lung dysfunction. No correlation was found between the decline in the 6MWT result and the RP rate (p = 0.6). Conclusion: Although the PFTs and 6MWT are related to each other, the correlation coefficients

  13. Potensi Kapsul Bee Pollen Plus sebagai Food Supplement Inovatif Peningkat Stamina dalam Rangka Pencegahan Penggunaan Doping pada Atlet Makassar : Uji Coba pada Mahasiswa UKM Sepak Bola

    OpenAIRE

    Utomo, Emilia; Saidah, Lia Nurmilatun; Utami, Iin Fadhilah; Sartini, Sartini

    2017-01-01

    Doping used for stamina enhancement and athletes' performance is actually a medicine that has negative effects on health and potentially causes an addiction. Therefore, it is necessary supplements that can increase the stamina and endurance of an athlete and at the same time could minimize the possibility of doping USAge. Bee pollen is one of the products of bees which is rich nutrients. The nutrients content of Bee pollen such as carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, minerals, vitamins, and polyp...

  14. A Case Study on the Walking Speed of Pedestrian at the Bus Terminal Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Ali Mohd Firdaus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Walking speed is one of the factors in understanding the pedestrian walking behaviours. Every pedestrian has different level of walking speed that are regulated by some factors such as gender and age. This study was conducted at a bus terminal area with two objectives in which the first one was to determine the average walking speed of pedestrian by considering the factors of age, gender, people with and without carrying baggage; and the second one was to make a comparison of the average walking speed that considered age as the factor of comparison between pedestrian at the bus terminal area and crosswalk. Demographic factor of pedestrian walking speed in this study are gender and age consist of male, female, and 7 groups of age categories that are children, adult men and women, senior adult men and women, over 70 and disabled person. Data of experiment was obtained by making a video recording of the movement of people that were walking and roaming around at the main lobby for 45 minutes by using a camcorder. Hence, data analysis was done by using software named Human Behaviour Simulator (HBS for analysing the data extracted from the video. The result of this study was male pedestrian walked faster than female with the average of walking speed 1.13m/s and 1.07m/s respectively. Averagely, pedestrian that walked without carrying baggage had higher walking speed compared to pedestrian that were carrying baggage with the speed of 1.02m/s and 0.70m/s respectively. Male pedestrian walks faster than female because they have higher level of stamina and they are mostly taller than female pedestrian. Furthermore, pedestrian with baggage walks slower because baggage will cause distractions such as pedestrian will have more weight to carry and people tend to walk slower.

  15. A Case Study on the Walking Speed of Pedestrian at the Bus Terminal Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdaus Mohamad Ali, Mohd; Salleh Abustan, Muhamad; Hidayah Abu Talib, Siti; Abustan, Ismail; Rahman, Noorhazlinda Abd; Gotoh, Hitoshi

    2018-03-01

    Walking speed is one of the factors in understanding the pedestrian walking behaviours. Every pedestrian has different level of walking speed that are regulated by some factors such as gender and age. This study was conducted at a bus terminal area with two objectives in which the first one was to determine the average walking speed of pedestrian by considering the factors of age, gender, people with and without carrying baggage; and the second one was to make a comparison of the average walking speed that considered age as the factor of comparison between pedestrian at the bus terminal area and crosswalk. Demographic factor of pedestrian walking speed in this study are gender and age consist of male, female, and 7 groups of age categories that are children, adult men and women, senior adult men and women, over 70 and disabled person. Data of experiment was obtained by making a video recording of the movement of people that were walking and roaming around at the main lobby for 45 minutes by using a camcorder. Hence, data analysis was done by using software named Human Behaviour Simulator (HBS) for analysing the data extracted from the video. The result of this study was male pedestrian walked faster than female with the average of walking speed 1.13m/s and 1.07m/s respectively. Averagely, pedestrian that walked without carrying baggage had higher walking speed compared to pedestrian that were carrying baggage with the speed of 1.02m/s and 0.70m/s respectively. Male pedestrian walks faster than female because they have higher level of stamina and they are mostly taller than female pedestrian. Furthermore, pedestrian with baggage walks slower because baggage will cause distractions such as pedestrian will have more weight to carry and people tend to walk slower.

  16. Long-term impact of pre-operative physical rehabilitation protocol on the 6-min walk test of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.L. dos Santos Alves

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Monitored physical activities in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS have been shown to improve physical performance, endurance and cardiopulmonary function and may be assessed by the 6-min walk test (6MWT. We aimed to evaluate the long-term results of the 6MWT after a rehabilitation protocol employed before surgical correction for AIS. Methods: This prospective randomized clinical trial studied the impact of a 4-month pre-operative physical rehabilitation protocol on post-operative cardiopulmonary function and physical endurance, by using the 6MWT, in patients with AIS submitted to surgical correction, comparing them to matched controls without physical rehabilitation. Studied variables were heart and respiratory rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, peripheral blood oxygen saturation, Borg score, and distance walked. Patients were assessed at baseline, after 4 months of rehabilitation, and 3, 6 and 12 months post-operatively. Results: A total of 50 patients with AIS were included in the study and allocated blindly, by simple randomization, into either one of the two groups, with 25 patients each: study group (pre-operative physical rehabilitation and control group. The physical rehabilitation protocol promoted significant progressive improvement in heart and respiratory rate, peripheral blood oxygen saturation, distance walked, and level of effort assessed by the Borg scale after surgery. Conclusions: Post-surgical recovery, evaluated by 6MWT, was significantly better in patients who underwent a 4-month pre-operative physical rehabilitation protocol. Keywords: Scoliosis, Exercise, Exercise movement techniques, Exercise therapy, Exercise test

  17. Walking to transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Using a real-life setting, WalkBostons project focused on developing and testing techniques to broaden the scope and range of public participation in transportation planning in a large neighborhood in Boston. The team explored methods of seeking o...

  18. Reliability and validity of heart rate variability threshold assessment during an incremental shuttle-walk test in middle-aged and older adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dourado, V.Z.; Guerra, R.L.F. [Laboratório de Estudos da Motricidade Humana, Departamento de Ciências do Movimento Humano, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Santos, SP (Brazil)

    2013-02-01

    Studies on the assessment of heart rate variability threshold (HRVT) during walking are scarce. We determined the reliability and validity of HRVT assessment during the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) in healthy subjects. Thirty-one participants aged 57 ± 9 years (17 females) performed 3 ISWTs. During the 1st and 2nd ISWTs, instantaneous heart rate variability was calculated every 30 s and HRVT was measured. Walking velocity at HRVT in these tests (WV-HRVT1 and WV-HRVT2) was registered. During the 3rd ISWT, physiological responses were assessed. The ventilatory equivalents were used to determine ventilatory threshold (VT) and the WV at VT (WV-VT) was recorded. The difference between WV-HRVT1 and WV-HRVT2 was not statistically significant (median and interquartile range = 4.8; 4.8 to 5.4 vs 4.8; 4.2 to 5.4 km/h); the correlation between WV-HRVT1 and WV-HRVT2 was significant (r = 0.84); the intraclass correlation coefficient was high (0.92; 0.82 to 0.96), and the agreement was acceptable (-0.08 km/h; -0.92 to 0.87). The difference between WV-VT and WV-HRVT2 was not statistically significant (4.8; 4.8 to 5.4 vs 4.8; 4.2 to 5.4 km/h) and the agreement was acceptable (0.04 km/h; -1.28 to 1.36). HRVT assessment during walking is a reliable measure and permits the estimation of VT in adults. We suggest the use of the ISWT for the assessment of exercise capacity in middle-aged and older adults.

  19. Reliability and validity of heart rate variability threshold assessment during an incremental shuttle-walk test in middle-aged and older adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dourado, V.Z.; Guerra, R.L.F.

    2013-01-01

    Studies on the assessment of heart rate variability threshold (HRVT) during walking are scarce. We determined the reliability and validity of HRVT assessment during the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) in healthy subjects. Thirty-one participants aged 57 ± 9 years (17 females) performed 3 ISWTs. During the 1st and 2nd ISWTs, instantaneous heart rate variability was calculated every 30 s and HRVT was measured. Walking velocity at HRVT in these tests (WV-HRVT1 and WV-HRVT2) was registered. During the 3rd ISWT, physiological responses were assessed. The ventilatory equivalents were used to determine ventilatory threshold (VT) and the WV at VT (WV-VT) was recorded. The difference between WV-HRVT1 and WV-HRVT2 was not statistically significant (median and interquartile range = 4.8; 4.8 to 5.4 vs 4.8; 4.2 to 5.4 km/h); the correlation between WV-HRVT1 and WV-HRVT2 was significant (r = 0.84); the intraclass correlation coefficient was high (0.92; 0.82 to 0.96), and the agreement was acceptable (-0.08 km/h; -0.92 to 0.87). The difference between WV-VT and WV-HRVT2 was not statistically significant (4.8; 4.8 to 5.4 vs 4.8; 4.2 to 5.4 km/h) and the agreement was acceptable (0.04 km/h; -1.28 to 1.36). HRVT assessment during walking is a reliable measure and permits the estimation of VT in adults. We suggest the use of the ISWT for the assessment of exercise capacity in middle-aged and older adults

  20. Reliability and validity of heart rate variability threshold assessment during an incremental shuttle-walk test in middle-aged and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Z. Dourado

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the assessment of heart rate variability threshold (HRVT during walking are scarce. We determined the reliability and validity of HRVT assessment during the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT in healthy subjects. Thirty-one participants aged 57 ± 9 years (17 females performed 3 ISWTs. During the 1st and 2nd ISWTs, instantaneous heart rate variability was calculated every 30 s and HRVT was measured. Walking velocity at HRVT in these tests (WV-HRVT1 and WV-HRVT2 was registered. During the 3rd ISWT, physiological responses were assessed. The ventilatory equivalents were used to determine ventilatory threshold (VT and the WV at VT (WV-VT was recorded. The difference between WV-HRVT1 and WV-HRVT2 was not statistically significant (median and interquartile range = 4.8; 4.8 to 5.4 vs 4.8; 4.2 to 5.4 km/h; the correlation between WV-HRVT1 and WV-HRVT2 was significant (r = 0.84; the intraclass correlation coefficient was high (0.92; 0.82 to 0.96, and the agreement was acceptable (-0.08 km/h; -0.92 to 0.87. The difference between WV-VT and WV-HRVT2 was not statistically significant (4.8; 4.8 to 5.4 vs 4.8; 4.2 to 5.4 km/h and the agreement was acceptable (0.04 km/h; -1.28 to 1.36. HRVT assessment during walking is a reliable measure and permits the estimation of VT in adults. We suggest the use of the ISWT for the assessment of exercise capacity in middle-aged and older adults.

  1. Pain when walking: individual sensory profiles in the foot soles of torture victims - a controlled study using quantitative sensory testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prip Karen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With quantitative sensory testing (QST we recently found no differences in sensory function of the foot soles between groups of torture victims with or without exposure to falanga (beatings under the feet. Compared to matched controls the torture victims had hyperalgesia to deep mechano-nociceptive stimuli and hypoesthesia to non-noxious cutaneous stimuli. The purpose of the present paper was to extend the group analysis into individual sensory profiles of victims’ feet to explore possible relations between external violence (torture, reported pain, sensory symptoms and QST data to help clarify the underlying mechanisms. Methods We employed interviews and assessments of the pain and sensory symptoms and QST by investigators blinded to whether the patients, 32 male torture victims from the Middle East, had (n=15, or had not (n=17 been exposed to falanga. Pain intensity, area and stimulus dependence were used to characterize the pain. QST included thresholds for touch, cold, warmth, cold-pain, heat-pain, deep pressure pain and wind-up to cutaneous noxious stimuli. An ethnically matched control group was available.The normality criterion, from our control group data, was set as the mean +/− 1.28SD, thus including 80% of all values.QST data were transformed into three categories in relation to our normality range; hypoesthesia, normoesthesia or hyperesthesia/hyperalgesia. Results Most patients, irrespective of having been exposed to falanga or not, reported severe pain when walking. This was often associated with hyperalgesia to deep mechanical pressure. Hypoesthesia to mechanical stimuli co-occurred with numbness, burning and with deep mechanical hyperalgesia more often than not, but otherwise, a hypoesthesia to cutaneous sensory modalities did not co-occur systematically to falanga, pain or sensory symptoms. Conclusion In torture victims, there seem to be overriding mechanisms, manifested by hyperalgesia to pressure pain

  2. Heart Rate and Oxygen Saturation Change Patterns During 6-min Walk Test in Subjects With Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Takeshi; Terada, Jiro; Yahaba, Misuzu; Kawata, Naoko; Jujo, Takayuki; Nagashima, Kengo; Sakao, Seiichiro; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2017-12-26

    The 6-min walk test (6MWT) is commonly performed to assess functional status in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. However, changes in heart rate and oxygen saturation ( S pO 2 ) patterns during 6MWT in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension remain unclear. Thirty-one subjects with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension were retrospectively evaluated to examine the relationships between the change in heart rate (Δheart rate), heart rate acceleration time, slope of heart rate acceleration, heart rate recovery during the first minute after 6MWT (HRR1), change in S pO 2 (Δ S pO 2 ), S pO 2 reduction time, and S pO 2 recovery time during 6MWT, and the severity of pulmonary hemodynamics assessed by right heart catheterization and echocardiography. Subjects with severe chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension had significantly longer heart rate acceleration time (144.9 ± 63.9 s vs 96.0 ± 42.5 s, P = .033), lower Δheart rate (47.4 ± 16.9 vs 61.8 ± 13.6 beats, P = .02), and lower HRR1 (13.3 ± 9.0 beats vs 27.1 ± 9.2 beats, P pulmonary hypertension. Subjects with severe chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension also had significantly longer S pO 2 reduction time (178.3 ± 70.3 s vs 134.3 ± 58.4 s, P = .03) and S pO 2 recovery time (107.6 ± 35.3 s vs 69.8 ± 32.7 s, P = .004) than did subjects with mild chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed only mean pulmonary arterial pressure independently was associated with heart rate acceleration time and slope of heart rate acceleration. Heart rate and S pO 2 change patterns during 6MWT is predominantly associated with pulmonary hemodynamics in subjects with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Evaluating heart rate and S pO 2 change patterns during 6MWT may serve a safe and convenient way to follow the change in pulmonary hemodynamics. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  3. Experiment of Burst Speed of Fingerling Masu salmon, Oncorhynchus, with Stamina Tunnel in The River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Mattashi; Yamamoto, Yasuyuki; Yataya, Kenichi; Kamiyama, Kohhei

    A swimming experiment of cultured fingerling masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou masou) (measuring 3cm to 6cm in length) was conducted in a round stamina tunnel (cylindrical pipe) installed in a fishway of a local river with a water flow velocity of 64cm·s-1 to 218cm·s-1 in order to study the burst speed of the masu salmon.The results show that: (1) the faster the swimming speed,the swimming time of the fingerling masu salmon shortened, and the ground speed also decreased as the flow velocity increased; (2)the faster the flow velocity,the shorter the swimming distance became; (3) the burst speed was calculated for the fingerling masu salmon with the considerably excellent swimming ability(measuring 4.6cm to 6.2cm in mean length) in conditions of a high velocity(218cm·s-1), and the result was: mean burst speed:229cm·s-1(S.D.8cm·s-1) to 232cm·s-1(S.D.:8cm·s-1).

  4. Analysis of the finescale timing of repeated signals: does shell rapping in hermit crabs signal stamina?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briffa; Elwood

    2000-01-01

    Hermit crabs, Pagurus bernhardus, sometimes exchange shells after a period of shell rapping, when the initiating or attacking crab brings its shell rapidly and repeatedly into contact with the shell of the noninitiator or defender in a series of bouts. Bouts are separated by pauses, and raps within bouts are separated by very short periods called 'gaps'. Since within-contest variation is missed when signals are studied by averaging performance rates over entire contests, we analysed the fine within-bout structure of this repeated, aggressive signal. We found that the pattern is consistent with high levels of fatigue in initiators. The duration of the gaps between individual raps increased both within bouts and from bout to bout, and we conclude that this activity is costly to perform. Furthermore, long pauses between bouts is correlated with increased vigour of rapping in the subsequent bout, which suggests that the pause allows for recovery from fatigue induced by rapping. These between-bout pauses may be assessed by noninitiators and provide a signal of stamina. Copyright 2000 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  5. A sequence polymorphism in MSTN predicts sprinting ability and racing stamina in thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Emmeline W; Gu, Jingjing; Eivers, Suzanne S; Fonseca, Rita G; McGivney, Beatrice A; Govindarajan, Preethi; Orr, Nick; Katz, Lisa M; MacHugh, David E; MacHugh, David

    2010-01-20

    Variants of the MSTN gene encoding myostatin are associated with muscle hypertrophy phenotypes in a range of mammalian species, most notably cattle, dogs, mice, and humans. Using a sample of registered Thoroughbred horses (n = 148), we have identified a novel MSTN sequence polymorphism that is strongly associated (g.66493737C>T, P = 4.85x10(-8)) with best race distance among elite racehorses (n = 79). This observation was independently validated (P = 1.91x10(-6)) in a resampled group of Thoroughbreds (n = 62) and in a cohort of Thoroughbreds (n = 37, P = 0.0047) produced by the same trainer. We observed that C/C horses are suited to fast, short-distance races; C/T horses compete favorably in middle-distance races; and T/T horses have greater stamina. Evaluation of retrospective racecourse performance (n = 142) and stallion progeny performance predict that C/C and C/T horses are more likely to be successful two-year-old racehorses than T/T animals. Here we describe for the first time the identification of a gene variant in Thoroughbred racehorses that is predictive of genetic potential for an athletic phenotype.

  6. A sequence polymorphism in MSTN predicts sprinting ability and racing stamina in thoroughbred horses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmeline W Hill

    Full Text Available Variants of the MSTN gene encoding myostatin are associated with muscle hypertrophy phenotypes in a range of mammalian species, most notably cattle, dogs, mice, and humans. Using a sample of registered Thoroughbred horses (n = 148, we have identified a novel MSTN sequence polymorphism that is strongly associated (g.66493737C>T, P = 4.85x10(-8 with best race distance among elite racehorses (n = 79. This observation was independently validated (P = 1.91x10(-6 in a resampled group of Thoroughbreds (n = 62 and in a cohort of Thoroughbreds (n = 37, P = 0.0047 produced by the same trainer. We observed that C/C horses are suited to fast, short-distance races; C/T horses compete favorably in middle-distance races; and T/T horses have greater stamina. Evaluation of retrospective racecourse performance (n = 142 and stallion progeny performance predict that C/C and C/T horses are more likely to be successful two-year-old racehorses than T/T animals. Here we describe for the first time the identification of a gene variant in Thoroughbred racehorses that is predictive of genetic potential for an athletic phenotype.

  7. Right to try? Phosphoethanolamine, di Bella and Stamina cases: an Italo-Brazilian analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARBOSA, Elina Magnan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on an analysis of court orders that determine experimental therapies and provides a comparative study of the Italian Di Bella and Stamina cases and the Brazilian Phosphoethanolamine case. The judicial sentences on the three cases were considered, along with their medical outcome and media repercussion. As a result of the comparison, it was observed that the Brazilian Constitutional Court is tending towards the non-recognition of a “right to try”, even though the Court’s official opinion remains to be seen. In Italy, on the other hand, after the negative judicial and medical experience concerning two emblematic cases, the opinion of the Italian Constitutional Court seems to have changed, indicating that the State is no longer forced to provide experimental therapies through the public health system. In the scope of these judicial lawsuits that claim compassionate cures, the technical framework, represented by the good clinical practices guidelines, comes about as the “zipper” that binds together law, science and ethics.

  8. Analysis of the performance of women with fibromyalgia in the six-minute walk test and its relation with health and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre-Román, P; Santos-Campos, M; Heredia-Jimenez, J; Delgado-Fernández, M; Soto-Hermoso, V

    2014-08-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic syndrome characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain that causes a significant reduction in functional capacity, affecting thus health and quality of life (QOL). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance of FM patients in the 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) and its relation with health and QOL. Thirty-six FM patients (all women), differentiated by degree of severity of disease, and 14 healthy women were evaluated. Distance walked in the 6MWT, cardiorespiratory responses, heart rate responses, kinematic parameters of gait, the results of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and the results of the Short-Form Healthy Survey (SF-36) were analyzed. Women with FM covered a shorter distance in the 6MWT, had a lower cardiorespiratory response, and had lower spatio-temporal parameters of gait than healthy women. No correlation was found in FM patients between the total FIQ score and the distance walked in the 6MWT. The analysis of performance parameters in the 6MWT may be an element of clinical relevance in FM patients.

  9. The effects of gravity on human walking: a new test of the dynamic similarity hypothesis using a predictive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raichlen, David A

    2008-09-01

    The dynamic similarity hypothesis (DSH) suggests that differences in animal locomotor biomechanics are due mostly to differences in size. According to the DSH, when the ratios of inertial to gravitational forces are equal between two animals that differ in size [e.g. at equal Froude numbers, where Froude = velocity2/(gravity x hip height)], their movements can be made similar by multiplying all time durations by one constant, all forces by a second constant and all linear distances by a third constant. The DSH has been generally supported by numerous comparative studies showing that as inertial forces differ (i.e. differences in the centripetal force acting on the animal due to variation in hip heights), animals walk with dynamic similarity. However, humans walking in simulated reduced gravity do not walk with dynamically similar kinematics. The simulated gravity experiments did not completely account for the effects of gravity on all body segments, and the importance of gravity in the DSH requires further examination. This study uses a kinematic model to predict the effects of gravity on human locomotion, taking into account both the effects of gravitational forces on the upper body and on the limbs. Results show that dynamic similarity is maintained in altered gravitational environments. Thus, the DSH does account for differences in the inertial forces governing locomotion (e.g. differences in hip height) as well as differences in the gravitational forces governing locomotion.

  10. Theorising and testing environmental pathways to behaviour change: natural experimental study of the perception and use of new infrastructure to promote walking and cycling in local communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panter, Jenna; Ogilvie, David

    2015-09-03

    Some studies have assessed the effectiveness of environmental interventions to promote physical activity, but few have examined how such interventions work. We investigated the environmental mechanisms linking an infrastructural intervention with behaviour change. Natural experimental study. Three UK municipalities (Southampton, Cardiff and Kenilworth). Adults living within 5 km of new walking and cycling infrastructure. Construction or improvement of walking and cycling routes. Exposure to the intervention was defined in terms of residential proximity. Questionnaires at baseline and 2-year follow-up assessed perceptions of the supportiveness of the environment, use of the new infrastructure, and walking and cycling behaviours. Analysis proceeded via factor analysis of perceptions of the physical environment (step 1) and regression analysis to identify plausible pathways involving physical and social environmental mediators and refine the intervention theory (step 2) to a final path analysis to test the model (step 3). Participants who lived near and used the new routes reported improvements in their perceptions of provision and safety. However, path analysis (step 3, n=967) showed that the effects of the intervention on changes in time spent walking and cycling were largely (90%) explained by a simple causal pathway involving use of the new routes, and other pathways involving changes in environmental cognitions explained only a small proportion of the effect. Physical improvement of the environment itself was the key to the effectiveness of the intervention, and seeking to change people's perceptions may be of limited value. Studies of how interventions lead to population behaviour change should complement those concerned with estimating their effects in supporting valid causal inference. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Test-retest reliability and minimal detectable change scores for sit-to-stand-to-sit tests, the six-minute walk test, the one-leg heel-rise test, and handgrip strength in people undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Ortí, Eva; Martínez-Olmos, Francisco José

    2011-08-01

    Determining the relative and absolute reliability of outcomes of physical performance tests for people undergoing hemodialysis is necessary to discriminate between the true effects of exercise interventions and the inherent variability of this cohort. The aims of this study were to assess the relative reliability of sit-to-stand-to-sit tests (the STS-10, which measures the time [in seconds] required to complete 10 full stands from a sitting position, and the STS-60, which measures the number of repetitions achieved in 60 seconds), the Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), the one-leg heel-rise test, and the handgrip strength test and to calculate minimal detectable change (MDC) scores in people undergoing hemodialysis. This study was a prospective, nonexperimental investigation. Thirty-nine people undergoing hemodialysis at 2 clinics in Spain were contacted. Study participants performed the STS-10 (n=37), the STS-60 (n=37), and the 6MWT (n=36). At one of the settings, the participants also performed the one-leg heel-rise test (n=21) and the handgrip strength test (n=12) on both the right and the left sides. Participants attended 2 testing sessions 1 to 2 weeks apart. High intraclass correlation coefficients (≥.88) were found for all tests, suggesting good relative reliability. The MDC scores at 90% confidence intervals were as follows: 8.4 seconds for the STS-10, 4 repetitions for the STS-60, 66.3 m for the 6MWT, 3.4 kg for handgrip strength (force-generating capacity), 3.7 repetitions for the one-leg heel-rise test with the right leg, and 5.2 repetitions for the one-leg heel-rise test with the left leg. Limitations A limited sample of patients was used in this study. The STS-16, STS-60, 6MWT, one-leg heel rise test, and handgrip strength test are reliable outcome measures. The MDC scores at 90% confidence intervals for these tests will help to determine whether a change is due to error or to an intervention.

  12. Teste de caminhada e rendimento escolar em crianças respiradoras bucais Walk test and school performance in mouth-breathing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Dias Vilas Boas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Nas últimas décadas, vários trabalhos sobre respiração bucal (RB têm surgido na literatura; em contrapartida, pouco se conhece sobre vários aspectos desta síndrome, incluindo gravidade, repercussões sobre o rendimento físico e escolar. OBJETIVO: Comparar o rendimento físico pelo teste de caminhada de seis minutos (TC6' e rendimento escolar de crianças e adolescentes com RB e respiradores nasais (RN. MÉTODO: Estudo de corte transversal descritivo e prospectivo em crianças RB e RN que foram submetidas ao TC6' e avaliação do rendimento escolar. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídos 156 escolares, 87 meninas (60 RN e 27 RB e 69 meninos (44 RN e 25 RB. Foram analisadas variáveis durante o TC6': frequência cardíaca (FC, frequência respiratória, saturação periférica de oxigênio, distância percorrida em seis minutos e escala de Borg modificada. Todos os valores das variáveis estudadas foram estatisticamente diferentes entre os grupos RB e RN, com exceção do rendimento escolar e FC no TC6'. CONCLUSÃO: A RB afeta o rendimento físico e não o rendimento escolar, sendo observado padrão alterado no TC6' no grupo RB. Uma vez que os RB desse estudo foram classificados como não graves outros estudos comparando as variáveis de rendimento escolar e TC6' são necessários para o melhor entendimento do processo dos desempenhos físico e escolar em crianças com RB.In recent decades, many studies on mouth breathing (MB have been published; however, little is known about many aspects of this syndrome, including severity, impact on physical and academic performances. OBJECTIVE: Compare the physical performance in a six minutes walk test (6MWT and the academic performance of MB and nasal-breathing (NB children and adolescents. METHOD: This is a descriptive, cross-sectional, and prospective study with MB and NB children submitted to the 6MWT and scholar performance assessment. RESULTS: We included 156 children, 87 girls (60 NB and 27 MB and 69

  13. Nordic walking versus walking without poles for rehabilitation with cardiovascular disease: Randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girold, Sébastien; Rousseau, Jérome; Le Gal, Magalie; Coudeyre, Emmanuel; Le Henaff, Jacqueline

    2017-07-01

    With Nordic walking, or walking with poles, one can travel a greater distance and at a higher rate than with walking without poles, but whether the activity is beneficial for patients with cardiovascular disease is unknown. This randomized controlled trial was undertaken to determine whether Nordic walking was more effective than walking without poles on walk distance to support rehabilitation training for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). Patients were recruited in a private specialized rehabilitation centre for cardiovascular diseases. The entire protocol, including patient recruitment, took place over 2 months, from September to October 2013. We divided patients into 2 groups: Nordic Walking Group (NWG, n=21) and Walking Group without poles (WG, n=21). All patients followed the same program over 4 weeks, except for the walk performed with or without poles. The main outcome was walk distance on the 6-min walk test. Secondary outcomes were maximum heart rate during exercise and walk distance and power output on a treadmill stress test. We included 42 patients (35 men; mean age 57.2±11 years and BMI 26.5±4.5kg/m 2 ). At the end of the training period, both groups showed improved walk distance on the 6-min walk test and treatment stress test as well as power on the treadmill stress test (PNordic walking training appeared more efficient than training without poles for increasing walk distance on the 6-min walk test for patients with ACS and PAOD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. HIV-infected Children in Malawi Have Decreased Performance on the 6-minute Walk Test With Preserved Cardiac Mechanics Regardless of Antiretroviral Treatment Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims Sanyahumbi, Amy E; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Guffey, Danielle; Hoffman, Irving; Kazembe, Peter N; McCrary, Madeline; Minard, Charles G; van der Horst, Charles; Sable, Craig A

    2017-07-01

    The aims of this study were to 1) determine if cardiac disease can be detected in HIV-infected children by strain imaging and 2) to evaluate differences in exercise performance between HIV-infected children on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and HIV-infected children not yet on ART and in HIV-uninfected children by 6-minute walk tests (6MWTs). This cross-sectional study evaluated cardiac function by echocardiogram and exercise performance by 6MWT in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children 4-18 years of age in Lilongwe, Malawi. Analyses compared HIV uninfected, HIV infected not yet on ART, and HIV infected on ART. Comparisons used χ test, t test, analysis of variance and multiple linear regression. No differences were found in ejection fraction, shortening fraction or strain in 73 children not yet on ART, 149 on ART and 77 HIV-uninfected controls. As viral load increased, children had worse circumferential strain. In addition, children receiving ART had better circumferential strain than those not yet on ART. Increased CD4 percentage was associated with better longitudinal strain and farther 6MWT distance. As longitudinal strain worsened, the 6MWT distance decreased. HIV-infected children not yet on ART walked a mean of 25.8 m less than HIV-uninfected children, and HIV-infected children on ART walked 25.9 m less (P = 0.015 comparing 3 groups). HIV-uninfected children performed better on the 6MWT than HIV-infected children. Lower viral load, being on ART, and higher CD4 percentage were associated with better strain measures. Better longitudinal strain was associated with a farther 6MWT distance. Overall, ejection fraction, shortening fraction and strain measures between groups were similar, so cardiac strain did not detect cardiac dysfunction in this young population.

  15. More Stamina, a Gamified mHealth Solution for Persons with Multiple Sclerosis: Research Through Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylonopoulou, Vasiliki; Rivera Romero, Octavio

    2018-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the world’s most common neurologic disorders. Fatigue is one of most common symptoms that persons with MS experience, having significant impact on their quality of life and limiting their activity levels. Self-management strategies are used to support them in the care of their health. Mobile health (mHealth) solutions are a way to offer persons with chronic conditions tools to successfully manage their symptoms and problems. Gamification is a current trend among mHealth apps used to create engaging user experiences and is suggested to be effective for behavioral change. To be effective, mHealth solutions need to be designed to specifically meet the intended audience needs. User-centered design (UCD) is a design philosophy that proposes placing end users’ needs and characteristics in the center of design and development, involving users early in the different phases of the software life cycle. There is a current gap in mHealth apps for persons with MS, which presents an interesting area to explore. Objective The purpose of this study was to describe the design and evaluation process of a gamified mHealth solution for behavioral change in persons with MS using UCD. Methods Building on previous work of our team where we identified needs, barriers, and facilitators for mHealth apps for persons with MS, we followed UCD to design and evaluate a mobile app prototype aimed to help persons with MS self-manage their fatigue. Design decisions were evidence-driven and guided by behavioral change models (BCM). Usability was assessed through inspection methods using Nielsen’s heuristic evaluation. Results The mHealth solution More Stamina was designed. It is a task organization tool designed to help persons with MS manage their energy to minimize the impact of fatigue in their day-to-day life. The tool acts as a to-do list where users can input tasks in a simple manner and assign Stamina Credits, a representation of perceived

  16. More Stamina, a Gamified mHealth Solution for Persons with Multiple Sclerosis: Research Through Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunti, Guido; Mylonopoulou, Vasiliki; Rivera Romero, Octavio

    2018-03-02

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the world's most common neurologic disorders. Fatigue is one of most common symptoms that persons with MS experience, having significant impact on their quality of life and limiting their activity levels. Self-management strategies are used to support them in the care of their health. Mobile health (mHealth) solutions are a way to offer persons with chronic conditions tools to successfully manage their symptoms and problems. Gamification is a current trend among mHealth apps used to create engaging user experiences and is suggested to be effective for behavioral change. To be effective, mHealth solutions need to be designed to specifically meet the intended audience needs. User-centered design (UCD) is a design philosophy that proposes placing end users' needs and characteristics in the center of design and development, involving users early in the different phases of the software life cycle. There is a current gap in mHealth apps for persons with MS, which presents an interesting area to explore. The purpose of this study was to describe the design and evaluation process of a gamified mHealth solution for behavioral change in persons with MS using UCD. Building on previous work of our team where we identified needs, barriers, and facilitators for mHealth apps for persons with MS, we followed UCD to design and evaluate a mobile app prototype aimed to help persons with MS self-manage their fatigue. Design decisions were evidence-driven and guided by behavioral change models (BCM). Usability was assessed through inspection methods using Nielsen's heuristic evaluation. The mHealth solution More Stamina was designed. It is a task organization tool designed to help persons with MS manage their energy to minimize the impact of fatigue in their day-to-day life. The tool acts as a to-do list where users can input tasks in a simple manner and assign Stamina Credits, a representation of perceived effort, to the task to help energy management

  17. Comparison of the Mini-Balance Evaluations Systems Test with the Berg Balance Scale in relationship to walking speed and motor recovery post stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Sangeetha; Bishnoi, Alka

    2017-12-01

    The Mini-BESTest is a recently developed balance assessment tool that incorporates challenging dynamic balance tasks. Few studies have compared the psychometric properties of the Mini-BESTest to the commonly used Berg Balance Scale (BBS). However, the utility of these scales in relationship to post stroke walking speeds has not been explored. The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the Mini-BESTest and BBS to evaluate walking speeds in individuals with stroke. A retrospective exploratory design. Forty-one individuals with chronic stroke were evaluated with the Mini-BESTest, BBS, and 10-meter self-selected walk test (10MWT). Based on their self-selected gait speeds (below or above 0.8 m/s), participants were classified as slow and fast walkers. Significant linear correlations were observed between the Mini-BESTest vs. BBS (r = 0.72, p ≤ 0.001), Mini-BESTest vs. 10MWT (r = 0.58, p ≤ 0.001), and BBS vs. 10MWT (r = 0.30, p = 0.05). Independent t-tests comparing the balance scores for the slow and fast walkers revealed significant group differences for the Mini-BESTest (p = 0.003), but not for the BBS (p = 0.09). The Mini-BESTest demonstrated higher sensitivity (93%) and specificity (64%) compared to the BBS (sensitivity 81%, specificity 56%) for discriminating participants into slow and fast walkers. The Mini-BESTest has a greater discriminative ability than the BBS to categorize individuals with stroke into slow and fast walkers.

  18. Human treadmill walking needs attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Olivier

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to assess the attentional requirements of steady state treadmill walking in human subjects using a dual task paradigm. The extent of decrement of a secondary (cognitive RT task provides a measure of the attentional resources required to maintain performance of the primary (locomotor task. Varying the level of difficulty of the reaction time (RT task is used to verify the priority of allocation of attentional resources. Methods 11 healthy adult subjects were required to walk while simultaneously performing a RT task. Participants were instructed to bite a pressure transducer placed in the mouth as quickly as possible in response to an unpredictable electrical stimulation applied on the back of the neck. Each subject was tested under five different experimental conditions: simple RT task alone and while walking, recognition RT task alone and while walking, walking alone. A foot switch system composed of a pressure sensitive sensor was placed under the heel and forefoot of each foot to determine the gait cycle duration. Results Gait cycle duration was unchanged (p > 0.05 by the addition of the RT task. Regardless of the level of difficulty of the RT task, the RTs were longer during treadmill walking than in sitting conditions (p 0.05 was found between the attentional demand of the walking task and the decrement of performance found in the RT task under varying levels of difficulty. This finding suggests that the healthy subjects prioritized the control of walking at the expense of cognitive performance. Conclusion We conclude that treadmill walking in young adults is not a purely automatic task. The methodology and outcome measures used in this study provide an assessment of the attentional resources required by walking on the treadmill at a steady state.

  19. Allegheny County Walk Scores

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Walk Score measures the walkability of any address using a patented system developed by the Walk Score company. For each 2010 Census Tract centroid, Walk Score...

  20. Toe Walking in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prone to damage and weaken over time. This diagnosis might be more likely if your child initially walked normally before starting to toe walk. Autism. Toe walking has been linked to autism spectrum ...

  1. Imaging Shallow Aquitard Breaches with P waves: Results from a Walk-away test and a Reflection Survey at two Sites in Memphis, Tennessee, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, J.; Magnani, M.; Waldron, B. A.

    2006-12-01

    We present the results of two seismic reflection experiments conducted in the Great Memphis area in April and July 2006. The two experiments consisted in a walk-away test and in the acquisition of a 1 km seismic reflection profile. The acquisition of the seismic data is part of a larger effort aimed at imaging the lateral continuity of the Upper Claiborne confining clay that separates the Memphis aquifer, the region's primary drinking water source, from the upper unconfined aquifer and protects the drinking aquifer from exposure to potential contamination. During the walk-away test, four P-wave sources, a 7.5 kg sledge hammer, a 20 kg weight drop, a 12-gauge Buffalo gun, and a Minivibe source were tested at two sites with the goal of selecting the best P-wave seismic source and acquisition parameters for shallow reflection surveys. Boreholes nearby both sites encountered the Upper Claiborne unit at a depth ranging from 10 m to 40 m. One site is located within a 100-meter length of road median that can be considered an urban environment. The second site is located at Shelby Farms within the City of Memphis yet reflects a rural setting with minimal noise and no subsurface infrastructure. Performing identical walk-away tests at both sites, the results indicate that the energy source selection is site dependent. At the urban site, the energy generated by the weight drop source is more coherent and can be interpreted with more confidence on the recorded data. However the Shelby Farms site the 12-gauge shotgun produced the strongest recorded energy, the highest dominant frequency and the broadest frequency band (6- 110 Hz). Strong attenuations are observed at both sites with a much higher attenuation in the urban road median site, where the near surface materials consisted of gravels, sands, clays, and pebbles. For both sites, surface waves and refractions dominate the seismic recordings. Filtering and gain of the data revealed the presence of shallow reflections related

  2. Walking drawings and walking ability in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jimmy; Mackey, Anna H; Stott, N Susan; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2013-06-01

    To investigate whether drawings of the self walking by children with cerebral palsy (CP) were associated with walking ability and illness perceptions. This was an exploratory study in 52 children with CP (M:F = 28:24), mean age 11.1 years (range 5-18), who were attending tertiary level outpatient clinics. Children were asked to draw a picture of themselves walking. Drawing size and content was used to investigate associations with clinical walk tests and children's own perceptions of their CP assessed using a CP version of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. Larger drawings of the self were associated with less distance traveled, higher emotional responses to CP, and lower perceptions of pain or discomfort, independent of age. A larger self-to-overall drawing height ratio was related to walking less distance. Drawings of the self confined within buildings and the absence of other figures were also associated with reduced walking ability. Drawing size and content can reflect walking ability, as well as symptom perceptions and distress. Drawings may be useful for clinicians to use with children with cerebral palsy to aid discussion about their condition. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. Ability to work in anaerobic condition is associated with physical performance on the six-minute walk test in older patients receiving cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Guido; Vannetti, Federica; Molino-Lova, Raffaele

    2015-05-01

    During maximal incremental exercise, the ability to work in the anaerobic condition, expressed by the respiratory exchange ratio, is associated with physical performance. Further, peak respiratory exchange ratio is regarded as the best non-invasive measure of a patient's actual exercise effort. This study examined whether ability to work in the anaerobic condition is also associated with physical performance in submaximal constant work rate exercise. A total of 75 older patients (51 men, 24 women), mean age 71.1 years (standard deviation 6.7 years), who had recently undergone cardiac surgery, performed cardiopulmonary exercise testing in a 6-min walk test before and after rehabilitation. The distance walked, steady-state oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide output and respiratory exchange ratio increased significantly after rehabilitation (p work in the anaerobic condition is associated with physical performance in submaximal constant work rate exercises. Thus the steady-state respiratory exchange ratio might be regarded as a measure of the patient's actual exercise effort. This information may prove useful in customizing exercise prescription and assessing the effects of rehabilitation.

  4. Interlimb coordination during forward walking is largely preserved in backward walking in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyns, P.; Molenaers, G.; Desloovere, K.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Limb kinematics in backward walking (BW) are essentially those of forward walking (FW) in reverse. It has been argued that subcortical mechanisms could underlie both walking modes. METHODS: Therefore, we tested whether participants with supraspinal/cortical deficits (i.e. cerebral palsy)

  5. The effects of aquatic oxygen concentration, body size and respiratory behaviour on the stamina of obligate aquatic (Bufo americanus) and facultative air-breathing (Xenopus laevis and Rana berlandieri) anuran larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassersug, R J; Feder, M E

    1983-07-01

    Larvae of the anurans Rana berlandieri and Xenopus laevis have lungs and can breathe air as well as irrigate buccal and pharyngeal surfaces for aquatic respiration. Larvae of Bufo americanus lack lungs until just before metamorphosis and are obligately aquatic. We examined the relationship between the locomotor stamina (time to fatigue), aquatic oxygen concentration, body size, and respiratory behaviour of swimming larvae of these species, with the following results: Stamina is size-dependent in all three species. Aquatic hypoxia reduces stamina in larvae of all three species, but most conspicuously in Bufo. Breathing air increases stamina in Rana larvae, especially in large animals and under aquatic hypoxia. In contrast to Rana larvae, Xenopus larvae swimming in normoxic water undergo a reduction in stamina when allowed to breathe air. In hypoxic water, aerial respiration moderates the reduction in stamina seen in Xenopus larvae. Branchial irrigation is associated with increased stamina in Xenopus, and is increased under hypoxia and at high swimming velocities. Respiratory demand, buoyancy and the drag associated with branchial irrigation all affect respiratory behaviour in Xenopus larvae. The great amount of interspecific variation in the relationship between respiratory behaviour and stamina reveals the importance of measuring performance directly when attempting to interpret the functional significance of respiratory structures and behaviour.

  6. The Effects of Walking or Walking-with-Poles Training on Tissue Oxygenation in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen G. Collins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This randomized trial proposed to determine if there were differences in calf muscle StO2 parameters in patients before and after 12 weeks of a traditional walking or walking-with-poles exercise program. Data were collected on 85 patients who were randomized to a traditional walking program ( or walking-with-poles program ( of exercise training. Patients walked for 3 times weekly for 12 weeks. Seventy-one patients completed both the baseline and the 12-week follow-up progressive treadmill tests ( traditional walking and walking-with-poles. Using the near-infrared spectroscopy measures, StO2 was measured prior to, during, and after exercise. At baseline, calf muscle oxygenation decreased from % prior to the treadmill test to % at peak exercise. The time elapsed prior to reaching nadir StO2 values increased more in the traditional walking group when compared to the walking-with-poles group. Likewise, absolute walking time increased more in the traditional walking group than in the walking-with-poles group. Tissue oxygenation decline during treadmill testing was less for patients assigned to a 12-week traditional walking program when compared to those assigned to a 12-week walking-with-poles program. In conclusion, the 12-week traditional walking program was superior to walking-with-poles in improving tissue deoxygenation in patients with PAD.

  7. Teste de caminhada de seis minutos: estudo do efeito do aprendizado em portadores de doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica Six minutes walk test: study of the effect of learning in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Leite Rodrigues

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Testes de caminhada de seis minutos vêm sendo utilizados de forma crescente para avaliar a efetividade de diferentes opções terapêuticas clínicas e cirúrgicas em pneumopatias. Entretanto, a falta de padronização para a sua realização pode influenciar as aferições, prejudicando a qualidade da avaliação. Nesse sentido, formulamos a hipótese de que os pacientes têm melhor performance com a realização do teste de caminhada de seis minutos após aprendizado. OBJETIVO: Determinar o possível efeito do aprendizado na distância percorrida durante o teste de caminhada de seis minutos em portadores de doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica. MÉTODO: Foram analisados, retrospectivamente, 35 prontuários de pacientes portadores de doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica, encaminhados ao Programa de Reabilitação Pulmonar do Hospital Universitário de Brasília, e que tivessem realizado, em dias alternados, dois testes de caminhada de seis minutos, espirometria e gasometria arterial. O diagnóstico clínico e funcional de doença foi baseado na história de exposição a fator de risco, produção de secreção, dispnéia e prova espirométrica alterada, após o uso de broncodilatador. RESULTADOS: Observamos que as distâncias percorridas no segundo teste de caminhada de seis minutos (515 ± 82 metros foram maiores que as distâncias percorridas no primeiro (480 ± 85 metros, com valores estatisticamente significativos (p BACKGROUND: The six minutes walk test has been increasingly utilized to assess the effectiveness of different clinical and surgical treatment options in pulmonary diseases. However lack of standardization for their performance may influence measurements and jeopardize assessment of the functional capacity of patients with cardiopulmonary disease. OBJECTIVE: To determine the possible effects of learning on the distance covered during the six minute walk test for bearers of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  8. Effects of temperature on disease progression and swimming stamina in Ichthyophonus-infected rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocan, R; Hershberger, P; Sanders, G; Winton, J

    2009-10-01

    Rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, were infected with Ichthyophonus sp. and held at 10 degrees C, 15 degrees C and 20 degrees C for 28 days to monitor mortality and disease progression. Infected fish demonstrated more rapid onset of disease, higher parasite load, more severe host tissue reaction and reduced mean-day-to-death at higher temperature. In a second experiment, Ichthyophonus-infected fish were reared at 15 degrees C for 16 weeks then subjected to forced swimming at 10 degrees C, 15 degrees C and 20 degrees C. Stamina improved significantly with increased temperature in uninfected fish; however, this was not observed for infected fish. The difference in performance between infected and uninfected fish became significant at 15 degrees C (P = 0.02) and highly significant at 20 degrees C (P = 0.005). These results have implications for changes in the ecology of fish diseases in the face of global warming and demonstrate the effects of higher temperature on the progression and severity of ichthyophoniasis as well as on swimming stamina, a critical fitness trait of salmonids. This study helps explain field observations showing the recent emergence of clinical ichthyophoniasis in Yukon River Chinook salmon later in their spawning migration when water temperatures were high, as well as the apparent failure of a substantial percentage of infected fish to successfully reach their natal spawning areas.

  9. Effects of temperature on disease progression and swimming stamina in Ichthyophonus-infected rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocan, R.; Hershberger, P.; Sanders, G.; Winton, J.

    2009-01-01

    Rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, were infected with Ichthyophonus sp. and held at 10 ??C, 15 ??C and 20 ??C for 28 days to monitor mortality and disease progression. Infected fish demonstrated more rapid onset of disease, higher parasite load, more severe host tissue reaction and reduced mean-day-to-death at higher temperature. In a second experiment, Ichthyophonus-infected fish were reared at 15 ??C for 16 weeks then subjected to forced swimming at 10 ??C, 15 ??C and 20 ??C. Stamina improved significantly with increased temperature in uninfected fish; however, this was not observed for infected fish. The difference in performance between infected and uninfected fish became significant at 15 ??C (P = 0.02) and highly significant at 20 ??C (P = 0.005). These results have implications for changes in the ecology of fish diseases in the face of global warming and demonstrate the effects of higher temperature on the progression and severity of ichthyophoniasis as well as on swimming stamina, a critical fitness trait of salmonids. This study helps explain field observations showing the recent emergence of clinical ichthyophoniasis in Yukon River Chinook salmon later in their spawning migration when water temperatures were high, as well as the apparent failure of a substantial percentage of infected fish to successfully reach their natal spawning areas. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Evaluation of Cooper 12-minute walk/run test as a marker of cardiorespiratory fitness in young urban children with persistent asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisgerber, Michael; Danduran, Michael; Meurer, John; Hartmann, Kathryn; Berger, Stuart; Flores, Glenn

    2009-07-01

    To evaluate Cooper 12-minute run/walk test (CT12) as a one-time estimate of cardiorespiratory fitness and marker of fitness change compared with treadmill fitness testing in young children with persistent asthma. A cohort of urban children with asthma participated in the asthma and exercise program and a subset completed pre- and postintervention fitness testing. Treadmill fitness testing was conducted by an exercise physiologist in the fitness laboratory at an academic children's hospital. CT12 was conducted in a college recreation center gymnasium. Forty-five urban children with persistent asthma aged 7 to 14 years participated in exercise interventions. A subset of 19 children completed pre- and postintervention exercise testing. Participants completed a 9-week exercise program where they participated in either swimming or golf 3 days a week for 1 hour. A subset of participants completed fitness testing by 2 methods before and after program completion. CT12 results (meters), maximal oxygen consumption ((.)Vo2max) (mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)), and treadmill exercise time (minutes). CT12 and maximal oxygen consumption were moderately correlated (preintervention: 0.55, P = 0.003; postintervention: 0.48, P = 0.04) as one-time measures of fitness. Correlations of the tests as markers of change over time were poor and nonsignificant. In children with asthma, CT12 is a reasonable one-time estimate of fitness but a poor marker of fitness change over time.

  11. Complementarity and quantum walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendon, Viv; Sanders, Barry C.

    2005-01-01

    We show that quantum walks interpolate between a coherent 'wave walk' and a random walk depending on how strongly the walker's coin state is measured; i.e., the quantum walk exhibits the quintessentially quantum property of complementarity, which is manifested as a tradeoff between knowledge of which path the walker takes vs the sharpness of the interference pattern. A physical implementation of a quantum walk (the quantum quincunx) should thus have an identifiable walker and the capacity to demonstrate the interpolation between wave walk and random walk depending on the strength of measurement

  12. Effect of body weight loss on cardiopulmonary function assessed by 6-minute walk test and arterial blood gas analysis in obese dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manens, J; Ricci, R; Damoiseaux, C; Gault, S; Contiero, B; Diez, M; Clercx, C

    2014-01-01

    Few studies show the detrimental effect of canine obesity on cardiopulmonary function (CPF). The 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) is a noninvasive exercise test easy to perform in clinical settings. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of obesity and body weight loss (BWL) on CPF assessed by the 6MWT and arterial blood gas analysis. Six experimental Beagles and 9 privately owned obese dogs were enrolled in a diet-induced BWL program. Arterial blood gas analysis and 6MWT were repeated in obese subjects (BCS 8-9/9), in the middle of BWL (overweight, BCS 6-7/9), and in lean dogs (BCS 5/9). Heart rate (HRp) and oxygen saturation (SpO2 ) were measured by pulse oximetry before the 6MWT, at midtest, and during a 5-minute recovery period. Twelve dogs completed the BWL program (initial BW, 27.3 ± 2.9 kg; final BW, 20.85 ± 2.9, lsmeans ± SE, P ≤ .001). BWL caused a significant increase in 6MWT walked distance (WD; obese: 509 ± 35 m; overweight: 575 ± 36 m; lean: 589 ± 36 m; P ≤ .05). Resting arterial blood gas results were not influenced by BWL. Including all time points, obese dogs showed higher HRp and lower SpO2 compared to overweight and lean dogs. SpO2 at the end of the walk was significantly lower in obese dogs. Obesity negatively affects 6MWT performances in dogs. The 6MWT may be used to demonstrate the efficacy of BWL to improve CPF and quality of life in obese dogs. Although BWL induced significant improvement of cardiopulmonary parameters before ideal BW, WD improved until the end of the BWL program. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  13. Fire-Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, David

    2010-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of fire-walking and then deals with the physics behind fire-walking. The author has performed approximately 50 fire-walks, took the data for the world's hottest fire-walk and was, at one time, a world record holder for the longest fire-walk (www.dwilley.com/HDATLTW/Record_Making_Firewalks.html). He currently…

  14. Influence of partially known parameter on flaw characterization in Eddy Current Testing by using a random walk MCMC method based on metamodeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Caifang; Lambert, Marc; Rodet, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    First, we present the implementation of a random walk Metropolis-within-Gibbs (MWG) sampling method in flaw characterization based on a metamodeling method. The role of metamodeling is to reduce the computational time cost in Eddy Current Testing (ECT) forward model calculation. In such a way, the use of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods becomes possible. Secondly, we analyze the influence of partially known parameters in Bayesian estimation. The objective is to evaluate the importance of providing more specific prior information. Simulation results show that even partially known information has great interest in providing more accurate flaw parameter estimations. The improvement ratio depends on the parameter dependence and the interest shows only when the provided information is specific enough

  15. Pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with bronchiectasis: pulmonary function, arterial blood gases, and the 6-minute walk test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zeller, Mafalda; Mota, Patrícia Caetano; Amorim, Adelina; Viana, Paulo; Martins, Paula; Gaspar, Luís; Hespanhol, Venceslau; Gomes, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Information regarding the effects of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) on pulmonary function (PF), arterial blood gases (ABG), and 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) in patients with bronchiectasis is scant in the literature. To evaluate the effects of PR on these indices in this population, a retrospective evaluation of those who attended PR from 2007 to 2010, was made. Pulmonary rehabilitation lasted a mean of 12 weeks and included cycle ergometer exercise for 30 minutes, 3 times per week, with additional upper limbs and quadriceps training. PF, ABG, and 6MWD were evaluated before and after PR to determine the potential influence of gender, exacerbations, underlying cause of bronchiectasis, severity of obstruction, and colonization with bacteria. Forty-one patients (48.8% males; median age, 54 years) were included; 25 had severe obstruction and 19 were colonized with bacteria. Following PR, no significant changes were detected in PF or ABG. Median 6MWD before PR was 425 m and post-PR was 450 m (P = .431). Outcomes did not show any interaction with gender, colonization, or exacerbations. However, patients with idiopathic bronchiectasis did show a significant improvement in forced vital capacity in percent of predicted and residual volume after PR (P = .016 and .048, respectively). Patients with severe obstruction showed a statistically significant decrease in percent of predicted residual volume (P = .025). There appears to be a beneficial impact of PR on PF in certain groups of patients with bronchiectasis. In addition, PR indications and protocols for patients with bronchiectasis may need to be adapted to accommodate specific patients, so that expressive exercise capacity improvement can be achieved.

  16. Tests and indicators for improving the pedagogical control of the legs force of long and middle distance, as well as sport walk 12-15 school categories athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Santana-García

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The control of the yield inside the process of sport training is one of the instruments that guarantee that it is made on the base of solid arguments as for the correspondence among the loads or preparation stimuli that must receive the sportsman and its condition to assimilate it. Due to the deficiencies, detected during a preliminary diagnosis based on the content analysis, measurement and mathematical statistical methods that corroborate the necessity to perfect elements of the sportsmen preparation management, a study begins with the in o rde r to give solution to the scientific problem: How to improve the pedagogic control of the legs force on Long and Middle distance, as well as Sport Walk athletes at 12 - 15 yeas school categories from “Ormani Arenado” Initial Sport School of Pinar del Río? It has the objective to select tests and indicators that improve this pedagogic control. There were used different methods and investigation instruments such as, analysis and synthesis, the measurement, as well as the descriptive and inferential statistic, which allowed the selection of the test of the ten jumps to include it in the protocol of evaluation of the physical performance set for the school categories, with procedures that brings forth four indicators on the sportsman's state. Its feasibility is being evaluating at present in an extended study certified by the provincial commission of Athletics. The contributions of this research, favor to the results of the investigative project “The evaluation and planning of the training in Long and Middle distance, as well as Sport Walk athletes in Pinar del Río”, answering, at the same time, to the fourth technological demand of the Athletics in this western county of Cuba.

  17. Gender disparity of changes in heart rate during the six-minute walk test among patients with chronic obstructive airway disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Alibakhshi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major cause of chronic morbidity and mortality worldwide. Clarify; COPD is the fifth leading cause of death and disease burden globally. Aims The purpose of this study is to compare the gender disparity of changes in heart rate during 6-minute walk test (6MWT among patients with chronic obstructive airway disease (COPD. We also aimed to assess the relationship between change in heart rate and body mass index (BMI. Methods We randomly selected 59 elderly subjects with COPD (made up of 45 men and 14 women. The selected patients all had Medical Research Council (MRC dyspnea index of ≥3. All patients in this study had informed written consent and carried out the 6 minute walk tests (6MWT according to standards. Data analysis was carried out with SPSS version 21.0 software and Excel 2016 with level of significance taken as p<0.05. We used of ANOVA to identify difference in the means among three or more groups. Results As the BMI range is 15–50 while the mean BMI was 26±00 include the standard deviation has been observed overweight in all patients with COPD. There was significant difference in the distance covered during the 6MWT between men and women (Men=397.00, Women=375.00 at p<0.001. Also, we can be seeing lowest significant different in heart rate basic (Mean Square=0.0 and oxygen saturation at rest (Mean Square=2.0 in value p<0.00 between men and women. Conclusion In this study, distance, SPO2, resting heart rate and 1-minute heart rate variables were evaluated for assessing exercise capacity and then the amount of breathlessness and exercise in patients with COPD.

  18. Effects of Muscle Strength and Balance Control on Sit-to-Walk and Turn Durations in the Timed Up and Go Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzurei; Chou, Li-Shan

    2017-12-01

    To examine the association of muscle strength and balance control with the amount of time taken to perform sit-to-walk (STW) or turning components of the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test in older adults. Correlations; multiple regression models. General community. Older adults (N=60) age >70 years recruited from the community. Not applicable. Muscle strength, balance control, and TUG test performance time. Muscle strength was quantified by peak joint moments during the isometric maximal voluntary contraction test for bilateral hip abductors, knee extensors, and ankle plantar flexors. Balance control was assessed with the Berg Balance Scale, Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale, and center of mass and ankle inclination angle derived during the TUG test performance. We found that balance control measures were significantly associated with both STW and turning durations even after controlling for muscle strength and other confounders (STW duration: Pbalance control is an important factor that contributes to longer STW and turning durations on the TUG test. Furthermore, strength has a higher association with STW than turning duration. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Randomized random walk on a random walk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.A.

    1983-06-01

    This paper discusses generalizations of the model introduced by Kehr and Kunter of the random walk of a particle on a one-dimensional chain which in turn has been constructed by a random walk procedure. The superimposed random walk is randomised in time according to the occurrences of a stochastic point process. The probability of finding the particle in a particular position at a certain instant is obtained explicitly in the transform domain. It is found that the asymptotic behaviour for large time of the mean-square displacement of the particle depends critically on the assumed structure of the basic random walk, giving a diffusion-like term for an asymmetric walk or a square root law if the walk is symmetric. Many results are obtained in closed form for the Poisson process case, and these agree with those given previously by Kehr and Kunter. (author)

  20. Relation between random walks and quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Stefan; Falkner, Stefan; Portugal, Renato

    2015-05-01

    Based on studies of four specific networks, we conjecture a general relation between the walk dimensions dw of discrete-time random walks and quantum walks with the (self-inverse) Grover coin. In each case, we find that dw of the quantum walk takes on exactly half the value found for the classical random walk on the same geometry. Since walks on homogeneous lattices satisfy this relation trivially, our results for heterogeneous networks suggest that such a relation holds irrespective of whether translational invariance is maintained or not. To develop our results, we extend the renormalization-group analysis (RG) of the stochastic master equation to one with a unitary propagator. As in the classical case, the solution ρ (x ,t ) in space and time of this quantum-walk equation exhibits a scaling collapse for a variable xdw/t in the weak limit, which defines dw and illuminates fundamental aspects of the walk dynamics, e.g., its mean-square displacement. We confirm the collapse for ρ (x ,t ) in each case with extensive numerical simulation. The exact values for dw themselves demonstrate that RG is a powerful complementary approach to study the asymptotics of quantum walks that weak-limit theorems have not been able to access, such as for systems lacking translational symmetries beyond simple trees.

  1. The Walking Corsi Test (WalCT): a normative study of topographical working memory in a sample of 4- to 11-year-olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccardi, L; Palermo, L; Leonzi, M; Risetti, M; Zompanti, L; D'Amico, S; Guariglia, C

    2014-01-01

    We report normative data on topographical working memory collected through the Walking Corsi Test (WalCT; Piccardi et al., 2008 ) for developing a standard administration procedure to be used in clinical and educational practice. A total of 268 typically developing Italian children aged 4-11 years performed both WalCT and Corsi Block-Tapping Test (CBT; Corsi, 1972 ) a well-known visuo-spatial memory test. WalCT has already been validated in adults, demonstrating sensitivity in detecting topographical memory deficits even in individuals who have no other memory impairments. Our results showed that age, but not sex, affected performances. Both girls and boys had a larger span on the CBT than the WalCT. The youngest group did not differ in performing WalCT and CBT, but from 5.6 years of age children performed better on CBT than WalCT, suggesting that memory in reaching space develops before topographical memory. Only after 5 years of age do children learn to process specifically topographical stimuli, suggesting that this happens when their environmental knowledge becomes operational and they increase environmental independence. We also discuss the importance to introduce WalCT in the clinical assessment.

  2. More Adults Are Walking

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast is based on the August 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. While more adults are walking, only half get the recommended amount of physical activity. Listen to learn how communities, employers, and individuals may help increase walking.

  3. Pain when walking: individual sensory profiles in the foot soles of torture victims - a controlled study using quantitative sensory testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prip, K.; Persson, A. L.; Sjolund, B. H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: With quantitative sensory testing (QST) we recently found no differences in sensory function of the foot soles between groups of torture victims with or without exposure to falanga (beatings under the feet). Compared to matched controls the torture victims had hyperalgesia to deep mec...

  4. 76 FR 65362 - Energy Conservation Program: Compliance Date Regarding the Test Procedures for Walk-In Coolers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-21

    ... Freezers and the Certification for Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and Fixtures AGENCY: Office of Energy... the Department of metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. DATES: This final rule is effective... starting October 12, 2011; that is, 180 days after publication of the test procedure final rule. DOE...

  5. Quantum walk computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendon, Viv

    2014-01-01

    Quantum versions of random walks have diverse applications that are motivating experimental implementations as well as theoretical studies. Recent results showing quantum walks are “universal for quantum computation” relate to algorithms, to be run on quantum computers. We consider whether an experimental implementation of a quantum walk could provide useful computation before we have a universal quantum computer

  6. Effect of Body Composition on Walking Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciejczyk Marcin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the study was to evaluate walking economy and physiological responses at two walking speeds in males with similar absolute body mass but different body composition. Methods. The study involved 22 young men with similar absolute body mass, BMI, aerobic performance, calf and thigh circumference. The participants differed in body composition: body fat (HBF group and lean body mass (HLBM group. In the graded test, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max and maximal heart rate were measured. Walking economy was evaluated during two walks performed at two different speeds (4.8 and 6.0 km ‧ h-1. Results. The VO2max was similar in both groups, as were the physiological responses during slow walking. The absolute oxygen uptake or oxygen uptake relative to body mass did not significantly differentiate the studied groups. The only indicator significantly differentiating the two groups was oxygen uptake relative to LBM. Conclusions. Body composition does not significantly affect walking economy at low speed, while during brisk walking, the economy is better in the HLBM vs. HBF group, provided that walking economy is presented as oxygen uptake relative to LBM. For this reason, we recommend this manner of oxygen uptake normalization in the evaluation of walking economy.

  7. Beam Walking in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadhead, Geoffrey D.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental test on beam walking (for balance), administered to 189 minimally brain injured and 226 educable mentally retarded (EMR) 8- to 13-year-old children, yielded results such as reliability estimates for the mean of three trials were high and there was greater performance reliability for EMR children. (MC)

  8. Beam walking can detect differences in walking balance proficiency across a range of sensorimotor abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawers, Andrew; Ting, Lena H

    2015-02-01

    The ability to quantify differences in walking balance proficiency is critical to curbing the rising health and financial costs of falls. Current laboratory-based approaches typically focus on successful recovery of balance while clinical instruments often pose little difficulty for all but the most impaired patients. Rarely do they test motor behaviors of sufficient difficulty to evoke failures in balance control limiting their ability to quantify balance proficiency. Our objective was to test whether a simple beam-walking task could quantify differences in walking balance proficiency across a range of sensorimotor abilities. Ten experts, ten novices, and five individuals with transtibial limb loss performed six walking trials across three different width beams. Walking balance proficiency was quantified as the ratio of distance walked to total possible distance. Balance proficiency was not significantly different between cohorts on the wide-beam, but clear differences between cohorts on the mid and narrow-beams were identified. Experts walked a greater distance than novices on the mid-beam (average of 3.63±0.04m verus 2.70±0.21m out of 3.66m; p=0.009), and novices walked further than amputees (1.52±0.20m; p=0.03). Amputees were unable to walk on the narrow-beam, while experts walked further (3.07±0.14m) than novices (1.55±0.26m; p=0.0005). A simple beam-walking task and an easily collected measure of distance traveled detected differences in walking balance proficiency across sensorimotor abilities. This approach provides a means to safely study and evaluate successes and failures in walking balance in the clinic or lab. It may prove useful in identifying mechanisms underlying falls versus fall recoveries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Increasing Walking in the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport: The Walk to Fly Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Janet E; Frederick, Ginny M; Paul, Prabasaj; Omura, John D; Carlson, Susan A; Dorn, Joan M

    2017-07-01

    To test the effectiveness of a point-of-decision intervention to prompt walking, versus motorized transport, in a large metropolitan airport. We installed point-of-decision prompt signage at 4 locations in the airport transportation mall at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (Atlanta, GA) at the connecting corridor between airport concourses. Six ceiling-mounted infrared sensors counted travelers entering and exiting the study location. We collected traveler counts from June 2013 to May 2016 when construction was present and absent (preintervention period: June 2013-September 2014; postintervention period: September 2014-May 2016). We used a model that incorporated weekly walking variation to estimate the intervention effect on walking. There was an 11.0% to 16.7% relative increase in walking in the absence of airport construction where 580 to 810 more travelers per day chose to walk. Through May 2016, travelers completed 390 000 additional walking trips. The Walk to Fly study demonstrated a significant and sustained increase in the number of airport travelers choosing to walk. Providing signage about options to walk in busy locations where reasonable walking options are available may improve population levels of physical activity and therefore improve public health.

  10. Sex-specific predictive power of 6-minute walk test in chronic heart failure is not enhanced using percent achieved of published reference equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenstein, Lutz; Zugck, Christian; Nelles, Manfred; Schellberg, Dieter; Katus, Hugo; Remppis, Andrew

    2008-04-01

    The 6-minute walk test (6MWT) is an established prognostic tool in chronic heart failure. The strong influence of height, weight, age, and sex on 6MWT distance may be accounted for by using percentage achieved of predicted value rather than uncorrected 6MWT values. The study included 1069 patients (862 men) with a mean age 55.2 +/- 11.7 years and mean left ventricular ejection fraction of 29% +/- 10%, attending the heart failure clinic of the University of Heidelberg between 1995 and 2005. The predictive power and accuracy of 6MWT and achieved percentage values according to all available published equations for mortality and mortality or transplant combined were tested separately for each sex. The percentage values varied largely between equations. For all equations, women in New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class I had higher values than men. Although the 6MWT significantly discriminated all NYHA classes for both sexes, only 1 equation discriminated all NYHA classes. No significant differences in the area under the receiver operating-characteristic curve were noted between achieved percentage values and 6MWT. Despite strong univariate significance, achieved percentage values did not retain multivariate significance. The 6MWT was independent from N-terminal brain natriuretic propeptide, NYHA, left ventricular ejection fraction, and peak oxygen uptake. We confirmed 6MWT to be a strong and independent risk predictor for both sexes. Because the prognostic power of 6MWT is not enhanced using percentage achieved of published reference equations, we suggest recalibration of these reference values rather than discarding this approach.

  11. Valores de referência para o teste de caminhada com carga progressiva em indivíduos saudáveis: da distância percorrida às respostas fisiológicas Reference values for the incremental shuttle walk test in healthy subjects: from the walk distance to physiological responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Zuniga Dourado

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar valores de referência para a distância caminhada (DC e para respostas fisiológicas durante o teste de caminhada com carga progressiva (TCCP e desenvolver equações preditivas para essas variáveis em adultos saudáveis. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 103 participantes saudáveis com idade > 40 anos (54 mulheres e 49 homens. Os participantes usaram um sistema de análise de gases durante o TCCP. Consumo de oxigênio (VO2, liberação de gás carbônico, ventilação minuto, FC, DC e velocidade máxima da caminhada (VMC foram obtidos como desfechos primários. Avaliamos também a força de preensão manual (FPM e a massa magra corporal (MMC. RESULTADOS: Os modelos de regressão utilizando variáveis fisiológicas, DC e VMC ajustados por idade, massa corporal, estatura e sexo apresentaram valores de R² entre 0,40 e 0,65 (para FC e pico de VO2, respectivamente. Os modelos incluindo MMC e FPM não aumentaram consideravelmente os valores de R² na previsão do pico de VO2, embora esses modelos tenham aumentado discretamente os valores do R² para DC e VMC (8% e 12%, respectivamente. As variáveis DC, VMC e DC × massa corporal, respectivamente, explicaram 76,7%, 73,3% e 81,2% da variabilidade do pico de VO2. CONCLUSÕES: Nossos resultados originaram valores de referência para a DC e respostas fisiológicas ao TCCP, que podem ser estimados adequadamente por características demográficas e antropométricas simples em adultos saudáveis com idade > 40 anos. O TCCP poderia ser utilizado na avaliação da capacidade física na população geral de adultos e no desenvolvimento de programas de caminhada individualizados.OBJECTIVE: To determine reference values for incremental shuttle walk distance (ISWD and peak physiological responses during the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT, as well as to develop a series of predictive equations for those variables in healthy adults. METHODS: We evaluated 103 healthy participants > 40 years of

  12. Burst Speed of Wild Fishes under High-Velocity Flow Conditions Using Stamina Tunnel with Natural Guidance System in River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Mattashi; Yamamoto, Yasuyuki; Yataya, Kenichi; Kamiyama, Kohhei

    Swimming experiments were conducted on wild fishes in a natural guidance system stamina tunnel (cylindrical pipe) installed in a fishway of a local river under high-velocity flow conditions (tunnel flow velocity : 211 to 279 cm·s-1). In this study, the swimming characteristics of fishes were observed. The results show that (1) the swimming speeds of Tribolodon hakonensis (Japanese dace), Phoxinus lagowshi steindachneri (Japanese fat-minnow), Plecoglossus altivelis (Ayu), and Zacco platypus (Pale chub) were in proportion to their body length under identical water flow velocity conditions; (2) the maximum burst speed of Japanese dace and Japanese fat-minnow (measuring 4 to 6 cm in length) was 262 to 319 cm·s-1 under high flow velocity conditions (225 to 230 cm·s-1), while the maximum burst speed of Ayu and Pale chub (measuring 5 cm to 12 cm in length) was 308 to 355 cm·s-1 under high flow velocity conditions (264 to 273 cm·s-1) ; (3) the 50cm-maximum swimming speed of swimming fishes was 1.07 times faster than the pipe-swimming speed; (4) the faster the flow velocity, the shorter the swimming distance became.

  13. Stamina pistilloida, the Pea ortholog of Fim and UFO, is required for normal development of flowers, inflorescences, and leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S; Hofer, J; Murfet, I

    2001-01-01

    Isolation and characterization of two severe alleles at the Stamina pistilloida (Stp) locus reveals that Stp is involved in a wide range of developmental processes in the garden pea. The most severe allele, stp-4, results in flowers consisting almost entirely of sepals and carpels. Production of ectopic secondary flowers in stp-4 plants suggests that Stp is involved in specifying floral meristem identity in pea. The stp mutations also reduce the complexity of the compound pea leaf, and primary inflorescences often terminate prematurely in an aberrant sepaloid flower. In addition, stp mutants were shorter than their wild-type siblings due to a reduction in cell number in their internodes. Fewer cells were also found in the epidermis of the leaf rachis of stp mutants. Examination of the effects of stp-4 in double mutant combinations with af, tl, det, and veg2-2-mutations known to influence leaf, inflorescence, and flower development in pea-suggests that Stp function is independent of these genes. A synergistic interaction between weak mutant alleles at Stp and Uni indicated that these two genes act together, possibly to regulate primordial growth. Molecular analysis revealed that Stp is the pea homolog of the Antirrhinum gene Fimbriata (Fim) and of UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) from Arabidopsis. Differences between Fim/UFO and Stp mutant phenotypes and expression patterns suggest that expansion of Stp activity into the leaf was an important step during evolution of the compound leaf in the garden pea.

  14. High on walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woythal, Bente Martinsen; Haahr, Anita; Dreyer, Pia

    2018-01-01

    a leg, and people who live with Parkinson’s disease. The analysis of the data is inspired by Paul Ricoeur’s philosophy of interpretation. Four themes were identified: (a) I feel high in two ways; (b) Walking has to be automatic; (c) Every Monday, I walk with the girls in the park; and (d) I dream...

  15. James Watt's Leicester Walk

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    a poem in which James Watt, inventor of the separate condenser, walks through contemporary Leicester (his route is from Bonners Lane and alongside the canal, taking in the Statue of Liberty on its traffic island near Sage Road). It is derived from the exercise of taking a character for a walk,

  16. More Adults Are Walking

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-31

    This podcast is based on the August 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. While more adults are walking, only half get the recommended amount of physical activity. Listen to learn how communities, employers, and individuals may help increase walking.  Created: 7/31/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/7/2012.

  17. Iterated random walks with shape prior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pujadas, Esmeralda Ruiz; Kjer, Hans Martin; Piella, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    the parametric probability density function. Then, random walks is performed iteratively aligning the prior with the current segmentation in every iteration. We tested the proposed approach with natural and medical images and compared it with the latest techniques with random walks and shape priors......We propose a new framework for image segmentation using random walks where a distance shape prior is combined with a region term. The shape prior is weighted by a confidence map to reduce the influence of the prior in high gradient areas and the region term is computed with k-means to estimate....... The experiments suggest that this method gives promising results for medical and natural images....

  18. Lévy walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaburdaev, V.; Denisov, S.; Klafter, J.

    2015-04-01

    Random walk is a fundamental concept with applications ranging from quantum physics to econometrics. Remarkably, one specific model of random walks appears to be ubiquitous across many fields as a tool to analyze transport phenomena in which the dispersal process is faster than dictated by Brownian diffusion. The Lévy-walk model combines two key features, the ability to generate anomalously fast diffusion and a finite velocity of a random walker. Recent results in optics, Hamiltonian chaos, cold atom dynamics, biophysics, and behavioral science demonstrate that this particular type of random walk provides significant insight into complex transport phenomena. This review gives a self-consistent introduction to Lévy walks, surveys their existing applications, including latest advances, and outlines further perspectives.

  19. Neuromorphic walking gait control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, Susanne; Hepp, Klaus; Douglas, Rodney J

    2006-03-01

    We present a neuromorphic pattern generator for controlling the walking gaits of four-legged robots which is inspired by central pattern generators found in the nervous system and which is implemented as a very large scale integrated (VLSI) chip. The chip contains oscillator circuits that mimic the output of motor neurons in a strongly simplified way. We show that four coupled oscillators can produce rhythmic patterns with phase relationships that are appropriate to generate all four-legged animal walking gaits. These phase relationships together with frequency and duty cycle of the oscillators determine the walking behavior of a robot driven by the chip, and they depend on a small set of stationary bias voltages. We give analytic expressions for these dependencies. This chip reduces the complex, dynamic inter-leg control problem associated with walking gait generation to the problem of setting a few stationary parameters. It provides a compact and low power solution for walking gait control in robots.

  20. Cell phones change the way we walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberg, Eric M; Muratori, Lisa M

    2012-04-01

    Cell phone use among pedestrians leads to increased cognitive distraction, reduced situation awareness and increases in unsafe behavior. Performing a dual-task, such as talking or texting with a cell phone while walking, may interfere with working memory and result in walking errors. At baseline, thirty-three participants visually located a target 8m ahead; then vision was occluded and they were instructed to walk to the remembered target. One week later participants were assigned to either walk, walk while talking on a cell phone, or walk while texting on a cell phone toward the target with vision occluded. Duration and final location of the heel were noted. Linear distance traveled, lateral angular deviation from the start line, and gait velocity were derived. Changes from baseline to testing were analyzed with paired t-tests. Participants engaged in cell phone use presented with significant reductions in gait velocity (texting: 33% reduction, p=0.01; talking: 16% reduction, p=0.02). Moreover, participants who were texting while walking demonstrated a 61% increase in lateral deviation (p=0.04) and 13% increase in linear distance traveled (p=0.03). These results suggest that the dual-task of walking while using a cell phone impacts executive function and working memory and influences gait to such a degree that it may compromise safety. Importantly, comparison of the two cell phone conditions demonstrates texting creates a significantly greater interference effect on walking than talking on a cell phone. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Biomechanical analysis of rollator walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Larsen, Peter K; Pedersen, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects.......The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects....

  2. Simulation of random walks in field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rensburg, E.J.J. van

    1988-01-01

    The numerical simulation of random walks is considered using the Monte Carlo method previously proposed. The algorithm is tested and then generalised to generate Edwards random walks. The renormalised masses of the Edwards model are calculated and the results are compared with those obtained from a simple perturbation theory calculation for small values of the bare coupling constant. The efficiency of this algorithm is discussed and compared with an alternative approach. (author)

  3. Walking dreams in congenital and acquired paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurat, Marie-Thérèse; Agbakou, Maité; Attigui, Patricia; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2011-12-01

    To test if dreams contain remote or never-experienced motor skills, we collected during 6 weeks dream reports from 15 paraplegics and 15 healthy subjects. In 9/10 subjects with spinal cord injury and in 5/5 with congenital paraplegia, voluntary leg movements were reported during dream, including feelings of walking (46%), running (8.6%), dancing (8%), standing up (6.3%), bicycling (6.3%), and practicing sports (skiing, playing basketball, swimming). Paraplegia patients experienced walking dreams (38.2%) just as often as controls (28.7%). There was no correlation between the frequency of walking dreams and the duration of paraplegia. In contrast, patients were rarely paraplegic in dreams. Subjects who had never walked or stopped walking 4-64 years prior to this study still experience walking in their dreams, suggesting that a cerebral walking program, either genetic or more probably developed via mirror neurons (activated when observing others performing an action) is reactivated during sleep. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Alzheimer random walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagaki, Takashi; Kasuya, Keisuke

    2017-09-01

    Using the Monte Carlo simulation, we investigate a memory-impaired self-avoiding walk on a square lattice in which a random walker marks each of sites visited with a given probability p and makes a random walk avoiding the marked sites. Namely, p = 0 and p = 1 correspond to the simple random walk and the self-avoiding walk, respectively. When p> 0, there is a finite probability that the walker is trapped. We show that the trap time distribution can well be fitted by Stacy's Weibull distribution b(a/b){a+1}/{b}[Γ({a+1}/{b})]-1x^a\\exp(-a/bx^b)} where a and b are fitting parameters depending on p. We also find that the mean trap time diverges at p = 0 as p- α with α = 1.89. In order to produce sufficient number of long walks, we exploit the pivot algorithm and obtain the mean square displacement and its Flory exponent ν(p) as functions of p. We find that the exponent determined for 1000 step walks interpolates both limits ν(0) for the simple random walk and ν(1) for the self-avoiding walk as [ ν(p) - ν(0) ] / [ ν(1) - ν(0) ] = pβ with β = 0.388 when p ≪ 0.1 and β = 0.0822 when p ≫ 0.1. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Continuous Time Random Walk Still Trendy: Fifty-year History, Current State and Outlook", edited by Ryszard Kutner and Jaume Masoliver.

  5. Correlation between Body Composition and Walking Capacity in Severe Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Correia de Faria Santar?m, G; de Cleva, R; Santo, Marco Aur?lio; Bernhard, Aline Biaseto; Gadducci, Alexandre Vieira; Greve, Julia Maria D?Andrea; Silva, Paulo Roberto Santos

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with mobility reduction due to mechanical factors and excessive body fat. The six-minute walk test (6MWT) has been used to assess functional capacity in severe obesity. Objective To determine the association of BMI, total and segmental body composition with distance walked (6MWD) during the six-minute walk test (6MWT) according to gender and obesity grade. Setting University of S?o Paulo Medical School, Brazil; Public Practice. Methods Functional capacity was ...

  6. Race walking gait and its influence on race walking economy in world-class race walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Ezeiza, Josu; Torres-Unda, Jon; Tam, Nicholas; Irazusta, Jon; Granados, Cristina; Santos-Concejero, Jordan

    2018-03-06

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationships between biomechanical parameters of the gait cycle and race walking economy in world-class Olympic race walkers. Twenty-One world-class race walkers possessing the Olympic qualifying standard participated in this study. Participants completed an incremental race walking test starting at 10 km·h -1 , where race walking economy (ml·kg -1 ·km -1 ) and spatiotemporal gait variables were analysed at different speeds. 20-km race walking performance was related to race walking economy, being the fastest race walkers those displaying reduced oxygen cost at a given speed (R = 0.760, p < 0.001). Longer ground contact times, shorter flight times, longer midstance sub-phase and shorter propulsive sub-phase during stance were related to a better race walking economy (moderate effect, p < 0.05). According to the results of this study, the fastest race walkers were more economi cal than the lesser performers. Similarly, shorter flight times are associated with a more efficient race walking economy. Coaches and race walkers should avoid modifying their race walking style by increasing flight times, as it may not only impair economy, but also lead to disqualification.

  7. Measuring Oscillating Walking Paths with a LIDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Palacín

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the analysis of different walking paths registered using a Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR laser range sensor in order to measure oscillating trajectories during unsupervised walking. The estimate of the gait and trajectory parameters were obtained with a terrestrial LIDAR placed 100 mm above the ground with the scanning plane parallel to the floor to measure the trajectory of the legs without attaching any markers or modifying the floor. Three different large walking experiments were performed to test the proposed measurement system with straight and oscillating trajectories. The main advantages of the proposed system are the possibility to measure several steps and obtain average gait parameters and the minimum infrastructure required. This measurement system enables the development of new ambulatory applications based on the analysis of the gait and the trajectory during a walk.

  8. The Act of Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Maria Quvang Harck; Olesen, Mette; Helmer, Pernille Falborg

    2014-01-01

    ’ of mobility (Jensen 2013:111) such as the urban environment, and the infrastructures. Walking has indeed also a ‘software dimension’ as an embodied performance that trigger the human senses (Jensen 2013) and which is closely related to the habitus and identity of the individual (Halprin 1963). The individual......The ability to walk in an area is, in the existing literature, often explained by the physical structures like building density and the presence of facilities in an area, and it is often termed ‘walkability’ (Patton 2007; Forsyth and Southworth 2008; Krizek, Handy and Forsyth 2009; Johnson 2003......; Frumkin 2002). The term ‘walkability’ focuses on how the physical structures in the urban environment can promote walking, and how this potentially eases issues of public health and liveability in our cities (Krizek et al. 2009). However, the study of walking should not be reduced merely to the ‘hardware...

  9. Minimal Walking Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foadi, Roshan; Frandsen, Mads Toudal; A. Ryttov, T.

    2007-01-01

    Different theoretical and phenomenological aspects of the Minimal and Nonminimal Walking Technicolor theories have recently been studied. The goal here is to make the models ready for collider phenomenology. We do this by constructing the low energy effective theory containing scalars......, pseudoscalars, vector mesons and other fields predicted by the minimal walking theory. We construct their self-interactions and interactions with standard model fields. Using the Weinberg sum rules, opportunely modified to take into account the walking behavior of the underlying gauge theory, we find...... interesting relations for the spin-one spectrum. We derive the electroweak parameters using the newly constructed effective theory and compare the results with the underlying gauge theory. Our analysis is sufficiently general such that the resulting model can be used to represent a generic walking technicolor...

  10. Walking - Sensing - Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads; Meinhardt, Nina Dam; Browning, David

    2014-01-01

    Building on ethnographic research and social theory in the field of ‘mobilities’, this workshop paper suggests that field work based on simply walking with people entails a form of embodied participation that informs technological interventions by creating a space within which to address a wider ...... set of experiential or ‘felt’ qualities of living with mobile technologies. Moving from reflections on the value of walking with people, the paper outlines some affordances of a smartphone application built to capture place experiences through walking.......Building on ethnographic research and social theory in the field of ‘mobilities’, this workshop paper suggests that field work based on simply walking with people entails a form of embodied participation that informs technological interventions by creating a space within which to address a wider...

  11. What Is Walking Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... different from regular pneumonia? Answers from Eric J. Olson, M.D. Walking pneumonia is an informal term ... be treated with an antibiotic. With Eric J. Olson, M.D. Goldman L, et al., eds. Mycoplasma ...

  12. walk over ℤ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Leroux

    2005-01-01

    walk over ℤ can be described from a coassociative coalgebra. Relationships between this coalgebra and the set of periodic orbits of the classical chaotic system x↦2x mod⁡1, x∈[0,1], are also given.

  13. Biomechanics of stair walking and jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, D J; Voloshin, A S

    1991-01-01

    Physical activities such as stair walking and jumping result in increased dynamic loading on the human musculoskeletal system. Use of light weight, externally attached accelerometers allows for in-vivo monitoring of the shock waves invading the human musculoskeletal system during those activities. Shock waves were measured in four subjects performing stair walking up and down, jumping in place and jumping off a fixed elevation. The results obtained show that walking down a staircase induced shock waves with amplitude of 130% of that observed in walking up stairs and 250% of the shock waves experienced in level gait. The jumping test revealed levels of the shock waves nearly eight times higher than that in level walking. It was also shown that the shock waves invading the human musculoskeletal system may be generated not only by the heel strike, but also by the metatarsal strike. To moderate the risk of degenerative joint disorders four types of viscoelastic insoles were utilized to reduce the impact generated shock waves. The insoles investigated were able to reduce the amplitude of the shock wave by between 9% and 41% depending on the insole type and particular physical activity. The insoles were more effective in the reduction of the heel strike impacts than in the reduction of the metatarsal strike impacts. In all instances, the shock attenuation capacities of the insoles tested were greater in the jumping trials than in the stair walking studies. The insoles were ranked in three groups on the basis of their shock absorbing capacity.

  14. Two Legged Walking Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Kraus, V.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to construct a two-legged wirelessly controlled walking robot. This paper describes the construction of the robot, its control electronics, and the solution of the wireless control. The article also includes a description of the application to control the robot. The control electronics of the walking robot are built using the development kit Arduino Mega, which is enhanced with WiFi module allowing the wireless control, a set of ultrasonic sensors for detecting obstacl...

  15. Effects of Walking Direction and Cognitive Challenges on Gait in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A. Wajda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Declines in walking performance are commonly seen when undergoing a concurrent cognitive task in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of walking direction and simultaneous cognitive task on the spatiotemporal gait parameters in persons with MS compared to healthy controls. Ten persons with MS (Median EDSS, 3.0 and ten healthy controls took part in this pilot study. Participants performed 4 walking trials at their self-selected comfortable pace. These trials included forward walking, forward walking with a cognitive task, backward walking, and backward walking with a cognitive task. Walking performance was indexed with measures of velocity, cadence, and stride length for each testing condition. The MS group walked slower with significantly reduced stride length compared to the control group. The novel observation of this investigation was that walking differences between persons with MS and healthy controls were greater during backward walking, and this effect was further highlighted during backward walking with added cognitive test. This raises the possibility that backward walking tests could be an effective way to examine walking difficulties in individuals with MS with relatively minimal walking impairment.

  16. EFFECTIVENES OF AEROBIC AND YOGA EXERCISE TO INCREASE CARDIORESPIRATION STAMINA IN CARIER WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esti Yunitasari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Cardiorespiratory endurance is one of the components of fitness. Cardiorespiratory endurance is considered to have relation with health because the low grade of fitness connected to high risk of immature death especially cardiovascular disease. Sport such as aerobic exercise and yoga exercise is one of efforts to increase cardiorespiratory endurance. This study was aimed to analyze the effectiveness aerobic exercise and yoga exercise to increase of cardiorespiratory endurance in female employee. Method : The design of the study was Quasy Experimental by using non-probability sampling (purposive sampling. Total sample of this study were 21 respondents. Seven respondents as treatment aerobic exerciser, 7 respondents as treatment yoga exerciser and 7 respondents as control group. The independent variables were aerobic exercise and yoga exercise. The dependent variables were the increase cardiorespiratory endurance. The data were collected and analyzed by using paired t test and anova with significance level a < 0,05. Result : The result showed that there were no differences effectiveness aerobic exercise and yoga exercise to increase cardiorespiratory endurance for female employee which were indicated by pulse (p=0,388, blood pressure systole (p= 0,520, blood pressure diastole (p=0,131 and respiration (p=0,432. Analysis :  It can be concluded that both of gymnastic aerobic and yoga effective on increasing immunity of cardiovascular for the female. Discussion : Female employee can consider aerobic and yoga as an effort to increase cardiorespiratory endurance.

  17. Integrated method development of general and special students stamina involved in the fight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Alekseev

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : testing the effectiveness of methods of development of general and special endurance cadets wrestlers. Material : the experiment was attended by 20 students aged 18-20 years (10-12 years experience of employment, qualifications - candidates for the master of sports and master of sports. Classes are held 10 times a week, lasting for 120 minutes. Results : the developed methodology based on the application of a special set of exercises. Technique promotes rapid increase endurance level students. The directions of increasing endurance and performance of students. As an exercise for the development of general endurance recommended: motocross race, gymnastics, sports (rugby, soccer. As an exercise for the development of special endurance recommended: Attempted partner with high intensity (8-9 shots in 10 seconds Perform five series, consisting of 5 spurts (the maximum number of shots in 10 seconds And run shots at a moderate pace (4 -5 throws for 10 seconds ; training and educational training bout, fight quadruples (fight lasts until the transition to the fight lying down or throw up. Conclusions : the increase in special endurance cadets should be in parallel with the improvement of overall fitness.

  18. Compliant walking appears metabolically advantageous at extreme step lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehoon; Bertram, John E A

    2018-05-19

    Humans alter gait in response to unusual gait circumstances to accomplish the task of walking. For instance, subjects spontaneously increase leg compliance at a step length threshold as step length increases. Here we test the hypothesis that this transition occurs based on the level of energy expenditure, where compliant walking becomes less energetically demanding at long step lengths. To map and compare the metabolic cost of normal and compliant walking as step length increases. 10 healthy individuals walked on a treadmill using progressively increasing step lengths (100%, 120%, 140% and 160% of preferred step length), in both normal and compliant leg walking as energy expenditure was recorded via indirect calorimetry. Leg compliance was controlled by lowering the center-of-mass trajectory during stance, forcing the leg to flex and extend as the body moved over the foot contact. For normal step lengths, compliant leg walking was more costly than normal walking gait, but compliant leg walking energetic cost did not increase as rapidly for longer step lengths. This led to an intersection between normal and compliant walking cost curves at 114% relative step length (regression analysis; r 2  = 0.92 for normal walking; r 2  = 0.65 for compliant walking). Compliant leg walking is less energetically demanding at longer step lengths where a spontaneous shift to compliant walking has been observed, suggesting the human motor control system is sensitive to energetic requirements and will employ alternate movement patterns if advantageous strategies are available. The transition could be attributed to the interplay between (i) leg work controlling body travel during single stance and (ii) leg work to control energy loss in the step-to-step transition. Compliant leg walking requires more stance leg work at normal step lengths, but involves less energy loss at the step-to-step transition for very long steps. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Association between the occurrence of falls and the performance on the Incremental Shuttle Walk Test in elderly women Associação entre a ocorrência de quedas e o desempenho no Incremental Shuttle Walk Test em mulheres idosas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela G. Bardin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT requires agility in its performance, we hypothesized that the test may be associated with balance and risk of falls in the elderly. Objective: To evaluate and compare the association between the performance on the ISWT, the timed up and go (TUG and the occurrence of falls in the elderly. METHOD: Thirty-three elderly individuals (68±7 years performed the TUG and the ISWT. Balance was assessed using the Berg Scale (BBS. Participants who fell at least twice in the last 12 months were placed in the "falls" group (FG and all other participants comprised the control group (CG. RESULTS: There were seventeen elderly women in the FG and 16 in the CG. Participants from the FG had a significant worse performance (pCONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: Levantamos a hipótese de que o Incremental Shuttle Walk Test (ISWT, por exigir agilidade do examinado, possa estar associado ao equilíbrio e ao risco de quedas em idosos. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar e comparar as associações entre os desempenhos no ISWT e no Timed Up and Go (TUG e a ocorrência de quedas em idosos. MÉTODO: Trinta e três idosas (68±7 anos realizaram o ISWT e o TUG. O equilíbrio foi avaliado pela Escala de Equilíbrio de Berg (EEB. As participantes que caíram, pelo menos, duas vezes nos últimos 12 meses foram alocadas no grupo "quedas" (GQ, e as demais compuseram o grupo controle (GC. RESULTADOS: O GQ foi composto por 17 idosas, e 16 compuseram o GC. O GQ apresentou pior desempenho (p<0,05 no TUG (8,01±0,22 vs. 6,22±0,21 s, na EEB (51±3 vs. 55±1 pontos e no ISWT [313±79 (92±15%prev. vs. 395±75 m (113±19%prev.]. A distância percorrida no ISWT correlacionou-se com o TUG (r=-0,75; p<0,001, com a EEB (r=0,50; p=0,002 e com o número de quedas (r=0,36; p=0,031. Após regressão logística, o TUG foi determinante (p=0,03, e a ISWT mostrou tendência para determinar a ocorrência de quedas (p=0,05. CONCLUSÃO: O ISWT foi válido para avaliar o risco

  20. Walking the Everyday

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Bissen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Since 2010, @matthewalking (Bissen, 2013 has published real-time public texts of walks in the city. This text-based Twitter feed has developed a narrative of a particular everyday life and developed a space of interface with others that represents a centering of perspective within an urban landscape. Walking the city provides a spatial, tactile, social, and embodied knowledge of the environment as each of us emerges into a space, orients ourselves, and determines a path that is highly localized, but is in connection with distant spaces and cultures. According to Ben Jacks in “Walking the City: Manhattan Projects,” “for urban dwellers and designers, walking is a fundamental tool for laying claim to, understanding, and shaping a livable city. Walking yields bodily knowing, recovers place memory, creates narrative, prioritizes human scale, and reconnects people to places” (75. @matthewalking’s walks, at times for as long as 5 hours, attempt to center an experience of an urban existence in a spatial narrative of the city that at once prioritizes a connection to place, but also is projected outward into a mediated relationship with others. The project is a series of unbounded walks, or dérives (drift, through the city that are logged on Twitter and traced to create an archive map of a set of particular urban experiences. The dérive concept as outlined in “The Theory of the Dérive,” by Guy Debord is when “one or more persons during a certain period drop their relations, their work and leisure activities, and all their other usual motives for movement and action, and let themselves be drawn by the attractions of the terrain and the encounters they find there” (62.

  1. Prospective assessment of the occurrence of anemia in patients with heart failure: results from the Study of Anemia in a Heart Failure Population (STAMINA-HFP) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kirkwood F; Patterson, James H; Patterson, John H; Oren, Ron M; Mehra, Mandeep R; O'Connor, Christopher M; Piña, Ileana L; Miller, Alan B; Chiong, Jun R; Dunlap, Stephanie H; Cotts, William G; Felker, Gary M; Schocken, Douglas D; Schwartz, Todd A; Ghali, Jalal K

    2009-05-01

    Although a potentially important pathophysiologic factor in heart failure, the prevalence and predictors of anemia have not been well studied in unselected patients with heart failure. The Study of Anemia in a Heart Failure Population (STAMINA-HFP) Registry prospectively studied the prevalence of anemia and the relationship of hemoglobin to health-related quality of life and outcomes among patients with heart failure. A random selection algorithm was used to reduce bias during enrollment of patients seen in specialty clinics or clinics of community cardiologists with experience in heart failure. In this initial report, data on prevalence and correlates of anemia were analyzed in 1,076 of the 1,082 registry patients who had clinical characteristics and hemoglobin determined by finger-stick at baseline. Overall (n = 1,082), the registry patients were 41% female and 73% white with a mean age (+/-SD) of 64 +/- 14 years (68 +/- 13 years in community and 57 +/- 14 years in specialty sites, P 70 years affected. Initial results from the STAMINA-HFP Registry suggest that anemia is a common comorbidity in unselected outpatients with heart failure. Given the strong association of anemia with adverse outcomes in heart failure, this study supports further investigation concerning the importance of anemia as a therapeutic target in this condition.

  2. Walks on SPR neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Alan Joseph J; Castillo, Juan; Lee, Jinnie; St John, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    A nearest-neighbor-interchange (NNI)-walk is a sequence of unrooted phylogenetic trees, T1, T2, . . . , T(k) where each consecutive pair of trees differs by a single NNI move. We give tight bounds on the length of the shortest NNI-walks that visit all trees in a subtree-prune-and-regraft (SPR) neighborhood of a given tree. For any unrooted, binary tree, T, on n leaves, the shortest walk takes Θ(n²) additional steps more than the number of trees in the SPR neighborhood. This answers Bryant’s Second Combinatorial Challenge from the Phylogenetics Challenges List, the Isaac Newton Institute, 2011, and the Penny Ante Problem List, 2009.

  3. Metabolic and clinical comparative analysis of treadmill six-minute walking test and cardiopulmonary exercise testing in obese and eutrophic women Análise clínica e metabólica comparativa entre o teste de caminhada de seis minutos e o teste de exercício cardiopulmonar em mulheres obesas e eutróficas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Di Thommazo-Luporini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Impaired exercise tolerance is directly linked to decreased functional capacity as a consequence of obesity. OBJECTIVES: To analyze and compare the cardiopulmonary, metabolic, and perceptual responses during a cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPX and a treadmill six-minute walking test (tread6MWT in obese and eutrophic women. METHOD: Twenty-nine female participants, aged 20-45 years were included. Fourteen were allocated to the obese group and 15 to the eutrophic group. Anthropometric measurements and body composition assessment were performed. RESULTS: In both tests, obese women presented with significantly higher absolute oxygen uptake, minute ventilation, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure; they also presented with lower speed, distance walked, and oxygen uptake corrected by the weight compared to eutrophics. During the maximal exercise test, perceived dyspnea was greater and the respiratory exchange ratio was lower in obese subjects compared to eutrophics. During the submaximal test, carbon dioxide production, tidal volume, and heart rate were higher in obese subjects compared to eutrophic women. When analyzing possible correlations between the CPX and the tread6MWT at peak, there was a strong correlation for the variable heart rate and a moderate correlation for the variable oxygen uptake. The heart rate obtained in the submaximal test was able to predict the one obtained in the maximal test. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated the agreement between both tests to identify metabolic and physiological parameters at peak exercise. CONCLUSIONS: The six-minute walking test induced ventilatory, metabolic, and cardiovascular responses in agreement with the maximal testing. Thus, the six-minute walking test proves to be important for functional evaluation in the physical therapy routine.CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: A reduzida tolerância ao exercício está relacionada à diminuída capacidade funcional consequente da obesidade. Objetivos

  4. Metabolic and clinical comparative analysis of treadmill six-minute walking test and cardiopulmonary exercise testing in obese and eutrophic women Análise clínica e metabólica comparativa entre o teste de caminhada de seis minutos e o teste de exercício cardiopulmonar em mulheres obesas e eutróficas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Di Thommazo-Luporini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Impaired exercise tolerance is directly linked to decreased functional capacity as a consequence of obesity. OBJECTIVES: To analyze and compare the cardiopulmonary, metabolic, and perceptual responses during a cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPX and a treadmill six-minute walking test (tread6MWT in obese and eutrophic women. METHOD: Twenty-nine female participants, aged 20-45 years were included. Fourteen were allocated to the obese group and 15 to the eutrophic group. Anthropometric measurements and body composition assessment were performed. RESULTS: In both tests, obese women presented with significantly higher absolute oxygen uptake, minute ventilation, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure; they also presented with lower speed, distance walked, and oxygen uptake corrected by the weight compared to eutrophics. During the maximal exercise test, perceived dyspnea was greater and the respiratory exchange ratio was lower in obese subjects compared to eutrophics. During the submaximal test, carbon dioxide production, tidal volume, and heart rate were higher in obese subjects compared to eutrophic women. When analyzing possible correlations between the CPX and the tread6MWT at peak, there was a strong correlation for the variable heart rate and a moderate correlation for the variable oxygen uptake. The heart rate obtained in the submaximal test was able to predict the one obtained in the maximal test. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated the agreement between both tests to identify metabolic and physiological parameters at peak exercise. CONCLUSIONS: The six-minute walking test induced ventilatory, metabolic, and cardiovascular responses in agreement with the maximal testing. Thus, the six-minute walking test proves to be important for functional evaluation in the physical therapy routine.CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: A reduzida tolerância ao exercício está relacionada à diminuída capacidade funcional consequente da obesidade. Objetivos

  5. Fitness Club / Nordic Walking

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness Club

    2011-01-01

    Nordic Walking at CERN Enrollments are open for Nordic Walking courses and outings at CERN. Classes will be on Tuesdays as of 20 September, and outings for the more experienced will be on Thursdays as of 15 September. We meet at the CERN Club barracks car park (near entrance A). • 18:00 to 19:00 on 20 & 27 September, as well as 4 & 11 October. Check out our schedule and rates and enroll at: http://cern.ch/club-fitness Hope to see you among us! CERN Fitness Club fitness.club@cern.ch  

  6. Daily intermittent hypoxia enhances walking after chronic spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Heather B.; Jayaraman, Arun; Herrmann, Megan; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Rymer, William Z.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To test the hypothesis that daily acute intermittent hypoxia (dAIH) and dAIH combined with overground walking improve walking speed and endurance in persons with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). Methods: Nineteen subjects completed the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Participants received 15, 90-second hypoxic exposures (dAIH, fraction of inspired oxygen [Fio2] = 0.09) or daily normoxia (dSHAM, Fio2 = 0.21) at 60-second normoxic intervals on 5 consecutive days; dAIH was given alone or combined with 30 minutes of overground walking 1 hour later. Walking speed and endurance were quantified using 10-Meter and 6-Minute Walk Tests. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01272349). Results: dAIH improved walking speed and endurance. Ten-Meter Walk time improved with dAIH vs dSHAM after 1 day (mean difference [MD] 3.8 seconds, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–6.5 seconds, p = 0.006) and 2 weeks (MD 3.8 seconds, 95% CI 0.9–6.7 seconds, p = 0.010). Six-Minute Walk distance increased with combined dAIH + walking vs dSHAM + walking after 5 days (MD 94.4 m, 95% CI 17.5–171.3 m, p = 0.017) and 1-week follow-up (MD 97.0 m, 95% CI 20.1–173.9 m, p = 0.014). dAIH + walking increased walking distance more than dAIH after 1 day (MD 67.7 m, 95% CI 1.3–134.1 m, p = 0.046), 5 days (MD 107.0 m, 95% CI 40.6–173.4 m, p = 0.002), and 1-week follow-up (MD 136.0 m, 95% CI 65.3–206.6 m, p walking improved walking speed and distance in persons with chronic iSCI. The impact of dAIH is enhanced by combination with walking, demonstrating that combinatorial therapies may promote greater functional benefits in persons with iSCI. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that transient hypoxia (through measured breathing treatments), along with overground walking training, improves walking speed and endurance after iSCI. PMID:24285617

  7. Physiological aspect walking and Nordic walking as adequate kinetic activities.

    OpenAIRE

    BENEŠ, Václav

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor thesis on the topic of The Physiological Aspect of Walking and Nordic Walking as an adequate physical activity focuses on chosen physiological changes of an organism during a five-month training cycle. In the theoretical part I describe the physiological changes of organism during a regularly repeated strain, and also the technique of walking, Nordic walking and health benefits of these activities are defined here. The research part of the thesis describes the measurement method...

  8. Walking along water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mattias Borg

    2014-01-01

    Steep slopes, white peaks and deep valleys make up the Andes. As phenomenologists of landscape have told us, different people have different landscapes. By moving across the terrain, walking along, we might get a sense of how this has been carved out by the movement of wind and water, tectonics...

  9. Walking and Sensing Mobile Lives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads; Meinhardt, Nina Dam

    In this position paper, we discuss how mindful walking with people allow us to explore sensory aspects of mobile lives that are typically absent from research. We present an app that aids researchers collect impressions from a walk.......In this position paper, we discuss how mindful walking with people allow us to explore sensory aspects of mobile lives that are typically absent from research. We present an app that aids researchers collect impressions from a walk....

  10. The Random-Walk Hypothesis on the Indian Stock Market

    OpenAIRE

    Ankita Mishra; Vinod Mishra; Russell Smyth

    2014-01-01

    This study tests the random walk hypothesis for the Indian stock market. Using 19 years of monthly data on six indices from the National Stock Exchange (NSE) and the Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE), this study applies three different unit root tests with two structural breaks to analyse the random walk hypothesis. We find that unit root tests that allow for two structural breaks alone are not able to reject the unit root null; however, a recently developed unit root test that simultaneously accou...

  11. Kineziologická charakteristika Nordic Walking

    OpenAIRE

    Pospíšilová, Petra

    2009-01-01

    Title: Functional a physiological characteristics of Nordic Walking Purposes: The aim of the thesis is to describe and summarize current knowledge about Nordic Walking Methods: Literature analysis Key words: Nordic Walking, free bipedal walk, health benefits, functional indicator changes

  12. Validity of the Nike+ device during walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, N A; Simmons, M C; John, D; Thompson, D L; Bassett, D R; Basset, D R

    2010-02-01

    We determined the validity of the Nike+ device for estimating speed, distance, and energy expenditure (EE) during walking and running. Twenty trained individuals performed a maximal oxygen uptake test and underwent anthropometric and body composition testing. Each participant was outfitted with a Nike+ sensor inserted into the shoe and an Apple iPod nano. They performed eight 6-min stages on the treadmill, including level walking at 55, 82, and 107 m x min(-1), inclined walking (82 m x min(-1)) at 5 and 10% grades, and level running at 134, 161, and 188 m x min(-1). Speed was measured using a tachometer and EE was measured by indirect calorimetry. Results showed that the Nike+ device overestimated the speed of level walking at 55 m x min(-1) by 20%, underestimated the speed of level walking at 107 m x min(-1) by 12%, but closely estimated the speed of level walking at 82 m x min(-1), and level running at all speeds (pNike+ device overestimated the EE of level walking by 18-37%, but closely estimated the EE of level running (pNike+ in-shoe device provided reasonable estimates of speed and distance during level running at the three speeds tested in this study. However, it overestimated EE during level walking and it did not detect the increased cost of inclined locomotion.

  13. The variability problem of normal human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjær, Tine

    2012-01-01

    Previous investigations have suggested considerable inter-individual variability in the time course pattern of net joint moments during normal human walking, although the limited sample sizes precluded statistical analyses. The purpose of the present study was to obtain joint moment patterns from...... a group of normal subjects and to test whether or not the expected differences would prove to be statistically significant. Fifteen healthy male subjects were recorded on video while they walked across two force platforms. Ten kinematic and kinetic parameters were selected and input to a statistical...... cluster analysis to determine whether or not the 15 subjects could be divided into different 'families' (clusters) of walking strategy. The net joint moments showed a variability corroborating earlier reports. The cluster analysis showed that the 15 subjects could be grouped into two clusters of 5 and 10...

  14. [Walking abnormalities in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Masaya

    2010-11-01

    Walking is a spontaneous movement termed locomotion that is promoted by activation of antigravity muscles by serotonergic (5HT) neurons. Development of antigravity activity follows 3 developmental epochs of the sleep-wake (S-W) cycle and is modulated by particular 5HT neurons in each epoch. Activation of antigravity activities occurs in the first epoch (around the age of 3 to 4 months) as restriction of atonia in rapid eye movement (REM) stage and development of circadian S-W cycle. These activities strengthen in the second epoch, with modulation of day-time sleep and induction of crawling around the age of 8 months and induction of walking by 1 year. Around the age of 1 year 6 months, absence of guarded walking and interlimb cordination is observed along with modulation of day-time sleep to once in the afternoon. Bipedal walking in upright position occurs in the third epoch, with development of a biphasic S-W cycle by the age of 4-5 years. Patients with infantile autism (IA), Rett syndrome (RTT), or Tourette syndrome (TS) show failure in the development of the first, second, or third epoch, respectively. Patients with IA fail to develop interlimb coordination; those with RTT, crawling and walking; and those with TS, walking in upright posture. Basic pathophysiology underlying these condition is failure in restricting atonia in REM stage; this induces dysfunction of the pedunculopontine nucleus and consequently dys- or hypofunction of the dopamine (DA) neurons. DA hypofunction in the developing brain, associated with compensatory upward regulation of the DA receptors causes psychobehavioral disorders in infancy (IA), failure in synaptogenesis in the frontal cortex and functional development of the motor and associate cortexes in late infancy through the basal ganglia (RTT), and failure in functional development of the prefrontal cortex through the basal ganglia (TS). Further, locomotion failure in early childhood causes failure in development of functional

  15. Walking adaptability after a stroke and its assessment in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Chitralakshmi K; Clark, David J; Fox, Emily J

    2014-01-01

    Control of walking has been described by a tripartite model consisting of stepping, equilibrium, and adaptability. This review focuses on walking adaptability, which is defined as the ability to modify walking to meet task goals and environmental demands. Walking adaptability is crucial to safe ambulation in the home and community environments and is often severely compromised after a stroke. Yet quantification of walking adaptability after stroke has received relatively little attention in the clinical setting. The objectives of this review were to examine the conceptual challenges for clinical measurement of walking adaptability and summarize the current state of clinical assessment for walking adaptability. We created nine domains of walking adaptability from dimensions of community mobility to address the conceptual challenges in measurement and reviewed performance-based clinical assessments of walking to determine if the assessments measure walking adaptability in these domains. Our literature review suggests the lack of a comprehensive well-tested clinical assessment tool for measuring walking adaptability. Accordingly, recommendations for the development of a comprehensive clinical assessment of walking adaptability after stroke have been presented. Such a clinical assessment will be essential for gauging recovery of walking adaptability with rehabilitation and for motivating novel strategies to enhance recovery of walking adaptability after stroke.

  16. Effects of L-malate on physical stamina and activities of enzymes related to the malate-aspartate shuttle in liver of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J L; Wu, Q P; Huang, J M; Chen, R; Cai, M; Tan, J B

    2007-01-01

    L-malate, a tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) intermediate, plays an important role in transporting NADH from cytosol to mitochondria for energy production and may be involved in the beneficial effects of improving physical stamina. In the present study, we investigated the effects of L-malate on the performance of forced swimming time and blood biochemical parameters related to fatigue - blood urea nitrogen (BUN), glucose (Glc), creatine kinase (CK),total protein (TP) and lactic acid (LA). To investigate the effects of L-malate on the malate-aspartate shuttle and energy metabolism in mice, the activities of enzymes related to the malate-aspartate shuttle were measured. L-malate was orally administered to mice continuously for 30 days using a feeding atraumatic needle. The swimming time was increased by 26.1 % and 28.5 %, respectively, in the 0.210 g/kg and 0.630 g/kg L-malate-treated group compared with the control group. There were no differences in the concentrations of Glc, BUN and TP between the L-malate-treated groups and the control groups. However, the levels of CK were significantly decreased in the L-malate-treated groups. The results predict a potential benefit of L-malate for improving physical stamina and minimizing muscle damage during swimming exercise. The activities of cytosolic and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase were significantly elevated in the L-malate-treated group compared with the control group. These enzymatic activities may be useful indicators for evaluating changes affecting the malate-aspartate shuttle and energy metabolism in the liver of mice.

  17. Nordic Walking Classes

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness Club

    2015-01-01

    Four classes of one hour each are held on Tuesdays. RDV barracks parking at Entrance A, 10 minutes before class time. Spring Course 2015: 05.05/12.05/19.05/26.05 Prices 40 CHF per session + 10 CHF club membership 5 CHF/hour pole rental Check out our schedule and enroll at: https://espace.cern.ch/club-fitness/Lists/Nordic%20Walking/NewForm.aspx? Hope to see you among us! fitness.club@cern.ch

  18. Variability in energy cost and walking gait during race walking in competitive race walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisswalter, J; Fougeron, B; Legros, P

    1998-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the variability of energy cost (Cw) and race walking gait after a 3-h walk at the competition pace in race walkers of the same performance level. Nine competitive race walkers were studied. In the same week, after a first test of VO2max determination, each subject completed two submaximal treadmill walks (6 min length, 0% grade, 12 km X h(-1) speed) before and after a 3-h overground test completed at the individual competition speed of the race walker. During the two submaximal tests, subjects were filmed between the 2nd and the 4th min, and physiological parameters were recorded between the 4th and the 6th min. Results showed two trends. On the one hand, we observed a significant and systematic increase in energy cost of walking (mean deltaCw = 8.4%), whereas no variation in the gait kinematics prescribed by the rules of race walking was recorded. On the other hand, this increase in metabolic energy demand was accompanied by variations of different magnitude and direction of stride length, of the excursion of the heel and of the maximal ankle flexion at toe-off among the race walkers. These results indicated that competitive race walkers are able to maintain their walking gait with exercise duration apart from a systematic increase in energy cost. Moreover, in this form of locomotion the effect of fatigue on the gait variability seems to be an individual function of the race walk constraints and the constraints of the performer.

  19. Ways of Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eslambolchilar, Parisa; Bødker, Mads; Chamberlain, Alan

    2016-01-01

    It seems logical to argue that mobile computing technologies are intended for use "on-the-go." However, on closer inspection, the use of mobile technologies pose a number of challenges for users who are mobile, particularly moving around on foot. In engaging with such mobile technologies and thei......It seems logical to argue that mobile computing technologies are intended for use "on-the-go." However, on closer inspection, the use of mobile technologies pose a number of challenges for users who are mobile, particularly moving around on foot. In engaging with such mobile technologies...... and their envisaged development, we argue that interaction designers must increasingly consider a multitude of perspectives that relate to walking in order to frame design problems appropriately. In this paper, we consider a number of perspectives on walking, and we discuss how these may inspire the design of mobile...... technologies. Drawing on insights from non-representational theory, we develop a partial vocabulary with which to engage with qualities of pedestrian mobility, and we outline how taking more mindful approaches to walking may enrich and inform the design space of handheld technologies....

  20. Detection of Abnormal Muscle Activations during Walking Following Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Low, K. H.; McGregor, Alison H.; Tow, Adela

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify optimal rehabilitation strategies for spinal cord injury (SCI) participants, assessment of impaired walking is required to detect, monitor and quantify movement disorders. In the proposed assessment, ten healthy and seven SCI participants were recruited to perform an over-ground walking test at slow walking speeds. SCI…

  1. Does gene flow constrain adaptive divergence or vice versa? A test using ecomorphology and sexual isolation in Timema cristinae walking-sticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosil, P; Crespi, B J

    2004-01-01

    Population differentiation often reflects a balance between divergent natural selection and the opportunity for homogenizing gene flow to erode the effects of selection. However, during ecological speciation, trait divergence results in reproductive isolation and becomes a cause, rather than a consequence, of reductions in gene flow. To assess both the causes and the reproductive consequences of morphological differentiation, we examined morphological divergence and sexual isolation among 17 populations of Timema cristinae walking-sticks. Individuals from populations adapted to using Adenostoma as a host plant tended to exhibit smaller overall body size, wide heads, and short legs relative to individuals using Ceonothus as a host. However, there was also significant variation in morphology among populations within host-plant species. Mean trait values for each single population could be reliably predicted based upon host-plant used and the potential for homogenizing gene flow, inferred from the size of the neighboring population using the alternate host and mitochondrial DNA estimates of gene flow. Morphology did not influence the probability of copulation in between-population mating trials. Thus, morphological divergence is facilitated by reductions in gene flow, but does not cause reductions in gene flow via the evolution of sexual isolation. Combined with rearing data indicating that size and shape have a partial genetic basis, evidence for parallel origins of the host-associated forms, and inferences from functional morphology, these results indicate that morphological divergence in T. cristinae reflects a balance between the effects of host-specific natural selection and gene flow. Our findings illustrate how data on mating preferences can help determine the causal associations between trait divergence and levels of gene flow.

  2. Derivation and validation of a simple clinical risk-model in heart failure based on 6 minute walk test performance and NT-proBNP status--do we need specificity for sex and beta-blockers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenstein, L; Goode, K; Ingle, L; Remppis, A; Schellberg, D; Nelles, M; Katus, H A; Clark, A L; Cleland, J G F; Zugck, C

    2011-02-17

    It is unclear whether risk prediction strategies in chronic heart failure (CHF) need to be specific for sex or beta-blockers. We examined this problem and developed and validated the consequent risk models based on 6-minute-walk-test and NT-proBNP. The derivation cohort comprised 636 German patients with systolic dysfunction. They were validated against 676 British patients with similar aetiology. ROC-curves for 1-year mortality identified cut-off values separately for specificity (none, sex, beta-blocker, both). Patients were grouped according to number of cut-offs met (group I/II/III - 0/1/2 cut-offs). Widest separation between groups was achieved with sex- and beta-blocker-specific cut offs. In the derivation population, 1-year mortality was 0%, 8%, 31% for group I, II and III, respectively. In the validation population, 1-year rates in the three risk groups were 2%, 7%, 14%, respectively, after application of the same cut-offs. Risk stratification for CHF should perhaps take sex and beta-blocker usage into account. We derived and independently validated relevant risk models based on 6-minute-walk-tests and NT-proBNP. Specifying sex and use of beta-blockers identified three distinct sub-groups with widely differing prognosis. In clinical practice, it may be appropriate to tailor the intensity of follow-up and/or the treatment strategy according to the risk-group. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Walking Behavior of Zoo Elephants: Associations between GPS-Measured Daily Walking Distances and Environmental Factors, Social Factors, and Welfare Indicators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Holdgate

    Full Text Available Research with humans and other animals suggests that walking benefits physical health. Perhaps because these links have been demonstrated in other species, it has been suggested that walking is important to elephant welfare, and that zoo elephant exhibits should be designed to allow for more walking. Our study is the first to address this suggestion empirically by measuring the mean daily walking distance of elephants in North American zoos, determining the factors that are associated with variations in walking distance, and testing for associations between walking and welfare indicators. We used anklets equipped with GPS data loggers to measure outdoor daily walking distance in 56 adult female African (n = 33 and Asian (n = 23 elephants housed in 30 North American zoos. We collected 259 days of data and determined associations between distance walked and social, housing, management, and demographic factors. Elephants walked an average of 5.3 km/day with no significant difference between species. In our multivariable model, more diverse feeding regimens were correlated with increased walking, and elephants who were fed on a temporally unpredictable feeding schedule walked 1.29 km/day more than elephants fed on a predictable schedule. Distance walked was also positively correlated with an increase in the number of social groupings and negatively correlated with age. We found a small but significant negative correlation between distance walked and nighttime Space Experience, but no other associations between walking distances and exhibit size were found. Finally, distance walked was not related to health or behavioral outcomes including foot health, joint health, body condition, and the performance of stereotypic behavior, suggesting that more research is necessary to determine explicitly how differences in walking may impact elephant welfare.

  4. Walking Behavior of Zoo Elephants: Associations between GPS-Measured Daily Walking Distances and Environmental Factors, Social Factors, and Welfare Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdgate, Matthew R; Meehan, Cheryl L; Hogan, Jennifer N; Miller, Lance J; Soltis, Joseph; Andrews, Jeff; Shepherdson, David J

    2016-01-01

    Research with humans and other animals suggests that walking benefits physical health. Perhaps because these links have been demonstrated in other species, it has been suggested that walking is important to elephant welfare, and that zoo elephant exhibits should be designed to allow for more walking. Our study is the first to address this suggestion empirically by measuring the mean daily walking distance of elephants in North American zoos, determining the factors that are associated with variations in walking distance, and testing for associations between walking and welfare indicators. We used anklets equipped with GPS data loggers to measure outdoor daily walking distance in 56 adult female African (n = 33) and Asian (n = 23) elephants housed in 30 North American zoos. We collected 259 days of data and determined associations between distance walked and social, housing, management, and demographic factors. Elephants walked an average of 5.3 km/day with no significant difference between species. In our multivariable model, more diverse feeding regimens were correlated with increased walking, and elephants who were fed on a temporally unpredictable feeding schedule walked 1.29 km/day more than elephants fed on a predictable schedule. Distance walked was also positively correlated with an increase in the number of social groupings and negatively correlated with age. We found a small but significant negative correlation between distance walked and nighttime Space Experience, but no other associations between walking distances and exhibit size were found. Finally, distance walked was not related to health or behavioral outcomes including foot health, joint health, body condition, and the performance of stereotypic behavior, suggesting that more research is necessary to determine explicitly how differences in walking may impact elephant welfare.

  5. Correlação entre os testes da caminhada, marcha estacionária e TUG em hipertensas idosas Correlation between the walk, 2-minute step and TUG tests among hypertensive older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Pedrosa

    2009-06-01

    cardiovascular function. The Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT, Two-Minute Step Test (2MST and Timed Up and Go Test (TUG are indicated for such evaluations. Studies among healthy older adults have shown associations between these tests, thus aiding the evaluation of functional capacity. However, there are no studies on the relationships between the 6MWT, 2MST and TUG among hypertensive individuals, thus justifying the present research. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether there is any association between aerobic endurance and functional mobility among hypertensive older women. METHODS:This was a cross-sectional observational and analytical study on 32 hypertensive older women who were evaluated using the 6MWT, 2MST and TUG. RESULTS:There was a moderate positive correlation between the 6MWT and 2MST (r=0.36; p=0.04, and there were moderate negative correlations between the 6MWT and TUG (r=-0.59; p=0.000 and between the 2MST and TUG (r=-0.66; p=0.000. CONCLUSIONS: For hypertensive older women, the 6MWT can be replaced by the 2MST; the same applied to healthy older adults. Regarding the correlation between the 6MWT, 2MST and TUG, it can be concluded that there is a close relationship between cardiovascular endurance and functional mobility. When there is lower cardiovascular endurance, there is precarious functional mobility and vice versa.

  6. Random Walks in Stock Exchange Prices and the Vienna Stock Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Peter

    1995-01-01

    This paper uses the multiple variance ratio test procedure developed by Chow and Denning (1993) to test for a random walk of stock returns on the Austrian Stock Exchange. I find that with daily data the test rejects the random walk hypothesis at all conventional significance levels for each and every title and for both indeces tested. Individual shares, however, do seem to follow a random walk when weekly returns are considered, while the hypothesis is rejected for both indices. Dieser Art...

  7. Rugged Walking Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimer, Stanley J.; Lisec, Thomas R.; Spiessbach, Andrew J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed walking-beam robot simpler and more rugged than articulated-leg walkers. Requires less data processing, and uses power more efficiently. Includes pair of tripods, one nested in other. Inner tripod holds power supplies, communication equipment, computers, instrumentation, sampling arms, and articulated sensor turrets. Outer tripod holds mast on which antennas for communication with remote control site and video cameras for viewing local and distant terrain mounted. Propels itself by raising, translating, and lowering tripods in alternation. Steers itself by rotating raised tripod on turntable.

  8. Random walk loop soup

    OpenAIRE

    Lawler, Gregory F.; Ferreras, José A. Trujillo

    2004-01-01

    The Brownian loop soup introduced in Lawler and Werner (2004) is a Poissonian realization from a sigma-finite measure on unrooted loops. This measure satisfies both conformal invariance and a restriction property. In this paper, we define a random walk loop soup and show that it converges to the Brownian loop soup. In fact, we give a strong approximation result making use of the strong approximation result of Koml\\'os, Major, and Tusn\\'ady. To make the paper self-contained, we include a proof...

  9. A mathematical nature walk

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, John A

    2009-01-01

    How heavy is that cloud? Why can you see farther in rain than in fog? Why are the droplets on that spider web spaced apart so evenly? If you have ever asked questions like these while outdoors, and wondered how you might figure out the answers, this is a book for you. An entertaining and informative collection of fascinating puzzles from the natural world around us, A Mathematical Nature Walk will delight anyone who loves nature or math or both. John Adam presents ninety-six questions about many common natural phenomena--and a few uncommon ones--and then shows how to answer them using mostly b

  10. Running for exercise mitigates age-related deterioration of walking economy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justus D Ortega

    Full Text Available Impaired walking performance is a key predictor of morbidity among older adults. A distinctive characteristic of impaired walking performance among older adults is a greater metabolic cost (worse economy compared to young adults. However, older adults who consistently run have been shown to retain a similar running economy as young runners. Unfortunately, those running studies did not measure the metabolic cost of walking. Thus, it is unclear if running exercise can prevent the deterioration of walking economy.To determine if and how regular walking vs. running exercise affects the economy of locomotion in older adults.15 older adults (69 ± 3 years who walk ≥ 30 min, 3x/week for exercise, "walkers" and 15 older adults (69 ± 5 years who run ≥ 30 min, 3x/week, "runners" walked on a force-instrumented treadmill at three speeds (0.75, 1.25, and 1.75 m/s. We determined walking economy using expired gas analysis and walking mechanics via ground reaction forces during the last 2 minutes of each 5 minute trial. We compared walking economy between the two groups and to non-aerobically trained young and older adults from a prior study.Older runners had a 7-10% better walking economy than older walkers over the range of speeds tested (p = .016 and had walking economy similar to young sedentary adults over a similar range of speeds (p =  .237. We found no substantial biomechanical differences between older walkers and runners. In contrast to older runners, older walkers had similar walking economy as older sedentary adults (p =  .461 and ∼ 26% worse walking economy than young adults (p<.0001.Running mitigates the age-related deterioration of walking economy whereas walking for exercise appears to have minimal effect on the age-related deterioration in walking economy.

  11. Physical implementation of quantum walks

    CERN Document Server

    Manouchehri, Kia

    2013-01-01

    Given the extensive application of random walks in virtually every science related discipline, we may be at the threshold of yet another problem solving paradigm with the advent of quantum walks. Over the past decade, quantum walks have been explored for their non-intuitive dynamics, which may hold the key to radically new quantum algorithms. This growing interest has been paralleled by a flurry of research into how one can implement quantum walks in laboratories. This book presents numerous proposals as well as actual experiments for such a physical realization, underpinned by a wide range of

  12. Quantum walks with entangled coins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venegas-Andraca, S E; Ball, J L; Burnett, K; Bose, S

    2005-01-01

    We present a mathematical formalism for the description of un- restricted quantum walks with entangled coins and one walker. The numerical behaviour of such walks is examined when using a Bell state as the initial coin state, with two different coin operators, two different shift operators, and one walker. We compare and contrast the performance of these quantum walks with that of a classical random walk consisting of one walker and two maximally correlated coins as well as quantum walks with coins sharing different degrees of entanglement. We illustrate that the behaviour of our walk with entangled coins can be very different in comparison to the usual quantum walk with a single coin. We also demonstrate that simply by changing the shift operator, we can generate widely different distributions. We also compare the behaviour of quantum walks with maximally entangled coins with that of quantum walks with non-entangled coins. Finally, we show that the use of different shift operators on two and three qubit coins leads to different position probability distributions in one- and two-dimensional graphs

  13. Walk well: a randomised controlled trial of a walking intervention for adults with intellectual disabilities: study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Walking interventions have been shown to have a positive impact on physical activity (PA) levels, health and wellbeing for adult and older adult populations. There has been very little work carried out to explore the effectiveness of walking interventions for adults with intellectual disabilities. This paper will provide details of the Walk Well intervention, designed for adults with intellectual disabilities, and a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test its effectiveness. Methods/design This study will adopt a RCT design, with participants allocated to the walking intervention group or a waiting list control group. The intervention consists of three PA consultations (baseline, six weeks and 12 weeks) and an individualised 12 week walking programme. A range of measures will be completed by participants at baseline, post intervention (three months from baseline) and at follow up (three months post intervention and six months from baseline). All outcome measures will be collected by a researcher who will be blinded to the study groups. The primary outcome will be steps walked per day, measured using accelerometers. Secondary outcome measures will include time spent in PA per day (across various intensity levels), time spent in sedentary behaviour per day, quality of life, self-efficacy and anthropometric measures to monitor weight change. Discussion Since there are currently no published RCTs of walking interventions for adults with intellectual disabilities, this RCT will examine if a walking intervention can successfully increase PA, health and wellbeing of adults with intellectual disabilities. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN50494254 PMID:23816316

  14. Random-walk enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  15. The quantum Levy walk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caceres, Manuel O; Nizama, Marco

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the quantum Levy walk to study transport and decoherence in a quantum random model. We have derived from second-order perturbation theory the quantum master equation for a Levy-like particle that moves along a lattice through scale-free hopping while interacting with a thermal bath of oscillators. The general evolution of the quantum Levy particle has been solved for different preparations of the system. We examine the evolution of the quantum purity, the localized correlation and the probability to be in a lattice site, all of them leading to important conclusions concerning quantum irreversibility and decoherence features. We prove that the quantum thermal mean-square displacement is finite under a constraint that is different when compared to the classical Weierstrass random walk. We prove that when the mean-square displacement is infinite the density of state has a complex null-set inside the Brillouin zone. We show the existence of a critical behavior in the continuous eigenenergy which is related to its non-differentiability and self-affine characteristics. In general, our approach allows us to study analytically quantum fluctuations and decoherence in a long-range hopping model.

  16. Using built environment characteristics to predict walking for exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siscovick David S

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Environments conducive to walking may help people avoid sedentary lifestyles and associated diseases. Recent studies developed walkability models combining several built environment characteristics to optimally predict walking. Developing and testing such models with the same data could lead to overestimating one's ability to predict walking in an independent sample of the population. More accurate estimates of model fit can be obtained by splitting a single study population into training and validation sets (holdout approach or through developing and evaluating models in different populations. We used these two approaches to test whether built environment characteristics near the home predict walking for exercise. Study participants lived in western Washington State and were adult members of a health maintenance organization. The physical activity data used in this study were collected by telephone interview and were selected for their relevance to cardiovascular disease. In order to limit confounding by prior health conditions, the sample was restricted to participants in good self-reported health and without a documented history of cardiovascular disease. Results For 1,608 participants meeting the inclusion criteria, the mean age was 64 years, 90 percent were white, 37 percent had a college degree, and 62 percent of participants reported that they walked for exercise. Single built environment characteristics, such as residential density or connectivity, did not significantly predict walking for exercise. Regression models using multiple built environment characteristics to predict walking were not successful at predicting walking for exercise in an independent population sample. In the validation set, none of the logistic models had a C-statistic confidence interval excluding the null value of 0.5, and none of the linear models explained more than one percent of the variance in time spent walking for exercise. We did not

  17. Kinematic control of walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacquaniti, F; Ivanenko, Y P; Zago, M

    2002-10-01

    The planar law of inter-segmental co-ordination we described may emerge from the coupling of neural oscillators between each other and with limb mechanical oscillators. Muscle contraction intervenes at variable times to re-excite the intrinsic oscillations of the system when energy is lost. The hypothesis that a law of coordinative control results from a minimal active tuning of the passive inertial and viscoelastic coupling among limb segments is congruent with the idea that movement has evolved according to minimum energy criteria (1, 8). It is known that multi-segment motion of mammals locomotion is controlled by a network of coupled oscillators (CPGs, see 18, 33, 37). Flexible combination of unit oscillators gives rise to different forms of locomotion. Inter-oscillator coupling can be modified by changing the synaptic strength (or polarity) of the relative spinal connections. As a result, unit oscillators can be coupled in phase, out of phase, or with a variable phase, giving rise to different behaviors, such as speed increments or reversal of gait direction (from forward to backward). Supra-spinal centers may drive or modulate functional sets of coordinating interneurons to generate different walking modes (or gaits). Although it is often assumed that CPGs control patterns of muscle activity, an equally plausible hypothesis is that they control patterns of limb segment motion instead (22). According to this kinematic view, each unit oscillator would directly control a limb segment, alternately generating forward and backward oscillations of the segment. Inter-segmental coordination would be achieved by coupling unit oscillators with a variable phase. Inter-segmental kinematic phase plays the role of global control variable previously postulated for the network of central oscillators. In fact, inter-segmental phase shifts systematically with increasing speed both in man (4) and cat (38). Because this phase-shift is correlated with the net mechanical power

  18. Walking Tips for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you can continue your walking program. Don’t let a cane or walker stop you It’s OK to use your cane or walker if you already have one. These can improve your balance and help take the load off painful joints. Aim for the right pace Try to walk as fast as you ...

  19. Running for exercise mitigates age-related deterioration of walking economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Justus D; Beck, Owen N; Roby, Jaclyn M; Turney, Aria L; Kram, Rodger

    2014-01-01

    Impaired walking performance is a key predictor of morbidity among older adults. A distinctive characteristic of impaired walking performance among older adults is a greater metabolic cost (worse economy) compared to young adults. However, older adults who consistently run have been shown to retain a similar running economy as young runners. Unfortunately, those running studies did not measure the metabolic cost of walking. Thus, it is unclear if running exercise can prevent the deterioration of walking economy. To determine if and how regular walking vs. running exercise affects the economy of locomotion in older adults. 15 older adults (69 ± 3 years) who walk ≥ 30 min, 3x/week for exercise, "walkers" and 15 older adults (69 ± 5 years) who run ≥ 30 min, 3x/week, "runners" walked on a force-instrumented treadmill at three speeds (0.75, 1.25, and 1.75 m/s). We determined walking economy using expired gas analysis and walking mechanics via ground reaction forces during the last 2 minutes of each 5 minute trial. We compared walking economy between the two groups and to non-aerobically trained young and older adults from a prior study. Older runners had a 7-10% better walking economy than older walkers over the range of speeds tested (p = .016) and had walking economy similar to young sedentary adults over a similar range of speeds (p =  .237). We found no substantial biomechanical differences between older walkers and runners. In contrast to older runners, older walkers had similar walking economy as older sedentary adults (p =  .461) and ∼ 26% worse walking economy than young adults (peconomy whereas walking for exercise appears to have minimal effect on the age-related deterioration in walking economy.

  20. Quantum walks and search algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Portugal, Renato

    2013-01-01

    This book addresses an interesting area of quantum computation called quantum walks, which play an important role in building quantum algorithms, in particular search algorithms. Quantum walks are the quantum analogue of classical random walks. It is known that quantum computers have great power for searching unsorted databases. This power extends to many kinds of searches, particularly to the problem of finding a specific location in a spatial layout, which can be modeled by a graph. The goal is to find a specific node knowing that the particle uses the edges to jump from one node to the next. This book is self-contained with main topics that include: Grover's algorithm, describing its geometrical interpretation and evolution by means of the spectral decomposition of the evolution operater Analytical solutions of quantum walks on important graphs like line, cycles, two-dimensional lattices, and hypercubes using Fourier transforms Quantum walks on generic graphs, describing methods to calculate the limiting d...

  1. walk around Irkutsk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available It is noteworthy that this country develops through two types of events: either through a jubilee or through a catastrophe.It seems that Irkutsk Airport will be built only after the next crash. At least the interest to this problem returns regularly after sad events, and this occurs almost half a century (a jubilee, too! – the Council of Ministers decided to relocate the Airport away from the city as long ago as 1962. The Airport does not relate to the topic of this issue, but an attentive reader understands that it is our Carthage, and that the Airport should be relocated. The Romans coped with it faster and more effectively.Back to Irkutsk’s jubilee, we should say that we will do without blare of trumpets. We will just make an unpretentious walk around the city in its summer 350. Each our route covers new (some of them have been completed by the jubilee and old buildings, some of them real monuments. All these buildings are integrated into public spaces of different quality and age.We will also touch on the problems, for old houses, especially the wooden ones often provoke a greedy developer to demolish or to burn them down. Thus a primitive thrift estimates an output of additional square meters. Not to mention how attractive it is to seize public spaces without demolition or without reallocation of the dwellers. Or, rather, the one who is to preserve, to cherish and to improve such houses for the good of the citizens never speaks about this sensitive issue. So we have to do it.Walking is a no-hurry genre, unlike the preparation for the celebration. Walking around the city you like is a pleasant and cognitive process. It will acquaint the architects with the works of their predecessors and colleagues. We hope that such a walk may be interesting for Irkutsk citizens and visitors, too. Isn’t it interesting to learn “at first hand” the intimate details of the restoration of the Trubetskoys’ estate

  2. Walking for art's sake

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The man who compared himself to a proton ! On 20 May, Gianni Motti went down into the LHC tunnel and walked around the 27 kilometres of the underground ring at an average, unaccelerated pace of 5 kph. This was an artistic rather than an athletic performance, aimed at drawing a parallel between the fantastic speed of the beams produced by the future accelerator and the leisurely stroll of a human. The artist, who hails from Lombardy, was accompanied by cameraman Ivo Zanetti, who filmed the event from start to finish, and physicist Jean-Pierre Merlo. The first part of the film can be seen at the Villa Bernasconi, 8 route du Grand-Lancy, Grand Lancy, until 26 June.

  3. Walking for art's sake

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

      The man who compared himself to a proton ! On 20 May, Gianni Motti went down into the LHC tunnel and walked around the 27 kilometres of the underground ring at an average, unaccelerated pace of 5 kph. This was an artistic rather than an athletic performance, aimed at drawing a parallel between the fantastic speed of the beams produced by the future accelerator and the leisurely stroll of a human. The artist, who hails from Lombardy, was accompanied by cameraman Ivo Zanetti, who filmed the event from start to finish, and physicist Jean-Pierre Merlo. The first part of the film can be seen at the Villa Bernasconi, 8 route du Grand-Lancy, Grand Lancy, until 26 June.

  4. Quantum walks on quotient graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krovi, Hari; Brun, Todd A.

    2007-01-01

    A discrete-time quantum walk on a graph Γ is the repeated application of a unitary evolution operator to a Hilbert space corresponding to the graph. If this unitary evolution operator has an associated group of symmetries, then for certain initial states the walk will be confined to a subspace of the original Hilbert space. Symmetries of the original graph, given by its automorphism group, can be inherited by the evolution operator. We show that a quantum walk confined to the subspace corresponding to this symmetry group can be seen as a different quantum walk on a smaller quotient graph. We give an explicit construction of the quotient graph for any subgroup H of the automorphism group and illustrate it with examples. The automorphisms of the quotient graph which are inherited from the original graph are the original automorphism group modulo the subgroup H used to construct it. The quotient graph is constructed by removing the symmetries of the subgroup H from the original graph. We then analyze the behavior of hitting times on quotient graphs. Hitting time is the average time it takes a walk to reach a given final vertex from a given initial vertex. It has been shown in earlier work [Phys. Rev. A 74, 042334 (2006)] that the hitting time for certain initial states of a quantum walks can be infinite, in contrast to classical random walks. We give a condition which determines whether the quotient graph has infinite hitting times given that they exist in the original graph. We apply this condition for the examples discussed and determine which quotient graphs have infinite hitting times. All known examples of quantum walks with hitting times which are short compared to classical random walks correspond to systems with quotient graphs much smaller than the original graph; we conjecture that the existence of a small quotient graph with finite hitting times is necessary for a walk to exhibit a quantum speedup

  5. Disorder and decoherence in coined quantum walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Rong; Qin Hao; Tang Bao; Xue Peng

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to provide a review on quantum walks. Starting form a basic idea of discrete-time quantum walks, we will review the impact of disorder and decoherence on the properties of quantum walks. The evolution of the standard quantum walks is deterministic and disorder introduces randomness to the whole system and change interference pattern leading to the localization effect. Whereas, decoherence plays the role of transmitting quantum walks to classical random walks. (topical review - quantum information)

  6. Identification of walking human model using agent-based modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabpoor, Erfan; Pavic, Aleksandar; Racic, Vitomir

    2018-03-01

    The interaction of walking people with large vibrating structures, such as footbridges and floors, in the vertical direction is an important yet challenging phenomenon to describe mathematically. Several different models have been proposed in the literature to simulate interaction of stationary people with vibrating structures. However, the research on moving (walking) human models, explicitly identified for vibration serviceability assessment of civil structures, is still sparse. In this study, the results of a comprehensive set of FRF-based modal tests were used, in which, over a hundred test subjects walked in different group sizes and walking patterns on a test structure. An agent-based model was used to simulate discrete traffic-structure interactions. The occupied structure modal parameters found in tests were used to identify the parameters of the walking individual's single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) mass-spring-damper model using 'reverse engineering' methodology. The analysis of the results suggested that the normal distribution with the average of μ = 2.85Hz and standard deviation of σ = 0.34Hz can describe human SDOF model natural frequency. Similarly, the normal distribution with μ = 0.295 and σ = 0.047 can describe the human model damping ratio. Compared to the previous studies, the agent-based modelling methodology proposed in this paper offers significant flexibility in simulating multi-pedestrian walking traffics, external forces and simulating different mechanisms of human-structure and human-environment interaction at the same time.

  7. Building the repertoire of measures of walking in Rett syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Michelle; Downs, Jenny; Leonard, Helen

    2017-01-01

    performance as measured with the FMS-RS was more strongly consistent with other clinical measures supporting its concurrent validity. Test-retest reliability was good for both the FMS-RS and the 2MWT. Therefore, these measures have the potential to be used in clinical practice and research. Implications...... with Rett syndrome (median 18.4 years, range 2.4-60.9 years) were assessed for clinical severity, gross motor skills, and mobility. To measure walking capacity, 27 of this group completed a 2MWT twice on two different assessment days. To assess walking performance, the FMS-RS was administered to the total......BACKGROUND: The repertoire of measures of walking in Rett syndrome is limited. This study aimed to determine measurement properties of a modified two-minute walk test (2MWT) and a modified Rett syndrome-specific functional mobility scale (FMS-RS) in Rett syndrome. METHODS: Forty-two girls and women...

  8. Modeling spatial segregation and travel cost influences on utilitarian walking: Towards policy intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Auchincloss, Amy H; Rodriguez, Daniel A; Brown, Daniel G; Riolo, Rick; Diez-Roux, Ana V

    2015-05-01

    We develop an agent-based model of utilitarian walking and use the model to explore spatial and socioeconomic factors affecting adult utilitarian walking and how travel costs as well as various educational interventions aimed at changing attitudes can alter the prevalence of walking and income differentials in walking. The model is validated against US national data. We contrast realistic and extreme parameter values in our model and test effects of changing these parameters across various segregation and pricing scenarios while allowing for interactions between travel choice and place and for behavioral feedbacks. Results suggest that in addition to income differences in the perceived cost of time, the concentration of mixed land use (differential density of residences and businesses) are important determinants of income differences in walking (high income walk less), whereas safety from crime and income segregation on their own do not have large influences on income differences in walking. We also show the difficulty in altering walking behaviors for higher income groups who are insensitive to price and how adding to the cost of driving could increase the income differential in walking particularly in the context of segregation by income and land use. We show that strategies to decrease positive attitudes towards driving can interact synergistically with shifting cost structures to favor walking in increasing the percent of walking trips. Agent-based models, with their ability to capture dynamic processes and incorporate empirical data, are powerful tools to explore the influence on health behavior from multiple factors and test policy interventions.

  9. Women with fibromyalgia walk with an altered muscle synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrynowski, Michael R; Tiidus, Peter M; Galea, Victoria

    2005-11-01

    Most individuals can use different movement and muscle recruitment patterns to perform a stated task but often only one pattern is selected which optimizes an unknown global objective given the individual's neuromusculoskeletal characteristics. Patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FS), characterized by their chronic pain, reduced physical work capacity and muscular fatigue, could exhibit a different control signature compared to asymptomatic control volunteers (CV). To test this proposal, 22 women with FS, and 11 CV, were assessed in a gait analysis laboratory. Each subject walked repeatedly at self-selected slow, comfortable, and fast walking speeds. The gait analysis provided, for each walk, each subject's stride time, length, and velocity, and ground reaction force, and lower extremity joint kinematics, moments and powers. The data were then anthropometrically scaled and velocity normalized to reduce the influence of subject mass, leg length, and walking speed on the measured gait outcomes. Similarities and differences in the two groups' scaled and normalized gait patterns were then determined. Results show that FS and CV walk with externally similar stride lengths, times, and velocities, and joint angles and ground reaction forces but they use internally different muscle recruitment patterns. Specifically, FS preferentially power gait using their hip flexors instead of their ankle plantarflexors. Interestingly, CV use a similar muscle fatiguing recruitment pattern to walk fast which parallels the common complaint of fatigue reported by FS walking at comfortable speed.

  10. Energy cost of walking: solving the paradox of steady state in the presence of variable walking speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasschaert, Frank; Jones, Kim; Forward, Malcolm

    2009-02-01

    Measurement of the energy cost of walking in children with cerebral palsy is used for baseline and outcome assessment. However, such testing relies on the establishment of steady state that is deemed present when oxygen consumption is stable. This is often assumed when walking speed is constant but in practice, speed can and does vary naturally. Whilst constant speed is achievable on a treadmill, this is often impractical clinically, thus rendering an energy cost test to an element of subjectivity. This paper attempts to address this issue by presenting a new method for calculating energy cost of walking that automatically applies a mathematically defined threshold for steady state within a (non-treadmill) walking trial and then strips out all of the non-steady state events within that trial. The method is compared with a generic approach that does not remove non-steady state data but rather uses an average value over a complete walking trial as is often used in the clinical environment. Both methods were applied to the calculation of several energy cost of walking parameters of self-selected walking speed in a cohort of unimpaired subjects and children with cerebral palsy. The results revealed that both methods were strongly correlated for each parameter but showed systematic significant differences. It is suggested that these differences are introduced by the rejection of non-steady state data that would otherwise have incorrectly been incorporated into the calculation of the energy cost of walking indices during self-selected walking with its inherent speed variation.

  11. RANDOM WALK HYPOTHESIS IN FINANCIAL MARKETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae-Marius JULA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Random walk hypothesis states that the stock market prices do not follow a predictable trajectory, but are simply random. If you are trying to predict a random set of data, one should test for randomness, because, despite the power and complexity of the used models, the results cannot be trustworthy. There are several methods for testing these hypotheses and the use of computational power provided by the R environment makes the work of the researcher easier and with a cost-effective approach. The increasing power of computing and the continuous development of econometric tests should give the potential investors new tools in selecting commodities and investing in efficient markets.

  12. The benefit of pulmonary rehabilitation against quality of life alteration and functional capacity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient assessed using St George’s respiratory questionnaire and 6 minutes walking distance test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwien H. Wiyono

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD have been shown to be benefit from pulmonary rehabilitation programs. We assessed an entirely outpatient-based program of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD, using the St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ and six minutes walking distance test (6MWD (which measures health-related quality of life and functional exercise tolerance as the primary outcome measure. We undertook a randomized, opened, prospective, parallel-group controlled study of outpatient rehabilitation program in 56 patients with COPD (52 men and 4 women. The active group (n=27 took part in a 6-weeks program of education and exercise. The control group (n=29 were reviewed routinely as medical outpatients. The SGRQ and 6MWD were administered at study entry and after 6 weeks. Outcome with SGRQ and 6MWD before and after therapy was performed. Decrease score SGRQ and increase 6MWD in both groups of study, it was analyzed by statistic study and in active group the decrease of SGRQ and the increase of 6MWD was statistically significant. In conclusion 6-weeks outpatient-based program significantly improved quality of life and functional capacity in mild-to-moderate COPD patient. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:165-72 Keywords: COPD, pulmonary rehabilitation, SGRQ, 6MWD

  13. Walking adaptability therapy after stroke: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Celine; Roerdink, Melvyn; van Ooijen, Marielle W; Meskers, Carel G; Janssen, Thomas W; Beek, Peter J

    2016-08-26

    Walking in everyday life requires the ability to adapt walking to the environment. This adaptability is often impaired after stroke, and this might contribute to the increased fall risk after stroke. To improve safe community ambulation, walking adaptability training might be beneficial after stroke. This study is designed to compare the effects of two interventions for improving walking speed and walking adaptability: treadmill-based C-Mill therapy (therapy with augmented reality) and the overground FALLS program (a conventional therapy program). We hypothesize that C-Mill therapy will result in better outcomes than the FALLS program, owing to its expected greater amount of walking practice. This is a single-center parallel group randomized controlled trial with pre-intervention, post-intervention, retention, and follow-up tests. Forty persons after stroke (≥3 months) with deficits in walking or balance will be included. Participants will be randomly allocated to either C-Mill therapy or the overground FALLS program for 5 weeks. Both interventions will incorporate practice of walking adaptability and will be matched in terms of frequency, duration, and therapist attention. Walking speed, as determined by the 10 Meter Walking Test, will be the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures will pertain to walking adaptability (10 Meter Walking Test with context or cognitive dual-task and Interactive Walkway assessments). Furthermore, commonly used clinical measures to determine walking ability (Timed Up-and-Go test), walking independence (Functional Ambulation Category), balance (Berg Balance Scale), and balance confidence (Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale) will be used, as well as a complementary set of walking-related assessments. The amount of walking practice (the number of steps taken per session) will be registered using the treadmill's inbuilt step counter (C-Mill therapy) and video recordings (FALLS program). This process measure will

  14. Walking speed and subclinical atherosclerosis in healthy older adults: the Whitehall II study

    OpenAIRE

    Hamer, M.; Kivimaki, M.; Lahiri, A.; Yerramasu, A.; Deanfield, J. E.; Marmot, M. G.; Steptoe, A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Extended walking speed is a predictor of incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in older individuals, but the ability of an objective short-distance walking speed test to stratify the severity of preclinical conditions remains unclear. This study examined whether performance in an 8-ft walking speed test is associated with metabolic risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis.Design Cross-sectional.Setting Epidemiological cohort.Participants 530 adults (aged 63 +/- 6 years, 50.3% ma...

  15. Walking speed and subclinical atherosclerosis in healthy older adults: the Whitehall II study

    OpenAIRE

    Hamer, Mark; Kivimaki, Mika; Lahiri, Avijit; Yerramasu, Ajay; Deanfield, John E; Marmot, Michael G; Steptoe, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Objective Extended walking speed is a predictor of incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in older individuals, but the ability of an objective short-distance walking speed test to stratify the severity of preclinical conditions remains unclear. This study examined whether performance in an 8-ft walking speed test is associated with metabolic risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Epidemiological cohort. Participants 530 adults (aged 63?6?years, 50.3% mal...

  16. Does walking strategy in older people change as a function of walking distance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Bijan; Helbostad, Jorunn L; Moe-Nilssen, Rolf; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Aminian, Kamiar

    2009-02-01

    This study investigates whether the spatio-temporal parameters of gait in the elderly vary as a function of walking distance. The gait pattern of older subjects (n=27) over both short (SWDLWD>20 m) walking was evaluated using an ambulatory device consisting of body-worn sensors (Physilog). The stride velocity (SV), gait cycle time (GCT), and inter-cycle variability of each parameter (CV) were evaluated for each subject. Analysis was undertaken after evaluating the errors and the test-retest reliability of the Physilog device compared with an electronic walkway system (GaitRite) over the SWD with different walking speeds. While both systems were highly reliable with respect to the SV and GCT parameters (ICC>0.82), agreement for the gait variability was poor. Interestingly, our data revealed that the measured gait parameters over SWD and LWD were significantly different. LWD trials had a mean increase of 5.2% (pLWD trials decreased by an average of 1% relative to the SWD case, the drop was not significant. Moreover, reliability for gait variability measures was poor, irrespective of the instrument and despite a moderate improvement for LWD trials. Taken together, our findings indicate that for valid and reliable comparisons, test and retest should be performed under identical distance conditions. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the older subjects may choose different walking strategies for SWD and LWD conditions.

  17. Walking beam pumping unit system efficiency measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilgore, J.J.; Tripp, H.A.; Hunt, C.L. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The cost of electricity used by walking beam pumping units is a major expense in producing crude oil. However, only very limited information is available on the efficiency of beam pumping systems and less is known about the efficiency of the various components of the pumping units. This paper presents and discusses measurements that have been made on wells at several Shell locations and on a specially designed walking beam pump test stand at Lufkin Industries. These measurements were made in order to determine the overall system efficiency and efficiency of individual components. The results of this work show that the overall beam pumping system efficiency is normally between 48 and 58 percent. This is primarily dependent on the motor size, motor type, gearbox size, system's age, production, pump size, tubing size, and rod sizes

  18. Big power from walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illenberger, Patrin K.; Madawala, Udaya K.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric Elastomer Generators (DEG) offer an opportunity to capture the energy otherwise wasted from human motion. By integrating a DEG into the heel of standard footwear, it is possible to harness this energy to power portable devices. DEGs require substantial auxiliary systems which are commonly large, heavy and inefficient. A unique challenge for these low power generators is the combination of high voltage and low current. A void exists in the semiconductor market for devices that can meet these requirements. Until these become available, existing devices must be used in an innovative way to produce an effective DEG system. Existing systems such as the Bi-Directional Flyback (BDFB) and Self Priming Circuit (SPC) are an excellent example of this. The BDFB allows full charging and discharging of the DEG, improving power gained. The SPC allows fully passive voltage boosting, removing the priming source and simplifying the electronics. This paper outlines the drawbacks and benefits of active and passive electronic solutions for maximizing power from walking.

  19. The Dead Walk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Phillips

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Monsters have always enjoyed a significant presence in the human imagination, and religion was instrumental in replacing the physical horror they engendered with that of a moral threat. Zombies, however, are amoral – their motivation purely instinctive and arbitrary, yet they are, perhaps, the most loathed of all contemporary monsters. One explanation for this lies in the theory of the uncanny valley, proposed by robotics engineer Masahiro Mori. According to the theory, we reserve our greatest fears for those things which seem most human, yet are not – such as dead bodies. Such a reaction is most likely a survival mechanism to protect us from danger and disease – a mechanism even more essential when the dead rise up and walk. From their beginnings zombies have reflected western societies’ greatest fears – be they of revolutionary Haitians, women, or communists. In recent years the rise in the popularity of the zombie in films, books and television series reflects our fears for the planet, the economy, and of death itself

  20. Walking around to grasp interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Jantzen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents experiences from a study using walk-alongs to provide insight into museum visitors’ experience with interactive features of sound art installations. The overall goal of the study was to learn about the participants’ opinions and feelings about the possibility of interaction...... with the sound installations. The aim was to gain an understanding of the role of the in-teraction, if interaction makes a difference for the understanding of the sound art. 30 walking interviews were carried out at ZKM, Karlsruhe with a total of 57 museum guests, individuals or groups. During the walk......-alongs the research-ers acted as facilitators and partners in the engagement with the sound installa-tions. The study provided good insight into advantages and challenges with the walk-along method, for instance the importance of shared, embodied sensing of space for the understanding of the experience. The common...

  1. Quantum snake walk on graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosmanis, Ansis

    2011-01-01

    I introduce a continuous-time quantum walk on graphs called the quantum snake walk, the basis states of which are fixed-length paths (snakes) in the underlying graph. First, I analyze the quantum snake walk on the line, and I show that, even though most states stay localized throughout the evolution, there are specific states that most likely move on the line as wave packets with momentum inversely proportional to the length of the snake. Next, I discuss how an algorithm based on the quantum snake walk might potentially be able to solve an extended version of the glued trees problem, which asks to find a path connecting both roots of the glued trees graph. To the best of my knowledge, no efficient quantum algorithm solving this problem is known yet.

  2. On your feet: protocol for a randomized controlled trial to compare the effects of pole walking and regular walking on physical and psychosocial health in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritschi, Juliette O; Brown, Wendy J; van Uffelen, Jannique G Z

    2014-04-17

    Physical activity is associated with better physical and mental health in older adults. Pole walking is a form of walking which may have additional health benefits in older adults, because of the addition of hand held poles, and consequent upper limb involvement. However, few studies have examined the potential additional effects of pole walking on physical and psychosocial health in older adults compared with walking. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of a pole walking program with the effects of a walking program, on physical and psychosocial wellbeing, in older adults in assisted living facilities. Sixty men and women from assisted living communities over 65 years will be recruited from senior retirement facilities and randomized into a group based, pole walking program, or walking program. The pole walking group will use the Exerstrider method of pole walking. Total duration of the programs is 12 weeks, with three sessions per week, building from 20 minute to 30 minute sessions.The primary outcome is physical function, as measured by items from the Seniors Fitness Test and hand grip strength. Secondary outcomes include, physical activity levels, sedentary behaviour, joint pain, and quality of life. All outcomes will be assessed before and after the programs, using valid and reliable measures. The study will add to the evidence base for the effects of pole walking, compared with walking, on physical and psychosocial health and physical function, in healthy older adults. This will improve understanding about the feasibility of pole walking programs and its specific benefits in this population. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612001127897.

  3. Stair-Walking Performance in Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Yun Shieh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Most individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID demonstrate problems in learning and movement coordination. Consequently, they usually have difficulties in activities such as standing, walking, and stair climbing. To monitor the physical impairments of these children, regular gross motor evaluation is crucial. Straight-line level walking is the most frequently used test of their mobility. However, numerous studies have found that unless the children have multiple disabilities, no significant differences can be found between the children with ID and typically-developed children in this test. Stair climbing presents more challenges than level walking because it is associated with numerous physical factors, including lower extremity strength, cardiopulmonary endurance, vision, balance, and fear of falling. Limited ability in those factors is one of the most vital markers for children with ID. In this paper, we propose a sensor-based approach for measuring stair-walking performance, both upstairs and downstairs, for adolescents with ID. Particularly, we address the problem of sensor calibration to ensure measurement accuracy. In total, 62 participants aged 15 to 21 years, namely 32 typically-developed (TD adolescents, 20 adolescents with ID, and 10 adolescents with multiple disabilities (MD, participated. The experimental results showed that stair-walking is more sensitive than straight-line level walking in capturing gait characteristics for adolescents with ID.

  4. Analysis of absorbing times of quantum walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Hirotada; Imai, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Quantum walks are expected to provide useful algorithmic tools for quantum computation. This paper introduces absorbing probability and time of quantum walks and gives both numerical simulation results and theoretical analyses on Hadamard walks on the line and symmetric walks on the hypercube from the viewpoint of absorbing probability and time

  5. Random walk through fractal environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isliker, H.; Vlahos, L.

    2003-01-01

    We analyze random walk through fractal environments, embedded in three-dimensional, permeable space. Particles travel freely and are scattered off into random directions when they hit the fractal. The statistical distribution of the flight increments (i.e., of the displacements between two consecutive hittings) is analytically derived from a common, practical definition of fractal dimension, and it turns out to approximate quite well a power-law in the case where the dimension D F of the fractal is less than 2, there is though, always a finite rate of unaffected escape. Random walks through fractal sets with D F ≤2 can thus be considered as defective Levy walks. The distribution of jump increments for D F >2 is decaying exponentially. The diffusive behavior of the random walk is analyzed in the frame of continuous time random walk, which we generalize to include the case of defective distributions of walk increments. It is shown that the particles undergo anomalous, enhanced diffusion for D F F >2 is normal for large times, enhanced though for small and intermediate times. In particular, it follows that fractals generated by a particular class of self-organized criticality models give rise to enhanced diffusion. The analytical results are illustrated by Monte Carlo simulations

  6. Patient Satisfaction of Using the ActiGait® Drop Foot Stimulator System and Effect of Treatment on Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Kåre Eg; Grey, Kurt; Juhl, Anne

    2014-01-01

    In this case-control study of ten chronic stroke patients with drop foot we report preliminary data on patient satisfaction, self- assessed changes in walking performance, effect on walking speed as well as adverse effects after surgical implantation of the ActiGait® drop foot stimulator in a cli...... with great care due to the small population size, the case control design and the limitations of the ten meter walk test in describing walking quality and safety....

  7. Visual evoked responses during standing and walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Gramann

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Human cognition has been shaped both by our body structure and by its complex interactionswith its environment. Our cognition is thus inextricably linked to our own and others’ motorbehavior. To model brain activity associated with natural cognition, we propose recording theconcurrent brain dynamics and body movements of human subjects performing normal actions.Here we tested the feasibility of such a mobile brain/body (MoBI imaging approach byrecording high-density electroencephalographic (EEG activity and body movements of subjectsstanding or walking on a treadmill while performing a visual oddball response task. Independentcomponent analysis (ICA of the EEG data revealed visual event-related potentials (ERPs thatduring standing, slow walking, and fast walking did not differ across movement conditions,demonstrating the viability of recording brain activity accompanying cognitive processes duringwhole body movement. Non-invasive and relatively low-cost MoBI studies of normal, motivatedactions might improve understanding of interactions between brain and body dynamics leadingto more complete biological models of cognition.

  8. Does Dog Walking Predict Physical Activity Participation: Results From a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to: (1) identify characteristics associated with dog owners who walk their dog, (2) describe the frequency and duration of walking the dog, and (3) determine whether dog owners who walk their dog participate in more physical activity than dog owners who do not walk their dog and non-dog owners. A cross-sectional study design was used. The study setting was nationwide. Adults (n = 4010) participating in the 2005 ConsumerStyles mail-panel survey were the study subjects. Measures used were demographic, physical activity, dog ownership, and dog walking questions from the 2005 ConsumerStyles mail-panel survey. Chi-square tests and analyses of variance were conducted to examine participant characteristics associated with dog walking and to describe the frequency and duration of dog walking. Analysis of covariance was used to determine whether dog owners who walk their dog participate in more physical activity than dog owners who do not walk their dog and non-dog owners. Among dog owners, 42% reported some dog walking in a typical week. Dog owners walked their dog an average 4.3 ± 0.1 times and 128.8 ± 5.6 minutes per week. There were no significant differences in weekly minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity across the dog-ownership and dog walking groups. Most dog owners did not walk their dog. Dog owners were not more active than non-dog owners, except when considering the activity obtained via dog walking. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Is the impact of fatigue related to walking capacity and perceived ability in persons with multiple sclerosis? A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgas, U; Langeskov-Christensen, M; Skjerbæk, A; Jensen, E; Baert, I; Romberg, A; Santoyo Medina, C; Gebara, B; Maertens de Noordhout, B; Knuts, K; Béthoux, F; Rasova, K; Severijns, D; Bibby, B M; Kalron, A; Norman, B; Van Geel, F; Wens, I; Feys, P

    2018-04-15

    The relationship between fatigue impact and walking capacity and perceived ability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is inconclusive in the existing literature. A better understanding might guide new treatment avenues for fatigue and/or walking capacity in patients with MS. To investigate the relationship between the subjective impact of fatigue and objective walking capacity as well as subjective walking ability in MS patients. A cross-sectional multicenter study design was applied. Ambulatory MS patients (n = 189, age: 47.6 ± 10.5 years; gender: 115/74 women/men; Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS): 4.1 ± 1.8 [range: 0-6.5]) were tested at 11 sites. Objective tests of walking capacity included short walking tests (Timed 25-Foot Walk (T25FW), 10-Metre Walk Test (10mWT) at usual and fastest speed and the timed up and go (TUG)), and long walking tests (2- and 6-Minute Walk Tests (MWT). Subjective walking ability was tested applying the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12). Fatigue impact was measured by the self-reported modified fatigue impact scale (MFIS) consisting of a total score (MFIS total ) and three subscales (MFIS physical , MFIS cognitive and MFIS psychosocial ). Uni- and multivariate regression analysis were performed to evaluate the relation between walking and fatigue impact. MFIS total was negatively related with long (6MWT, r = -0.14, p = 0.05) and short composite (TUG, r = -0.22, p = 0.003) walking measures. MFIS physical showed a significant albeit weak relationship to walking speed in all walking capacity tests (r = -0.22 to -0.33, p < .0001), which persisted in the multivariate linear regression analysis. Subjective walking ability (MSWS-12) was related to MFIS total (r = 0.49, p < 0.0001), as well as to all other subscales of MFIS (r = 0.24-0.63, p < 0.001), showing stronger relationships than objective measures of walking. The physical impact of fatigue is weakly

  10. The Automation Control System Design of Walking Beam Heating Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yu LIU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Combining the transformation project of certain strip steel rolling production line, the techniques process of walking beam heating furnace was elaborated in this paper. The practical application of LOS-T18-2ZC1 laser detector was elaborated. The network communication model of walking beam heating furnace control system was designed. The realization method of production process automation control was elaborated. The entire automation control system allocation picture and PLC power distribution system picture of walking beam heating furnace were designed. Charge machine movement process was elaborated. Walking beam movement process was elaborated. Extractor movement process was elaborated. The hydraulic station of walking mechanism was elaborated. Relative control circuit diagram was designed. The control function of parallel shift motor, uplifted and degressive motor was elaborated. The control circuit diagram of parallel shift motor of charge machine and extractor of first heating furnace was designed. The control circuit diagram of uplifted and degressive motor of charge machine and extractor of first heating furnace was designed. The realization method of steel blank length test function was elaborated. The realization method of tracking and sequence control function of heating furnace field roller were elaborated. The design provides important reference base for enhancing walking beam heating furnace control level.

  11. Distances walked in the six-minute walk test: suggestion of defining characteristic for the nursing diagnosis Ineffective Peripheral Tissue Perfusion Distancias recorridas en la prueba de caminata de los seis minutos: propuesta de característica definitoria para el diagnóstico de enfermería Perfusión Tisular Periférica Inefectiva Distâncias percorridas no teste de caminhada de seis minutos: proposta de característica definidora para o diagnóstico de enfermagem Perfusão Tissular Periférica Ineficaz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cassia Gengo e Silva

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Distances walked in walking tests are important functional markers, although they are not accepted as defining characteristics of Ineffective Peripheral Tissue Perfusion. The aims of this study were to verify the distances participants with and without this nursing diagnosis walked in the six-minute walk test and if these measures may be considered defining characteristics of this phenomenon. Participants with (group A; n=65 and without (group B; n=17 this nursing diagnosis were evaluated regarding physical examination, vascular function and functional capacity. Participants of group A seemed to have worse vascular function and functional capacity compared with those of group B. Pain-free travelled distance was predictive of the nursing diagnosis. These results are important for the refinement of this diagnosis. In conclusion, this study provides evidences that the distances walked in the six-minute walk test may be considered defining characteristics of Ineffective Peripheral Tissue Perfusion.Las distancias en pruebas de marcha son importantes marcadores funcionales, pero no son aceptados como características de definición de la Perfusión Tisular Periférica Inefectiva. Los objetivos fueron determinar las distancias recorridas en la prueba de caminata de los seis minutos por los participantes con e sin el diagnóstico de enfermería y si esas medidas se pueden considerar características de definición de este fenómeno. Los participantes con (grupo A, n=65 y sin (grupo B, n=17 el diagnóstico fueron evaluados mediante examen físico, función vascular periférica y capacidad funcional. Los participantes del grupo A ha presentado peor función vascular y desempeño en la prueba de marcha do que aquellos del grupo B. La distancia recorrida libre de dolor fue predictiva del diagnóstico de enfermería. Los resultados de este estudio pueden contribuir para el refinamiento de este diagnóstico. Las distancias recorridas en la prueba de marcha se

  12. Feedforward neural control of toe walking in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzen, Jakob; Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Hüche Larsen, Helle; Svane, Christian; Forman, Christian; Frisk, Rasmus; Farmer, Simon Francis; Kersting, Uwe; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2018-03-23

    Activation of ankle muscles at ground contact during toe walking is unaltered when sensory feedback is blocked or the ground is suddenly dropped. Responses in the soleus muscle to transcranial magnetic stimulation, but not peripheral nerve stimulation, are facilitated at ground contact during toe walking. We argue that toe walking is supported by feedforward control at ground contact. Toe walking requires careful control of the ankle muscles in order to absorb the impact of ground contact and maintain a stable position of the joint. The present study aimed to clarify the peripheral and central neural mechanisms involved. Fifteen healthy adults walked on a treadmill (3.0 km h -1 ). Tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (Sol) EMG, knee and ankle joint angles, and gastrocnemius-soleus muscle fascicle lengths were recorded. Peripheral and central contributions to the EMG activity were assessed by afferent blockade, H-reflex testing, transcranial magnetic brain stimulation (TMS) and sudden unloading of the planter flexor muscle-tendon complex. Sol EMG activity started prior to ground contact and remained high throughout stance. TA EMG activity, which is normally seen around ground contact during heel strike walking, was absent. Although stretch of the Achilles tendon-muscle complex was observed after ground contact, this was not associated with lengthening of the ankle plantar flexor muscle fascicles. Sol EMG around ground contact was not affected by ischaemic blockade of large-diameter sensory afferents, or the sudden removal of ground support shortly after toe contact. Soleus motor-evoked potentials elicited by TMS were facilitated immediately after ground contact, whereas Sol H-reflexes were not. These findings indicate that at the crucial time of ankle stabilization following ground contact, toe walking is governed by centrally mediated motor drive rather than sensory driven reflex mechanisms. These findings have implications for our understanding of the control of

  13. Relação da função muscular respiratória e de membros inferiores de idosos comunitários com a capacidade funcional avaliada por teste de caminhada Relationship between functional capacity assessed by walking test and respiratory and lower limb muscle function in community-dwelling elders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo A. Simões

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: A sarcopenia é considerada o fator mais significativo na redução da força muscular periférica e respiratória e pode ocasionar incapacidades progressivas, perda de independência e interferir na capacidade funcional dos idosos. OBJETIVOS: Caracterizar a força dos músculos respiratórios (pressão inspiratória máxima - PImax e pressão expiratória máxima - PEmax e de membros inferiores (MMII, bem como as possíveis correlações existentes com a capacidade funcional dos idosos. MÉTODOS: Sessenta e cinco idosos, com 71,7±4,9 anos; foram avaliados por dinamometria isocinética para flexores e extensores dos joelhos, manovacuometria analógica para os músculos respiratórios pelo teste de caminhada de 6 minutos para capacidade funcional. Foram utilizados os testes Mann-Whitney e t de Student para comparação entre os gêneros. As correlações foram calculadas pelo coeficiente de correlação de Pearson. Para todos os testes foi considerado pBACKGROUND: Sarcopenia is the most significant factor in the decline of peripheral and respiratory muscle strength. It can lead to progressive disability, loss of independence and impaired functional capacity. OBJECTIVES: To determine the strength of respiratory muscles (maximal inspiratory pressure - MIP and maximal expiratory pressure - MEP and lower limb muscles, and to explore the possible relationships between these variables and the functional capacity of the elderly. METHODS: Sixty-five elderly patients (71.7±4.9 years old took part in the study. Isokinetic dynamometry was used to assess the knee flexors and extensors, an analog vacuum manometer was used to assess the respiratory muscles, and the six-minute walking test was used as an outcome of functional capacity. The Mann-Whitney test and Student's t-test were used for gender comparison. The relationships were investigated using Pearson's correlation. The significance level was p<0.05. RESULTS: The lower limb and

  14. Effects of a 6-month exercise program pilot study on walking economy, peak physiological characteristics, and walking performance in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crowther RG

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Robert G Crowther1, Anthony S Leicht1, Warwick L Spinks1, Kunwarjit Sangla2, Frank Quigley2, Jonathan Golledge2,31Institute of Sport and Exercise Science, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia; 2Townsville Hospital, Townsville, Queensland, Australia; 3The Vascular Biology Unit, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract : The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a 6-month exercise program on submaximal walking economy in individuals with peripheral arterial disease and intermittent claudication (PAD-IC. Participants (n = 16 were randomly allocated to either a control PAD-IC group (CPAD-IC, n = 6 which received standard medical therapy, or a treatment PAD-IC group (TPAD-IC; n = 10 which took part in a supervised exercise program. During a graded treadmill test, physiological responses, including oxygen consumption, were assessed to calculate walking economy during submaximal and maximal walking performance. Differences between groups at baseline and post-intervention were analyzed via Kruskal–Wallis tests. At baseline, CPAD-IC and TPAD-IC groups demonstrated similar walking performance and physiological responses. Postintervention, TPAD-IC patients demonstrated significantly lower oxygen consumption during the graded exercise test, and greater maximal walking performance compared to CPAD-IC. These preliminary results indicate that 6 months of regular exercise improves both submaximal walking economy and maximal walking performance, without significant changes in maximal walking economy. Enhanced walking economy may contribute to physiological efficiency, which in turn may improve walking performance as demonstrated by PAD-IC patients following regular exercise programs.Keywords: vascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, walking economy

  15. Pedestrian Walking Behavior Revealed through a Random Walk Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper applies method of continuous-time random walks for pedestrian flow simulation. In the model, pedestrians can walk forward or backward and turn left or right if there is no block. Velocities of pedestrian flow moving forward or diffusing are dominated by coefficients. The waiting time preceding each jump is assumed to follow an exponential distribution. To solve the model, a second-order two-dimensional partial differential equation, a high-order compact scheme with the alternating direction implicit method, is employed. In the numerical experiments, the walking domain of the first one is two-dimensional with two entrances and one exit, and that of the second one is two-dimensional with one entrance and one exit. The flows in both scenarios are one way. Numerical results show that the model can be used for pedestrian flow simulation.

  16. Reliability and Validity of Ten Consumer Activity Trackers Depend on Walking Speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkema, Tryntsje; Kooiman, Thea J M; Krijnen, Wim P; VAN DER Schans, Cees P; DE Groot, Martijn

    2017-04-01

    To examine the test-retest reliability and validity of ten activity trackers for step counting at three different walking speeds. Thirty-one healthy participants walked twice on a treadmill for 30 min while wearing 10 activity trackers (Polar Loop, Garmin Vivosmart, Fitbit Charge HR, Apple Watch Sport, Pebble Smartwatch, Samsung Gear S, Misfit Flash, Jawbone Up Move, Flyfit, and Moves). Participants walked three walking speeds for 10 min each; slow (3.2 km·h), average (4.8 km·h), and vigorous (6.4 km·h). To measure test-retest reliability, intraclass correlations (ICC) were determined between the first and second treadmill test. Validity was determined by comparing the trackers with the gold standard (hand counting), using mean differences, mean absolute percentage errors, and ICC. Statistical differences were calculated by paired-sample t tests, Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, and by constructing Bland-Altman plots. Test-retest reliability varied with ICC ranging from -0.02 to 0.97. Validity varied between trackers and different walking speeds with mean differences between the gold standard and activity trackers ranging from 0.0 to 26.4%. Most trackers showed relatively low ICC and broad limits of agreement of the Bland-Altman plots at the different speeds. For the slow walking speed, the Garmin Vivosmart and Fitbit Charge HR showed the most accurate results. The Garmin Vivosmart and Apple Watch Sport demonstrated the best accuracy at an average walking speed. For vigorous walking, the Apple Watch Sport, Pebble Smartwatch, and Samsung Gear S exhibited the most accurate results. Test-retest reliability and validity of activity trackers depends on walking speed. In general, consumer activity trackers perform better at an average and vigorous walking speed than at a slower walking speed.

  17. Safe RESIDential Environments? A longitudinal analysis of the influence of crime-related safety on walking

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Sarah; Hooper, Paula; Knuiman, Matthew; Christian, Hayley; Bull, Fiona; Giles-Corti, Billie

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous cross-sectional studies have investigated the premise that the perception of crime will cause residents to constrain their walking; however the findings to date are inconclusive. In contrast, few longitudinal or prospective studies have examined the impact of crime-related safety on residents walking behaviours. This study used longitudinal data to test whether there is a causal relationship between crime-related safety and walking in the local neighbourhood. Methods Parti...

  18. Changes in resting and walking energy expenditure and walking speed during pregnancy in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Nuala M; Groves, Ainsley M; McIntyre, H David; Callaway, Leonie K

    2011-09-01

    Energy-conserving processes reported in undernourished women during pregnancy are a recognized strategy for providing the energy required to support fetal development. Women who are obese before conceiving arguably have sufficient fat stores to support the energy demands of pregnancy without the need to provoke energy-conserving mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that obese women would show behavioral adaptation [ie, a decrease in self-selected walking (SSW) speed] but not metabolic compensation [ie, a decrease in resting metabolic rate (RMR) or the metabolic cost of walking] during gestation. RMR, SSW speed, metabolic cost of walking, and anthropometric variables were measured in 23 women aged 31 ± 4 y with a BMI (in kg/m(2)) of 33.6 ± 2.5 (mean ± SD) at ≈15 and 30 wk of gestation. RMR was also measured in 2 cohorts of nonpregnant control subjects matched for the age, weight, and height of the pregnant cohort at 15 (n = 23) and 30 (n = 23) wk. Gestational weight gain varied widely (11.3 ± 5.4 kg), and 52% of the women gained more weight than is recommended. RMR increased significantly by an average of 177 ± 176 kcal/d (11 ± 12%; P 80% of the cohort, the net oxygen cost of walking decreased in the same proportion of women. Although the increase in RMR was greater than that explained by weight gain, evidence of both behavioral and biological compensation in the metabolic cost of walking was observed in obese women during gestation. The trial is registered with the Australian Clinical Trials Registry as ACTRN012606000271505.

  19. Mechanical design of walking machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikawa, Keisuke; Hirose, Shigeo

    2007-01-15

    The performance of existing actuators, such as electric motors, is very limited, be it power-weight ratio or energy efficiency. In this paper, we discuss the method to design a practical walking machine under this severe constraint with focus on two concepts, the gravitationally decoupled actuation (GDA) and the coupled drive. The GDA decouples the driving system against the gravitational field to suppress generation of negative power and improve energy efficiency. On the other hand, the coupled drive couples the driving system to distribute the output power equally among actuators and maximize the utilization of installed actuator power. First, we depict the GDA and coupled drive in detail. Then, we present actual machines, TITAN-III and VIII, quadruped walking machines designed on the basis of the GDA, and NINJA-I and II, quadruped wall walking machines designed on the basis of the coupled drive. Finally, we discuss walking machines that travel on three-dimensional terrain (3D terrain), which includes the ground, walls and ceiling. Then, we demonstrate with computer simulation that we can selectively leverage GDA and coupled drive by walking posture control.

  20. Quantum walks based on an interferometric analogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillery, Mark; Bergou, Janos; Feldman, Edgar

    2003-01-01

    There are presently two models for quantum walks on graphs. The ''coined'' walk uses discrete-time steps, and contains, besides the particle making the walk, a second quantum system, the coin, that determines the direction in which the particle will move. The continuous walk operates with continuous time. Here a third model for quantum walks is proposed, which is based on an analogy to optical interferometers. It is a discrete-time model, and the unitary operator that advances the walk one step depends only on the local structure of the graph on which the walk is taking place. This type of walk also allows us to introduce elements, such as phase shifters, that have no counterpart in classical random walks. Several examples are discussed

  1. Who walks? Factors associated with walking behavior in disabled older women with and without self-reported walking difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsick, E M; Guralnik, J M; Fried, L P

    1999-06-01

    To determine how severity of walking difficulty and sociodemographic, psychosocial, and health-related factors influence walking behavior in disabled older women. Cross-sectional analyses of baseline data from the Women's Health and Aging Study (WHAS). An urban community encompassing 12 contiguous zip code areas in the eastern portion of Baltimore City and part of Baltimore County, Maryland. A total of 920 moderately to severely disabled community-resident women, aged 65 years and older, identified from an age-stratified random sample of Medicare beneficiaries. Walking behavior was defined as minutes walked for exercise and total blocks walked per week. Independent variables included self-reported walking difficulty, sociodemographic factors, psychological status (depression, mastery, anxiety, and cognition), and health-related factors (falls and fear of falling, fatigue, vision and balance problems, weight, smoking, and cane use). Walking at least 8 blocks per week was strongly negatively related to severity of walking difficulty. Independent of difficulty level, older age, black race, fatigue, obesity, and cane use were also negatively associated with walking; living alone and high mastery had a positive association with walking. Even among functionally limited women, sociocultural, psychological, and health-related factors were independently associated with walking behavior. Thus, programs aimed at improving walking ability need to address these factors in addition to walking difficulties to maximize participation and compliance.

  2. Single and Dual Task Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie de Bruin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the viability and efficacy of integrating cadence-matched, salient music into a walking intervention for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD. Twenty-two people with PD were randomised to a control (CTRL, n=11 or experimental (MUSIC, n=11 group. MUSIC subjects walked with an individualised music playlist three times a week for the intervention period. Playlists were designed to meet subject's musical preferences. In addition, the tempo of the music closely matched (±10–15 bpm the subject's preferred cadence. CTRL subjects continued with their regular activities during the intervention. The effects of training accompanied by “walking songs” were evaluated using objective measures of gait score. The MUSIC group improved gait velocity, stride time, cadence, and motor symptom severity following the intervention. This is the first study to demonstrate that music listening can be safely implemented amongst PD patients during home exercise.

  3. Walking the history of healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Nick

    2007-12-01

    The history of healthcare is complex, confusing and contested. In Walking London's medical history the story of how health services developed from medieval times to the present day is told through seven walks. The book also aims to help preserve our legacy, as increasingly former healthcare buildings are converted to other uses, and to enhance understanding of the current challenges we face in trying to improve healthcare in the 21st century. Each walk has a theme, ranging from the way hospitals merge or move and the development of primary care to how key healthcare trades became professions and the competition between the church, Crown and City for control of healthcare. While recognising the contributions of the 'great men of medicine', the book takes as much interest in the six ambulance stations built by the London County Council (1915) as the grandest teaching hospitals.

  4. Pedagogies of the Walking Dead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Peters

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the trope of the zombie and the recent upsurge in popular culture surrounding the figure of the zombie described as the “walking dead”. We investigate this trope and figure as a means of analyzing the “pedagogy of the walking dead” with particular attention to the crisis of education in the era of neoliberal capitalism. In particular we examine the professionalization and responsibilization of teachers in the new regulative environment and ask whether there is any room left for the project of critical education.

  5. Reserves Represented by Random Walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipe, J A; Ferreira, M A M; Andrade, M

    2012-01-01

    The reserves problem is studied through models based on Random Walks. Random walks are a classical particular case in the analysis of stochastic processes. They do not appear only to study reserves evolution models. They are also used to build more complex systems and as analysis instruments, in a theoretical feature, of other kind of systems. In this work by studying the reserves, the main objective is to see and guarantee that pensions funds get sustainable. Being the use of these models considering this goal a classical approach in the study of pensions funds, this work concluded about the problematic of reserves. A concrete example is presented.

  6. Factors affecting walking activity of older people from culturally diverse groups: an Australian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Stephen R; Radermacher, Harriet; Sims, Jane; Feldman, Susan; Browning, Colette; Thomas, Shane

    2010-07-01

    This study sought to investigate the walking habits of older people from diverse cultural backgrounds, and to identify the factors associated with their walking. Three hundred and thirty three people over the age of 60 years were recruited from seven culturally diverse groups from the Western suburbs of Melbourne, Australia. A survey questionnaire recording physical activity, and various factors related to activity, was interviewer-administered in the participants' preferred language. Data were analysed using Kruskal-Wallis, chi(2) and Mann-Whitney tests. Forty-seven percent of the participants walked at least 150 min per week, with no significant difference in prevalence between genders or cultural groups. Some cultural differences were found in relation to reasons and locations for walking, and women were more likely than men to report walking in the shopping mall, whilst men were more likely than women to report walking in the park and along walking trails. Those who attained >150 min of walking were more likely to report health and fitness as reasons for walking, to perceive their walking environment as more pleasurable, to use walking trails, and to consider their environment safe and to facilitate social interaction. This study indicates that the continued advocating of walking as a health promoting activity should be central to future campaigns to increase physical activity in this age group. The provision of locations that are accessible, safe, aesthetically pleasing, and encourage social engagement are likely to facilitate older people's participation in walking. For maximum effectiveness, however, strategies may benefit from being tailored to meet specific gender and cultural preferences. Copyright 2009 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Slow walking model for children with multiple disabilities via an application of humanoid robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, ZeFeng; Peyrodie, Laurent; Cao, Hua; Agnani, Olivier; Watelain, Eric; Wang, HaoPing

    2016-02-01

    Walk training research with children having multiple disabilities is presented. Orthosis aid in walking for children with multiple disabilities such as Cerebral Palsy continues to be a clinical and technological challenge. In order to reduce pain and improve treatment strategies, an intermediate structure - humanoid robot NAO - is proposed as an assay platform to study walking training models, to be transferred to future special exoskeletons for children. A suitable and stable walking model is proposed for walk training. It would be simulated and tested on NAO. This comparative study of zero moment point (ZMP) supports polygons and energy consumption validates the model as more stable than the conventional NAO. Accordingly direction variation of the center of mass and the slopes of linear regression knee/ankle angles, the Slow Walk model faithfully emulates the gait pattern of children.

  8. Walk Score(TM), Perceived Neighborhood Walkability, and walking in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckel, Peter; Milczarski, William

    2015-03-01

    To investigate both the Walk Score(TM) and a self-reported measure of neighborhood walkability ("Perceived Neighborhood Walkability") as estimators of transport and recreational walking among Americans. The study is based upon a survey of a nationally-representative sample of 1224 American adults. The survey gauged walking for both transport and recreation and included a self-reported measure of neighborhood walkability and each respondent's Walk Score(TM). Binary logistic and linear regression analyses were performed on the data. The Walk Score(TM) is associated with walking for transport, but not recreational walking nor total walking. Perceived Neighborhood Walkability is associated with transport, recreational and total walking. Perceived Neighborhood Walkability captures the experiential nature of walking more than the Walk Score(TM).

  9. Adults' Daily Walking for Travel and Leisure: Interaction Between Attitude Toward Walking and the Neighborhood Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Diez-Roux, Ana V

    2017-09-01

    Studies on how the interaction of psychological and environmental characteristics influences walking are limited, and the results are inconsistent. Our aim is to examine how the attitude toward walking and neighborhood environments interacts to influence walking. Cross-sectional phone and mail survey. Participants randomly sampled from 6 study sites including Los Angeles, Chicago, Baltimore, Minneapolis, Manhattan, and Bronx Counties in New York City, and Forsyth and Davidson Counties in North Carolina. The final sample consisted of 2621 persons from 2011 to 2012. Total minutes of walking for travel or leisure, attitude toward walking, and perceptions of the neighborhood environments were self-reported. Street Smart (SS) Walk Score (a measure of walkability derived from a variety of geographic data) was obtained for each residential location. Linear regression models adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, and income. Attitude toward walking was positively associated with walking for both purposes. Walking for travel was significantly associated with SS Walk Score, whereas walking for leisure was not. The SS Walk Score and selected perceived environment characteristics were associated with walking in people with a very positive attitude toward walking but were not associated with walking in people with a less positive attitude. Attitudes toward walking and neighborhood environments interact to affect walking behavior.

  10. Effects of Nordic walking and walking on spatiotemporal gait parameters and ground reaction force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Kyu; Yang, Dae Jung; Kang, Yang Hun; Kim, Je Ho; Uhm, Yo Han; Lee, Yong Seon

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Nordic walking and walking on spatiotemporal gait parameters and ground reaction force. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 30 young adult males, who were divided into a Nordic walking group of 15 subjects and a walking group of 15 subjects. [Methods] To analyze the spatiotemporal parameters and ground reaction force during walking in the two groups, the six-camera Vicon MX motion analysis system was used. The subjects were asked to walk 12 meters using the more comfortable walking method for them between Nordic walking and walking. After they walked 12 meters more than 10 times, their most natural walking patterns were chosen three times and analyzed. To determine the pole for Nordic walking, each subject's height was multiplied by 0.68. We then measured the spatiotemporal gait parameters and ground reaction force. [Results] Compared with the walking group, the Nordic walking group showed an increase in cadence, stride length, and step length, and a decrease in stride time, step time, and vertical ground reaction force. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that Nordic walking increases the stride and can be considered as helping patients with diseases affecting their gait. This demonstrates that Nordic walking is more effective in improving functional capabilities by promoting effective energy use and reducing the lower limb load, because the weight of the upper and lower limbs is dispersed during Nordic walking.

  11. A mechanical protocol to replicate impact in walking footwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Carina; Cooper, Glen; Graham-Smith, Philip; Jones, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Impact testing is undertaken to quantify the shock absorption characteristics of footwear. The current widely reported mechanical testing method mimics the heel impact in running and therefore applies excessive energy to walking footwear. The purpose of this study was to modify the ASTM protocol F1614 (Procedure A) to better represent walking gait. This was achieved by collecting kinematic and kinetic data while participants walked in four different styles of walking footwear (trainer, oxford shoe, flip-flop and triple-density sandal). The quantified heel-velocity and effective mass at ground-impact were then replicated in a mechanical protocol. The kinematic data identified different impact characteristics in the footwear styles. Significantly faster heel velocity towards the floor was recorded walking in the toe-post sandals (flip-flop and triple-density sandal) compared with other conditions (e.g. flip-flop: 0.36±0.05 ms(-1) versus trainer: 0.18±0.06 ms(-1)). The mechanical protocol was adapted by altering the mass and drop height specific to the data captured for each shoe (e.g. flip-flop: drop height 7 mm, mass 16.2 kg). As expected, the adapted mechanical protocol produced significantly lower peak force and accelerometer values than the ASTM protocol (pfootwear style specific. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. More Adults Are Walking PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second PSA is based on the August 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. While more adults are walking, only half get the recommended amount of physical activity. Listen to learn how communities, employers, and individuals may help increase walking.

  13. Quantum walks, quantum gates, and quantum computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hines, Andrew P.; Stamp, P. C. E.

    2007-01-01

    The physics of quantum walks on graphs is formulated in Hamiltonian language, both for simple quantum walks and for composite walks, where extra discrete degrees of freedom live at each node of the graph. It is shown how to map between quantum walk Hamiltonians and Hamiltonians for qubit systems and quantum circuits; this is done for both single-excitation and multiexcitation encodings. Specific examples of spin chains, as well as static and dynamic systems of qubits, are mapped to quantum walks, and walks on hyperlattices and hypercubes are mapped to various gate systems. We also show how to map a quantum circuit performing the quantum Fourier transform, the key element of Shor's algorithm, to a quantum walk system doing the same. The results herein are an essential preliminary to a Hamiltonian formulation of quantum walks in which coupling to a dynamic quantum environment is included

  14. Minnesota Walk-In Access Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The Minnesota Walk-In Access site (WIA) GIS data represents areas of private land that have been made open to the public for the purpose of walk-in (foot travel)...

  15. Successful Statewide Walking Program Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teran, Bianca Maria; Hongu, Nobuko

    2012-01-01

    Statewide Extension walking programs are making an effort to increase physical activity levels in America. An investigation of all 20 of these programs revealed that 14 use websites as marketing and educational tools, which could prove useful as the popularity of Internet communities continues to grow. Website usability information and an analysis…

  16. Constraining walking and custodial technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foadi, Roshan; Frandsen, Mads Toudal; Sannino, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    We show how to constrain the physical spectrum of walking technicolor models via precision measurements and modified Weinberg sum rules. We also study models possessing a custodial symmetry for the S parameter at the effective Lagrangian level-custodial technicolor-and argue that these models...

  17. Thermophoresis as persistent random walk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plyukhin, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    In a simple model of a continuous random walk a particle moves in one dimension with the velocity fluctuating between +v and -v. If v is associated with the thermal velocity of a Brownian particle and allowed to be position dependent, the model accounts readily for the particle's drift along the temperature gradient and recovers basic results of the conventional thermophoresis theory.

  18. Different instructions during the ten-meter walking test determined significant increases in maximum gait speed in individuals with chronic hemiparesis Diferentes instruções durante teste de velocidade de marcha determinam aumento significativo na velocidade máxima de indivíduos com hemiparesia crônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas R. Nascimento

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of different instructions for the assessment of maximum walking speed during the ten-meter walking test with chronic stroke subjects. METHODS: Participants were instructed to walk under four experimental conditions: (1 comfortable speed, (2 maximum speed (simple verbal command, (3 maximum speed (modified verbal command-"catch a bus" and (4 maximum speed (verbal command + demonstration. Participants walked three times in each condition and the mean time to cover the intermediate 10 meters of a 14-meter corridor was registered to calculate the gait speed (m/s. Repeated-measures ANOVAs, followed by planned contrasts, were employed to investigate differences between the conditions (α=5%. Means, standard deviations and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated. RESULTS: The mean values for the four conditions were: (1 0.74m/s; (2 0.85 m/s; (3 0.93 m/s; (4 0.92 m/s, respectively, with significant differences between the conditions (F=40.9; pOBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos de diferentes instruções para avaliação da velocidade de marcha máxima de indivíduos hemiparéticos durante o teste de caminhada de 10 metros. MÉTODOS: Os indivíduos deambularam em quatro condições experimentais: (1 velocidade habitual, (2 velocidade máxima (comando verbal simples, (3 velocidade máxima (comando verbal modificado: pegar ônibus, (4 velocidade máxima (comando verbal + demonstração. Solicitou-se a cada participante que deambulasse três vezes em cada condição, e a média do tempo necessário para percorrer os 10 metros intermediários de um corredor de 14 metros foi utilizada para cálculo da velocidade (m/s. A ANOVA de medidas repetidas, com contrastes pré-planejados, foi utilizada para comparação dos dados (α=5%, sendo apresentados valores de média, desvio-padrão e intervalos de confiança (IC de 95%. RESULTADOS: As médias de velocidade para as quatro condições foram: (1 0,74m/s; (2 0,85m/s; (3 0,93m/s; (4

  19. To walk or to fly? How birds choose among foraging modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bautista, LM; Tinbergen, J; Kacelnik, A; Bautista, Luis M.; Southwood, Richard

    2001-01-01

    We test the predictive value of the main energetic currencies used in foraging theory using starlings that choose between two foraging modes (walking versus flying). Walking is low-cost, low-yield, whereas flying is the opposite. We fixed experimentally, at 11 different values, the amount of flight

  20. Reliability and Validity of Ten Consumer Activity Trackers Depend on Walking Speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, Tryntsje; Kooiman, Thea J. M.; Krijnen, Wim P.; Van der Schans, Cees P.; De Groot, Martijn

    Purpose: To examine the test-retest reliability and validity of ten activity trackers for step counting at three different walking speeds. Methods: Thirty-one healthy participants walked twice on a treadmill for 30 min while wearing 10 activity trackers (Polar Loop, Garmin Vivosmart, Fitbit Charge

  1. Nine walks (photo series / web page)

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    'Nine Walks' is a body of work resulting from my engagement with the Media Arts Research Walking Group at Sheffield Hallam University who are exploring the role of walking in as a social, developmental and production space for the creative arts. / My participation in the walking group is an extension of my investigation of the journey as a creative, conceptual and contemplative space for photography which in turn reflects an interest in the role of the accident, instinct and intuition and the...

  2. Treadmill walking with body weight support

    OpenAIRE

    Aaslund, Mona Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rehabilitating walking in patients post-stroke with safe, task-specific, intensive training of sufficient duration, can be challenging. Body weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) has been proposed as an effective method to meet these challenges and may therefore have benefits over training overground walking. However, walking characteristics should not be aggravated during BWSTT or require a long familiarisation time compared to overground walking. Objectives: To investi...

  3. Equações de referência para o teste de caminhada de seis minutos em indivíduos saudáveis Ecuaciones de referencia para el test de caminata de seis minutos en individuos sanos Reference equations for the 6-minute walk test in healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Zuniga Dourado

    2011-06-01

    en inglés (LILACS, SCIELO, MEDLINE y PUBMED, que evaluaron los valores normales y elaboraron ecuaciones de referencia para la previsión de la DTC6 en individuos sanos, comparándolos a los resultados recientemente obtenidos en individuos brasileños. Edad, género, peso, estatura e índice de masa corporal fueron los atributos demográficos y antropométricos más frecuentemente correlacionados con la DTC6. Las ecuaciones resultantes de esos atributos fueron capaces de explicar entre 25 y 66% de la variabilidad total de la DTC6. Lamentablemente, las ecuaciones extranjeras no son adecuadas para la población brasileña. Aun cuando el test es realizado bajo estandarización rigurosa, la diferencia de performance en el TC6 entre extranjeros y brasileños permanece, indicando la necesidad de los valores de referencias específicos para cada población y/o etnia. En ese sentido, las ecuaciones desarrolladas recientemente en el Brasil son, probablemente, las más apropiadas para interpretar la performance de caminata de nuestros compatriotas con enfermedades crónicas que afectan su capacidad para realizar ejercicios. Estudios futuros con muestras substancialmente mayores (p.e. multicéntricos y con técnica de muestreo randomizada son necesarios para que los valores de referencia de la DTC6 sean más representativos.The six-minute walk test (6MWT has been broadly used in clinical settings. Several reference equations for prediction of the total distance walked during the test (6MWD are available in literature. The present review aimed to critically discuss studies, published in Portuguese and English (LILACS, SCIELO, MEDLINE, PUBMED, which evaluated normal values and created reference equations for predicting 6MWD in healthy subjects, comparing them with the results that were recently obtained in Brazilian individuals. Age, sex, weight, height and body mass index were the main demographic and anthropometric features more often correlated with 6MWD. The equations derived

  4. Diferentes padronizações do teste da caminhada de seis minutos como método para mensuração da capacidade de exercício de idosos com e sem cardiopatia clinicamente evidente Different patterns for the 6-minute walk test as a test to measure exercise ability in elderly with and without clinically evident cardiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clênia Oliveira Araújo

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a correlação do consumo de oxigênio pico (VO2pico, no teste cardiopulmonar, com a distância percorrida no teste da caminhada de seis minutos (TC6 em idosos saudáveis e com infarto do miocárdio (IM. MÉTODOS: Avaliados 30 indivíduos, idade entre 65 e 87 anos (76,03 ± 4,75, divididos em 2 grupos: Grupo I - 14 com doença cardíaca clinicamente evidente (DCCE Grupo II - 16 sem DCCE. Foram submetidos ao teste cardiopulmonar (TCP e a 2 tipos de TC6. As variáveis mensuradas foram: a freqüência cardíaca (FC e respiratória (FR, pressão arterial (PA, distância percorrida (DP, e a percepção subjetiva de esforço de BORG. RESULTADOS: O estudo mostrou uma forte correlação das distâncias percorridas, em ambas as formas do (TC6, com o VO2pico obtido no TCP, em todos idosos incluídos neste estudo. Na comparação entre os TC6, quando aplicado com acompanhamento (TC6ac e sem acompanhamento (TC6s, foi observada diferença estatisticamente significante, com maiores valores médios da DP, da FC e FR, e da percepção subjetiva de esforço no TC6ac, em ambos os grupos. Além disso, a FC atingida ao final do esforço, no TC6ac, foi semelhante à obtida no TCP máximo (p OBJECTIVES: Evaluate the correlation between peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak, from cardiopulmonary test with the distance covered in the six-minute walk test (6MWT in healthy elderly and with myocardial infarction (MI. METHODS: Thirty individuals were studied, with age range 65 - 87 years (76, 03± 4,75, divided into 2 groups: Group I - 14 with clinically evident coronary heart disease (CHD and Group II - 16 without clinically evident CHD. They were submitted to cardiopulmonary test (CPT and 2 types of 6MWT, standard test 6MWTs. Variables measure at rest and exertion were heart rate (HR and respiratory rate (RR, blood pressure (BP, distance covered (DC, and Borg’s rate subjective perceived exertion (RPE. RESULTS: The study showed significant, strong

  5. Walking pattern classification and walking distance estimation algorithms using gait phase information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jeen-Shing; Lin, Che-Wei; Yang, Ya-Ting C; Ho, Yu-Jen

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a walking pattern classification and a walking distance estimation algorithm using gait phase information. A gait phase information retrieval algorithm was developed to analyze the duration of the phases in a gait cycle (i.e., stance, push-off, swing, and heel-strike phases). Based on the gait phase information, a decision tree based on the relations between gait phases was constructed for classifying three different walking patterns (level walking, walking upstairs, and walking downstairs). Gait phase information was also used for developing a walking distance estimation algorithm. The walking distance estimation algorithm consists of the processes of step count and step length estimation. The proposed walking pattern classification and walking distance estimation algorithm have been validated by a series of experiments. The accuracy of the proposed walking pattern classification was 98.87%, 95.45%, and 95.00% for level walking, walking upstairs, and walking downstairs, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed walking distance estimation algorithm was 96.42% over a walking distance.

  6. KidsWalk-to-School: A Guide To Promote Walking to School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (DHHS/CDC), Atlanta, GA.

    This guide encourages people to create safe walking and biking routes to school, promoting four issues: physically active travel, safe and walkable routes to school, crime prevention, and health environments. The chapters include: "KidsWalk-to-School: A Guide to Promote Walking to School" (Is there a solution? Why is walking to school important?…

  7. Measuring walking within and outside the neighborhood in Chinese elders: reliability and validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerin Ester

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Walking is a preferred, prevalent and recommended activity for aging populations and is influenced by the neighborhood built environment. To study this influence it is necessary to differentiate whether walking occurs within or outside of the neighborhood. The Neighborhood Physical Activity Questionnaire (NPAQ collects information on setting-specific physical activity, including walking, inside and outside one's neighborhood. While the NPAQ has shown to be a reliable measure in adults, its reliability in older adults is unknown. Additionally its validity and the influence of type of neighborhood on reliability and validity have yet to be explored. Methods The NPAQ walking component was adapted for Chinese speaking elders (NWQ-CS. Ninety-six Chinese elders, stratified by social economic status and neighborhood walkability, wore an accelerometer and completed a log of walks for 7 days. Following the collection of valid data the NWQ-CS was interviewer-administered. Fourteen to 20 days (average of 17 days later the NWQ-CS was re-administered. Test-retest reliability and validity of the NWQ-CS were assessed. Results Reliability and validity estimates did not differ with type of neighborhood. NWQ-CS measures of walking showed moderate to excellent reliability. Reliability was generally higher for estimates of weekly frequency than minutes of walking. Total weekly minutes of walking were moderately related to all accelerometry measures. Moderate-to-strong associations were found between the NWQ-CS and log-of-walks variables. The NWQ-CS yielded statistically significantly lower mean values of total walking, weekly minutes of walking for transportation and weekly frequency of walking for transportation outside the neighborhood than the log-of-walks. Conclusions The NWQ-CS showed measurement invariance across types of neighborhoods. It is a valid measure of walking for recreation and frequency of walking for transport. However, it may

  8. Development of independent walking in toddlers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanenko, Yuri P; Dominici, Nadia; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    Surprisingly, despite millions of years of bipedal walking evolution, the gravity-related pendulum mechanism of walking does not seem to be implemented at the onset of independent walking, requiring each toddler to develop it. We discuss the precursor of the mature locomotor pattern in infants as an

  9. Walking Beliefs in Women With Fibromyalgia: Clinical Profile and Impact on Walking Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñacoba, Cecilia; Pastor, María-Ángeles; López-Roig, Sofía; Velasco, Lilian; Lledo, Ana

    2017-10-01

    Although exercise is essential for the treatment of fibromyalgia, adherence is low. Walking, as a form of physical exercise, has significant advantages. The aim of this article is to describe, in 920 women with fibromyalgia, the prevalence of certain walking beliefs and analyze their effects both on the walking behavior itself and on the associated symptoms when patients walk according to a clinically recommended way. The results highlight the high prevalence of beliefs related to pain and fatigue as walking-inhibitors. In the whole sample, beliefs are associated with an increased perception that comorbidity prevents walking, and with higher levels of pain and fatigue. In patients who walk regularly, beliefs are only associated with the perception that comorbidity prevents them from walking. It is necessary to promote walking according to the established way (including breaks to prevent fatigue) and to implement interventions on the most prevalent beliefs that inhibit walking.

  10. To Walk or Not to Walk?: The Hierarchy of Walking Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonzo, Mariela

    2005-01-01

    The multitude of quality of life problems associated with declining walking rates has impelled researchers from various disciplines to identify factors related to this behavior change. Currently, this body of research is in need of a transdisciplinary, multilevel theoretical model that can help explain how individual, group, regional, and…

  11. Exercise as a therapy for improvement of walking ability in adults with multiple sclerosis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Melissa; Dieberg, Gudrun; Smart, Neil

    2015-07-01

    To quantify improvements in walking performance commonly observed in patients with multiple sclerosis (pwMS), a systematic literature search and meta-analysis were conducted quantifying the expected benefits of exercise on walking ability in pwMS. Potential studies were identified by systematic search using PubMed (1966 to March 31, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to March 31, 2014), CINAHL (1998 to March 31, 2014), SPORTDiscus (1991 to March 31, 2014), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (1966 to March 31, 2014). The search used key concepts of "multiple sclerosis" AND "exercise." Randomized controlled trials of exercise training in adult pwMS. Data on patient and study characteristics, walking ability, 10-m walk test (10mWT), timed 25-foot walk test (T25FW), 2-minute walk test (2MWT), 6-minute walk test (6MWT), and timed Up and Go (TUG) were extracted and archived. Data from 13 studies were included. In pwMS who exercised, significant improvements were found in walking speed, measured by the 10mWT (mean difference [MD] reduction in walking time of -1.76s; 95% confidence interval [CI], -2.47 to -1.06; Pwalking endurance as measured by the 6MWT and 2MWT, with an increased walking distance of MD=36.46m (95% CI, 15.14-57.79; Pwalking speed and endurance in pwMS. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Teachers’ Narratives indicate Professional Stamina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugbjerg, Peer Schrøder

    The neoliberal restructuring of the welfare state has changed the conditions for teacher practice. Teachers’ narratives have been collected in the western part of Denmark. They give insight in teacher practice and how teachers’ conditions for working have changed. 3 themes are discussed to illust...

  13. From Input to Intelligence Stamina

    OpenAIRE

    山本, 昭夫

    2012-01-01

    Input has been one of the major issues in the fields of fbreign language leaming, teaching, and research. There have been various kinds of leanling and teaching methods that would have been thought to increase the amount of input and some theories examined in research of English as a second  language, or ESL and English as a foreign language, or EFL. However, the leamers of ESL and EFL may not be able to use English proficiently no matter how much input they have if they do not care about the...

  14. The influence of gait speed on the stability of walking among the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yifang; Li, Zhiyu; Han, Shuyan; Lv, Changsheng; Zhang, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Walking speed is a basic factor to consider when walking exercises are prescribed as part of a training programme. Although associations between walking speed, step length and falling risk have been identified, the relationship between spontaneous walking pattern and falling risk remains unclear. The present study, therefore, examined the stability of spontaneous walking at normal, fast and slow speed among elderly (67.5±3.23) and young (21.4±1.31) individuals. In all, 55 participants undertook a test that involved walking on a plantar pressure platform. Foot-ground contact data were used to calculate walking speed, step length, pressure impulse along the plantar-impulse principal axis and pressure record of time series along the plantar-impulse principal axis. A forward dynamics method was used to calculate acceleration, velocity and displacement of the centre of mass in the vertical direction. The results showed that when the elderly walked at different speeds, their average step length was smaller than that observed among the young (p=0.000), whereas their anterior/posterior variability and lateral variability had no significant difference. When walking was performed at normal or slow speed, no significant between-group difference in cadence was found. When walking at a fast speed, the elderly increased their stride length moderately and their cadence greatly (p=0.012). In summary, the present study found no correlation between fast walking speed and instability among the elderly, which indicates that healthy elderly individuals might safely perform fast-speed walking exercises. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Variability of leg kinematics during overground walking in persons with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Won Joon; Tan, Andrew Q; Hayes, Heather B; Pochiraju, Saahith; Deffeyes, Joan; Trumbower, Randy D

    2018-03-20

    Incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) often leads to partial disruption of spinal pathways that are important for motor control of walking. Persons with iSCI present with deficits in walking ability due, in part, to inconsistent leg kinematics during stepping. While kinematic variability is important for normal walking, growing evidence indicates that excessive variability may limit walking ability and increase reliance on assistive devices (AD) after iSCI. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of iSCI-induced impairments on kinematic variability during overground walking. We hypothesized that iSCI results in greater variability of foot and joint displacement during overground walking compared to controls. We further hypothesized that variability is larger in persons with limited walking speed and greater reliance on ADs. To test these hypotheses, iSCI and control subjects walked overground. Kinematic variability was quantified as step-to-step foot placement variability (endpoint), and variability in hip-knee, hip-ankle, and knee-ankle joint space (angular coefficient of correspondence; ACC). We characterized sensitivity of kinematic variability to cadence, auditory cue, and AD. Supporting our hypothesis, persons with iSCI exhibited greater kinematic variability than controls, which scaled with deficits in overground walking speed (pvariability, and with walking speed, indicates both are markers of walking performance. Moreover, hip-knee and hip-ankle ACC discriminated between AD use, indicating that ACC may capture AD-specific control strategies. We conclude that increased variability of foot and joint displacement are indicative of motor impairment severity and may serve as therapeutic targets to restore walking after iSCI.

  16. Autonomous exoskeleton reduces metabolic cost of human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Luke M; Rouse, Elliott J; Herr, Hugh M

    2014-11-03

    Passive exoskeletons that assist with human locomotion are often lightweight and compact, but are unable to provide net mechanical power to the exoskeletal wearer. In contrast, powered exoskeletons often provide biologically appropriate levels of mechanical power, but the size and mass of their actuator/power source designs often lead to heavy and unwieldy devices. In this study, we extend the design and evaluation of a lightweight and powerful autonomous exoskeleton evaluated for loaded walking in (J Neuroeng Rehab 11:80, 2014) to the case of unloaded walking conditions. The metabolic energy consumption of seven study participants (85 ± 12 kg body mass) was measured while walking on a level treadmill at 1.4 m/s. Testing conditions included not wearing the exoskeleton and wearing the exoskeleton, in both powered and unpowered modes. When averaged across the gait cycle, the autonomous exoskeleton applied a mean positive mechanical power of 26 ± 1 W (13 W per ankle) with 2.12 kg of added exoskeletal foot-shank mass (1.06 kg per leg). Use of the leg exoskeleton significantly reduced the metabolic cost of walking by 35 ± 13 W, which was an improvement of 10 ± 3% (p = 0.023) relative to the control condition of not wearing the exoskeleton. The results of this study highlight the advantages of developing lightweight and powerful exoskeletons that can comfortably assist the body during walking.

  17. Determination of Ankle and Metatarsophalangeal Stiffness During Walking and Jogging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mager, Fabian; Richards, Jim; Hennies, Malika; Dötzel, Eugen; Chohan, Ambreen; Mbuli, Alex; Capanni, Felix

    2018-05-29

    Forefoot stiffness has been shown to influence joint biomechanics. However, little or no data exists on metatarsophalangeal stiffness. Twenty-four healthy rearfoot strike runners were recruited from a staff and student population at the University of Central Lancashire. Five repetitions of shod, self-selected speed level walking and jogging were performed. Kinetic and kinematic data were collected using retro-reflective markers placed on the lower limb and foot, to create a three-segment foot model using the Calibrated Anatomical System Technique. Ankle and metatarsophalangeal moments and angles were calculated. Stiffness values were calculated using a linear best fit line of moment versus of angle plots. Paired t-tests were used to compare values between walking and jogging conditions. Significant differences were seen in ankle range of motion (ROM), but not in metatarsophalangeal ROM. Maximum moments were significantly greater in the ankle during jogging, but these were not significantly different at the metatarsophalangeal joint. Average ankle joint stiffness exhibited significantly lower stiffness when walking compared to jogging. However, the metatarsophalangeal joint exhibited significantly greater stiffness when walking compared to jogging. A greater understanding of forefoot stiffness may inform the development of footwear, prosthetic feet and orthotic devices, such as ankle-foot orthoses for walking and sporting activities.

  18. An Improved Walk Model for Train Movement on Railway Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Keping; Mao Bohua; Gao Ziyou

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an improved walk model for simulating the train movement on railway network. In the proposed method, walkers represent trains. The improved walk model is a kind of the network-based simulation analysis model. Using some management rules for walker movement, walker can dynamically determine its departure and arrival times at stations. In order to test the proposed method, we simulate the train movement on a part of railway network. The numerical simulation and analytical results demonstrate that the improved model is an effective tool for simulating the train movement on railway network. Moreover, it can well capture the characteristic behaviors of train scheduling in railway traffic. (general)

  19. Record statistics of a strongly correlated time series: random walks and Lévy flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godrèche, Claude; Majumdar, Satya N.; Schehr, Grégory

    2017-08-01

    We review recent advances on the record statistics of strongly correlated time series, whose entries denote the positions of a random walk or a Lévy flight on a line. After a brief survey of the theory of records for independent and identically distributed random variables, we focus on random walks. During the last few years, it was indeed realized that random walks are a very useful ‘laboratory’ to test the effects of correlations on the record statistics. We start with the simple one-dimensional random walk with symmetric jumps (both continuous and discrete) and discuss in detail the statistics of the number of records, as well as of the ages of the records, i.e. the lapses of time between two successive record breaking events. Then we review the results that were obtained for a wide variety of random walk models, including random walks with a linear drift, continuous time random walks, constrained random walks (like the random walk bridge) and the case of multiple independent random walkers. Finally, we discuss further observables related to records, like the record increments, as well as some questions raised by physical applications of record statistics, like the effects of measurement error and noise.

  20. Modification of the Ladder Rung Walking Task—New Options for Analysis of Skilled Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwa Antonow-Schlorke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Method sensitivity is critical for evaluation of poststroke motor function. Skilled walking was assessed in horizontal, upward, and downward rung ladder walking to compare the demands of the tasks and test sensitivity. The complete step sequence of a walk was subjected to analysis aimed at demonstrating the walking pattern, step sequence, step cycle, limb coordination, and limb interaction to complement the foot fault scoring system. Rats (males, n=10 underwent unilateral photothrombotic lesion of the motor cortex of the forelimb and hind limb areas. Locomotion was video recorded before the insult and at postischemic days 7 and 28. Analysis of walking was performed frame-by-frame. Walking along the rung ladder revealed different results that were dependent on ladder inclination. Horizontal walking was found to discriminate lesion-related motor deficits in forelimb, whereas downward walking demonstrates hind limb use most sensitively. A more frequent use of the impaired forelimb that possibly supported poststroke motor learning in rats was shown. The present study provides a novel system for a detailed analysis of the complete walking sequence and will help to provide a better understanding of how rats deal with motor impairments.

  1. Factors predicting walking intolerance in patients with peripheral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine which physiological variables conduce to walking intolerance in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Design. The physiological response to a graded treadmill exercise test (GTT) in patients with PAD was characterised. Setting. Patients were recruited from the Department of. Vascular ...

  2. Counting statistics of many-particle quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Klaus; Tichy, Malte C.; Mintert, Florian; Konrad, Thomas; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2011-06-01

    We study quantum walks of many noninteracting particles on a beam splitter array as a paradigmatic testing ground for the competition of single- and many-particle interference in a multimode system. We derive a general expression for multimode particle-number correlation functions, valid for bosons and fermions, and infer pronounced signatures of many-particle interferences in the counting statistics.

  3. Counting statistics of many-particle quantum walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, Klaus; Tichy, Malte C.; Buchleitner, Andreas; Mintert, Florian; Konrad, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We study quantum walks of many noninteracting particles on a beam splitter array as a paradigmatic testing ground for the competition of single- and many-particle interference in a multimode system. We derive a general expression for multimode particle-number correlation functions, valid for bosons and fermions, and infer pronounced signatures of many-particle interferences in the counting statistics.

  4. Random walk of passive tracers among randomly moving obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Matteo; Donato, Irene; Floriani, Elena; Nardecchia, Ilaria; Pettini, Marco

    2016-04-14

    This study is mainly motivated by the need of understanding how the diffusion behavior of a biomolecule (or even of a larger object) is affected by other moving macromolecules, organelles, and so on, inside a living cell, whence the possibility of understanding whether or not a randomly walking biomolecule is also subject to a long-range force field driving it to its target. By means of the Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) technique the topic of random walk in random environment is here considered in the case of a passively diffusing particle among randomly moving and interacting obstacles. The relevant physical quantity which is worked out is the diffusion coefficient of the passive tracer which is computed as a function of the average inter-obstacles distance. The results reported here suggest that if a biomolecule, let us call it a test molecule, moves towards its target in the presence of other independently interacting molecules, its motion can be considerably slowed down.

  5. Comparison of the metabolic energy cost of overground and treadmill walking in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Nicolas; Gayda, Mathieu; Nigam, Anil; Juneau, Martin; Bherer, Louis; Bosquet, Laurent

    2012-05-01

    We assessed whether the metabolic energy cost of walking was higher when measured overground or on a treadmill in a population of healthy older adults. We also assessed the association between the two testing modes. Participants (n = 20, 14 men and 6 women aged between 65 and 83 years of age) were randomly divided into two groups. Half of them went through the overground-treadmill sequence while the other half did the opposite order. A familiarization visit was held for each participant prior to the actual testing. For both modes of testing, five walking speeds were experimented (0.67, 0.89, 1.11, 1.33 and 1.67 m s(-1)). Oxygen uptake was monitored for all walking speeds. We found a significant difference between treadmill and track metabolic energy cost of walking, whatever the walking speed. The results show that walking on the treadmill requires more metabolic energy than walking overground for all experimental speeds (P < 0.05). The association between both measures was low to moderate (0.17 < ICC < 0.65), and the standard error of measurement represented 6.9-15.7% of the average value. These data indicate that metabolic energy cost of walking results from a treadmill test does not necessarily apply in daily overground activities. Interventions aiming at reducing the metabolic energy cost of walking should be assessed with the same mode as it was proposed during the intervention. If the treadmill mode is necessary for any purposes, functional overground walking tests should be implemented to obtain a more complete and specific evaluation.

  6. Acute Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Responses During Exoskeleton-Assisted Walking Overground Among Persons with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nicholas; Hartigan, Clare; Kandilakis, Casey; Pharo, Elizabeth; Clesson, Ismari

    2015-01-01

    Lower extremity robotic exoskeleton technology is being developed with the promise of affording people with spinal cord injury (SCI) the opportunity to stand and walk. The mobility benefits of exoskeleton-assisted walking can be realized immediately, however the cardiorespiratory and metabolic benefits of this technology have not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the acute cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses associated with exoskeleton-assisted walking overground and to determine the degree to which these responses change at differing walking speeds. Five subjects (4 male, 1 female) with chronic SCI (AIS A) volunteered for the study. Expired gases were collected during maximal graded exercise testing and two, 6-minute bouts of exoskeleton-assisted walking overground. Outcome measures included peak oxygen consumption (V̇O2peak), average oxygen consumption (V̇O2avg), peak heart rate (HRpeak), walking economy, metabolic equivalent of tasks for SCI (METssci), walk speed, and walk distance. Significant differences were observed between walk-1 and walk-2 for walk speed, total walk distance, V̇O2avg, and METssci. Exoskeleton-assisted walking resulted in %V̇O2peak range of 51.5% to 63.2%. The metabolic cost of exoskeleton-assisted walking ranged from 3.5 to 4.3 METssci. Persons with motor-complete SCI may be limited in their capacity to perform physical exercise to the extent needed to improve health and fitness. Based on preliminary data, cardiorespiratory and metabolic demands of exoskeleton-assisted walking are consistent with activities performed at a moderate intensity.

  7. Acute Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Responses During Exoskeleton-Assisted Walking Overground Among Persons with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, Clare; Kandilakis, Casey; Pharo, Elizabeth; Clesson, Ismari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lower extremity robotic exoskeleton technology is being developed with the promise of affording people with spinal cord injury (SCI) the opportunity to stand and walk. The mobility benefits of exoskeleton-assisted walking can be realized immediately, however the cardiorespiratory and metabolic benefits of this technology have not been thoroughly investigated. Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the acute cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses associated with exoskeleton-assisted walking overground and to determine the degree to which these responses change at differing walking speeds. Methods: Five subjects (4 male, 1 female) with chronic SCI (AIS A) volunteered for the study. Expired gases were collected during maximal graded exercise testing and two, 6-minute bouts of exoskeleton-assisted walking overground. Outcome measures included peak oxygen consumption (V̇O2peak), average oxygen consumption (V̇O2avg), peak heart rate (HRpeak), walking economy, metabolic equivalent of tasks for SCI (METssci), walk speed, and walk distance. Results: Significant differences were observed between walk-1 and walk-2 for walk speed, total walk distance, V̇O2avg, and METssci. Exoskeleton-assisted walking resulted in %V̇O2peak range of 51.5% to 63.2%. The metabolic cost of exoskeleton-assisted walking ranged from 3.5 to 4.3 METssci. Conclusion: Persons with motor-complete SCI may be limited in their capacity to perform physical exercise to the extent needed to improve health and fitness. Based on preliminary data, cardiorespiratory and metabolic demands of exoskeleton-assisted walking are consistent with activities performed at a moderate intensity. PMID:26364281

  8. Avaliação da segurança do teste de caminhada dos 6 minutos em pacientes no pré-transplante cardíaco Evaluación de la seguridad de la test de marcha de 6 minutos en pacientes en el pre-transplante cardiaco Analysis of 6-minute walk test safety in pre-heart transplantation patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Cipriano Jr

    2009-04-01

    ínico y el pronóstico cardiovascular. La seguridad y el impacto metabólico son poco descritos en la literatura, principalmente en pacientes con insuficiencia cardiaca severa e indicación clínica para transplante cardiovascular Objetivo: Evaluar la ocurrencia de arritmias y alteraciones cardiovasculares durante el TM6m. Correlacionar el desempeño en el TM6m con el estadiamiento clínico y el pronóstico cardiovascular. MÉTODOS: Un total de 12 pacientes, 10 varones, con edad de 52 ± 8 años, fueron sometidos a evaluación inicial. Realizaron el TM6m con monitoreo electrocardiográfico por telemetría, señales vitales y lactato. Se siguieron a los individuos por 12 meses. RESULTADOS: Los pacientes recorrieron 399,4 ± 122,5 (D, m, alcanzando un esfuerzo percibido (EP de 14,3 ± 1,5 y variación del 34% en la frecuencia cardiaca basal. Dos pacientes presentaron arritmia de mayor severidad pre-TM6m y no mostraron empeoramiento ante el esfuerzo; cuatro tuvieron elevación significativa en los niveles de lactato sanguíneo (>5 mmol/dl, y tres interrumpieron el examen. La distancia recorrida evidenció correlación con la fracción de eyección (% y la clasificación funcional (NYHA. Tras 12 meses de seguimiento, tres pacientes murieron, y siete se reinternaron por descompensación cardiaca. La relación (D/EP y frecuencia cardiaca de recuperación en el segundo minuto (FCR2, lpm fueron inferiores en el grupo óbito. CONCLUSIÓN: El comportamiento clínico y electrocardiográfico sugiere que el método es seguro, pero se puede considerarlo de alta intensidad para algunos pacientes con insuficiencia cardiaca severa. Variables relacionadas al desempeño en el TM6m pueden estar asociadas con la mortalidad en el seguimiento de un año.BACKGROUND: The 6-minute walk test (6WT has been used as a means of assessment of the functional capacity, clinical staging and cardiovascular prognosis. Its safety and metabolic impact have not been frequently described in the literature

  9. Validação de um protocolo para o teste de caminhada de seis minutos em esteira para avaliação de pacientes com hipertensão arterial pulmonar Validation of a treadmill six-minute walk test protocol for the evaluation of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Moreira de Camargo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Elaborar e validar um protocolo para teste de caminhada de seis minutos em esteira (TC6est para a avaliação de pacientes com hipertensão arterial pulmonar (HAP. MÉTODOS: A população do estudo foi composta por 73 pacientes com HAP diagnosticados através de cateterismo cardíaco direito, com ou sem inalação de NO. Todos os pacientes realizaram um TC6 em solo e três TC6est baseados em um protocolo de incremento de velocidade pré-determinado e intercalados por um período de repouso. Os pacientes que haviam realizado o teste hemodinâmico com inalação de NO realizaram o terceiro TC6est com a inalação da mesma dose de NO utilizada durante o cateterismo. RESULTADOS: Os resultados mostraram uma correlação da distância caminhada no TC6est com os dados hemodinâmicos, assim como com a classe funcional e com a distância caminhada no solo. Além disso, a distância percorrida no TC6est apresentou uma correlação significativa com a sobrevida, confirmando, portanto, sua correlação com a gravidade da doença. A inalação de NO durante o TC6est levou a variações compatíveis com as variações hemodinâmicas frente à mesma dose de NO, sugerindo que o protocolo em questão pode refletir o efeito de intervenções terapêuticas. CONCLUSÕES: Concluímos que a distância percorrida no TC6est é um marcador funcional e prognóstico na avaliação de rotina de pacientes com HAP.OBJECTIVE: To develop and validate a protocol for the treadmill six-minute walk test (tread6MWT to evaluate patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. METHODS:The study population comprised 73 patients with PAH, diagnosed by means of right heart catheterization, with or without NO inhalation. All patients performed a hallway 6MWT and three tread6MWTs based on a pre-determined incremental speed protocol and interposed by a rest period. The patients who had been submitted to hemodynamic testing using NO performed the third tread6MWT while inhaling

  10. Not Just "A Walking the Dog": Dog Walking and Pet Play and Their Association With Recommended Physical Activity Among Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Karen E; Wood, Lisa; Christian, Hayley; Trapp, Georgina S A

    2015-01-01

    To examine the role of pet play and dog walking in children's and adolescents' leisure time, and the relationship between these activities and physical activity. The study design was observational. The study setting was metropolitan Perth and nonmetropolitan regions in Western Australia. The study included 1097 primary school (mean age, 10.1 years; SD, 1.6 years) and 657 secondary school (mean age, 14.0 years; SD, 1.3 years) students. Validated measures of total physical activity, dog walking, and pet play activity (prevalence and time) were calculated. Generalized linear models tested for differences between proportions, while adjusting for socioeconomic status, age, and school-level clustering. Approximately one third of primary school and one quarter of secondary school students reported that they walked the dog at least once in the last week. Pet play was the most common play activity for primary and secondary school girls, and the second and third most popular play activity for secondary and primary school boys, respectively. Secondary school students who walked the dog or played with pets spent an average of 1 hour per week on each activity, and they were significantly more likely (p physical activity recommendations than secondary school students not reporting these activities. Given the significant proportion of young people who frequently engage in dog walking and pet play, and the high level of pet ownership in many Western countries, promotion of these activities to support young people's health is warranted.

  11. Walking stability during cell phone use in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Pei-Chun; Higginson, Christopher I; Seymour, Kelly; Kamerdze, Morgan; Higginson, Jill S

    2015-05-01

    The number of falls and/or accidental injuries associated with cellular phone use during walking is growing rapidly. Understanding the effects of concurrent cell phone use on human gait may help develop safety guidelines for pedestrians. It was shown previously that older adults had more pronounced dual-task interferences than younger adults when concurrent cognitive task required visual information processing. Thus, cell phone use might have greater impact on walking stability in older than in younger adults. This study examined gait stability and variability during a cell phone dialing task (phone) and two classic cognitive tasks, the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) and Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT). Nine older and seven younger healthy adults walked on a treadmill at four different conditions: walking only, PASAT, phone, and SDMT. We computed short-term local divergence exponent (LDE) of the trunk motion (local stability), dynamic margins of stability (MOS), step spatiotemporal measures, and kinematic variability. Older and younger adults had similar values of short-term LDE during all conditions, indicating that local stability was not affected by the dual-task. Compared to walking only, older and younger adults walked with significantly greater average mediolateral MOS during phone and SDMT conditions but significantly less ankle angle variability during all dual-tasks and less knee angle variability during PASAT. The current findings demonstrate that healthy adults may try to control foot placement and joint kinematics during cell phone use or another cognitive task with a visual component to ensure sufficient dynamic margins of stability and maintain local stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Equivalence of Szegedy's and coined quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Thomas G.

    2017-09-01

    Szegedy's quantum walk is a quantization of a classical random walk or Markov chain, where the walk occurs on the edges of the bipartite double cover of the original graph. To search, one can simply quantize a Markov chain with absorbing vertices. Recently, Santos proposed two alternative search algorithms that instead utilize the sign-flip oracle in Grover's algorithm rather than absorbing vertices. In this paper, we show that these two algorithms are exactly equivalent to two algorithms involving coined quantum walks, which are walks on the vertices of the original graph with an internal degree of freedom. The first scheme is equivalent to a coined quantum walk with one walk step per query of Grover's oracle, and the second is equivalent to a coined quantum walk with two walk steps per query of Grover's oracle. These equivalences lie outside the previously known equivalence of Szegedy's quantum walk with absorbing vertices and the coined quantum walk with the negative identity operator as the coin for marked vertices, whose precise relationships we also investigate.

  13. Rhythmic walking interactions with auditory feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jylhä, Antti; Serafin, Stefania; Erkut, Cumhur

    2012-01-01

    of interactions based on varying the temporal characteristics of the output, using the sound of human walking as the input. The system either provides a direct synthesis of a walking sound based on the detected amplitude envelope of the user's footstep sounds, or provides a continuous synthetic walking sound...... as a stimulus for the walking human, either with a fixed tempo or a tempo adapting to the human gait. In a pilot experiment, the different interaction modes are studied with respect to their effect on the walking tempo and the experience of the subjects. The results tentatively outline different user profiles......Walking is a natural rhythmic activity that has become of interest as a means of interacting with software systems such as computer games. Therefore, designing multimodal walking interactions calls for further examination. This exploratory study presents a system capable of different kinds...

  14. Nordic walking and chronic low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsø, Lars; Hartvigsen, Jan; Puggaard, Lis

    2006-01-01

    activity provide similar benefits. Nordic Walking is a popular and fast growing type of exercise in Northern Europe. Initial studies have demonstrated that persons performing Nordic Walking are able to exercise longer and harder compared to normal walking thereby increasing their cardiovascular metabolism....... Until now no studies have been performed to investigate whether Nordic Walking has beneficial effects in relation to low back pain. The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether supervised Nordic Walking can reduce pain and improve function in a population of chronic low back pain patients...... when compared to unsupervised Nordic Walking and advice to stay active. In addition we investigate whether there is an increase in the cardiovascular metabolism in persons performing supervised Nordic Walking compared to persons who are advised to stay active. Finally, we investigate whether...

  15. City Walks and Tactile Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mădălina Diaconu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to develop categories of the pedestrian’s tactile and kinaesthetic experience of the city. The beginning emphasizes the haptic qualities of surfaces and textures, which can be “palpated” visually or experienced by walking. Also the lived city is three-dimensional; its corporeal depth is discussed here in relation to the invisible sewers, protuberant profiles, and the formal diversity of roofscapes. A central role is ascribed in the present analysis to the formal similarities between the representation of the city by walking through it and the representation of the tactile form of objects. Additional aspects of the “tactile” experience of the city in a broad sense concern the feeling of their rhythms and the exposure to weather conditions. Finally, several aspects of contingency converge in the visible age of architectural works, which record traces of individual and collective histories.

  16. Groups, graphs and random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Salvatori, Maura; Sava-Huss, Ecaterina

    2017-01-01

    An accessible and panoramic account of the theory of random walks on groups and graphs, stressing the strong connections of the theory with other branches of mathematics, including geometric and combinatorial group theory, potential analysis, and theoretical computer science. This volume brings together original surveys and research-expository papers from renowned and leading experts, many of whom spoke at the workshop 'Groups, Graphs and Random Walks' celebrating the sixtieth birthday of Wolfgang Woess in Cortona, Italy. Topics include: growth and amenability of groups; Schrödinger operators and symbolic dynamics; ergodic theorems; Thompson's group F; Poisson boundaries; probability theory on buildings and groups of Lie type; structure trees for edge cuts in networks; and mathematical crystallography. In what is currently a fast-growing area of mathematics, this book provides an up-to-date and valuable reference for both researchers and graduate students, from which future research activities will undoubted...

  17. Stable walking with asymmetric legs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merker, Andreas; Rummel, Juergen; Seyfarth, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetric leg function is often an undesired side-effect in artificial legged systems and may reflect functional deficits or variations in the mechanical construction. It can also be found in legged locomotion in humans and animals such as after an accident or in specific gait patterns. So far, it is not clear to what extent differences in the leg function of contralateral limbs can be tolerated during walking or running. Here, we address this issue using a bipedal spring-mass model for simulating walking with compliant legs. With the help of the model, we show that considerable differences between contralateral legs can be tolerated and may even provide advantages to the robustness of the system dynamics. A better understanding of the mechanisms and potential benefits of asymmetric leg operation may help to guide the development of artificial limbs or the design novel therapeutic concepts and rehabilitation strategies.

  18. The relationship between walking, manual dexterity, cognition and activity/participation in persons with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, Marie; Einarsson, Ulrika; Gottberg, Kristina; von Koch, Lena; Holmqvist, Lotta Widén

    2012-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis has a vast impact on health, but the relationship between walking, manual dexterity, cognition and activity/participation is unclear. The specific aims were to explore the discriminative ability of measures of walking, manual dexterity and cognition, and to identify cut-off values in these measures, for prediction of independence in personal and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL) and activity/participation in social and lifestyle activities. Data from 164 persons with multiple sclerosis were collected during home visits with the following measures: the 2 × 5 m walk test, the Nine-hole Peg Test, the Symbol Digit Modalities Test, the Katz Personal and Instrumental ADL Indexes, and the Frenchay Activities Index (measuring frequency in social and lifestyle activities). The 2 × 5 m walk test and the Nine-hole Peg Test had high and better discriminative and predictive ability than the Symbol Digit Modalities Test. Cut-off values were identified. The accuracy of predictions was increased above all by combining the 2 × 5 m walk test and the Nine-hole Peg Test. The proposed cut-off values in the 2 × 5 m walk test and the Nine-hole Peg Test may be used as indicators of functioning and to identify persons risking activity limitations and participation restrictions. However, further studies are needed to confirm the usefulness in clinical practice.

  19. Random walk through fractal environments

    OpenAIRE

    Isliker, H.; Vlahos, L.

    2002-01-01

    We analyze random walk through fractal environments, embedded in 3-dimensional, permeable space. Particles travel freely and are scattered off into random directions when they hit the fractal. The statistical distribution of the flight increments (i.e. of the displacements between two consecutive hittings) is analytically derived from a common, practical definition of fractal dimension, and it turns out to approximate quite well a power-law in the case where the dimension D of the fractal is ...

  20. Object Study Walk. BLOK P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone Huse

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available I would like to take you for a walk, around the housing complex Blok P in the centre of Nuuk, Greenland. I encourage you to move and listen, to smell and touch. In the presence of your evoked senses, linger for a moment; turn your face towards the past. Let us explore urban nostalgia, not as an either/or reactionary, speculative, radical, or future-oriented but as the organizing narrative of our shared journey.

  1. The Evaluation of Effectiviness of Conventional Corset on Walking Potential in Patients with Fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    İnanır, Ahmet; Habiboğlu, Abdulkadir; Erkorkmaz, Ünal; İnanır, Sema

    2011-01-01

    Objective: It has been aimed whether the corset changes the potential to exercise in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. Material and Methods: In this study, classified according to body mass index (BMI), 51 patients diagnosed Rehabilitation clinic with fibromyalgia and tested in walking 6 minutes with and without the corset were compared in their test results. Findings: In their walking test scores with/without the corset of the Groups 1, 2 and 3 fibromyalgia patients were identified statis...

  2. Spin lattices of walking droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz, Pedro; Pucci, Giuseppe; Goujon, Alexis; Dunkel, Jorn; Bush, John

    2017-11-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the spontaneous emergence of collective behavior in spin lattice of droplets walking on a vibrating fluid bath. The bottom topography consists of relatively deep circular wells that encourage the walking droplets to follow circular trajectories centered at the lattice sites, in one direction or the other. Wave-mediated interactions between neighboring drops are enabled through a thin fluid layer between the wells. The sense of rotation of the walking droplets may thus become globally coupled. When the coupling is sufficiently strong, interactions with neighboring droplets may result in switches in spin that lead to preferred global arrangements, including correlated (all drops rotating in the same direction) or anti-correlated (neighboring drops rotating in opposite directions) states. Analogies with ferromagnetism and anti-ferromagnetism are drawn. Different spatial arrangements are presented in 1D and 2D lattices to illustrate the effects of topological frustration. This work was supported by the US National Science Foundation through Grants CMMI-1333242 and DMS-1614043.

  3. Self-reported walking ability predicts functional mobility performance in frail older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, N B; Guire, K E; Thelen, D G; Ashton-Miller, J A; Schultz, A B; Grunawalt, J C; Giordani, B

    2000-11-01

    related to one Katz ADL item, walking (eta-squared ranging from 0.15 to 0.33) as all of the Katz ADL items combined (eta-squared ranging from 0.21 to 0.35). Tests of problem solving and psychomotor speed, the Trails A and Trails B tests, are significantly correlated with the residuals from the self-report and performance-based ANOVA models. Compared with the rest of the EPESE self-report items, self-report items related to walking (such as Katz walking and Rosow-Breslau items) are better predictors of functional mobility performance on tasks involving walking, stance maintenance, and rising from chairs. Compared with other self-report items, self-reported walking ability may be the best predictor of overall functional mobility.

  4. Comparison between actual and predicted postoperative stair-climbing test, walk test and spirometric values in patients undergoing lung resection Comparação dos testes de escada, caminhada e espirometria preditos com os obtidos no pós-operatório de ressecções pulmonares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Vinícius Cataneo Pancieri

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess whether the tests - Forced Expiratory Volume at one second (FEV1, 6-minute walk test (6MWT and stair-climbing test (SCT showed proportional changes after the resection of functioning lung. METHODS: Candidates for pulmonary resection were included. Spirometry, 6MWT and SCT were performed preoperatively (pre and at least 3 months after surgery (pos. SCT was performed on a staircase with a total ascent height of 12.16m. The time taken to climb the total height the fastest possible was defined as stair-climbing time (SCt. Number of functioning segments lost, was used to calculated predicted postoperative (ppo tests values. Pre, ppo and pos values for each test were compared. Data were analyzed by repeated-measure ANOVA with significance level set at 5%. RESULTS: A total of 40 patients were enrolled. Pulmonary resection results ranged from gain of 2 functioning segments to loss of 9. Pre, ppo and pos values were the following: preFEV1 = 2.6±0.8L, ppo FEV1 =2.3±0.8L, and pos FEV1=2.3±0.8L, (pre FEV1 > ppo FEV1 = pos FEV1; pre6MWT = 604±63m, ppo6MWT= 529±103m, pos6MWT= 599±74m (pre6MWT = pos6MWT > ppo6MWT; preSCt = 32.9±7.6s, ppoSCt = 37.8±12.1s, posSCt = 33.7±8.5s (preSCt = posSCt OBJETIVO: Verificar se os testes: Volume Expiratório Forçado no 1º segundo (VEF1, Teste de Caminhada de 6 minutos (TC6 e Teste de Escada (TE se alteram proporcionalmente ao pulmão funcionante ressecado. MÉTODOS: Foram incluídos pacientes candidatos a toracotomia para ressecção pulmonar. No pré-operatório (pré e no mínimo três meses após a cirurgia (pós, realizaram espirometria, TC6 e TE. O TE foi realizado em escada com 12,16m de altura. O tempo para subir todos os degraus o mais rápido possível foi chamado tempo de escada (tTE. Os cálculos dos valores dos testes preditos para o pós-operatório (ppo foram realizados conforme o número de segmentos funcionantes perdidos. Os valores pré, ppo e pós foram comparados entre si para

  5. Shared and task-specific muscle synergies of Nordic walking and conventional walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, G; Zoppirolli, C; Bortolan, L; Schena, F; Pellegrini, B

    2018-03-01

    Nordic walking is a form of walking that includes a poling action, and therefore an additional subtask, with respect to conventional walking. The aim of this study was to assess whether Nordic walking required a task-specific muscle coordination with respect to conventional walking. We compared the electromyographic (EMG) activity of 15 upper- and lower-limb muscles of 9 Nordic walking instructors, while executing Nordic walking and conventional walking at 1.3 ms -1 on a treadmill. Non-negative matrix factorization method was applied to identify muscle synergies, representing the spatial and temporal organization of muscle coordination. The number of muscle synergies was not different between Nordic walking (5.2 ± 0.4) and conventional walking (5.0 ± 0.7, P = .423). Five muscle synergies accounted for 91.2 ± 1.1% and 92.9 ± 1.2% of total EMG variance in Nordic walking and conventional walking, respectively. Similarity and cross-reconstruction analyses showed that 4 muscle synergies, mainly involving lower-limb and trunk muscles, are shared between Nordic walking and conventional walking. One synergy acting during upper limb propulsion is specific to Nordic walking, modifying the spatial organization and the magnitude of activation of upper limb muscles compared to conventional walking. The inclusion of the poling action in Nordic walking does not increase the complexity of movement control and does not change the coordination of lower limb muscles. This makes Nordic walking a physical activity suitable also for people with low motor skill. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Random walks and diffusion on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naoki; Porter, Mason A.; Lambiotte, Renaud

    2017-11-01

    Random walks are ubiquitous in the sciences, and they are interesting from both theoretical and practical perspectives. They are one of the most fundamental types of stochastic processes; can be used to model numerous phenomena, including diffusion, interactions, and opinions among humans and animals; and can be used to extract information about important entities or dense groups of entities in a network. Random walks have been studied for many decades on both regular lattices and (especially in the last couple of decades) on networks with a variety of structures. In the present article, we survey the theory and applications of random walks on networks, restricting ourselves to simple cases of single and non-adaptive random walkers. We distinguish three main types of random walks: discrete-time random walks, node-centric continuous-time random walks, and edge-centric continuous-time random walks. We first briefly survey random walks on a line, and then we consider random walks on various types of networks. We extensively discuss applications of random walks, including ranking of nodes (e.g., PageRank), community detection, respondent-driven sampling, and opinion models such as voter models.

  7. Quantum walks with infinite hitting times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krovi, Hari; Brun, Todd A.

    2006-01-01

    Hitting times are the average time it takes a walk to reach a given final vertex from a given starting vertex. The hitting time for a classical random walk on a connected graph will always be finite. We show that, by contrast, quantum walks can have infinite hitting times for some initial states. We seek criteria to determine if a given walk on a graph will have infinite hitting times, and find a sufficient condition, which for discrete time quantum walks is that the degeneracy of the evolution operator be greater than the degree of the graph. The set of initial states which give an infinite hitting time form a subspace. The phenomenon of infinite hitting times is in general a consequence of the symmetry of the graph and its automorphism group. Using the irreducible representations of the automorphism group, we derive conditions such that quantum walks defined on this graph must have infinite hitting times for some initial states. In the case of the discrete walk, if this condition is satisfied the walk will have infinite hitting times for any choice of a coin operator, and we give a class of graphs with infinite hitting times for any choice of coin. Hitting times are not very well defined for continuous time quantum walks, but we show that the idea of infinite hitting-time walks naturally extends to the continuous time case as well

  8. Positive messaging promotes walking in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notthoff, Nanna; Carstensen, Laura L

    2014-06-01

    Walking is among the most cost-effective and accessible means of exercise. Mounting evidence suggests that walking may help to maintain physical and cognitive independence in old age by preventing a variety of health problems. However, older Americans fall far short of meeting the daily recommendations for walking. In 2 studies, we examined whether considering older adults' preferential attention to positive information may effectively enhance interventions aimed at promoting walking. In Study 1, we compared the effectiveness of positive, negative, and neutral messages to encourage walking (as measured with pedometers). Older adults who were informed about the benefits of walking walked more than those who were informed about the negative consequences of failing to walk, whereas younger adults were unaffected by framing valence. In Study 2, we examined within-person change in walking in older adults in response to positively- or negatively-framed messages over a 28-day period. Once again, positively-framed messages more effectively promoted walking than negatively-framed messages, and the effect was sustained across the intervention period. Together, these studies suggest that consideration of age-related changes in preferences for positive and negative information may inform the design of effective interventions to promote healthy lifestyles. Future research is needed to examine the mechanisms underlying the greater effectiveness of positively- as opposed to negatively-framed messages and the generalizability of findings to other intervention targets and other subpopulations of older adults. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Validity of Walk Score® as a measure of neighborhood walkability in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohsari, Mohammad Javad; Sugiyama, Takemi; Hanibuchi, Tomoya; Shibata, Ai; Ishii, Kaori; Liao, Yung; Oka, Koichiro

    2018-03-01

    Objective measures of environmental attributes have been used to understand how neighborhood environments relate to physical activity. However, this method relies on detailed spatial data, which are often not easily available. Walk Score® is a free, publicly available web-based tool that shows how walkable a given location is based on objectively-derived proximity to several types of local destinations and street connectivity. To date, several studies have tested the concurrent validity of Walk Score as a measure of neighborhood walkability in the USA and Canada. However, it is unknown whether Walk Score is a valid measure in other regions. The current study examined how Walk Score is correlated with objectively-derived attributes of neighborhood walkability, for residential addresses in Japan. Walk Scores were obtained for 1072 residential addresses in urban and rural areas in Japan. Five environmental attributes (residential density, intersection density, number of local destinations, sidewalk availability, and access to public transportation) were calculated using geographic information systems for each address. Pearson's correlation coefficients between Walk Score and these environmental attributes were calculated (conducted in May 2017). Significant positive correlations were observed between Walk Score and environmental attributes relevant to walking. Walk Score was most closely associated with intersection density ( r  = 0.82) and with the number of local destinations ( r  = 0.77). Walk Score appears to be a valid measure of neighborhood walkability in Japan. Walk Score will allow urban designers and public health practitioners to identify walkability of local areas without relying on detailed geographic data.

  10. Walking to work in Canada: health benefits, socio-economic characteristics and urban-regional variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Peter; Williams, Allison; Chowhan, James

    2011-04-04

    There is mounting concern over increasing rates of physical inactivity and overweight/obesity among children and adult in Canada. There is a clear link between the amount of walking a person does and his or her health. The purpose of this paper is to assess the health factors, socio-economic characteristics and urban-regional variations of walking to work among adults in Canada. Data is drawn from two cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey: 2001 and 2005. The study population is divided into three groups: non-walkers, lower-duration walkers and high-duration walkers. Logistic regression modeling tests the association between levels of walking and health related outcomes (diabetes, high blood pressure, stress, BMI, physical activity), socio-economic characteristics (sex, age, income, education) and place of residence (selected Census Metropolitan Areas). In 2005, the presence of diabetes and high blood pressure was not associated with any form of walking. Adults within the normal weight range were more likely to be high-duration walkers. Females and younger people were more likely to be lower-duration walkers but less likely to be high-duration walkers. There was a strong association between SES (particularly relative disadvantage) and walking to work. In both 2001 and 2005, the conditions influencing walking to work were especially prevalent in Canada's largest city, Toronto, as well as in several small to medium sized urban areas including Halifax, Kingston, Hamilton, Regina, Calgary and Victoria. A number of strategies can be followed to increase levels of walking in Canada. It is clear that for many people walking to work is not possible. However, strategies can be developed to encourage adults to incorporate walking into their daily work and commuting routines. These include mass transit walking and workplace walking programs.

  11. Walking to work in Canada: health benefits, socio-economic characteristics and urban-regional variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Allison

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is mounting concern over increasing rates of physical inactivity and overweight/obesity among children and adult in Canada. There is a clear link between the amount of walking a person does and his or her health. The purpose of this paper is to assess the health factors, socio-economic characteristics and urban-regional variations of walking to work among adults in Canada. Methods Data is drawn from two cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey: 2001 and 2005. The study population is divided into three groups: non-walkers, lower-duration walkers and high-duration walkers. Logistic regression modeling tests the association between levels of walking and health related outcomes (diabetes, high blood pressure, stress, BMI, physical activity, socio-economic characteristics (sex, age, income, education and place of residence (selected Census Metropolitan Areas. Results In 2005, the presence of diabetes and high blood pressure was not associated with any form of walking. Adults within the normal weight range were more likely to be high-duration walkers. Females and younger people were more likely to be lower-duration walkers but less likely to be high-duration walkers. There was a strong association between SES (particularly relative disadvantage and walking to work. In both 2001 and 2005, the conditions influencing walking to work were especially prevalent in Canada's largest city, Toronto, as well as in several small to medium sized urban areas including Halifax, Kingston, Hamilton, Regina, Calgary and Victoria. Conclusion A number of strategies can be followed to increase levels of walking in Canada. It is clear that for many people walking to work is not possible. However, strategies can be developed to encourage adults to incorporate walking into their daily work and commuting routines. These include mass transit walking and workplace walking programs.

  12. Walk-Startup of a Two-Legged Walking Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babković, Kalman; Nagy, László; Krklješ, Damir; Borovac, Branislav

    There is a growing interest towards humanoid robots. One of their most important characteristic is the two-legged motion - walk. Starting and stopping of humanoid robots introduce substantial delays. In this paper, the goal is to explore the possibility of using a short unbalanced state of the biped robot to quickly gain speed and achieve the steady state velocity during a period shorter than half of the single support phase. The proposed method is verified by simulation. Maintainig a steady state, balanced gait is not considered in this paper.

  13. Mentally walking through doorways causes forgetting: The location updating effect and imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Zachary; Peterson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have documented an intriguing phenomenon whereby simply walking through a doorway causes forgetting (the location updating effect). The Event Horizon Model is the most commonly cited theory to explain these data. Importantly, this model explains the effect without invoking the importance or reliance upon perceptual information (i.e., seeing oneself pass through the doorway). This generates the intriguing hypothesis that the effect may be demonstrated in participants who simply imagine walking through a doorway. Across two experiments, we explicitly test this hypothesis. Participants familiarised themselves with both real (Experiment 1) and virtual (Experiment 2) environments which served as the setting for their mental walk. They were then provided with an image to remember and were instructed to imagine themselves walking through the previously presented space. In both experiments, when the mental walk required participants to pass through a doorway, more forgetting occurred, consistent with the predictions laid out in the Event Horizon Model.

  14. Effects of jumping skill training on walking balance for children with mental retardation and Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W Y; Chang, J J

    1997-08-01

    In the present study, we hypothesized that the enhancements obtained from the practice of jumping activity could be transferred to improve the walking balance in children with mental retardation (MR) and Down's syndrome (DS). Fourteen children with the diagnosis of MR or DS, aged 3 to 6 years, were recruited from a day care institution. They were ambulant but without jumping ability. Sixty-one non-handicapped children was used to serve as a normative comparison group. Before the training program, the performances of walking balance, jump skills and jumping distances were assessed individually by one physical therapist. The balance sub-test in the Bruininks Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOTMP) was administered to assess the walking balance. Motor Skill Inventory (MSI) was used to assess the qualitative levels of jumping skills. A jumping skill training lesson that included horizontal jumps and vertical jumps was designed and integrated into the educational program. The recruited children received 3 sessions of training per-week for 6 weeks. A post-training test and a follow-up test were administered to the handicapped children. In BOTMP scores, statistical differences exited between the pre-training and post-training tests in the tested items of floor walk and beam walk. However, no significant difference was found in the items of floor stand, beam stand and floor heel-toe walk. MSI scales revealed there were significant differences between pre-training and post-training tests. There was no significant difference between the scores of post-training test and the follow-up test. The results implicated that the jumping activity might effectively evoke the automatic and dynamic postural control. Moreover, the significant improvements of the floor walk and beam walk performances might be due to the transferred effects via the practice of dynamic jumping activity. Furthermore, implications and suggestions are discussed.

  15. System overview and walking dynamics of a passive dynamic walking robot with flat feet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of “passive dynamic walking robot” refers to the robot that can walk down a shallow slope stably without any actuation and control which shows a limit cycle during walking. By adding actuation at some joints, the passive dynamic walking robot can walk stably on level ground and exhibit more versatile gaits than fully passive robot, namely, the “limit cycle walker.” In this article, we present the mechanical structures and control system design for a passive dynamic walking robot with series elastic actuators at hip joint and ankle joints. We built a walking model that consisted of an upper body, knee joints, and flat feet and derived its walking dynamics that involve double stance phases in a walking cycle based on virtual power principle. The instant just before impact was chosen as the start of one step to reduce the number of independent state variables. A numerical simulation was implemented by using MATLAB, in which the proposed passive dynamic walking model could walk stably down a shallow slope, which proves that the derived walking dynamics are correct. A physical passive robot prototype was built finally, and the experiment results show that by only simple control scheme the passive dynamic robot could walk stably on level ground.

  16. Redução da capacidade funcional e exacerbação da dor durante o esforço do teste de caminhada de 6 minutos em mulheres com fibromialgia Impaired functional capacity and exacerbation of pain and exertion during the 6-minute walk test in women with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Homann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: A fibromialgia (FM parece limitar o desempenho físico, e a realização de atividades da vida diária (AVDs pode exacerbar a dor e o esforço percebido nesses pacientes. OBJETIVOS: Comparar o desempenho do teste de caminhada de 6 minutos (TC6 entre pacientes com FM e controles e verificar relações entre esse desempenho com o impacto na qualidade de vida, na realização de tarefas da vida diária e no nível de atividade física. MÉTODOS: Participaram do estudo 19 mulheres com FM e 20 mulheres saudáveis. Realizou-se o TC6 e, durante o teste, foram mensuradas a intensidade de dor e a percepção subjetiva de esforço (PSE. Foram aplicados o Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ e o International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ. RESULTADOS: O grupo de mulheres com FM percorreu menor distância no TC6 (pacientes: 473,52±77,84 m versus controles: 541,75±85,62 m; p=0,02. Para o grupo de pacientes houve correlações entre a distância caminhada e o questionário FIQ (r=-0,46; p=0,05, o HAQ (r=-0,49; p=0,03 e o consumo de oxigênio (r=0,78; pBACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia has been association with physical performance limitations. Additionally, activities of daily living have been reported to be directly associated with the exacerbation of pain and perceived exertion in this patient population. OBJECTIVES: To compare the performance of a 6-minute walk (6MWT test in patients with fibromyalgia and controls and to evaluate the relationship between test performance and quality of life, limitations of activities of daily living and physical activity level. METHODS: The study included 19 women with fibromyalgia (FM and 20 healthy controls (CG. A 6MWT was conducted and pain intensity and perceived effort (PE were assessed during the test. In addition, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ and International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ were

  17. Correlation between the Oswestry Disability Index and objective measurements of walking capacity and performance in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Annette Bennedsgaard; Gustafsson, Malin Eleonora Av Kák

    2018-03-05

    The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) plays a significant role in lumbar spinal stenosis research and is used to assess patient's walking limitations. The World Health Organisation describes the constructs of walking capacity and performance and recommend measuring both to fully describe patient's walking ability. Objective methods to assess walking capacity and performance is being investigated and used alongside the traditional use of PROs. This review of the literature was made to provide an overview of relations between the ODI and outcome measures of walking capacity and performance in spinal stenosis research, and to provide a strategy for improving such measures in future research. The review was conducted according to the Prisma Statement. In February 2017, a search was performed in Pubmed, Embase and Cochrane database. Authors independently screened articles by title, abstract, and full text, and studies were included if both authors agreed. Articles with correlation analysis between the ODI, walking capacity and performance measures by accelerometer or GPS were included. The results support a correlation between the ODI and walking capacity measures. The available studies using ODI and accelerometers were too few to reach a conclusion regarding correlation between ODI and walking performance. No articles with GPS measure were identified. The ODI should not stand alone when evaluating walking limitations in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. To enable a comprehensive assessment of walking ability, a walking test should be used to assess walking capacity and accelerometers should be investigated and standardized in measuring walking performance. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.

  18. A random walk model to evaluate autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, T. R. S.; Fulco, U. L.; Albuquerque, E. L.

    2018-02-01

    A common test administered during neurological examination in children is the analysis of their social communication and interaction across multiple contexts, including repetitive patterns of behavior. Poor performance may be associated with neurological conditions characterized by impairments in executive function, such as the so-called pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs), a particular condition of the autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Inspired in these diagnosis tools, mainly those related to repetitive movements and behaviors, we studied here how the diffusion regimes of two discrete-time random walkers, mimicking the lack of social interaction and restricted interests developed for children with PDDs, are affected. Our model, which is based on the so-called elephant random walk (ERW) approach, consider that one of the random walker can learn and imitate the microscopic behavior of the other with probability f (1 - f otherwise). The diffusion regimes, measured by the Hurst exponent (H), is then obtained, whose changes may indicate a different degree of autism.

  19. Quantum walk on a chimera graph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shu; Sun, Xiangxiang; Wu, Jizhou; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Arshed, Nigum; Sanders, Barry C.

    2018-05-01

    We analyse a continuous-time quantum walk on a chimera graph, which is a graph of choice for designing quantum annealers, and we discover beautiful quantum walk features such as localization that starkly distinguishes classical from quantum behaviour. Motivated by technological thrusts, we study continuous-time quantum walk on enhanced variants of the chimera graph and on diminished chimera graph with a random removal of vertices. We explain the quantum walk by constructing a generating set for a suitable subgroup of graph isomorphisms and corresponding symmetry operators that commute with the quantum walk Hamiltonian; the Hamiltonian and these symmetry operators provide a complete set of labels for the spectrum and the stationary states. Our quantum walk characterization of the chimera graph and its variants yields valuable insights into graphs used for designing quantum-annealers.

  20. Full revivals in 2D quantum walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanak, M; Jex, I; Kollar, B; Kiss, T

    2010-01-01

    Recurrence of a random walk is described by the Polya number. For quantum walks, recurrence is understood as the return of the walker to the origin, rather than the full revival of its quantum state. Localization for two-dimensional quantum walks is known to exist in the sense of non-vanishing probability distribution in the asymptotic limit. We show, on the example of the 2D Grover walk, that one can exploit the effect of localization to construct stationary solutions. Moreover, we find full revivals of a quantum state with a period of two steps. We prove that there cannot be longer cycles for a four-state quantum walk. Stationary states and revivals result from interference, which has no counterpart in classical random walks.

  1. Effects of Progressive Body Weight Support Treadmill Forward and Backward Walking Training on Stroke Patients' Affected Side Lower Extremity's Walking Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Lee, Kyoungbo

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of progressive body weight supported treadmill forward and backward walking training (PBWSTFBWT), progressive body weight supported treadmill forward walking training (PBWSTFWT), progressive body weight supported treadmill backward walking training (PBWSTBWT), on stroke patients' affected side lower extremity's walking ability. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 36 chronic stroke patients were divided into three groups with 12 subjects in each group. Each of the groups performed one of the progressive body weight supported treadmill training methods for 30 minute, six times per week for three weeks, and then received general physical therapy without any other intervention until the follow-up tests. For the assessment of the affected side lower extremity's walking ability, step length of the affected side, stance phase of the affected side, swing phase of the affected side, single support of the affected side, and step time of the affected side were measured using optogait and the symmetry index. [Results] In the within group comparisons, all the three groups showed significant differences between before and after the intervention and in the comparison of the three groups, the PBWSTFBWT group showed more significant differences in all of the assessed items than the other two groups. [Conclusion] In the present study progressive body weight supported treadmill training was performed in an environment in which the subjects were actually walked, and PBWSTFBWT was more effective at efficiently training stroke patients' affected side lower extremity's walking ability.

  2. Assessing interactions among multiple physiological systems during walking outside a laboratory: An Android based gait monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejdić, E.; Millecamps, A.; Teoli, J.; Rothfuss, M. A.; Franconi, N. G.; Perera, S.; Jones, A. K.; Brach, J. S.; Mickle, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Gait function is traditionally assessed using well-lit, unobstructed walkways with minimal distractions. In patients with subclinical physiological abnormalities, these conditions may not provide enough stress on their ability to adapt to walking. The introduction of challenging walking conditions in gait can induce responses in physiological systems in addition to the locomotor system. There is a need for a device that is capable of monitoring multiple physiological systems in various walking conditions. To address this need, an Android-based gait-monitoring device was developed that enabled the recording of a patient's physiological systems during walking. The gait-monitoring device was tested during self-regulated overground walking sessions of fifteen healthy subjects that included 6 females and 9 males aged 18 to 35 years. The gait-monitoring device measures the patient's stride interval, acceleration, electrocardiogram, skin conductance and respiratory rate. The data is stored on an Android phone and is analyzed offline through the extraction of features in the time, frequency and time-frequency domains. The analysis of the data depicted multisystem physiological interactions during overground walking in healthy subjects. These interactions included locomotion-electrodermal, locomotion-respiratory and cardiolocomotion couplings. The current results depicting strong interactions between the locomotion system and the other considered systems (i.e., electrodermal, respiratory and cardivascular systems) warrant further investigation into multisystem interactions during walking, particularly in challenging walking conditions with older adults. PMID:26390946

  3. Can psychology walk the walk of open science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Bradford W

    2018-01-01

    An "open science movement" is gaining traction across many disciplines within the research enterprise but is also precipitating consternation among those who worry that too much disruption may be hampering professional productivity. Despite this disruption, proponents of open data collaboration have argued that some of the biggest problems of the 21st century need to be solved with the help of many people and that data sharing will be the necessary engine to make that happen. In the United States, a national strategic plan for data sharing encouraged the federally funded scientific agencies to (a) publish open data for community use in discoverable, machine-readable, and useful ways; (b) work with public and civil society organizations to set priorities for data to be shared; (c) support innovation and feedback on open data solutions; and (d) continue efforts to release and enhance high-priority data sets funded by taxpayer dollars. One of the more visible open data projects in the psychological sciences is the presidentially announced "Brain Research Through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies" (BRAIN) initiative. Lessons learned from initiatives such as these are instructive both from the perspective of open science within psychology and from the perspective of understanding the psychology of open science. Recommendations for creating better pathways to "walk the walk" in open science include (a) nurturing innovation and agile learning, (b) thinking outside the paradigm, (c) creating simplicity from complexity, and (d) participating in continuous learning evidence platforms. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Narrowing beam-walking is a clinically feasible approach for assessing balance ability in lower-limb prosthesis users

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Sawers; Brian J. Hafner

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Challenging clinical balance tests are needed to expose balance deficits in lower-limb prost-hesis users. This study examined whether narrowing beam-walking could overcome conceptual and practical limitations identified in fixed-width beam-walking. Design: Cross-sectional. Participants: Unilateral lower-limb prosthesis users. Methods: Participants walked 10 times along a low, narrowing beam. Performance was quantified using the normalize...

  5. Quantum Walks for Computer Scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Venegas-Andraca, Salvador

    2008-01-01

    Quantum computation, one of the latest joint ventures between physics and the theory of computation, is a scientific field whose main goals include the development of hardware and algorithms based on the quantum mechanical properties of those physical systems used to implement such algorithms. Solving difficult tasks (for example, the Satisfiability Problem and other NP-complete problems) requires the development of sophisticated algorithms, many of which employ stochastic processes as their mathematical basis. Discrete random walks are a popular choice among those stochastic processes. Inspir

  6. Lively quantum walks on cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, Przemysław; Miszczak, Jarosław Adam; Ostaszewski, Mateusz

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a family of quantum walks on cycles parametrized by their liveliness, defined by the ability to execute a long-range move. We investigate the behaviour of the probability distribution and time-averaged probability distribution. We show that the liveliness parameter, controlling the magnitude of the additional long-range move, has a direct impact on the periodicity of the limiting distribution. We also show that the introduced model provides a method for network exploration which is robust against trapping. (paper)

  7. Thermodynamics and entanglements of walks under stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janse van Rensburg, E J; Orlandini, E; Tesi, M C; Whittington, S G

    2009-01-01

    We use rigorous arguments and Monte Carlo simulations to study the thermodynamics and the topological properties of self-avoiding walks on the cubic lattice subjected to an external force f. The walks are anchored at one or both endpoints to an impenetrable plane at Z = 0 and the force is applied in the Z-direction. If a force is applied to the free endpoint of an anchored walk, then a model of pulled walks is obtained. If the walk is confined to a slab and a force is applied to the top bounding plane, then a model of stretched walks is obtained. For both models we prove the existence of the limiting free energy for any value of the force and we show that, for compressive forces, the thermodynamic properties of the two models differ substantially. For pulled walks we prove the existence of a phase transition that, by numerical simulation, we estimate to be second order and located at f = 0. By using a pattern theorem for large positive forces we show that almost all sufficiently long stretched walks are knotted. We examine the entanglement complexity of stretched and pulled walks; our numerical results show a sharp reduction with increasing pulling and stretching forces. Finally, we also examine models of pulled and stretched loops. We prove the existence of limiting free energies in these models and consider the knot probability numerically as a function of the applied pulling or stretching force

  8. Motor modules in robot-aided walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizzi Leonardo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is hypothesized that locomotion is achieved by means of rhythm generating networks (central pattern generators and muscle activation generating networks. This modular organization can be partly identified from the analysis of the muscular activity by means of factorization algorithms. The activity of rhythm generating networks is described by activation signals whilst the muscle intervention generating network is represented by motor modules (muscle synergies. In this study, we extend the analysis of modular organization of walking to the case of robot-aided locomotion, at varying speed and body weight support level. Methods Non Negative Matrix Factorization was applied on surface electromyographic signals of 8 lower limb muscles of healthy subjects walking in gait robotic trainer at different walking velocities (1 to 3km/h and levels of body weight support (0 to 30%. Results The muscular activity of volunteers could be described by low dimensionality (4 modules, as for overground walking. Moreover, the activation signals during robot-aided walking were bursts of activation timed at specific phases of the gait cycle, underlying an impulsive controller, as also observed in overground walking. This modular organization was consistent across the investigated speeds, body weight support level, and subjects. Conclusions These results indicate that walking in a Lokomat robotic trainer is achieved by similar motor modules and activation signals as overground walking and thus supports the use of robotic training for re-establishing natural walking patterns.

  9. Locally Perturbed Random Walks with Unbounded Jumps

    OpenAIRE

    Paulin, Daniel; Szász, Domokos

    2010-01-01

    In \\cite{SzT}, D. Sz\\'asz and A. Telcs have shown that for the diffusively scaled, simple symmetric random walk, weak convergence to the Brownian motion holds even in the case of local impurities if $d \\ge 2$. The extension of their result to finite range random walks is straightforward. Here, however, we are interested in the situation when the random walk has unbounded range. Concretely we generalize the statement of \\cite{SzT} to unbounded random walks whose jump distribution belongs to th...

  10. Efficient quantum circuit implementation of quantum walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, B. L.; Wang, J. B.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum walks, being the quantum analog of classical random walks, are expected to provide a fruitful source of quantum algorithms. A few such algorithms have already been developed, including the 'glued trees' algorithm, which provides an exponential speedup over classical methods, relative to a particular quantum oracle. Here, we discuss the possibility of a quantum walk algorithm yielding such an exponential speedup over possible classical algorithms, without the use of an oracle. We provide examples of some highly symmetric graphs on which efficient quantum circuits implementing quantum walks can be constructed and discuss potential applications to quantum search for marked vertices along these graphs.

  11. Knee flexor strength and balance control impairment may explain declines during prolonged walking in women with mild multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramari, Cintia; Moraes, Andréa G; Tauil, Carlos B; von Glehn, Felipe; Motl, Robert; de David, Ana C

    2018-02-01

    Physiological factors such as muscle weakness and balance could explain declines in walking distance by multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The purpose of this study was to characterize levels and examine associations among decline in walking distance, balance and muscular strength in women with mild MS. Participants included 28 women with mild relapsing-remitting MS and 21 women without MS. We executed the 6-min walk test (6MWT) to verify declines in walking distance. Isokinetic knee flexion (KF) and extension (KE) muscle strength was measured using a dynamometer. Balance was quantified using a force platform, with eyes open and closed, on a rigid and foam surface. The MS patients presented declines in walking, lower KF muscle strength, and worse balance than controls. KF strength and balance correlated with walking in the MS group. The KF strength explained differences between groups in walking. The KF strength and balance presented as predictors of walking slowing down in the 6MWT, in mild MS. Women with mild MS have strength impairment of knee flexor muscles and balance control impairment that may explain walking related motor fatigability during prolonged walking. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of the implementation of a whole-workplace walking programme using the RE-AIM framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Emma J; Chalkley, Anna E; Esliger, Dale W; Sherar, Lauren B

    2017-05-18

    Promoting walking for the journey to/from work and during the working day is one potential approach to increase physical activity in adults. Walking Works was a practice-led, whole-workplace walking programme delivered by employees (walking champions). This study aimed to evaluate the implementation of Walking Works using the RE-AIM framework and provide recommendations for future delivery of whole-workplace walking programmes. Two cross sectional surveys were conducted; 1544 (28%) employees completed the baseline survey and 918 employees (21%) completed the follow-up survey. Effectiveness was assessed using baseline and follow-up data; reach, implementation and maintenance were assessed using follow-up data only. For categorical data, Chi square tests were conducted to assess differences between surveys or groups. Continuous data were analysed to test for significant differences using a Mann-Whitney U test. Telephone interviews were conducted with the lead organisation co-ordinator, eight walking champions and three business representatives at follow-up. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed to identify key themes related to adoption, implementation and maintenance. Adoption: Five workplaces participated in Walking Works. Reach: 480 (52.3%) employees were aware of activities and 221 (24.1%) participated. A variety of walking activities were delivered. Some programme components were not delivered as planned which was partly due to barriers in using walking champions to deliver activities. These included the walking champions' capacity, skills, support needs, ability to engage senior management, and the number and type of activities they could deliver. Other barriers included lack of management support, difficulties communicating information about activities and challenges embedding the programme into normal business activities. Effectiveness: No significant changes in walking to/from work or walking during the working day were observed. Maintenance

  13. Evaluation of the implementation of a whole-workplace walking programme using the RE-AIM framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J. Adams

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Promoting walking for the journey to/from work and during the working day is one potential approach to increase physical activity in adults. Walking Works was a practice-led, whole-workplace walking programme delivered by employees (walking champions. This study aimed to evaluate the implementation of Walking Works using the RE-AIM framework and provide recommendations for future delivery of whole-workplace walking programmes. Methods Two cross sectional surveys were conducted; 1544 (28% employees completed the baseline survey and 918 employees (21% completed the follow-up survey. Effectiveness was assessed using baseline and follow-up data; reach, implementation and maintenance were assessed using follow-up data only. For categorical data, Chi square tests were conducted to assess differences between surveys or groups. Continuous data were analysed to test for significant differences using a Mann-Whitney U test. Telephone interviews were conducted with the lead organisation co-ordinator, eight walking champions and three business representatives at follow-up. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed to identify key themes related to adoption, implementation and maintenance. Results Adoption: Five workplaces participated in Walking Works. Reach: 480 (52.3% employees were aware of activities and 221 (24.1% participated. Implementation: A variety of walking activities were delivered. Some programme components were not delivered as planned which was partly due to barriers in using walking champions to deliver activities. These included the walking champions’ capacity, skills, support needs, ability to engage senior management, and the number and type of activities they could deliver. Other barriers included lack of management support, difficulties communicating information about activities and challenges embedding the programme into normal business activities. Effectiveness: No significant changes in walking to

  14. Spatial search by quantum walk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, Andrew M.; Goldstone, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Grover's quantum search algorithm provides a way to speed up combinatorial search, but is not directly applicable to searching a physical database. Nevertheless, Aaronson and Ambainis showed that a database of N items laid out in d spatial dimensions can be searched in time of order √(N) for d>2, and in time of order √(N) poly(log N) for d=2. We consider an alternative search algorithm based on a continuous-time quantum walk on a graph. The case of the complete graph gives the continuous-time search algorithm of Farhi and Gutmann, and other previously known results can be used to show that √(N) speedup can also be achieved on the hypercube. We show that full √(N) speedup can be achieved on a d-dimensional periodic lattice for d>4. In d=4, the quantum walk search algorithm takes time of order √(N) poly(log N), and in d<4, the algorithm does not provide substantial speedup

  15. Walking, sustainability and health: findings from a study of a Walking for Health group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Gordon; Machaczek, Kasia; Pollard, Nick; Allmark, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Not only is it tacitly understood that walking is good for health and well-being but there is also now robust evidence to support this link. There is also growing evidence that regular short walks can be a protective factor for a range of long-term health conditions. Walking in the countryside can bring additional benefits, but access to the countryside brings complexities, especially for people with poorer material resources and from different ethnic communities. Reasons for people taking up walking as a physical activity are reasonably well understood, but factors linked to sustained walking, and therefore sustained benefit, are not. Based on an ethnographic study of a Walking for Health group in Lincolnshire, UK, this paper considers the motivations and rewards of group walks for older people. Nineteen members of the walking group, almost all with long-term conditions, took part in tape-recorded interviews about the personal benefits of walking. The paper provides insights into the links between walking as a sustainable activity and health, and why a combination of personal adaptive capacities, design elements of the walks and relational achievements of the walking group are important to this understanding. The paper concludes with some observations about the need to reframe conventional thinking about adherence to physical activity programmes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Recycling energy to restore impaired ankle function during human walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven H Collins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Humans normally dissipate significant energy during walking, largely at the transitions between steps. The ankle then acts to restore energy during push-off, which may be the reason that ankle impairment nearly always leads to poorer walking economy. The replacement of lost energy is necessary for steady gait, in which mechanical energy is constant on average, external dissipation is negligible, and no net work is performed over a stride. However, dissipation and replacement by muscles might not be necessary if energy were instead captured and reused by an assistive device. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a microprocessor-controlled artificial foot that captures some of the energy that is normally dissipated by the leg and "recycles" it as positive ankle work. In tests on subjects walking with an artificially-impaired ankle, a conventional prosthesis reduced ankle push-off work and increased net metabolic energy expenditure by 23% compared to normal walking. Energy recycling restored ankle push-off to normal and reduced the net metabolic energy penalty to 14%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that reduced ankle push-off contributes to the increased metabolic energy expenditure accompanying ankle impairments, and demonstrate that energy recycling can be used to reduce such cost.

  17. Fast visual prediction and slow optimization of preferred walking speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Shawn M; Donelan, J Maxwell

    2012-05-01

    People prefer walking speeds that minimize energetic cost. This may be accomplished by directly sensing metabolic rate and adapting gait to minimize it, but only slowly due to the compounded effects of sensing delays and iterative convergence. Visual and other sensory information is available more rapidly and could help predict which gait changes reduce energetic cost, but only approximately because it relies on prior experience and an indirect means to achieve economy. We used virtual reality to manipulate visually presented speed while 10 healthy subjects freely walked on a self-paced treadmill to test whether the nervous system beneficially combines these two mechanisms. Rather than manipulating the speed of visual flow directly, we coupled it to the walking speed selected by the subject and then manipulated the ratio between these two speeds. We then quantified the dynamics of walking speed adjustments in response to perturbations of the visual speed. For step changes in visual speed, subjects responded with rapid speed adjustments (lasting 300 s). The timing and direction of these responses strongly indicate that a rapid predictive process informed by visual feedback helps select preferred speed, perhaps to complement a slower optimization process that seeks to minimize energetic cost.

  18. Walking performance: correlation between energy cost of walking and walking participation. new statistical approach concerning outcome measurement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Franceschini

    Full Text Available Walking ability, though important for quality of life and participation in social and economic activities, can be adversely affected by neurological disorders, such as Spinal Cord Injury, Stroke, Multiple Sclerosis or Traumatic Brain Injury. The aim of this study is to evaluate if the energy cost of walking (CW, in a mixed group of chronic patients with neurological diseases almost 6 months after discharge from rehabilitation wards, can predict the walking performance and any walking restriction on community activities, as indicated by Walking Handicap Scale categories (WHS. One hundred and seven subjects were included in the study, 31 suffering from Stroke, 26 from Spinal Cord Injury and 50 from Multiple Sclerosis. The multivariable binary logistical regression analysis has produced a statistical model with good characteristics of fit and good predictability. This model generated a cut-off value of.40, which enabled us to classify correctly the cases with a percentage of 85.0%. Our research reveal that, in our subjects, CW is the only predictor of the walking performance of in the community, to be compared with the score of WHS. We have been also identifying a cut-off value of CW cost, which makes a distinction between those who can walk in the community and those who cannot do it. In particular, these values could be used to predict the ability to walk in the community when discharged from the rehabilitation units, and to adjust the rehabilitative treatment to improve the performance.

  19. Walking performance and muscle strength in the later stage poststroke: a nonlinear relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cristiane; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S; Willén, Carin

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the relation between muscle strength in the lower extremities and walking performance (speed and distance) in subjects in the later stage poststroke and to compare this with normative data. A cross-sectional observational study. University hospital department. Subjects poststroke (n=41; 31 men, 10 women) with a mean age of 59±5.8 years and a time from stroke onset of 52±36 months were evaluated. An urban sample (n=144) of 40- to 79-year-olds (69 men, 75 women) formed the healthy reference group. Not applicable. Muscle strength in the lower extremities was measured with an isokinetic dynamometer and combined into a strength index. Values for the 30-meter walk test for self-selected and maximum speed and the 6-minute walk test were measured. A nonlinear regression model was used. The average strength index was 730±309 in the subjects after stroke compared with 1112±362 in the healthy group. A nonlinear relation between walking performance and muscle strength was evident. The model explained 37% of the variance in self-selected speed in the stroke group and 20% in the healthy group, and 63% and 38%, respectively, in the maximum walking speed. For the 6-minute walk test, the model explained 44% of the variance in the stroke group. Subjects in the later stage poststroke were weaker than the healthy reference group, and their weakness was associated with walking performance. At the same strength index, subjects walked at lower speeds and shorter distances after stroke, indicating that there are multiple impairments that affect walking ability. Treatments focused on increasing muscle strength thus continue to hold promise. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Walking Distance as a Predictor of Falls in People With Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsagård, Ylva; Westerdahl, Elisabeth; Wittrin, Anna; Gunnarsson, Martin

    2016-06-01

    People with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) experience falls, usually when walking and transferring. The aim was to investigate if walking distance and patient overestimate of walking distance are predictors of falls in PwMS. A prospective study was conducted, with a single test occasion followed by prospective registration of falls for 3 months. All PwMS in Region Örebro County with a previously registered Expanded Disability Status Scale score between 3.0 and 7.0 in the Swedish MS Registry were invited to participate (n = 149). Altogether, data from 49 PwMS being relapse free for at least 3 months and with a confirmed Expanded Disability Status Scale between 1.5 and 7.0 upon study entry were analysed. Twenty-two PwMS (45%) fell during the study period, providing information of 66 falls. Walking distance or overestimate of one's walking distance, as compared with test results, did not predict falls in this MS sample. Walking and standing activities are associated with numerous falls in PwMS. Our data do not clearly support routine measurements of walking distance in assessing individual fall risk. © 2015 The Authors. Physiotherapy Research International published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2015 The Authors. Physiotherapy Research International published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Using GPS, accelerometry and heart rate to predict outdoor graded walking energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Müllenheim, P-Y; Chaudru, S; Emily, M; Gernigon, M; Mahé, G; Bickert, S; Prioux, J; Noury-Desvaux, B; Le Faucheur, A

    2018-02-01

    To determine the best method and combination of methods among global positioning system (GPS), accelerometry, and heart rate (HR) for estimating energy expenditure (EE) during level and graded outdoor walking. Thirty adults completed 6-min outdoor walks at speeds of 2.0, 3.5, and 5.0kmh -1 during three randomized outdoor walking sessions: one level walking session and two graded (uphill and downhill) walking sessions on a 3.4% and a 10.4% grade. EE was measured using a portable metabolic system (K4b 2 ). Participants wore a GlobalSat ® DG100 GPS receiver, an ActiGraph™ wGT3X+ accelerometer, and a Polar ® HR monitor. Linear mixed models (LMMs) were tested for EE predictions based on GPS speed and grade, accelerometer counts or HR-related parameters (alone and combined). Root-mean-square error (RMSE) was used to determine the accuracy of the models. Published speed/grade-, count-, and HR-based equations were also cross-validated. According to the LMMs, GPS was as accurate as accelerometry (RMSE=0.89-0.90kcalmin -1 ) and more accurate than HR (RMSE=1.20kcalmin -1 ) for estimating EE during level walking; GPS was the most accurate method for estimating EE during both level and uphill (RMSE=1.34kcalmin -1 )/downhill (RMSE=0.84kcalmin -1 ) walking; combining methods did not increase the accuracy reached using GPS (or accelerometry for level walking). The cross-validation results were in accordance with the LMMs, except for downhill walking. Our study provides useful information regarding the best method(s) for estimating EE with appropriate equations during level and graded outdoor walking. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Does moderate-to-high intensity Nordic walking improve functional capacity and pain in fibromyalgia? A prospective randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa; Nordeman, Lena; Cider, ?sa; Jonsson, Gunilla

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of moderate-to-high intensity Nordic walking (NW) on functional capacity and pain in fibromyalgia (FM). Methods A total of 67 women with FM were recruited to the study and randomized either to moderate-to-high intensity Nordic Walking (n = 34, age 48 ? 7.8 years) or to a control group engaging in supervised low-intensity walking (LIW, n = 33, age 50 ? 7.6 years). Primary outcomes were the six-minute walk test (6MWT) and t...

  3. Human-like Walking with Compliant Legs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L.C.; de Geus, Wouter; Stramigioli, Stefano; Carloni, Raffaella

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a novel approach to robotic bipedal walking. Based on the bipedal spring-mass model, which is known to closely describe human-like walking behavior, a robot has been designed that approaches the ideal model as closely as possible. The compliance of the springs is controllable by

  4. Rhythmic walking interaction with auditory feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maculewicz, Justyna; Jylhä, Antti; Serafin, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    We present an interactive auditory display for walking with sinusoidal tones or ecological, physically-based synthetic walking sounds. The feedback is either step-based or rhythmic, with constant or adaptive tempo. In a tempo-following experiment, we investigate different interaction modes...

  5. Chinese City Children and Youth's Walking Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Minghui; Chen, Peijie; Zhuang, Jie; Wang, Chao

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Although walking has been demonstrated as one of the best forms for promoting physical activity (PA), little is known about Chinese city children and youth's walking behavior. The purpose of this study was therefore to assess ambulatory PA behavior of Chinese city children and youth. Method: The daily steps of 2,751 children and youth…

  6. Non-Markovian decoherent quantum walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Peng; Zhang Yong-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Quantum walks act in obviously different ways from their classical counterparts, but decoherence will lessen and close this gap between them. To understand this process, it is necessary to investigate the evolution of quantum walks under different decoherence situations. In this article, we study a non-Markovian decoherent quantum walk on a line. In a short time regime, the behavior of the walk deviates from both ideal quantum walks and classical random walks. The position variance as a measure of the quantum walk collapses and revives for a short time, and tends to have a linear relation with time. That is, the walker's behavior shows a diffusive spread over a long time limit, which is caused by non-Markovian dephasing affecting the quantum correlations between the quantum walker and his coin. We also study both quantum discord and measurement-induced disturbance as measures of the quantum correlations, and observe both collapse and revival in the short time regime, and the tendency to be zero in the long time limit. Therefore, quantum walks with non-Markovian decoherence tend to have diffusive spreading behavior over long time limits, while in the short time regime they oscillate between ballistic and diffusive spreading behavior, and the quantum correlation collapses and revives due to the memory effect

  7. Cognitive Resource Demands of Redirected Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Gerd; Lubas, Paul; Steinicke, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Redirected walking allows users to walk through a large-scale immersive virtual environment (IVE) while physically remaining in a reasonably small workspace. Therefore, manipulations are applied to virtual camera motions so that the user's self-motion in the virtual world differs from movements in the real world. Previous work found that the human perceptual system tolerates a certain amount of inconsistency between proprioceptive, vestibular and visual sensation in IVEs, and even compensates for slight discrepancies with recalibrated motor commands. Experiments showed that users are not able to detect an inconsistency if their physical path is bent with a radius of at least 22 meters during virtual straightforward movements. If redirected walking is applied in a smaller workspace, manipulations become noticeable, but users are still able to move through a potentially infinitely large virtual world by walking. For this semi-natural form of locomotion, the question arises if such manipulations impose cognitive demands on the user, which may compete with other tasks in IVEs for finite cognitive resources. In this article we present an experiment in which we analyze the mutual influence between redirected walking and verbal as well as spatial working memory tasks using a dual-tasking method. The results show an influence of redirected walking on verbal as well as spatial working memory tasks, and we also found an effect of cognitive tasks on walking behavior. We discuss the implications and provide guidelines for using redirected walking in virtual reality laboratories.

  8. Random Walks with Anti-Correlated Steps

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Dirk; Noga, John

    2005-01-01

    We conjecture the expected value of random walks with anti-correlated steps to be exactly 1. We support this conjecture with 2 plausibility arguments and experimental data. The experimental analysis includes the computation of the expected values of random walks for steps up to 22. The result shows the expected value asymptotically converging to 1.

  9. Brownian Optimal Stopping and Random Walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamberton, D.

    2002-01-01

    One way to compute the value function of an optimal stopping problem along Brownian paths consists of approximating Brownian motion by a random walk. We derive error estimates for this type of approximation under various assumptions on the distribution of the approximating random walk

  10. Hopeless love and other lattice walks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeff, T.; Verhoeff, Koos; Swart, David; Séquin, Carlo H.; Fenyvesi, Kristóf

    The Hopeless Love theme arose from observations about chess bishops and their walks on the chessboard. In chess, there are two types of bishops: one confined to the white squares and the other to the black squares. If two bishops of opposite type fall in love, then they can walk around each other,

  11. Identifying particular places through experimental walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Schultz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Experimental walking can be used to identify particular places, design strategies and spatial visions for urban landscapes. Walking designers can explore sites and, in particular, their temporal dynamics and atmospheric particularities – both essential elements in making particular places. This article illustrates the benefits of this method, using the changing German city of Freiburg as an example.

  12. The environmental benefits of bicycling and walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Bicycling and walking are the two major non-fuel-consuming, non-polluting : forms of transportation in the United States. Millions of Americans ride : bicycles and/or walk for a wide variety of purposes --- commuting to work, as : part of their job, ...

  13. Metronome rate and walking foot contact time in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickstein, Ruth; Plax, Michael

    2012-02-01

    It is assumed that when people walk guided by an audible constant rate, they match foot contact to the external pace. The purpose of this preliminary study was to test that assumption by examining the temporal relationship between audible signals generated by a metronome and foot contact time during gait. Ten healthy young women were tested in walking repetitions guided by metronome rates of 60, 110, and 150 beats/min. Metronome beats and foot contact times were collected in real time. The findings indicated that foot contact was not fully synchronized with the auditory signals; the shortest time interval between the metronome beat and foot contact time was at the prescribed rate of 60 beats/min., while the longest interval was at the rate of 150 beats/min. The correlation between left and right foot contact times was highest with the slowest rate and lowest with the fastest rate.

  14. Walking in Place Through Virtual Worlds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Chr.; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Immersive virtual reality (IVR) is seemingly on the verge of entering the homes of consumers. Enabling users to walk through virtual worlds in a limited physical space presents a challenge. With an outset in a taxonomy of virtual travel techniques, we argue that Walking-in-Place (WIP) techniques...... constitute a promising approach to virtual walking in relation to consumer IVR. Subsequently we review existing approaches to WIP locomotion and highlight the need for a more explicit focus on the perceived naturalness of WIP techniques; i.e., the degree to which WIP locomotion feels like real walking....... Finally, we summarize work we have performed in order to produce more natural WIP locomotion and present unexplored topics which need to be address if WIP techniques are to provide perceptually natural walking experiences....

  15. Quantum walk with one variable absorbing boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Feiran; Zhang, Pei; Wang, Yunlong; Liu, Ruifeng; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2017-01-01

    Quantum walks constitute a promising ingredient in the research on quantum algorithms; consequently, exploring different types of quantum walks is of great significance for quantum information and quantum computation. In this study, we investigate the progress of quantum walks with a variable absorbing boundary and provide an analytical solution for the escape probability (the probability of a walker that is not absorbed by the boundary). We simulate the behavior of escape probability under different conditions, including the reflection coefficient, boundary location, and initial state. Moreover, it is also meaningful to extend our research to the situation of continuous-time and high-dimensional quantum walks. - Highlights: • A novel scheme about quantum walk with variable boundary is proposed. • The analytical results of the survival probability from the absorbing boundary. • The behavior of survival probability under different boundary conditions. • The influence of different initial coin states on the survival probability.

  16. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Wang, Jingbo B.; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-01-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor. PMID:27146471

  17. Exploring topological phases with quantum walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Takuya; Rudner, Mark S.; Berg, Erez; Demler, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    The quantum walk was originally proposed as a quantum-mechanical analog of the classical random walk, and has since become a powerful tool in quantum information science. In this paper, we show that discrete-time quantum walks provide a versatile platform for studying topological phases, which are currently the subject of intense theoretical and experimental investigations. In particular, we demonstrate that recent experimental realizations of quantum walks with cold atoms, photons, and ions simulate a nontrivial one-dimensional topological phase. With simple modifications, the quantum walk can be engineered to realize all of the topological phases, which have been classified in one and two dimensions. We further discuss the existence of robust edge modes at phase boundaries, which provide experimental signatures for the nontrivial topological character of the system.

  18. The effects of free-living interval-walking training on glycemic control, body composition, and physical fitness in type 2 diabetic patients: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstoft, Kristian; Winding, Kamilla; Knudsen, Sine H; Nielsen, Jens S; Thomsen, Carsten; Pedersen, Bente K; Solomon, Thomas P J

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of free-living walking training in type 2 diabetic patients and to investigate the effects of interval-walking training versus continuous-walking training upon physical fitness, body composition, and glycemic control. Subjects with type 2 diabetes were randomized to a control (n = 8), continuous-walking (n = 12), or interval-walking group (n = 12). Training groups were prescribed five sessions per week (60 min/session) and were controlled with an accelerometer and a heart-rate monitor. Continuous walkers performed all training at moderate intensity, whereas interval walkers alternated 3-min repetitions at low and high intensity. Before and after the 4-month intervention, the following variables were measured: VO(2)max, body composition, and glycemic control (fasting glucose, HbA(1c), oral glucose tolerance test, and continuous glucose monitoring [CGM]). Training adherence was high (89 ± 4%), and training energy expenditure and mean intensity were comparable. VO(2)max increased 16.1 ± 3.7% in the interval-walking group (P Body mass and adiposity (fat mass and visceral fat) decreased in the interval-walking group only (P interval-walking group. The continuous walkers showed no changes in glycemic control. Free-living walking training is feasible in type 2 diabetic patients. Continuous walking offsets the deterioration in glycemia seen in the control group, and interval walking is superior to energy expenditure-matched continuous walking for improving physical fitness, body composition, and glycemic control.

  19. Effects of walking and strength training on walking capacity in individuals with claudication: meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra de Souza Miranda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Over the past few years, several clinical trials have been performed to analyze the effects of exercise training on walking ability in patients with intermittent claudication (IC. However, it remains unclear which type of physical exercise provides the maximum benefits in terms of walking ability. OBJECTIVE: To analyze, by means of a meta-analysis, the effects of walking and strength training on the walking capacity in patients with IC. METHODS: Papers analyzing the effects of walking and strength training programs in patients with IC were browsed on the Medline, Lilacs, and Cochrane databases. Randomized clinical trials scoring >4 on the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro scale and assessing claudication distance (CD and total walking distance (TWD were included in the review. RESULTS: Walking and strength training yielded increases in CD and TWD (P < 0.05. However, walking training yielded greater increases than strength training (P = 0.02. CONCLUSION: Walking and strength training improve walking capacity in patients with IC. However, greater improvements in TWD are obtained with walking training.

  20. Biomechanical parameters in lower limbs during natural walking and Nordic walking at different speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziuba, Alicja K; Żurek, Grzegorz; Garrard, Ian; Wierzbicka-Damska, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Nordic Walking (NW) is a sport that has a number of benefits as a rehabilitation method. It is performed with specially designed poles and has been often recommended as a physical activity that helps reduce the load to limbs. However, some studies have suggested that these findings might be erroneous. The aim of this paper was to compare the kinematic, kinetic and dynamic parameters of lower limbs between Natural Walking (W) and Nordic Walking (NW) at both low and high walking speeds. The study used a registration system, BTS Smart software and Kistler platform. Eleven subjects walked along a 15-metre path at low (below 2 m⋅s-1) and high (over 2 m⋅s-1) walking speeds. The Davis model was employed for calculations of kinematic, kinetic and dynamic parameters of lower limbs. With constant speed, the support given by Nordic Walking poles does not make the stroke longer and there is no change in pelvic rotation either. The only change observed was much bigger pelvic anteversion in the sagittal plane during fast NW. There were no changes in forces, power and muscle torques in lower limbs. The study found no differences in kinematic, kinetic and dynamic parameters between Natural Walking (W) and Nordic Walking (NW). Higher speeds generate greater ground reaction forces and muscle torques in lower limbs. Gait parameters depend on walking speed rather than on walking style.

  1. Kinematic and ground reaction force accommodation during weighted walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, C Roger; Atkins, Lee T; Yang, Hyung Suk; Dufek, Janet S; Bates, Barry T

    2015-12-01

    Weighted walking is a functional activity common in daily life and can influence risks for musculoskeletal loading, injury and falling. Much information exists about weighted walking during military, occupational and recreational tasks, but less is known about strategies used to accommodate to weight carriage typical in daily life. The purposes of the study were to examine the effects of weight carriage on kinematics and peak ground reaction force (GRF) during walking, and explore relationships between these variables. Twenty subjects walked on a treadmill while carrying 0, 44.5 and 89 N weights in front of the body. Peak GRF, sagittal plane joint/segment angular kinematics, stride length and center of mass (COM) vertical displacement were measured. Changes in peak GRF and displacement variables between weight conditions represented accommodation. Effects of weight carriage were tested using analysis of variance. Relationships between peak GRF and kinematic accommodation variables were examined using correlation and regression. Subjects were classified into sub-groups based on peak GRF responses and the correlation analysis was repeated. Weight carriage increased peak GRF by an amount greater than the weight carried, decreased stride length, increased vertical COM displacement, and resulted in a more extended and upright posture, with less hip and trunk displacement during weight acceptance. A GRF increase was associated with decreases in hip extension (|r|=.53, p=.020) and thigh anterior rotation (|r|=.57, p=.009) displacements, and an increase in foot anterior rotation displacement (|r|=.58, p=.008). Sub-group analysis revealed that greater GRF increases were associated with changes at multiple sites, while lesser GRF increases were associated with changes in foot and trunk displacement. Weight carriage affected walking kinematics and revealed different accommodation strategies that could have implications for loading and stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B

  2. Walking on high heels changes muscle activity and the dynamics of human walking significantly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Nørreslet, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the distribution of net joint moments in the lower extremities during walking on high-heeled shoes compared with barefooted walking at identical speed. Fourteen female subjects walked at 4 km/h across three force platforms while they were filmed by five...... digital video cameras operating at 50 frames/second. Both barefooted walking and walking on high-heeled shoes (heel height: 9 cm) were recorded. Net joint moments were calculated by 3D inverse dynamics. EMG was recorded from eight leg muscles. The knee extensor moment peak in the first half of the stance...... phase was doubled when walking on high heels. The knee joint angle showed that high-heeled walking caused the subjects to flex the knee joint significantly more in the first half of the stance phase. In the frontal plane a significant increase was observed in the knee joint abductor moment and the hip...

  3. Random walks on reductive groups

    CERN Document Server

    Benoist, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The classical theory of Random Walks describes the asymptotic behavior of sums of independent identically distributed random real variables. This book explains the generalization of this theory to products of independent identically distributed random matrices with real coefficients. Under the assumption that the action of the matrices is semisimple – or, equivalently, that the Zariski closure of the group generated by these matrices is reductive - and under suitable moment assumptions, it is shown that the norm of the products of such random matrices satisfies a number of classical probabilistic laws. This book includes necessary background on the theory of reductive algebraic groups, probability theory and operator theory, thereby providing a modern introduction to the topic.

  4. Chemical Continuous Time Random Walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, T.; Dentz, M.

    2017-12-01

    Traditional methods for modeling solute transport through heterogeneous media employ Eulerian schemes to solve for solute concentration. More recently, Lagrangian methods have removed the need for spatial discretization through the use of Monte Carlo implementations of Langevin equations for solute particle motions. While there have been recent advances in modeling chemically reactive transport with recourse to Lagrangian methods, these remain less developed than their Eulerian counterparts, and many open problems such as efficient convergence and reconstruction of the concentration field remain. We explore a different avenue and consider the question: In heterogeneous chemically reactive systems, is it possible to describe the evolution of macroscopic reactant concentrations without explicitly resolving the spatial transport? Traditional Kinetic Monte Carlo methods, such as the Gillespie algorithm, model chemical reactions as random walks in particle number space, without the introduction of spatial coordinates. The inter-reaction times are exponentially distributed under the assumption that the system is well mixed. In real systems, transport limitations lead to incomplete mixing and decreased reaction efficiency. We introduce an arbitrary inter-reaction time distribution, which may account for the impact of incomplete mixing. This process defines an inhomogeneous continuous time random walk in particle number space, from which we derive a generalized chemical Master equation and formulate a generalized Gillespie algorithm. We then determine the modified chemical rate laws for different inter-reaction time distributions. We trace Michaelis-Menten-type kinetics back to finite-mean delay times, and predict time-nonlocal macroscopic reaction kinetics as a consequence of broadly distributed delays. Non-Markovian kinetics exhibit weak ergodicity breaking and show key features of reactions under local non-equilibrium.

  5. Evaluation of the Dogs, Physical Activity, and Walking (Dogs PAW) Intervention: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Elizabeth A; Ogata, Niwako; Cheng, Ching-Wei

    2016-01-01

    To facilitate physical activity (PA) adoption and maintenance, promotion of innovative population-level strategies that focus on incorporating moderate-intensity lifestyle PAs are needed. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the Dogs, Physical Activity, and Walking intervention, a 3-month, social cognitive theory (SCT), e-mail-based PA intervention. In a longitudinal, repeated-measures design, 49 dog owners were randomly assigned to a control (n = 25) or intervention group (n = 24). The intervention group received e-mail messages (twice weekly for 4 weeks and weekly for 8 weeks) designed to influence SCT constructs of self-efficacy, self-regulation, outcome expectations and expectancies, and social support. At baseline and every 3 months through 1 year, participants completed self-reported questionnaires of individual, interpersonal, and PA variables. Linear mixed models were used to assess for significant differences in weekly minutes of dog walking and theoretical constructs between groups (intervention and control) across time. To test self-efficacy as a mediator of social support for dog walking, tests for mediation were conducted using the bootstrapping technique. With the exception of Month 9, participants in the intervention group accumulated significantly more weekly minutes of dog walking than the control group. On average, the intervention group accumulated 58.4 more minutes (SD = 18.1) of weekly dog walking than the control group (p dog walking. Results indicate that a simple SCT-based e-mail intervention is effective in increasing and maintaining an increase in dog walking among dog owners at 12-month follow-up. In light of these findings, it may be advantageous to design dog walking interventions that focus on increasing self-efficacy for dog walking by fostering social support.

  6. Real-time feedback enhances forward propulsion during walking in old adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Jason R; Maletis, Michela; Kram, Rodger

    2014-01-01

    Reduced propulsive function during the push-off phase of walking plays a central role in the deterioration of walking ability with age. We used real-time propulsive feedback to test the hypothesis that old adults have an underutilized propulsive reserve available during walking. 8 old adults (mean [SD], age: 72.1 [3.9] years) and 11 young adults (age: 21.0 [1.5] years) participated. For our primary aim, old subjects walked: 1) normally, 2) with visual feedback of their peak propulsive ground reaction forces, and 3) with visual feedback of their medial gastrocnemius electromyographic activity during push-off. We asked those subjects to match a target set to 20% and 40% greater propulsive force or push-off muscle activity than normal walking. We tested young subjects walking normally only to provide reference ground reaction force values. Walking normally, old adults exerted 12.5% smaller peak propulsive forces than young adults (Ppush-off muscle activities when we provided propulsive feedback. Most notably, force feedback elicited propulsive forces that were equal to or 10.5% greater than those of young adults (+20% target, P=0.87; +40% target, P=0.02). With electromyographic feedback, old adults significantly increased their push-off muscle activities but without increasing their propulsive forces. Old adults with propulsive deficits have a considerable and underutilized propulsive reserve available during level walking. Further, real-time propulsive feedback represents a promising therapeutic strategy to improve the forward propulsion of old adults and thus maintain their walking ability and independence. © 2013.

  7. Motor fatigue measurement by distance-induced slow down of walking speed in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémy Phan-Ba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE: Motor fatigue and ambulation impairment are prominent clinical features of people with multiple sclerosis (pMS. We hypothesized that a multimodal and comparative assessment of walking speed on short and long distance would allow a better delineation and quantification of gait fatigability in pMS. Our objectives were to compare 4 walking paradigms: the timed 25-foot walk (T25FW, a corrected version of the T25FW with dynamic start (T25FW(+, the timed 100-meter walk (T100MW and the timed 500-meter walk (T500MW. METHODS: Thirty controls and 81 pMS performed the 4 walking tests in a single study visit. RESULTS: The 4 walking tests were performed with a slower WS in pMS compared to controls even in subgroups with minimal disability. The finishing speed of the last 100-meter of the T500MW was the slowest measurable WS whereas the T25FW(+ provided the fastest measurable WS. The ratio between such slowest and fastest WS (Deceleration Index, DI was significantly lower only in pMS with EDSS 4.0-6.0, a pyramidal or cerebellar functional system score reaching 3 or a maximum reported walking distance ≤ 4000 m. CONCLUSION: The motor fatigue which triggers gait deceleration over a sustained effort in pMS can be measured by the WS ratio between performances on a very short distance and the finishing pace on a longer more demanding task. The absolute walking speed is abnormal early in MS whatever the distance of effort when patients are unaware of ambulation impairment. In contrast, the DI-measured ambulation fatigability appears to take place later in the disease course.

  8. The efficacy of the Ankle Mimicking Prosthetic Foot prototype 4.0 during walking: Physiological determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pauw, Kevin; Cherelle, Pierre; Roelands, Bart; Lefeber, Dirk; Meeusen, Romain

    2018-04-01

    Evaluating the effectiveness of a novel prosthetic device during walking is an important step in product development. To investigate the efficacy of a novel quasi-passive ankle prosthetic device, Ankle Mimicking Prosthetic Foot 4.0, during walking at different speeds, using physiological determinants in transtibial and transfemoral amputees. Nonrandomized crossover design for amputees. Six able-bodied subjects, six unilateral transtibial amputees, and six unilateral transfemoral amputees underwent a 6-min walk test at normal speed, followed by series of 2-min walking at slow, normal, and fast speeds. The intensity of effort and subjective measures were determined. Amputees performed all walking tests on a treadmill with current and novel prostheses. Shapiro-Wilk normality tests and parametric and nonparametric tests were conducted (p 4.0 is a novel quasi-passive ankle prosthesis with state-of-the-art technological parts. Subjective measures show the importance of this technology, but the intensity of effort during walking still remains higher compared to current passive prostheses, especially in transfemoral amputees.

  9. Performed and perceived walking ability in relation to the Expanded Disability Status Scale in persons with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langeskov-Christensen, D; Feys, P; Baert, I

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The severity of walking impairment in persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) at different levels on the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) is unclear. Furthermore, it is unclear if the EDSS is differently related to performed- and perceived walking capacity tests. AIMS: To quantify...

  10. Random walk theory and exchange rate dynamics in transition economies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gradojević Nikola

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the validity of the random walk theory in the Euro-Serbian dinar exchange rate market. We apply Andrew Lo and Archie MacKinlay's (1988 conventional variance ratio test and Jonathan Wright's (2000 non-parametric ranks and signs based variance ratio tests to the daily Euro/Serbian dinar exchange rate returns using the data from January 2005 - December 2008. Both types of variance ratio tests overwhelmingly reject the random walk hypothesis over the data span. To assess the robustness of our findings, we examine the forecasting performance of a non-linear, nonparametric model in the spirit of Francis Diebold and James Nason (1990 and find that it is able to significantly improve upon the random walk model, thus confirming the existence of foreign exchange market imperfections in a small transition economy such as Serbia. In the last part of the paper, we conduct a comparative study on how our results relate to those of other transition economies in the region.

  11. Neighborhood preference, walkability and walking in overweight/obese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Gregory J; Carlson, Jordan A; O'Mara, Stephanie; Sallis, James F; Patrick, Kevin; Frank, Lawrence D; Godbole, Suneeta V

    2013-03-01

    To investigate whether self-selection moderated the effects of walkability on walking in overweight and obese men. 240 overweight and obese men completed measures on importance of walkability when choosing a neighborhood (selection) and preference for walkable features in general (preference). IPAQ measured walking. A walkbility index was derived from geographic information systems (GIS). Walkability was associated with walking for transportation (p = .027) and neighborhood selection was associated with walking for transportation (p = .002) and total walking (p = .001). Preference was associated with leisure walking (p = .045) and preference moderated the relationship between walkability and total walking (p = .059). Walkability and self-selection are both important to walking behavior.

  12. Effect of Music Tempo on Attentional Focus and Perceived Exertion during Self-selected Paced Walking

    OpenAIRE

    SILVA, ALDO COELHO; DOS SANTOS FERREIRA, SANDRO; ALVES, RAGAMI CHAVES; FOLLADOR, LUCIO; DA SILVA, SERGIO GREGORIO

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of music on the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and attentional focus during walking at a self-selected pace. Fifteen overweight and obese women volunteered to participate in the study. They underwent four sessions: the first for incremental maximal test and anthropometric measurement followed by three experimental sessions. After the first session, they were exposed to three 30-minute walking sessions at a self-selected pace in a counterbalanced order...

  13. The influence of water depth on kinematic and spatiotemporal gait parameters during aquatic treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Taeyou; Kim, Yumi; Lim, Hyosok; Vrongistinos, Konstantinos

    2018-01-16

    The purpose of this study was to investigate kinematic and spatiotemporal variables of aquatic treadmill walking at three different water depths. A total of 15 healthy individuals completed three two-minute walking trials at three different water depths. The aquatic treadmill walking was conducted at waist-depth, chest-depth and neck-depth, while a customised 3-D underwater motion analysis system captured their walking. Each participant's self-selected walking speed at the waist level was used as a reference speed, which was applied to the remaining two test conditions. A repeated measures ANOVA showed statistically significant differences among the three walking conditions in stride length, cadence, peak hip extension, hip range of motion (ROM), peak ankle plantar flexion and ankle ROM (All p values hip ROM as the water depth rose from waist and chest to the neck level. However, our study found no significant difference between waist and chest level water in all variables. Hydrodynamics, such as buoyancy and drag force, in response to changes in water depths, can affect gait patterns during aquatic treadmill walking.

  14. Walking With Death, Walking With Science, Walking With Living: Philosophical Praxis and Happiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Gray

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the consequences of acknowledging that we are the dead walking with the dead. I argue that if we take the view that life frames death, rather than the view that death frames life, then we must refigure our living as ethical creatures. Using Aristotle's notion that we become virtuous by practising virtue, I argue that happiness, thought of in terms of ethical living, should temper our attitude to death as the inevitable end we must all encounter. Acknowledgement of our dying and our death enhances the ethical imperative to live virtuously and to promote human flourishing. I adopt a Buddhist reading of death and dying to interpret the Aristotelian perspective.

  15. Walking With Death, Walking With Science, Walking With Living: Philosophical Praxis and Happiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Gray

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the consequences of acknowledging that we are the dead walking with the dead. I argue that if we take the view that life frames death, rather than the view that death frames life, then we must refigure our living as ethical creatures. Using Aristotle's notion that we become virtuous by practising virtue, I argue that happiness, thought of in terms of ethical living, should temper our attitude to death as the inevitable end we must all encounter. Acknowledgement of our dying and our death enhances the ethical imperative to live virtuously and to promote human flourishing. I adopt a Buddhist reading of death and dying to interpret the Aristotelian perspective.

  16. Straight and Curved Path Walking Among Older Adults in Primary Care: Associations With Fall-Related Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Sarah A; Ward, Rachel E; Kurlinski, Laura A; Kiely, Dan K; Goldstein, Richard; VanSwearingen, Jessie; Brach, Jennifer S; Bean, Jonathan F

    2016-08-01

    Most falls among community-dwelling older adults occur while walking. Simple walking tests that require little resources and can be interpreted quickly are advocated as useful screening tools for fall prone patients. To investigate 2 clinically feasible walking tests consisting of straight- and curved-path walking and examine their associations with history of previous falls and fall-related outcomes among community-living older adults. A cross-sectional analysis was performed on baseline data from a longitudinal cohort study. Participants were recruited through primary care practices. Participants included 428 primary care patients ≥65 years of age at risk for mobility decline. Participants had a median age of 76.5 years, 67.8% were women, and 82.5% were white. Straight-path walking performance was measured as the time needed to walk a 4-meter straight path at usual pace from standstill using a stopwatch (timed to 0.1 second). Curved-path walking performance was timed while participants walked from standstill in a figure-of-8 pattern around two cones placed 5 feet apart. Multivariable negative binomial regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between straight-path walking or curved-path walking and self-reported history of number of falls. For fall-related injuries, and fall-related hospitalizations, logistic regression models were used. In the fully adjusted model, an increase of 1 second in straight path walking time was associated with 26% greater rate of falls (rate ratio 1.26, 95% confidence interval 1.10-1.45). An increase in curved-path walking time was associated with 8% greater rate of falls (rate ratio 1.08, 95% confidence interval = 1.03-1.14). Neither walk test was associated with history of fall-related injuries or hospitalizations. Poor performance on straight- and curved-path walking performance was associated with a history of greater fall rates in the previous year but not with a history of fall-related injuries or

  17. Do MENA stock market returns follow a random walk process?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Lahmiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, three variance ratio tests: the standard variance ratio test, the wild bootstrap multiple variance ratio test, and the non-parametric rank scores test are adopted to test the random walk hypothesis (RWH of stock markets in Middle East and North Africa (MENA region using most recent data from January 2010 to September 2012. The empirical results obtained by all three econometric tests show that the RWH is strongly rejected for Kuwait, Tunisia, and Morocco. However, the standard variance ratio test and the wild bootstrap multiple variance ratio test reject the null hypothesis of random walk in Jordan and KSA, while non-parametric rank scores test do not. We may conclude that Jordan and KSA stock market are weak efficient. In sum, the empirical results suggest that return series in Kuwait, Tunisia, and Morocco are predictable. In other words, predictable patterns that can be exploited in these markets still exit. Therefore, investors may make profits in such less efficient markets.

  18. Efficient quantum circuits for Szegedy quantum walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loke, T.; Wang, J.B.

    2017-01-01

    A major advantage in using Szegedy’s formalism over discrete-time and continuous-time quantum walks lies in its ability to define a unitary quantum walk by quantizing a Markov chain on a directed or weighted graph. In this paper, we present a general scheme to construct efficient quantum circuits for Szegedy quantum walks that correspond to classical Markov chains possessing transformational symmetry in the columns of the transition matrix. In particular, the transformational symmetry criteria do not necessarily depend on the sparsity of the transition matrix, so this scheme can be applied to non-sparse Markov chains. Two classes of Markov chains that are amenable to this construction are cyclic permutations and complete bipartite graphs, for which we provide explicit efficient quantum circuit implementations. We also prove that our scheme can be applied to Markov chains formed by a tensor product. We also briefly discuss the implementation of Markov chains based on weighted interdependent networks. In addition, we apply this scheme to construct efficient quantum circuits simulating the Szegedy walks used in the quantum Pagerank algorithm for some classes of non-trivial graphs, providing a necessary tool for experimental demonstration of the quantum Pagerank algorithm. - Highlights: • A general theoretical framework for implementing Szegedy walks using quantum circuits. • Explicit efficient quantum circuit implementation of the Szegedy walk for several classes of graphs. • Efficient implementation of Szegedy walks for quantum page-ranking of a certain class of graphs.

  19. Walking training with cueing of cadence improves walking speed and stride length after stroke more than walking training alone: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Lucas R; de Oliveira, Camila Quel; Ada, Louise; Michaelsen, Stella M; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F

    2015-01-01

    After stroke, is walking training with cueing of cadence superior to walking training alone in improving walking speed, stride length, cadence and symmetry? Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised or controlled trials. Adults who have had a stroke. Walking training with cueing of cadence. Four walking outcomes were of interest: walking speed, stride length, cadence and symmetry. This review included seven trials involving 211 participants. Because one trial caused substantial statistical heterogeneity, meta-analyses were conducted with and without this trial. Walking training with cueing of cadence improved walking speed by 0.23 m/s (95% CI 0.18 to 0.27, I(2)=0%), stride length by 0.21 m (95% CI 0.14 to 0.28, I(2)=18%), cadence by 19 steps/minute (95% CI 14 to 23, I(2)=40%), and symmetry by 15% (95% CI 3 to 26, random effects) more than walking training alone. This review provides evidence that walking training with cueing of cadence improves walking speed and stride length more than walking training alone. It may also produce benefits in terms of cadence and symmetry of walking. The evidence appears strong enough to recommend the addition of 30 minutes of cueing of cadence to walking training, four times a week for 4 weeks, in order to improve walking in moderately disabled individuals with stroke. PROSPERO (CRD42013005873). Copyright © 2014 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Walking modality, but not task difficulty, influences the control of dual-task walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrightson, J G; Smeeton, N J

    2017-10-01

    During dual-task gait, changes in the stride-to-stride variability of stride time (STV) are suggested to represent the allocation of cognitive control to walking [1]. However, contrasting effects have been reported for overground and treadmill walking, which may be due to differences in the relative difficulty of the dual task. Here we compared the effect of overground and treadmill dual-task walking on STV in 18 healthy adults. Participants walked overground and on a treadmill for 120s during single-task (walking only) and dual-task (walking whilst performing serial subtractions in sevens) conditions. Dual-task effects on STV, cognitive task (serial subtraction) performance and perceived task difficulty were compared between walking modalities. STV was increased during overground dual-task walking, but was unchanged during treadmill dual-task walking. There were no differences in cognitive task performance or perceived task difficulty. These results show that gait is controlled differently during overground and treadmill dual-task walking. However, these differences are not solely due to differences in task difficulty, and may instead represent modality dependent control strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Walking Renaissance: A Longitudinal Analysis of Walking Travel in the Greater Los Angeles Area, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Joh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Promoting walking travel is considered important for reducing automobile use and improving public health. Recent U.S. transportation policy has incentivized investments in alternative, more sustainable transportation modes such as walking, bicycling and transit in auto-oriented cities such as Los Angeles. Although many past studies have analyzed changes in walking travel across the U.S., there is little clarity on the drivers of change. We address this gap by conducting a longitudinal analysis of walking travel in the greater Los Angeles area from 2001 to 2009. We use travel diary and household data from regional and national surveys to analyze changes in walking trip shares and rates across our study area. Results show that walking has significantly increased across most of Los Angeles, and that increases in walking trips generally correspond with increases in population, employment, and transit service densities. Estimates from fixed-effects regression analysis generally suggest a positive association between population density and walking, and that higher increases in transit stop density are correlated with increased walking trips to and from transit stops. These findings illustrate how regional planning efforts to pursue a coordinated land use-transit planning strategy can help promote walking in auto-oriented or vehicle adopting cities.

  2. Age-Related Imbalance Is Associated With Slower Walking Speed: An Analysis From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yanjun J; Liu, Elizabeth Y; Anson, Eric R; Agrawal, Yuri

    Walking speed is an important dimension of gait function and is known to decline with age. Gait function is a process of dynamic balance and motor control that relies on multiple sensory inputs (eg, visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular) and motor outputs. These sensory and motor physiologic systems also play a role in static postural control, which has been shown to decline with age. In this study, we evaluated whether imbalance that occurs as part of healthy aging is associated with slower walking speed in a nationally representative sample of older adults. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the previously collected 1999 to 2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data to evaluate whether age-related imbalance is associated with slower walking speed in older adults aged 50 to 85 years (n = 2116). Balance was assessed on a pass/fail basis during a challenging postural task-condition 4 of the modified Romberg Test-and walking speed was determined using a 20-ft (6.10 m) timed walk. Multivariable linear regression was used to evaluate the association between imbalance and walking speed, adjusting for demographic and health-related covariates. A structural equation model was developed to estimate the extent to which imbalance mediates the association between age and slower walking speed. In the unadjusted regression model, inability to perform the NHANES balance task was significantly associated with 0.10 m/s slower walking speed (95% confidence interval: -0.13 to -0.07; P imbalance mediates 12.2% of the association between age and slower walking speed in older adults. In a nationally representative sample, age-related balance limitation was associated with slower walking speed. Balance impairment may lead to walking speed declines. In addition, reduced static postural control and dynamic walking speed that occur with aging may share common etiologic origins, including the decline in visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular sensory and

  3. Use of self-report to predict ability to walk 400 meters in mobility-limited older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Stephen P; Brach, Jennifer S; Newman, Anne B; Heeren, Tim C; Guralnik, Jack M; Fielding, Roger A

    2004-12-01

    To determine whether the ability to walk 400 m could be predicted from self-reported walking habits and abilities in older adults and to develop an accurate self-report measure appropriate for observational trials of mobility when functional measures are impractical to collect. Cross-sectional. University-based human physiology laboratory. One hundred fifty community-dwelling older men and women (mean age+/-standard error= 79.8+/-0.3). An 18-item questionnaire assessing walking habits and ability was administered to each participant, followed by a 400-m walk test. Ninety-eight (65%) volunteers were able to complete the 400-m walk; 52 (35%) were unable. Logistic regression was performed using response items from a questionnaire as predictors and 400-m walk as the outcome. Three questions (Do you think you could walk one-quarter of a mile now without sitting down to rest. Because of a health or physical problem, do you have difficulty walking 1 mile? Could you walk up and down every aisle of a grocery store without sitting down to rest or leaning on a cart?) were predictive of 400-m walking ability and were included in the model. If participants answered all three questions compatible with the inability to walk 400 m, there was a 91% probability that they were unable to walk 400 m, with a sensitivity of 46% and a specificity of 97%. A three-item self-report developed in the study was able to accurately predict mobility disability. The utility of this instrument may be in evaluating self-reported mobility in large observational trials on mobility when functional mobility tasks are impractical to collect.

  4. Kinesthetic taping improves walking function in patients with stroke: a pilot cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeskov, Birgitte; Carver, Line Tornehøj; von Essen-Leise, Anders; Henriksen, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is an important cause of severe disability and impaired motor function. Treatment modalities that improve motor function in patients with stroke are needed. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of kinesthetic taping of the anterior thigh and knee on maximal walking speed and clinical indices of spasticity in patients with stroke. Thirty-two patients (9 women) receiving rehabilitation after stroke (average, 50 days since stroke) who had impaired walking ability were recruited. Primary outcome was maximal walking speed measured by the 10-meter walk test. Secondary outcomes were number of steps taken during the test and clinical signs of spasticity measured by the Tardieu Scale. Tests were conducted before and immediately after application of kinesthetic tape to the anterior thigh and knee of the paretic lower limb. After application of the tape, the maximal walking speed increased, on average, by 0.08 m/s (95% CI, 0.04 to 0.12; P kinesthetic taping of the anterior thigh and knee provides an immediate improvement in walking function in patients with stroke. Such a positive effect on motor function could be a valuable adjunct in physical therapy and rehabilitation of patients with stroke.

  5. Urban walking: Perspectives of locals and tourists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkić Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban planners and architects have done extensive research on walk ability: what it means and how it correlates with urban design and quality of life of the locals, however, it has been hitherto neglected from the aspect of tourism studies. Many cities worldwide are or tend to be walkable as this leads to more sustainable and prosperous communities. In addition, walking-friendly environments greatly cater for leisure and tourism, as in many cities, walking is an integral part of tourist experience. Therefore, tourism industry can be of tremendous help for the city authorities in understanding walkers' needs and experiences. Taking into account both the locals and tourists, this research sought to: (1 determine the most frequently utilized modes of transportation in Novi Sad in Serbia and Koper in Slovenia; (2 assess thier reasons for walking and perception of the quality of pedestrian infrastructure; and (3 evaluate the psychometric properties of the questionnaire designed for the purpose of this study. The results show that the great majority of respondents walk in these two cities. The locals walk primarily to achieve physical fitness, whereas tourists walk primarily to explore the urban spaces. This makes more space for tourism as it combines a competitive supply able to meet visitors' expectations with a positive contribution to the sustainable development of cities and well-being of their residents. Furthermore, this study contributes to emphasizing walking as a sustainable form of mobility in urban environment and can be the impetus for profiling Novi Sad and Koper as walking-friendly cities.

  6. Narrowing beam-walking is a clinically feasible approach for assessing balance ability in lower-limb prosthesis users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawers, Andrew; Hafner, Brian J

    2018-05-08

    Challenging clinical balance tests are needed to expose balance deficits in lower-limb prost-hesis users. This study examined whether narrowing beam-walking could overcome conceptual and practical limitations identified in fixed-width beam-walking. Cross-sectional. Unilateral lower-limb prosthesis users. Participants walked 10 times along a low, narrowing beam. Performance was quantified using the normalized distance walked. Heuristic rules were applied to determine whether the narrowing beam task was "too easy," "too hard," or "appropriately challenging" for each participant. Linear regression and Bland-Altman plots were used to determine whether combinations of the first 5 trials could predict participants' stable beam-walking performance. Forty unilateral lower-limb prosthesis users participated. Narrowing beam-walking was appropriately challenging for 98% of participants. Performance stabilized for 93% of participants within 5 trials, while 62% were stable across all trials. The mean of trials 3-5 accurately predicted stable performance. A clinical narrowing beam-walking test is likely to challenge a range of lower-limb prosthesis users, have minimal administrative burden, and exhibit no floor or ceiling effects. Narrowing beam-walking is therefore a clinically viable method to evaluate lower-limb prosthesis users' balance ability, but requires psychometric testing before it is used to assess fall risk.

  7. The effectiveness of body weight-supported gait training and floor walking in patients with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peurala, Sinikka H; Tarkka, Ina M; Pitkänen, Kauko; Sivenius, Juhani

    2005-08-01

    To compare body weight-supported exercise on a gait trainer with walking exercise overground. Randomized controlled trial. Rehabilitation hospital. Forty-five ambulatory patients with chronic stroke. Patients were randomized to 3 groups: (1) gait trainer exercise with functional electric stimulation (GTstim), (2) gait trainer exercise without stimulation (GT), and (3) walking overground (WALK). All patients practiced gait for 15 sessions during 3 weeks (each session, 20 min), and they received additional physiotherapy 55 minutes daily. Ten-meter walk test (10MWT), six-minute walk test (6MWT), lower-limb spasticity and muscle force, postural sway tests, Modified Motor Assessment Scale (MMAS), and FIM instrument scores were recorded before, during, and after the rehabilitation and at 6 months follow-up. The mean walking distance using the gait trainer was 6900+/-1200 m in the GTstim group and 6500+/-1700 m in GT group. In the WALK group, the distance was 4800+/-2800 m, which was less than the walking distance obtained in the GTstim group (P=.027). The body-weight support was individually reduced from 30% to 9% of the body weight over the course of the program. In the pooled 45 patients, the 10MWT (Pgait after the intensive rehabilitation program. Patients' motor performance remained improved at the follow-up.

  8. Narrowing beam-walking is a clinically feasible approach for assessing balance ability in lower-limb prosthesis users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Sawers

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Challenging clinical balance tests are needed to expose balance deficits in lower-limb prost-hesis users. This study examined whether narrowing beam-walking could overcome conceptual and practical limitations identified in fixed-width beam-walking. Design: Cross-sectional. Participants: Unilateral lower-limb prosthesis users. Methods: Participants walked 10 times along a low, narrowing beam. Performance was quantified using the normalized distance walked. Heuristic rules were applied to determine whether the narrowing beam task was “too easy,” “too hard,” or “appropriately challenging” for each participant. Linear regression and Bland-Altman plots were used to determine whether combinations of the first 5 trials could predict participants’ stable beam-walking performance. Results: Forty unilateral lower-limb prosthesis users participated. Narrowing beam-walking was appropriately challenging for 98% of participants. Performance stabilized for 93% of participants within 5 trials, while 62% were stable across all trials. The mean of trials 3–5 accurately predicted stable performance. Conclusion: A clinical narrowing beam-walking test is likely to challenge a range of lower-limb prosthesis users, have minimal administrative burden, and exhibit no floor or ceiling effects. Narrowing beam-walking is therefore a clinically viable method to evaluate lower-limb prosthesis users’ balance ability, but requires psychometric testing before it is used to assess fall risk.

  9. Can an aversive, extinction-resistant memory trigger impairments in walking adaptability? An experimental study using adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Filipe Mello; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Baptista, Pedro Porto Alegre; Neves, Laura Tartari; Martins, Lucas Athaydes; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; Izquierdo, Iván; Xavier, Léder Leal; Hollands, Kristen; Mestriner, Régis Gemerasca

    2018-02-05

    Cognitive demands can influence the adaptation of walking, a crucial skill to maintain body stability and prevent falls. Whilst previous research has shown emotional load tunes goal-directed movements, little attention has been given to this finding. This study sought to assess the effects of suffering an extinction-resistant memory on skilled walking performance in adult rats, as an indicator of walking adaptability. Thus, 36 Wistar rats were divided in a two-part experiment. In the first part (n=16), the aversive, extinction-resistance memory paradigm was established using a fear-conditioning chamber. In the second, rats (n=20) were assessed in a neutral room using the ladder rung walking test before and tree days after inducing an extinction-resistance memory. In addition, the elevated plus-maze test was used to control the influence of the anxiety-like status on gait adaptability. Our results revealed the shock group exhibited worse walking adaptability (lower skilled walking score), when compared to the sham group. Moreover, the immobility time in the ladder rung walking test was similar to the controls, suggesting that gait adaptability performance was not a consequence of the fear generalization. No anxiety-like behavior was observed in the plus maze test. Finally, correlation coefficients also showed the skilled walking performance score was positively correlated with the number of gait cycles and trial time in the ladder rung walking test and the total crossings in the plus maze. Overall, these preliminary findings provide evidence to hypothesize an aversive, extinction-resistant experience might change the emotional load, affecting the ability to adapt walking. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Elements of random walk and diffusion processes

    CERN Document Server

    Ibe, Oliver C

    2013-01-01

    Presents an important and unique introduction to random walk theory Random walk is a stochastic process that has proven to be a useful model in understanding discrete-state discrete-time processes across a wide spectrum of scientific disciplines. Elements of Random Walk and Diffusion Processes provides an interdisciplinary approach by including numerous practical examples and exercises with real-world applications in operations research, economics, engineering, and physics. Featuring an introduction to powerful and general techniques that are used in the application of physical and dynamic

  11. Walking execution is not affected by divided attention in patients with multiple sclerosis with no disability, but there is a motor planning impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Leandro Alberto Calazans; Santos, Luciano Teixeira Dos; Sabino, Pollyane Galinari; Alvarenga, Regina Maria Papais; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos

    2013-08-01

    We analysed the cognitive influence on walking in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, in the absence of clinical disability. A case-control study was conducted with 12 MS patients with no disability and 12 matched healthy controls. Subjects were referred for completion a timed walk test of 10 m and a 3D-kinematic analysis. Participants were instructed to walk at a comfortable speed in a dual-task (arithmetic task) condition, and motor planning was measured by mental chronometry. Scores of walking speed and cadence showed no statistically significant differences between the groups in the three conditions. The dual-task condition showed an increase in the double support duration in both groups. Motor imagery analysis showed statistically significant differences between real and imagined walking in patients. MS patients with no disability did not show any influence of divided attention on walking execution. However, motor planning was overestimated as compared with real walking.

  12. Walking speed and subclinical atherosclerosis in healthy older adults: the Whitehall II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Mark; Kivimaki, Mika; Lahiri, Avijit; Yerramasu, Ajay; Deanfield, John E; Marmot, Michael G; Steptoe, Andrew

    2010-03-01

    Extended walking speed is a predictor of incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in older individuals, but the ability of an objective short-distance walking speed test to stratify the severity of preclinical conditions remains unclear. This study examined whether performance in an 8-ft walking speed test is associated with metabolic risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis. Cross-sectional. Setting Epidemiological cohort. 530 adults (aged 63 + or - 6 years, 50.3% male) from the Whitehall II cohort study with no known history or objective signs of CVD. Electron beam computed tomography and ultrasound was used to assess the presence and extent of coronary artery calcification (CAC) and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), respectively. High levels of CAC (Agatston score >100) were detected in 24% of the sample; the mean IMT was 0.75 mm (SD 0.15). Participants with no detectable CAC complete