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Sample records for stamen filament growth

  1. Stamen development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis the development of the stamen is investigated, using structural and histochemical observations, micromanipulation and in-vitro culture.

    Formation and exposure of pollen are the two main goals of the developing stamen. The main processes of the pollen formation were

  2. Decreased sorbitol synthesis leads to abnormal stamen development and reduced pollen tube growth via an MYB transcription factor, MdMYB39L, in apple (Malus domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Dong; He, Mingyang; Bai, Yang; Xu, Hongxia; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Fei, Zhangjun; Cheng, Lailiang

    2018-01-01

    Sugars produced by photosynthesis not only fuel plant growth and development, but may also act as signals to regulate plant growth and development. This work focuses on the role of sorbitol, a sugar alcohol, in flower development and pollen tube growth of apple (Malus domestica). Transgenic 'Greensleeves' apple trees with decreased sorbitol synthesis had abnormal stamen development, a decreased pollen germination rate and reduced pollen tube growth, which were all closely related to lower sorbitol concentrations in stamens. RNA sequencing and quantitative RT-PCR analyses identified reduced transcript levels during stamen development and pollen tube growth in the transgenic trees of a stamen-specific MYB39-like transcription factor, MdMYB39L, and of its putative target genes involved in hexose uptake, cell wall formation and microsporogenesis. Suppressing MdMYB39L expression in pollen via antisense oligonucleotide transfection significantly reduced the expression of its putative target genes and pollen tube growth. Exogenous sorbitol application during flower development partially restored MdMYB39L expression, stamen development, and pollen germination and tube growth of the transgenic trees. Addition of sorbitol to the germination medium also partially restored pollen germination and tube growth of the transgenic trees. We conclude that sorbitol plays an essential role in stamen development and pollen tube growth via MdMYB39L in apple. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Filamentous Growth in Eremothecium Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Therese

    , this thesis deals with some of the aspects of hyphal growth, which is an important virulence factor for pathogenic fungi infecting both humans and plants. Hyphal establishment through continuous polar growth is a complex process, requiring the careful coordination of a large subset of proteins involved...... in polarity establishment and maintenance, cytoskeleton dynamics and intracellular transport. The first part of this thesis addresses the A. gossypii Arf3 small GTPase and its GEF- and GAP regulators; Yel1 and Gts1, which has been implicated in polar growth in a wide range of organisms. We could demonstrate......-regulatory activity of AgGts1, the protein could have additional actin organizing properties. In the second and third part, this thesis addresses the use of A. gossypii and its relative E. cymbalariae as model organisms for filamentous growth. A series of assays analyzed the capability of Eremothecium genus fungi...

  4. Stamen venation in the Winteraceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampson, F.B.

    1987-01-01

    Stamen venation is described for all species of Pseudowintera and an interspecific hybrid; the single species of Exospermum, several species of Belliolum, Drimys, Tasmannia (syn. Drimys sect. Tasmannia) and Zygogynum, as well as one species of Bubbia. One, two and three-veined stamens were found in

  5. Observations of the Growth of an Active Region Filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo

    2017-04-01

    We present observations of the growth of an active region filament caused by magnetic interactions among the filament and its adjacent superpenumbral filament (SF) and dark thread-like structures (T). Multistep reconnections are identified during the whole growing process. Magnetic flux convergence and cancellation occurring at the positive footpoint region of the filament is the first step reconnection, which resulted in the filament bifurcating into two sets of intertwined threads. One set anchored in situ, while the other set moved toward and interacted with the SF and part of T. This indicates the second step reconnection, which gave rise to the disappearance of the SF and the formation of a long thread-like structure that connects the far ends of the filament and T. The long thread-like structure further interacted with the T and then separated into two parts, representing the third step reconnection. Finally, another similar long thread-like structure, which intertwined with the fixed filament threads, appeared. Hαobservations show that this twisted structure is a longer sinistral filament. Based on the observed photospheric vector magnetograms, we performed a non-linear force-free field extrapolation to reconstruct the magnetic fields above the photosphere and found that the coronal magnetic field lines associated with the filament consists of two twisted flux ropes winding around each other. These results suggest that magnetic interactions among filaments and their adjacent SFs and T could lead to the growth of the filaments, and the filament is probably supported in a flux rope.

  6. Filament growth and resistive switching in hafnium oxide memristive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkmann, Sven; Kaiser, Jan; Wenger, Christian; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2018-03-30

    We report on the resistive switching in TiN/Ti/HfO 2 /TiN memristive devices. A resistive switching model for the device is proposed, taking into account important experimental and theoretical findings. The proposed switching model is validated using 2D and 3D kinetic Monte Carlo simulation models. The models are consistently coupled to the electric field and different current transport mechanisms as direct tunneling, trap assisted tunneling (TAT), ohmic transport, and transport through a quantum point contact (QPC) have been considered. We find that the numerical results are in excellent agreement with experimentally obtained data. Important device parameters, which are difficult or impossible to measure in experiments, are calculated. This includes the shape of the conductive filament, width of filament constriction, current density, and temperature distribution. To obtain insights in the operation of the device, consecutive cycles have been simulated. Furthermore, the switching kinetic for the forming and set process for different applied voltages is investigated. Finally, the influence of an annealing process on the filament growth, especially on the filament growth direction, is discussed.

  7. Filamentous Growth in Eremothecium Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Therese

    The fungal kingdom encompasses a diverse group of organisms some of which have a great impact on human lives, either as domesticated benefactors or as human and crop pathogens. Using the filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii and its close relative Eremothecium cymbalariae as model organisms, this th...... of molecular tools for E. cymbalariae to enable a faster and more efficient approach for genetic comparisons between Eremothecium genus fungi.......-regulatory activity of AgGts1, the protein could have additional actin organizing properties. In the second and third part, this thesis addresses the use of A. gossypii and its relative E. cymbalariae as model organisms for filamentous growth. A series of assays analyzed the capability of Eremothecium genus fungi...

  8. Impact of matric potential and pore size distribution on growth dynamics of filamentous and non-filamentous soil bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, A.B.; Vos, M.; De Boer, W.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous growth form is an important strategy for soil microbes to bridge air-filled pores in unsaturated soils. In particular, fungi perform better than bacteria in soils during drought, a property that has been ascribed to the hyphal growth form of fungi. However, it is unknown if, and to

  9. Impact of Matric Potential and Pore Size Distribution on Growth Dynamics of Filamentous and Non-Filamentous Soil Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, A.B.; Vos, de M.; Boer, de W.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous growth form is an important strategy for soil microbes to bridge air-filled pores in unsaturated soils. In particular, fungi perform better than bacteria in soils during drought, a property that has been ascribed to the hyphal growth form of fungi. However, it is unknown if, and to

  10. Stamen morphoanatomy of Dyckia Schult.f. (Bromeliaceae, Pitcairnioideae species: new data for taxonomic use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordano Dorval Tavares de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study presents a morphoanatomical analysis of Dyckia ibicuiensis , D. polyclada and D. racinae stamens. Flowers at anthesis were desiccated and their stamens were processed using common light microscopic techniques. Morphologically, the androecium in these species is differentiated by the disposition of the stamens around the gynoecium and by general anther characteristics. Included stamens, with antesepalous filaments different from those of the antepetalous, anthers in a radial disposition, always curved, and sporangia facing the gynoecium characterize D. ibicuiensis and D. racinae . This configuration results from the filament connation, as well as special anatomical characteristics of the anthers, such as the connective with thickenings. In addition, these species are differentiated by the U-shaped thickening in the endothecium. D. polyclada is characterized by its small, free and exserted stamens, with a very short common tube, its anthers, that are not curved or organized around the gynoecium, and its divergent sporangia. The anatomical and morphological characteristics identified here are important for characterization of these species. Considering that the androecium is important in the delimitation of Dyckia , the increased use of these data should be equally important for other species and infrageneric groupings.

  11. Analysis of growth characteristics of filamentous fungi in different nutrient media.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meletiadis, J.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Mouton, J.W.; Verweij, P.E.

    2001-01-01

    A microbroth kinetic model based on turbidity measurements was developed in order to analyze the growth characteristics of three species of filamentous fungi (Rhizopus microsporus, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Scedosporium prolificans) characterized by different growth rates in five nutrient media

  12. Video-supported analysis of Beggiatoa filament growth, breakage, and movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Røy, Hans; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N.

    2008-01-01

    A marine Beggiatoa sp. was cultured in semi-solid agar with opposing oxygen-sulfide gradients. Growth pattern, breakage of filaments for multiplication, and movement directions of Beggiatoa filaments in the transparent agar were investigated by time-lapse video recording. The initial doubling time...

  13. Analysis of the Yeast Kinome Reveals a Network of Regulated Protein Localization during Filamentous Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Bharucha, Nikë; Ma, Jun; Dobry, Craig J.; Lawson, Sarah K.; Yang, Zhifen; Kumar, Anuj

    2008-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of kinases and other signaling proteins is regulated in response to cellular cues; however, the extent of this regulation has not been investigated for any gene set in any organism. Here, we present a systematic analysis of protein kinases in the budding yeast, screening for differential localization during filamentous growth. Filamentous growth is an important stress response involving mitogen-activated protein kinase and cAMP-dependent protein kinase signaling m...

  14. Farnesol inhibits translation to limit growth and filamentation in C. albicans and S. cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nkechi E. Egbe

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a polymorphic yeast where the capacity to switch between yeast and filamentous growth is critical for pathogenicity. Farnesol is a quorum-sensing sesquiterpene alcohol that, via regulation of specific signalling and transcription components, inhibits filamentous growth in C. albicans. Here we show that farnesol also inhibits translation at the initiation step in both C. albicans and S. cerevisiae. In contrast to fusel alcohols, that target the eukaryotic initiation factor 2B (eIF2B, farnesol affects the interaction of the mRNA with the small ribosomal subunit leading to reduced levels of the 48S preinitiation ribosomal complex in S. cerevisiae. Therefore, farnesol targets a different step in the translation pathway than fusel alcohols to elicit a completely opposite physiological outcome by negating filamentous growth.

  15. Growth and nitrate reduction of Beggiatoa filaments studied in enrichment cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja

    at the same point at which the tip of a forming loop of the filament had been observed before. As it is known that filament breakage is accomplished by the formation of a sacrificial cell, it was hypothesised that sacrificial cells interrupt the communication between two parts of one filament...... in oxygen-sulphide gradient tubes, and observed with a camera system. Growth mode, breakage, and movement directions of Beggiatoa filaments were documented via time-lapse video recording. The initial doubling time of cells was 15.7 ±1.3 h (mean ±SD; room temperature). Filaments grew up to an average length....... As a consequence, the two parts of one filament can move towards each other forming the tip of a loop at the sacrificial cell. The second part of this thesis focused on the physiology of Beggiatoa. The sulphur bacteria Beggiatoa can reach high biomass in many aquatic habitats, e.g. in and on freshwater and marine...

  16. The role of stamens in ethylene production in Ipomoea nil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, H.G.

    1989-01-01

    Ethylene production inhibits filament and corolla growth during young stages in flower development, and it promotes corolla unfolding and senescence in Ipomoea nil. Initial studies with the in vitro application of gibberellic acid (GA 3 ), demonstrated that decreased filament growth occurred when the anthers remained attached to the filaments during the young stages in development. The removal of the anthers from intact plants did not enhance filament growth until the synthesis of wound ethylene was inhibited by applied aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG) or cobalt chloride. It was hypothesized that the anthers were source tissues and that the filaments were transport vectors for the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to regulate growth events in the various floral organs. To test this hypothesis, endogenous IAA and ACC and ethylene production were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or gas chromatography. The transport of 14 C-IAA and 14 C-ACC through filament segments and filaments within intact flower buds also was examined during flower development

  17. Effect of substrate roughness on growth of diamond by hot filament ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Polycrystalline diamond coatings are grown on Si (100) substrate by hot filament CVD technique. We investigate here the effect of substrate roughening on the substrate temperature and methane concentra- tion required to maintain high quality, high growth rate and faceted morphology of the diamond coatings. It.

  18. Dysfunctional mitochondria modulate cAMP-PKA signaling and filamentous and invasive growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aun, Anu; Tamm, Tiina; Sedman, Juhan

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is targeted by conserved signaling pathways that mediate external information to the cell. However, less is known about whether mitochondrial dysfunction interferes with signaling and thereby modulates the cellular response to environmental changes. In this study, we analyzed defective filamentous and invasive growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that have a dysfunctional mitochondrial genome (rho mutants). We found that the morphogenetic defect of rho mutants was caused by specific downregulation of FLO11, the adhesin essential for invasive and filamentous growth, and did not result from general metabolic changes brought about by interorganellar retrograde signaling. Transcription of FLO11 is known to be regulated by several signaling pathways, including the filamentous-growth-specific MAPK and cAMP-activated protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) pathways. Our analysis showed that the filamentous-growth-specific MAPK pathway retained functionality in respiratory-deficient yeast cells. In contrast, the cAMP-PKA pathway was downregulated, explaining also various phenotypic traits observed in rho mutants. Thus, our results indicate that dysfunctional mitochondria modulate the output of the conserved cAMP-PKA signaling pathway.

  19. Stamen-derived bioactive gibberellin is essential for male flower development of Cucurbita maxima L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta Lange, Maria João; Knop, Nicole; Lange, Theo

    2012-04-01

    Gibberellin (GA) signalling during pumpkin male flower development is highly regulated, including biosynthetic, perception, and transduction pathways. GA 20-oxidases, 3-oxidases, and 2-oxidases catalyse the final part of GA synthesis. Additionally, 7-oxidase initiates this part of the pathway in some cucurbits including Cucurbita maxima L. (pumpkin). Expression patterns for these GA-oxidase-encoding genes were examined by competitive reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and endogenous GA levels were determined during pumpkin male flower development. In young flowers, GA20ox3 transcript levels are high in stamens, followed by high levels of the GA precursor GA(9). Later, just before flower opening, transcript levels for GA3ox3 and GA3ox4 increase in the hypanthium and stamens, respectively. In the stamen, following GA3ox4 expression, bioactive GA(4) levels rise dramatically. Accordingly, catabolic GA2ox2 and GA2ox3 transcript levels are low in developing flowers, and increase in mature flowers. Putative GA receptor GID1b and DELLA repressor GAIPb transcript levels do not change in developing flowers, but increase sharply in mature flowers. Emasculation arrests floral development completely and leads to abscission of premature flowers. Application of GA(4) (but not of its precursors GA(12)-aldehyde or GA(9)) restores normal growth of emasculated flowers. These results indicate that de novo GA(4) synthesis in the stamen is under control of GA20ox3 and GA3ox4 genes just before the rapid flower growth phase. Stamen-derived bioactive GA is essential and sufficient for male flower development, including the petal and the pedicel growth.

  20. Molecular phenotypes associated with anomalous stamen development in Alternanthera philoxeroides

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    Zhu eZhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Alternanthera philoxeroides is a perennial amphibious weed native to South America but has now spread to diverse parts of the world. A. philoxeroides reproduces both sexually and asexually in its native range, but propagates solely through vegetative means in its introduced range. Traits associated with sexual reproduction become degraded for sexual dysfunction, with flowers possessing either pistillate stamens or male-sterile anthers. Degradations of sexual characters for loss of sexuality commonly take place in clonal plants. The underlying molecular-genetic processes remain largely unknown. We compared the gene expression profiles of abnormal stamens with that of normal stamens by RNA-Seq analysis, and identified a large number of differentially expressed genes between abnormal and normal stamens. In accordance with flower morphology, the expression of B-class MADS-box genes (ApAP3, ApTM6 and ApPI was markedly reduced in pistillate stamens. However, most of the genes involved in meiosis were expressed normally in stamens with male-sterile anthers. In addition to verifying the expression patterns of genes previously known to be related to stamen and pollen grain development, we also identified previously unknown molecular phenotypes associated with sexual dysfunction in A. philoxeroides, that is helpful for dissecting the molecular mechanisms underpinning various male-sterile phenotypes and the molecular processes underlying the transition from sexuality to asexuality in clonal plants.

  1. Effects of filamentous macroalgae mats on growth and survival of eelgrass, Zostera marina, seedlings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jonas; Olesen, Birgit; Krause-Jensen, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to assess the effect of filamentous algae mats on the performance of seedlings of the eelgrass, Zostera marina. The seedlings were covered by three levels (3, 6 and 9 cm) of natural (Chaetomorpha linum) and imitation algae mats and it was hypothesized...... that the effects of the natural algae on seedling growth may be more severe because of the metabolic demands of the algae. Results show that coverage by both C. linum and imitation algae significantly reduced seedling growth and increased allocation of resources to above ground tissues. No clear effects of algae...

  2. Growth of highly oriented carbon nanotubes by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Z.P.; Xu, J.W.; Ren, Z.F.; Wang, J.H. [Materials Synthesis Laboratory, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, and Center for Advanced Photonic and Electronic Materials (CAPEM), State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Siegal, M.P.; Provencio, P.N. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Highly oriented, multiwalled carbon nanotubes were grown on polished polycrystalline and single crystal nickel substrates by plasma enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition at temperatures below 666 {degree}C. The carbon nanotubes range from 10 to 500 nm in diameter and 0.1 to 50 {mu}m in length depending on growth conditions. Acetylene is used as the carbon source for the growth of the carbon nanotubes and ammonia is used for dilution gas and catalysis. The plasma intensity, acetylene to ammonia gas ratio, and their flow rates, etc. affect the diameters and uniformity of the carbon nanotubes. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Growth-induced axial buckling of a slender elastic filament embedded in an isotropic elastic matrix

    KAUST Repository

    O'Keeffe, Stephen G.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the problem of an axially loaded, isotropic, slender cylinder embedded in a soft, isotropic, outer elastic matrix. The cylinder undergoes uniform axial growth, whilst both the cylinder and the surrounding elastic matrix are confined between two rigid plates, so that this growth results in axial compression of the cylinder. We use two different modelling approaches to estimate the critical axial growth (that is, the amount of axial growth the cylinder is able to sustain before it buckles) and buckling wavelength of the cylinder. The first approach treats the filament and surrounding matrix as a single 3-dimensional elastic body undergoing large deformations, whilst the second approach treats the filament as a planar, elastic rod embedded in an infinite elastic foundation. By comparing the results of these two approaches, we obtain an estimate of the foundation modulus parameter, which characterises the strength of the foundation, in terms of the geometric and material properties of the system. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dynamics of actin cables in polarized growth of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eBergs

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Highly polarized growth of filamentous fungi requires a continuous supply of proteins and lipids to the hyphal tip. This transport is managed by vesicle trafficking via the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons and their associated motor proteins. Particularly, actin cables originating from the hyphal tip are essential for hyphal growth. Although specific marker proteins to visualize actin cables have been developed in filamentous fungi, the exact organization and dynamics of actin cables has remained elusive. Here we visualized actin cables using tropomyosin (TpmA and Lifeact fused to fluorescent proteins in Aspergillus nidulans and studied the dynamics and regulation. GFP tagged TpmA visualized dynamic actin cables formed from the hyphal tip with cycles of elongation and shrinkage. The elongation and shrinkage rates of actin cables were similar and approximately 0.6 μm/s. Comparison of actin markers revealed that high concentrations of Lifeact reduced actin dynamics. Simultaneous visualization of actin cables and microtubules suggests temporally and spatially coordinated polymerization and depolymerization between the two cytoskeletons. Our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of ordered polarized growth regulated by actin cables and microtubules.

  5. The filamentous growth MAPK Pathway Responds to Glucose Starvation Through the Mig1/2 transcriptional repressors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunanithi, Sheelarani; Cullen, Paul J

    2012-11-01

    In the budding yeast S. cerevisiae, nutrient limitation induces a MAPK pathway that regulates filamentous growth and biofilm/mat formation. How nutrient levels feed into the regulation of the filamentous growth pathway is not entirely clear. We characterized a newly identified MAPK regulatory protein of the filamentous growth pathway, Opy2. A two-hybrid screen with the cytosolic domain of Opy2 uncovered new interacting partners including a transcriptional repressor that functions in the AMPK pathway, Mig1, and its close functional homolog, Mig2. Mig1 and Mig2 coregulated the filamentous growth pathway in response to glucose limitation, as did the AMP kinase Snf1. In addition to associating with Opy2, Mig1 and Mig2 interacted with other regulators of the filamentous growth pathway including the cytosolic domain of the signaling mucin Msb2, the MAP kinase kinase Ste7, and the MAP kinase Kss1. As for Opy2, Mig1 overproduction dampened the pheromone response pathway, which implicates Mig1 and Opy2 as potential regulators of pathway specificity. Taken together, our findings provide the first regulatory link in yeast between components of the AMPK pathway and a MAPK pathway that controls cellular differentiation.

  6. Identification of a motor protein required for filamentous growth in Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmler, C; Steinberg, G; Snetselaar, K M; Schliwa, M; Kahmann, R; Bölker, M

    1997-06-16

    The phytopathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis exists in two stages, the yeast-like haploid form and the filamentous dikaryon. Both pathogenicity and dimorphism are genetically controlled by two mating-type loci, with only the filamentous stage being pathogenic on corn. We have identified two genes (kin1 and kin2) encoding motor proteins of the kinesin family. Kin1 is most similar to the human CENP-E gene product, while Kin2 is most closely related to the conventional kinesin Nkin of Neurospora crassa. Deletion mutants of kin1 had no discernible phenotype; delta kin2 mutants, however, were severely affected in hyphal extension and pathogenicity. The wild-type dikaryon showed rapid tip growth, with all the cytoplasm being moved to the tip compartment. Left behind are septate cell wall tubes devoid of cytoplasm. In delta kin2 mutants, dikaryotic cells were formed after cell fusion, but these hyphal structures remained short and filled with cytoplasm. A functional green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Kin2 fusion was generated and used to determine the localization of the motor protein by fluorescence microscopy. Inspection of the hyphal tips by electron microscopy revealed a characteristic accumulation of darkly stained vesicles which was absent in mutant cells. We suggest that the motor protein Kin2 is involved in organizing this specialized growth zone at the hyphal tip, probably by affecting the vectorial transport of vesicles.

  7. Quantifying in situ growth rate of a filamentous bacterial species in activated sludge using rRNA:rDNA ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vivi L; He, Xia; de Los Reyes, Francis L

    2016-11-01

    If the in situ growth rate of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge can be quantified, researchers can more accurately assess the effect of operating conditions on the growth of filaments and improve the mathematical modeling of filamentous bulking. We developed a method to quantify the in situ specific growth rate of Sphaerotilus natans (a model filament) in activated sludge using the species-specific 16S rRNA:rDNA ratio. Primers targeting the 16S rRNA of S. natans were designed, and real-time PCR and RT-PCR were used to quantify DNA and RNA levels of S. natans, respectively. A positive linear relationship was found between the rRNA:rDNA ratio (from 440 to 4500) and the specific growth rate of S. natans (from 0.036 to 0.172 h -1 ) using chemostat experiments. The in situ growth rates of S. natans in activated sludge samples from three water reclamation facilities were quantified, illustrating how the approach can be applied in a complex environment such as activated sludge. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. A Universally Applicable and Rapid Method for Measuring the Growth of Streptomyces and Other Filamentous Microorganisms by Methylene Blue Adsorption-Desorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of growth of filamentous microorganisms, such as streptomycetes, is generally restricted to determination of dry weight. Here, we describe a straightforward methylene blue-based sorption assay to monitor microbial growth quantitatively, simply, and rapidly. The assay is equally applicable to unicellular and filamentous bacterial and eukaryotic microorganisms. PMID:23666340

  9. Capric acid secreted by S. boulardii inhibits C. albicans filamentous growth, adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Murzyn

    Full Text Available Candidiasis are life-threatening systemic fungal diseases, especially of gastro intestinal track, skin and mucous membranes lining various body cavities like the nostrils, the mouth, the lips, the eyelids, the ears or the genital area. Due to increasing resistance of candidiasis to existing drugs, it is very important to look for new strategies helping the treatment of such fungal diseases. One promising strategy is the use of the probiotic microorganisms, which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit. Such a probiotic microorganism is yeast Saccharomyces boulardii, a close relative of baker yeast. Saccharomyces boulardii cells and their extract affect the virulence factors of the important human fungal pathogen C. albicans, its hyphae formation, adhesion and biofilm development. Extract prepared from S. boulardii culture filtrate was fractionated and GC-MS analysis showed that the active fraction contained, apart from 2-phenylethanol, caproic, caprylic and capric acid whose presence was confirmed by ESI-MS analysis. Biological activity was tested on C. albicans using extract and pure identified compounds. Our study demonstrated that this probiotic yeast secretes into the medium active compounds reducing candidal virulence factors. The chief compound inhibiting filamentous C. albicans growth comparably to S. boulardii extract was capric acid, which is thus responsible for inhibition of hyphae formation. It also reduced candidal adhesion and biofilm formation, though three times less than the extract, which thus contains other factors suppressing C. albicans adherence. The expression profile of selected genes associated with C. albicans virulence by real-time PCR showed a reduced expression of HWP1, INO1 and CSH1 genes in C. albicans cells treated with capric acid and S. boulardii extract. Hence capric acid secreted by S. boulardii is responsible for inhibition of C. albicans filamentation and partially also adhesion and

  10. The pattern of vascular bundles in the stamens of Nymphaea lotus L. and its bearing on stamen morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heel, van W.A.

    1977-01-01

    In 1969 I published, together with P. G. Heinsbroek, a paper on the anatomy of the stamens of Victoria amazonica. The flowers used in that study came from plants which were cultivated in the green-house of the Leiden Botanic Garden. Because the possibility could not be excluded that the structures

  11. Role of Tellurite Resistance Operon in Filamentous Growth of Yersinia pestis in Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Clinkenbeard, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis initiates infection by parasitism of host macrophages. In response to macrophage infections, intracellular Y. pestis can assume a filamentous cellular morphology which may mediate resistance to host cell innate immune responses. We previously observed the expression of Y. pestis tellurite resistance proteins TerD and TerE from the terZABCDE operon during macrophage infections. Others have observed a filamentous response associated with expression of tellurite resistance operon in Escherichia coli exposed to tellurite. Therefore, in this study we examine the potential role of Y. pestis tellurite resistance operon in filamentous cellular morphology during macrophage infections. In vitro treatment of Y. pestis culture with sodium tellurite (Na2TeO3) caused the bacterial cells to assume a filamentous phenotype similar to the filamentous phenotype observed during macrophage infections. A deletion mutant for genes terZAB abolished the filamentous morphologic response to tellurite exposure or intracellular parasitism, but without affecting tellurite resistance. However, a terZABCDE deletion mutant abolished both filamentous morphologic response and tellurite resistance. Complementation of the terZABCDE deletion mutant with terCDE, but not terZAB, partially restored tellurite resistance. When the terZABCDE deletion mutant was complemented with terZAB or terCDE, Y. pestis exhibited filamentous morphology during macrophage infections as well as while these complemented genes were being expressed under an in vitro condition. Further in E. coli, expression of Y. pestis terZAB, but not terCDE, conferred a filamentous phenotype. These findings support the role of Y. pestis terZAB mediation of the filamentous response phenotype; whereas, terCDE confers tellurite resistance. Although the beneficial role of filamentous morphological responses by Y. pestis during macrophage infections is yet to be fully defined, it may be a bacterial adaptive strategy to macrophage

  12. Ambient aging of rhenium filaments used in thermal ionization mass spectrometry: Growth of oxo-rhenium crystallites and anti-aging strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Mannion

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Degassing is a common preparation technique for rhenium filaments used for thermal ionization mass spectrometric analysis of actinides, including plutonium. Although optimization studies regarding degassing conditions have been reported, little work has been done to characterize filament aging after degassing. In this study, the effects of filament aging after degassing were explored to determine a “shelf-life” for degassed rhenium filaments, and methods to limit filament aging were investigated. Zone-refined rhenium filaments were degassed by resistance heating under high vacuum before exposure to ambient atmosphere for up to 2 months. After degassing the nucleation and preferential growth of oxo-rhenium crystallites on the surface of polycrystalline rhenium filaments was observed by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Compositional analysis of the crystallites was conducted using SEM-Raman spectroscopy and SEM energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and grain orientation at the metal surface was investigated by electron back-scatter diffraction mapping. Spectra collected by SEM-Raman suggest crystallites are composed primarily of perrhenic acid. The relative extent of growth and crystallite morphology were found to be grain dependent and affected by the dissolution of carbon into filaments during annealing (often referred to as carbonization or carburization. Crystallites were observed to nucleate in region specific modes and grow over time through transfer of material from the surface. Factors most likely to affect the rates of crystallite growth include rhenium substrate properties such as grain size, orientation, levels of dissolved carbon, and relative abundance of defect sites; as well as environmental factors such as length of exposure to oxygen and relative humidity. Thin (∼180 nm hydrophobic films of poly(vinylbenzyl chloride were found to slow the growth of oxo-rhenium crystallites on the filament

  13. Floral development and morphology of Vochysiaceae. II. The position of the single fertile stamen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Amy; Stevenson, Dennis W

    2003-11-01

    A conspicuous feature of Vochysiaceae flowers is their single fertile stamen. In some genera, the stamen is in front of a petal, whereas in others it is in front of a sepal. This difference has been attributed to two independent reductions, which implies the stamen is not homologous across the family. The observation that genera with an antesepalous stamen have only one petal, whereas those with an antepetalous stamen have three or five petals, led us to the hypothesis that in all genera the stamen arises in an antepetalous position, but that it is displaced during development in single-petaled taxa. We examined developing buds of five genera using scanning electron microscopy and serial sectioning and conclude that the stamen in all genera is fundamentally antepetalous. The stamen is not displaced. The petal, however, appears to be displaced in some genera. Further, the position of the fertile stamen in Erisma has been misinterpreted. We discuss the evolution of the androecium in this family in a phylogenetic context and consider the significance of symmetry and of loss vs. suppression in the development of Vochysiaceae flowers.

  14. Growth of filamentous blue-green algae at high temperatures: a source of biomass for renewable fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timourian, H.; Ward, R.L.; Jeffries, T.W.

    1977-08-17

    The growth of filamentous blue-green algae (FBGA) at high temperatures in outdoor, shallow solar ponds is being investigated. The temperature of the 60-m/sup 2/ ponds can be controlled to an average temperature of 45/sup 0/C. The growth of FBGA at high temperatures offers an opportunity, not presently available from outdoor algal ponds or energy farms, to obtain large amounts of biomass. Growth of algae at high temperatures results in higher yields because of increased growth rate, the higher light intensity that can be used before saturating the photosynthetic process, easier maintenance of selected FBGA strains, and fewer predators to decimate culture. Additional advantages of growing FBGA as a source of biomass include: bypassing the limitations of nutrient sources, because FBGA fix their own nitrogen and require only CO/sub 2/ when inorganic nutrients are recycled; toleration of higher salinity and metal ion concentrations; and easier and less expensive harvesting procedures.

  15. Effect of substrate roughness on growth of diamond by hot filament ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    1999; May 2000; Das and Singh 2007). To exploit these properties for engineering applications many techniques have been developed in the last three decades to deposit diamond films on engineering components. Hot filament assisted chemical vapour deposition technique (Kama et al 1983; Wang et al 2003; Sarangi et ...

  16. Filamentous invasive growth of mutants of the genes encoding ammonia-metabolizing enzymes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshie Sasaki

    Full Text Available The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes a switch from yeast to filamentous invasive growth in response to certain environmental stimuli. Among them is ammonium limitation. Amt1, one of the three ammonium transporters in this yeast, is required for the ammonium limitation-induced morphological transition; however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be understood. Cells lacking Amt1 became capable of invasive growth upon increasing concentrations of ammonium in the medium, suggesting that the ammonium taken up into the cell or a metabolic intermediate in ammonium assimilation might serve as a signal for the ammonium limitation-induced morphological transition. To investigate the possible role of ammonium-metabolizing enzymes in the signaling process, deletion mutants were constructed for the gdh1, gdh2, gln1, and glt1 genes, which were demonstrated by enzyme assays to encode NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase, NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase, respectively. Growth tests on various nitrogen sources revealed that a gln1Δ mutant was a glutamine auxotroph and that a gdh1Δ mutant had a defect in growth on ammonium, particularly at high concentrations. The latter observation indicates that the NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase of S. pombe plays a major role in ammonium assimilation under high ammonium concentrations. Invasive growth assays showed that gdh1Δ and glt1Δ mutants underwent invasive growth to a lesser extent than did wild-type strains. Increasing the ammonium concentration in the medium suppressed the invasive growth defect of the glt1Δ mutant, but not the gdh1Δ mutant. These results suggest that the nitrogen status of the cell is important in the induction of filamentous invasive growth in S. pombe.

  17. Ectopic expression of SUPERMAN suppresses development of petals and stamens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jae-Young; Weigel, Detlef; Lee, Ilha

    2002-01-01

    The floral regulatory gene SUPERMAN (SUP) encodes a C2H2 type zinc finger protein that is required for maintaining boundaries between floral organs in Arabidopsis. It has been proposed that the main function of SUP is to balance cell proliferation in the third and fourth whorl of developing flowers, thereby maintaining the boundaries between the two whorls. To gain further insight into the function of SUP, we have ectopically expressed SUP using the promoter of APETALA1 (AP1), a gene that is initially expressed throughout floral meristems and later becomes restricted to the first and second whorls. Flowers of AP1::SUP plants have fewer floral organs, consistent with an effect of SUP on cell proliferation. In addition, the AP1::SUP transgene caused the conversion of petals to sepals and suppressed the development of stamens. The expression of the B function homeotic gene APETALA3 (AP3) and its regulator UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) were delayed and reduced in AP1::SUP flowers. However, SUP does not act merely through UFO, as constitutive expression of UFO did not rescue the defects in petal and stamen development in AP1::SUP flowers. Together, these results suggest that SUP has both indirect and direct effects on the expression of B function homeotic genes.

  18. Towards systematic discovery of signaling networks in budding yeast filamentous growth stress response using interventional phosphorylation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Shively, Christian; Kumar, Anuj; Andrews, Philip C

    2013-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation is one of the major mechanisms of signal transduction, and signaling networks are critical regulators of cell growth and development. However, few of these networks have been delineated completely. Towards this end, quantitative phosphoproteomics is emerging as a useful tool enabling large-scale determination of relative phosphorylation levels. However, phosphoproteomics differs from classical proteomics by a more extensive sampling limitation due to the limited number of detectable sites per protein. Here, we propose a comprehensive quantitative analysis pipeline customized for phosphoproteome data from interventional experiments for identifying key proteins in specific pathways, discovering the protein-protein interactions and inferring the signaling network. We also made an effort to partially compensate for the missing value problem, a chronic issue for proteomics studies. The dataset used for this study was generated using SILAC (Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture) technique with interventional experiments (kinase-dead mutations). The major components of the pipeline include phosphopeptide meta-analysis, correlation network analysis and causal relationship discovery. We have successfully applied our pipeline to interventional experiments identifying phosphorylation events underlying the transition to a filamentous growth form in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified 5 high-confidence proteins from meta-analysis, and 19 hub proteins from correlation analysis (Pbi2p and Hsp42p were identified by both analyses). All these proteins are involved in stress responses. Nine of them have direct or indirect evidence of involvement in filamentous growth. In addition, we tested four of our predicted proteins, Nth1p, Pbi2p, Pdr12p and Rcn2p, by interventional phenotypic experiments and all of them present differential invasive growth, providing prospective validation of our approach. This comprehensive pipeline presents a

  19. Towards systematic discovery of signaling networks in budding yeast filamentous growth stress response using interventional phosphorylation data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available Reversible phosphorylation is one of the major mechanisms of signal transduction, and signaling networks are critical regulators of cell growth and development. However, few of these networks have been delineated completely. Towards this end, quantitative phosphoproteomics is emerging as a useful tool enabling large-scale determination of relative phosphorylation levels. However, phosphoproteomics differs from classical proteomics by a more extensive sampling limitation due to the limited number of detectable sites per protein. Here, we propose a comprehensive quantitative analysis pipeline customized for phosphoproteome data from interventional experiments for identifying key proteins in specific pathways, discovering the protein-protein interactions and inferring the signaling network. We also made an effort to partially compensate for the missing value problem, a chronic issue for proteomics studies. The dataset used for this study was generated using SILAC (Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture technique with interventional experiments (kinase-dead mutations. The major components of the pipeline include phosphopeptide meta-analysis, correlation network analysis and causal relationship discovery. We have successfully applied our pipeline to interventional experiments identifying phosphorylation events underlying the transition to a filamentous growth form in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified 5 high-confidence proteins from meta-analysis, and 19 hub proteins from correlation analysis (Pbi2p and Hsp42p were identified by both analyses. All these proteins are involved in stress responses. Nine of them have direct or indirect evidence of involvement in filamentous growth. In addition, we tested four of our predicted proteins, Nth1p, Pbi2p, Pdr12p and Rcn2p, by interventional phenotypic experiments and all of them present differential invasive growth, providing prospective validation of our approach. This comprehensive

  20. Mutagenic synergism detected between 1,2-dibromoethane and X rays in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone BNL 4430

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Ling Zhi; Ichikawa, Sadao

    1998-01-01

    Mutagenic interaction between 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) and X rays was studied in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone BNL 4430, a blue/pink heterozygote. The young inflorescence-bearing shoots with roots of this clone cultivated in a nutrient solution circulating growth chamber were used as the tester plants. EDB is a promutagen and also a bifunctional alkylating agent with a high Swain-Scott substrate constant, but is thought to react probably via SN 1 mechanism. After confirming the dose-dependent mutagenicities of aqueous solutions of EDB for the first time in Tradescantia stamen hairs, a combined treatment with EDB and X rays was conducted, exposing acutely to 578 mGy X rays at the midpoint of 66.5 mM EDB treatment for 4 h. The induced somatic mutation frequency determined after the combined treatment was significantly higher (at 0.1% level) than that expected from the additive effects of EDB and X rays, showing that EDB and X rays acted obviously synergistically. The confirmation of the mutagenic synergism between EDB and X rays is reported here for the first time, although a likelihood of synergistic effects of EDB with 3 H beta rays has been suggested earlier. (author)

  1. Two new growth inhibition tests with the filamentous algae Ceramium strictum and C. tenuicorne (Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Ellen; Eklund, Britta

    2003-01-01

    Two growth inhibition tests using the red marine macroalgae Ceramium strictum and the brackish water relative C. tenuicorne have been developed. Besides using phenol as a reference substance, the toxicity of a metal, a flame retardant and a complex effluent water were assayed. The two methods are reliable and repeatable bioassays for salinities between 4 and 30 per thousandth. The coefficients of variation (CV) for toxicity of the reference substance phenol were 15% for the Stereo Microscope Analysis test and between 24 and 51% for the Computer Image Analysis test (n=5). Ceramium spp. are common and important primary producers in temperate coastal waters and are thus relevant as test organisms. Both algae grow well in laboratorial conditions and tests can be performed all year around.

  2. Two new growth inhibition tests with the filamentous algae Ceramium strictum and C. tenuicorne (Rhodophyta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, Ellen; Eklund, Britta

    2003-09-01

    Two species of Ceramium grow well in lab assays and tests can be performed all year around. - Two growth inhibition tests using the red marine macroalgae Ceramium strictum and the brackish water relative C. tenuicorne have been developed. Besides using phenol as a reference substance, the toxicity of a metal, a flame retardant and a complex effluent water were assayed. The two methods are reliable and repeatable bioassays for salinities between 4 and 30%o. The coefficients of variation (CV) for toxicity of the reference substance phenol were 15% for the Stereo Microscope Analysis test and between 24 and 51% for the Computer Image Analysis test (n=5). Ceramium spp. are common and important primary producers in temperate coastal waters and are thus relevant as test organisms. Both algae grow well in laboratorial conditions and tests can be performed all year around.

  3. Two new growth inhibition tests with the filamentous algae Ceramium strictum and C. tenuicorne (Rhodophyta)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, Ellen; Eklund, Britta

    2003-01-01

    Two species of Ceramium grow well in lab assays and tests can be performed all year around. - Two growth inhibition tests using the red marine macroalgae Ceramium strictum and the brackish water relative C. tenuicorne have been developed. Besides using phenol as a reference substance, the toxicity of a metal, a flame retardant and a complex effluent water were assayed. The two methods are reliable and repeatable bioassays for salinities between 4 and 30%o. The coefficients of variation (CV) for toxicity of the reference substance phenol were 15% for the Stereo Microscope Analysis test and between 24 and 51% for the Computer Image Analysis test (n=5). Ceramium spp. are common and important primary producers in temperate coastal waters and are thus relevant as test organisms. Both algae grow well in laboratorial conditions and tests can be performed all year around

  4. Arabidopsis actin-depolymerizing factor7 severs actin filaments and regulates actin cable turnover to promote normal pollen tube growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yiyan; Xie, Yurong; Jiang, Yuxiang; Qu, Xiaolu; Huang, Shanjin

    2013-09-01

    Actin filaments are often arranged into higher-order structures, such as the longitudinal actin cables that generate the reverse fountain cytoplasmic streaming pattern present in pollen tubes. While several actin binding proteins have been implicated in the generation of these cables, the mechanisms that regulate their dynamic turnover remain largely unknown. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana actin-depolymerizing factor7 (ADF7) is required for turnover of longitudinal actin cables. In vitro biochemical analyses revealed that ADF7 is a typical ADF that prefers ADP-G-actin over ATP-G-actin. ADF7 inhibits nucleotide exchange on actin and severs filaments, but its filament severing and depolymerizing activities are less potent than those of the vegetative ADF1. ADF7 primarily decorates longitudinal actin cables in the shanks of pollen tubes. Consistent with this localization pattern, the severing frequency and depolymerization rate of filaments significantly decreased, while their maximum lifetime significantly increased, in adf7 pollen tube shanks. Furthermore, an ADF7-enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion with defective severing activity but normal G-actin binding activity could not complement adf7, providing compelling evidence that the severing activity of ADF7 is vital for its in vivo functions. These observations suggest that ADF7 evolved to promote turnover of longitudinal actin cables by severing actin filaments in pollen tubes.

  5. Exploratory monitoring of air pollutants for mutagenicity activity with the Tradescantia stamen hair system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, L A; Van't Hof, J; Hayes, C G; Burton, R M; de Serres, F J

    1978-12-01

    The Tradescantia genetic system developed by the late Dr. Arnold H. Sparrow for the study of effects of ionizing radiation is applicable to chemical mutagen detection. Early radiobiological data demonstrated that the stamen hairs were sensitive to as little as 0.25 rad of x-rays and that the number of cells showing a phenotypic change in pigmentation from blue to pink plateaus after approximately 21 days of chronic, low-level irradiation. Exposures to the air pollutants SO(2), NO(2), and O(3) and to vapors of mutagens such as 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE) and ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) demonstrated the usefulness of the system as a detector of chemical mutagens. A significant number of phenotypic changes was observed following exposures to as little as 0.14 ppm of DBE. The maximum sensitivity of the system is obtained with long-term or chronic exposures because the response increases linearly in proportion to the duration of exposure up to 21 days. To monitor industrial sites for atmospheric mutagens a mobile laboratory was designed to support plant culture in the field. Environment-controlled growth chambers were installed in a trailer so that both ambient air fumigations and concurrent clean-air control exposures could be made. Sites monitored by the mobile laboratory were: Elizabeth, N. J.; Charleston, W. Va.; Birmingham, Ala.; Baton Rouge, La.; Houston, Tex.; Upland, Calif.; Magna, Utah; and Grand Canyon, Ariz. The latter site at Grand Canyon served as a clean air control study. Atmospheric contaminants from petroleum and chemical processing plants generated a significant number of phenotypic pigment changes that were 17 to 31% above the control levels; contaminants from steel and copper smelters, automotive combustion products and photochemical compounds were negative. Chemical analyses are underway to identify the atmospheric mutagens at the sites that showed a positive response.

  6. Functional analysis of the two Brassica AP3 genes involved in apetalous and stamen carpelloid phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfeng Zhang

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis homeotic genes APETALA3 (AP3 and PISTILLATA (PI are B genes which encode MADS-box transcription factors and specify petal and stamen identities. In the current study, the stamen carpelloid (SC mutants, HGMS and AMS, of B. rapa and B. napus were investigated and two types of AP3 genes, B.AP3.a and B.AP3.b, were functional characterized. B.AP3.a and B.AP3.b share high similarity in amino acid sequences except for 8 residues difference located at the C-terminus. Loss of this 8 residues in B.AP3.b led to the change of PI-derived motifs. Meanwhile, B.AP3.a specified petal and stamen development, whereas B.AP3.b only specified stamen development. In B. rapa, the mutations of both genes generated the SC mutant HGMS. In B. napus that contained two B.AP3.a and two B.AP3.b, loss of the two B.AP3.a functions was the key reason for the apetalous mutation, however, the loss-of-function in all four AP3 was related to the SC mutant AMS. We inferred that the 8 residues or the PI-derived motif in AP3 gene probably relates to petal formation.

  7. [Anatomy and development of stamens and carpels of Drimys granadensis (Winteraceae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquínez-Casas, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    Winteraceae has long been considered a family with early diversification among angiosperms, with characters such as: flowers with many spirally arranged parts and apocarpic ovary formed by plicated carpels with sessile stigma. In Drimys, the presence or absence of conspicuous glands on the connective of the stamens have been used as a taxonomic character, and it is considered a synapomorphy for the clade including Drimys angustifolia, D. brasiliensis, D. granadensis and D. roraimensis (Northeastern clade); however, the anatomy of stamens and carpels has only been studied in detail for D. winteri (Southwestern clade). In this research, the presence and the structure of glands on the connective of stamens was studied in seven species of the genus from herbarium specimens, and a detailed study of the anatomy and development of stamens and carpels was carried out by scanning electron and optic microscopy in Drimys granadensis. We found similarities between D. granadensis and D. winteri for the following characters: Basic type anther wall formation, secretory tapetum that collapses at maturity, intermediate type microsporogenesis with formation of a transient cell plate in telophase I, ascidiated carpel due to the formation of an adaxial lip during development, stigma closed by interdigitation of epidermal cells. We also determined that the large glands on anther mature connective are originated by an overgrowth of subepidermal oil cells; this character is a Northeastern Drimys clade synapomorphy, while it was absent in both Drimys of Southwestern clade (which includes D. andina, D. confertifolia and D. winteri), and the rest of the Winteraceae. We are proposing the hypothesis that the highly variable enviromental conditions in the tropics where Drimys Northeastern clade is distributed, with a wide range of pollinators, would be associated with the emergence of glandular conspicuously stamens; while, as a prediction to be confirmed, temperated Southwestern clade species

  8. Denitrification, activity of bacterial flocs, and growth of a filamentous bacterium in relation with the bulking of activated sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    Activated sludge with poor settling characteristics is caught under the term "bulking" sludge. Various types of bulking activated sludge can be distinguished.
    1) Sludge containing an abundance of filamentous microorganisms.
    2) Sludge, characterized by excessive amount of

  9. Two-Dimensional Visualization of Growth and Burst of the Edge-Localized Filaments in KSTAR H-Mode Plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Choi, M. J.; Lee, J.; Park, H. K.; Tobias, B.; Domier, C.W.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Donne, A. J. H.; Lee, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    The filamentary nature and dynamics of edge-localized modes (ELMs) in the KSTAR high-confinement mode plasmas have been visualized in 2D via electron cyclotron emission imaging. The ELM filaments rotating with a net poloidal velocity are observed to evolve in three distinctive stages: initial linear

  10. Organelle Simple Sequence Repeat Markers Help to Distinguish Carpelloid Stamen and Normal Cytoplasmic Male Sterile Sources in Broccoli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jinshuai; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Zhang, Lili; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhuang, Mu; Zhang, Yangyong; Lv, Honghao

    2015-01-01

    We previously discovered carpelloid stamens when breeding cytoplasmic male sterile lines in broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica). In this study, hybrids and multiple backcrosses were produced from different cytoplasmic male sterile carpelloid stamen sources and maintainer lines. Carpelloid stamens caused dysplasia of the flower structure and led to hooked or coiled siliques with poor seed setting, which were inherited in a maternal fashion. Using four distinct carpelloid stamens and twelve distinct normal stamens from cytoplasmic male sterile sources and one maintainer, we used 21 mitochondrial simple sequence repeat (mtSSR) primers and 32 chloroplast SSR primers to identify a mitochondrial marker, mtSSR2, that can differentiate between the cytoplasm of carpelloid and normal stamens. Thereafter, mtSSR2 was used to identify another 34 broccoli accessions, with an accuracy rate of 100%. Analysis of the polymorphic sequences revealed that the mtSSR2 open reading frame of carpelloid stamen sterile sources had a deletion of 51 bases (encoding 18 amino acids) compared with normal stamen materials. The open reading frame is located in the coding region of orf125 and orf108 of the mitochondrial genomes in Brassica crops and had the highest similarity with Raphanus sativus and Brassica carinata. The current study has not only identified a useful molecular marker to detect the cytoplasm of carpelloid stamens during broccoli breeding, but it also provides evidence that the mitochondrial genome is maternally inherited and provides a basis for studying the effect of the cytoplasm on flower organ development in plants. PMID:26407159

  11. Influence of temperature on spontaneous and radiation-induced somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nauman, C.H.; Schairer, L.A.; Sparrow, A.H.

    1978-01-01

    Three diploid clones of Tradescantia which are heterozygous or hemizygous for flower color, and which exhibit a 35-fold range in spontaneous mutation frequency, have been compared in their response to increased temperatures. The endpoint studied is the expression of pink and colorless mutations, which arise in stamen hair cells spontaneously and following exposure to ionizing radiation and chemical mutagens. Increased temperature (26.5 or 28 0 vs. 16 or 19 0 ) significantly increased the spontaneous pink mutation frequency in stamen hair cells of all three clones. Colorless mutations in clone 0106 were not increased significantly at the higher temperature. The influence of increased temperature on radiation-induced pink mutation frequency was examined in clone 02. Temperatures in the range of 16-28 0 did not influence the magnitude of mutation response after exposure to 100 rad of X-rays; however, the timing of the mutation response was altered both in time of onset and duration. (Auth.)

  12. The systematic wood anatomy of the Moraceae (Uriticales). V. Genera of the tribe Moreae without urticaceous stamens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welle, ter B.J.H.; Koek-Noorman, J.; Topper, S.M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The wood anatomy of the Moreae without urticaceous stamens is described in detail. Generic descriptions of the following genera are provided: Antiaropsis, Artocarpus, Bagassa, Batocarpus, Clarisia, Parartocarpus, Poulsenia, Prainea, Sorocea, Sparattosyce, and Treculia. Wood anatomical variation

  13. The systematic wood anatomy of the Moraceae (Urticales) IV. Genera of the tribe Moreae with urticaceous stamens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welle, ter B.J.H.; Koek-Noorman, J.; Topper, S.M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The wood anatomy of the genera of the tribe Moreae with urticaceous stamens, viz. Broussonetia, Madura s.l. (including Cardiogyne, Chlorophora, and Cudrania), Malaisia, Milicia, Morus, Olmedia, Pachytrophe, Plecospermum, Sloetiopsis, Streblus s.l. (including Paratrophis, Phyllochlamys,

  14. Global expression profiling applied to the analysis of Arabidopsis stamen development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Ferreira, Márcio; Wellmer, Frank; Banhara, Aline; Kumar, Vijaya; Riechmann, José Luis; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2007-11-01

    To obtain detailed information about gene expression during stamen development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we compared, by microarray analysis, the gene expression profile of wild-type inflorescences to those of the floral mutants apetala3, sporocyteless/nozzle, and male sterile1 (ms1), in which different aspects of stamen formation are disrupted. These experiments led to the identification of groups of genes with predicted expression at early, intermediate, and late stages of stamen development. Validation experiments using in situ hybridization confirmed the predicted expression patterns. Additional experiments aimed at characterizing gene expression specifically during microspore formation. To this end, we compared the gene expression profiles of wild-type flowers of distinct developmental stages to those of the ms1 mutant. Computational analysis of the datasets derived from this experiment led to the identification of genes that are likely involved in the control of key developmental processes during microsporogenesis. We also identified a large number of genes whose expression is prolonged in ms1 mutant flowers compared to the wild type. This result suggests that MS1, which encodes a putative transcriptional regulator, is involved in the stage-specific repression of these genes. Lastly, we applied reverse genetics to characterize several of the genes identified in the microarray experiments and uncovered novel regulators of microsporogenesis, including the transcription factor MYB99 and a putative phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase.

  15. Global Expression Profiling Applied to the Analysis of Arabidopsis Stamen Development1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Ferreira, Márcio; Wellmer, Frank; Banhara, Aline; Kumar, Vijaya; Riechmann, José Luis; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.

    2007-01-01

    To obtain detailed information about gene expression during stamen development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we compared, by microarray analysis, the gene expression profile of wild-type inflorescences to those of the floral mutants apetala3, sporocyteless/nozzle, and male sterile1 (ms1), in which different aspects of stamen formation are disrupted. These experiments led to the identification of groups of genes with predicted expression at early, intermediate, and late stages of stamen development. Validation experiments using in situ hybridization confirmed the predicted expression patterns. Additional experiments aimed at characterizing gene expression specifically during microspore formation. To this end, we compared the gene expression profiles of wild-type flowers of distinct developmental stages to those of the ms1 mutant. Computational analysis of the datasets derived from this experiment led to the identification of genes that are likely involved in the control of key developmental processes during microsporogenesis. We also identified a large number of genes whose expression is prolonged in ms1 mutant flowers compared to the wild type. This result suggests that MS1, which encodes a putative transcriptional regulator, is involved in the stage-specific repression of these genes. Lastly, we applied reverse genetics to characterize several of the genes identified in the microarray experiments and uncovered novel regulators of microsporogenesis, including the transcription factor MYB99 and a putative phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase. PMID:17905860

  16. The effect of phase front deformation on the growth of the filamentation instability in laser–plasma interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, E; Norreys, P A; Trines, R; Bingham, R; Lancaster, K L; Jiang, J; Davies, J R

    2013-01-01

    Laser pulses of 0.9 kJ/1 ns/1053 nm were focused onto low-Z plastic targets in both spherical and planar geometry. The uniformity of the resulting plasma production was studied using x-ray pinhole imaging. Evidence is provided suggesting that thermal filamentation starts to occur for irradiances on the target of Iλ 2 ⩾ 10 14 W cm −2 μm 2 , even on deployment of phase plates to improve the focal spot spatial uniformity. The experiments are supported by both analytical modelling and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The implications for the applications of laser–plasma interactions that require high degrees of uniform irradiation are discussed. (paper)

  17. Changes in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia 4430 treated with mercury and γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Jeon; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2009-01-01

    Tradescantia 4430 clone is an interspecific hybrid made by artificially crossing T. hirsutiflora which is a species that blossoms indigo colored flowers with T. subacaulis with pink colored flowers. It has hereditary heteromorphy as its flower color and it blossoms indigo colored flowers that are normally dominant. Because of its genetic property, T-4430 is extremely sensitive to ionizing radiation. Mutations occur in the T-4430 stamen hair cells due to radiation, and their frequency shows the aspect of slowly increasing, reaching a maximum value, and then decreasing

  18. Biological response of Tradescantia stamen-hairs in Brazilian radioactive waste deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Heliana A.; Macacini, Jose Flavio

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to apply a highly sensitive botanical test of mutagenicity (the Tradescantia stamen-hair mutation bioassay), to assess in situ the biological responses induced by occurring radiation in Brazilian radioactive waste deposits (waste deposits from the Mineral Treatment Unit/Brazilian Nuclear Industries (UTM/INB), from the Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN) and from the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN). The mutagenesis was evaluated in environments presenting gamma radiation exposure rates ranging from 1.6 μR.min -1 up to 3300.0 μR.min -1 . It was detected a significant increase in the mutation rate for pink Tradescantia stamen-hair only for the local presenting the highest exposition rate within UTM/INB which had a radiation exposition rate of 750 μR.min -1 . The Tradescantia plants exposed to the radioactive waste deposits from CDTN and IPEN presented an insufficient number of flowers for the statistical evaluation of mutagenicity. (author)

  19. Harmful impact of filamentous algae (Spirogyra sp.) on juvenile crayfish

    OpenAIRE

    Ulikowski Dariusz; Chybowski Łucjan; Traczuk Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of filamentous algae on the growth and survival of juvenile narrow-clawed crayfish, Astacus leptodactylus (Esch.), in rearing basins. Three stocking variants were used: A - basins with a layer of filamentous algae without imitation mineral substrate; B - basins with a layer of filamentous algae with imitation mineral substrate; C - basins without filamentous algae but with mineral substrate. The crayfish were reared from June 12 to October 10 ...

  20. Colony induction and growth inhibition in Desmodesmus quadrispina (Chlorococcales) by allelochemicals released from the filamentous alga Uronema confervicolum (Ulotrichales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leflaive, Joséphine; Lacroix, Gérard; Nicaise, Yvan; Ten-Hage, Loïc

    2008-06-01

    In biofilms, the competition between microorganisms for light, nutrients and space is extreme. Moreover, planktonic algae can be considered as competitors insofar as they decrease the available light for the benthic algae. One of the strategies employed by microorganisms to eliminate competitors is the release of inhibiting compounds, a process known as allelopathy. Here we demonstrate that a benthic/epiphytic alga, Uronema confervicolum, produces allelopathic compounds that induce oxidative stress and growth inhibition in the planktonic Desmodesmus quadrispina. Some of these compounds can also trigger the formation of colony in D. quadrispina. As colonies have higher sedimentation rates than unicells, their induction by U. confervicolum might decrease shading. This study is the first report of colony induction in the context of alga-alga interaction. Our results also suggest the implication of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases in the transduction of the signal leading to the formation of reactive oxygen species in the cells. A comparison with allelochemicals from another planktonic green alga, Monoraphidium aff. dybowski, emphasizes the specificity of colony induction by U. confervicolum, in contrast with oxidative stress which is induced by several compounds. The reciprocal production of inhibiting compounds by D. quadrispina makes this interaction an interesting example of co-evolution between two microorganisms belonging to different compartments of the ecosystem.

  1. Inhibition of bacterial and filamentous fungal growth in high moisture, nonsterile corn with intermittent pumping of trans-2-hexenal vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucca, Anthony J; Carter-Wientjes, Carol H; Boué, Stephen M; Lovisa, Mary P; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2013-07-01

    Trans-2-hexenal (T2H), a plant-produced aldehyde, was intermittently pumped over a 7 d period into a small, bench top model of stored corn (nonsterile, moisture content about 23%). Naturally occurring bacteria and fungi, including added Aspergillus flavus, grew rapidly on corn not treated with T2H vapor. However, intermittently pumped T2H (30 min per 2 h or 30 min per 12 h) significantly reduced bacterial and fungal viable populations, with nearly 100% fungal viability loss observed after either (1) one day of pumping at the 30 min per 2 h rate or (2) pumping cycles of 30 min per 12 h period over the initial 48 to 72 h of incubation. Data suggest that short-term intermittent fumigation of stored corn with T2H could prevent growth of bacteria and mycotoxigenic fungi such as A. flavus. Journal of Food Science © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists® No claim to original US government works.

  2. Solar Features - Prominences and Filaments - Filaments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Filaments are formed in magnetic loops that hold relatively cool, dense gas suspended above the surface of the Sun (David Hathaway/NASA)

  3. The histone acetyltransferase GCN5 affects the inflorescence meristem and stamen development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ross; Schocken, John; Kaldis, Athanasios; Vlachonasios, Konstantinos E; Hark, Amy T; McCain, Elizabeth R

    2009-11-01

    A central question in biology is to understand how gene expression is precisely regulated to give rise to a variety of forms during the process of development. Epigenetic effects such as DNA methylation or histone modification have been increasingly shown to play a critical role in regulation of genome function. GCN5 is a prototypical histone acetyltransferase that participates in regulating developmental gene expression in several metazoan species. In Arabidopsis thaliana, plants with T-DNA insertions in GCN5 (also known as HAG1) display a variety of pleiotropic effects including dwarfism, loss of apical dominance, and floral defects affecting fertility. We sought to determine when during early development floral abnormalities first arise. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that gcn5-1/hag1-1 and gcn5-5/hag1-5 mutants display overproliferation of young buds and development of abnormal structures around the inflorescence meristem. gcn5 mutants also display defects in stamen number and arrangement at later stages. This analysis provides temporal and spatial information to aid in the identification of GCN5 target genes in the developing flower. Preliminary studies of putative targets using reverse transcriptase PCR suggest that the floral meristem identity gene LEAFY is among factors upregulated in gcn5-1 mutants.

  4. Cucumber SUPERMAN has conserved function in stamen and fruit development and a distinct role in floral patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianyu; Liu, Meiling; Jiang, Li; Ding, Lian; Yan, Shuang Shuang; Zhang, Juan; Dong, Zhaobin; Ren, Huazhong; Zhang, Xiaolan

    2014-01-01

    The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN (SUP) gene encodes a C2H2 type zinc finger protein that is required for maintaining the boundaries between stamens and carpels, and for regulating development of ovule outer integument. Orthologs of SUP have been characterized in bisexual flowers as well as dioecious species, but it remains elusive in monoecious plants with unisexual flowers on the same individual. Here we isolate the SUP ortholog in Cucumis sativus L (CsSUP), a monoecious vegetable. CsSUP is predominantly expressed in female specific organs: the female flower buds and ovules. Ectopic expression of CsSUP in Arabidopsis can partially complement the fruit development in sup-5 mutant, and its over-expression in wide-type leads to reduced silique length, suppressed stamen development and distorted petal patterning. Our data suggest that CsSUP plays conserved as well as distinct roles during flower and fruit development, and it may function in the boundaries and ovules to balance petal patterning, stamen and ovule development in Arabidopsis.

  5. Cucumber SUPERMAN has conserved function in stamen and fruit development and a distinct role in floral patterning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyu Zhao

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN (SUP gene encodes a C2H2 type zinc finger protein that is required for maintaining the boundaries between stamens and carpels, and for regulating development of ovule outer integument. Orthologs of SUP have been characterized in bisexual flowers as well as dioecious species, but it remains elusive in monoecious plants with unisexual flowers on the same individual. Here we isolate the SUP ortholog in Cucumis sativus L (CsSUP, a monoecious vegetable. CsSUP is predominantly expressed in female specific organs: the female flower buds and ovules. Ectopic expression of CsSUP in Arabidopsis can partially complement the fruit development in sup-5 mutant, and its over-expression in wide-type leads to reduced silique length, suppressed stamen development and distorted petal patterning. Our data suggest that CsSUP plays conserved as well as distinct roles during flower and fruit development, and it may function in the boundaries and ovules to balance petal patterning, stamen and ovule development in Arabidopsis.

  6. Cell Death and Cell Cycle Arrest of Silene latifolia Stamens and Pistils After Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Hiroki; Yamanaka, Kaori; Koizumi, Ayako; Hirata, Aiko; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2017-02-01

    Mechanisms of suppression of pistil primordia in male flowers and of stamen primordia in female flowers differ in diclinous plants. In this study, we investigated how cell death and cell cycle arrest are related to flower organ formation in Silene latifolia. Using in situ hybridization and a TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling) assay, we detected both cell cycle arrest and cell death in suppressed stamens of female flowers and suppressed pistils of male flowers in S. latifolia. In female flowers infected with Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae, developmental suppression of stamens is released, and cell cycle arrest and cell death do not occur. Smut spores are formed in S. latifolia anthers infected with M. lychnidis-dioicae, followed by cell death in the endothelium, middle layer, tapetal cells and pollen mother cells. Cell death is difficult to detect using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled TUNEL assay due to strong autofluorescence in the anther. We therefore combined a TUNEL assay in an infrared region with transmission electron microscopy to detect cell death in anthers. We show that following infection by M. lychnidis-dioicae, a TUNEL signal was not detected in the endothelium, middle layer or pollen mother cells, and cell death with outflow of cell contents, including the nucleoplast, was observed in tapetal cells. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Tungsten Filament Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  8. Proteomics of Filamentous Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passel, van M.W.J.; Schaap, P.J.; Graaff, de L.H.

    2013-01-01

    Filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae traditionally have had an important role in providing enzymes and enzyme cocktails that are used in food industry. In recent years the genome sequences of many filamentous fungi have become available. This combined with

  9. Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Scannapieco, Evan [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States). School of Earth and Space Exploration

    2013-01-15

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z ≈ 0.1Z filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10-3Z filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which leads to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbusting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occur. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253, but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  10. Evolution of Filament Barbs

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Rui; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haimin

    2010-01-01

    We present a selected few cases in which the sense of chirality of filament barbs changed within as short as hours. We investigate in detail a quiescent filament on 2003 September 10 and 11. Of its four barbs displaying such changes only one overlay a small polarity inversion line inside the EUV filament channel (EFC). No magnetic elements with magnitude above the noise level were detected at the endpoints of all barbs. In particular, a pair of barbs first approached toward and then departed ...

  11. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation

    CERN Document Server

    Chin, See Leang

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond Laser Filamentation gives a comprehensive review of the physics of propagation of intense femtosecond laser pulses in optical media (principally air) and the applications and challenges of this new technique. This book presents the modern understanding of the physics of femtosecond laser pulse propagation, including unusual new effects such as the self-transformation of the pulse into a white light laser pulse, intensity clamping, the physics of multiple filamentation and competition, and how filaments’ ability to melt glass leads to wave guide writing. The potential applications of laser filamentation in atmospheric sensing and the generation of other electromagnetic pulses from the UV to the radio frequency are treated, together with possible future challenges in the excitation of super-excited states of molecules. Exciting new phenomena such as filament induced ultrafast birefringence and the excitation of molecular rotational wave packets and their multiple revivals in air (gases) will also ...

  12. An APETALA2 Homolog, RcAP2, Regulates the Number of Rose Petals Derived From Stamens and Response to Temperature Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Han

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Rosa chinensis, which is a famous traditional flower in China, is a major ornamental plant worldwide. Long-term cultivation and breeding have resulted in considerable changes in the number of rose petals, while most wild Rosaceae plants have only one whorl consisting of five petals. The petals of double flowers reportedly originate from stamens, but the underlying molecular mechanism has not been fully characterized. In this study, we observed that the number of petals of R. chinensis ‘Old Blush’ flowers increased and decreased in response to low- and high-temperature treatments, respectively, similar to previous reports. We characterized these variations in further detail and found that the number of stamens exhibited the opposite trend. We cloned an APETALA2 homolog, RcAP2. A detailed analysis of gene structure and promoter cis-acting elements as well as RcAP2 temporospatial expression patterns and responses to temperature changes suggested that RcAP2 expression may be related to the number of petals from stamen origin. The overexpression of RcAP2 in Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic plants may induce the transformation of stamens to petals, thereby increasing the number of petals. Moreover, silencing RcAP2 in ‘Old Blush’ plants decreased the number of petals. Our results may be useful for clarifying the temperature-responsive mechanism involved in petaloid stamen production, which may be relevant for the breeding of new rose varieties with enhanced flower traits.

  13. Filament Substructures and their Interrelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Martin, S. F.; Engvold, O.

    The main structural components of solar filaments, their spines, barbs, and legs at the extreme ends of the spine, are illustrated from recent high-resolution observations. The thread-like structures appear to be present in filaments everywhere and at all times. They are the fundamental elements of solar filaments. The interrelation of the spines, barbs and legs are discussed. From observations, we present a conceptual model of the magnetic field of a filament. We suggest that only a single physical model is needed to explain filaments in a continuous spectrum represented by active region filaments at one end and quiescent filaments at the other end.

  14. Filament-filament switching can be regulated by separation between filaments together with cargo motor number.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P Erickson

    Full Text Available How intracellular transport controls the probability that cargos switch at intersections between filaments is not well understood. In one hypothesis some motors on the cargo attach to one filament while others attach to the intersecting filament, and the ensuing tug-of-war determines which filament is chosen. We investigate this hypothesis using 3D computer simulations, and discover that switching at intersections increases with the number of motors on the cargo, but is not strongly dependent on motor number when the filaments touch. Thus, simply controlling the number of active motors on the cargo cannot account for in vivo observations that found reduced switching with increasing motor number, suggesting additional mechanisms of regulation. We use simulations to show that one possible way to regulate switching is by simultaneously adjusting the separation between planes containing the crossing filaments and the total number of active motors on the cargo. Heretofore, the effect of filament-filament separation on switching has been unexplored. We find that the switching probability decreases with increasing filament separation. This effect is particularly strong for cargos with only a modest number of motors. As the filament separation increases past the maximum head-to-head distance of the motor, individual motors walking along a filament will be unable to reach the intersecting filament. Thus, any switching requires that other motors on the cargo attach to the intersecting filament and haul the cargo along it, while motor(s engaged on the original filament detach. Further, if the filament separation is large enough, the cargo can have difficulty proceeding along the initial filament because the engaged motors can walk underneath the intersecting filament, but the cargo itself cannot fit between the filaments. Thus, the cargo either detaches entirely from the original filament, or must dip to the side of the initial filament and then pass below

  15. Filament-filament switching can be regulated by separation between filaments together with cargo motor number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Robert P; Gross, Steven P; Yu, Clare C

    2013-01-01

    How intracellular transport controls the probability that cargos switch at intersections between filaments is not well understood. In one hypothesis some motors on the cargo attach to one filament while others attach to the intersecting filament, and the ensuing tug-of-war determines which filament is chosen. We investigate this hypothesis using 3D computer simulations, and discover that switching at intersections increases with the number of motors on the cargo, but is not strongly dependent on motor number when the filaments touch. Thus, simply controlling the number of active motors on the cargo cannot account for in vivo observations that found reduced switching with increasing motor number, suggesting additional mechanisms of regulation. We use simulations to show that one possible way to regulate switching is by simultaneously adjusting the separation between planes containing the crossing filaments and the total number of active motors on the cargo. Heretofore, the effect of filament-filament separation on switching has been unexplored. We find that the switching probability decreases with increasing filament separation. This effect is particularly strong for cargos with only a modest number of motors. As the filament separation increases past the maximum head-to-head distance of the motor, individual motors walking along a filament will be unable to reach the intersecting filament. Thus, any switching requires that other motors on the cargo attach to the intersecting filament and haul the cargo along it, while motor(s) engaged on the original filament detach. Further, if the filament separation is large enough, the cargo can have difficulty proceeding along the initial filament because the engaged motors can walk underneath the intersecting filament, but the cargo itself cannot fit between the filaments. Thus, the cargo either detaches entirely from the original filament, or must dip to the side of the initial filament and then pass below the crossing

  16. Modelling the morphology of filamentous microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1996-01-01

    The rapid development in image analysis techniques has made it possible to study the growth kinetics of filamentous microorganisms in more detail than previously, However, owing to the many different processes that influence the morphology it is important to apply mathematical models to extract...

  17. Uptake of tritiated 1,2-dibromoethane by Tradescantia floral tissues: relation to induced mutation frequency in stamen hair cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nauman, C.H.; Klotz, P.J.; Schairer, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    Inflorescences of two clones of Tradescantia (02 and 4430) have been exposed to the gaseous form of tritium-labeled 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE). A comparison of chemical exposure concentration and tissue dose for various exposure periods indicated that DBE readily and rapidly penetrated through the outer sepal and petal tissues to the critical stamen hair cells - the targets for mutation induction. Bud and open flower tissues of both clones contained generally similar amounts of [ 3 H]-DBE after similar exposures; thus, a differential penetration or uptake of the mutagen into the tissues of these clones cannot account for the 7 to 9 fold difference between clones in pink mutation frequency elicited by DBE exposure. Autoradiographs of stamen hair cells showed clearly that the DBE was not localized, but distributed randomly throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus. Comparison of [ 3 H]-DBE-induced pink mutation-response curves to those derived previously with unlabeled DBE revealed that the rad dose of tritium could not account entirely for the elevated mutation response following exposure to the [ 3 H]-DBE. Plots of the total exposure to [ 3 H]-DBE vs both tissue molar concentration of [ 3 H]-DBE and pink mutation incidence following exposure to DBE made possible the construction of true target-tissue dose-response curves. (author)

  18. Evolution of filament barbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R.; Xu, Y.; Wang, H.

    We present a selected few cases in which the sense of chirality of filament barbs changed within periods as short as hours. We investigate in detail a quiescent filament on 2003 September 10 and 11. Of its four barbs displaying such changes, only one overlays a small polarity inversion line inside the EUV filament channel (EFC). No magnetic elements with magnitude above the noise level were detected at the endpoints of all barbs. In particular, a pair of barbs first approached toward, and then departed from, each other in Halpha , with the barb endpoints migrating as far as ˜ 10 arcsec. We conclude that the evolution of the barbs was driven by flux emergence and cancellation of small bipolar units at the EFC border.

  19. Filaments in Lupus I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Rodon, J.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Plunkett, A.

    2017-06-01

    The mechanisms behind the formation of sub-stellar mass sources are key to determine the populations at the low-mass end of the stellar distribution. Here, we present mapping observations toward the Lupus I cloud in C18O(2-1) and 13CO(2-1) obtained with APEX. We have identified a few velocity-coherent filaments. Each contains several substellar mass sources that are also identified in the 1.1mm continuum data (see also SOLA catalogue presentation). We will discuss the velocity structure, fragmentation properties of the identified filaments, and the nature of the detected sources.

  20. Positrusion Filament Recycling System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TUI proposes a novel process to produce 3d printer feedstock filament out of scrap ABS on the ISS. Currently the plastic filament materials that most 3d printers use...

  1. Solar Features - Prominences and Filaments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Prominences and filaments are two manifestations of the same phenomenon. Both prominences and filaments are features formed above the chromosphere by cool dense...

  2. Automated image analysis for quantification of filamentous bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, M.; Rosenvinge, F. S.; Spillum, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antibiotics of the beta-lactam group are able to alter the shape of the bacterial cell wall, e.g. filamentation or a spheroplast formation. Early determination of antimicrobial susceptibility may be complicated by filamentation of bacteria as this can be falsely interpreted as growth...... displaying different resistant profiles and differences in filamentation kinetics were used to study a novel image analysis algorithm to quantify length of bacteria and bacterial filamentation. A total of 12 beta-lactam antibiotics or beta-lactam-beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations were analyzed...... in systems relying on colorimetry or turbidometry (such as Vitek-2, Phoenix, MicroScan WalkAway). The objective was to examine an automated image analysis algorithm for quantification of filamentous bacteria using the 3D digital microscopy imaging system, oCelloScope. Results: Three E. coli strains...

  3. Synthesis and functionalization of coiled carbon filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikita, Muneaki

    Coiled carbon filaments have one of the most attractive three-dimensional forms in carbon materials due to their helical morphologies. Because of their shape and carbon structure, they exhibit excellent mechanical and electrical properties such as superelasticity, low Young's modulus, relatively high electrical conductivity, and good electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption. Therefore, they are good candidates as fillers in composite materials for tactile sensor and electromagnetic interference shielding. In medical areas of interests, coiled carbon filaments can be used as micro and nano heaters or trigger for thermotherapy and biosensors using EM wave exposure because absorbed EM waves by coiled carbon filaments are converted into heat. Although various shapes of coiled carbon filaments have been discovered, optimum synthesis conditions and growth mechanisms of coiled carbon filaments are poorly understood. The study of growth kinetics is significant not only to analyze catalyst activity but also to establish the growth mechanisms of coiled carbon filaments. The establishment of growth mechanisms would be useful for determining optimum synthesis conditions and maximizing the quantity of carbon filaments synthesized for a given application. In the first study, tip grown single helical carbon filaments or carbon nanocoils (CNCs) were synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition method using tin-iron-oxide (Sn-Fe-O) xerogel film catalyst. The Sn-Fe-O catalyst was prepared by a low-cost sol-gel method using stannous acetate and ferric acetate as precursors. The growth kinetics of CNCs were monitored by a thermogravimetric analyzer, and the experimental result was correlated using a one-dimensional kinetic model, corresponding to one-dimensional tip growth. In the second study, bidirectionally grown double helical filaments or carbon microcoils (CMCs) were synthesized using a chemical vapor deposition method. CMCs obtained at two reaction temperatures were compared. CMCs

  4. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...... also shares in vivo properties of assembly and dynamics with IF proteins by forming stable filamentous structures that continuously incorporate subunits along their length and that grow in a nonpolar fashion. De novo assembly of crescentin is biphasic and involves a cell size-dependent mechanism...... a new function for MreB and providing a parallel to the role of actin in IF assembly and organization in metazoan cells. Additionally, analysis of an MreB localization mutant suggests that cell wall insertion during cell elongation normally occurs along two helices of opposite handedness, each...

  5. Filamentous Fungi Fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Anders; Stocks, Stuart; Woodley, John

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi (including microorganisms such as Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oryzae) represent an enormously important platform for industrial fermentation. Two particularly valuable features are the high yield coefficients and the ability to secrete products. However, the filamentous...... morphology, together with non-Newtonian rheological properties (shear thinning), result in poor oxygen transfer unless sufficient energy is provided to the fermentation. While genomic research may improve the organisms, there is no doubt that to enable further application in future it will be necessary...... to match such research with studies of oxygen transfer and energy supply to high viscosity fluids. Hence, the implementation of innovative solutions (some of which in principle are already possible) will be essential to ensure the further development of such fermentations....

  6. Actin organization and dynamics in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berepiki, Adokiye; Lichius, Alexander; Read, Nick D

    2011-11-02

    Growth and morphogenesis of filamentous fungi is underpinned by dynamic reorganization and polarization of the actin cytoskeleton. Actin has crucial roles in exocytosis, endocytosis, organelle movement and cytokinesis in fungi, and these processes are coupled to the production of distinct higher-order structures (actin patches, cables and rings) that generate forces or serve as tracks for intracellular transport. New approaches for imaging actin in living cells are revealing important similarities and differences in actin architecture and organization within the fungal kingdom, and have yielded key insights into cell polarity, tip growth and long-distance intracellular transport. In this Review, we discuss the contribution that recent live-cell imaging and mutational studies have made to our understanding of the dynamics and regulation of actin in filamentous fungi.

  7. A comparison of methods for the non-destructive fresh weight determination of filamentous algae for growth rate analysis and dry weight estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michael E; Stanley, Michele S; Day, John G; Semião, Andrea J C

    2017-01-01

    The determination of rates of macroalgal growth and productivity via temporal fresh weight (FW) measurements is attractive, as it does not necessitate the sacrifice of biomass. However, there is no standardised method for FW analysis; this may lead to potential discrepancies when determining growth rates or productivity and make literature comparison problematic. This study systematically assessed a variety of lab-scale methods for macroalgal FW measurement for growth rate determination. Method efficacy was assessed over a 14-day period as impact upon algal physiology, growth rate on basis of FW and dry weight (DW), nitrate removal, and maintenance of structural integrity. The choice of method is critical to both accuracy and inter-study comparability of the data generated. In this study, it was observed that the choice of protocol had an impact upon the DW yield ( P values = 0.036-0.51). For instance, those involving regular mechanical pressing resulted in a >25% reduction in the final DW in two of the three species studied when compared to algae not subjected to any treatment. This study proposes a standardised FW determination method employing a reticulated spinner that is rapid, reliable, and non-destructive and provides an accurate growth estimation.

  8. Harmful impact of filamentous algae (Spirogyra sp. on juvenile crayfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulikowski Dariusz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the impact of filamentous algae on the growth and survival of juvenile narrow-clawed crayfish, Astacus leptodactylus (Esch., in rearing basins. Three stocking variants were used: A - basins with a layer of filamentous algae without imitation mineral substrate; B - basins with a layer of filamentous algae with imitation mineral substrate; C - basins without filamentous algae but with mineral substrate. The crayfish were reared from June 12 to October 10 under natural thermal conditions and fed a commercial feed. The results indicated that the presence of the filamentous algae did not have a statistically significant impact on the growth of the juvenile crayfish (P > 0.05. The presence of the filamentous algae had a strong negative impact on juvenile crayfish survival and stock biomass (P < 0.05. The layer of gravel and small stones that imitated the mineral substrate of natural aquatic basins somewhat neutralized the disadvantageous impact the filamentous algae had on the crayfish.

  9. Mapping the filaments in NGC 1275

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos, Aracely Susan; Rich, Jeffrey; Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS)

    2018-01-01

    The giant elliptical brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) at the centers of many massive clusters are often surrounded by drawn-out forms of gaseous material. It is believed that this gaseous material is gas condensing from the intracluster medium (ICM) in a “cooling flow,” and it can directly impact the growth of the BCG. The galaxy NGC 1275 is one of the closest giant elliptical BCGs and lies at the center of the Perseus cluster. NGC 1275 has large filaments that are thought to be associated with a cooling flow, but they may also be affected by its AGN. To investigate the relationship between the AGN and the cooling flow we have mapped the filaments around NGC 1275 with the Cosmic Web Imager, an image-slicing integral field spectrograph at Palomar Observatories. We employ standard emission-line ratio diagnostics to determine the source of ionizing radiation. We use our analysis to investigate whether the formation of the extended filaments is a result of gas from the ICM collapsing onto the galaxy as it cools or if it is possible that the filaments are a result of the cluster’s interaction with the outflow driven by the AGN.

  10. Filament wound structure and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dritt, W.S.; Gerth, H.L.; Knight, C.E. Jr.; Pardue, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A filament wound spherical structure is described comprising a plurality of filament band sets disposed about the surface of a mandrel with each band of each set formed of a continuous filament circumferentially wound about the mandrel a selected number of circuits and with each circuit of filament being wound parallel to and contiguous with an immediate previously wound circuit. Each filament band in each band set is wound at the same helix angle from the axis of revolution of the mandrel and all of the bands of each set are uniformly distributed about the mandrel circumference. The pole-to-equator wall thickness taper associated with each band set, as several contiguous band sets are wound about the mandrel starting at the poles, is accumulative as the band sets are nested to provide a complete filament wound sphere of essentially uniform thickness

  11. Magnetic vortex filament flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, Manuel; Cabrerizo, Jose L.; Fernandez, Manuel; Romero, Alfonso

    2007-01-01

    We exhibit a variational approach to study the magnetic flow associated with a Killing magnetic field in dimension 3. In this context, the solutions of the Lorentz force equation are viewed as Kirchhoff elastic rods and conversely. This provides an amazing connection between two apparently unrelated physical models and, in particular, it ties the classical elastic theory with the Hall effect. Then, these magnetic flows can be regarded as vortex filament flows within the localized induction approximation. The Hasimoto transformation can be used to see the magnetic trajectories as solutions of the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation showing the solitonic nature of those

  12. Solar Filament Extraction and Characterizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Shih, F. Y.; Jing, J.; Wang, H.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a new method to extract and characterize solar filaments from H-alpha full-disk images produced by Big Bear Solar Observatory. A cascading Hough Transform method is designed to identify solar disk center location and radius. Solar disks are segmented from the background, and unbalanced illumination on the surface of solar disks is removed using polynomial surface fitting. And then a localized adaptive thresholding is employed to extract solar filament candidates. After the removal of small solar filament candidates, the remaining larger candidates are used as the seeds of region growing. The procedure of region growing not only connects broken filaments but also generate complete shape for each filament. Mathematical morphology thinning is adopted to produce the skeleton of each filament, and graph theory is used to prune branches and barbs to get the main skeleton. The length and the location of the main skeleton is characterized. The proposed method can help scientists and researches study the evolution of solar filament, for instance, to detect solar filament eruption. The presented method has already been used by Space Weather Research Lab of New Jersey Institute of Technology (http://swrl.njit.edu) to generate the solar filament online catalog using H-alpha full-disk images of Global H-alpha Network (http://swrl.njit.edu/ghn_web/).

  13. Chaperonin filaments: The archael cytoskeleton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, E.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Chaperonins are multi-subunit double-ring complexed composed of 60-kDa proteins that are believed to mediate protein folding in vivo. The chaperonins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae are composed of the organism`s two most abundant proteins, which represent 4% of its total protein and have an intracellular concentration of {ge} 3.0 mg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 mg/ml, purified chaperonin proteins aggregate to form ordered filaments. Filament formation, which requires Mg{sup ++} and nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), occurs at physiological temperatures under conditions suggesting filaments may exist in vivo. If the estimated 4,600 chaperonins per cell, formed filaments in vivo, they could create a matrix of filaments that would span the diameter of an average S. shibatae cell 100 times. Direct observations of unfixed, minimally treated cells by intermediate voltage electron microscopy (300 kV) revealed an intracellular network of filaments that resembles chaperonin filaments produced in vitro. The hypothesis that the intracellular network contains chaperonins is supported by immunogold analyses. The authors propose that chaperonin activity may be regulated in vivo by filament formation and that chaperonin filaments may serve a cytoskeleton-like function in archaea and perhaps in other prokaryotes.

  14. Effect of low dose gamma radiation on stamen-hairs of different clones of Tradescantia presenting variability in the frequency of spontaneous mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, C.S.

    1976-01-01

    Changes in the frequency of spontaneous somatic mutations were studied for three different clones of Tradescantia heterozygotes for flower and stamen-hair color keeping them under controlled or natural conditions in order to verify the effect of different environmental conditions on the different genotypes. The effect of inflorescence age on the variation of spontaneous mutations was studied choosing young and old inflorescences of a same plant. Low dose irradiation experiments were carried out with those clones to elucidate the radiation effects on the clones presenting changes in the frequency of spontaneous mutations. The chronic-and acute irradiation effects of low dose irradiation of the stamen-hair of Tradescantia were also studied. Results are discussed. (M.A.) [pt

  15. Influence of X-ray dose fractionation on the frequency of somatic mutations induced in Tradescantia stamen hairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNulty, P.J.; Nauman, C.H.; Sparrow, A.H.; Schwemmer, S.S.; Schairer, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    X-rays were used to investigate the influence of dose fractionation on the induction of pink and colorless somatic mutations in stamen hair cells of Tradescantia clone 02. Inflorescences were exposed to a single acute dose of 60 rad, two acute doses of 30 rad, or three acute doses of 20 rad. The dose rate in all cases was 30 rad/min. Intervals between dose fractions were varied from 35 sec to 48 h and the mutation frequency was compared with that resulting after the single dose of 60 rad. The date show a reduction in mutation frequency for fractionation intervals longer than 15 and 6 min for pink and colorless mutations, respectively, but not for shorter intervals. One interpretation of the data predicts that pink mutation frequencies are reduced by 11% for fraction intervals of 30 min to 6 h, and that colorless mutation frequencies are reduced by 24% for intervals of 15 min to 6 h. The corresponding sparing effect of dose fractionation is equal to 6 rad for pink mutations and 9 rad at the colorless mutation endpoint. A calculation has been made which indicates that the percentages of the total repairable (presumably two-hit) damage that is repaired during fraction intervals up to 6 h, are 16 and 35% for pink and colorless mutations, respectively

  16. The role of ClpP, RpoS and CsrA in growth and filament formation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium at low temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Nielsen, Maj-Britt; Thomsen, Line Elnif

    2014-01-01

    Background: Salmonellae are food-borne pathogens of great health and economic importance. To pose a threat to humans, Salmonellae normally have to cope with a series of stressful conditions in the food chain, including low temperature. In the current study, we evaluated the importance of the Clp....... The clpP mutant formed cold resistant suppressor mutants at a frequency of 2.5 x 10(-3) and these were found not to express RpoS. Together these results indicated that the impaired growth of the clpP mutant was caused by high level of RpoS. Evaluation by microscopy of the clpP mutant revealed...... that the phenotype of the csrA mutant was independent from RpoS. Conclusions: The cold sensitivity of clpP mutant was associated with increased levels of RpoS and probably caused by toxic levels of RpoS. Although a csrA mutant also accumulated high level of RpoS, growth impairment caused by lack of csr...

  17. Two C3H Type Zinc Finger Protein Genes, CpCZF1 and CpCZF2, from Chimonanthus praecox Affect Stamen Development in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huamin Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Wintersweet (Chimonanthus praecox is a popular garden plant because of its flowering time, sweet fragrance, and ornamental value. However, research into the molecular mechanism that regulates flower development in wintersweet is still limited. In this study, we sought to investigate the molecular characteristics, expression patterns, and potential functions of two C3H-type zinc finger (CZF protein genes, CpCZF1 and CpCZF2, which were isolated from the wintersweet flowers based on the flower developmental transcriptome database. CpCZF1 and CpCZF2 were more highly expressed in flower organs than in vegetative tissues, and during the flower development, their expression profiles were associated with flower primordial differentiation, especially that of petal and stamen primordial differentiation. Overexpression of either CpCZF1 or CpCZF2 caused alterations on stamens in transgenic Arabidopsis. The expression levels of the stamen identity-related genes, such as AGAMOUS (AG, PISTILLATA (PI, SEPALLATA1 (SEP1, SEPALLATA2 (SEP2, SEPALLATA3 (SEP3, APETALA1 (AP1, APETALA2 (AP2, and boundary gene RABBIT EAR (RBE were significantly up-regulated in CpCZF1 overexpression lines. Additionally, the transcripts of AG, PI, APETALA3 SEP1-3, AP1, and RBE were markedly increased in CpCZF2 overexpressed plant inflorescences. Moreover, CpCZF1 and CpCZF2 could interact with each other by using yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. Our results suggest that CpCZF1 and CpCZF2 may be involved in the regulation of stamen development and cause the formation of abnormal flowers in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

  18. Restoration of stamen development and production of functional pollen in an alloplasmic CMS tobacco line by ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana SUPERMAN gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereterbide, Agnès; Hernould, Michel; Farbos, Isabelle; Glimelius, Kristina; Mouras, Armand

    2002-03-01

    The alloplasmic male-sterile tobacco line Nta(rep)S, combining the nucleus of Nicotiana tabacum with the cytoplasm of Nicotiana repanda, exhibits cadastral-type anomalies due to a fusion of several stamens with the pistil. These anomalies share similarities with Arabidopsis superman mutants. SUPERMAN (SUP) is a cadastral gene controlling the boundary between whorls 3 (androecium) and 4 (gynoecium). Thus we hypothesized that the expression of the tobacco SUP orthologue might be impaired in the alloplasmic Nta(rep)S line, and that the deficiency could be complemented by the Arabidopsis SUP gene. Here we show that the ectopic expression of SUP in the alloplasmic male-sterile tobacco line Nta(rep)S significantly increases the frequency of flowers possessing free stamens, inducing the recovery of a proper structure for whorls 3 and 4. Furthermore, flowers of transgenic plants show a significant improvement of the morphology of stamens, and more particularly of the anthers, which are able to produce few but functional pollen. The data show that ectopic expression of Arabidopsis SUP reactivates the regulatory cascade of anther development. The plausible causes of the developmental defects of anthers in the alloplasmic male-sterile tobacco line are discussed in relation to the model of regulation of the Arabidopsis SUP gene.

  19. Morphogenesis of filaments growing in flexible confinements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, R.; Wittel, F. K.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2014-07-01

    Space-saving design is a requirement that is encountered in biological systems and the development of modern technological devices alike. Many living organisms dynamically pack their polymer chains, filaments or membranes inside deformable vesicles or soft tissue-like cell walls, chorions and buds. Surprisingly little is known about morphogenesis due to growth in flexible confinements—perhaps owing to the daunting complexity lying in the nonlinear feedback between packed material and expandable cavity. Here we show by experiments and simulations how geometric and material properties lead to a plethora of morphologies when elastic filaments are growing far beyond the equilibrium size of a flexible thin sheet they are confined in. Depending on friction, sheet flexibility and thickness, we identify four distinct morphological phases emerging from bifurcation and present the corresponding phase diagram. Four order parameters quantifying the transitions between these phases are proposed.

  20. Interaction between the macrophyte Stratiotes aloides and filamentous algae: does it indicate allelopathy?

    OpenAIRE

    Mulderij, G.; Mau, B.; De Senerpont Domis, L.N.; Smolders, A.J.P.; Van Donk, E.

    2009-01-01

    The aquatic macrophyte Stratiotes aloides Linnaeus, which has recently received attention in studies on allelopathy, has been shown to suppress phytoplankton growth. In the Netherlands, S. aloides often co-occurs with floating filamentous algae. However, filamentous algae are generally absent in close proximity to S. aloides, resulting in gaps in filamentous algae mats. We analyzed whether those gaps may be caused by allelopathic substances excreted by S. aloides or by nutrient depletion. We ...

  1. Comparative Biomechanics of Thick Filaments and Thin Filaments with Functional Consequences for Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Miller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The scaffold of striated muscle is predominantly comprised of myosin and actin polymers known as thick filaments and thin filaments, respectively. The roles these filaments play in muscle contraction are well known, but the extent to which variations in filament mechanical properties influence muscle function is not fully understood. Here we review information on the material properties of thick filaments, thin filaments, and their primary constituents; we also discuss ways in which mechanical properties of filaments impact muscle performance.

  2. Treadmilling of actin filaments via Brownian dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kunkun; Shillcock, Julian; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2010-10-01

    Actin polymerization is coupled to the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate (Pi). Therefore, each protomer within an actin filament can attain three different nucleotide states corresponding to bound ATP, ADP/Pi, and ADP. These protomer states form spatial patterns on the growing (or shrinking) filaments. Using Brownian dynamics simulations, the growth behavior of long filaments is studied, together with the associated protomer patterns, as a function of ATP-actin monomer concentration, CT, within the surrounding solution. For concentrations close to the critical concentration CT=CT,cr, the filaments undergo treadmilling, i.e., they grow at the barbed and shrink at the pointed end, which leads to directed translational motion of the whole filament. The corresponding nonequilibrium states are characterized by several global fluxes and by spatial density and flux profiles along the filaments. We focus on a certain set of transition rates as deduced from in vitro experiments and find that the associated treadmilling (or turnover) rate is about 0.08 monomers per second.

  3. Colloidal transport by active filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Raj Kumar; Kumar, P B Sunil; Adhikari, R

    2017-01-14

    Enhanced colloidal transport beyond the limit imposed by diffusion is usually achieved through external fields. Here, we demonstrate the ballistic transport of a colloidal sphere using internal sources of energy provided by an attached active filament. The latter is modeled as a chain of chemo-mechanically active beads connected by potentials that enforce semi-flexibility and self-avoidance. The fluid flow produced by the active beads and the forces they mediate are explicitly taken into account in the overdamped equations of motion describing the colloid-filament assembly. The speed and efficiency of transport depend on the dynamical conformational states of the filament. We characterize these states using filament writhe as an order parameter and identify ones yielding maxima in speed and efficiency of transport. The transport mechanism reported here has a remarkable resemblance to the flagellar propulsion of microorganisms which suggests its utility in biomimetic systems.

  4. Colloidal transport by active filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Raj Kumar; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Adhikari, R.

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced colloidal transport beyond the limit imposed by diffusion is usually achieved through external fields. Here, we demonstrate the ballistic transport of a colloidal sphere using internal sources of energy provided by an attached active filament. The latter is modeled as a chain of chemo-mechanically active beads connected by potentials that enforce semi-flexibility and self-avoidance. The fluid flow produced by the active beads and the forces they mediate are explicitly taken into account in the overdamped equations of motion describing the colloid-filament assembly. The speed and efficiency of transport depend on the dynamical conformational states of the filament. We characterize these states using filament writhe as an order parameter and identify ones yielding maxima in speed and efficiency of transport. The transport mechanism reported here has a remarkable resemblance to the flagellar propulsion of microorganisms which suggests its utility in biomimetic systems.

  5. Stability of two-dimensional vorticity filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhmaidi, D.; Provenzale, A.; Lili, T.; Babiano, A.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the results of a numerical study on the stability of two-dimensional vorticity filaments around a circular vortex. We illustrate how the stability of the filaments depends on the balance between the strain associated with the far field of the vortex and the local vorticity of the filament, and we discuss an empirical criterion for filament stability

  6. Self-Elongation with Sequential Folding of a Filament of Bacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Ryojiro; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Katori, Makoto

    2015-11-01

    Under hard-agar and nutrient-rich conditions, a cell of Bacillus subtilis grows as a single filament owing to the failure of cell separation after each growth and division cycle. The self-elongating filament of cells shows sequential folding processes, and multifold structures extend over an agar plate. We report that the growth process from the exponential phase to the stationary phase is well described by the time evolution of fractal dimensions of the filament configuration. We propose a method of characterizing filament configurations using a set of lengths of multifold parts of a filament. Systems of differential equations are introduced to describe the folding processes that create multifold structures in the early stage of the growth process. We show that the fitting of experimental data to the solutions of equations is excellent, and the parameters involved in our model systems are determined.

  7. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siccardi, Stefano, E-mail: ssiccardi@2ssas.it [The Unconventional Computing Centre, University of the West of England, Bristol (United Kingdom); Tuszynski, Jack A., E-mail: jackt@ualberta.ca [Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Adamatzky, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.adamatzky@uwe.ac.uk [The Unconventional Computing Centre, University of the West of England, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-08

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications. - Highlights: • We simulate interaction between voltage pulses using on actin filaments. • We use a coupled nonlinear transmission line model. • We design Boolean logical gates via interactions between the voltage pulses. • We construct one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses.

  8. Interaction between the macrophyte Stratiotes aloides and filamentous algae: does it indicate allelopathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulderij, G.; Mau, B.; De Senerpont Domis, L.N.; Smolders, A.J.P.; Van Donk, E.

    2009-01-01

    The aquatic macrophyte Stratiotes aloides Linnaeus, which has recently received attention in studies on allelopathy, has been shown to suppress phytoplankton growth. In the Netherlands, S. aloides often co-occurs with floating filamentous algae. However, filamentous algae are generally absent in

  9. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siccardi, Stefano; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications.

  10. Somatic mutation frequencies in the stamen hairs of stable and mutable clones of Tradescantia after acute gamma-ray treatments with small doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Sadao; Takahashi, C.S.

    1977-01-01

    Young inflorescences of two different Tradescantia clones heterozygous for flower and stamen-hair color, one stable (KU 9) and the other spontaneously mutable (KU 20), were irradiated acutely with small doses (approx. 3 to 50 R) of 60 Co gamma-rays. Somatic mutation frequencies from blue to pink in the stamen hairs scored on post-irradiation days 10 to 16 increased essentially linearly with increasing gamma-ray dose in both clones. Despite about a 5-fold difference in spontaneous mutation frequency per hair found between the two clones, the dose-response curves of pink mutations determined were similar to each other, giving average mutation frequencies of 1.51 and 1.41 pink-mutant events per 1000 hairs per R for KU 9 and KU 20, respectively. These frequencies are comparable to earlier results obtained from acute irradiation treatments of other clones with higher doses. The doubling dose of pink mutation (the radiation dose making the mutation frequency double the spontaneous level) was calculated to be 2.09 R for KU 9, and this low doubling dose must be given full attention. On the other hand, the doubling dose for KU 20 (calculated to be 10.4 R) is of questionable value, being greatly subject to change because of the diversely variable spontaneous mutation frequency of this clone

  11. Evaluation of mutagenic potential of contaminated atmosphere at Ibirapuera Park, Sao Paulo - SP, Brazil, using the Tradescantia stamen-hair assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Maria Izildinha; Domingos, Marisa; Gomes, Heliana de A; Saldiva, Paulo H.N.; Assuncao, Joao V. de

    2007-01-01

    Trad-SHM assay was used to check mutagenic potential of atmospheric contamination at Ibirapuera Park, located in Sao Paulo city, Brazil, and variation of risk along the year, besides determining which Tradescantia clone, BNL 4430 or KU-20, better indicates risk. Thirty pots of both clones were exposed during one-year period (September, 2002-August, 2003). Twenty inflorescences were taken from each clone twice a month in the morning, in order to estimate the frequency of mutations in stamen hairs. Results were compared to air pollution and climatic data measured next to the exposure site. KU-20 showed stamen-hair mutations greater than BNL 4430. Greatest mutation rates in KU-20 were observed in condition of high monthly mean of NO 2 and average peak concentrations of NO during the day, indicating that mutagenic effects originated from vehicular pollution. Clone KU-20 revealed to be more appropriate for biomonitoring purposes at the Park. - Clone KU-20 showed to be more appropriate than clone BNL 4430 to indicate vehicular pollution mutagenic risks in Trad-SHM assay

  12. Mutation frequency of Tradescantia (BNL clone 4430) stamen hairs exposed to low dose of gamma ray in KAERI γ-field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S.H.; Lee, Y.I.; Chung, K.H.; Oh, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    For determination of mutation frequency induced by chronic irradiation of low dose gamma rays, Tradescantia clone 4430 was exposed to Co-60 γ rays with different exposure rates from 3.6mR/day to 182R/day in or out of the gamma field at Kumkok Experiment Farm of KAERI. Somatic mutations based on pink mutant events of the stamen hair cells were clearly observed by the treatment. The pink mutant events were increased proportionally with increasing exposure rates of gamma ray except fo relatively high dose rates of 105R/day and 182R/day, indicating saturation effect of mutation. The somatic pink mutations could be fairly detectable even in the low dose rate of 3.6mR/day. Therefore, this stamen hair system of Tradescantia clone 4430 seemed to be a reasonable test system for detecting mutability of low level irradiation. These results imply that artificial mutation induction in the fruit and ornamental trees could be expected in the γ-field. (author)

  13. Beam distribution function after filamentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, T.O.; Decker, F.J.; Seeman, J.T.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, the authors calculate the beam distribution function after filamentation (phase-mixing) of a focusing mismatch. This distribution is relevant when interpreting beam measurements and sources of emittance dilution in linear colliders. It is also important when considering methods of diluting the phase space density, which may be required for the machine protection system in future linear colliders, and it is important when studying effects of trapped ions which filament in the electron beam potential. Finally, the resulting distribution is compared with measured beam distributions from the SLAC linac.

  14. Filamentation instability of large-amplitude Alfven waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, S.P.; Whang, M.H.; Lee, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    An instability that leads to the filamentation of large-amplitude Alfven waves and gives rise to purely growing density and magnetic field fluctuations is studied. The dispersion relation of the instability is derived, from which the threshold conditions and the growth rates of the instability are analyzed quantitatively for applications to the solar wind plasma. We have examined their dependence on the filamentation spectrum, the plasma β, and the pump frequency and intensity for both right-hand and left-hand circularly polarized Alfven waves. The excitation of filamentation instability for certain cases of interest is discussed and compared with that of the parametric decay and modulation instability. The relevance of the proposed instability with some observations is discussed. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  15. Magnetic helicity and active filament configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.; Zuccarello, F.; Poedts, S.; Soenen, A.; Zuccarello, F. P.

    2009-11-01

    Context: The role of magnetic helicity in active filament formation and destabilization is still under debate. Aims: Although active filaments usually show a sigmoid shape and a twisted configuration before and during their eruption, it is unclear which mechanism leads to these topologies. In order to provide an observational contribution to clarify these issues, we describe a filament evolution whose characteristics seem to be directly linked to the magnetic helicity transport in corona. Methods: We applied different methods to determine the helicity sign and the chirality of the filament magnetic field. We also computed the magnetic helicity transport rate at the filament footpoints. Results: All the observational signatures provided information on the positive helicity and sinistral chirality of the flux rope containing the filament material: its forward S shape, the orientation of its barbs, the bright and dark threads at 195 Å. Moreover, the magnetic helicity transport rate at the filament footpoints showed a clear accumulation of positive helicity. Conclusions: The study of this event showed a correspondence between several signatures of the sinistral chirality of the filament and several evidences of the positive magnetic helicity of the filament magnetic field. We also found that the magnetic helicity transported along the filament footpoints showed an increase just before the change of the filament shape observed in Hα images. We argued that the photospheric regions where the filament was rooted might be the preferential ways where the magnetic helicity was injected along the filament itself and where the conditions to trigger the eruption were yielded.

  16. [Controlling the morphology of filamentous fungi for optimization of fermentation process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qiang; Xu, Qing; Gu, Shuai; Li, Shuang

    2012-02-01

    Filamentous fungi have been extensively used in industrial fermentation processes. One of the most interesting topics of filamentous fungi is their bothersome morphology, which closely correlates with the productivity and broth rheology. Aiming at the optimization of the microbial process, works mainly focused on the relationships between morphology, productivity and environment in the last decades. Based on those works, we tried to interpret the mechanism of filamentous fungi growth from physiological aspects, and reviewed the mathematical models describing the hyphal growth, differentiation during the formation of target products. Above all, efficient and effective morphology controlling strategies were addressed from the engineering view.

  17. Filament Winding. A Unified Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koussios, S.

    2004-01-01

    In this dissertation we have presented an overview and comprehensive treatment of several facets of the filament winding process. With the concepts of differential geometry and the theory of thin anisotropic shells of revolution, a parametric shape generator has been formulated for the design

  18. Towards filament free semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.

    2000-01-01

    We outline physical models and simulations for suppression of self-focusing and filamentation in large aperture semiconductor lasers. The principal technical objective is to generate multi-watt CW or quasi-CW outputs with nearly diffraction limited beams, suitable for long distance free space...

  19. Capillary thinning of polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Szabo, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The capillary thinning of filaments of a Newtonian polybutene fluid and a viscoelastic polyisobutylene solution are analyzed experimentally and by means of numerical simulation. The experimental procedure is as follows. Initially, a liquid sample is placed between two cylindrical plates. Then...

  20. Capillary thinning of polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Szabo, Peter; Hassager, Ole

    1998-01-01

    The capillary thinning of a polymeric filament is analysed experimentally as well as by means of numerical simulation. The experimental procedure is as follows. Initially a liquid sample is kept between two cylindrical plates. Then the bottom plate is lowered under gravity to yield a given strain...

  1. Various Barbs in Solar Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, Boris

    2017-07-01

    Interest to lateral details of the solar filament shape named barbs, motivated by their relationship to filament chirality and helicity, showed their different orientation relative to the expected direction of the magnetic field. While the majority of barbs are stretched along the field, some barbs seem to be transversal to it and are referred to as anomalous barbs. We analyse the deformation of helical field lines by a small parasitic polarity using a simple flux rope model with a force-free field. A rather small and distant source of parasitic polarity stretches the bottom parts of the helical lines in its direction creating a lateral extension of dips below the flux-rope axis. They can be considered as normal barbs of the filament. A stronger and closer source of parasitic polarity makes the flux-rope field lines to be convex below its axis and creates narrow and deep dips near its position. As a result, the narrow structure, with thin threads across it, is formed whose axis is nearly perpendicular to the field. The structure resembles an anomalous barb. Hence, the presence of anomalous barbs does not contradict the flux-rope structure of a filament.

  2. Transient filament stretching rheometer II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    1997-01-01

    The Lagrangian sspecification is used to simulate the transient stretching filament rheometer. Simulations are performed for dilute PIB-solutions modeled as a four mode Oldroyd-B fluid and a semidilute PIB-solution modeled as a non-linear single integral equation. The simulations are compared...

  3. Towards filament free semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.

    2000-01-01

    We outline physical models and simulations for suppression of self-focusing and filamentation in large aperture semiconductor lasers. The principal technical objective is to generate multi-watt CW or quasi-CW outputs with nearly diffraction limited beams, suitable for long distance free space...... propagation structures in lasers and amplifiers which suppress lateral reflections....

  4. Positrusion Filament Recycling System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TUI proposes a novel process to produce 3d printer feedstock filament out of scrap ABS on the ISS. Currently the plastic filament materials that most 3d printers use...

  5. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation for Atmospheric Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Huai Liang Xu; See Leang Chin

    2010-01-01

    Powerful femtosecond laser pulses propagating in transparent materials result in the formation of self-guided structures called filaments. Such filamentation in air can be controlled to occur at a distance as far as a few kilometers, making it ideally suited for remote sensing of pollutants in the atmosphere. On the one hand, the high intensity inside the filaments can induce the fragmentation of all matters in the path of filaments, resulting in the emission of characteristic fluorescence sp...

  6. Filament Winding Of Carbon/Carbon Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoy, Paul J.; Schmitigal, Wesley P.; Phillips, Wayne M.

    1991-01-01

    Improved method of winding carbon filaments for carbon/carbon composite structures less costly and labor-intensive, also produces more consistent results. Involves use of roller squeegee to ensure filaments continuously wet with resin during winding. Also involves control of spacing and resin contents of plies to obtain strong bonds between carbon filaments and carbon matrices. Lends itself to full automation and involves use of filaments and matrix-precursor resins in their simplest forms, thereby reducing costs.

  7. Solar Filaments as Tracers of Subsurface Processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Filaments are clouds of relatively cool and dense gas in the solar atmosphere. ... First-tier filaments may be related to a peculiar feature of the solar dynamo. .... Still, an appeal to subsurface processes should be resisted, but surface motion models have been able to reproduce neither the pattern of filament field orientations ...

  8. Striation and convection in penumbral filaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit, H.C.; Scharmer, G.B.; Löfdahl, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    Observations with the 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope of the flows seen in penumbral filaments are presented. Time sequences of bright filaments show overturning motions strikingly similar to those seen along the walls of small isolated structures in the active regions. The filaments show outward

  9. Solar Filaments as Tracers of Subsurface Processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    according to which, probably all the magnetic flux that emerges into the photosphere is twisted. Twisted flux forms sunspots, active regions (ARs) and filaments. The twist accumulates in filaments and coronal arcades. Eventually the accumulated, highly twisted fields become unstable and erupt. From a study of filament ...

  10. Evaluation of filamentous green algae as feedstocks for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Yonggang; Cui, Binjie; Wang, Hui; Liu, Tianzhong

    2016-11-01

    Compared with unicellular microalgae, filamentous algae have high resistance to grazer-predation and low-cost recovery in large-scale production. Green algae, as the most diverse group of algae, included numerous filamentous genera and species. In this study, records of filamentous genera and species in green algae were firstly censused and classified. Then, seven filamentous strains subordinated in different genera were cultivated in bubbled-column to investigate their growth rate and energy molecular (lipid and starch) capacity. Four strains including Stigeoclonium sp., Oedogonium nodulosum, Hormidium sp. and Zygnema extenue were screened out due to their robust growth. And they all could accumulate triacylglycerols and starch in their biomass, but with different capacity. After nitrogen starvation, Hormidium sp. and Oedogonium nodulosum respectively exhibited high capacity of lipid (45.38% in dry weight) and starch (46.19% in dry weight) accumulation, which could be of high potential as feedstocks for biodiesel and bioethanol production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Elasticity of a Filament with Kinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein

    2017-12-01

    Using the wormlike chain model, we analytically study the elasticity of a filament with kinks. We calculate the position probability density function and the force constant of a kinked filament with a general kink angle. Then, using the mathematical induction, we obtain the positional-orientational probability density function of a filament with regular kinks. For this filament, we compute the force constant in two different directions. In longitudinal direction of the filament, the force constant is proportional to the inverse of the number of the segments, i.e., 1 / m, while in transverse direction, it is proportional to 1/m^3.

  12. UNUSUAL FILAMENTS INSIDE THE UMBRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleint, L. [High Altitude Observatory/NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Sainz Dalda, A., E-mail: kleintl@ucar.edu [Stanford-Lockheed Institute for Space Research, Stanford University, HEPL, 466 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    We analyze several unusual filamentary structures which appeared in the umbra of one of the sunspots in AR 11302. They do not resemble typical light bridges in morphology or in evolution. We analyze data from SDO/HMI to investigate their temporal evolution, Hinode/SP for photospheric inversions, IBIS for chromospheric imaging, and SDO/AIA for the overlying corona. Photospheric inversions reveal a horizontal, inverse Evershed flow along these structures, which we call umbral filaments. Chromospheric images show brightenings and energy dissipation, while coronal images indicate that bright coronal loops seem to end in these umbral filaments. These rapidly evolving features do not seem to be common, and are possibly related to the high flare-productivity of the active region. Their analysis could help to understand the complex evolution of active regions.

  13. Self-assembly of actin monomers into long filaments: Brownian dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kunkun; Shillcock, Julian; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2009-07-01

    Brownian dynamics simulations are used to study the dynamical process of self-assembly of actin monomers into long filaments containing up to 1000 actin protomers. In order to overcome the large separation of time scales between the diffusive motion of the free monomers and the relatively slow attachment and detachment processes at the two ends of the filaments, we introduce a novel rescaling procedure by which we speed all dynamical processes related to actin polymerization and depolymerization up by the same factor. In general, the actin protomers within a filament can attain three different states corresponding to a bound adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate with inorganic phosphate (ADP/P), and ADP molecule. The simplest situation that has been studied experimentally is provided by the polymerization of ADP-actin, for which all protomers are identical. This case is used to unravel certain relations between the filament's physical properties and the model parameters such as the attachment rate constant and the size of the capture zone, the detachment rate and the probability of the detached event, as well as the growth rate and waiting times between two successive attachment/detachment events. When a single filament is allowed to grow in a bath of constant concentration of free ADP-actin monomers, its growth rate increases linearly with the free monomer concentration in quantitative agreement with in vitro experiments. The results also show that the waiting time is governed by exponential distributions and that the two ends of a filament undergo biased random walks. The filament length fluctuations are described by a length diffusion constant that is found to attain a constant value at low ADP-actin concentration and to increase linearly with this concentration. It is straightforward to apply our simulation code to more complex processes such as polymerization of ATP-actin coupled to ATP hydrolysis, force generation by filaments, formation of

  14. [Chitinolytic activity of filamentous fungi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubakov, A A; Kucheriavykh, P S

    2004-01-01

    The chitinolytic activity of nine species of filamentous fungi, classified with seven genera (specifically, Aspergillus, Penicillium, Trichoderma, Paecilomyces, Sporotrichum, Beaueria, and Mucor), was studied. When cultured in liquid medium containing 1% crystalline chitin, all fungi produced extracellular chitosans with activity varying from 0.2 U/mg protein (Sporotrichum olivaceum, Mucor sp., etc.) to 4.0-4.2 U/mg protein (Trichoderma lignorum, Aspergillus niger).

  15. Lighting the universe with filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Theuns, Tom

    2007-09-14

    The first stars in the universe form when chemically pristine gas heats as it falls into dark-matter potential wells, cools radiatively because of the formation of molecular hydrogen, and becomes self-gravitating. Using supercomputer simulations, we demonstrated that the stars' properties depend critically on the currently unknown nature of the dark matter. If the dark-matter particles have intrinsic velocities that wipe out small-scale structure, then the first stars form in filaments with lengths on the order of the free-streaming scale, which can be approximately 10(20) meters (approximately 3 kiloparsecs, corresponding to a baryonic mass of approximately 10(7) solar masses) for realistic "warm dark matter" candidates. Fragmentation of the filaments forms stars with a range of masses, which may explain the observed peculiar element abundance pattern of extremely metal-poor stars, whereas coalescence of fragments and stars during the filament's ultimate collapse may seed the supermassive black holes that lurk in the centers of most massive galaxies.

  16. Antagonistic interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and the cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Sarah

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and filamentous cyanobacteria. Here, interactions between the filamentous heterotrophic bacteria Fibrella aestuarina (strain BUZ 2 and Fibrisoma limi (BUZ 3 with an axenic strain of the autotrophic filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum (SAG 25.82 were studied in mixed cultures under nutrient rich (carbon source present in medium and poor (carbon source absent in medium conditions. Findings F. aestuarina BUZ 2 significantly reduced the cyanobacterial population whereas F. limi BUZ 3 did not. Physical contact between heterotrophs and autotroph was observed and the cyanobacterial cells showed some level of damage and lysis. Therefore, either contact lysis or entrapment with production of extracellular compounds in close vicinity of host cells could be considered as potential modes of action. The supernatants from pure heterotrophic cultures did not have an effect on Nostoc cultures. However, supernatant from mixed cultures of BUZ 2 and Nostoc had a negative effect on cyanobacterial growth, indicating that the lytic compounds were only produced in the presence of Nostoc. The growth and survival of tested heterotrophs was enhanced by the presence of Nostoc or its metabolites, suggesting that the heterotrophs could utilize the autotrophs and its products as a nutrient source. However, the autotroph could withstand and out-compete the heterotrophs under nutrient poor conditions. Conclusions Our results suggest that the nutrients in cultivation media, which boost or reduce the number of heterotrophs, were the important factor influencing the outcome of the interplay between filamentous heterotrophs and autotrophs. For better understanding of these interactions, additional research is needed. In particular, it is necessary to elucidate the mode of action for lysis by heterotrophs, and the possible defense mechanisms of the autotrophs.

  17. Filamentous fungi: the indeterminate lifestyle and microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, D A; Paschke, M W

    2004-04-01

    The filamentous fungi have dynamic and variable hyphal structures within which cytoplasm can be moved, synthesized, and degraded, in response to changes in environmental conditions, resource availability, and resource distribution. Their study has gone through several phases. In the first phase, direct observation was emphasized without undue concern for interior structures or in the presence of cytoplasm. By the mid-1970s, single biochemical proxies (ergosterol, marker fatty acids, chitin derivatives, etc.) were being used increasingly. The use of these surrogate single measurements continues, in spite of their inability to provide information on the physical structure of the filamentous fungi. Molecular approaches also are being used, primarily through the use of bulk nucleic acid extraction and cloning. Because the sources of the nucleic acids used in such studies usually are not known, taxonomic and phylogenetic information derived by this approach cannot be linked to specific fungal structures. Recently, a greater emphasis has been placed on assessing physical aspects of indeterminate fungal growth, involving the assessment of cytoplasm-filled and evacuated (empty) hyphae. Both of these parameters are important for describing filamentous fungal growth and function. The use of phase contrast microscopy and varied general stains, as well as fluorogenic substrates with observation by epifluorescence microscopy, has made it possible to provide estimates of cytoplasm-filled hyphal lengths. Using this approach, it has been possible to evaluate the responses of the indeterminate fungal community to changes in environmental conditions, including soil management. It is now possible to obtain molecular information from individual bacteria and fungal structures (hyphae, spores, fruiting bodies) recovered from environments, making it possible to link individual fungal structures with their taxonomic and phylogenetic information. In addition, this information can be

  18. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation for Atmospheric Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai Liang Xu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Powerful femtosecond laser pulses propagating in transparent materials result in the formation of self-guided structures called filaments. Such filamentation in air can be controlled to occur at a distance as far as a few kilometers, making it ideally suited for remote sensing of pollutants in the atmosphere. On the one hand, the high intensity inside the filaments can induce the fragmentation of all matters in the path of filaments, resulting in the emission of characteristic fluorescence spectra (fingerprints from the excited fragments, which can be used for the identification of various substances including chemical and biological species. On the other hand, along with the femtosecond laser filamentation, white-light supercontinuum emission in the infrared to UV range is generated, which can be used as an ideal light source for absorption Lidar. In this paper, we present an overview of recent progress concerning remote sensing of the atmosphere using femtosecond laser filamentation.

  19. The Mysterious Case of the Missing Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alden, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections, or CMEs, are large solar eruptions that can have major debilitating impacts on society. Typically, these eruptions have the three following key structures: the leading edge, the empty chamber known as the cavity, and the filament which often is the brightest part of the CME. When we can see all three structures clearly with a coronagraph, it is called a classic three-part CME, also referred to as a 'lightbulb' CME. According to current knowledge, when a CME erupts, a filament should also erupt or lift off the Sun in order to have the bright center within the CME. However, we do not always see a filament erupt at the surface, and yet we still get a 'filament' within the coronagraph CME. To better understand what might be occurring with these missing filaments, we looked at three-part CMEs using the SOHO LASCO CME Catalog and filaments from the SDO AIA Filament Catalog in order to create a list of 50 CMEs without a listed filament erupting at the surface. For those CMEs without filaments in the list we closely inspected the AIA images for evidence of filament eruption. To ensure that there were no filaments past the limb of the Sun, we used data from the STEREO-A and STEREO-B spacecraft's to look at the Sun from other angles. We have found numerous events where no filament erupts from the surface, but we still see the classic three-part CME. We believe this may be due to an optical illusion occurring from the twisting of the flux rope.

  20. Assembly of Superparamagnetic Filaments in External Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiachen; Song, Fan; Dobnikar, Jure

    2016-09-13

    We present a theoretical and simulation study of anchored magneto-elastic filaments in external magnetic field. The filaments are composed of a mixture of superparamagnetic and nonmagnetic colloidal beads interlinked with elastic springs. We explore the steady-state structures of filaments with various composition and bending rigidity subject to external magnetic field parallel to the surface. The interplay of elastic and induced magnetic interactions results in a rich phase behavior with morphologies reminiscent of macromolecular folding: bent filaments, loops, sheets, helicoids, and other collapsed structures. Our results provide new insights into the design of hierarchically assembled supramolecular structures with controlled response to external stimuli.

  1. Chaperonin filaments: The archaeal cytoskeleton?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, Eric; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1997-01-01

    Chaperonins are high molecular mass double-ring structures composed of 60-kDa protein subunits. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae the two chaperonin proteins represent ≈4% of its total protein and have a combined intracellular concentration of >30 mg/ml. At concentrations ≥ 0.5 mg/ml purified chaperonins form filaments in the presence of Mg2+ and nucleotides. Filament formation requires nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), and occurs at physiological temperatures in biologically relevant buffers, including a buffer made from cell extracts. These observations suggest that chaperonin filaments may exist in vivo and the estimated 4600 chaperonins per cell suggest that such filaments could form an extensive cytostructure. We observed filamentous structures in unfixed, uranyl-acetate-stained S. shibatae cells, which resemble the chaperonin filaments in size and appearance. ImmunoGold (Janssen) labeling using chaperonin antibodies indicated that many chaperonins are associated with insoluble cellular structures and these structures appear to be filamentous in some areas, although they could not be uranyl-acetate-stained. The existence of chaperonin filaments in vivo suggests a mechanism whereby their protein-folding activities can be regulated. More generally, the filaments themselves may play a cytoskeletal role in Archaea. PMID:9144246

  2. Subcutaneous implants of polypropylene filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, T C; Chartoff, R P; Cosgrove, S L; McCuskey, R S

    1976-11-01

    Extruded filaments of unmodified polypropylene (PP) with and without antioxidant were implanted subcutaneously in hamsters in order to determine their rate of degradation. Specimens were removed periodically during a 5 month test period and analyzed by infrared spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical testing. The analyses show that degradation beigns to occur after only a few days. Although the reaction sequence is not known, several factors suggest that the in vivo degradation process is similar to autoxidation which occurs in air or oxygen. The infrared data indicate that the hydroxyl content of the implants increases at a rate of 0.061 mg/g polypropylene per day during the initiation phase of the reaction. An induction time of 108 days was extablished. Carbonyl bonds appear after an implantation time of 50--90 days and increase therafter. Mechanical tests indicate a decrease in the dynamic loss tangent, tan delta, during the first month of implantation for unmodified polypropylene. No change in the infrared spectra or tan delta was observed, however, for implants containing an antioxidant. Thus, it is apparent that polypropylene filaments implanted subcutaneously in hamsters degrade by an oxidation process which is retarded effectively by using an antioxidant. While the findings reported are specific to subcutaneous polypropylene implants, they suggest that degradation of other systems may involve similar processes. This notion suggests directions for further research on increasing the in vivo stability of synthetic polymers. Long-term effects of polymer implantation upon tissue were not studied in this work.

  3. Filament poisoning at typical carbon nanotube deposition conditions by hot-filament CVD

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oliphant, CJ

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the poisoning of tungsten filaments during the hot-filament chemical vapour deposition process at typical carbon nanotube (CNT) deposition conditions and filament temperatures ranging from 1400 to 2000 °C. The morphological...

  4. A Statistical Study of Solar Filament Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanche, Nicole; Aggarwal, Ashna; Reeves, Kathy; Kempton, Dustin James; Angryk, Rafal

    2016-05-01

    Solar filaments are cool, dark channels of partially-ionized plasma that lie above the chromosphere. Their structure follows the neutral line between local regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Previous research (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2013, McCauley et al. 2015) has shown a positive correlation (70-80%) between the occurrence of filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CME’s). In this study, we attempt to use properties of the filament in order to predict whether or not a given filament will erupt. This prediction would help to better predict the occurrence of an oncoming CME. To track the evolution of a filament over time, a spatio-temporal algorithm that groups separate filament instances from the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) into filament tracks was developed. Filament features from the HEK metadata, such as length, chirality, and tilt are then combined with other physical features, such as the overlying decay index for two sets of filaments tracks - those that erupt and those that remain bound. Using statistical methods such as the Kolmogrov-Smirnov test and a Random Forest Classifier, we determine the effectiveness of the combined features in prediction. We conclude that there is significant overlap between the properties of filaments that erupt and those that do not, leading to predictions only ~5-10% above chance. However, the changes in features, such as a change in the filament's length over time, were determined to have the highest predictive power. We discuss the possible physical connections with the change in these features."This project has been supported by funding from the Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure within the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, the Division of Astronomical Sciences within the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences within the Directorate for Geosciences, under NSF award #1443061.”

  5. A First Approach to Filament Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P. E. S.; de Abreu, F. Vistulo; Simoes, R.; Dias, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    Modelling elastic filament dynamics is a topic of high interest due to the wide range of applications. However, it has reached a high level of complexity in the literature, making it unaccessible to a beginner. In this paper we explain the main steps involved in the computational modelling of the dynamics of an elastic filament. We first derive…

  6. Fine filament NbTi superconductive composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, S.; Grabinsky, G.; Marancik, W.; Pattanayak, D.

    1986-01-01

    The large superconducting magnet for the high energy physics accelerator requires fine filament composite to minimize the field error due to the persistent current in the filaments. New concepts toward the fine filament composite and its cable fabrication are discussed. Two-stage cables of fine wire with intermediate number of filaments were introduced. The first stage was six wires cables around one and in the second stage this was used to produce a Rutherford cable. The advantage of this process is in the ease of billet fabrication since the number of filaments in a single wire is within the range of easy billet fabrication. The disadvantage is in the cable fabrication. One of the major concerns in the fabrication of fine NbTi filaments composite in a copper matrix is the intermetallic compound formation during the extrusion and heat treatment steps. The hard intermetallic particles degrade the uniformity of the filaments and reduce the critical current density. The process of using Nb barrier between the filaments and copper matrix in order to prevent this CuTi intermetallic particle formation is described

  7. Theory of Semiflexible Filaments and Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanlong Meng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We briefly review the recent developments in the theory of individual semiflexible filaments, and of a crosslinked network of such filaments, both permanent and transient. Starting from the free energy of an individual semiflexible chain, models on its force-extension relation and other mechanical properties such as Euler buckling are discussed. For a permanently crosslinked network of filaments, theories on how the network responds to deformation are provided, with a focus on continuum approaches. Characteristic features of filament networks, such as nonlinear stress-strain relation, negative normal stress, tensegrity, and marginal stability are discussed. In the new area of transient filament network, where the crosslinks can be dynamically broken and re-formed, we show some recent attempts for understanding the dynamics of the crosslinks, and the related rheological properties, such as stress relaxation, yield stress and plasticity.

  8. Epithelial Intermediate Filaments: Guardians against Microbial Infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Geisler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments are abundant cytoskeletal components of epithelial tissues. They have been implicated in overall stress protection. A hitherto poorly investigated area of research is the function of intermediate filaments as a barrier to microbial infection. This review summarizes the accumulating knowledge about this interaction. It first emphasizes the unique spatial organization of the keratin intermediate filament cytoskeleton in different epithelial tissues to protect the organism against microbial insults. We then present examples of direct interaction between viral, bacterial, and parasitic proteins and the intermediate filament system and describe how this affects the microbe-host interaction by modulating the epithelial cytoskeleton, the progression of infection, and host response. These observations not only provide novel insights into the dynamics and function of intermediate filaments but also indicate future avenues to combat microbial infection.

  9. Particles trajectories in magnetic filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    The motion of a particle in a spatially harmonic magnetic field is a basic problem involved, for example, in the mechanism of formation of a collisionless shock. In such settings, it is generally reasoned that particles entering a Weibel generated turbulence are trapped inside it, provided their Larmor radius in the peak field is smaller than the field coherence length. The goal of this work is to put this heuristic conclusion on firm ground by studying, both analytically and numerically, such motion. A toy model is analyzed, consisting of a relativistic particle entering a region of space occupied by a spatially harmonic field. The particle penetrates the magnetic structure in a direction aligned with the magnetic filaments. Although the conclusions are not trivial, the main result is confirmed.

  10. Kinetics of filamentous phage assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploss, Martin; Kuhn, Andreas

    2010-12-01

    Filamentous phages release their progeny particles by a secretory process without lysing the bacterial cell. By this process about 6 viral particles per min are secreted from each cell. We show here that when the major coat protein (gp8) is provided from a plasmid we observe a phage progeny production rate depending on the induction of gp8 by IPTG. We also show that a transfection of Escherichia coli lacking F-pili is observed using a mutant of M13 that carries an ampicillin resistance gene, and phage particles are secreted in the absence of an F-plasmid. Extruding phage was visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using gold-labeled antibodies to the major coat protein.

  11. Polar patterns of driven filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Volker; Weber, Christoph; Semmrich, Christine; Frey, Erwin; Bausch, Andreas R

    2010-09-02

    The emergence of collective motion exhibited by systems ranging from flocks of animals to self-propelled microorganisms to the cytoskeleton is a ubiquitous and fascinating self-organization phenomenon. Similarities between these systems, such as the inherent polarity of the constituents, a density-dependent transition to ordered phases or the existence of very large density fluctuations, suggest universal principles underlying pattern formation. This idea is followed by theoretical models at all levels of description: micro- or mesoscopic models directly map local forces and interactions using only a few, preferably simple, interaction rules, and more macroscopic approaches in the hydrodynamic limit rely on the systems' generic symmetries. All these models characteristically have a broad parameter space with a manifold of possible patterns, most of which have not yet been experimentally verified. The complexity of interactions and the limited parameter control of existing experimental systems are major obstacles to our understanding of the underlying ordering principles. Here we demonstrate the emergence of collective motion in a high-density motility assay that consists of highly concentrated actin filaments propelled by immobilized molecular motors in a planar geometry. Above a critical density, the filaments self-organize to form coherently moving structures with persistent density modulations, such as clusters, swirls and interconnected bands. These polar nematic structures are long lived and can span length scales orders of magnitudes larger than their constituents. Our experimental approach, which offers control of all relevant system parameters, complemented by agent-based simulations, allows backtracking of the assembly and disassembly pathways to the underlying local interactions. We identify weak and local alignment interactions to be essential for the observed formation of patterns and their dynamics. The presented minimal polar-pattern-forming system

  12. Filament Activation in Response to Magnetic Flux Emergence and Cancellation in Filament Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun; Ji, Haisheng

    2015-06-01

    We conducted a comparative analysis of two filaments that showed a quite different activation in response to the flux emergence within the filament channels. The observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) were made to analyze the two filaments on 2013 August 17 - 20 (SOL2013-08-17) and September 29 (SOL2013-09-29). The first event showed that the main body of the filament was separated into two parts when an active region (AR) emerged with a maximum magnetic flux of about 6.4×1021 Mx underlying the filament. The close neighborhood and common direction of the bright threads in the filament and the open AR fan loops suggest a similar magnetic connectivity of these two flux systems. The equilibrium of the filament was not destroyed three days after the start of the emergence of the AR. To our knowledge, similar observations have never been reported before. In the second event, the emerging flux occurred nearby a barb of the filament with a maximum magnetic flux of 4.2×1020 Mx, about one order of magnitude lower than that of the first event. Two patches of parasitic polarity in the vicinity of the barb merged, then cancelled with nearby network fields. About 20 hours after the onset of the emergence, the filament erupted. Our findings imply that the location of emerging flux within the filament channel is probably crucial to filament evolution. If the flux emergence appears nearby the barbs, it is highly likely that the emerging flux and the filament magnetic fields will cancel, which may lead to the eruption of the filament. The comparison of the two events shows that the emergence of a small AR may still not be enough to disrupt the stability of a filament system, and the actual eruption only occurs after the flux cancellation sets in.

  13. Automatic Detect and Trace of Solar Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cheng; Chen, P. F.; Tang, Yu-hua; Hao, Qi; Guo, Yang

    We developed a series of methods to automatically detect and trace solar filaments in solar Hα images. The programs are able to not only recognize filaments and determine their properties, such as the position, the area and other relevant parameters, but also to trace the daily evolution of the filaments. For solar full disk Hα images, the method consists of three parts: first, preprocessing is applied to correct the original images; second, the Canny edge-detection method is used to detect the filaments; third, filament properties are recognized through the morphological operators. For each Hα filament and its barb features, we introduced the unweighted undirected graph concept and adopted Dijkstra shortest-path algorithm to recognize the filament spine; then, using polarity inversion line shift method for measuring the polarities in both sides of the filament to determine the filament axis chirality; finally, employing connected components labeling method to identify the barbs and calculating the angle between each barb and spine to indicate the barb chirality. Our algorithms are applied to the observations from varied observatories, including the Optical & Near Infrared Solar Eruption Tracer (ONSET) in Nanjing University, Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) and Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The programs are demonstrated to be effective and efficient. We used our method to automatically process and analyze 3470 images obtained by MLSO from January 1998 to December 2009, and a butterfly diagram of filaments is obtained. It shows that the latitudinal migration of solar filaments has three trends in the Solar Cycle 23: The drift velocity was fast from 1998 to the solar maximum; after the solar maximum, it became relatively slow and after 2006, the migration became divergent, signifying the solar minimum. About 60% filaments with the latitudes larger than 50 degree migrate towards the Polar Regions with relatively high velocities, and the latitudinal migrating

  14. Lifetime of titanium filament at constant current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, T.S.; Lanni, C.

    1981-01-01

    Titanium Sublimation Pump (TSP) represents the most efficient and the least expensive method to produce Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) in storage rings. In ISABELLE, a proton storage accelerator under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, for example, TSP provides a pumping speed for hydrogen of > 2 x 10 6 l/s. Due to the finite life of titanium filaments, new filaments have to be switched in before the end of filament burn out, to ensure smooth operation of the accelerator. Therefore, several operational modes that can be used to activate the TSP were studied. The constant current mode is a convenient way of maintaining constant evaporating rate by increasing the power input while the filament diameter decreases as titanium evaporates. The filaments used in this experiment were standard Varian 916-0024 filaments made of Ti 85%, Mo 15% alloy. During their lifetime at a constant current of 48 amperes, the evaporation rate rose to a maximum at about 10% of their life and then flattened out to a constant value, 0.25 g/hr. The maximum evaporation rate occurs coincidently with the recrystallization of 74% Ti 26% Mo 2 from microstructure crystalline at higher titanium concentration to macrostructure crystalline at lower titanium concentration. As the macrocrystal grows, the slip plane develops at the grain boundary resulting in high resistance at the slip plane which will eventually cause the filament burn out due to local heating

  15. On the motion of Newtonian and non-Newtonian liquid filaments: Stretching, beading, blistering, pinching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolka, Linda Beth

    The motion and stability of a liquid filament drawn out behind a falling drop is examined experimentally and mathematically for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. We confirm experimentally that an exact solution for the interfacial motion of an infinite Newtonian filament captures the thinning of the filament in experiments with several fluids. We also show experimentally that a linear stability analysis of this solution correctly predicts whether the filament end-pinches or internally-pinches, creating either one or several satellite drops. We derive an exact solution for a purely extensional cylindrical filament of non-Newtonian fluid that satisfies both the Upper Convected Maxwell and Oldroyd-B constitutive laws. The resulting prediction of decreasing filament thickness agrees with our experimental measurements for dilute polymer solutions. In the limit t → infinity, the exact solution approaches that for a Newtonian fluid. In experiments with a polyelectrolyte polymer (xanthan gum) solution, the drop length sensitively depends on the ionic strength of the solvent environment due to charge screening effects. We also study the "beadon-string" phenomenon, in which a nascent disturbance grows to finite size along a filament. In experiments with an aqueous polymer solution the perturbation grows logarithmically, and may saturate in size to a nearly spherical shape. Numerical simulations of a simple 1-D model for the bead predicts the logarithmic growth, but fail to capture saturation. Finally, in experiments with surfactant solutions composed of wormlike micelles, with low concentrations, the drop pinches-off in one location along the filament, and the free filament ends contract toward the orifice or drop. For higher concentrations, this free filament does not fully retract, instead it retains some of its deformation. The drop may also stall in its downward motion, such that elasticity balances the weight of the drop. For still higher concentration surfactant

  16. Filaments in simulations of molecular cloud formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, Gilberto C.; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Campus Morelia Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2014-08-20

    We report on the filaments that develop self-consistently in a new numerical simulation of cloud formation by colliding flows. As in previous studies, the forming cloud begins to undergo gravitational collapse because it rapidly acquires a mass much larger than the average Jeans mass. Thus, the collapse soon becomes nearly pressureless, proceeding along its shortest dimension first. This naturally produces filaments in the cloud and clumps within the filaments. The filaments are not in equilibrium at any time, but instead are long-lived flow features through which the gas flows from the cloud to the clumps. The filaments are long-lived because they accrete from their environment while simultaneously accreting onto the clumps within them; they are essentially the locus where the flow changes from accreting in two dimensions to accreting in one dimension. Moreover, the clumps also exhibit a hierarchical nature: the gas in a filament flows onto a main, central clump but other, smaller-scale clumps form along the infalling gas. Correspondingly, the velocity along the filament exhibits a hierarchy of jumps at the locations of the clumps. Two prominent filaments in the simulation have lengths ∼15 pc and masses ∼600 M {sub ☉} above density n ∼ 10{sup 3} cm{sup –3} (∼2 × 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉} at n > 50 cm{sup –3}). The density profile exhibits a central flattened core of size ∼0.3 pc and an envelope that decays as r {sup –2.5} in reasonable agreement with observations. Accretion onto the filament reaches a maximum linear density rate of ∼30 M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1} pc{sup –1}.

  17. Functional characterisation of filamentous actin probe expression in neuronal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrujna Patel

    Full Text Available Genetically encoded filamentous actin probes, Lifeact, Utrophin and F-tractin, are used as tools to label the actin cytoskeleton. Recent evidence in several different cell types indicates that these probes can cause changes in filamentous actin dynamics, altering cell morphology and function. Although these probes are commonly used to visualise actin dynamics in neurons, their effects on axonal and dendritic morphology has not been systematically characterised. In this study, we quantitatively analysed the effect of Lifeact, Utrophin and F-tractin on neuronal morphogenesis in primary hippocampal neurons. Our data show that the expression of actin-tracking probes significantly impacts on axonal and dendrite growth these neurons. Lifeact-GFP expression, under the control of a pBABE promoter, caused a significant decrease in total axon length, while another Lifeact-GFP expression, under the control of a CAG promoter, decreased the length and complexity of dendritic trees. Utr261-EGFP resulted in increased dendritic branching but Utr230-EGFP only accumulated in cell soma, without labelling any neurites. Lifeact-7-mEGFP and F-tractin-EGFP in a pEGFP-C1 vector, under the control of a CMV promoter, caused only minor changes in neuronal morphology as detected by Sholl analysis. The results of this study demonstrate the effects that filamentous actin tracking probes can have on the axonal and dendritic compartments of neuronal cells and emphasise the care that must be taken when interpreting data from experiments using these probes.

  18. Current filamentation in high-current diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, A.V.; Kuksov, P.V.; Fanchenko, S.D.; Shuvaev, V.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental data are reported on the filamentation of a high-current relativistic electron beam in the Kal'mar-1 relativistic-electron-beam source. A possible mechanism for this filamentation is studied theoretically. It is shown that the experimental results on the number of filaments into which the relativistic electron beam breaks up can be explained on the basis of an azimuthal nonuniformity of the current. This nonuniformity develops in the plasma near the cathode as the result of a Rayleigh--Taylor electron instability

  19. Membrane Buckling Induced by Curved Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Martin; Crow, Daniel J. G.; Joanny, Jean-François

    2009-07-01

    We present a novel buckling instability relevant to membrane budding in eukaryotic cells. In this mechanism, curved filaments bind to a lipid bilayer without changing its intrinsic curvature. As more and more filaments adsorb, newly added ones are more and more strained, which destabilizes the flat membrane. We perform a linear stability analysis of filament-dressed membranes and find that the buckling threshold is within reasonable in vivo parameter values. We account for the formation of long tubes previously observed in cells and in purified systems. We study strongly deformed dressed membranes and their bifurcation diagram numerically. Our mechanism could be validated by a simple experiment.

  20. Methods for transforming and expression screening of filamentous fungal cells with a DNA library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teter, Sarah; Lamsa, Michael; Cherry, Joel; Ward, Connie

    2015-06-02

    The present invention relates to methods for expression screening of filamentous fungal transformants, comprising: (a) isolating single colony transformants of a DNA library introduced into E. coli; (b) preparing DNA from each of the single colony E. coli transformants; (c) introducing a sample of each of the DNA preparations of step (b) into separate suspensions of protoplasts of a filamentous fungus to obtain transformants thereof, wherein each transformant contains one or more copies of an individual polynucleotide from the DNA library; (d) growing the individual filamentous fungal transformants of step (c) on selective growth medium, thereby permitting growth of the filamentous fungal transformants, while suppressing growth of untransformed filamentous fungi; and (e) measuring activity or a property of each polypeptide encoded by the individual polynucleotides. The present invention also relates to isolated polynucleotides encoding polypeptides of interest obtained by such methods, to nucleic acid constructs, expression vectors, and recombinant host cells comprising the isolated polynucleotides, and to methods of producing the polypeptides encoded by the isolated polynucleotides.

  1. A mathematical model for electrochemically active filamentous sulfide-oxidising bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Keelan M; Batstone, Damien J; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Picioreanu, Cristian

    2015-04-01

    Oxygen and sulfide in ocean sediments can be consumed biologically over long spatial distances by way of filamentous bacteria in electron-conducting sheaths. To analyse observations, a mathematical model of these filamentous sulfur-oxidising bacteria was developed, including electrical conduction between reactive zones. Mechanisms include Nernst-Planck diffusion and migration of ions coupled with Ohm's law for conduction along filaments, and metabolic activity throughout the filaments. Simulations predict outward biomass growth toward the boundaries of the sediment floor and top surface, resulting in two distinct zones with anode (sulfide consumption) and cathode (oxygen consumption) reactions enabled by electron conduction. Results show inward fluxes of 4.6 mmol O2/m(2)/d and 2.5 mmol S/m(2)/d, with consumption increasing with growth to final fluxes of 8.2 mmol O2/m(2)/d and 4.34 mmol S/m(2)/d. Qualitatively, the effect of varying cell conductivity and substrate affinity is evaluated. Controlling mechanisms are identified to shift from biomass limitation, to substrate limitation, and to conductivity limitations as the lengths of the filaments increase. While most observed data are reflected in the simulation results, a key discrepancy is the lower growth rates, which are largely fixed by thermodynamics, indicating that microbes may utilise secondary substrates or an alternative metabolism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Two-step solar filament eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, B.

    2018-04-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are closely related to eruptive filaments and usually are the continuation of the same eruptive process into the upper corona. There are failed filament eruptions when a filament decelerates and stops at some greater height in the corona. Sometimes the filament after several hours starts to rise again and develops into the successful eruption with a CME formation. We propose a simple model for the interpretation of such two-step eruptions in terms of equilibrium of a flux rope in a two-scale ambient magnetic field. The eruption is caused by a slow decrease of the holding magnetic field. The presence of two critical heights for the initiation of the flux-rope vertical instability allows the flux rope to stay after the first jump some time in a metastable equilibrium near the second critical height. If the decrease of the ambient field continues, the next eruption step follows.

  3. Intense EM filamentation in relativistic hot plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qiang-Lin [Department of Physics, Jinggangshan University, Ji' an, Jiangxi 343009 (China); Chen, Zhong-Ping [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Mahajan, Swadesh M., E-mail: mahajan@mail.utexas.edu [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Department of Physics, School of Natural Sciences, Shiv Nadar University, Uttar Pradesh 201314 (India)

    2017-03-03

    Highlights: • Breaking up of an intense EM pulse into filaments is a spectacular demonstration of the nonlinear wave-plasma interaction. • Filaments are spectacularly sharper, highly extended and longer lived at relativistic temperatures. • EM energy concentration can trigger new nonlinear phenomena with absolute consequences for high energy density matter. - Abstract: Through 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we demonstrate that the nature of filamentation of a high intensity electromagnetic (EM) pulse propagating in an underdense plasma, is profoundly affected at relativistically high temperatures. The “relativistic” filaments are sharper, are dramatically extended (along the direction of propagation), and live much longer than their lower temperature counterparts. The thermally boosted electron inertia is invoked to understand this very interesting and powerful phenomenon.

  4. Morgellons disease: a filamentous borrelial dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Middelveen MJ; Stricker RB

    2016-01-01

    Marianne J Middelveen, Raphael B Stricker International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA Abstract: Morgellons disease (MD) is a dermopathy characterized by multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although MD was initially considered to be a delusional disorder, recent studies have demonstrated that the dermopathy is associated with tickborne infection, that the filaments are composed of keratin and collagen, and that they resu...

  5. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchel Alioscha-Perez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale. Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i first the input image is decomposed into a 'cartoon' part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii on the 'cartoon' image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in

  6. Can we determine the filament chirality by the filament footpoint location or the barb-bearing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qi; Guo, Yang; Fang, Cheng; Chen, Peng-Fei; Cao, Wen-Da

    2016-01-01

    We attempt to propose a method for automatically detecting the solar filament chirality and barb bearing. We first introduce the concept of an unweighted undirected graph and adopt the Dijkstra shortest path algorithm to recognize the filament spine. Then, we use the polarity inversion line (PIL) shift method for measuring the polarities on both sides of the filament, and employ the connected components labeling method to identify the barbs and calculate the angle between each barb and the spine to determine the bearing of the barbs, i.e., left or right. We test the automatic detection method with Hα filtergrams from the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) Hα archive and magnetograms observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Four filaments are automatically detected and illustrated to show the results. The barbs in different parts of a filament may have opposite bearings. The filaments in the southern hemisphere (northern hemisphere) mainly have left-bearing (right-bearing) barbs and positive (negative) magnetic helicity, respectively. The tested results demonstrate that our method is efficient and effective in detecting the bearing of filament barbs. It is demonstrated that the conventionally believed one-to-one correspondence between filament chirality and barb bearing is not valid. The correct detection of the filament axis chirality should be done by combining both imaging morphology and magnetic field observations.

  7. Can we determine the filament chirality by the filament footpoint location or the barb-bearing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Qi; Guo, Yang; Fang, Cheng; Chen, Peng-Fei; Cao, Wen-Da

    2016-01-01

    We attempt to propose a method for automatically detecting the solar filament chirality and barb bearing. We first introduce the concept of an unweighted undirected graph and adopt the Dijkstra shortest path algorithm to recognize the filament spine. Then, we use the polarity inversion line (PIL) shift method for measuring the polarities on both sides of the filament, and employ the connected components labeling method to identify the barbs and calculate the angle between each barb and the spine to determine the bearing of the barbs, i.e., left or right. We test the automatic detection method with Hα filtergrams from the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) Hα archive and magnetograms observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Four filaments are automatically detected and illustrated to show the results. The barbs in different parts of a filament may have opposite bearings. The filaments in the southern hemisphere (northern hemisphere) mainly have left-bearing (right-bearing) barbs and positive (negative) magnetic helicity, respectively. The tested results demonstrate that our method is efficient and effective in detecting the bearing of filament barbs. It is demonstrated that the conventionally believed one-to-one correspondence between filament chirality and barb bearing is not valid. The correct detection of the filament axis chirality should be done by combining both imaging morphology and magnetic field observations. (paper)

  8. Growth of non-axisymmetric disturbances of the free surface in the filament stretching rheometer: experiments and simulation. Bach, A.; Rasmussen, H.K.; Longin, P.-Y.; Hassager, O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Bach, Anders; Longin, Pierre-Yves

    2002-01-01

    perturbations grow into a number of fluid columns. It is shown that the growth is associated with strain hardening of the material. The relevant Deborah number is the product of a time constant associated with the non-linear properties of the fluid and the imposed extension rate....

  9. Dynamics of contracting surfactant-covered filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Pritish; Thete, Sumeet; Xu, Qi; Basaran, Osman

    2013-11-01

    When drops are produced from a nozzle, a thin liquid thread connects the primary drop that is about to form to the rest of the liquid in the nozzle. Often, the thread becomes disconnected from both the primary drop and the remnant liquid mass hanging from the nozzle and thereby gives rise to a free filament. Due to surface tension, the free filament then contracts or recoils. During recoil, the filament can either contract into a single satellite droplet or break up into several small satellites. Such satellite droplets are undesirable in applications where they can, for example, cause misting in a manufacturing environment and mar product quality in ink-jet printing. In many applications, the filaments are coated with a monolayer of surfactant. In this work, we study the dynamics of contraction of slender filaments of a Newtonian fluid that are covered with a monolayer of surfactant when the surrounding fluid is a passive gas. Taking advantage of the fact that the filaments are long and slender, we use a 1D-slender-jet approximation of the governing system of equations consisting of the Navier-Stokes system and the convection-diffusion equation for surfactant transport. We solve the 1D system of equations by a finite element based numerical method.

  10. Evidence for Mixed Helicity in Erupting Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muglach, K.; Wang, Y.-M.; Kliem, B.

    2009-09-01

    Erupting filaments are sometimes observed to undergo a rotation about the vertical direction as they rise. This rotation of the filament axis is generally interpreted as a conversion of twist into writhe in a kink-unstable magnetic flux rope. Consistent with this interpretation, the rotation is usually found to be clockwise (as viewed from above) if the post-eruption arcade has right-handed helicity, but counterclockwise if it has left-handed helicity. Here, we describe two non-active-region filament events recorded with the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory in which the sense of rotation appears to be opposite to that expected from the helicity of the post-event arcade. Based on these observations, we suggest that the rotation of the filament axis is, in general, determined by the net helicity of the erupting system, and that the axially aligned core of the filament can have the opposite helicity sign to the surrounding field. In most cases, the surrounding field provides the main contribution to the net helicity. In the events reported here, however, the helicity associated with the filament "barbs" is opposite in sign to and dominates that of the overlying arcade.

  11. Prokaryotic cytoskeletons: protein filaments organizing small cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, James; Löwe, Jan

    2018-04-01

    Most, if not all, bacterial and archaeal cells contain at least one protein filament system. Although these filament systems in some cases form structures that are very similar to eukaryotic cytoskeletons, the term 'prokaryotic cytoskeletons' is used to refer to many different kinds of protein filaments. Cytoskeletons achieve their functions through polymerization of protein monomers and the resulting ability to access length scales larger than the size of the monomer. Prokaryotic cytoskeletons are involved in many fundamental aspects of prokaryotic cell biology and have important roles in cell shape determination, cell division and nonchromosomal DNA segregation. Some of the filament-forming proteins have been classified into a small number of conserved protein families, for example, the almost ubiquitous tubulin and actin superfamilies. To understand what makes filaments special and how the cytoskeletons they form enable cells to perform essential functions, the structure and function of cytoskeletal molecules and their filaments have been investigated in diverse bacteria and archaea. In this Review, we bring these data together to highlight the diverse ways that linear protein polymers can be used to organize other molecules and structures in bacteria and archaea.

  12. Filamented plasmas in laser ablation of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J. R.; Fajardo, M.; Kozlová, M.; Mocek, T.; Polan, J.; Rus, B.

    2009-03-01

    We report results from laser-solid experiments at PALS using an x-ray laser probe with a pulse length of 0.1 ns and a wavelength of 21.2 nm. A laser with a pulse length of 0.3 ns, a peak intensity of up to 5 × 1013 W cm-2 and a wavelength of 1.3 µm was focused to a 0.15 mm wide line on 3 mm long zinc and 1 mm long iron targets and the probe was passed along the length of the plasma formed. The results show plasma 'hairs', or filaments, appearing only below the critical density, 0.1 ns before the peak of the laser pulse. The plasma around the critical density was clearly imaged and remained uniform. Magneto-hydrodynamic modelling indicates that this is caused by a magnetic field that diffuses from the critical surface, where it is generated, leading to a magnetic pressure comparable to the plasma pressure below the critical density. A dispersion relation is derived for density perturbations perpendicular to a temperature gradient in the presence of an existing magnetic field, which shows that such perturbations always grow, with the growth rate being the greatest for small wavelength perturbations and at low densities. These results indicate that the hair-like structures should be a typical feature of laser ablated plasmas below the critical density following significant plasma expansion, in agreement with numerous experimental results. The implications for x-ray lasers and fast ignition inertial confinement fusion are discussed.

  13. Transition of Femtosecond-Filament-Solid Interactions from Single to Multiple Filament Regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrodzki, P J; Burger, M; Jovanovic, I

    2017-10-06

    High-peak-power fs-laser filaments offer unique characteristics attractive to remote sensing via techniques such as remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (R-LIBS). The dynamics of several ablation mechanisms following the interaction between a filament and a solid determines the emission strength and reproducibility of target plasma, which is of relevance for R-LIBS applications. We investigate the space- and time-resolved dynamics of ionic and atomic emission from copper as well as the surrounding atmosphere in order to understand limitations of fs-filament-ablation for standoff energy delivery. Furthermore, we probe the shock front produced from filament-target interaction using time-resolved shadowgraphy and infer laser-material coupling efficiencies for both single and multiple filament regimes through analysis of shock expansion with the Sedov model for point detonation. The results provide insight into plasma structure for the range of peak powers up to 30 times the critical power for filamentation P cr . Despite the stochastic nucleation of multiple filaments at peak-powers greater than 16 P cr , emission of ionic and neutral species increases with pump beam intensity, and short-lived nitrogen emission originating from the ambient is consistently observed. Ultimately, results suggest favorable scaling of emission intensity from target species on the laser pump energy, furthering the prospects for use of filament-solid interactions for remote sensing.

  14. Straight-nosed pipefish Nerophis ophidion and broad-nosed pipefish Syngnathus typhle avoid eelgrass overgrown with filamentous algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundin, J; Jacobsson, Ö; Berglund, A; Rosenqvist, G

    2011-06-01

    In a habitat choice experiment straight-nosed pipefish Nerophis ophidion and broad-nosed pipefish Syngnathus typhle avoided eelgrass Zostera marina covered with filamentous algae. Both juveniles as well as brooding adult males of the two species clearly preferred to position themselves in Z. marina without growth of filamentous algae. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2011 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  15. The significance of peroxisomes in secondary metabolite biosynthesis in filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartoszewska, Magdalena; Opalinski, Lukasz; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles characterized by a protein-rich matrix surrounded by a single membrane. In filamentous fungi, peroxisomes are crucial for the primary metabolism of several unusual carbon sources used for growth (e. g. fatty acids), but increasing evidence is presented that

  16. Sectoring patterns of spontaneous and radiation-induced somatic pink mutations in the stamen hairs of a temperature-sensitive mutable clone of Tradescantia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Sadao

    1994-01-01

    The sectoring patterns of somatic pink mutations were analyzed in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone KU 20, a temperature-sensitive mutable clone. This clone is a blue/pink heterozygote, and its spontaneous pink mutation frequency increases up to about 40-fold at lower temperature. In order to elucidate the mutable nature of this clone, the sectoring patterns were analyzed on 1,123 spontaneous pink mutant events and on 2,725 pink mutant events induced by 0.606 and 1.28 Gy of gamma rays. The average number of pink cells per terminal pink mutant event (a row of pink cells including the terminal cell of a hair) occurred spontaneously was 7.40, whereas the number for the terminal pink mutant event induced by gamma rays varied from 3.33 to 9.88 depending on the post-irradiation days, i.e., increased gradually as the number of days proceeded, then was stabilized at the level of spontaneous mutations after about three weeks. The average number of pink cells per interstitial pink mutant event (a single pink cell or two or more contiguous pink cells between blue cells was 1.97 for spontaneous mutations, while the number for induced mutations varied also depending on the post-irradiation days. The ratio of the number of interstitial pink mutant events against that of terminal pink mutant events was 1.35 for spontaneous mutations, but the ratio for induced mutations varied also with post-irradiation period reaching 2.89 at the peak, indicating that more interstitial pink mutant events are induced by gamma rays than terminal pink mutant events, as compared with spontaneous mutations. The frequency of multiple pink mutant sectors in a hair was more than four times higher than that expected from independent occurrences in case of spontaneous mutations, while the frequency was close to the expectation in induced mutations. suggesting that somatic recombination is involved as one of the major causes of spontaneous mutations in this mutable clone. (author)

  17. Role of multiple filaments in self-accelerating actions of laser filamentation in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuze; Nie, Jinsong; Sun, Ke

    2017-11-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of multiple filaments in self-accelerating actions by using corrected accelerating parabolic beams (CAPBs) are numerically investigated. By increasing the number of main lobes, the curved filaments can be elongated, leading to a longer displacement. The replenished energy originating from curved multiple filaments (MFs) that constructively interfere with the central one plays a crucial role in the phenomenon. At the bifurcation position, a beam pattern in which secondary lobes tightly follow the main lobes is formed, which is beneficial for the accelerating action of MFs. A new curved filament is generated due to the merging of side-curved MFs, and its accelerating strength decreases gradually with further propagation. Moreover, a special spatiotemporal profile that enhances the possibility of acceleration is also formed. The use of the accelerating beam with the appropriate amount of main lobes provides a new approach to elongate curved filaments.

  18. Mycelial pellet formation by edible ascomycete filamentous fungi, Neurospora intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Ramkumar B; Lennartsson, Patrik R; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2016-12-01

    Pellet formation of filamentous fungi in submerged culture is an imperative topic of fermentation research. In this study, we report for the first time the growth of filamentous ascomycete fungus, Neurospora intermedia in its mycelial pellet form. In submerged culture, the growth morphology of the fungus was successfully manipulated into growing as pellets by modifying various cultivation conditions. Factors such as pH (2.0-10.0), agitation rate (100-150 rpm), carbon source (glucose, arabinose, sucrose, and galactose), the presence of additive agents (glycerol and calcium chloride) and trace metals were investigated for their effect on the pellet formation. Of the various factors screened, uniform pellets were formed only at pH range 3.0-4.0, signifying it as the most influential factor for N. intermedia pellet formation. The average pellet size ranged from 2.38 ± 0.12 to 2.86 ± 0.38 mm. The pellet formation remained unaffected by the inoculum type used and its size showed an inverse correlation with the agitation rate of the culture. Efficient glucose utilization was observed with fungal pellets, as opposed to the freely suspended mycelium, proving its viability for fast-fermentation processes. Scale up of the pelletization process was also carried out in bench-scale airlift and bubble column reactors (4.5 L).

  19. Filamentous Influenza Virus Enters Cells via Macropinocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Jeremy S.; Leser, George P.

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus is pleiomorphic, producing both spherical (100-nm-diameter) and filamentous (100-nm by 20-μm) virions. While the spherical virions are known to enter host cells through exploitation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, the entry pathway for filamentous virions has not been determined, though the existence of an alternative, non-clathrin-, non-caveolin-mediated entry pathway for influenza virus has been known for many years. In this study, we confirm recent results showing that influenza virus utilizes macropinocytosis as an alternate entry pathway. Furthermore, we find that filamentous influenza viruses use macropinocytosis as the primary entry mechanism. Virions enter cells as intact filaments within macropinosomes and are trafficked to the acidic late-endosomal compartment. Low pH triggers a conformational change in the M2 ion channel protein, altering membrane curvature and leading to a fragmentation of the filamentous virions. This fragmentation may enable more-efficient fusion between the viral and endosomal membranes. PMID:22875971

  20. Efeito da toxicidade de Cr (VI e Zn (II no crescimento do fungo filamentoso Aspergillus niger isolado de efluente industrial Toxicity effect of Cr (VI and Zn (II on growth of filamentous fungi Aspergillus niger isolated from industrial effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Socorro Vale

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Processos convencionais de tratamento de efluentes utilizam microrganismos vivos, o que sugere limitações relativas À toxicidade de metais para os microrganismos. O experimento consistiu em adicionar soluções monoelementares de Cr (VI e Zn(II em diferentes concentrações (0, 20, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 mg.L-1 ao meio de crescimento e observar a influência dos metais no crescimento micelial e germinativo do fungo Aspergillus Níger por verificação visual da expansão radial do micélio e da germinação de esporos, seguida de registro fotográfico. Os resultados mostraram que o metabolismo do fungo foi completamente inibido em concentrações acima de 500 mg Zn (II.L-1 e 150 mg Cr (VI.L-1. O ED50 (concentração de ingrediente ativo capaz de inibir 50% do crescimento micelial do fungo para os dois íons metálicos, nas condições estudadas, está na faixa entre 100 e 150 mg.L-1. Palavras-chave: metais pesados; inibição; crescimento micelial; Aspergillus niger; ED50.Many standard processes of wastewater treatment use live microorganisms, which suggests limitations on a metal toxicity to the microorganism. The experiment consisted in adding mono elementary solutions of Cr (VI and Zn (II at different concentrations (0, 20, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 mg.L-1 to the growth mean, and to observe the influence of metals on mycelial and germinative growth of the Aspergillus niger fungus, by means of visual observation of the radial expansion of the mycelius and the germination of spores, followed by photograph registration. The results showed that the metabolism of the fungus was completely inhibited at concentrations above 500 mg Zn (II.L-1 and 150 mg Cr (VI.L-1. The ED50 (concentration of active ingredient capable of inhibiting 50% of mycelial growth of the fungus for both metal ions, under the studied conditions, is in the range between 100 and 150 mg.L-1.

  1. Evaluation of plant-wide WWTP control strategies including the effects of filamentous bulking sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores Alsina, Xavier; Comas, J.S.; Rodríguez Roda, I.

    2009-01-01

    Model No. 2 (BSM2). In a second series of simulations the parameters of the secondary settler model in the BSM2 are automatically changed on the basis of an on-line calculated risk of filamentous bulking, in order to mimic the effect of growth of filamentous bacteria in the plant. The results...... concentration in both return and waste flow, less biomass in the bioreactors and a reduction of the TSS removal efficiency. The control alternatives using a TSS controller substantially increase the food to microorganisms (F/M) ratio in the bioreactor, thereby reducing both risk and effects of bulking sludge...

  2. Heterologous expression of cellobiohydrolases in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoglowek, Marta; Lübeck, Peter S.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    2015-01-01

    Cellobiohydrolases are among the most important enzymes functioning in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose, significantly contributing to the efficient biorefining of recalcitrant lignocellulosic biomass into biofuels and bio-based products. Filamentous fungi are recognized as both well...... into valuable products. However, due to low cellobiohydrolase activities, certain fungi might be deficient with regard to enzymes of value for cellulose conversion, and improving cellobiohydrolase expression in filamentous fungi has proven to be challenging. In this review, we examine the effects of altering...... promoters, signal peptides, culture conditions and host post-translational modifications. For heterologous cellobiohydrolase production in filamentous fungi to become an industrially feasible process, the construction of site-integrating plasmids, development of protease-deficient strains and glycosylation...

  3. Heterologous gene expression in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoyun; Schmitz, George; Zhang, Meiling; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac K O

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are critical to production of many commercial enzymes and organic compounds. Fungal-based systems have several advantages over bacterial-based systems for protein production because high-level secretion of enzymes is a common trait of their decomposer lifestyle. Furthermore, in the large-scale production of recombinant proteins of eukaryotic origin, the filamentous fungi become the vehicle of choice due to critical processes shared in gene expression with other eukaryotic organisms. The complexity and relative dearth of understanding of the physiology of filamentous fungi, compared to bacteria, have hindered rapid development of these organisms as highly efficient factories for the production of heterologous proteins. In this review, we highlight several of the known benefits and challenges in using filamentous fungi (particularly Aspergillus spp., Trichoderma reesei, and Neurospora crassa) for the production of proteins, especially heterologous, nonfungal enzymes. We review various techniques commonly employed in recombinant protein production in the filamentous fungi, including transformation methods, selection of gene regulatory elements such as promoters, protein secretion factors such as the signal peptide, and optimization of coding sequence. We provide insights into current models of host genomic defenses such as repeat-induced point mutation and quelling. Furthermore, we examine the regulatory effects of transcript sequences, including introns and untranslated regions, pre-mRNA (messenger RNA) processing, transcript transport, and mRNA stability. We anticipate that this review will become a resource for researchers who aim at advancing the use of these fascinating organisms as protein production factories, for both academic and industrial purposes, and also for scientists with general interest in the biology of the filamentous fungi. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Structure of Flexible Filamentous Plant Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Bian, Wen; Bowles, Timothy; Baumgarten, Sarah C.; Shi, Jian; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Bullitt, Esther; Gore, David; Irving, Thomas C.; Havens, Wendy M.; Ghabrial, Said A.; Wall, Joseph S.; Stubbs, Gerald (IIT); (BU-M); (Vanderbilt); (Kentucky); (BNL)

    2008-10-23

    Flexible filamentous viruses make up a large fraction of the known plant viruses, but in comparison with those of other viruses, very little is known about their structures. We have used fiber diffraction, cryo-electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy to determine the symmetry of a potyvirus, soybean mosaic virus; to confirm the symmetry of a potexvirus, potato virus X; and to determine the low-resolution structures of both viruses. We conclude that these viruses and, by implication, most or all flexible filamentous plant viruses share a common coat protein fold and helical symmetry, with slightly less than 9 subunits per helical turn.

  5. Interaction of Two Filaments in a Long Filament Channel Associated with Twin Coronal Mass Ejections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Wang, Bing; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, and Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, 264209 Weihai (China); Zhang, Qingmin [Key Laboratory for Dark Matter and Space Science, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yang, Kai, E-mail: ruishengzheng@sdu.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, 210023 Nanjing (China)

    2017-02-20

    Using the high-quality observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory , we present the interaction of two filaments (F1 and F2) in a long filament channel associated with twin coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on 2016 January 26. Before the eruption, a sequence of rapid cancellation and emergence of the magnetic flux has been observed, which likely triggered the ascending of the west filament (F1). The east footpoints of rising F1 moved toward the east far end of the filament channel, accompanied by post-eruption loops and flare ribbons. This likely indicated a large-scale eruption involving the long filament channel, which resulted from the interaction between F1 and the east filament (F2). Some bright plasma flew over F2, and F2 stayed at rest during the eruption, likely due to the confinement of its overlying lower magnetic field. Interestingly, the impulsive F1 pushed its overlying magnetic arcades to form the first CME, and F1 finally evolved into the second CME after the collision with the nearby coronal hole. We suggest that the interaction of F1 and the overlying magnetic field of F2 led to the merging reconnection that forms a longer eruptive filament loop. Our results also provide a possible picture of the origin of twin CMEs and show that the large-scale magnetic topology of the coronal hole is important for the eventual propagation direction of CMEs.

  6. Two-dimensional atomic hydrogen concentration maps in hot-filament diamond-deposition environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larjo, J.; Koivikko, H.; Lahtonen, K.; Hernberg, R.

    This paper reports the two-dimensional mapping of atomic hydrogen concentration with two-photon excited laser induced fluorescence in a multi-wire grid hot-filament chemical vapor deposition reactor. The measurements were made in a diamond film deposition environment under different filament temperatures and wire configurations. The measurement was calibrated with a titration reaction using NO2 as a titrant. The kinetic gas temperature in the reactor was measured from the Doppler broadening of the Lyman-β transition excited in the fluorescence. The filament temperature was found to have a significant effect on atomic hydrogen production and transfer to the substrate. The axial concentration distributions were compared to a one-dimensional kinetic gas-surface chemistry model with good agreement. The model produced a reasonable estimate for the bulk diamond film growth rate.

  7. High-resolution Observations of Sympathetic Filament Eruptions by NVST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shangwei; Su, Yingna; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng [Key Laboratory for Dark Matter and Space Science, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China); Van Ballegooijen, Adriaan [5001 Riverwood Avenue, Sarasota, FL 34231 (United States); Sun, Xudong, E-mail: ynsu@pmo.ac.cn [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2017-07-20

    We investigate two sympathetic filament eruptions observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope on 2015 October 15. The full picture of the eruptions is obtained from the corresponding Solar Dynamics Observatory ( SDO )/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations. The two filaments start from active region NOAA 12434 in the north and end in one large quiescent filament channel in the south. The left filament erupts first, followed by the right filament eruption about 10 minutes later. Clear twist structure and rotating motion are observed in both filaments during the eruption. Both eruptions failed, since the filaments first rise up, then flow toward the south and merge into the southern large quiescent filament. We also observe repeated activations of mini filaments below the right filament after its eruption. Using magnetic field models constructed based on SDO /HMI magnetograms via the flux rope insertion method, we find that the left filament eruption is likely to be triggered by kink instability, while the weakening of overlying magnetic fields due to magnetic reconnection at an X-point between the two filament systems might play an important role in the onset of the right filament eruption.

  8. Diversity and importance of filamentous bacteria in biological nutrient removal wastewater treatment plants – a worldwide survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; McIlroy, Simon Jon; Ziegler, Anja Sloth

    Filamentous bacteria are present in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) worldwide where they play an important role by providing structural backbone for activated sludge (AS) flocs and thus ensuring good settling properties. However, their excessive growth may lead to inter-floc bridging, which...... interferes with floc settleability, causing ‘bulking’. This phenomenon is dependent on the type and abundance of filaments present thus it is important to know the community composition in AS systems. In this study we utilized state-of-the-art molecular techniques to make a detailed survey of filamentous...... bacteria in full-scale nutrient removal WWTPs. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was applied to survey 24 Danish and 30 worldwide full-scale biological nutrient removal WWTPs (total of >550 samples), where all known bacterial genera possessing filamentous morphology were investigated. Candidatus Microthrix...

  9. Large-scale Motion of Solar Filaments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Large-scale Motion of Solar Filaments. Pavel Ambrož, Astronomical Institute of the Acad. Sci. of the Czech Republic, CZ-25165. Ondrejov, The Czech Republic. e-mail: pambroz@asu.cas.cz. Alfred Schroll, Kanzelhöehe Solar Observatory of the University of Graz, A-9521 Treffen,. Austria. e-mail: schroll@solobskh.ac.at.

  10. Filamentous bacteria transport electrons over centimetre distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeffer, Christian; Larsen, Steffen; Song, Jie

    2012-01-01

    across centimetre-wide zones. Here we present evidence that the native conductors are long, filamentous bacteria. They abounded in sediment zones with electric currents and along their length they contained strings with distinct properties in accordance with a function as electron transporters. Living...

  11. Filament stretching rheometry of polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    The Filament Stretching Rheometry (FSR) method developed by Sridhar, McKinley and coworkers for polymer solutions has been extended to be used also for polymer melts. The design of a melt-FSR will be described and differences to conventional melt elongational rheometers will be pointed out. Results...

  12. The exo-metabolome in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Ulf; Andersen, Birgitte; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are a diverse group of eukaryotic microorganisms that have a significant impact on human life as spoilers of food and feed by degradation and toxin production. They are also most useful as a source of bulk and fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals. This chapter focuses on the exo...

  13. Evolution of genetic systems in filamentous ascomycetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    A great variety of genetic systems exist in filamentous ascomycetes. The transmission of genetic material does not only occur by (sexual or asexual) reproduction, but it can also follow vegetative fusion of different strains. In this thesis the evolution of this variability is studied,

  14. Featured Image: A Filament Forms and Erupts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    This dynamic image of active region NOAA 12241 was captured by the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in December 2014. Observations of this region from a number of observatories and instruments recently presented by Jincheng Wang (University of Chinese Academy of Sciences) and collaborators reveal details about the formation and eruption of a long solar filament. Wang and collaborators show that the right part of the filament formed by magnetic reconnection between two bundles of magnetic field lines, while the left part formed as a result of shearing motion. When these two parts interacted, the filament erupted. You can read more about the teams results in the article linked below. Also, check out this awesome video of the filament formation and eruption, again by SDO/AIA:http://cdn.iopscience.com/images/0004-637X/839/2/128/Full/apjaa6bf3f1_video.mp4CitationJincheng Wang et al 2017 ApJ 839 128. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa6bf3

  15. Unraveling Intermediate Filaments : The super resolution solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahidiazar, L.

    2017-01-01

    Intermediate Filaments (IFs) carry out major functions in cells. Several diseases have been associated with malfunctioning IFs in the cells and among them are certain sub types of cancer. To determine the structure and organization of IFs, we have used Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM)

  16. Large-scale Motion of Solar Filaments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    The 'seeing' dependent contrast of the Hα pictures is the source of uncertainties during the measurements on ... Results of measurements and conclusions. Heliographic position of the filaments is measured on the full disc Hα pictures taken ... consecutive magnetic synoptic charts. Two arrays of corresponding velocities are ...

  17. On viscoelastic instability in polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    1999-01-01

    The 3D Lagrangian Integral Method is used to simulate the effects of surface tension on the viscoelastic end-plate instability, occuring in the rapid extension of some polymeric filaments between parallel plates. It is shovn that the surface tension delays the onset of the instability. Furthermore...

  18. Standing waves in a counter-rotating vortex filament pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Azpeitia, Carlos

    2018-03-01

    The distance among two counter-rotating vortex filaments satisfies a beam-type of equation according to the model derived in [15]. This equation has an explicit solution where two straight filaments travel with constant speed at a constant distance. The boundary condition of the filaments is 2π-periodic. Using the distance of the filaments as bifurcating parameter, an infinite number of branches of periodic standing waves bifurcate from this initial configuration with constant rational frequency along each branch.

  19. Graphene-based filament material for thermal ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewitt, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shick, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Siegfried, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-19

    The use of graphene oxide materials for thermal ionization mass spectrometry analysis of plutonium and uranium has been investigated. Filament made from graphene oxide slurries have been 3-D printed. A method for attaching these filaments to commercial thermal ionization post assemblies has been devised. Resistive heating of the graphene based filaments under high vacuum showed stable operation in excess of 4 hours. Plutonium ion production has been observed in an initial set of filaments spiked with the Pu 128 Certified Reference Material.

  20. Fabrication of Polylactide Nanocomposite Filament Using Melt Extrusion and Filament Characterization for 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shrenik Kumar

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM) technology uses thermoplastic filament for layer by layer fabrication of objects. To make functional objects with desired properties, composite filaments are required in the FDM. In this thesis, less expensive mesoporous Nano carbon (NC) and carbon nanotube (CNT) infused in Polylactide (PLA) thermoplastic filaments were fabricated to improve the electrical properties and maintain sufficient strength for 3D printing. Solution blending was used for nanocomposite fabrication and melt extrusion was employed to make cylindrical filaments. Mechanical and electrical properties of 1 to 20 wt% of NC and 1 to 3 wt% of CNT filaments were investigated and significant improvement of conductivity (3.76 S/m) and sufficient yield strength (35MPa) were obtained. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images exhibited uniform dispersion of nanoparticles in polymer matrix and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results showed no significant changes in the glass transition temperature (Tg) for all the compositions. Perspective uses of this filament are for fabrication of electrical wires in 3D printed robots, drones, prosthetics, orthotics and others.

  1. A penny-shaped crack in a filament-reinforced matrix. I - The filament model. II - The crack problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, F.; Pacella, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    The study deals with the elastostatic problem of a penny-shaped crack in an elastic matrix which is reinforced by filaments or fibers perpendicular to the plane of the crack. An elastic filament model is first developed, followed by consideration of the application of the model to the penny-shaped crack problem in which the filaments of finite length are asymmetrically distributed around the crack. Since the primary interest is in the application of the results to studies relating to the fracture of fiber or filament-reinforced composites and reinforced concrete, the main emphasis of the study is on the evaluation of the stress intensity factor along the periphery of the crack, the stresses in the filaments or fibers, and the interface shear between the matrix and the filaments or fibers. Using the filament model developed, the elastostatic interaction problem between a penny-shaped crack and a slender inclusion or filament in an elastic matrix is formulated.

  2. Induction and cultivation of cloned filaments of Polysiphonia urceolata (Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinxia; Shao, Kuishuang; Cheng, Bin; Lu, Qinqin; Zhou, Baicheng

    2011-11-01

    A filamentous clone of Polysiphonia urceolata was regenerated from segments cut from the fronds of gametophytes. Unlike wild thalli with short virgate branchlets, the clone was filamentous with few branches. Many transparent trichoblasts arose from pericentral cells during the induction culture, but these were seldom observed during normal growth. The trichoblasts were uniseriate, often colorless, and formed lobed rhizoids rapidly when they came into contact with solid substrates. In addition to morphological characteristics, the photosynthetic properties and growth conditions of the clone differed from those of the mother plant. Cross-gradient light and temperature culture experiments revealed that the most favorable conditions for culture of the filamentous clone were 22°C and 95-120 μE/(m2·s) light intensity. The photosynthetic light saturation value for filaments was approx. 100 μE/(m2·s), which is far lower than that of wild thalli. These results could be used to develop techniques for mass cultures of P. urceolata in photobioreactors for production of seed stock or bioactive products.

  3. Fabrication of PLA Filaments and its Printable Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjie; Zhou, Jianping; Ma, Yuming; Wang, Jie; Xu, Jie

    2017-12-01

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is a typical 3D printing technology and preparation of qualified filaments is the basis. In order to prepare polylactic acid (PLA) filaments suitable for personalized FDM 3D printing, this article investigated the effect of factors such as extrusion temperature and screw speed on the diameter, surface roughness and ultimate tensile stress of the obtained PLA filaments. The optimal process parameters for fabrication of qualified filaments were determined. Further, the printable performance of the obtained PLA filaments for 3D objects was preliminarily explored.

  4. SWAYING THREADS OF A SOLAR FILAMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.; Engvold, O.; Langangen, Oe.; Rouppe van der Voort, L. H. M.; Soler, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Oliver, R.

    2009-01-01

    From recent high-resolution observations obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope in La Palma, we detect swaying motions of individual filament threads in the plane of the sky. The oscillatory characters of these motions are comparable with oscillatory Doppler signals obtained from corresponding filament threads. Simultaneous recordings of motions in the line of sight and in the plane of the sky give information about the orientation of the oscillatory plane. These oscillations are interpreted in the context of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. Kink MHD waves supported by the thread body are proposed as an explanation of the observed thread oscillations. On the basis of this interpretation and by means of seismological arguments, we give an estimation of the thread Alfven speed and magnetic field strength by means of seismological arguments.

  5. Helicity and Filament Channels? The Straight Twist!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important and most puzzling features of the coronal magnetic field is that it appears to have smooth magnetic structure with little evidence for non-potentiality except at special locations, photospheric polarity inversions lines where the non-potentiality is observed as a filament channel. This characteristic feature of the closed-field corona is highly unexpected given that photospheric motions continuously tangle its magnetic field. Although reconnection can eliminate some of the injected structure, it cannot destroy the helicity, which should build up to produce observable complexity. We propose that an inverse cascade process transports the injected helicity from the interior of closed flux regions to their boundaries, polarity inversion lines, creating filament channels. We describe how the helicity is injected and transported and calculate the relevant rates. We argue that one process, helicity transport, can explain both the observed lack and presence of structure in the coronal magnetic field.

  6. Morgellons disease: a filamentous borrelial dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Stricker, Raphael B

    2016-01-01

    Morgellons disease (MD) is a dermopathy characterized by multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although MD was initially considered to be a delusional disorder, recent studies have demonstrated that the dermopathy is associated with tickborne infection, that the filaments are composed of keratin and collagen, and that they result from proliferation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in epithelial tissue. Culture, histopathological and molecular evidence of spirochetal infection associated with MD has been presented in several published studies using a variety of techniques. Spirochetes genetically identified as Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto predominate as the infective agent in most of the Morgellons skin specimens studied so far. Other species of Borrelia including Borrelia garinii , Borrelia miyamotoi , and Borrelia hermsii have also been detected in skin specimens taken from MD patients. The optimal treatment for MD remains to be determined.

  7. Statistical study of solar filaments since 1919

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboudarham, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Science board of Paris Observatory funded the data capture of tables associated with Meudon synoptic maps of Solar activity, which were published for observations ranging from 1919 to 1992. The EU HELIO project developed automatic recognition codes, especially concerning filaments based on observations between 1996 en 2014 (and soon, up to now). We plan to fill the gap between the two catalogues in the short term. But it is already possible to study filaments behavior over quite long periods of time. We present here the first series of results obtained from this analysis which give some clue about the way Solar activity behaves in various parts of the cycle, and about the way if depends on the hemisphere where activity occurs. This information could then be correlated with events catalogues (e.g. flares, CMEs, …) in order to link those phenomena with concrete Solar activity.

  8. Laser filamentation mathematical methods and models

    CERN Document Server

    Lorin, Emmanuel; Moloney, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    This book is focused on the nonlinear theoretical and mathematical problems associated with ultrafast intense laser pulse propagation in gases and in particular, in air. With the aim of understanding the physics of filamentation in gases, solids, the atmosphere, and even biological tissue, specialists in nonlinear optics and filamentation from both physics and mathematics attempt to rigorously derive and analyze relevant non-perturbative models. Modern laser technology allows the generation of ultrafast (few cycle) laser pulses, with intensities exceeding the internal electric field in atoms and molecules (E=5x109 V/cm or intensity I = 3.5 x 1016 Watts/cm2 ). The interaction of such pulses with atoms and molecules leads to new, highly nonlinear nonperturbative regimes, where new physical phenomena, such as High Harmonic Generation (HHG), occur, and from which the shortest (attosecond - the natural time scale of the electron) pulses have been created. One of the major experimental discoveries in this nonlinear...

  9. Motility patterns of filamentous sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunker, Rita; Røy, Hans; Kamp, Anja

    2011-01-01

    The large sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp., live on the oxidation of sulfide with oxygen or nitrate, but avoid high concentrations of both sulfide and oxygen. As gliding filaments, they rely on reversals in the gliding direction to find their preferred environment, the oxygen–sulfide interface. We...... observed the chemotactic patterns of single filaments in a transparent agar medium and scored their reversals and the glided distances between reversals. Filaments within the preferred microenvironment glided distances shorter than their own length between reversals that anchored them in their position...... as a microbial mat. Filaments in the oxic region above the mat or in the sulfidic, anoxic region below the mat glided distances longer than the filament length between reversals. This reversal behavior resulted in a diffusion-like spreading of the filaments. A numerical model of such gliding filaments...

  10. Laser induced white lighting of tungsten filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, W.; Tomala, R.; Lukaszewicz, M.

    2018-04-01

    The sustained bright white light emission of thin tungsten filament was induced under irradiation with focused beam of CW infrared laser diode. The broadband emission centered at 600 nm has demonstrated the threshold behavior on excitation power. Its intensity increased non-linearly with excitation power. The emission occurred only from the spot of focused beam of excitation laser diode. The white lighting was accompanied by efficient photocurrent flow and photoelectron emission which both increased non-linearly with laser irradiation power.

  11. Filamented plasmas in laser ablation of solids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Davies, J.R.; Fajardo, M.; Kozlová, Michaela; Mocek, Tomáš; Polan, Jiří; Rus, Bedřich

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2009), 035013/1-035013/12 ISSN 0741-3335 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 12843 - TUIXS Grant - others:FCT(PT) POCI/FIS/59563/2004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : magneto-hydrodynamic modelling * perturbation * filaments * x-ray * plasma Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.409, year: 2009

  12. A first approach to filament dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, P E S; De Abreu, F Vistulo; Dias, R G [Department of Physics, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Simoes, R, E-mail: fva@ua.p [I3N-Institute for Nanostructures, Nanomodelling and Nanofabrication (Portugal)

    2010-11-15

    Modelling elastic filament dynamics is a topic of high interest due to the wide range of applications. However, it has reached a high level of complexity in the literature, making it unaccessible to a beginner. In this paper we explain the main steps involved in the computational modelling of the dynamics of an elastic filament. We first derive equations governing the dynamics of an elastic lament suitable for a computer simulation implementation. The derivation starts from the relation between forces and potential energy in conservative systems in order to derive the equation of motion of any bead in the filament. Only two-dimensional movements are considered, but extensions to three dimensions can follow similar lines. Suggestions for computer implementations are provided in Matlab as well as an example of application related to the generation of musical sounds. This example allows a critical analysis of the numerical results obtained using a cross-disciplinary perspective. Since derivations start from basic physics equations, use simple calculus and computational implementations are straightforward, this paper proposes a different approach to introduce simple molecular dynamics simulations or animations of real systems in undergraduate elasticity or computer modelling courses.

  13. The Magnetic Structure of Filament Barbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jongchul; Moon, Yong-Jae; Park, Young-Deuk

    2005-06-01

    There is a controversy about how features protruding laterally from filaments, called barbs, are magnetically structured. On 2004 August 3, we observed a filament that had well-developed barbs. The observations were performed using the 10 inch refractor of the Big Bear Solar Observatory. A fast camera was employed to capture images at five different wavelengths of the Hα line and successively record them on the basis of frame selection. The terminating points of the barbs were clearly discernable in the Hα images without any ambiguity. The comparison of the Hα images with the magnetograms taken by SOHO MDI revealed that the termination occurred above the minor polarity inversion line dividing the magnetic elements of the major polarity and those of the minor polarity. There is also evidence that the flux cancellation proceeded on the polarity inversion line. Our results together with similar other recent observations support the idea that filament barbs are cool matter suspended in local dips of magnetic field lines, formed by magnetic reconnection in the chromosphere.

  14. Tracer filamentation at an unstable ocean front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yen Chia; Mahadevan, Amala; Thiffeault, Jean-Luc; Yecko, Philip

    2017-11-01

    A front, where two bodies of ocean water with different physical properties meet, can become unstable and lead to a flow with high strain rate and vorticity. Phytoplankton and other oceanic tracers are stirred into filaments by such flow fields, as can often be seen in satellite imagery. The stretching and folding of a tracer by a two-dimensional flow field has been well studied. In the ocean, however, the vertical shear of horizontal velocity is typically two orders of magnitude larger than the horizontal velocity gradient. Theoretical calculations show that vertical shear alters the way in which horizontal strain affects the tracer, resulting in thin, sloping structures in the tracer field. Using a non-hydrostatic ocean model of an unstable ocean front, we simulate tracer filamentation to identify the effect of vertical shear on the deformation of the tracer. In a complementary laboratory experiment, we generate a simple, vertically sheared strain flow and use dye and particle image velocimetry to quantify the filamentary structures in terms of the strain and shear. We identify how vertical shear alters the tracer filaments and infer how the evolution of tracers in the ocean will differ from the idealized two-dimensional paradigm. Support of NSF DMS-1418956 is acknowledged.

  15. A first approach to filament dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, P E S; De Abreu, F Vistulo; Dias, R G; Simoes, R

    2010-01-01

    Modelling elastic filament dynamics is a topic of high interest due to the wide range of applications. However, it has reached a high level of complexity in the literature, making it unaccessible to a beginner. In this paper we explain the main steps involved in the computational modelling of the dynamics of an elastic filament. We first derive equations governing the dynamics of an elastic lament suitable for a computer simulation implementation. The derivation starts from the relation between forces and potential energy in conservative systems in order to derive the equation of motion of any bead in the filament. Only two-dimensional movements are considered, but extensions to three dimensions can follow similar lines. Suggestions for computer implementations are provided in Matlab as well as an example of application related to the generation of musical sounds. This example allows a critical analysis of the numerical results obtained using a cross-disciplinary perspective. Since derivations start from basic physics equations, use simple calculus and computational implementations are straightforward, this paper proposes a different approach to introduce simple molecular dynamics simulations or animations of real systems in undergraduate elasticity or computer modelling courses.

  16. Magnetization Modeling of Twisted Superconducting Filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Satiramatekul, T; Devred, Arnaud; Leroy, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new Finite Element numerical method to analyze the coupling between twisted filaments in a superconducting multifilament composite wire. To avoid the large number of elements required by a 3D code, the proposed method makes use of the energy balance principle in a 2D code. The relationship between superconductor critical current density and local magnetic flux density is implemented in the program for the Bean and modified Kim models. The modeled wire is made up of six filaments twisted together and embedded in a lowresistivity matrix. Computations of magnetization cycle and of the electric field pattern have been performed for various twist pitch values in the case of a pure copper matrix. The results confirm that the maximum magnetization depends on the matrix conductivity, the superconductor critical current density, the applied field frequency, and the filament twist pitch. The simulations also lead to a practical criterion for wire design that can be used to assess whether or not th...

  17. On the fragmentation of filaments in a molecular cloud simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chira, R.-A.; Kainulainen, J.; Ibáñez-Mejía, J. C.; Henning, Th.; Mac Low, M.-M.

    2018-03-01

    Context. The fragmentation of filaments in molecular clouds has attracted a lot of attention recently as there seems to be a close relation between the evolution of filaments and star formation. The study of the fragmentation process has been motivated by simple analytical models. However, only a few comprehensive studies have analysed the evolution of filaments using numerical simulations where the filaments form self-consistently as part of large-scale molecular cloud evolution. Aim. We address the early evolution of parsec-scale filaments that form within individual clouds. In particular, we focus on three questions: How do the line masses of filaments evolve? How and when do the filaments fragment? How does the fragmentation relate to the line masses of the filaments? Methods: We examine three simulated molecular clouds formed in kiloparsec-scale numerical simulations performed with the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamic code. The simulations model a self-gravitating, magnetised, stratified, supernova-driven interstellar medium, including photoelectric heating and radiative cooling. We follow the evolution of the clouds for 6 Myr from the time self-gravity starts to act. We identify filaments using the DisPerSe algorithm, and compare the results to other filament-finding algorithms. We determine the properties of the identified filaments and compare them with the predictions of analytic filament stability models. Results: The average line masses of the identified filaments, as well as the fraction of mass in filamentary structures, increases fairly continuously after the onset of self-gravity. The filaments show fragmentation starting relatively early: the first fragments appear when the line masses lie well below the critical line mass of Ostriker's isolated hydrostatic equilibrium solution ( 16 M⊙ pc-1), commonly used as a fragmentation criterion. The average line masses of filaments identified in three-dimensional volume density cubes

  18. Position detection and observation of a conducting filament hidden under a top electrode in a Ta₂O₅-based atomic switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Alpana; Wang, Qi; Itoh, Yaomi; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Boodhoo, Liam; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Aono, Masakazu

    2015-04-10

    Resistive random access memories (ReRAMs) are promising next-generation memory devices. Observation of the conductive filaments formed in ReRAMs is essential in understanding their operating mechanisms and their expected ultimate performance. Finding the position of the conductive filament is the key process in the preparation of samples for cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging. Here, we propose a method for locating the position of conductive filaments hidden under top electrodes. Atomic force microscopy imaging with a conductive tip detects the current flowing through a conductive filament from the bottom electrode, which reaches its maximum at a position that is above the conductive filament. This is achieved by properly biasing a top electrode, a bottom electrode and the conductive tip. This technique was applied to Cu/Ta2O5/Pt atomic switches, revealing the formation of a single Cu filament in a device, although the device had a large area of 5 × 5 μm(2). Change in filament size was clearly observed depending on the compliance current used in the set process. It was also found from the TEM observation that the cross-sectional shape of the formed filament varies considerably, which is attributable to different Cu nuclei growth mechanisms.

  19. Quantification of filamentation by uropathogenic Escherichia coli during experimental bladder cell infection by using semi-automated image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Kasper; Palarasah, Yaseelan; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    2015-01-01

    of bacterial pathogens and study the advantages of bacterial morphological plasticity, methods are needed to accurately quantify changes in bacterial cell shape. In this study, we present a method for quantification of bacterial filamentation based on automatic detection and measurement of bacterial units......Several rod-shaped pathogens including Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Klebsiella pneumonia are capable of adopting highly filamentous cell shapes under certain circumstances. This phenomenon occurs as a result of continued cell elongation during growth without the usual septation into single...... rod-shaped cells. Evidence has emerged over the past decade suggesting that this morphological transformation is controlled and reversible and provides selective advantages under certain growth conditions, such as during infection in humans. In order to identify the factors which induce filamentation...

  20. A continuum theoretical model and finite elements simulation of bacterial flagellar filament phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Meng, Shuo; Han, Jingshi

    2017-10-03

    The Bacterial flagellar filament can undergo a polymorphic phase transition in response to both mechanical and chemical variations in vitro and in vivo environments. Under mechanical stimuli, such as viscous flow or forces induced by motor rotation, the filament changes its phase from left-handed normal (N) to right-handed semi-coiled (SC) via phase nucleation and growth. Our detailed mechanical analysis of existing experiments shows that both torque and bending moment contribute to the filament phase transition. In this paper, we establish a non-convex and non-local continuum model based on the Ginzburg-Landau theory to describe main characteristics of the filament phase transition such as new-phase nucleation, growth, propagation and the merging of neighboring interfaces. The finite element method (FEM) is adopted to simulate the phase transition under a displacement-controlled loading condition (rotation angle and bending deflection). We show that new-phase nucleation corresponds to the maximum torque and bending moment at the stuck end of the filament. The hysteresis loop in the loading and unloading curves indicates energy dissipation. When the new phase grows and propagates, torque and bending moment remain static. We also find that there is a drop in load when the two interfaces merge, indicating a concomitant reduction in the interfacial energy. Finally, the interface thickness is governed by the coefficients of the gradient of order parameters in the non-local interface energy. Our continuum theory and the finite element method provide a method to study the mechanical behavior of such biomaterials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chirality of Intermediate Filaments and Magnetic Helicity of Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Chae, J.

    2009-05-01

    Filaments that form either between or around active regions (ARs) are called intermediate filaments. Even though there have been many theoretical studies, the origin of the chirality of filaments is still unknown. We investigated how intermediate filaments are related to their associated ARs, especially from the point of view of magnetic helicity and the orientation of polarity inversion lines (PILs). The chirality of filaments has been determined based on the orientations of barbs observed in the full-disk Hα images taken at Big Bear Solar Observatory during the rising phase of solar cycle 23. The sign of magnetic helicity of ARs has been determined using S/inverse-S shaped sigmoids from Yohkoh SXT images. As a result, we have found a good correlation between the chirality of filaments and the magnetic helicity sign of ARs. Among 45 filaments, 42 filaments have shown the same sign as helicity sign of nearby ARs. It has been also confirmed that the role of both the orientation and the relative direction of PILs to ARs in determining the chirality of filaments is not significant, against a theoretical prediction. These results suggest that the chirality of intermediate filaments may originate from magnetic helicity of their associated ARs.

  2. Tropomyosin - master regulator of actin filament function in the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2015-08-15

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms are the master regulators of the functions of individual actin filaments in fungi and metazoans. Tpms are coiled-coil parallel dimers that form a head-to-tail polymer along the length of actin filaments. Yeast only has two Tpm isoforms, whereas mammals have over 40. Each cytoskeletal actin filament contains a homopolymer of Tpm homodimers, resulting in a filament of uniform Tpm composition along its length. Evidence for this 'master regulator' role is based on four core sets of observation. First, spatially and functionally distinct actin filaments contain different Tpm isoforms, and recent data suggest that members of the formin family of actin filament nucleators can specify which Tpm isoform is added to the growing actin filament. Second, Tpms regulate whole-organism physiology in terms of morphogenesis, cell proliferation, vesicle trafficking, biomechanics, glucose metabolism and organ size in an isoform-specific manner. Third, Tpms achieve these functional outputs by regulating the interaction of actin filaments with myosin motors and actin-binding proteins in an isoform-specific manner. Last, the assembly of complex structures, such as stress fibers and podosomes involves the collaboration of multiple types of actin filament specified by their Tpm composition. This allows the cell to specify actin filament function in time and space by simply specifying their Tpm isoform composition. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Measuring Filament Orientation: A New Quantitative, Local Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, C.-E.; Cunningham, M. R.; Jones, P. A. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052 (Australia); Dawson, J. R. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Novak, G. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Fissel, L. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA, 22903 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The relative orientation between filamentary structures in molecular clouds and the ambient magnetic field provides insight into filament formation and stability. To calculate the relative orientation, a measurement of filament orientation is first required. We propose a new method to calculate the orientation of the one-pixel-wide filament skeleton that is output by filament identification algorithms such as filfinder. We derive the local filament orientation from the direction of the intensity gradient in the skeleton image using the Sobel filter and a few simple post-processing steps. We call this the “Sobel-gradient method.” The resulting filament orientation map can be compared quantitatively on a local scale with the magnetic field orientation map to then find the relative orientation of the filament with respect to the magnetic field at each point along the filament. It can also be used for constructing radial profiles for filament width fitting. The proposed method facilitates automation in analyses of filament skeletons, which is imperative in this era of “big data.”.

  4. Patterns of molecular motors that guide and sort filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Beat; Nédélec, François

    2012-11-21

    Molecular motors can be immobilized to transport filaments and loads that are attached to these filaments inside a nano-device. However, if motors are distributed uniformly over a flat surface, the motility is undirected, and the filaments move equally in all directions. For many applications it is important to control the direction in which the filaments move, and two strategies have been explored to achieve this: applying external forces and confining the filaments inside channels. In this article, we discuss a third strategy in which the topography of the sample remains flat, but the motors are distributed non-uniformly over the surface. Systems of filaments and patterned molecular motors were simulated using a stochastic engine that included Brownian motion and filament bending elasticity. Using an evolutionary algorithm, patterns were optimized for their capacity to precisely control the paths of the filaments. We identified patterns of motors that could either direct the filaments in a particular direction, or separate short and long filaments. These functionalities already exceed what has been achieved with confinement. The patterns are composed of one or two types of motors positioned in lines or along arcs and should be easy to manufacture. Finally, these patterns can be easily combined into larger designs, allowing one to precisely control the motion of microscopic objects inside a device.

  5. Bacterial filamentation accelerates colonization of adhesive spots embedded in biopassive surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Möller, Jens; Emge, Philippe; Vizcarra, Ima Avalos; Kollmannsberger, Philip; Vogel, Viola

    2013-01-01

    Sessile bacteria adhere to engineered surfaces and host tissues and pose a substantial clinical and economical risk when growing into biofilms. Most engineered and biological interfaces are of chemically heterogeneous nature and provide adhesive islands for bacterial attachment and growth. To mimic either defects in a surface coating of biomedical implants or heterogeneities within mucosal layers (Peyer's patches), we embedded micrometre-sized adhesive islands in a poly(ethylene glycol) biopassive background. We show experimentally and computationally that filamentation of Escherichia coli can significantly accelerate the bacterial surface colonization under physiological flow conditions. Filamentation can thus provide an advantage to a bacterial population to bridge non-adhesive distances exceeding 5 μm. Bacterial filamentation, caused by blocking of bacterial division, is common among bacterial species and can be triggered by environmental conditions or antibiotic treatment. While great awareness exists that the build-up of antibiotic resistance serves as intrinsic survival strategy, we show here that antibiotic treatment can actually promote surface colonization by triggering filamentation, which in turn prevents daughter cells from being washed away. Our combined microfabrication and computational approaches provide quantitative insights into mechanisms that enable biofouling of biopassive surfaces with embedded adhesive spots, even for spot distances that are multiples of the bacterial length. (paper)

  6. Bacterial filamentation accelerates colonization of adhesive spots embedded in biopassive surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Jens; Emge, Philippe; Avalos Vizcarra, Ima; Kollmannsberger, Philip; Vogel, Viola

    2013-12-01

    Sessile bacteria adhere to engineered surfaces and host tissues and pose a substantial clinical and economical risk when growing into biofilms. Most engineered and biological interfaces are of chemically heterogeneous nature and provide adhesive islands for bacterial attachment and growth. To mimic either defects in a surface coating of biomedical implants or heterogeneities within mucosal layers (Peyer's patches), we embedded micrometre-sized adhesive islands in a poly(ethylene glycol) biopassive background. We show experimentally and computationally that filamentation of Escherichia coli can significantly accelerate the bacterial surface colonization under physiological flow conditions. Filamentation can thus provide an advantage to a bacterial population to bridge non-adhesive distances exceeding 5 μm. Bacterial filamentation, caused by blocking of bacterial division, is common among bacterial species and can be triggered by environmental conditions or antibiotic treatment. While great awareness exists that the build-up of antibiotic resistance serves as intrinsic survival strategy, we show here that antibiotic treatment can actually promote surface colonization by triggering filamentation, which in turn prevents daughter cells from being washed away. Our combined microfabrication and computational approaches provide quantitative insights into mechanisms that enable biofouling of biopassive surfaces with embedded adhesive spots, even for spot distances that are multiples of the bacterial length.

  7. Morphology of Filamentous Fungi: Linking Cellular Biology to Process Engineering Using Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Rainer; Cordes, Christiana; Horn, Harald; Kampen, Ingo; Kwade, Arno; Neu, Thomas R.; Nörtemann, Bernd

    In various biotechnological processes, filamentous fungi, e.g. Aspergillus niger, are widely applied for the production of high value-added products due to their secretion efficiency. There is, however, a tangled relationship between the morphology of these microorganisms, the transport phenomena and the related productivity. The morphological characteristics vary between freely dispersed mycelia and distinct pellets of aggregated biomass. Hence, advantages and disadvantages for mycel or pellet cultivation have to be balanced out carefully. Due to this inadequate understanding of morphogenesis of filamentous microorganisms, fungal morphology, along with reproducibility of inocula of the same quality, is often a bottleneck of productivity in industrial production. To obtain an optimisation of the production process it is of great importance to gain a better understanding of the molecular and cell biology of these microorganisms as well as the approaches in biochemical engineering and particle technique, in particular to characterise the interactions between the growth conditions, cell morphology, spore-hyphae-interactions and product formation. Advances in particle and image analysis techniques as well as micromechanical devices and their applications to fungal cultivations have made available quantitative morphological data on filamentous cells. This chapter provides the ambitious aspects of this line of action, focussing on the control and characterisation of the morphology, the transport gradients and the approaches to understand the metabolism of filamentous fungi. Based on these data, bottlenecks in the morphogenesis of A. niger within the complex production pathways from gene to product should be identified and this may improve the production yield.

  8. FILAMENTOUS FUNGI ON GRAPES IN CENTRAL SLOVAK WINE REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubomír Rybárik

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The concern about filamentous fungi in the vineyards has traditionally been linked to spoilage of grapes due to fungal growth. The aims of this study were to monitor the mycobiota in Central Slovak wine region. The Central Slovak wine region is divided into seven different subregions. In this work we had ten grape samples from seven various wine growing subregions and eight different villages. Five of these samples were from white grape berries and five were from red grape berries. The sample nr. 7 was without chemical protection (interspecific variety and three samples (nr. 8, 9, 10 were from bio-production. In the samples were determined exogenous contamination (direct platting method and endogenous contamination (surface-disinfected grapes. The exogenous mycobiota was determined by the method that each sample of 50 grape berries without visible damage was direct plated on to a DRBC agar medium. In exogenous contamination was detected 17 different genera Alternaria, Arthrinium, Aspergillus, Bipolaris, Botrytis, Cladosporium, Cunninghamella, Epicoccum, Fusarium, Geotrichum, Chaetomium, Mucor, Penicillium, Phoma, Rhizopus, Sordaria, Trichoderma and group Mycelia sterilia in which we included all colony of filamentous fungi that after incubation did not create fruiting bodies necessary for identification to genera level. By the endogenous contamination was each sample of 50 grape berries was surface-disinfected with sodium hypochlorite solution (1% for 1 min, rinsed in sterile distilled water three times and plated onto a DRBC (Dichloran Rose Bengal Chloramphenicol medium, Merck, Germany. The plates were incubated at 25±1 ºC for 7 days in the dark. By the endogenous plating method was identified 15 different genera from all ten samples Alternaria, Arthrinium, Aspergillus, Botrytis, Cladosporium, Epicoccum, Fusarium, Geotrichum, Gelasinospora, Chaetomium, Mucor, Penicillium, Phoma, Rhizopus, Trichoderma and Mycelia sterilia.

  9. The role of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in filament threads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terradas, J.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2012-05-01

    Context. Many solar filaments and prominences show short-lived horizontal threads lying parallel to the photosphere. Aims: In this work the possible link between Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and thread lifetimes is investigated. Methods: This is done by calculating the eigenmodes of a thread modelled as a Cartesian slab under the presence of gravity. An analytical dispersion relation is derived using the incompressible assumption for the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) perturbations. Results: The system allows a mode that is always stable, independently of the value of the Alfvén speed in the thread. The character of this mode varies from being localised at the upper interface of the slab when the magnetic field is weak, to having a global nature and resembling the transverse kink mode when the magnetic field is strong. On the contrary, the slab model permits another mode that is unstable and localised at the lower interface when the magnetic field is weak. The growth rates of this mode can be very short, of the order of minutes for typical thread conditions. This Rayleigh-Taylor unstable mode becomes stable when the magnetic field is increased, and in the limit of strong magnetic field it is essentially a sausage magnetic mode. Conclusions: The gravity force might have a strong effect on the modes of oscillation of threads, depending on the value of the Alfvén speed. In the case of threads in quiescent filaments, where the Alfvén speed is presumably low, very short lifetimes are expected according to the slab model. In active region prominences, the stabilising effect of the magnetic tension might be enough to suppress the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for a wide range of wavelengths.

  10. Filament Eruptions, Jets, and Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Robe, Nick; Falconer, David; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Previously, from chromospheric H alpha and coronal X-ray movies of the Sun's polar coronal holes, it was found that nearly all coronal jets (greater than 90%) are one or the other of two roughly equally common different kinds, different in how they erupt: standard jets and blowout jets (Yamauchi et al 2004, Apl, 605, 5ll: Moore et all 2010, Apj, 720, 757). Here, from inspection of SDO/AIA He II 304 A movies of 54 polar x-ray jets observed in Hinode/XRT movies, we report, as Moore et al (2010) anticipated, that (1) most standard x-ray jets (greater than 80%) show no ejected plasma that is cool enough (T is less than or approximately 10(exp 5K) to be seen in the He II 304 A movies; (2) nearly all blownout X-ray jets (greater than 90%) show obvious ejection of such cool plasma; (3) whereas when cool plasma is ejected in standard X-ray jets, it shows no lateral expansion, the cool plasma ejected in blowout X-ray jets shows strong lateral expansion; and (4) in many blowout X-ray jets, the cool plasma ejection displays the erupting-magnetic-rope form of clasic filament eruptions and is thereby seen to be a miniature filament eruption. The XRT movies also showed most blowout X-ray jets to be larger and brighter, and hence to apparently have more energy, than most standard X-ray jets. These observations (1) confirm the dichotomy of coronal jets, (2) agree with the Shibata model for standard jets, and (3) support the conclusion of Moore et al (2010) that in blowout jets the magnetic-arch base of the jet erupts in the manner of the much larger magnetic arcades in which the core field, the field rooted along the arcade's polarity inversion line, is sheared and twisted (sigmoid), often carries a cool-plasma filament, and erupts to blowout the arcade, producing a CME. From Hinode/SOT Ca II movies of the polar limb, Sterling et al (2010, ApJ, 714, L1) found that chromospheric Type-II spicules show a dichotomy of eruption dynamics similar to that found here for the cool

  11. The THMIS-MTR observation of a active region filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, W. G.; Tang, Y. H.; Fang, C.

    We present some THMIS-MTR observations of a active region filament on September 4, 2002. The full stokes parameters of the filament were obtained in Hα, CaII 8542 and FeI 6302. By use of the data with high spatial resolution(0.44" per pixel), we probed the fine structure of the filament and gave out the parameters at the barbs' endpoints, including intensity, velocity and longitudinal magnetic field. Comparing the quiescent filament which we have discussed before, we find that: 1)The velocities of the barbs' endpoints are much bigger in the active region filament, the values are more than one thousand meters per second. 2)The barbs' endpoints terminate at the low logitudinal magnetic field in the active region filament, too.

  12. A filament supported by different magnetic field configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y.; Schmieder, B.; Démoulin, P.; Wiegelmann, T.; Aulanier, G.; Török, T.; Bommier, V.

    2011-08-01

    A nonlinear force-free magnetic field extrapolation of vector magnetogram data obtained by THEMIS/MTR on 2005 May 27 suggests the simultaneous existence of different magnetic configurations within one active region filament: one part of the filament is supported by field line dips within a flux rope, while the other part is located in dips within an arcade structure. Although the axial field chirality (dextral) and the magnetic helicity (negative) are the same along the whole filament, the chiralities of the filament barbs at different sections are opposite, i.e., right-bearing in the flux rope part and left-bearing in the arcade part. This argues against past suggestions that different barb chiralities imply different signs of helicity of the underlying magnetic field. This new finding about the chirality of filaments will be useful to associate eruptive filaments and magnetic cloud using the helicity parameter in the Space Weather Science.

  13. Filament-producing mutants of influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1 virus have higher neuraminidase activities than the spherical wild-type.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Seladi-Schulman

    Full Text Available Influenza virus exhibits two morphologies - spherical and filamentous. Strains that have been grown extensively in laboratory substrates are comprised predominantly of spherical virions while clinical or low passage isolates produce a mixture of spheres and filamentous virions of varying lengths. The filamentous morphology can be lost upon continued passage in embryonated chicken eggs, a common laboratory substrate for influenza viruses. The fact that the filamentous morphology is maintained in nature but lost in favor of a spherical morphology in ovo suggests that filaments confer a selective advantage within the infected host that is not necessary for growth in laboratory substrates. Indeed, we have recently shown that filament-producing variant viruses are selected upon passage of the spherical laboratory strain A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1 [PR8] in guinea pigs. Toward determining the nature of the selective advantage conferred by filaments, we sought to identify functional differences between spherical and filamentous particles. We compared the wild-type PR8 virus to two previously characterized recombinant PR8 viruses in which single point mutations within M1 confer a filamentous morphology. Our results indicate that these filamentous PR8 mutants have higher neuraminidase activities than the spherical PR8 virus. Conversely, no differences were observed in HAU:PFU or HAU:RNA ratios, binding avidity, sensitivity to immune serum in hemagglutination inhibition assays, or virion stability at elevated temperatures. Based on these results, we propose that the pleomorphic nature of influenza virus particles is important for the optimization of neuraminidase functions in vivo.

  14. Reduced filamentation in high power semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Peter M. W.; McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter

    1999-01-01

    High brightness semiconductor lasers have applications in fields ranging from material processing to medicine. The main difficulty associated with high brightness is that high optical power densities cause damage to the laser facet and thus require large apertures. This, in turn, results in spatio......-temporal instabilities such as filamentation which degrades spatial coherence and brightness. We first evaluate performance of existing designs with a “top-hat” shaped transverse current density profile. The unstable nature of highly excited semiconductor material results in a run-away process where small modulations...

  15. The elastic modulus of isolated polytetrafluoroethylene filaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Drawe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report vibrational Raman spectra of small extended perfluoro-n-alkanes (CnF2n+2 with n = 6, 8–10, 12–14 isolated in supersonic jet expansions and use wavenumbers of longitudinal acoustic vibrations to extrapolate the elastic modulus of cold, isolated polytetrafluoroethylene filaments. The derived value E = 209(10 GPa defines an upper limit for the elastic modulus of the perfectly crystalline, noninteracting polymer at low temperatures and serves as a benchmark for quantum chemical predictions.

  16. Filament winding cylinders. I - Process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo-Yong; Springer, George S.

    1990-01-01

    A model was developed which describes the filament winding process of composite cylinders. The model relates the significant process variables such as winding speed, fiber tension, and applied temperature to the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior of the composite cylinder and the mandrel. Based on the model, a user friendly code was written which can be used to calculate (1) the temperature in the cylinder and the mandrel, (2) the degree of cure and viscosity in the cylinder, (3) the fiber tensions and fiber positions, (4) the stresses and strains in the cylinder and in the mandrel, and (5) the void diameters in the cylinder.

  17. Multiple filamentation generated by focusing femtosecond laser with axicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaodong; Gao, Hui; Zeng, Bin; Xu, Shengqi; Liu, Weiwei; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan; Mu, Guoguang

    2012-03-01

    Multiple filamentation has been observed when focusing a femtosecond laser pulse into a methanol solution with an axicon. It is found that multiple long filaments are located on the central spot and ring structures of the quasi-Bessel beam created by the axicon. Since the quasi-Bessel profile is determined by the axicon properties, the axicon has been suggested as a simple optics to control multiple filaments. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  18. Native bare zone assemblage nucleates myosin filament assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederman, R; Peters, L K

    1982-11-15

    Native myosin filaments from rabbit psoas muscle are always 1.5 micrometer long. The regulated assembly of these filaments is generally considered to occur by an initial antiparallel and subsequent parallel aggregation of identical myosin subunits. In this schema myosin filament length is controlled by either a self-assembly or a Vernier process. We present evidence which refines these ideas. Namely, that the intact myosin bare zone assemblage nucleates myosin filament assembly. This suggestion is based on the following experimental evidence. (1) A native bare zone assemblage about 0.3 micrometer long can be formed by dialysis of native myosin filaments to either a pH 8 or a 0.2 M-KCl solution. (2) Upon dialysis back to 0.1 M-KCl, bare zone assemblages and distal myosin molecules recombine to form 1.5 micrometer long bipolar filaments. (3) The bare zone assemblage can be separated from the distal myosin molecules by column chromatography in 0.2 M-KCl. Upon dialysis of the fractionated subsets back to 0.1 M-KCl, the bare zone assemblage retains its length of about 0.3 micrometer. However, the distal molecules reassemble to form filaments about 5 micrometers long. (4) Filaments are formed from mixes of the isolated subsets. The lengths of these filaments vary with the amount of distal myosin present. (5) When native filaments, isolated bare zone assemblages or distal myosin molecules are moved sequentially to 0.6 M-KCl and then to 0.1 M-KCl, the final filament lengths are all about 5 micrometers. The capacity of the bare zone assemblage to nucleate filament assembly may be due to the bare zone myosin molecules, the associated M band components or both.

  19. Dynamic Regulation of Sarcomeric Actin Filaments in Striated Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2010-01-01

    In striated muscle, the actin cytoskeleton is differentiated into myofibrils. Actin and myosin filaments are organized in sarcomeres and specialized for producing contractile forces. Regular arrangement of actin filaments with uniform length and polarity is critical for the contractile function. However, the mechanisms of assembly and maintenance of sarcomeric actin filaments in striated muscle are not completely understood. Live imaging of actin in striated muscle has revealed that actin sub...

  20. Modeling Vertical Plasma Flows in Solar Filament Barbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Speeds of observed flows in quiescent solar filaments are typically much less than the local Alfvén speed. This is why the flows in filament barbs can be modeled by perturbing a local magnetostatic solution describing the balance between the Lorentz force, gravity, and gas pressure in a barb. Similarly, large-scale filament flows can be treated as adiabatically slow deformations of a force-free magnetic equilibrium that describes the global structure of a filament. This approach reconciles current theoretical models with the puzzling observational result that some of the flows appear to be neither aligned with the magnetic field nor controlled by gravity.

  1. Filament shape versus coronal potential magnetic field structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, B.

    2016-01-01

    Solar filament shape in projection on disc depends on the structure of the coronal magnetic field. We calculate the position of polarity inversion lines (PILs) of coronal potential magnetic field at different heights above the photosphere, which compose the magnetic neutral surface, and compare with them the distribution of the filament material in Hα chromospheric images. We found that the most of the filament material is enclosed between two PILs, one at a lower height close to the chromosphere and one at a higher level, which can be considered as a height of the filament spine. Observations of the same filament on the limb by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft confirm that the height of the spine is really very close to the value obtained from the PIL and filament border matching. Such matching can be used for filament height estimations in on-disc observations. Filament barbs are housed within protruding sections of the low-level PIL. On the base of simple model, we show that the similarity of the neutral surfaces in potential and non-potential fields with the same sub-photospheric sources is the reason for the found tendency for the filament material to gather near the potential-field neutral surface.

  2. Statistical Study of the Magnetic Field Orientation in Solar Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, Yoichiro; Sakurai, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    We have carried out a statistical study of the average orientation of the magnetic field in solar filaments with respect to their axes for more than 400 samples, based on data taken with daily full-Sun, full-Stokes spectropolarimetric observations using the He I 1083.0 nm line. The major part of the samples are the filaments in the quiet areas, but those in the active areas are included as well. The average orientation of the magnetic field in filaments shows a systematic property depending on the hemisphere; the direction of the magnetic field in filaments in the northern (southern) hemisphere mostly deviates clockwise (counterclockwise) from their axes, which run along the magnetic polarity inversion line. The deviation angles of the magnetic field from the axes are concentrated between 10° and 30°. This hemispheric pattern is consistent with that revealed for chirality of filament barbs, filament channels, and for other solar features found to possess chirality. For some filaments, it was confirmed that their magnetic field direction is locally parallel to their structure seen in Hα images. Our results for the first time confirmed this hemispheric pattern with the direct observation of the magnetic field in filaments. Interestingly, the filaments which show the opposite magnetic field deviation to the hemispheric pattern, are in many cases found above the polarity inversion line whose ambient photospheric magnetic field has the polarity alignment being opposite to that of active regions following the Hale–Nicholson law.

  3. Spatial evolution of laser filaments in turbulent air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Tao; Zhu, Shiping; Zhou, Shengling; He, Yan

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the spatial evolution properties of laser filament clusters in turbulent air were evaluated using numerical simulations. Various statistical parameters were calculated, such as the percolation probability, filling factor, and average cluster size. The results indicate that turbulence-induced multi-filamentation can be described as a new phase transition universality class. In addition, during this process, the relationship between the average cluster size and filling factor could be fit by a power function. Our results are valuable for applications involving filamentation that can be influenced by the geometrical features of multiple filaments.

  4. Numerical simulation of laser filamentation in underdense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Lichun; Chen Zhihua; Tu Qinfen

    2000-01-01

    Developing process of filamentation and effect of characteristic parameters in underdense plasma have been studied using numerical simulation method. Production and development of two-dimensional cylinder filamentation instability were presented clearly. The results indicate incidence laser intensity and plasma background density are important factors affecting convergent intensity. At the same time, it was showed that different laser wavelength or different electron background density could affect filamentation process. The results are consistent with theory and experiments of alien reports. It can provide reference for restraining filamentation

  5. MATERIAL SUPPLY AND MAGNETIC CONFIGURATION OF AN ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, P.; Fang, C.; Chen, P. F.; Yang, K.; Hao, Q. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Cao, Wenda, E-mail: fangc@nju.edu.cn [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States)

    2016-11-10

    It is important to study the fine structures of solar filaments with high-resolution observations, since it can help us understand the magnetic and thermal structures of the filaments and their dynamics. In this paper, we study a newly formed filament located inside the active region NOAA 11762, which was observed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory from 16:40:19 UT to 17:07:58 UT on 2013 June 5. As revealed by the H α filtergrams, cool material is seen to be injected into the filament spine with a speed of 5–10 km s{sup -1}. At the source of the injection, brightenings are identified in the chromosphere, which are accompanied by magnetic cancellation in the photosphere, implying the importance of magnetic reconnection in replenishing the filament with plasmas from the lower atmosphere. Counter-streamings are detected near one endpoint of the filament, with the plane-of-the-sky speed being 7–9 km s{sup -1} in the H α red-wing filtergrams and 9–25 km s{sup -1} in the blue-wing filtergrams. The observations are indicative that this active region filament is supported by a sheared arcade without magnetic dips, and the counter-streamings are due to unidirectional flows with alternative directions, rather than due to the longitudinal oscillations of filament threads as in many other filaments.

  6. Isolation and characterization of the new mosaic filamentous phage VFJ Φ of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuya; Kan, Biao; Wang, Ruibai

    2013-01-01

    Filamentous phages have distinguished roles in conferring many pathogenicity and survival related features to Gram-negative bacteria including the medically important Vibrio cholerae, which carries factors such as cholera toxin on phages. A novel filamentous phage, designated VFJΦ, was isolated in this study from an ampicillin and kanamycin-resistant O139 serogroup V. cholerae strain ICDC-4470. The genome of VFJΦ is 8555 nucleotides long, including 12 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), which are organized in a modular structure. VFJΦ was found to be a mosaic of two groups of V. cholerae phages. A large part of the genome is highly similar to that of the fs2 phage, and the remaining 700 bp is homologous to VEJ and VCYΦ. This 700 bp region gave VFJΦ several characteristics that are not found in fs2 and other filamentous phages. In its native host ICDC-4470 and newly-infected strain N16961, VFJΦ was found to exist as a plasmid but did not integrate into the host chromosome. It showed a relatively wide host range but did not infect the classical biotype O1 V. cholerae strains. After infection, the host strains exhibited obvious inhibition of both growth and flagellum formation and had acquired a low level of ampicillin resistance and a high level of kanamycin resistance. The antibiotic resistances were not directly conferred to the hosts by phage-encoded genes and were not related to penicillinase. The discovery of VFJΦ updates our understanding of filamentous phages as well as the evolution and classification of V. cholerae filamentous phage, and the study provides new information on the interaction between phages and their host bacteria.

  7. Isolation and characterization of the new mosaic filamentous phage VFJ Φ of Vibrio cholerae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuya Wang

    Full Text Available Filamentous phages have distinguished roles in conferring many pathogenicity and survival related features to Gram-negative bacteria including the medically important Vibrio cholerae, which carries factors such as cholera toxin on phages. A novel filamentous phage, designated VFJΦ, was isolated in this study from an ampicillin and kanamycin-resistant O139 serogroup V. cholerae strain ICDC-4470. The genome of VFJΦ is 8555 nucleotides long, including 12 predicted open reading frames (ORFs, which are organized in a modular structure. VFJΦ was found to be a mosaic of two groups of V. cholerae phages. A large part of the genome is highly similar to that of the fs2 phage, and the remaining 700 bp is homologous to VEJ and VCYΦ. This 700 bp region gave VFJΦ several characteristics that are not found in fs2 and other filamentous phages. In its native host ICDC-4470 and newly-infected strain N16961, VFJΦ was found to exist as a plasmid but did not integrate into the host chromosome. It showed a relatively wide host range but did not infect the classical biotype O1 V. cholerae strains. After infection, the host strains exhibited obvious inhibition of both growth and flagellum formation and had acquired a low level of ampicillin resistance and a high level of kanamycin resistance. The antibiotic resistances were not directly conferred to the hosts by phage-encoded genes and were not related to penicillinase. The discovery of VFJΦ updates our understanding of filamentous phages as well as the evolution and classification of V. cholerae filamentous phage, and the study provides new information on the interaction between phages and their host bacteria.

  8. Electromechanical vortex filaments during cardiac fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoph, J.; Chebbok, M.; Richter, C.; Schröder-Schetelig, J.; Bittihn, P.; Stein, S.; Uzelac, I.; Fenton, F. H.; Hasenfuß, G.; Gilmour, R. F., Jr.; Luther, S.

    2018-03-01

    The self-organized dynamics of vortex-like rotating waves, which are also known as scroll waves, are the basis of the formation of complex spatiotemporal patterns in many excitable chemical and biological systems. In the heart, filament-like phase singularities that are associated with three-dimensional scroll waves are considered to be the organizing centres of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. The mechanisms that underlie the onset, maintenance and control of electromechanical turbulence in the heart are inherently three-dimensional phenomena. However, it has not previously been possible to visualize the three-dimensional spatiotemporal dynamics of scroll waves inside cardiac tissues. Here we show that three-dimensional mechanical scroll waves and filament-like phase singularities can be observed deep inside the contracting heart wall using high-resolution four-dimensional ultrasound-based strain imaging. We found that mechanical phase singularities co-exist with electrical phase singularities during cardiac fibrillation. We investigated the dynamics of electrical and mechanical phase singularities by simultaneously measuring the membrane potential, intracellular calcium concentration and mechanical contractions of the heart. We show that cardiac fibrillation can be characterized using the three-dimensional spatiotemporal dynamics of mechanical phase singularities, which arise inside the fibrillating contracting ventricular wall. We demonstrate that electrical and mechanical phase singularities show complex interactions and we characterize their dynamics in terms of trajectories, topological charge and lifetime. We anticipate that our findings will provide novel perspectives for non-invasive diagnostic imaging and therapeutic applications.

  9. Morgellons disease: a filamentous borrelial dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Middelveen MJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marianne J Middelveen, Raphael B Stricker International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA Abstract: Morgellons disease (MD is a dermopathy characterized by multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although MD was initially considered to be a delusional disorder, recent studies have demonstrated that the dermopathy is associated with tickborne infection, that the filaments are composed of keratin and collagen, and that they result from proliferation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in epithelial tissue. Culture, histopathological and molecular evidence of spirochetal infection associated with MD has been presented in several published studies using a variety of techniques. Spirochetes genetically identified as Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto predominate as the infective agent in most of the Morgellons skin specimens studied so far. Other species of Borrelia including Borrelia garinii, Borrelia miyamotoi, and Borrelia hermsii have also been detected in skin specimens taken from MD patients. The optimal treatment for MD remains to be determined. Keywords: Morgellons disease, dermatitis, Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, spirochetes

  10. Intermediate filament mechanics in vitro and in the cell: From coiled coils to filaments, fibers and networks

    OpenAIRE

    Köster, Sarah; Weitz, David; Goldman, Robert D.; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate filament proteins form filaments, fibers and networks both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of metazoan cells. Their general structural building plan accommodates highly varying amino acid sequences to yield extended dimeric α-helical coiled coils of highly conserved design. These “rod” particles are the basic building blocks of intrinsically flexible, filamentous structures that are able to resist high mechanical stresses, i.e. bending and stretching to a considerable degree, bo...

  11. Fatigue behaviour of core-spun yarns containing filament by means of cyclic dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esin, S.; Osman, B.

    2017-10-01

    The behaviour of yarns under dynamic loading is important that leads to understand the growth characteristics which is exposed to repetitive loadings during usage of fabric made from these yarns. Fabric growth is undesirable property that originated from low resilience characteristics of fabric. In this study, the effects of the filament fineness and yarn linear density on fatigue behaviour of rigid-core spun yarns were determined. Cotton covered yarns containing different filament fineness of polyester (PET) draw textured yarns (DTY) (100d/36f, 100d/96f, 100d/144f, 100d/192f and 100d/333f) and yarn linear densities (37 tex, 30 tex, 25 tex and 21 tex) were manufactured by using a modified ring spinning system at the same spinning parameters. Repetitive loads were applied for 25 cycles at levels between 0.1 and 3 N. Dynamic modulus and dynamic strain of yarn samples were analyzed statistically. Results showed that filament fineness and yarn linear density have significance effect on dynamic modulus and dynamic strain after cyclic loading.

  12. Sphaerotilus natans, a neutrophilic iron-related filamentous bacterium : mechanisms of uranium scavenging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seder-Colomina, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals and radionuclides are present in some ecosystems worldwide due to natural contaminations or anthropogenic activities. The use of microorganisms to restore those polluted ecosystems, a process known as bioremediation, is of increasing interest, especially under near-neutral pH conditions. Iron minerals encrusting neutrophilic iron-related bacteria, especially Bacterio-genic Iron Oxides (BIOS), have a poorly crystalline structure, which in addition to their large surface area and reactivity make them excellent scavengers for inorganic pollutants. In this PhD work we studied the different mechanisms of uranium scavenging by the neutrophilic bacterium Sphaerotilus natans, chosen as a model bacterium for iron-related sheath-forming filamentous microorganisms. S. natans can grow as single cells and filaments. The latter were used to investigate U(VI) bio-sorption and U(VI) sorption onto BIOS. In addition, uranium sorption onto the abiotic analogues of such iron minerals was assessed. In order to use S. natans filaments for U(VI) scavenging, it was necessary to identify factors inducing S. natans filamentation. The influence of oxygen was ascertained by using molecular biology techniques and our results revealed that while saturated oxygen conditions resulted in single cell growth, a moderate oxygen depletion to ∼ 3 mg O 2 .L -1 led to the desired filamentous growth of S. natans. BIOS attached to S. natans filaments as well as the abiotic analogues were analysed by XAS at Fe K-edge. Both materials were identified as amorphous iron(III) phosphates with a small component of Fe(II), with a high reactivity towards scavenging of inorganic pollutants. In addition, EXAFS at the U LIII-edge revealed a common structure for the O shells, while those for P, Fe and C were different for each sorbent. An integrated approach combining experimental techniques and speciation calculations made it possible to describe U(VI) adsorption isotherms by using a surface complexation

  13. Ultrarelativistic modulation and filamentation instabilities in a laser-produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimullah, M.; Mamun, A.A.; Majid, F.

    1991-08-01

    A rigorous theoretical investigation is made on the ultrarelativistic modulation and filamentation instabilities in a collisionless and unmagnetized laser-produced plasma. The kinetic description of the laser-produced plasma, viz., the relativistic Vlasov equation has been employed to find the nonlinear response of electrons for the four-wave parametric processes in the plasma. It is noted that the modulation and filamentation instabilities have significant relativistic effects and the growth rates of both the instabilities in the ultrarelativistic consideration are approximately (c 2 /v 2 e ) times higher than those in the nonrelativistic consideration, where c and v e are the free-space speed of light and the thermal speed of the plasma electrons. (author). 21 refs

  14. The seeding and cultivation of a tropical species of filamentous Ulva for algal biomass production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Carl

    Full Text Available Filamentous species of Ulva are ideal for cultivation because they are robust with high growth rates and maintained across a broad range of environments. Temperate species of filamentous Ulva are commercially cultivated on nets which can be artificially 'seeded' under controlled conditions allowing for a high level of control over seeding density and consequently biomass production. This study quantified for the first time the seeding and culture cycle of a tropical species of filamentous Ulva (Ulva sp. 3 and identified seeding density and nursery period as key factors affecting growth and biomass yield. A seeding density of 621,000 swarmers m(-1 rope in combination with a nursery period of five days resulted in the highest growth rate and correspondingly the highest biomass yield. A nursery period of five days was optimal with up to six times the biomass yield compared to ropes under either shorter or longer nursery periods. These combined parameters of seeding density and nursery period resulted in a specific growth rate of more than 65% day(-1 between 7 and 10 days of outdoor cultivation post-nursery. This was followed by a decrease in growth through to 25 days. This study also demonstrated that the timing of harvest is critical as the maximum biomass yield of 23.0 ± 8.8 g dry weight m(-1 (228.7 ± 115.4 g fresh weight m(-1 was achieved after 13 days of outdoor cultivation whereas biomass degraded to 15.5 ± 7.3 g dry weight m(-1 (120.2 ± 71.8 g fresh weight m(-1 over a longer outdoor cultivation period of 25 days. Artificially seeded ropes of Ulva with high biomass yields over short culture cycles may therefore be an alternative to unattached cultivation in integrated pond-based aquaculture systems.

  15. A catalytic oligomeric motor that walks along a filament track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mu-Jie; Kapral, Raymond

    2015-06-01

    Most biological motors in the cell execute chemically powered conformational changes as they walk on biopolymer filaments in order to carry out directed transport functions. Synthetic motors that operate in a similar manner are being studied since they have the potential to perform similar tasks in a variety of applications. In this paper, a synthetic nanomotor that moves along a filament track, without invoking motor conformational changes, is constructed and its properties are studied in detail. The motor is an oligomer comprising three linked beads with specific binding properties. The filament track is a stiff polymer chain, also described by a linear chain of linked coarse-grained molecular groups modeled as beads. Reactions on the filament that are catalyzed by a motor bead and use fuel in the environment, in conjunction within the binding affinities of the motor beads to the filament beads, lead to directed motion. The system operates out of equilibrium due to the state of the filament and supply of fuel. The motor, filament, and surrounding medium are all described at microscopic level that permits a full analysis of the motor motion. A stochastic model that captures the main trends seen in the simulations is also presented. The results of this study point to some of the key features that could be used to construct nanomotors that undergo biased walks powered by chemical reactions on filaments.

  16. Physical principles of filamentous protein self-assembly kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, Thomas C T; Liu, Lucie X; Meisl, Georg; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2017-01-01

    The polymerization of proteins and peptides into filamentous supramolecular structures is an elementary form of self-organization of key importance to the functioning biological systems, as in the case of actin biofilaments that compose the cellular cytoskeleton. Aberrant filamentous protein self-assembly, however, is associated with undesired effects and severe clinical disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, which, at the molecular level, are associated with the formation of certain forms of filamentous protein aggregates known as amyloids. Moreover, due to their unique physicochemical properties, protein filaments are finding extensive applications as biomaterials for nanotechnology. With all these different factors at play, the field of filamentous protein self-assembly has experienced tremendous activity in recent years. A key question in this area has been to elucidate the microscopic mechanisms through which filamentous aggregates emerge from dispersed proteins with the goal of uncovering the underlying physical principles. With the latest developments in the mathematical modeling of protein aggregation kinetics as well as the improvement of the available experimental techniques it is now possible to tackle many of these complex systems and carry out detailed analyses of the underlying microscopic steps involved in protein filament formation. In this paper, we review some classical and modern kinetic theories of protein filament formation, highlighting their use as a general strategy for quantifying the molecular-level mechanisms and transition states involved in these processes. (topical review)

  17. Application of digital holography to filament size analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semin, N.V.; Poelma, C.; Drost, S.; Westerweel, J.

    2010-01-01

    The potential of in-line digital holography to locate and measure the size and position of filaments, i.e. thin wire-like objects, distributed throughout a thick volume has been investigated. In this paper two approaches are introduced to study filaments of varying diameter. (1) It is shown

  18. Fully filamentized HTS coated conductor via striation and selective electroplating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesgin, Ibrahim; Majkic, Goran [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Selvamanickam, Venkat, E-mail: selva@uh.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Fully-filamentized coated conductor with 13-fold reduction in ac losses. ► Selective electroplating for filamentization of thick copper stabilizer. ► A twofold decrease in ac loss by filamentization of copper stabilizer. ► Absence of appreciable coupling loss contribution from electroplating. -- Abstract: A simple, cost-effective method involving top-down mechanical scribing, oxidation and bottom-up electroplating has been successfully developed to fabricate fully filamentized HTS coated conductors. The copper stabilizer layer is selectively electroplated on the superconducting filaments while the striations remain copper-free due to the formation of a resistive oxide layer in between filaments by oxidation of the striated grooves at elevated temperature in oxygen atmosphere. Magnetization AC loss measurements, performed in a frequency range of 45–500 Hz at 77 K, confirmed the expected N-fold reduction in AC loss of the filamentized tapes with no significant degradation in critical current beyond that due to the material removal from the striations (N – number of filaments). A considerable reduction in coupling AC loss was observed after high temperature annealing/oxidation of the striated tapes. Furthermore, a significant reduction in eddy current loss was achieved with selective copper electroplating, as evidenced by analyzing the field and frequency dependence of magnetization AC loss, as well as by comparing the AC loss performance of striated samples to that of non-striated samples after electroplating of copper stabilizer.

  19. Fully filamentized HTS coated conductor via striation and selective electroplating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesgin, Ibrahim; Majkic, Goran; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fully-filamentized coated conductor with 13-fold reduction in ac losses. ► Selective electroplating for filamentization of thick copper stabilizer. ► A twofold decrease in ac loss by filamentization of copper stabilizer. ► Absence of appreciable coupling loss contribution from electroplating. -- Abstract: A simple, cost-effective method involving top-down mechanical scribing, oxidation and bottom-up electroplating has been successfully developed to fabricate fully filamentized HTS coated conductors. The copper stabilizer layer is selectively electroplated on the superconducting filaments while the striations remain copper-free due to the formation of a resistive oxide layer in between filaments by oxidation of the striated grooves at elevated temperature in oxygen atmosphere. Magnetization AC loss measurements, performed in a frequency range of 45–500 Hz at 77 K, confirmed the expected N-fold reduction in AC loss of the filamentized tapes with no significant degradation in critical current beyond that due to the material removal from the striations (N – number of filaments). A considerable reduction in coupling AC loss was observed after high temperature annealing/oxidation of the striated tapes. Furthermore, a significant reduction in eddy current loss was achieved with selective copper electroplating, as evidenced by analyzing the field and frequency dependence of magnetization AC loss, as well as by comparing the AC loss performance of striated samples to that of non-striated samples after electroplating of copper stabilizer

  20. Fossil evidence for spin alignment of SDSS galaxies in filaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Bernard J.T.; Weygaert, Rien van de; Arag´on-Calvo, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    We search for and find fossil evidence that the distribution of the spin axes of galaxies in cosmic web filaments relative to their host filaments are not randomly distributed. This would indicate that the action of large scale tidal torques effected the alignments of galaxies located in cosmic

  1. Method for simultaneously coating a plurality of filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, P.A.; Pochan, P.D.; Siegal, M.P.; Dominguez, F.

    1995-07-11

    Methods and apparatuses are disclosed for coating materials, and the products and compositions produced thereby. Substances, such as diamond or diamond-like carbon, are deposited onto materials, such as a filament or a plurality of filaments simultaneously, using one or more cylindrical, inductively coupled, resonator plasma reactors. 3 figs.

  2. Cellulase activity of filamentous fungi induced by rice husk | Oliveros ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cellulase activity of filamentous fungi induced by rice husk. DF Oliveros, N Guarnizo, EM Perea, WM Arango. Abstract. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of different filamentous fungi to degrade cellulose in rice husk pre-treated with steam explosion or alkaline hydrolysis. A preliminary test performed ...

  3. Calibration and Temperature Profile of a Tungsten Filament Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Izarra, Charles; Gitton, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament…

  4. Design and Optimization of Filament Wound Composite Pressure Vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zu, L.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important issues for the design of filament-wound pressure vessels reflects on the determination of the most efficient meridian profiles and related fiber architectures, leading to optimal structural performance. To better understand the design and optimization of filament-wound

  5. THE APPARATUS FOR ALIGNMENT OF THE PHOTOMETRIC LAMP FILAMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Dlugunovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During photometric measurements involving the use of photometric lamps it is necessary that the filament of lamp takes a strictly predetermined position with respect to the photodetector and the optical axis of the photometric setup. The errors in positioning of alignment filament with respect to the optical axis of the measuring system lead to increase the uncertainty of measurement of the photometric characteristics of the light sources. A typical method for alignment of filament of photometric lamps is based on the use a diopter tubes (telescopes. Using this method, the mounting of filament to the required position is carried out by successive approximations, which requires special concentration and a lot of time. The aim of this work is to develop an apparatus for alignment which allows simultaneous alignment of the filament of lamps in two mutually perpendicular planes. The method and apparatus for alignment of the photometric lamp filament during measurements of the photometric characteristics of light sources based on two digital video cameras is described in this paper. The apparatus allows to simultaneously displaying the image of lamps filament on the computer screen in two mutually perpendicular planes. The apparatus eliminates a large number of functional units requiring elementwise alignment and reduces the time required to carry out the alignment. The apparatus also provides the imaging of lamps filament with opaque coated on the bulb. The apparatus is used at the National standard of light intensity and illuminance units of the Republic of Belarus. 

  6. PDGF-AA-induced filamentous mitochondria benefit dermal papilla cells in cellular migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifude, C; Kaseda, K

    2015-06-01

    Human dermal papilla cells (HDPCs) play essential roles in hair follicular morphogenesis and postnatal hair growth cycles. Previous reports demonstrated that platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA) enhanced the formation of dermal condensates in hair follicular development. Additionally, PDGF-AA induces/maintains the anagen phase of the hair cycle. It is likely that mitochondrial morphology and functions are tightly coupled with maintenance of these energy-demanding activities. However, little is known about the mitochondrial regulation in HDPCs. Thus, we investigated the PDGF-involved mitochondrial regulation in HDPCs. The mitochondrial morphologies of HDPCs were examined in the presence or absence of PDGF-AA under a fluorescent microscope. ATP production and cellular motility were investigated. The relationship between mitochondrial morphology and the cellular functions was discussed. We observed that primary HDPCs contained mitochondria with filamentous and/or rounded morphologies. Both types of mitochondria showed similar membrane potentials. Interestingly, in the presence of PDGF-AA, but not PDGF-BB, the balance between the two morphologies shifted towards the filamentous form. Concomitantly, both mitochondrial enzymatic activity and total cellular ATP level were augmented by PDGF-AA. These two parameters were closely correlated, suggesting the mitochondrial involvement in the PDGF-augmented ATP production. Moreover, PDGF-AA accelerated the migration of HDPCs in a gap-filling assay, but did not change the rate of cellular proliferation. Notably, filamentous mitochondria dominated migrating HDPCs. PDGF-AA benefits HDPCs in the process of migration, by increasing the number of filamentous mitochondria. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  7. Bursting of filaments in the plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratton, F.T.L.

    1976-01-01

    Photographs of the current sheath of (low energy) plasma focus show a disruption of the filaments. This phenomenon is interpreted as a vortex breakdown. Physical parameters which support this hypothesis are obtained from measurements, from the theoretical thickness of the current sheath given by Nardi and from some models of the plasma flow. The widening of a vortex due to axial velocity increase is analyzed by means of magnetohydrodynamic collinear models. The main results are: (1) the existence of a limit separating supercritical from subcritical regimes (their character changes with the ratio between kinetic and magnetic energy); (2) the existence of flow regimes where the vortex radius remains approximately constant for moderate increments of the external velocity; (3) the structure of the vortex may change substantially for a sufficiently large increment of the external velocity, even in subcritical states; (4) the possibility that a burst of the vortex may occur when the external velocity suffers a slowdown

  8. Methods for genetic transformation of filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dandan; Tang, Yu; Lin, Jun; Cai, Weiwen

    2017-10-03

    Filamentous fungi have been of great interest because of their excellent ability as cell factories to manufacture useful products for human beings. The development of genetic transformation techniques is a precondition that enables scientists to target and modify genes efficiently and may reveal the function of target genes. The method to deliver foreign nucleic acid into cells is the sticking point for fungal genome modification. Up to date, there are some general methods of genetic transformation for fungi, including protoplast-mediated transformation, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, electroporation, biolistic method and shock-wave-mediated transformation. This article reviews basic protocols and principles of these transformation methods, as well as their advantages and disadvantages.

  9. Engineering of filamentous bacteriophage for protein sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasino, Michael

    Methods of high throughput, sensitive and cost effective quantification of proteins enables personalized medicine by allowing healthcare professionals to better monitor patient condition and response to treatment. My doctoral research has attempted to advance these methods through the use of filamentous bacteriophage (phage). These bacterial viruses are particularly amenable to both genetic and chemical engineering and can be produced efficiently in large amounts. Here, I discuss several strategies for modifying phage for use in protein sensing assays. These include the expression of bio-orthogonal conjugation handles on the phage coat, the incorporation of specific recognition sequences within the phage genome, and the creation of antibody-phage conjugates via a photo-crosslinking non-canonical amino acid. The physical and chemical characterization of these engineered phage and the results of their use in modified protein sensing assays will be presented.

  10. Filament wound data base development, revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, R. Scott; Braddock, William F.

    1985-01-01

    The objective was to update the present Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) baseline reentry aerodynamic data base and to develop a new reentry data base for the filament wound case SRB along with individual protuberance increments. Lockheed's procedures for performing these tasks are discussed. Free fall of the SRBs after separation from the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle is completely uncontrolled. However, the SRBs must decelerate to a velocity and attitude that is suitable for parachute deployment. To determine the SRB reentry trajectory parameters, including the rate of deceleration and attitude history during free-fall, engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center are using a six-degree-of-freedom computer program to predict dynamic behavior. Static stability aerodynamic coefficients are part of the information required for input into this computer program. Lockheed analyzed the existing reentry aerodynamic data tape (Data Tape 5) for the current steel case SRB. This analysis resulted in the development of Data Tape 7.

  11. Validation of the filament winding process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calius, Emilo P.; Springer, George S.; Wilson, Brian A.; Hanson, R. Scott

    1987-01-01

    Tests were performed toward validating the WIND model developed previously for simulating the filament winding of composite cylinders. In these tests two 24 in. long, 8 in. diam and 0.285 in. thick cylinders, made of IM-6G fibers and HBRF-55 resin, were wound at + or - 45 deg angle on steel mandrels. The temperatures on the inner and outer surfaces and inside the composite cylinders were recorded during oven cure. The temperatures inside the cylinders were also calculated by the WIND model. The measured and calculated temperatures were then compared. In addition, the degree of cure and resin viscosity distributions inside the cylinders were calculated for the conditions which existed in the tests.

  12. Natural Fiber Filament Wound Composites: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ansari Suriyati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent development, natural fibers have attracted the interest of engineers, researchers, professionals and scientists all over the world as an alternative reinforcement for fiber reinforced polymer composites. This is due to its superior properties such as high specific strength, low weight, low cost, fairly good mechanical properties, non-abrasive, eco-friendly and bio-degradable characteristics. In this point of view, natural fiber-polymer composites (NFPCs are becoming increasingly utilized in a wide variety of applications because they represent an ecological and inexpensive alternative to conventional petroleum-derived materials. On the other hand, considerable amounts of organic waste and residue from the industrial and agricultural processes are still underutilized as low-value energy sources. This is a comprehensive review discussing about natural fiber reinforced composite produced by filament winding technique.

  13. HIERARCHICAL FRAGMENTATION OF THE ORION MOLECULAR FILAMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.; Su, Yu-Nung; Teixeira, Paula S.; Zapata, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a high angular resolution map of the 850 μm continuum emission of the Orion Molecular Cloud-3 (OMC 3) obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA); the map is a mosaic of 85 pointings covering an approximate area of 6.'5 × 2.'0 (0.88 × 0.27 pc). We detect 12 spatially resolved continuum sources, each with an H 2 mass between 0.3-5.7 M ☉ and a projected source size between 1400-8200 AU. All the detected sources are on the filamentary main ridge (n H 2 ≥10 6 cm –3 ), and analysis based on the Jeans theorem suggests that they are most likely gravitationally unstable. Comparison of multi-wavelength data sets indicates that of the continuum sources, 6/12 (50%) are associated with molecular outflows, 8/12 (67%) are associated with infrared sources, and 3/12 (25%) are associated with ionized jets. The evolutionary status of these sources ranges from prestellar cores to protostar phase, confirming that OMC-3 is an active region with ongoing embedded star formation. We detect quasi-periodical separations between the OMC-3 sources of ≈17''/0.035 pc. This spatial distribution is part of a large hierarchical structure that also includes fragmentation scales of giant molecular cloud (≈35 pc), large-scale clumps (≈1.3 pc), and small-scale clumps (≈0.3 pc), suggesting that hierarchical fragmentation operates within the Orion A molecular cloud. The fragmentation spacings are roughly consistent with the thermal fragmentation length in large-scale clumps, while for small-scale cores it is smaller than the local fragmentation length. These smaller spacings observed with the SMA can be explained by either a helical magnetic field, cloud rotation, or/and global filament collapse. Finally, possible evidence for sequential fragmentation is suggested in the northern part of the OMC-3 filament.

  14. RADIATION SPECTRAL SYNTHESIS OF RELATIVISTIC FILAMENTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederiksen, Jacob Trier; Haugboelle, Troels; Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Nordlund, Ake

    2010-01-01

    Radiation from many astrophysical sources, e.g., gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei, is believed to arise from relativistically shocked collisionless plasmas. Such sources often exhibit highly transient spectra evolving rapidly compared with source lifetimes. Radiation emitted from these sources is typically associated with nonlinear plasma physics, complex field topologies, and non-thermal particle distributions. In such circumstances, a standard synchrotron paradigm may fail to produce accurate conclusions regarding the underlying physics. Simulating spectral emission and spectral evolution numerically in various relativistic shock scenarios is then the only viable method to determine the detailed physical origin of the emitted spectra. In this Letter, we present synthetic radiation spectra representing the early stage development of the filamentation (streaming) instability of an initially unmagnetized plasma, which is relevant for both collisionless shock formation and reconnection dynamics in relativistic astrophysical outflows as well as for laboratory astrophysics experiments. Results were obtained using a highly efficient in situ diagnostics method, based on detailed particle-in-cell modeling of collisionless plasmas. The synthetic spectra obtained here are compared with those predicted by a semi-analytical model for jitter radiation from the filamentation instability, the latter including self-consistent generated field topologies and particle distributions obtained from the simulations reported upon here. Spectra exhibit dependence on the presence-or the absence-of an inert plasma constituent, when comparing baryonic plasmas (i.e., containing protons) with pair plasmas. The results also illustrate that considerable care should be taken when using lower-dimensional models to obtain information about the astrophysical phenomena generating observed spectra.

  15. Bundling of elastic filaments induced by hydrodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Yi; Page, William; Poole, Robert J.; Lauga, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Peritrichous bacteria swim in viscous fluids by rotating multiple helical flagellar filaments. As the bacterium swims forward, all its flagella rotate in synchrony behind the cell in a tight helical bundle. When the bacterium changes its direction, the flagellar filaments unbundle and randomly reorient the cell for a short period of time before returning to their bundled state and resuming swimming. This rapid bundling and unbundling is, at its heart, a mechanical process whereby hydrodynamic interactions balance with elasticity to determine the time-varying deformation of the filaments. Inspired by this biophysical problem, we present in this paper what is perhaps the simplest model of bundling whereby two or more straight elastic filaments immersed in a viscous fluid rotate about their centerline, inducing rotational flows which tend to bend the filaments around each other. We derive an integrodifferential equation governing the shape of the filaments resulting from mechanical balance in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds number. We show that such equation may be evaluated asymptotically analytically in the long-wavelength limit, leading to a local partial differential equation governed by a single dimensionless bundling number. A numerical study of the dynamics predicted by the model reveals the presence of two configuration instabilities with increasing bundling numbers: first to a crossing state where filaments touch at one point and then to a bundled state where filaments wrap along each other in a helical fashion. We also consider the case of multiple filaments and the unbundling dynamics. We next provide an intuitive physical model for the crossing instability and show that it may be used to predict analytically its threshold and adapted to address the transition to a bundling state. We then use a macroscale experimental implementation of the two-filament configuration in order to validate our theoretical predictions and obtain excellent agreement. This long

  16. Axonal Actin Transport Driven By Metastable Actin Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Nilaj; Ganguly, Archan; Roy, Subhojit; Jung, Peter

    Actin is one of the key constituents of the neuronal cytoskeleton and is responsible for driving important cellular processes like axon elongation. Axonal actin is synthesized in the cell body and transported at rates of 0.25 - 3 mm/day, as shown by in-vivo pulse-chase radiolabelling studies. However, the underlying transport mechanisms are unknown. Recent experiments in cultured neurons have revealed a dynamic network of metastable actin filaments (actin trails). Actin trails seem to originate from focal actin hotspots which colocalize with stationary endosomes. Interestingly, the number of actin trails extending anterogradely is higher than the ones extending retrogradely. We hypothesize that the bulk axonal transport of actin originates from this directional asymmetry of the number of actin trails. To test this, we constructed a computational model of actin trail growth and simulated the pulse-chase experiment. In our model, local, metastable trails, which grow with their barbed ends anchored to the hotspots, drive the bulk anterograde transport. Our results indicate that the observed bias of the nucleation probabilities and the elongation rate of actin trails are sufficient to drive the bulk transport of actin at rates that agree with in-vivo pulse chase experiments.

  17. Production and chemical characterization of pigments in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Patrícia Nirlane da Costa; Grigoletto, Tahuana Luiza Bim; de Moraes, Luiz Alberto Beraldo; Abreu, Lucas M; Guimarães, Luís Henrique Souza; Santos, Cledir; Galvão, Luciano Ribeiro; Cardoso, Patrícia Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Production of pigments by filamentous fungi is gaining interest owing to their use as food colourants, in cosmetics and textiles, and because of the important biological activities of these compounds. In this context, the objectives of this study were to select pigment-producing fungi, identify these fungi based on internal transcribed spacer sequences, evaluate the growth and pigment production of the selected strains on four different media, and characterize the major coloured metabolites in their extracts. Of the selected fungal strains, eight were identified as Aspergillus sydowii (CML2967), Aspergillus aureolatus (CML2964), Aspergillus keveii (CML2968), Penicillium flavigenum (CML2965), Penicillium chermesinum (CML2966), Epicoccum nigrum (CML2971), Lecanicillium aphanocladii (CML2970) and Fusarium sp. (CML2969). Fungal pigment production was influenced by medium composition. Complex media, such as potato dextrose and malt extract, favoured increased pigment production. The coloured compounds oosporein, orevactaene and dihydrotrichodimerol were identified in extracts of L. aphanocladii (CML2970), E. nigrum (CML2971), and P. flavigenum (CML2965), respectively. These results indicate that the selected fungal strains can serve as novel sources of pigments that have important industrial applications.

  18. Footpoint detection and mass-motion in chromospheric filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    V, Aparna; Hardersen, P. S.; Martin, S. F.

    2013-07-01

    A quiescent region on the Sun containing three filaments is used to study the properties of mass motion. This study determines if the footpoints or end-points of the filaments are the locations from where mass gets injected into the filaments. Several hypotheses have been put forth in the past to determine how a filament acquires mass. Trapping of coronal mass in the filament channel due to condensation (Martin, 1996) and injection of mass into the filaments during magnetic reconnection (Priest, et al., 1995) are some of the speculations. This study looks for indications for injection of mass via chromospheric footpoints. The data consists of blue (Hα-0.5 Å) and red (Hα+0.5 Å) wing high resolution Hα images of the W29N37 region of the Sun taken on Oct 30, 2010, from 1200 - 1600 UT. The Dutch Open Telescope was used to obtain the data. The images are aligned and animated to see Doppler motion in the fibrils. Smaller fibrils merge to form longer ones; barbs appear and disappear in one of the long filaments and is seen moving along the length of the filament. A region with no typical filament-like absorption feature is observed to be continuously receiving mass. Fibrils appear to be converging from opposite sides along what appears to be a neutral line; mass motion is seen in these fibrils as well. An eruption occurs in a region of fibrils lumped together at the end of the first hour (1300 UT) followed by plage brightening at 1430 UT near one of the filament regions. Helioviewer (Panasenco, et al., 2011) is used for aligning the images; GIMP is used for precision alignment and animation. Each frame in the sequence is studied carefully to note changes in the filament regions. The footpoints of the filaments are determined by the changes observed in the position of the filament ‘legs’ in each frame. Variations in the magnetic polarity corresponding to changes observed in the chromosphere are analyzed using HMI magnetograms. Bright and dark points on the

  19. Microwave structure of quiescent solar filaments at high resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    High resolution very low altitude maps of a quiescent filament at three frequencies are presented. The spatial resolution (approx. 15'' at 1.45 GHz, approx. 6'' at 4.9 GHz, and approx. 2'' at 15 GHz) is several times better than previously attained. At each frequency, the filament appears as a depression in the quiet Sun background. The depression is measurably wider and longer in extent than the corresponding H alpha filament at 1.45 GHz and 4.9 GHz, indicating that the depression is due in large part to a deficit in coronal density associated with the filament channel. In contrast, the shape of the radio depression at 15 CHz closely matches that of the H alpha filament. In addition, the 15 GHz map shows enhanced emission along both sides of the radio depression. A similar enhancement is seen in an observation of a second filament 4 days later, which suggests that the enhancement is a general feature of filaments. Possible causes of the enhanced emission are explored

  20. The evolution of compositionally and functionally distinct actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Peter W; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Whitaker, Shane; Popp, David; Robinson, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    The actin filament is astonishingly well conserved across a diverse set of eukaryotic species. It has essentially remained unchanged in the billion years that separate yeast, Arabidopsis and man. In contrast, bacterial actin-like proteins have diverged to the extreme, and many of them are not readily identified from sequence-based homology searches. Here, we present phylogenetic analyses that point to an evolutionary drive to diversify actin filament composition across kingdoms. Bacteria use a one-filament-one-function system to create distinct filament systems within a single cell. In contrast, eukaryotic actin is a universal force provider in a wide range of processes. In plants, there has been an expansion of the number of closely related actin genes, whereas in fungi and metazoa diversification in tropomyosins has increased the compositional variety in actin filament systems. Both mechanisms dictate the subset of actin-binding proteins that interact with each filament type, leading to specialization in function. In this Hypothesis, we thus propose that different mechanisms were selected in bacteria, plants and metazoa, which achieved actin filament compositional variation leading to the expansion of their functional diversity. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Microalgae harvesting via co-culture with filamentous fungus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gultom, Sarman Oktovianus

    Microalgae harvesting is a labor- and energy-intensive process. For instance, classical harvesting technologies such as chemical addition and mechanical separation are economically prohibiting for biofuel production. Newer approaches to harvest microalgae have been developed in order to decrease costs. Among these new methods, fungal co-pelletization seems to be a promising technology. By co-culturing filamentous fungi with microalgae, it is possible to form pellets, which can easily be separated. In this study, different parameters for the cultivation of filamentous fungus (Aspergillus niger) and microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) to efficiently form cell pellets were evaluated under heterotrophic and phototrophic conditions, including organic carbon source (glucose, glycerol and sodium acetate) concentration, pH, initial concentration of fungal spores, initial concentration of microalgal cells, concentration of ionic strength (Calcium and Magnesium) and concentration of salinity (NaCl). In addition, zeta-potential measurements were carried out in order to get a better understanding of the mechanism of attraction. It was found that 2 g/L of glucose, a fungus to microalgae ratio of 1:300, and uncontrolled pH (around 7) are the best culturing conditions for co-pelletization. Under these conditions, it was possible to achieve a high harvesting performance (>90%). In addition, it was observed that most pellets formed in the co-culture were spherical with an average diameter of 3.5 mm and in concentrations of about 5 pellets per mL of culture media. Under phototrophic conditions, co-pelletization required the addition of glucose as organic carbon source to sustain the growth of fungi and to allow the harvesting of microalgae. Zeta-potential measurements indicated that (i) both microalgae and fungi have low zeta-potential values regardless of the pH on the bulk (i.e. <-10 mV) (ii) fungi can have a positive electric charge at low pH (ie. pH=3). These values suggest that it

  2. A study of short wave instability on vortex filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong Yun [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The numerical stability and accuracy of the vortex method are studied. The effect of the ordinary differential equations (ODE) solver and of the time step on the numerical stability is analyzed. Various ODE solvers are compared and a best performer is chosen. A new constraint on the time step based on numerical stability is proposed and verified in numerical simulations. It is shown through numerical examples that empirical rules for selecting the spatial discretization obtained in simple test problems may not be extended to more general problems. The thin tube vortex filament method is applied to the problem of Widnall's instability on vortex rings. Numerical results different from previous calculations are presented and the source of the discrepancies is explained. The long time behavior of the unstable mode on thin vortex rings is simulated and analyzed. The short wave instability on vortex filaments is investigated both theoretically and numerically. It is shown that the short wave instability always occurs on co-rotating vortex filaments of fixed core structure. Furthermore when they are close to each other, vortex filaments produce short wave unstable modes which lead to wild stretching and folding. However, when the inter-filament distance is large in comparison with the core size of the filaments, unstable modes are bounded by a small fraction of the core size and the vortex filaments do not create hairpins nor wild stretching. These findings may explain the smooth behavior of the superfluid vortices. The formation of hairpin structures on numerical vortex filaments is investigated. It is shown that the formation of hairpin structures is independent of the ODE solver, of the time step and of other numerical parameters. The hairpin structures are primarily caused by short wave instability on co-rotating vortex filaments.

  3. Robustness of the filamentation instability in arbitrarily oriented magnetic field: Full three dimensional calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bret, A., E-mail: antoineclaude.bret@uclm.es [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain and Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2014-02-15

    The filamentation (Weibel) instability plays a key role in the formation of collisionless shocks which are thought to produce Gamma-Ray-Bursts and High-Energy-Cosmic-Rays in astrophysical environments. While it has been known for long that a flow-aligned magnetic field can completely quench the instability, it was recently proved in 2D that in the cold regime, such cancelation is possible if and only if the field is perfectly aligned. Here, this result is finally extended to a 3D geometry. Calculations are conducted for symmetric and asymmetric counter-streaming relativistic plasma shells. 2D results are retrieved in 3D: the instability can never be completely canceled for an oblique magnetic field. In addition, the maximum growth-rate is always larger for wave vectors lying in the plan defined by the flow and the oblique field. On the one hand, this bears consequences on the orientation of the generated filaments. On the other hand, it certifies 2D simulations of the problem can be performed without missing the most unstable filamentation modes.

  4. Self-assembly of actin monomers into long filaments: Brownian Dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2009-01-01

    states corresponding to a bound adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate with inorganic phosphate (ADP/P), and ADP molecule. The simplest situation that has been studied experimentally is provided by the polymerization of ADP-actin, for which all protomers are identical. This case is used...... attachment and detachment processes at the two ends of the filaments, we introduce a novel rescaling procedure by which we speed all dynamical processes related to actin polymerization and depolymerization up by the same factor. In general, the actin protomers within a filament can attain three different....../detachment events. When a single filament is allowed to grow in a bath of constant concentration of free ADP-actin monomers, its growth rate increases linearly with the free monomer concentration in quantitative agreement with in vitro experiments. Theresults also show that the waiting time is governed by...

  5. HIERARCHICAL FRAGMENTATION OF THE ORION MOLECULAR FILAMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.; Su, Yu-Nung [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Teixeira, Paula S. [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Wien, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180, Wien (Austria); Zapata, Luis A., E-mail: satoko_t@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia, Michoacan 58090 (Mexico)

    2013-01-20

    We present a high angular resolution map of the 850 {mu}m continuum emission of the Orion Molecular Cloud-3 (OMC 3) obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA); the map is a mosaic of 85 pointings covering an approximate area of 6.'5 Multiplication-Sign 2.'0 (0.88 Multiplication-Sign 0.27 pc). We detect 12 spatially resolved continuum sources, each with an H{sub 2} mass between 0.3-5.7 M {sub Sun} and a projected source size between 1400-8200 AU. All the detected sources are on the filamentary main ridge (n{sub H{sub 2}}{>=}10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}), and analysis based on the Jeans theorem suggests that they are most likely gravitationally unstable. Comparison of multi-wavelength data sets indicates that of the continuum sources, 6/12 (50%) are associated with molecular outflows, 8/12 (67%) are associated with infrared sources, and 3/12 (25%) are associated with ionized jets. The evolutionary status of these sources ranges from prestellar cores to protostar phase, confirming that OMC-3 is an active region with ongoing embedded star formation. We detect quasi-periodical separations between the OMC-3 sources of Almost-Equal-To 17''/0.035 pc. This spatial distribution is part of a large hierarchical structure that also includes fragmentation scales of giant molecular cloud ( Almost-Equal-To 35 pc), large-scale clumps ( Almost-Equal-To 1.3 pc), and small-scale clumps ( Almost-Equal-To 0.3 pc), suggesting that hierarchical fragmentation operates within the Orion A molecular cloud. The fragmentation spacings are roughly consistent with the thermal fragmentation length in large-scale clumps, while for small-scale cores it is smaller than the local fragmentation length. These smaller spacings observed with the SMA can be explained by either a helical magnetic field, cloud rotation, or/and global filament collapse. Finally, possible evidence for sequential fragmentation is suggested in the northern part of the OMC-3 filament.

  6. Failure and nonfailure of fluid filaments in extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Kolte, Mette Irene; Renardy, Michael

    1998-01-01

    The phenomenon of ductile failure of Newtonian and viscoelastic fluid filaments without surface tension is studied by a 2D finite element method and by ID non-linear analysis. The viscoelastic fluids are described by single integral constitutive equations. The main conclusions are: (1) Newtonian...... fluid filaments do not exhibit ductile failure without surface tension; (2) some viscoelastic fluids form stable filaments while other fluids exhibit ductile failure as a result of an elastic instability; (3) for large Deborah numbers, the Considere condition may be used to predict the Hencky strain...

  7. Linear viscoelastic characterization from filament stretching rheometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingstrand, Sara Lindeblad; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Hassager, Ole

    Traditionally, linear viscoelasticity is measured using small amplitude oscillatory shear flow. Due to experimental difficulties, shear flows are predominately confined to the linear and mildly nonlinear regime. On the other hand, extensional flows have proven more practical in measuring viscoela......Traditionally, linear viscoelasticity is measured using small amplitude oscillatory shear flow. Due to experimental difficulties, shear flows are predominately confined to the linear and mildly nonlinear regime. On the other hand, extensional flows have proven more practical in measuring...... viscoelasticity well into the nonlinear regime. Therefore at present, complete rheological characterization of a material requires two apparatuses: a shear and an extensional rheometer. This work is focused on developing a linear viscoelastic protocol for the filament stretching rheometer (FSR) in order...... to measure both linear and nonlinear dynamics on a single apparatus. With a software modification to the FSR motor control, we show that linear viscoelasticity can be measured via small amplitude squeeze flow (SASF). Squeeze flow is a combination of both shear and extensional flow applied by axially...

  8. The Apis mellifera Filamentous Virus Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Gauthier

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A complete reference genome of the Apis mellifera Filamentous virus (AmFV was determined using Illumina Hiseq sequencing. The AmFV genome is a double stranded DNA molecule of approximately 498,500 nucleotides with a GC content of 50.8%. It encompasses 247 non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs, equally distributed on both strands, which cover 65% of the genome. While most of the ORFs lacked threshold sequence alignments to reference protein databases, twenty-eight were found to display significant homologies with proteins present in other large double stranded DNA viruses. Remarkably, 13 ORFs had strong similarity with typical baculovirus domains such as PIFs (per os infectivity factor genes: pif-1, pif-2, pif-3 and p74 and BRO (Baculovirus Repeated Open Reading Frame. The putative AmFV DNA polymerase is of type B, but is only distantly related to those of the baculoviruses. The ORFs encoding proteins involved in nucleotide metabolism had the highest percent identity to viral proteins in GenBank. Other notable features include the presence of several collagen-like, chitin-binding, kinesin and pacifastin domains. Due to the large size of the AmFV genome and the inconsistent affiliation with other large double stranded DNA virus families infecting invertebrates, AmFV may belong to a new virus family.

  9. Screening of epoxy systems for high performance filament winding applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, T. T.; Jessop, E. S.; Penn, L.

    1975-01-01

    Several promising epoxy systems for high performance filament winding applications are described. Viscosities, gel times, and cast resin tensile behavior are given, as well as heat deflection under load and water absorption measurements.

  10. Biofilms from a Brazilian water distribution system include filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, V M; Oliveira, H M B; Santos, C; Paterson, R R M; Gusmão, N B; Lima, N

    2013-03-01

    Filamentous fungi in drinking water can block water pipes, can cause organoleptic biodeterioration, and are a source of pathogens. There are increasing reports of the involvement of the organisms in biofilms. This present study describes a sampling device that can be inserted directly into pipes within water distribution systems, allowing biofilm formation in situ. Calcofluor White M2R staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization with morphological analyses using epifluorescent microscopy were used to analyse biofilms for filamentous fungi, permitting direct observation of the fungi. DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) was applied to detect bacteria. Filamentous fungi were detected in biofilms after 6 months on coupons exposed to raw water, decanted water and at the entrance of the water distribution system. Algae, yeast, and bacteria were also observed. The role of filamentous fungi requires further investigations.

  11. Health Risks Associated with Exposure to Filamentous Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbuta, Mary Augustina; Mwanza, Mulunda

    2017-01-01

    Filamentous fungi occur widely in the environment, contaminating soil, air, food and other substrates. Due to their wide distribution, they have medical and economic implications. Regardless of their use as a source of antibiotics, vitamins and raw materials for various industrially important chemicals, most fungi and filamentous fungi produce metabolites associated with a range of health risks, both in humans and in animals. The association of filamentous fungi and their metabolites to different negative health conditions in humans and animals, has contributed to the importance of investigating different health risks induced by this family of heterotrophs. This review aims to discuss health risks associated with commonly occurring filamentous fungal species which belong to genera Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium, as well as evaluating their pathogenicity and mycotoxic properties. PMID:28677641

  12. Biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal by filamentous bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: activated sludge, denitrification, glycogen accumulating organisms, filamentous bacteria, phosphorus removal. Introduction. Biological nutrient removal (BNR) has gained attention over chemical nutrient removal because of the high cost of the chemi- cal process and the large sludge volumes produced.

  13. Method for preparing metallated filament-wound structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, George R.

    1979-01-01

    Metallated graphite filament-wound structures are prepared by coating a continuous multi-filament carbon yarn with a metal carbide, impregnating the carbide coated yarn with a polymerizable carbon precursor, winding the resulting filament about a mandrel, partially curing the impregnation in air, subjecting the wound composite to heat and pressure to cure the carbon precursor, and thereafter heating the composite in a sizing die at a pressure loading of at least 1000 psi for graphitizing the carbonaceous material in the composite. The carbide in the composite coalesces into rod-like shapes which are disposed in an end-to-end relationship parallel with the filaments to provide resistance to erosion in abrasive laden atmospheres.

  14. Positrusion Filament Recycling System for ISS, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Positrusion ISS Recycler enables recycling of scrap and waste plastics into high-quality filament for 3D printers to enable sustainable in-situ manufacturing on...

  15. Self-induced dipole force and filamentation instability of a matter wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffman, M.

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of copropagating electromagnetic and matter waves is described with a set of coupled higher-order nonlinear Schrodinger equations. Optical self-focusing modulates an initially planar wave leading to the generation of dipole forces on the atoms. Atomic channeling due to the dipole...... forces leads, in the nonlinear regime, to filamentation of the atomic beam. Instability growth rates are calculated for atomic beams with both low and high phase space densities. In one transverse dimension an exact solution is found that describes a coupled optical and atomic soliton....

  16. UHECR acceleration in dark matter filaments of cosmological structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkov, M. A.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Diamond, P. H.

    2011-04-01

    A mechanism for proton acceleration to ~ 1021 eV is suggested. It may operate in accretion flows onto thin dark matter filaments of cosmic structure formation. The flow compresses the ambient magnetic field to strongly increase and align it with the filament. Particles begin the acceleration by E × B drift with the accretion flow. The energy gain in the drift regime is limited by the conservation of the adiabatic invariant p⊥2/B(r). Upon approaching the filament, the drift turns into the gyro-motion around the filament so that the particle moves parallel to the azimuthal electric field. In this `betatron' regime the acceleration speeds up to rapidly reach the electrodynamic limit cpmax = eBR for an accelerator with magnetic field B and the orbit radius R (Larmor radius). The periodic orbit becomes unstable and the particle slings out of the filament to the region of a weak (uncompressed) magnetic field, which terminates the acceleration. To escape the filament, accelerated particles must have gyro-radii comparable with the filament radius. Therefore, the mechanism requires pre-acceleration that is likely to occur in large scale shocks upstream or nearby the filament accretion flow. Previous studies identify such shocks as efficient proton accelerators, with a firm upper limit ~ 1019.5 eV placed by the catastrophic photo-pion losses. The present mechanism combines explosive energy gain in its final (betatron) phase with prompt particle release from the region of strong magnetic field. It is this combination that allows protons to overcome both the photo-pion and the synchrotron-Compton losses and therefore attain energy ~ 1021 eV. A customary requirement on accelerator power to reach a given Emax, which is placed by the accelerator energy dissipation proptoEmax2/Z0 due to the finite vacuum impedance Z0, is circumvented by the cyclic operation of the accelerator.

  17. Impact of Submesoscale Processes on Dynamics of Phytoplankton Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-12

    RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 29-04-2015 Journal Article Impact of submesoscale processes on dynamics of phytoplankton ...in contrast to the earlier summer time, when the ASC mixes phytoplankton much deeper to the area below of the euphotic depth, and chlorophyll a...filaments are 3 -4 times weaker. coastal processes; upwelling, submesoscale processes, phytoplankton filaments Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified UU 13 Igor Shulman (228) 688-5646 Reset

  18. The architecture and fine structure of gill filaments in the brown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Special attention was paid to filament architecture, ennervation of filaments, number and type of cells populating filament epithelia and variations in epithelial cell morphology and cilia ultrastructure. Filament shape was maintained by thickened chi-tln and strategically placed smooth myocytes. The epithelium was populated ...

  19. Unconventional actin conformations localize on intermediate filaments in mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Gettemans, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Unconventional actin conformations colocalize with vimentin on a cage-like structure in metaphase HEK 293T cells. → These conformations are detected with the anti-actin antibodies 1C7 ('lower dimer') and 2G2 ('nuclear actin'), but not C4 (monomeric actin). → Mitotic unconventional actin cables are independent of filamentous actin or microtubules. → Unconventional actin colocalizes with vimentin on a nocodazole-induced perinuclear dense mass of cables. -- Abstract: Different structural conformations of actin have been identified in cells and shown to reside in distinct subcellular locations of cells. In this report, we describe the localization of actin on a cage-like structure in metaphase HEK 293T cells. Actin was detected with the anti-actin antibodies 1C7 and 2G2, but not with the anti-actin antibody C4. Actin contained in this structure is independent of microtubules and actin filaments, and colocalizes with vimentin. Taking advantage of intermediate filament collapse into a perinuclear dense mass of cables when microtubules are depolymerized, we were able to relocalize actin to such structures. We hypothesize that phosphorylation of intermediate filaments at mitosis entry triggers the recruitment of different actin conformations to mitotic intermediate filaments. Storage and partition of the nuclear actin and antiparallel 'lower dimer' actin conformations between daughter cells possibly contribute to gene transcription and transient actin filament dynamics at G1 entry.

  20. The Weak Lensing Masses of Filaments between Luminous Red Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, Seth D.; Hudson, Michael J.

    2017-07-01

    In the standard model of non-linear structure formation, a cosmic web of dark-matter-dominated filaments connects dark matter haloes. In this paper, we stack the weak lensing signal of an ensemble of filaments between groups and clusters of galaxies. Specifically, we detect the weak lensing signal, using CFHTLenS galaxy ellipticities, from stacked filaments between Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-III/Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey luminous red galaxies (LRGs). As a control, we compare the physical LRG pairs with projected LRG pairs that are more widely separated in redshift space. We detect the excess filament mass density in the projected pairs at the 5σ level, finding a mass of (1.6 ± 0.3) × 1013 M⊙ for a stacked filament region 7.1 h-1 Mpc long and 2.5 h-1 Mpc wide. This filament signal is compared with a model based on the three-point galaxy-galaxy-convergence correlation function, as developed in Clampitt et al., yielding reasonable agreement.

  1. Design and optimize of 3-axis filament winding machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanjin, Ma; Rejab, M. R. M.; Idris, M. S.; Bachtiar, B.; Siregar, J. P.; Harith, M. N.

    2017-10-01

    Filament winding technique is developed as the primary process for composite cylindrical structures fabrication at low cost. Fibres are wound on a rotating mandrel by a filament winding machine where resin impregnated fibres pass through a pay-out eye. This paper aims to develop and optimize a 3-axis, lightweight, practical, efficient, portable filament winding machine to satisfy the customer demand, which can fabricate pipes and round shape cylinders with resins. There are 3 main units on the 3-axis filament winding machine, which are the rotary unit, the delivery unit and control system unit. Comparison with previous existing filament winding machines in the factory, it has 3 degrees of freedom and can fabricate more complex shape specimens based on the mandrel shape and particular control system. The machine has been designed and fabricated on 3 axes movements with control system. The x-axis is for movement of the carriage, the y-axis is the rotation of mandrel and the z-axis is the movement of the pay-out eye. Cylindrical specimens with different dimensions and winding angles were produced. 3-axis automated filament winding machine has been successfully designed with simple control system.

  2. The electric toothbrush: analysis of filaments under stereomicroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checchi, L; Farina, E; Felice, P; Montevecchi, M

    2004-08-01

    The use of manual and electric toothbrushes has a fundamental role in primary prevention in oral hygiene. However, aggressive use of the toothbrush, especially those with non-rounded filaments, can result in lesions in both soft and hard oral tissue. Without doubt, the electric toothbrush is a useful aid for the patient, and it is therefore interesting to evaluate not only its effectiveness in plaque removal, but also the relationship between morphology of filaments and incidence of muco-gingival pathologies. The aim of this research was to evaluate various forms of bristles of electric toothbrushes under a stereomicroscope vision. Brushes tested included two samples of toothbrushes from six different types. Tufts from the same position on the toothbrush head were removed and examined under stereomicroscope. In this study the percentage of rounded filaments that is considered acceptable and non-traumatic was evaluated according to the Silverstone and Featherstone classification. Morphological analysis of electric toothbrush filaments revealed a low percentage of rounded filaments. In only four of 12 electric toothbrushes tested there were more than 50% of the filaments rounded in appearance.

  3. Effect of Filament Fineness on Composite Yarn Residual Torque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarıoğlu Esin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Yarn residual torque or twist liveliness occurs when the twist is imparted to spin the fibers during yarn formation. It causes yarn snarling, which is an undesirable property and can lead the problems for further processes such as weaving and knitting. It affects the spirality of knitted fabrics and skewness of woven fabrics. Generally, yarn residual torque depends on yarn twist, yarn linear density, and fiber properties used. Composite yarns are widely produced to exploit two yarns with different properties such on optimum way at the same time and these yarns can be produced by wrapping sheath fibers around filament core fiber with a certain twist. In this study, the effect of filament fineness used as core component of composite yarn on residual torque was analyzed. Thus, the false twist textured polyester filament yarns with different filament fineness were used to produce composite yarns with different yarn count. The variance analysis was performed to determine the significance of twist liveliness of filament yarns and yarn count on yarn twist liveliness. Results showed that there is a statistically significant differences at significance level of α=0.05 between filament fineness and yarn residual torque of composite yarns.

  4. Optical and electrical properties of a spiral LED filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liping; Zou, Jun; Yang, Bobo; Li, Wenbo; Li, Yang; Shi, Mingming; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Canyun; Wang, Fengchao; Lin, Yujie

    2018-02-01

    This paper introduces a new type of spiral white light-emitting diodes (WLED) filament with high luminous efficiency and uniform optical performance. The optical and thermal properties of the flexible filament were investigated at different stretching heights, namely 0, 1, 2, and 3 cm. The results indicated that the filament showed the best optical characteristics at the stretching height of 2 cm, because of good heat dissipation. In addition, the radiation temperature of the filament was inversely proportional to the output luminous flux. The reliability of the filament at a stretching height of 2 cm was also evaluated after 1000 h of use. The result demonstrated that the luminous flux decay of the bulb was only 0.85%. The flexible spiral WLED filament exhibiting high luminous flux and good reliability could be adapted to promote industrial development in the near future. Project supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China (No. 51302171), the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (CN) (No. 14500503300), the Shanghai Municipal Alliance Program (No. Lm201547), the Shanghai Cooperative Project (No. ShanghaiCXY-2013-61), and the Jiashan County Technology Program (No. 20141316).

  5. Experimental study of infrared filaments under different initial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirell, Daniel Joseph

    In 1964, four years after the first working laser was constructed, long skinny damage tracks and fluorescence trails were seen inside of certain transparent media that were excited by intense light pulses [1]. What was so remarkable about these features was the narrowness of the spatial profile and their long propagation length in the beam in concert with the very high intensity of the light that would be necessary to produce them. A purely linear model of light propagation through such media was insufficient to explain the results of these experiments and hence a new area of nonlinear optics, latex coined filamentation (to describe the length, slimness, and intensity of the light field), was born. Filament studies begin with a medium that has a nonlinear index of refraction, n¯2, that interacts with an intense beam of light so as to cause it to self-focus. The n¯2 of liquid and solid transparent media is much higher than the n¯ 2 of gases and therefore a much higher intensity of laser source would need to be invented to begin the study of filaments in air. With the advent of the Ti-Sapphire Kerr-lens modelocked laser [2], working in combination with the development of the chirped pulse amplifier system in the mid-1990's, light intensities sufficient to produce filaments in air was realized. Since that time much experimental and theoretical work has been done to better understand some of the additional complexities that arise specifically in the filamentation of light in air using several different wavelengths (UV to IR) and pulsewidths (femto- to pico-seconds). Many theoretical models exist each with a different emphasis on the various physical mechanisms that may produce the features experimentally observed in filaments. The experimental work has sought to give the theoretician better data on some of the properties of filaments such as the: (a) spatial and temporal structure of the beam and of the produced plasma (that arises due to the high intensity light

  6. Self-assembly of designed supramolecular magnetic filaments of different shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, E.V. [Ural Federal University, Lenin Av. 51, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Rozhkov, D.A., E-mail: d.a.rozhkov@gmail.com [Ural Federal University, Lenin Av. 51, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Sanchez, P.A. [University of Vienna, Sensengasse 8, Vienna (Austria); Kantorovich, S.S. [Ural Federal University, Lenin Av. 51, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); University of Vienna, Sensengasse 8, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-06-01

    In the present work we study via molecular dynamics simulations filaments of ring and linear shape. Filaments are made of magnetic nanoparticles, possessing a point dipole in their centres. Particles in filaments are crosslinked in a particular way, so that the deviation of the neighbouring dipoles from the head-to-tail orientation is penalised by the bond. We show how the conformation of a single chain and ring filament changes on cooling for different lengths. We also study filament pairs, by fixing filaments at a certain distance and analysing the impact of inter-filament interaction on the equilibrium configurations. Our study opens a perspective to investigate the dispersions of filaments, both theoretically and numerically, by using effective potentials. - Highlights: • Single filament study. • Magnetic particles crosslinked in chains and rings. • Magnetic filament interactions.

  7. Clinical strains of Lactobacillus reduce the filamentation of Candida albicans and protect Galleria mellonella against experimental candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Dos Santos Velloso, Marisol; Figueiredo, Lívia Mara Alves; Martins, Carolina Pistille; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2018-05-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen and can grow as yeast or filaments, depending on the environmental conditions. The filamentous form is of particular interest because it can play a direct role in adherence and pathogenicity. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three clinical strains of Lactobacillus on C. albicans filamentation as well as their probiotic potential in pathogen-host interactions via an experimental candidiasis model study in Galleria mellonella. We used the reference strain Candida albicans ATCC 18804 and three clinical strains of Lactobacillus: L. rhamnosus strain 5.2, L. paracasei strain 20.3, and L. fermentum strain 20.4. First, the capacity of C. albicans to form hyphae was tested in vitro through association with the Lactobacillus strains. After that, we verified the ability of these strains to attenuate experimental candidiasis in a Galleria mellonella model through a survival curve assay. Regarding the filamentation assay, a significant reduction in hyphae formation of up to 57% was observed when C. albicans was incubated in the presence of the Lactobacillus strains, compared to a control group composed of only C. albicans. In addition, when the larvae were pretreated with Lactobacillus spp. prior to C. albicans infection, the survival rate of G. mellonela increased in all experimental groups. We concluded that Lactobacillus influences the growth and expression C. albicans virulence factors, which may interfere with the pathogenicity of these microorganisms.

  8. Occurrence and relevance of filamentous fungi in respiratory secretions of patients with cystic fibrosis--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihet, Marc; Carrere, Jacqueline; Cimon, Bernard; Chabasse, Dominique; Delhaes, Laurence; Symoens, Françoise; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2009-06-01

    The colonization of airways by filamentous fungi and the development of respiratory infections require some predisposing factors as encountered in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Indeed, the defective mucociliary clearance which characterizes the disease is associated with local immunological disorders. In addition, the prolonged therapy with antibiotics and the use of corticosteroid treatments also facilitate fungal growth. An important fungal biota has been described in respiratory secretions of patients suffering from CF. Aspergillus fumigatus, Scedosporium apiospermum and Aspergillus terreus for filamentous fungi and Candida albicans for yeasts are the main fungal species associated with CF. Although less common, several fungal species including Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus nidulans may be isolated transiently from CF respiratory secretions, while others such as Exophiala dermatitidis and Scedosporium prolificans may chronically colonize the airways. Moreover, some of them like Penicillium emersonii and Acrophialophora fusispora are encountered in humans almost exclusively in the context of CF. As fungal complications in CF patients are essentially caused by filamentous fungi the present review will not include works related to yeasts. In CF patients, fungi may sometimes be responsible for deterioration of lung function, as occurs in allergic broncho-pulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) which is the most common fungal disease in this context. Additionally, although the clinical relevance of the fungal airway colonization is still a matter of debate, filamentous fungi may contribute to the local inflammatory response, and therefore to the progressive deterioration of the lung function.

  9. The importance of connections between the cell wall integrity pathway and the unfolded protein response in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavazi, Iran; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Brown, Neil Andrew

    2014-11-01

    In the external environment, or within a host organism, filamentous fungi experience sudden changes in nutrient availability, osmolality, pH, temperature and the exposure to toxic compounds. The fungal cell wall represents the first line of defense, while also performing essential roles in morphology, development and virulence. A polarized secretion system is paramount for cell wall biosynthesis, filamentous growth, nutrient acquisition and interactions with the environment. The unique ability of filamentous fungi to secrete has resulted in their industrial adoption as fungal cell factories. Protein maturation and secretion commences in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The unfolded protein response (UPR) maintains ER functionality during exposure to secretion and cell wall stress. UPR, therefore, influences secretion and cell wall homeostasis, which in turn impacts upon numerous fungal traits important to pathogenesis and biotechnology. Subsequently, this review describes the relevance of the cell wall and UPR systems to filamentous fungal pathogens or industrial microbes and then highlights interconnections between the two systems. Ultimately, the possible biotechnological applications of an enhanced understanding of such regulatory systems in combating fungal disease, or the removal of natural bottlenecks in protein secretion in an industrial setting, are discussed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Electrostatic interactions between the Bni1p Formin FH2 domain and actin influence actin filament nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Joseph L; Courtemanche, Naomi; Parton, Daniel L; McCullagh, Martin; Pollard, Thomas D; Voth, Gregory A

    2015-01-06

    Formins catalyze nucleation and growth of actin filaments. Here, we study the structure and interactions of actin with the FH2 domain of budding yeast formin Bni1p. We built an all-atom model of the formin dimer on an Oda actin filament 7-mer and studied structural relaxation and interprotein interactions by molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations produced a refined model for the FH2 dimer associated with the barbed end of the filament and showed electrostatic interactions between the formin knob and actin target-binding cleft. Mutations of two formin residues contributing to these interactions (R1423N, K1467L, or both) reduced the interaction energies between the proteins, and in coarse-grained simulations, the formin lost more interprotein contacts with an actin dimer than with an actin 7-mer. Biochemical experiments confirmed a strong influence of these mutations on Bni1p-mediated actin filament nucleation, but not elongation, suggesting that different interactions contribute to these two functions of formins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Giant quiescent solar filament observed with high-resolution spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuckein, C.; Verma, M.; Denker, C.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: An extremely large filament was studied in various layers of the solar atmosphere. The inferred physical parameters and the morphological aspects are compared with smaller quiescent filaments. Methods: A giant quiet-Sun filament was observed with the high-resolution Echelle spectrograph at the Vacuum Tower Telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain, on 2011 November 15. A mosaic of spectra (ten maps of 100″ × 182″) was recorded simultaneously in the chromospheric absorption lines Hα and Na I D2. Physical parameters of the filament plasma were derived using cloud model (CM) inversions and line core fits. The spectra were complemented with full-disk filtergrams (He I λ10830 Å, Hα, and Ca II K) of the Chromospheric Telescope (ChroTel) and full-disk magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Results: The filament had extremely large linear dimensions (~817 arcsec), which corresponds to about 658 Mm along a great circle on the solar surface. A total amount of 175119 Hα contrast profiles were inverted using the CM approach. The inferred mean line-of-sight (LOS) velocity, Doppler width, and source function were similar to previous works of smaller quiescent filaments. However, the derived optical thickness was higher. LOS velocity trends inferred from the Hα line core fits were in accord but weaker than those obtained with CM inversions. Signatures of counter-streaming flows were detected in the filament. The largest brightening conglomerates in the line core of Na I D2 coincided well with small-scale magnetic fields as seen by HMI. Mixed magnetic polarities were detected close to the ends of barbs. The computation of photospheric horizontal flows based on HMI magnetograms revealed flow kernels with a size of 5-8 Mm and velocities of 0.30-0.45 km s-1 at the ends of the filament. Conclusions: The physical properties of extremely large filaments are similar to their smaller counterparts, except for the optical thickness, which in

  12. Molecular evolution of type VI intermediate filament proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Michel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tanabin, transitin and nestin are type VI intermediate filament (IF proteins that are developmentally regulated in frogs, birds and mammals, respectively. Tanabin is expressed in the growth cones of embryonic vertebrate neurons, whereas transitin and nestin are found in myogenic and neurogenic cells. Another type VI IF protein, synemin, is expressed in undifferentiated and mature muscle cells of birds and mammals. In addition to an IF-typical α-helical core domain, type VI IF proteins are characterized by a long C-terminal tail often containing distinct repeated motifs. The molecular evolution of type VI IF proteins remains poorly studied. Results To examine the evolutionary history of type VI IF proteins, sequence comparisons, BLAST searches, synteny studies and phylogenic analyses were performed. This study provides new evidence that tanabin, transitin and nestin are indeed orthologous type VI IF proteins. It demonstrates that tanabin, transitin and nestin genes share intron positions and sequence identities, have a similar chromosomal context and display closely related positions in phylogenic analyses. Despite this homology, fast evolution rates of their C-terminal extremity have caused the appearance of repeated motifs with distinct biological activities. In particular, our in silico and in vitro analyses of their tail domain have shown that (avian transitin, but not (mammalian nestin, contains a repeat domain displaying nucleotide hydrolysis activity. Conclusion These analyses of the evolutionary history of the IF proteins fit with a model in which type VI IFs form a branch distinct from NF proteins and are composed of two major proteins: synemin and nestin orthologs. Rapid evolution of the C-terminal extremity of nestin orthologs could be responsible for their divergent functions.

  13. Large-amplitude Longitudinal Oscillations in a Solar Filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q. M.; Li, T.; Zheng, R. S.; Su, Y. N.; Ji, H. S.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we report our multiwavelength observations of the large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations of a filament observed on 2015 May 3. Located next to active region 12335, the sigmoidal filament was observed by the ground-based Hα telescopes from the Global Oscillation Network Group and by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The filament oscillations were most probably triggered by the magnetic reconnection in the filament channel, which is characterized by the bidirectional flows, brightenings in EUV and soft X-ray, and magnetic cancellation in the photosphere. The directions of oscillations have angles of 4°-36° with respect to the filament axis. The whole filament did not oscillate in phase as a rigid body. Meanwhile, the oscillation periods (3100-4400 s) have a spatial dependence, implying that the curvature radii (R) of the magnetic dips are different at different positions. The values of R are estimated to be 69.4-133.9 Mm, and the minimum transverse magnetic field of the dips is estimated to be 15 G. The amplitudes of S5-S8 grew with time, while the amplitudes of S9-S14 damped with time. The oscillation amplitudes range from a few to ten Mm, and the maximum velocity can reach 30 km s-1. Interestingly, the filament experienced mass drainage southward at a speed of ˜27 km s-1. The oscillations continued after the mass drainage and lasted for more than 11 hr. After the mass drainage, the oscillation phases did not change much. The periods of S5-S8 decreased, while the periods of S9-S14 increased. The amplitudes of S5-S8 damped with time, while the amplitudes of S9-S14 grew. Most of the damping (growing) ratios are between -9 and 14. We offer a schematic cartoon to explain the complex behaviors of oscillations by introducing thread-thread interaction.

  14. Attractive interactions among intermediate filaments determine network mechanics in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Pawelzyk

    Full Text Available Mechanical and structural properties of K8/K18 and vimentin intermediate filament (IF networks have been investigated using bulk mechanical rheometry and optical microrheology including diffusing wave spectroscopy and multiple particle tracking. A high elastic modulus G0 at low protein concentration c, a weak concentration dependency of G0 (G0 ∼ c(0.5 ± 0.1 and pronounced strain stiffening are found for these systems even without external crossbridgers. Strong attractive interactions among filaments are required to maintain these characteristic mechanical features, which have also been reported for various other IF networks. Filament assembly, the persistence length of the filaments and the network mesh size remain essentially unaffected when a nonionic surfactant is added, but strain stiffening is completely suppressed, G0 drops by orders of magnitude and exhibits a scaling G0 ∼ c(1.9 ± 0.2 in agreement with microrheological measurements and as expected for entangled networks of semi-flexible polymers. Tailless K8Δ/K18ΔT and various other tailless filament networks do not exhibit strain stiffening, but still show high G0 values. Therefore, two binding sites are proposed to exist in IF networks. A weaker one mediated by hydrophobic amino acid clusters in the central rod prevents stretched filaments between adjacent cross-links from thermal equilibration and thus provides the high G0 values. Another strong one facilitating strain stiffening is located in the tail domain with its high fraction of hydrophobic amino acid sequences. Strain stiffening is less pronounced for vimentin than for K8/K18 due to electrostatic repulsion forces partly compensating the strong attraction at filament contact points.

  15. Closely spaced fine filament multifilamentary NbTi strands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, E.; Liu, H.; Seuntjens, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    A series of papers showing the advantages of close spacing and matrix alloying for the development of high J c , fine filament, NbTi materials which have low electrical coupling have appeared in the last seven years. In order to achieve the highest J c 's, it has been shown that close spacing has many advantages. This, however, leads to proximity coupling which has to be overcome by the addition of alloying elements to the matrix between the filaments. Of the three alloying materials normally used for this purpose, Ni, Si, and Mn, the most effective is Mn, which operates by a spin flip scattering mechanism whereas Ni and Si produce decoupling by less effective resistive scattering. Ni and Si, however, harden the matrix more than does the small amount of Mn, [0.5wt%], which has been used in most of the past work on the reduction of proximity coupling. This hardening allows the filaments to be separated to a greater extent than is possible in the case of a pure copper matrix without a significant increase in filament sausaging and a resultant J c decrease. Silicon also has one additional advantage over the other alloying elements in that it reduces the formation of compounds on the surface of the filaments, thus it may obviate the necessity for a Nb barrier layer and thus allow an even greater increase in J c . In this paper the authors explore further some of the effects of the addition of manganese and/or silicon to the matrix between the filaments in an effort to optimize properties at the smaller filament sizes

  16. Organic crystal lattices in the axial filament of silica spicules of Demospongiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Peter; Blumtritt, Horst; Natalio, Filipe

    2017-06-01

    The skeletal system of Demospongiae consists of siliceous spicules, which are composed of an axial channel containing an organic axial filament (AF) surrounded by a compact layer of hydrated amorphous silica. Here we report the ultrastructural investigations of the AF of siliceous spicules from two Demospongiae: Suberites domuncula and Tethya aurantium. Electron microscopy, electron diffraction and elemental mapping analyses on both longitudinal and transversal cross-sections yield that spicules's AF consist of a three-dimensional crystal lattice of six-fold symmetry. Its structure, which is the result of a biological growth process, is a crystalline assembly characterized by a lattice of organic cages (periodicity in the range of 6nm) filled with enzymatically-produced silica. In general, the six-fold lattice symmetry is reflected by the morphology of the AF, which is characterized by six-fold facets. This seems to be the result of a lattice energy minimization process similar to the situation found during the growth of inorganic crystals. Our structural exploitation of three-dimensional organic lattices generated by biological systems is expected to contribute for explaining the relation between axial filament's ultrastructure and spicule's ultimate morphology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnetic Fields in the Massive Dense Cores of the DR21 Filament: Weakly Magnetized Cores in a Strongly Magnetized Filament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, Tao-Chung; Lai, Shih-Ping [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Zhang, Qizhou; Girart, Josep M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Qiu, Keping [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, 163 Xianlin Avenue, Nanjing 210023 (China); Liu, Hauyu B., E-mail: chingtaochung@gmail.com [European Southern Observatory (ESO), Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    We present Submillimeter Array 880 μ m dust polarization observations of six massive dense cores in the DR21 filament. The dust polarization shows complex magnetic field structures in the massive dense cores with sizes of 0.1 pc, in contrast to the ordered magnetic fields of the parsec-scale filament. The major axes of the massive dense cores appear to be aligned either parallel or perpendicular to the magnetic fields of the filament, indicating that the parsec-scale magnetic fields play an important role in the formation of the massive dense cores. However, the correlation between the major axes of the cores and the magnetic fields of the cores is less significant, suggesting that during the core formation, the magnetic fields below 0.1 pc scales become less important than the magnetic fields above 0.1 pc scales in supporting a core against gravity. Our analysis of the angular dispersion functions of the observed polarization segments yields a plane-of-sky magnetic field strength of 0.4–1.7 mG for the massive dense cores. We estimate the kinematic, magnetic, and gravitational virial parameters of the filament and the cores. The virial parameters show that the gravitational energy in the filament dominates magnetic and kinematic energies, while the kinematic energy dominates in the cores. Our work suggests that although magnetic fields may play an important role in a collapsing filament, the kinematics arising from gravitational collapse must become more important than magnetic fields during the evolution from filaments to massive dense cores.

  18. A comparison study of a solar active-region eruptive filament and a neighboring non-eruptive filament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Chao-Wei; Feng, Xue-Shang; Wu, Shi-Tsan; Hu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Solar active region (AR) 11283 is a very magnetically complex region and it has produced many eruptions. However, there exists a non-eruptive filament in the plage region just next to an eruptive one in the AR, which gives us an opportunity to perform a comparison analysis of these two filaments. The coronal magnetic field extrapolated using our CESE–MHD–NLFFF code reveals that two magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) exist in the same extrapolation box supporting these two filaments, respectively. Analysis of the magnetic field shows that the eruptive MFR contains a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) cospatial very well with a pre-eruptive EUV sigmoid, which is consistent with the BPSS model for coronal sigmoids. The magnetic dips of the non-eruptive MFRs match Hα observation of the non-eruptive filament strikingly well, which strongly supports the MFR-dip model for filaments. Compared with the non-eruptive MFR/filament (with a length of about 200 Mm), the eruptive MFR/filament is much smaller (with a length of about 20 Mm), but it contains most of the magnetic free energy in the extrapolation box and holds a much higher free energy density than the non-eruptive one. Both the MFRs are weakly twisted and cannot trigger kink instability. The AR eruptive MFR is unstable because its axis reaches above a critical height for torus instability, at which the overlying closed arcades can no longer confine the MFR stably. On the contrary, the quiescent MFR is very firmly held by its overlying field, as its axis apex is far below the torus-instability threshold height. Overall, this comparison investigation supports that an MFR can exist prior to eruption and the ideal MHD instability can trigger an MFR eruption. (paper)

  19. A comparison study of a solar active-region eruptive filament and a neighboring non-eruptive filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao-Wei; Wu, Shi-Tsan; Feng, Xue-Shang; Hu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Solar active region (AR) 11283 is a very magnetically complex region and it has produced many eruptions. However, there exists a non-eruptive filament in the plage region just next to an eruptive one in the AR, which gives us an opportunity to perform a comparison analysis of these two filaments. The coronal magnetic field extrapolated using our CESE-MHD-NLFFF code reveals that two magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) exist in the same extrapolation box supporting these two filaments, respectively. Analysis of the magnetic field shows that the eruptive MFR contains a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) cospatial very well with a pre-eruptive EUV sigmoid, which is consistent with the BPSS model for coronal sigmoids. The magnetic dips of the non-eruptive MFRs match Hα observation of the non-eruptive filament strikingly well, which strongly supports the MFR-dip model for filaments. Compared with the non-eruptive MFR/filament (with a length of about 200 Mm), the eruptive MFR/filament is much smaller (with a length of about 20 Mm), but it contains most of the magnetic free energy in the extrapolation box and holds a much higher free energy density than the non-eruptive one. Both the MFRs are weakly twisted and cannot trigger kink instability. The AR eruptive MFR is unstable because its axis reaches above a critical height for torus instability, at which the overlying closed arcades can no longer confine the MFR stably. On the contrary, the quiescent MFR is very firmly held by its overlying field, as its axis apex is far below the torus-instability threshold height. Overall, this comparison investigation supports that an MFR can exist prior to eruption and the ideal MHD instability can trigger an MFR eruption.

  20. Rapid Formation and Disappearance of a Filament Barb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anand D.; Srivastava, Nandita; Mathew, Shibu K.; Martin, Sara F.

    2013-11-01

    We present observations of an activated quiescent filament obtained in Hα from the high-resolution Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) on 20 August 2010. The filament developed a barb in 10 min, which disappeared within the next 35 min. A data set from the DOT spanning 2 h was used to analyse this event. Line-of-sight velocity maps were constructed from the Doppler images, which reveal flows in filament spine during this period. Photospheric magnetograms were used from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to determine the changes in magnetic flux in the region surrounding the barb location. The analysis shows flows in the filament spine towards the barb location preceding its formation, and flows in the barb towards the spine during its disappearance. Magnetograms reveal patches of minority polarity flux close to the end of the barb at its greatest elongation. The flows in the spine and barbs are along numerous threads that compose these typical filament structures. The flows are consistent with field-aligned threads and demonstrate that the replacement time of the mass in barbs, and by inference, in the spine is very rapid.

  1. High-Resolution Observations of a Filament showing Activated Barb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anand; Martin, Sara F.; Mathew, Shibu; Srivastava, Nandita

    2012-07-01

    Analysis of a filament showing an activated barb using observations from the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) on 2010 August 20 are presented. The DOT takes Doppler images in Hα, among other wavelengths, in a region about 110 × 110 arcsec^{2} in area, at a cadence of 30~seconds. The offline image restoration technique of speckle reconstruction is applied to obtain diffraction limited images. The filament developed a new barb in 10~minutes, which disappeared within the next 35~minutes. Such a rapid formation and disappearance of a filament barb is unusual, and has not been reported earlier. Line-of-sight velocity maps were constructed from the Doppler images of the target filament. We observe flows in the filament spine towards the barb location prior to its formation, and flows in the barb towards the spine during its disappearance. Photospheric magnetograms from Heliospheric Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, at a cadence of 45~seconds, were used to determine the changes in magnetic flux in the region surrounding the barb location. The variation of magnetic flux in this duration supports the view that barbs are rooted in minor magnetic polarity. Our analysis shows that barbs can be short-lived and formation and disappearance of the barb was associated with cancellation of magnetic flux.

  2. Morphological indictors of the chirality of solar filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, B. P.

    2017-10-01

    There is no doubt that the structural features of filaments reflect properties of their magnetic fields, such as chirality and helicity. However, the interpretation of some morphological features can lead to incorrect conclusions when the observing time is limited and the spatial resolution is insufficiently high. In spite of the relative constancy of their overall shapes, filaments are dynamical formations with inhomogeneities moving along the threads making them up. Therefore, it is possible to observe material concentrated not only in magnetic traps, but also along curved arcs. Difficulties often arise in determining the chirality of filaments with anomalous "barbs"; i.e., those whose jagged side is located on the opposite side of the axis compared to most ("normal") filaments. A simple model is used to show that anomalous barbs can exist in an ordinary magnetic flux rope, with the threads of its fine structure oriented nearly perpendicular to its length. A careful analysis of images with the maximum available spatial resolution and with information about temporal dynamics, together with comparisons with observations in various spectral lines, can enable a correct determination of the chirality of filaments.

  3. Ack kinase regulates CTP synthase filaments during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strochlic, Todd I; Stavrides, Kevin P; Thomas, Sam V; Nicolas, Emmanuelle; O'Reilly, Alana M; Peterson, Jeffrey R

    2014-11-01

    The enzyme CTP synthase (CTPS) dynamically assembles into macromolecular filaments in bacteria, yeast, Drosophila, and mammalian cells, but the role of this morphological reorganization in regulating CTPS activity is controversial. During Drosophila oogenesis, CTPS filaments are transiently apparent in ovarian germline cells during a period of intense genomic endoreplication and stockpiling of ribosomal RNA. Here, we demonstrate that CTPS filaments are catalytically active and that their assembly is regulated by the non-receptor tyrosine kinase DAck, the Drosophila homologue of mammalian Ack1 (activated cdc42-associated kinase 1), which we find also localizes to CTPS filaments. Egg chambers from flies deficient in DAck or lacking DAck catalytic activity exhibit disrupted CTPS filament architecture and morphological defects that correlate with reduced fertility. Furthermore, ovaries from these flies exhibit reduced levels of total RNA, suggesting that DAck may regulate CTP synthase activity. These findings highlight an unexpected function for DAck and provide insight into a novel pathway for the developmental control of an essential metabolic pathway governing nucleotide biosynthesis. © 2014 The Authors.

  4. Studies of the laser filament instability in a semicollisional plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, P.; Labaune, C.; Weber, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.; Bonnaud, G.; Riazuelo, G.; Walraet, F.

    2003-01-01

    The stability and nonlinear evolution of a laser filament in an underdense, semicollisional plasma are studied with a simulation code accounting for the ponderomotive and thermal effects together with the nonlocal electron transport. It is found that the filament is stable at low intensities, where the trapped laser power is below the self-focusing threshold. For larger powers, the filament is unstable with respect to bending. This instability, though predicted in theory (the m=1 mode), has not been seen so far in monospeckle modelling probably because of simulation symmetry. In our simulations an artificial noise source has been implemented in order to make nonsymmetric features appear. The instability leads to a complete breakup of the filament which reconstructs itself after some time and the process then repeats itself. Due to the filament instability the plasma sets in a regime of self-supported oscillations and results in temporal modulation and angular spreading of transmitted light. The numerical simulations are compared with theoretical predictions and experimental observations of speckle dynamics in the interaction of a randomized laser beam with preformed plasmas

  5. Filamentous hydrous ferric oxide biosignatures in a pipeline carrying acid mine drainage at Iron Mountain Mine, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amy J.; Alpers, Charles N.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Campbell, Kate M.

    2017-01-01

    A pipeline carrying acidic mine effluent at Iron Mountain, CA, developed Fe(III)-rich precipitate caused by oxidation of Fe(II)aq. The native microbial community in the pipe included filamentous microbes. The pipe scale consisted of microbial filaments, and schwertmannite (ferric oxyhydroxysulfate, FOHS) mineral spheres and filaments. FOHS filaments contained central lumina with diameters similar to those of microbial filaments. FOHS filament geometry, the geochemical environment, and the presence of filamentous microbes suggest that FOHS filaments are mineralized microbial filaments. This formation of textural biosignatures provides the basis for a conceptual model for the development and preservation of biosignatures in other environments.

  6. Filamentation of a heavy-ion beam in a reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.P.; Yu, S.; Buchanan, H.L.; Chambers, F.W.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1980-01-01

    A heavy-ion beam driver for inertial confinement fusion is subject to filamentation instability over a broad range of beam and plasma background conditions. The case of a beam injected into a gas-filled reactor vessel, where finite pulse length and propagation distance play an important role in limiting mode growth, is analyzed. The effects of transverse thermal spread, spherical convergence to the pellet, and finite magnetic decay rate of eddy currents are included in this treatment. It is concluded that a cold beam will be severly disrupted unless the product of magnetic plasma frequency and propagation time is not large compared with unity. If this condition is not met, mode growth may still be limited to about six e folds by adding transverse velocity spread such that the pulse tail is in a state of pinch equilibrium. However, this approach causes much of the pulse to be lost by thermal expansion

  7. The formation and disappearance of filament barbs observed by SDO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Leping; Zhang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Employing six-day (August 16-21, 2010) SDO/AIA observations, we systematically investigate the formation and disappearance of 58 barbs of a northern (~N60) polar crown filament. Three different ways of barb formation are discovered, including (1) the convergence of surrounding moving materials (55.2%), (2) the flows of materials from the filament (37.9%), and (3) the material injections from neighboring brightening regions (6.9%). We also find three different types of barb disappearance, involving: (i) the bi-lateral movements (44.8%), and (ii) the outflowing (27.6%) of barb material resulting in the barb disappearance, as well as (iii) the barb disappearance associated with neighboring brightenings (27.6%). We propose that barbs exchange materials with the filament, surrounding atmosphere, and nearby brightening regions, causing the barb formation and disappearance.

  8. Trivalent Cation Induced Bundle Formation of Filamentous fd Phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz Zirpel, Nuriye; Park, Eun Jin

    2015-09-01

    Bacteriophages are filamentous polyelectrolyte viral rods infecting only bacteria. In this study, we investigate the bundle formation of fd phages with trivalent cations having different ionic radii (Al(3+) , La(3+) and Y(3+) ) at various phage and counterion concentrations, and at varying bundling times. Aggregated phage bundles were detected at relatively low trivalent counterion concentrations (1 mM). Although 10 mM and 100 mM Y(3+) and La(3+) treatments formed larger and more intertwined phage bundles, Al(3+) and Fe(3+) treatments lead to the formation of networking filaments. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analyses confirmed the presence of C, N and O peaks on densely packed phage bundles. Immunofluorescence labelling and ELISA analyses with anti-p8 antibodies showed the presence of phage filaments after bundling. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Vortex Filaments in Grids for Scalable, Fine Smoke Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhang; Weixin, Si; Yinling, Qian; Hanqiu, Sun; Jing, Qin; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2015-01-01

    Vortex modeling can produce attractive visual effects of dynamic fluids, which are widely applicable for dynamic media, computer games, special effects, and virtual reality systems. However, it is challenging to effectively simulate intensive and fine detailed fluids such as smoke with fast increasing vortex filaments and smoke particles. The authors propose a novel vortex filaments in grids scheme in which the uniform grids dynamically bridge the vortex filaments and smoke particles for scalable, fine smoke simulation with macroscopic vortex structures. Using the vortex model, their approach supports the trade-off between simulation speed and scale of details. After computing the whole velocity, external control can be easily exerted on the embedded grid to guide the vortex-based smoke motion. The experimental results demonstrate the efficiency of using the proposed scheme for a visually plausible smoke simulation with macroscopic vortex structures.

  10. Effect of filament supports on emissive probe measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.; Howes, C. T.; Horányi, M.; Robertson, S.

    2013-01-01

    We have constructed an emissive probe with a thin tungsten filament spot-welded across two nickel wires insulated with ceramic paint. We show that the ceramic supports covering the nickel wires have a large effect on the potential measurements in low-density plasmas. It is found that the potential measured by the emissive probe is more negative than the potential derived from a Langmuir probe current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve when the plasma density is so low that the emitting filament remains immersed in the sheaths of the ceramic supports. The length of the filament L needs to be larger than about 2 Debye lengths (L > 2λ De ) in order to avoid the influence of the ceramic supports and to achieve reliable plasma potential measurements using emissive probes.

  11. Filaments Data Since 1919: A Basis for Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboudarham, J.; Renié, C.

    2016-04-01

    From 1919 to 2002, Paris-Meudon Observatory published synoptic maps of the Solar activity. Together with maps, tables were provided, containing some information concerning at least filaments. The board of Paris Observatory funded a data capture program concerning the 680 000 basic informations available in those tables. On the other hand, in the frame of the FP7 European project HELIO, a Heliophysics Feature Catalogue (HFC) has been developed, which contains also filaments data from 1996 up to now. We now pool all these data in order to give access to a filaments database for nearly a century of observations. This allows to make statistical studies of those Solar features, and try to correlate them with other information such as sunspot number. We present here the data available for this long period of time.

  12. Filament Discharge Phenomena in Fingerprint Acquisition by Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng Ming; Xu Weijun; Liu Qiang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the dielectric barrier discharge fingerprint acquisition technique is introduced. The filament discharge phenomena were observed in the process of fingerprint acquisition. The filament discharge reduced the quality of fingerprint images. Obviously, it was necessary to eliminate streamer discharges in order to get good fingerprint images. The streamer discharge was considered to be the cause of the filament discharge in the experiment. The relationship between the critical electric field and the discharge gap was calculated with the Raether's model of streamer discharge. The calculated results and our experiment proved that it would be difficult for the streamer discharge to occur when the discharge gap was narrow. With a narrow discharge gap, the discharge was homogeneous, and the fingerprint images were clear and large in area. The images obtained in the experiment are very suitable for fingerprint identification as they contain more information

  13. Dynamically generated patterns in dense suspensions of active filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathyusha, K. R.; Henkes, Silke; Sknepnek, Rastko

    2018-02-01

    We use Langevin dynamics simulations to study dynamical behavior of a dense planar layer of active semiflexible filaments. Using the strength of active force and the thermal persistence length as parameters, we map a detailed phase diagram and identify several nonequilibrium phases in this system. In addition to a slowly flowing melt phase, we observe that, for sufficiently high activity, collective flow accompanied by signatures of local polar and nematic order appears in the system. This state is also characterized by strong density fluctuations. Furthermore, we identify an activity-driven crossover from this state of coherently flowing bundles of filaments to a phase with no global flow, formed by individual filaments coiled into rotating spirals. This suggests a mechanism where the system responds to activity by changing the shape of active agents, an effect with no analog in systems of active particles without internal degrees of freedom.

  14. XUV laser-plasma source based on solid Ar filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peth, Christian; Kalinin, Anton; Barkusky, Frank; Mann, Klaus; Toennies, J Peter; Rusin, Lev Yu

    2007-10-01

    We present a laser driven soft x-ray source based on a novel solid argon filament. The continuously flowing micron-sized filament (diameter approximately 56 microm, flow speed approximately 5 mms) was used as a laser target in order to generate a plasma source of high brightness in the "water window" (2.2-4.4 nm) spectral range. The emission properties of the source were characterized in detail with respect to crucial parameters such as positional and energy stability using an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) sensitive pinhole camera and an XUV spectrometer. The results are compared with an argon plasma based on a gas puff target operated under the same experimental conditions showing an increase of the brilliance by a factor of 84. By changing the capillary geometry from a constant diameter to a convergent shape the flow speed of the filament was significantly increased up to 250 mms, facilitating the operation at higher repetition rates.

  15. On the association of magnetic clouds with disappearing filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.M.; Hildner, E.

    1986-01-01

    We present evidence that an interplanetary magnetic cloud preceding an interaction region, observed at earth January 24, 1974, is associated with the eruptive filament or disparition brusque (DB) near central meridian on January 18. The DB also was associated with a long-decay soft X ray transient (LDE) and a long-duration gradual-rise-and-fall (GRF) radio burst. To assess whether magnetic clouds are generally associated with DBs, we present results from statistical testing of the relation of 33 magnetic clouds (and 33 control samples without magnetic clouds) to disappearing filaments near central meridian (approx. 99% confidence. There is a suggestion that clouds following shocks, probably launched at times of solar flares, are not as strongly associated with disappearing filaments as are clouds launched less violently

  16. Ultra small angle neutron scattering from superconducting filament structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amenitsch, H.

    1999-01-01

    With a perfect crystal camera, ultra small-angle scattering measurements were performed to investigate the internal diffusion process of tin inside a superconducting multi-filament wire caused by a temperature treatment. Commercially available Nb 3 Sn superconducting multi-filament wires were treated at 700 C with varying ageing times up to 144 h. A theoretical model taking into account the geometrical form, the size distribution, the interference term and the multiple scattering has been developed to understand and to describe the small angle diffraction pattern. Additionally, the diffusion of H and D into the filament wires was used to vary the scattering length density inside the wires. The results show a direct relationship between the different technological treatments and the characteristic small-angle scattering parameters, like Guinier radius and small-angle scattering probability. (orig.) [de

  17. Self-Structured Conductive Filament Nanoheater for Chalcogenide Phase Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Byoung Kuk; Byun, Myunghwan; Kim, Seungjun; Lee, Keon Jae

    2015-06-23

    Ge2Sb2Te5-based phase-change memories (PCMs), which undergo fast and reversible switching between amorphous and crystalline structural transformation, are being utilized for nonvolatile data storage. However, a critical obstacle is the high programming current of the PCM cell, resulting from the limited pattern size of the optical lithography-based heater. Here, we suggest a facile and scalable strategy of utilizing self-structured conductive filament (CF) nanoheaters for Joule heating of chalcogenide materials. This CF nanoheater can replace the lithographical-patterned conventional resistor-type heater. The sub-10 nm contact area between the CF and the phase-change material achieves significant reduction of the reset current. In particular, the PCM cell with a single Ni filament nanoheater can be operated at an ultralow writing current of 20 μA. Finally, phase-transition behaviors through filament-type nanoheaters were directly observed by using transmission electron microscopy.

  18. Chemical Strategies for the Covalent Modification of Filamentous Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Francis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Historically filamentous bacteriophage have been known to be the workhorse of phage display due to their ability to link genotype to phenotype. More recently, the filamentous phage scaffold has proved to be powerful outside the realms of phage display technology in fields such as molecular imaging, cancer research and materials and vaccine development. The ability of the virion to serve as a platform for a variety of applications heavily relies on the functionalization of the phage coat proteins with a wide variety of functionalities. Genetic modification of the coat proteins has been the most widely used strategy for functionalizing the virion; however complementary chemical modification strategies can help to diversify the range of materials that can be developed. This review emphasizes the recent advances that have been made in the chemical modification of filamentous phage as well as some of the challenges that are involved functionalizing the virion.

  19. The versatility of hot-filament activated chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Lothar; Hoefer, Markus; Kroeger, Roland

    2006-01-01

    In the field of activated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of polycrystalline diamond films, hot-filament activation (HF-CVD) is widely used for applications where large deposition areas are needed or three-dimensional substrates have to be coated. We have developed processes for the deposition of conductive, boron-doped diamond films as well as for tribological crystalline diamond coatings on deposition areas up to 50 cm x 100 cm. Such multi-filament processes are used to produce diamond electrodes for advanced electrochemical processes or large batches of diamond-coated tools and parts, respectively. These processes demonstrate the high degree of uniformity and reproducibility of hot-filament CVD. The usability of hot-filament CVD for diamond deposition on three-dimensional substrates is well known for CVD diamond shaft tools. We also develop interior diamond coatings for drawing dies, nozzles, and thread guides. Hot-filament CVD also enables the deposition of diamond film modifications with tailored properties. In order to adjust the surface topography to specific applications, we apply processes for smooth, fine-grained or textured diamond films for cutting tools and tribological applications. Rough diamond is employed for grinding applications. Multilayers of fine-grained and coarse-grained diamond have been developed, showing increased shock resistance due to reduced crack propagation. Hot-filament CVD is also used for in situ deposition of carbide coatings and diamond-carbide composites, and the deposition of non-diamond, silicon-based films. These coatings are suitable as diffusion barriers and are also applied for adhesion and stress engineering and for semiconductor applications, respectively

  20. [Clinical significance of positive sputum culture for filamentous fungi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiao-Chun; Liu, Zheng-Yin; Xu, Ying-Chun; Wang, Ai-Xia

    2010-01-26

    To investigate the clinical significance of positive sputum culture for filamentous fungi. The medical data of 140 patients positive for filamentous fungi in sputum culture at Peking Union Medical College Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Based on the diagnostic criteria by European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group, invasive pulmonary fungal infection (IPFI) was diagnosed. The clinical characteristics of cases with and without IPFI were analyzed respectively. Among all 140 cases positive for filamentous fungi in sputum culture, only 22 cases could be diagnosed as IPFI. Two of 22 IPFI cases were confirmed by post-operative pathology, 1 case was confirmed by positive blood culture for filamentous fungi and the remaining 19 cases were diagnosed clinically according to the nature of hosts, characteristics of pulmonary infections and microbiological evidence (positive sputum culture for filamentous fungi, 2 - 5 times for each case). Most of etiological fungi in IPFI patients belonged to Aspergillus. And the identity of isolated fungal strain was mostly one strain for each patient. In IPFI group, patients who had been treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics (100%), steroids (13, 59.1%) or immunosuppressant (7, 31.8%) or who had pulmonary X-ray imaging changes (100%), primary diseases (21, 95.5%), hypoalbuminemia (18, 81.8%) or hemoptysis (10, 45.5%), were significantly more than those in non-IPFI group (66.9%, 34.7%, 18.6%, 79.7%, 72.0%, 45.8% and 4.2% respectively; P significance of positive sputum culture for filamentous fungi are associated with the times of positive culture, the number and species of isolated fungal strains. Meanwhile it is important to determine whether there is IPFI according to the nature and clinical characteristics of patients.

  1. Dual-frequency terahertz emission from splitting filaments induced by lens tilting in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhelin; Chen, Yanping; Yang, Liu; Yuan, Xiaohui; Liu, Feng; Chen, Min; Xu, Jianqiu; Zhang, Jie; Sheng, Zhengming

    2014-01-01

    Dual-frequency terahertz radiation from air-plasma filaments produced with two-color lasers in air has been demonstrated experimentally. When a focusing lens is tilted for a few degrees, it is shown that the laser filament evolves from a single one to two sub-filaments. Two independent terahertz sources emitted from the sub-filaments with different frequencies and polarizations are identified, where the frequency of terahertz waves from the trailing sub-filament is higher than that from the leading sub-filament.

  2. Development and manufacture of ultra-fine NbTi filament wires at ALSTHOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, G.K.; Laumond, Y.; Sabrie, J.L.; Dubots, P.

    1986-01-01

    Ultra-fine NbTi filament wires have been developed and manufactured by ALSTHOM. It is now possible to produce industrial copper -copper-nickel matrix wires with 0.6 mu m NbTi filaments for use in 50 / 60 Hz machines. Smaller filaments with diameters down to 0.08 mu m have been obtained with 254 100 filament wire samples. Studies are now being carried out on copper matrix conductors to reduce the filament diameter. The first results show that it is possible to obtain submicron filaments even in copper matrix wires

  3. Water quenching of a filament heated to high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthoud, G.; Boulin, A.; Gros D'Aillon, L.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to precise the type of heat transfer which takes place when a filament heated to high temperature is plunged into water. The originality of this study resides in the high temperature and in the study of pressure effects. A scale analysis allows to distinguish between two extreme cases: the strong under-cooling where the main part of the heat lost by the filament is used to heat the water, and the weak under-cooling where the main part of the heat is used to vaporize water. A correlation is proposed for the first case. (J.S.)

  4. Filamentous bacteriophage fd as an antigen delivery system in vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisco, Antonella; De Berardinis, Piergiuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Peptides displayed on the surface of filamentous bacteriophage fd are able to induce humoral as well as cell-mediated immune responses, which makes phage particles an attractive antigen delivery system to design new vaccines. The immune response induced by phage-displayed peptides can be enhanced by targeting phage particles to the professional antigen presenting cells, utilizing a single-chain antibody fragment that binds dendritic cell receptor DEC-205. Here, we review recent advances in the use of filamentous phage fd as a platform for peptide vaccines, with a special focus on the use of phage fd as an antigen delivery platform for peptide vaccines in Alzheimer's Disease and cancer.

  5. Strength analysis of filament-wound composite tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasović Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this work is focused on strength analysis of filament-wound composite tubes made of E glass/polyester under internal pressure. The primary attention of this investigation is to develop a reliable computation procedure for stress, displacement and initial failure analysis of layered composite tubes. For that purpose we have combined the finite element method (FEM with corresponding initial failure criterions. In addition, finite element analyses using commercial code, MSC/NASTRAN, were performed to predict the behavior of filament wound structures. Computation results are compared with experiments. Good agreement between computation and experimental results are obtained.

  6. Use of Lecane rotifers for limiting Thiothrix filamentous bacteria in bulking activated sludge in a dairy wastewater treatment plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalska Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive growth of filamentous bacteria is a serious problem in many dairy wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs. The objective of the study was to determine whether Lecane inermis rotifers were able to reduce the density of Thiothrix bacteria in activated sludge originating from a dairy WWTP, as well as to identify the impact of rotifers on other organisms in sludge. On a laboratory scale, three experiments were conducted in which activated sludge with a predominance of Thiothrix was inoculated with rotifers at an initial concentration of app. 600 individuals/mL. The results showed that the rotifers, by feeding on the bacterium filaments, are able to reduce significantly the quantity of Thiothrix. A decline in Thiothrix abundance coincided with an improvement of the sedimentation properties of activated sludge. In addition, it was proven that Lecane inermis did not negatively affect the number of Protozoa and Metazoa in activated sludge.

  7. Effect of kinetin on the course of cell cycle in successive developmental stages of the antheridial filaments of Chara vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosław Godlewski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of kinetin on the course of cell cycle in successive developmental stages of the antheridial filaments of Chara vulgaris L. were investigated. A shortening of the duration of cell cycles has been observed, particularly in initial. and final developmental stages. S phase. shortened in all stages whereas G2 phase+mitosis shortened in early but become longer in late developmental stages of filaments. Incorporation of 14C-adenine into cell nuclei increased after kinetin treatment in 4- and 8-celled filaments whereas that of 3H-phenylalanine increased in 8- and particularly 16-celled ones. This plant growth regulator stimulated also the 3H-thymidine incorporation into cells in studied developmental stages of filaments. The stimulation of radioactive phenylalanine incorporation into nucleus and cytoplasm was stronger in late G2 phase. A participation of cytokinins in the control of cell cycle in relation to process of differentiation of antheridial cells is discussed. A possibility of changes in the cytokinin content in antheridia and antheridial filament cells during their; development has been postulated.

  8. The phenotype of a phospholipase C (plc-1) mutant in a filamentous fungus, Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Roger R; Giblon, Rachel E; Lorenti, Miranda S H

    2015-09-01

    In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, phospholipase C may play a role in hyphal extension at the growing tips as part of a growth-sensing mechanism that activates calcium release from internal stores to mediate continued expansion of the hyphal tip. One candidate for a tip-localized phospholipase C is PLC-1. We characterized morphology and growth characteristics of a knockout mutant (KO plc-1) and a RIP mutated strain (RIP plc-1) (missense mutations and a nonsense mutation render the gene product non-functional). Growth and hyphal cytology of wildtype and KO plc-1 were similar, but the RIP plc-1 mutant grew slower and exhibited abnormal membrane structures at the hyphal tip, imaged using the fluorescence dye FM4-64. To test for causes of the slower growth of the RIP plc-1 mutant, we examined its physiological poise compared to wildtype and the KO plc-1 mutant. The electrical properties of all three strains and the electrogenic contribution of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase (identified by cyanide inhibition) were the same. Responses to high osmolarity were also similar. However, the RIP plc-1 mutant had a significantly lower turgor, a possible cause of its slower growth. While growth of all three strains was inhibited by the phospholipase C inhibitor 3-nitrocoumarin, the RIP plc-1 mutant did not exhibit hyphal bursting after addition of the inhibitor, observed in both wildtype and the KO plc-1 mutant. Although the plc-1 gene is not obligatory for tip growth, the phenotype of the RIP plc-1 mutant - abnormal tip cytology, lower turgor and resistance to inhibitor-induced hyphal bursting - suggest it does play a role in tip growth. The expression of a dysfunctional plc-1 gene may cause a shift to alternative mechanism(s) of growth sensing in hyphal extension. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses of different wavelengths in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-01-17

    Jan 17, 2017 ... Hence, many researchers choose a noble gas such as argon as the propagating medium [21–25]. In this paper, we adopt incident laser pulses hav- ing three different wavelengths to study the filament in argon. The content is organized as follows: Section 2 introduces the nonlinear Schrödinger equation for.

  10. Monetary value of the impacts of filamentous green algae on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents estimates of the monetary value of the impact of eutrophication (algae) on commercial agriculture in two different catchments in South Africa. A production function approach is applied to estimate the monetary value of the impact of filamentous green algae on commercial agriculture in the Dwars River, ...

  11. Thermal Resonator Experiments Using A Magnetized Electron Temperature Filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbashewski, Scott; Sydora, Richard; van Compernolle, Bart; Poulos, Matt; Morales, George

    2017-10-01

    We present results from basic heat transport experiments of a magnetized electron temperature filament that behaves as a thermal resonator. Experiments are performed in the Large Plasma Device at UCLA. A CeB6 cathode injects low energy electrons along a magnetic field into the center of a pre-existing plasma forming a hot electron filament embedded in a colder plasma. Previous work reported that the filament exhibits spontaneous excitation of thermal waves and temperature gradient driven drift-Alfvén waves that enhance cross-field transport. We have added to the cathode bias a series of low amplitude pulse trains tuned to the thermal resonance of the filament that externally excite thermal waves. Langmuir probe measurements allow for the determination of the phase velocity and radial decay length of the thermal mode. These results are used to compute the axial and transverse thermal conductivities of the magnetized plasma and compare with those given by classical theory. Agreement of the axial conductivity provides a measurement of electron temperature; deviation of the transverse conductivity suggests anomalous transport or non-uniform excitation. Work Supported by NSERC, Canada and NSF-DOE, USA.

  12. Dynamical origin of non-thermal states in galactic filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cintio, Pierfrancesco; Gupta, Shamik; Casetti, Lapo

    2018-03-01

    Observations strongly suggest that filaments in galactic molecular clouds are in a non-thermal state. As a simple model of a filament, we study a two-dimensional system of self-gravitating point particles by means of numerical simulations of the dynamics, with various methods: direct N-body integration of the equations of motion, particle-in-cell simulations, and a recently developed numerical scheme that includes multiparticle collisions in a particle-in-cell approach. Studying the collapse of Gaussian overdensities, we find that after the damping of virial oscillations the system settles in a non-thermal steady state whose radial density profile is similar to the observed ones, thus suggesting a dynamical origin of the non-thermal states observed in real filaments. Moreover, for sufficiently cold collapses, the density profiles are anticorrelated with the kinetic temperature, i.e. exhibit temperature inversion, again a feature that has been found in some observations of filaments. The same happens in the state reached after a strong perturbation of an initially isothermal cylinder. Finally, we discuss our results in the light of recent findings in other contexts (including non-astrophysical ones) and argue that the same kind of non-thermal states may be observed in any physical system with long-range interactions.

  13. Motility patterns of filamentous sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunker, Rita; Røy, Hans; Kamp, Anja

    2011-01-01

    The large sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp., live on the oxidation of sulfide with oxygen or nitrate, but avoid high concentrations of both sulfide and oxygen. As gliding filaments, they rely on reversals in the gliding direction to find their preferred environment, the oxygen–sulfide interface.We ...... Beggiatoa accumulate high nitrate concentrations in internal vacuoles as an alternative electron acceptor to oxygen....

  14. The physiology of the filamentous bacterium Microthrix parvicella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slijkhuis, H.

    1983-01-01

    A study has been made of the physiology of Microthrix parvicella. This filamentous bacterium often causes poor settleability of activated sludge in oxidation ditches supplied with domestic sewage. The organism was found to utilize only long chain fatty acids (preferably in

  15. Measurement of Reversed Extension Flow using the Filament Stretch Rheometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Nielsen, Jens Kromann

    2008-01-01

    ). The latter is applicable on highly extensible elastomers, whereas in LAOE measurements on liquids (including polymer melts) the LAOE flow needs to be imposed upon a constant strain rate uniaxial elongation. The used Filament Stretching Rheometer allows measurements on polymeric fluids (including polymeric...... melts) from room temperature until 200 degrees C....

  16. Filament identification and dominance of Eikelboom Type 0092 in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order of prevalence, the five most common dominant filament species in 96 activated sludge samples were: Eikelboom Type 0092, Eikelboom Type 1851, nocardioforms, Microthrix parvicella and Eikelboom Type 021N. In order to compile a statistically significant database, it is recommended that an extensive nationwide ...

  17. A model of filamentous cyanobacteria leading to reticulate pattern formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamulonis, C.; Kaandorp, J.

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium, Pseudanabaena, has been shown to produce reticulate patterns that are thought to be the result of its gliding motility. Similar fossilized structures found in the geological record constitute some of the earliest signs of life on Earth. It is difficult to tie these

  18. Sensitivity of RF-driven Plasma Filaments to Trace Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burin, M. J.; Czarnocki, C. J.; Czarnocki, K.; Zweben, S. J.; Zwicker, A.

    2011-10-01

    Filamentary structures have been observed in many types of plasma discharges in both natural (e.g. lightning) and industrial systems (e.g. dielectric barrier discharges). Recent progress has been made in characterizing these structures, though various aspects of their essential physics remain unclear. A common example of this phenomenon can be found within a toy plasma globe (or plasma ball), wherein a primarily neon gas mixture near atmospheric pressure clearly and aesthetically displays filamentation. Recent work has provided the first characterization of these plasma globe filaments [Campanell et al., Physics of Plasmas 2010], where it was noticed that discharges of pure gases tend not to produce filaments. We have extended this initial work to investigate in greater detail the dependence of trace gases on filamentation within a primarily Neon discharge. Our preliminary results using a custom globe apparatus will be presented, along with some discussion of voltage dependencies. Newly supported by the NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering.

  19. Organic acid production in Aspergillus niger and other filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odoni, Dorett I.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to increase the understanding of organic acid production in Aspergillus niger and other filamentous fungi, with the ultimate purpose to improve A. niger as biotechnological production host. In Chapter 1, the use of microbial cell-factories for the

  20. Propulsion by passive filaments and active flagella near boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Lauga, Eric

    2010-10-01

    Confinement and wall effects are known to affect the kinematics and propulsive characteristics of swimming microorganisms. When a solid body is dragged through a viscous fluid at constant velocity, the presence of a wall increases fluid drag, and thus the net force required to maintain speed has to increase. In contrast, recent optical trapping experiments have revealed that the propulsive force generated by human spermatozoa is decreased by the presence of boundaries. Here, we use a series of simple models to analytically elucidate the propulsive effects of a solid boundary on passively actuated filaments and model flagella. For passive flexible filaments actuated periodically at one end, the presence of the wall is shown to increase the propulsive forces generated by the filaments in the case of displacement-driven actuation, while it decreases the force in the case of force-driven actuation. In the case of active filaments as models for eukaryotic flagella, we demonstrate that the manner in which a solid wall affects propulsion cannot be known a priori, but is instead a nontrivial function of the flagellum frequency, wavelength, its material characteristics, the manner in which the molecular motors self-organize to produce oscillations (prescribed activity model or self-organized axonemal beating model), and the boundary conditions applied experimentally to the tethered flagellum. In particular, we show that in some cases, the increase in fluid friction induced by the wall can lead to a change in the waveform expressed by the flagella, which results in a decrease in their propulsive force.

  1. Tesla coil discharges guided by femtosecond laser filaments in air

    OpenAIRE

    Brelet, Yohann; Houard, Aurélien; Arantchouk, Leonid; Forestier, Benjamin; Liu, Yi; Prade, Bernard; Carbonnel, Jérôme; André, Yves-Bernard; Mysyrowicz, André

    2012-01-01

    International audience; A Tesla coil generator was designed to produce high voltage pulses oscillating at 100 kHz synchronisable with a nanosecond temporal jitter. Using this compact high voltage generator, we demonstrate reproducible meter long discharges in air at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. Triggering and guiding of the discharges are performed in air by femtosecond laser filaments.

  2. Filamentous phage associated with recent pandemic strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    OpenAIRE

    Iida, T.; Hattori, A.; Tagomori, K.; Nasu, H.; Naim, R.; Honda, T.

    2001-01-01

    A group of pandemic strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus has recently appeared in Asia and North America. We demonstrate that a filamentous phage is specifically associated with the pandemic V. parahaemolyticus strains. An open reading frame unique to the phage is a useful genetic marker to identify these strains.

  3. Calorie restriction in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diepeningen, Anne D; Slakhorst, S Marijke; Koopmanschap, A Bertha; Ikink, Gerjon J; Debets, Alfons J M; Hoekstra, Rolf F

    Calorie restriction (CR) is a regimen of reduced food intake that, although the underlying mechanism is unknown, in many organisms leads to life span extension. Podospora anserina is one of the few known ageing filamentous fungi and the ageing process and concomitant degeneration of mitochondria

  4. Spin alignment of dark matter haloes in filaments and walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aragón-Calvo, M. A.; Weygaert, R. van de; Jones, B. J. T.; Hulst, T. van der

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: The MMF technique is used to segment the cosmic web as seen in a cosmological N-body simulation into wall-like and filament-like structures. We find that the spins and shapes of dark matter haloes are significantly correlated with each other and with the orientation of their host

  5. Spin alignment of dark matter halos in filaments and walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A.; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.; van der Hulst, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    The MMF technique is used to segment the cosmic web as seen in a cosmological N-body simulation into wall-like and filament-like structures. We find that the spins and shapes of dark matter halos are significantly correlated with each other and with the orientation of their host structures. The

  6. Filamentous fungi as cell factories for heterologous protein production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, P.J.; Biezen, N. van; Conesa, A.; Albers, A.; Mangnus, J.; Hondel, C. van den

    2002-01-01

    Filamentous fungi have been used as sources of metabolites and enzymes for centuries. For about two decades, molecular genetic tools have enabled us to use these organisms to express extra copies of both endogenous and exogenous genes. This review of current practice reveals that molecular tools

  7. Solar Tornadoes Triggered by Interaction between Filaments and EUV Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huadong; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Suli [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Yan, Xiaoli [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Xue, Jianchao, E-mail: hdchen@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory for Dark Matter and Space Science, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2017-05-20

    We investigate the formations and evolutions of two successive solar tornadoes in/near AR 12297 during 2015 March 19–20. Recurrent EUV jets close to two filaments were detected along a large-scale coronal loop prior to the appearances of the tornadoes. Under the disturbances from the activities, the filaments continually ascended and finally interacted with the loops tracked by the jets. Subsequently, the structures of the filaments and the loop were merged together, probably via magnetic reconnections, and formed tornado-like structures with a long spiral arm. Our observations suggest that solar tornadoes can be triggered by the interaction between filaments and nearby coronal jets, which has rarely been reported before. At the earlier development phase of the first tornado, about 30 small-scale sub-jets appeared in the tornado’s arm, accompanied by local EUV brightenings. They have an ejection direction approximately vertical to the axis of the arm and a typical maximum speed of ∼280 km s{sup −1}. During the ruinations of the two tornadoes, fast plasma outflows from the strong EUV brightenings inside tornadoes are observed, in company with the untangling or unwinding of the highly twisted tornado structures. These observational features indicate that self reconnections probably occurred between the tangled magnetic fields of the tornadoes and resulted in the rapid disintegrations and disappearances of the tornadoes. According to the reconnection theory, we also derive the field strength of the tornado core to be ∼8 G.

  8. Solar Tornadoes Triggered by Interaction between Filaments and EUV Jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Huadong; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Suli; Yan, Xiaoli; Xue, Jianchao

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the formations and evolutions of two successive solar tornadoes in/near AR 12297 during 2015 March 19–20. Recurrent EUV jets close to two filaments were detected along a large-scale coronal loop prior to the appearances of the tornadoes. Under the disturbances from the activities, the filaments continually ascended and finally interacted with the loops tracked by the jets. Subsequently, the structures of the filaments and the loop were merged together, probably via magnetic reconnections, and formed tornado-like structures with a long spiral arm. Our observations suggest that solar tornadoes can be triggered by the interaction between filaments and nearby coronal jets, which has rarely been reported before. At the earlier development phase of the first tornado, about 30 small-scale sub-jets appeared in the tornado’s arm, accompanied by local EUV brightenings. They have an ejection direction approximately vertical to the axis of the arm and a typical maximum speed of ∼280 km s −1 . During the ruinations of the two tornadoes, fast plasma outflows from the strong EUV brightenings inside tornadoes are observed, in company with the untangling or unwinding of the highly twisted tornado structures. These observational features indicate that self reconnections probably occurred between the tangled magnetic fields of the tornadoes and resulted in the rapid disintegrations and disappearances of the tornadoes. According to the reconnection theory, we also derive the field strength of the tornado core to be ∼8 G.

  9. Solar Tornadoes Triggered by Interaction between Filaments and EUV Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huadong; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Suli; Yan, Xiaoli; Xue, Jianchao

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the formations and evolutions of two successive solar tornadoes in/near AR 12297 during 2015 March 19-20. Recurrent EUV jets close to two filaments were detected along a large-scale coronal loop prior to the appearances of the tornadoes. Under the disturbances from the activities, the filaments continually ascended and finally interacted with the loops tracked by the jets. Subsequently, the structures of the filaments and the loop were merged together, probably via magnetic reconnections, and formed tornado-like structures with a long spiral arm. Our observations suggest that solar tornadoes can be triggered by the interaction between filaments and nearby coronal jets, which has rarely been reported before. At the earlier development phase of the first tornado, about 30 small-scale sub-jets appeared in the tornado’s arm, accompanied by local EUV brightenings. They have an ejection direction approximately vertical to the axis of the arm and a typical maximum speed of ˜280 km s-1. During the ruinations of the two tornadoes, fast plasma outflows from the strong EUV brightenings inside tornadoes are observed, in company with the untangling or unwinding of the highly twisted tornado structures. These observational features indicate that self reconnections probably occurred between the tangled magnetic fields of the tornadoes and resulted in the rapid disintegrations and disappearances of the tornadoes. According to the reconnection theory, we also derive the field strength of the tornado core to be ˜8 G.

  10. Filamentation of diamond nanoparticles treated in underwater corona discharge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirásek, Vít; Lukeš, Petr; Kozak, Halyna; Artemenko, Anna; Člupek, Martin; Čermák, Jan; Rezek, Bohuslav; Kromka, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 3 (2016), 2352-2360 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-01687S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14011 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : nanodiamonds * pulsed streamer corona discharge * filamentation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.108, year: 2016

  11. Protein secretion in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenink, Xavier Oswin

    2008-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are multicellular eukaryotic organisms, which represent a separate taxonomic group organisms within the fungal kingdom, apart from the yeasts. These fungi always need a substrate to grow on, this can be living or dead material. Fungi possess the capacity to secrete high levels of

  12. Transportation of Nanoscale Cargoes by Myosin Propelled Actin Filaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persson, Malin; Gullberg, Maria; Tolf, Conny; Lindberg, A. Michael; Mansson, Alf; Kocer, Armagan

    2013-01-01

    Myosin II propelled actin filaments move ten times faster than kinesin driven microtubules and are thus attractive candidates as cargo-transporting shuttles in motor driven lab-on-a-chip devices. In addition, actomyosin-based transportation of nanoparticles is useful in various fundamental studies.

  13. Viruses: incredible nanomachines. New advances with filamentous phages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemminga, M.A.; Vos, W.L.; Nazarov, P.V.; Koehorst, R.B.M.; Wolfs, C.J.A.M.; Spruijt, R.B.; Stopar, D.

    2010-01-01

    During recent decades, bacteriophages have been at the cutting edge of new developments in molecular biology, biophysics, and, more recently, bionanotechnology. In particular filamentous viruses, for example bacteriophage M13, have a virion architecture that enables precision building of ordered and

  14. Isolation and cultivation of filamentous bacteria implicated in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Filamentous bacteria have long been associated with activated sludge bulking and foaming and are known to be the main cause of this problem. Chemical control methods such as chlorination and the use of hydrogen peroxide have been, and still are, used to cure bulking and foaming but are only effective as interim ...

  15. Three-dimensional simulations of viscoelastic instability in polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    1999-01-01

    The three-dimensional Langrangian integral method is used to simulate the elastic end-plate instability that occurs in the rapid extension of some polymeric filaments between parallel plates. It is demonstrated that the upper convected Maxwell model describes the essential features of the instabi...

  16. Biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal by filamentous bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biological phosphorus removal has gained attention because the condition of wastewater is manipulated in order to facilitate nutrient removal by the microbial communities in the wastewater. It has been reported that filamentous bacteria are capable of removing P at a similar or higher rate to that of heterotrophic bacteria.

  17. Decidable and undecidable arithmetic functions in actin filament networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    The plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum is very sensitive to its environment, and reacts to stimuli with appropriate motions. Both the sensory and motor stages of these reactions are explained by hydrodynamic processes, based on fluid dynamics, with the participation of actin filament networks. This paper is devoted to actin filament networks as a computational medium. The point is that actin filaments, with contributions from many other proteins like myosin, are sensitive to extracellular stimuli (attractants as well as repellents), and appear and disappear at different places in the cell to change aspects of the cell structure—e.g. its shape. By assembling and disassembling actin filaments, some unicellular organisms, like Amoeba proteus, can move in response to various stimuli. As a result, these organisms can be considered a simple reversible logic gate—extracellular signals being its inputs and motions its outputs. In this way, we can implement various logic gates on amoeboid behaviours. These networks can embody arithmetic functions within p-adic valued logic. Furthermore, within these networks we can define the so-called diagonalization for deducing undecidable arithmetic functions.

  18. Nonlinear Loading-Rate-Dependent Force Response of Individual Vimentin Intermediate Filaments to Applied Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Block, Johanna; Witt, Hannes; Candelli, Andrea; Peterman, Erwin J. G.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Janshoff, Andreas; Koester, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical properties of eukaryotic cells are to a great extent determined by the cytoskeleton, a composite network of different filamentous proteins. Among these, intermediate filaments (IFs) are exceptional in their molecular architecture and mechanical properties. Here we directly record

  19. A Study of Low Density, High Strength High Modulus Filaments and Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alexander, J

    1966-01-01

    ...) Multilaminar composites consisting of alternate layers of metal and ceramic. In order to fabricate the filament composites, continuous boron, and batch boron carbide, and silicon carbide filaments were synthesized at GTC...

  20. Large-amplitude Longitudinal Oscillations in a Solar Filament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q. M.; Su, Y. N.; Ji, H. S. [Key Laboratory for Dark Matter and Space Science, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China); Li, T. [CAS Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Beijing 100012 (China); Zheng, R. S., E-mail: zhangqm@pmo.ac.cn [Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai 264209 (China)

    2017-06-10

    In this paper, we report our multiwavelength observations of the large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations of a filament observed on 2015 May 3. Located next to active region 12335, the sigmoidal filament was observed by the ground-based H α telescopes from the Global Oscillation Network Group and by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory . The filament oscillations were most probably triggered by the magnetic reconnection in the filament channel, which is characterized by the bidirectional flows, brightenings in EUV and soft X-ray, and magnetic cancellation in the photosphere. The directions of oscillations have angles of 4°–36° with respect to the filament axis. The whole filament did not oscillate in phase as a rigid body. Meanwhile, the oscillation periods (3100–4400 s) have a spatial dependence, implying that the curvature radii ( R ) of the magnetic dips are different at different positions. The values of R are estimated to be 69.4–133.9 Mm, and the minimum transverse magnetic field of the dips is estimated to be 15 G. The amplitudes of S5-S8 grew with time, while the amplitudes of S9-S14 damped with time. The oscillation amplitudes range from a few to ten Mm, and the maximum velocity can reach 30 km s{sup −1}. Interestingly, the filament experienced mass drainage southward at a speed of ∼27 km s{sup −1}. The oscillations continued after the mass drainage and lasted for more than 11 hr. After the mass drainage, the oscillation phases did not change much. The periods of S5-S8 decreased, while the periods of S9-S14 increased. The amplitudes of S5-S8 damped with time, while the amplitudes of S9-S14 grew. Most of the damping (growing) ratios are between −9 and 14. We offer a schematic cartoon to explain the complex behaviors of oscillations by introducing thread-thread interaction.

  1. Effect of solids retention time on Microthrix parvicella growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of solids retention time (SRT) on M. parvicella growth and to calculate growth kinetic parameters of this filamentous species. Bench-scale continuous-flow experiments showed that M. parvicella growth can be significantly suppressed at an SRT of lower than 5.7 d for ...

  2. Anthropization Effects on the Filamentous Fungal Community of the Brazilian Catimbau National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Cruz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The Caatinga biome features an exclusive endemic biodiversity, and is characterized by the presence of xerophytic, deciduous vegetation, high temperatures, and low rainfall. This important park has undergone anthropization, especially through extraction of firewood and timber and growing plants for raising goats. The objectives of this study were to compare the communities of filamentous fungi present in the preserved area and in the anthropized soil of the Catimbau National Park in Buíque, PE, Brazil, and to evaluate the impacts of anthropization on such communities. A total of 12 collections of soil samples were made, six in the preserved area and six in the anthropic area, and the physicochemical properties of the soil samples were analyzed. Fungi were isolated through suspension and serial dilution methods. After growth, the samples were purified and identified based on classical taxonomy, according to specific literature. The diversity, evenness, richness, dominance, frequency, and similarity among the species of filamentous fungi in both areas were assessed based on ecological indexes. A total of 4,488 colony-forming units of filamentous fungi were obtained, which were distributed into 65 species belonging to 15 genera. In the preserved area, higher abundance and richness of species were observed, with predominance of the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium. In both areas, diversity and equitability were high, demonstrating that the species are well distributed in these areas. In the preserved area, the dominant genera were Aspergillus, Gongronella, and Penicillium, whereas Aspergillus was the dominant genus in the anthropic area. Two distinct communities were observed in the areas analyzed. Principal component analysis showed that Penicillium simplicissimum influences the total diversity of both communities. The anthropization that occurred in the Catimbau National Park has changed the composition of the filamentous fungal

  3. Visualization of channels connecting cells in filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omairi-Nasser, Amin; Haselkorn, Robert; Austin, Jotham

    2014-07-01

    Cyanobacteria, formerly called blue-green algae, are abundant bacteria that carry out green plant photosynthesis, fixing CO2 and generating O2. Many species can also fix N2 when reduced nitrogen sources are scarce. Many studies imply the existence of intracellular communicating channels in filamentous cyanobacteria, in particular, the nitrogen-fixing species. In a species such as Anabaena, growth in nitrogen-depleted medium, in which ∼10% of the cells differentiate into anaerobic factories for nitrogen fixation (heterocysts), requires the transport of amino acids from heterocysts to vegetative cells, and reciprocally, the transport of sugar from vegetative cells to heterocysts. Convincing physical evidence for such channels has been slim. Using improved preservation of structure by high-pressure rapid freezing of samples for electron microscopy, coupled with high-resolution 3D tomography, it has been possible to visualize and measure the dimensions of channels that breach the peptidoglycan between vegetative cells and between heterocysts and vegetative cells. The channels appear to be straight tubes, 21 nm long and 14 nm in diameter for the latter and 12 nm long and 12 nm in diameter for the former.-Omairi-Nasser, A., Haselkorn, R., Austin, J. II. Visualization of channels connecting cells in filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. © FASEB.

  4. Fatty acid profiles of four filamentous green algae under varying culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junzhuo; Vanormelingen, Pieter; Vyverman, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Although benthic filamentous algae are interesting targets for wastewater treatment and biotechnology, relatively little is known about their biochemical composition and variation in response to growth conditions. Fatty acid composition of four benthic filamentous green algae was determined in different culture conditions. Although the response was partly species-dependent, increasing culture age, nitrogen deprivation and dark exposure of stationary phase greatly increased both total fatty acid content (TFA) from 12-35 to 40-173mgg(-1) dry weight (DW) and the relative proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) from 21-58% to 55-87% of TFA, with dark exposure having the greatest effect. However, the main variation in fatty acid composition was between species, with Uronema being rich in C16:0 (2.3% of DW), Klebsormidium in C18:2ω6 (5.4% of DW) and Stigeoclonium in C18:3ω3 (11.1% of DW). This indicates the potential of the latter two species as potential sources of these PUFAs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of Actin Filament Dynamics during Mitosis in Wheat Protoplasts under UV-B Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huize; Han, Rong

    2016-01-29

    Enhanced ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation is caused by the thinning ozone and affects photosynthesis and crop yield. Recently, UV-B radiation has been considered as an environmental signal that regulates plant growth. Elucidating the downstream effectors in UV-B-triggered pathways is of particular interest. Previous studies have shown that actin filaments (AFs) play many roles during cell physiological processes. However, the underlying response of AFs to UV-B radiation remains unclear. In this study, wheat protoplasts were isolated from 7-d-old leaves. The dynamics of AFs during mitosis were observed under different treatments. The protoplasts were treated with UV-B radiation, cytochalasin B (CB) and jasplakinolide (JAS). Ph-FITC labelling results revealed typical actin filament structures in the control group; AFs were rearranged under UV-B radiation. AFs polymerized into bundles during interphase, the preprophase band (PPB) structure was destroyed during prophase, and the AFs gathered into plaques during metaphase in response to UV-B radiation. During anaphase and telophase, the distribution of AFs was dispersed. Pharmacologic experiments revealed that CB induced apoptosis and JAS induced nuclear division without cytokinesis in wheat protoplasts. These results indicated that AFs respond to UV-B radiation during mitosis, supplying evidence of UV-B signal transduction in plants.

  6. Rice intermediate filament, OsIF, stabilizes photosynthetic machinery and yield under salinity and heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soda, Neelam; Gupta, Brijesh K; Anwar, Khalid; Sharan, Ashutosh; Govindjee; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L; Pareek, Ashwani

    2018-03-06

    Cytoskeleton plays a vital role in stress tolerance; however, involvement of intermediate filaments (IFs) in such a response remains elusive in crop plants. This study provides clear evidence about the unique involvement of IFs in cellular protection against abiotic stress in rice. Transcript abundance of Oryza sativa intermediate filament (OsIF) encoding gene showed 2-10 fold up-regulation under different abiotic stress. Overexpression of OsIF in transgenic rice enhanced tolerance to salinity and heat stress, while its knock-down (KD) rendered plants more sensitive thereby indicating the role of IFs in promoting survival under stress. Seeds of OsIF overexpression rice germinated normally in the presence of high salt, showed better growth, maintained chloroplast ultrastructure and favourable K + /Na + ratio than the wild type (WT) and KD plants. Analysis of photosynthesis and chlorophyll a fluorescence data suggested better performance of both photosystem I and II in the OsIF overexpression rice under salinity stress as compared to the WT and KD. Under salinity and high temperature stress, OsIF overexpressing plants could maintain significantly high yield, while the WT and KD plants could not. Further, metabolite profiling revealed a 2-4 fold higher accumulation of proline and trehalose in OsIF overexpressing rice than WT, under salinity stress.

  7. Cultural characteristics of chromium resistant filamentous cyanobacteria isolated from local environment in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hameed, A.; Hasnain, S.

    2005-01-01

    Many filamentous cyanobacteria were isolated from different places: fields, ponds, polluted water and soils from Muredkey and Kasur tanneries area, near Lahore, Pakistan. Different media like BG 11 medium, Bold Basal medium, Chu's number 10 medium, Gorham's medium and modified SAG medium, in standard forms and with slight variations of ingredients, different pH, temperature and light regimes were checked for the optimum growth of isolates. The isolation procedure was repeated with different concentrations of chromium to select the resistant strains, These selected strains grew on chromium of range 100-200 micro gml/sup -1/ in BG 11 medium. Cyanobacteria were maintained in solid and in liquid media with/without shaking. Cyanobacterial strains were collected from natural habitats that were accompanied by a diversified group of organisms including bacteria, protozoan and rotifers etc. In order to eliminate these agents termed as contaminants, we used several methods including phenol treatment, use of antibiotic and careful manual picking of filamentous cyanobacteria. Resistance of these strains against different heavy metal (ZnSO/sub 4/, MnSO/sub 4/, NiSO/sub 4/, CoCl/sub 2/, Pb (NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, CuSO/sub 4/, HgCl/sub 2/, AgNO/sub 3/ and CdCl/sub 2/) and antibiotics (erythromycin, streptomycin, kanamycin, chloramphenicol and neomycin) was evolved. Optimum temperature was 35 deg. C with pH 9 for the reduction of Cr (VI) in to Cr (III) in majority. (author)

  8. Filamentation of a converging heavy ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.P.; Buchanan, H.L.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1980-01-01

    A major concern in the use of heavy ion beams as igniters in pellet fusion systems is the vulnerability of the beam to the transverse flamentation instability. The undesirable consequence of this mode is the transverse heating of the beam to the extent that convergence on the pellet becomes impossible. This work considers the case of a beam injected into a gas filled reactor vessel, where finite pulse length and propagation distance play an important role in limiting growth. Two geometries are analyzed: a nonconverging case where the radius at injection is nearly equal to the desired radius at the pellet, and a converging case in which the injection radius is large and the beam is pre-focused to converge at the target. It is found that a cold beam will be severely disrupted if the product of the magnetic plasma frequency and the propagation distance is much larger than unity

  9. UV/IR Filaments for High Resolution Novel Spectroscopic Interrogation of Plumes on Nuclear Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    6201 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6201 T E C H N IC A L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-16-66 UV/ IR filaments for high resolution novel spectroscopic...by the factor to get the U.S. customary unit. UV/ IR filaments for high resolution novel spectroscopic Interrogation of Plumes on nuclear materials...10 5.1 UV filaments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 5.2 IR filaments

  10. Effect of ammonia on Ta filaments in the hot wire CVD process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, V.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Oliphant, C.J.; Bakker, R.; Houweling, Z.S.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2009-01-01

    The exposure of Ta filaments to a pure NH3 ambient in a hot wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) reactor affects the resistance of the wires. For filament temperatures below 1950 °C the resistance increases over time, which is probably caused by in-diffusion of N atoms. Using the filaments in a

  11. Enhancement of peak intensity in a filament core with spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Bin; Chu Wei; Li Guihua; Zhang Haisu; Ni Jielei [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Gao Hui; Liu Weiwei [Institute of Modern Optics, Nankai University, Tianjin, 300071 (China); Yao Jinping; Cheng Ya; Xu Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Chin, See Leang [Center for Optics, Photonics and Laser (COPL) and Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Optics, Universite Laval, Quebec City, QC, G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    We demonstrate that the peak intensity in the filament core, which is inherently limited by the intensity clamping effect during femtosecond laser filamentation, can be significantly enhanced using spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser pulses. In addition, the filament length obtained by spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser pulses is {approx}25 times shorter than that obtained by a conventional focusing scheme, resulting in improved high spatial resolution.

  12. Fossil evidence for spin alignment of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies in filaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; van de Weijgaert, Marinus; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    We search for and find fossil evidence that the spin axes of galaxies in cosmic web filaments relative to their host filaments are not randomly distributed. This indicates the fact that the action of large-scale tidal torques affected the alignments of galaxies located in cosmic filaments. To this

  13. Ultrashort laser pulse filamentation from spontaneous X-Wave formation in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccio, Daniele; Averchi, Alessandro; Lotti, Antonio; Di Trapani, Paolo; Couairon, Arnaud; Papazoglou, Dimitris; Tzortzakis, Stelios

    2008-02-04

    The description of ultrashort laser pulse filamentation in condensed media as a spontaneous formation of X waves is shown to apply also to filaments generated in air. Within this framework, a simple explanation is brought for several features of the filament such as the subdiffractive propagation and the energy flux from the weakly localized tails of the X-waves to the intense core.

  14. Three-dimensional manipulation of femtosecond filament direction with an air bubble in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Qiannan; Yao, Jinping; Ni, Jielei; Cheng, Ya

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally reported a simple, novel method to manipulate the directions of femtosecond filaments in three-dimensional (3D) space taking advantage of an air bubble in water. When the air bubble is introduced to the path of filaments, it will change the propagation direction of filaments by reflection or refraction, acting as a curved mirror with a high damage threshold. In this way, we successfully realized 3D manipulation of the directions of both filaments and supercontinuum emission over a wide range of solid angles only by finely adjusting the position of the air bubble with respect to the filament. (paper)

  15. Feasibility of filamentous fungi for biofuel production using hydrolysate from dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of wheat straw

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Lipids produced from filamentous fungi show great promise for biofuel production, but a major limiting factor is the high production cost attributed to feedstock. Lignocellulosic biomass is a suitable feedstock for biofuel production due to its abundance and low value. However, very limited study has been performed on lipid production by culturing oleaginous fungi with lignocellulosic materials. Thus, identification of filamentous fungal strains capable of utilizing lignocellulosic hydrolysates for lipid accumulation is critical to improve the process and reduce the production cost. Results The growth performances of eleven filamentous fungi were investigated when cultured on glucose and xylose. Their dry cell weights, lipid contents and fatty acid profiles were determined. Six fungal strains with high lipid contents were selected to culture with the hydrolysate from dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of wheat straw. The results showed that all the selected fungal strains were able to grow on both detoxified liquid hydrolysate (DLH) and non-detoxified liquid hydrolysate (NDLH). The highest lipid content of 39.4% was obtained by Mortierella isabellina on NDLH. In addition, NDLH with some precipitate could help M. isabellina form pellets with an average diameter of 0.11 mm. Conclusion This study demonstrated the possibility of fungal lipid production from lignocellulosic biomass. M. isabellina was the best lipid producer grown on lignocellulosic hydrolysates among the tested filamentous fungi, because it could not only accumulate oils with a high content by directly utilizing NDLH to simplify the fermentation process, but also form proper pellets to benefit the downstream harvesting. Considering the yield and cost, fungal lipids from lignocellulosic biomass are promising alternative sources for biodiesel production. PMID:22824058

  16. Biological Nitrate Removal from Groundwater by Filamentous Media at Pilot Scale, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Keshtgar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The compounds which contain nitrogen entering the environment can cause some problems, such as eutrophication for water resources and potential risk for human health because of methemoglobinemia and cancer. Biological techniques are effective in removing nitrate. The aim of this study was to remove nitrate from groundwater using denitrification. The main objectives of this research were determining the reduction of water nitrate based on different retention time and also the effect of using grape extract as organic matter and electron acceptor in biological nitrate removal from water. Methods: In this experimental study, the effect of heterotrophic Pseudomonas separated from Shiraz wastewater treatment plant on removing nitrate from groundwater was investigated at pilot scale using grape extract as carbon source and filamentous media at constant pH (7±0.1 and temperature (20±1 °C. During this study, 2 pilots were made. Pilot number 1 was used for separation and growth of the above mentioned bacteria (Pseudomonas that are able to remove nitrate. Pilot number 2 was also used for surveying the removal of nitrate by these bacteria. At least, 13 samples were examined in every retention time and each test was repeated for 2 or 3 times. Statistical analysis was performed in SPSS (ver.19 software using one-way repeated measures ANOVA, and Bonferroni tests. Results: According to the results, nitrate removal rates were 49%, 55%, 67% and, 67% at retention times of 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 hours, respectively. The best retention time was 2 hours with 67% removal rate (P<0.05. Conclusion: The results showed that using grape extract as the carbon source and proper growth of bacteria in filamentous media led to a significant increase in the removal rate

  17. Additive Manufacturing of Syntactic Foams: Part 1: Development, Properties, and Recycling Potential of Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashish Kumar; Patil, Balu; Hoffmann, Niklas; Saltonstall, Brooks; Doddamani, Mrityunjay; Gupta, Nikhil

    2018-01-01

    This work focuses on developing filaments of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and their hollow particle-filled syntactic foams for commercial three-dimensional (3D) printers based on fused filament fabrication technology. Hollow fly-ash cenospheres were blended by 40 wt.% in a HDPE matrix to produce syntactic foam (HDPE40) filaments. Further, the recycling potential was studied by pelletizing the filaments again to extrude twice (2×) and three times (3×). The filaments were tensile tested at 10-4 s-1, 10-3 s-1, and 10-2 s-1 strain rates. HDPE40 filaments show an increasing trend in modulus and strength with the strain rate. Higher density and modulus were noticed for 2× filaments compared to 1× filaments because of the crushing of some cenospheres in the extrusion cycle. However, 2× and 3× filament densities are nearly the same, showing potential for recycling them. The filaments show better properties than the same materials processed by conventional injection molding. Micro-CT scans show a uniform dispersion of cenospheres in all filaments.

  18. Additive Manufacturing of Syntactic Foams: Part 1: Development, Properties, and Recycling Potential of Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashish Kumar; Patil, Balu; Hoffmann, Niklas; Saltonstall, Brooks; Doddamani, Mrityunjay; Gupta, Nikhil

    2018-03-01

    This work focuses on developing filaments of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and their hollow particle-filled syntactic foams for commercial three-dimensional (3D) printers based on fused filament fabrication technology. Hollow fly-ash cenospheres were blended by 40 wt.% in a HDPE matrix to produce syntactic foam (HDPE40) filaments. Further, the recycling potential was studied by pelletizing the filaments again to extrude twice (2×) and three times (3×). The filaments were tensile tested at 10-4 s-1, 10-3 s-1, and 10-2 s-1 strain rates. HDPE40 filaments show an increasing trend in modulus and strength with the strain rate. Higher density and modulus were noticed for 2× filaments compared to 1× filaments because of the crushing of some cenospheres in the extrusion cycle. However, 2× and 3× filament densities are nearly the same, showing potential for recycling them. The filaments show better properties than the same materials processed by conventional injection molding. Micro-CT scans show a uniform dispersion of cenospheres in all filaments.

  19. [Treatment of polluted urban river water using filamentous green algae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xia; Li, Xiao-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Filamentous green algae dominated treatment system was set up to remove contaminants from polluted urban river water under lab conditions. Experiments show that TP is decreased up to 50%, associated with 72% removal of TSS. The removal efficiencies of soluble species, PO4(3-) and NH4(+)-N, are up to 90% and 85% respectively. Under heavily polluted conditions (TP > 3.0 mg x L(-1), TN > 22.0 mg x L(-1)), the average removal efficiencies of TP and TN are 89% and 45% respectively, while under light polluted conditions (TP filamentous green algae is increased significantly (38.78%), and at the same time a large number of unicellular Chlorophytes and Cyanophytes species are occurred on the interior wall surface of experimental fertility. The maximum biomass occurs at the highest concentration of DO.

  20. Rapid microfabrication of transparent materials using filamented femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkus, S.; Gaižauskas, E.; Paipulas, D.; Viburys, Ž.; Kaškelyė, D.; Barkauskas, M.; Alesenkov, A.; Sirutkaitis, V.

    2014-01-01

    Microfabrication of transparent materials using femtosecond laser pulses has showed good potential towards industrial application. Maintaining pulse energies exceeding the critical self-focusing threshold by more than 100-fold produced filaments that were used for micromachining purposes. This article demonstrates two different micromachining techniques using femtosecond filaments generated in different transparent media (water and glass). The stated micromachining techniques are cutting and welding of transparent samples. In addition, cutting and drilling experiments were backed by theoretical modelling giving a deeper insight into the whole process. We demonstrate cut-out holes in soda-lime glass having thickness up to 1 mm and aspect ratios close to 20, moreover, the fabrication time is of the order of tens of seconds, in addition, grooves and holes were fabricated in hardened 1.1 mm thick glass (Corning Gorilla glass). Glass welding was made possible and welded samples were achieved after several seconds of laser fabrication.

  1. Prokaryotic DNA segregation by an actin-like filament

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus; Löwe, Jan

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for prokaryotic DNA segregation are largely unknown. The partitioning locus (par) encoded by the Escherichia coli plasmid R1 actively segregates its replicon to daughter cells. We show here that the ParM ATPase encoded by par forms dynamic actin-like filaments...... was ATP dependent, and depolymerization of ParM filaments required nucleotide hydrolysis. Our in vivo and in vitro results indicate that ParM polymerization generates the force required for directional movement of plasmids to opposite cell poles and that the ParR-parC complex functions as a nucleation...... point for ParM polymerization. Hence, we provide evidence for a simple prokaryotic analogue of the eukaryotic mitotic spindle apparatus....

  2. An Early Cretaceous heterodontosaurid dinosaur with filamentous integumentary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao-Ting; You, Hai-Lu; Xu, Xing; Dong, Zhi-Ming

    2009-03-19

    Ornithischia is one of the two major groups of dinosaurs, with heterodontosauridae as one of its major clades. Heterodontosauridae is characterized by small, gracile bodies and a problematic phylogenetic position. Recent phylogenetic work indicates that it represents the most basal group of all well-known ornithischians. Previous heterodontosaurid records are mainly from the Early Jurassic period (205-190 million years ago) of Africa. Here we report a new heterodontosaurid, Tianyulong confuciusi gen. et sp. nov., from the Early Cretaceous period (144-99 million years ago) of western Liaoning Province, China. Tianyulong extends the geographical distribution of heterodontosaurids to Asia and confirms the clade's previously questionable temporal range extension into the Early Cretaceous period. More surprisingly, Tianyulong bears long, singular and unbranched filamentous integumentary (outer skin) structures. This represents the first confirmed report, to our knowledge, of filamentous integumentary structures in an ornithischian dinosaur.

  3. Current state of genome-scale modeling in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2015-01-01

    capacity. One of the major bottlenecks in the development of new strains into viable industrial hosts is the alteration of the metabolism towards optimal production. Genome-scale models promise a reduction in the time needed for metabolic engineering by predicting the most potent targets in silico before...... testing them in vivo. The increasing availability of high quality models and molecular biological tools for manipulating filamentous fungi renders the model-guided engineering of these fungal factories possible with comprehensive metabolic networks. A typical fungal model contains on average 1138 unique...... metabolic reactions and 1050 ORFs, making them a vast knowledge-base of fungal metabolism. In the present review we focus on the current state as well as potential future applications of genome-scale models in filamentous fungi....

  4. Regulated 15-V, 7500-A, neutral-beam filament supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reass, W.

    1977-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) designed a cost-effective, regulated 15-V, 7500-A filament supply for use with the High-Voltage Test Stand , a major ERDA developmental neutral-beam test facility. The filament supply can float to 200 kV and can provide pulse widths up to 30 s. Powered by a 24-V, 0.5-TJ battery bank, it avoids the use of expensive isolation transformers and induction voltage regulators (IVR's). Battery output is regulated by a water-cooled resistor-contactor combination in which contactors are closed in sequential format to create a staircase current waveform. A fine-tuning network tunes in-between the ''steps'' for regulation to less than 0.5 percent. The regulator is digitally controlled except for the sense amplifiers, which are optically coupled to the digital controller. All ground telemetry uses optical links to minimize effects of rfi and emi noise in the data channels

  5. Conformational and dynamic differences between actin filaments polymerized from ATP- or ADP-actin monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyitrai, M; Hild, G; Hartvig, N; Belágyi, J; Somogyi, B

    2000-12-29

    Conformational and dynamic properties of actin filaments polymerized from ATP- or ADP-actin monomers were compared by using fluorescence spectroscopic methods. The fluorescence intensity of IAEDANS attached to the Cys(374) residue of actin was smaller in filaments from ADP-actin than in filaments from ATP-actin monomers, which reflected a nucleotide-induced conformational difference in subdomain 1 of the monomer. Radial coordinate calculations revealed that this conformational difference did not modify the distance of Cys(374) from the longitudinal filament axis. Temperature-dependent fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements between donor and acceptor molecules on Cys(374) of neighboring actin protomers revealed that the inter-monomer flexibility of filaments assembled from ADP-actin monomers were substantially greater than the one of filaments from ATP-actin monomers. Flexibility was reduced by phalloidin in both types of filaments.

  6. The surge-like eruption of a miniature filament associated with circular flare ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haidong; Yang, Jiayan; Jiang, Yunchun; Bi, Yi; Qu, Zhining; Chen, Hechao

    2018-02-01

    We present a study of a mini-filament erupting in association with a circular ribbon flare observed by NVST and SDO/AIA on 2014 March 17. The filament was located at one footpoint region of a large loops. The potential field extrapolation shows that it was embedded under a magnetic null point configuration. First, we observed a brightening of the filament at the corresponding EUV images, close to one end of the filament. With time evolution, a circular flare ribbon was observed around the filament at the onset of the eruption, which is regarded as a signature of reconnection at the null point. After the filament activation, its eruption took the form of a surge, which ejected along one end of a large-scale closed coronal loops with a curtain-like shape. We conjecture that the null point reconnection may facilitate the eruption of the filament.

  7. Femtosecond laser filament array generated with step phase plate in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Chu, Wei; Yu, Guoliang; Zeng, Bin; Zhao, Jiayu; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Weiwei; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-02-25

    Femtosecond laser filament arrays are generated in air by using three kinds of step phase plates with π phase lag, namely, the semicircular phase plate (SCPP), the quarter-circle phase plate (QCPP) and eight-octant phase plate (EOPP). Experimental results and simulations show that filament arrays consisting of two, four and eight filaments, respectively, are produced by three phase plates. The transverse patterns of the filament arrays are determined by the geometrical shapes of the phase plates. At the same time, the separation distances are found to vary with the focal lengths of the used lenses. We further propose that by using an axicon, filament array in the form of ring shape could be realized while the lengths of the filaments could be significantly elongated at the same time. Our study has suggested a realistic method to generate filament array by the step phase plate with π phase lag.

  8. Stability of a plasma filament with a skinned current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blekher, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    An effective sufficient condition of existence of ideal helical plasma filament instability in a strong longitUdinal magnetic field for skinned current profiles is deduced in the paper. The results of numerical calculations of current skinned profiles of instability diagrams are presented and these results are compared with the obtained sufficient condition. An analytical solution for one model current profile skinning and this solution also is compared with the sufficient condition of instability

  9. Diversity and ecology of filamentous green conjugate algae

    OpenAIRE

    Strouhalová, Pavla

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous conjugating algae have a cosmopolitan distribution. They often inhabit fragile freshwater habitats such as temporary hydrated ditches or puddles of melting snow. Occurrence in this environment entails having to deal with extreme conditions. That helps them to variously adaptation and also the formation of resistant stages. Algae belonging to this group have an important role in nature, because they are often the first species that inhabit newly created habitats and consequently al...

  10. A model of filament-wound thin cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calius, Emilio P.; Springer, George S.

    1990-01-01

    A model was developed for simulating he manufacturing process of filament-wound cylinders made of a thermoset matrix composite. The model relates the process variables (winding speed, fiber tension, applied temperature) to the parameters characterizing the composite cylinder and the mandrel. The model is applicable to cylinders for which the diameter is large compared to the wall thickness. The model was implemented by a user-friendly computer code suitable for generating numerical results.

  11. Filament winding cylinders. III - Selection of the process variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo-Yong; Springer, George S.

    1990-01-01

    By using the Lee-Springer filament winding model temperatures, degrees of cure, viscosities, stresses, strains, fiber tensions, fiber motions, and void diameters were calculated in graphite-epoxy composite cylinders during the winding and subsequent curing. The results demonstrate the type of information which can be generated by the model. It is shown, in reference to these results, how the model, and the corresponding WINDTHICK code, can be used to select the appropriate process variables.

  12. Oxygen vacancy chain and conductive filament formation in hafnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Kan-Hao; Miao, Xiang-Shui

    2018-04-01

    The stability and aggregation mechanisms of oxygen vacancy chains are studied for hafnia using self-energy corrected density functional theory. While oxygen vacancies tend not to align along the c-axis of monoclinic HfO2, oxygen vacancy chains along a-axis and b-axis are energetically favorable, with cohesive energies of 0.05 eV and 0.03 eV per vacancy, respectively. Nevertheless, with an increase of the cross section area, intensive oxygen vacancy chains become much more stable in hafnia, which yields phase separation into Hf-clusters and HfO2. Compared with disperse single vacancy chains, intensive oxygen vacancy chains made of 4, 6, and 8 single vacancy chains are energetically more favorable by 0.17, 0.20, and 0.30 eV per oxygen vacancy, respectively. On the other hand, while a single oxygen vacancy chain exhibits a tiny electronic energy gap of around 0.5 eV, metallic conduction emerges for the intensive vacancy chain made of 8 single vacancy chains, which possesses a filament cross section area of ˜0.4 nm2. This sets a lower area limit for Hf-cluster filaments from metallic conduction point of view, but in real hafnia resistive RAM devices the cross section area of the filaments can generally be much larger (>5 nm2) for the sake of energy minimization. Our work sets up a bridge between oxygen vacancy ordering and phase separation in hafnia, and shows a clear trend of filament stabilization with larger dimensions. The results could explain the threshold switching phenomenon in hafnia when a small AFM tip was used as the top electrode, as well as the undesired multimode operation in resistive RAM cells with 3 nm-thick hafnia.

  13. Finite element modeling of the filament winding process using ABAQUS

    OpenAIRE

    Miltenberger, Louis C.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive stress model of the filament winding fabrication process, previously implemented in the finite element program, WACSAFE, was implemented using the ABAQUS finite element software package. This new implementation, referred to as the ABWACSAFE procedure, consists of the ABAQUS software and a pre/postprocessing routine that was developed to prepare necessary ABAQUS input files and process ABAQUS displacement results for stress and strain computation. The ABWACSAF...

  14. Preserved Filamentous Microbial Biosignatures in the Brick Flat Gossan, Iron Mountain, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amy J; Sumner, Dawn Y; Alpers, Charles N; Karunatillake, Suniti; Hofmann, Beda A

    2015-08-01

    A variety of actively precipitating mineral environments preserve morphological evidence of microbial biosignatures. One such environment with preserved microbial biosignatures is the oxidized portion of a massive sulfide deposit, or gossan, such as that at Iron Mountain, California. This gossan may serve as a mineralogical analogue to some ancient martian environments due to the presence of oxidized iron and sulfate species, and minerals that only form in acidic aqueous conditions, in both environments. Evaluating the potential biogenicity of cryptic textures in such martian gossans requires an understanding of how microbial textures form biosignatures on Earth. The iron-oxide-dominated composition and morphology of terrestrial, nonbranching filamentous microbial biosignatures may be distinctive of the underlying formation and preservation processes. The Iron Mountain gossan consists primarily of ferric oxide (hematite), hydrous ferric oxide (HFO, predominantly goethite), and jarosite group minerals, categorized into in situ gossan, and remobilized iron deposits. We interpret HFO filaments, found in both gossan types, as HFO-mineralized microbial filaments based in part on (1) the presence of preserved central filament lumina in smooth HFO mineral filaments that are likely molds of microbial filaments, (2) mineral filament formation in actively precipitating iron-oxide environments, (3) high degrees of mineral filament bending consistent with a flexible microbial filament template, and (4) the presence of bare microbial filaments on gossan rocks. Individual HFO filaments are below the resolution of the Mars Curiosity and Mars 2020 rover cameras, but sinuous filaments forming macroscopic matlike textures are resolvable. If present on Mars, available cameras may resolve these features identified as similar to terrestrial HFO filaments and allow subsequent evaluation for their biogenicity by synthesizing geochemical, mineralogical, and morphological analyses. Sinuous

  15. Programmable Active Matter: Dynamics of active filaments on patterned surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vikrant; Todd, Daniel; Milas, Peker; Ruijgrok, Paul; Bryant, Zev; Ross, Jennifer

    Interfaces are ubiquitous in biology. For a sub-cellular component moving inside the cell, any change in its local environment across an interface whether chemical concentration, density, or any other physical variables can produce novel dynamics. Recent advances in bioengineering allow us to control motor proteins' velocities when prompted by an optical trigger. Using an optical diaphragm and a gear-shifting myosin XI construct containing a photoactive LOV domain, we can spatially pattern light to create interfaces across which speed of a gliding actin filament can differ by as much as a factor of two. We observe that when a gliding actin filament crosses an interface that has a discontinuous velocity jump, it buckles and changes its angle of orientation due to the velocity mismatch. Our preliminary data suggests that for small angels of incidence, the angle of emergence increases linearly. If we increase the angle of incidence further we observe that the angle of emergence saturates. For some actin filaments approaching the interface near-tangentially we observe total internal reflection as they fail to crossover the boundary. We have modeled our system using Cytosim software package and find excellent agreement with experimental data.

  16. Characterization of actin filament severing by actophorin from Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Actophorin is an abundant 15-kD actinbinding protein from Acanthamoeba that is thought to form a nonpolymerizable complex with actin monomers and also to reduce the viscosity of polymerized actin by severing filaments (Cooper et al., 1986. J. Biol. Chem. 261:477-485). Homologous proteins have been identified in sea urchin, chicken, and mammalian tissues. Chemical crosslinking produces a 1:1 covalent complex of actin and actophorin. Actophorin and profilin compete for crosslinking to actin monomers. The influence of actophorin on the steady-state actin polymer concentration gave a Kd of 0.2 microM for the complex of actophorin with actin monomers. Several new lines of evidence, including assays for actin filament ends by elongation rate and depolymerization rate, show that actophorin severs actin filaments both at steady state and during spontaneous polymerization. This is confirmed by direct observation in the light microscope and by showing that the effects of actophorin on the low shear viscosity of polymerized actin cannot be explained by monomer sequestration. The severing activity of actophorin is strongly inhibited by stoichiometric concentrations of phalloidin or millimolar concentrations of inorganic phosphate. PMID:1757465

  17. Liquid droplets of cross-linked actin filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weirich, Kimberly; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayan; Gardel, Margaret

    Soft materials constructed from biomolecules self-assemble into a myriad of structures that work in concert to support cell physiology. One critical soft material is the actin cytoskeleton, a viscoelastic gel composed of cross-linked actin filaments. Although actin networks are primarily known for their elastic properties, which are crucial to regulating cell mechanics, the viscous behavior has been theorized to enable shape changes and flows. We experimentally demonstrate a fluid phase of cross-linked actin, where cross-linker condenses dilute short actin filaments into spindle-shaped droplets, or tactoids. Tactoids have shape dynamics consistent with a continuum model of liquid crystal droplets. The cross-linker, which acts as a long range attractive interaction, analogous to molecular cohesion, controls the tactoid shape and dynamics, which reports on the liquid's interfacial tension and viscosity. We investigate how the cross-linker properties and filament length influence the liquid properties. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism to control organization of the actin cytoskeleton and provide insight into design principles for complex, macromolecular liquid phases.

  18. Towards tradable permits for filamentous green algae pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, W J; Botha, A M; Oberholster, P J

    2016-09-01

    Water pollution permit systems are challenging to design and implement. Operational systems that has maintained functionality remains few and far between, particularly in developing countries. We present current progress towards developing such a system for nutrient enrichment based water pollution, mainly from commercial agriculture. We applied a production function approach to first estimate the monetary value of the impact of the pollution, which is then used as reference point for establishing a reserve price for pollution permits. The subsequent market making process is explained according to five steps including permit design, terms, conditions and transactional protocol, the monitoring system, piloting and implementation. The monetary value of the impact of pollution was estimated at R1887 per hectare per year, which not only provide a "management budget" for filamentous green algae mitigation strategies in the study area, but also enabled the calculation of a reserve price for filamentous green algae pollution permits, which was estimated between R2.25 and R111 per gram filamentous algae and R8.99 per gram at the preferred state. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED FILAMENT THREAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler, R.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    Oscillations and propagating waves are commonly seen in high-resolution observations of filament threads, i.e., the fine-structures of solar filaments/prominences. Since the temperature of prominences is typically of the order of 10 4 K, the prominence plasma is only partially ionized. In this paper, we study the effect of neutrals on the wave propagation in a filament thread modeled as a partially ionized homogeneous magnetic flux tube embedded in an homogeneous and fully ionized coronal plasma. Ohmic and ambipolar magnetic diffusion are considered in the basic resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. We numerically compute the eigenfrequencies of kink, slow, and Alfven linear MHD modes and obtain analytical approximations in some cases. We find that the existence of propagating modes is constrained by the presence of critical values of the longitudinal wavenumber. In particular, the lower and upper frequency cutoffs of kink and Alfven waves owe their existence to magnetic diffusion parallel and perpendicular to magnetic field lines, respectively. The slow mode only has a lower frequency cutoff, which is caused by perpendicular magnetic diffusion and is significantly affected by the ionization degree. In addition, ion-neutral collision is the most efficient damping mechanism for short wavelengths, while ohmic diffusion dominates in the long-wavelength regime.

  20. Effectors of Filamentous Plant Pathogens: Commonalities amid Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschetti, Marina; Maqbool, Abbas; Jiménez-Dalmaroni, Maximiliano J; Pennington, Helen G; Kamoun, Sophien; Banfield, Mark J

    2017-06-01

    Fungi and oomycetes are filamentous microorganisms that include a diversity of highly developed pathogens of plants. These are sophisticated modulators of plant processes that secrete an arsenal of effector proteins to target multiple host cell compartments and enable parasitic infection. Genome sequencing revealed complex catalogues of effectors of filamentous pathogens, with some species harboring hundreds of effector genes. Although a large fraction of these effector genes encode secreted proteins with weak or no sequence similarity to known proteins, structural studies have revealed unexpected similarities amid the diversity. This article reviews progress in our understanding of effector structure and function in light of these new insights. We conclude that there is emerging evidence for multiple pathways of evolution of effectors of filamentous plant pathogens but that some families have probably expanded from a common ancestor by duplication and diversification. Conserved folds, such as the oomycete WY and the fungal MAX domains, are not predictive of the precise function of the effectors but serve as a chassis to support protein structural integrity while providing enough plasticity for the effectors to bind different host proteins and evolve unrelated activities inside host cells. Further effector evolution and diversification arise via short linear motifs, domain integration and duplications, and oligomerization. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Class of cyclic ribosomal peptide synthetic genes in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Nozomi; Umemura, Myco; Izumikawa, Miho; Kawano, Jin; Ishii, Tomoko; Kikuchi, Moto; Tomii, Kentaro; Kumagai, Toshitaka; Yoshimi, Akira; Machida, Masayuki; Abe, Keietsu; Shin-Ya, Kazuo; Asai, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Ustiloxins were found recently to be the first example of cyclic peptidyl secondary metabolites that are ribosomally synthesized in filamentous fungi. In this work, two function-unknown genes (ustYa/ustYb) in the gene cluster for ustiloxins from Aspergillus flavus were found experimentally to be involved in cyclization of the peptide. Their homologous genes are observed mainly in filamentous fungi and mushrooms. They have two "HXXHC" motifs that might form active sites. Computational genome analyses showed that these genes are frequently located near candidate genes for ribosomal peptide precursors, which have signal peptides at the N-termini and repeated sequences with core peptides for the cyclic portions, in the genomes of filamentous fungi, particularly Aspergilli, as observed in the ustiloxin gene cluster. Based on the combination of the ustYa/ustYb homologous genes and the nearby ribosomal peptide precursor candidate genes, 94 ribosomal peptide precursor candidates that were identified computationally from Aspergilli genome sequences were classified into more than 40 types including a wide variety of core peptide sequences. A set of the predicted ribosomal peptide biosynthetic genes was experimentally verified to synthesize a new cyclic peptide compound, designated as asperipin-2a, which comprises the amino acid sequence in the corresponding precursor gene, distinct from the ustiloxin precursors. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel Actin-like Filament Structure from Clostridium tetani*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, David; Narita, Akihiro; Lee, Lin Jie; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Xue, Bo; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K.; Tanaka, Toshitsugu; Robinson, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic F-actin is constructed from two protofilaments that gently wind around each other to form a helical polymer. Several bacterial actin-like proteins (Alps) are also known to form F-actin-like helical arrangements from two protofilaments, yet with varied helical geometries. Here, we report a unique filament architecture of Alp12 from Clostridium tetani that is constructed from four protofilaments. Through fitting of an Alp12 monomer homology model into the electron microscopy data, the filament was determined to be constructed from two antiparallel strands, each composed of two parallel protofilaments. These four protofilaments form an open helical cylinder separated by a wide cleft. The molecular interactions within single protofilaments are similar to F-actin, yet interactions between protofilaments differ from those in F-actin. The filament structure and assembly and disassembly kinetics suggest Alp12 to be a dynamically unstable force-generating motor involved in segregating the pE88 plasmid, which encodes the lethal tetanus toxin, and thus a potential target for drug design. Alp12 can be repeatedly cycled between states of polymerization and dissociation, making it a novel candidate for incorporation into fuel-propelled nanobiopolymer machines. PMID:22514279

  3. Novel actin-like filament structure from Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, David; Narita, Akihiro; Lee, Lin Jie; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Xue, Bo; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Tanaka, Toshitsugu; Robinson, Robert C

    2012-06-15

    Eukaryotic F-actin is constructed from two protofilaments that gently wind around each other to form a helical polymer. Several bacterial actin-like proteins (Alps) are also known to form F-actin-like helical arrangements from two protofilaments, yet with varied helical geometries. Here, we report a unique filament architecture of Alp12 from Clostridium tetani that is constructed from four protofilaments. Through fitting of an Alp12 monomer homology model into the electron microscopy data, the filament was determined to be constructed from two antiparallel strands, each composed of two parallel protofilaments. These four protofilaments form an open helical cylinder separated by a wide cleft. The molecular interactions within single protofilaments are similar to F-actin, yet interactions between protofilaments differ from those in F-actin. The filament structure and assembly and disassembly kinetics suggest Alp12 to be a dynamically unstable force-generating motor involved in segregating the pE88 plasmid, which encodes the lethal tetanus toxin, and thus a potential target for drug design. Alp12 can be repeatedly cycled between states of polymerization and dissociation, making it a novel candidate for incorporation into fuel-propelled nanobiopolymer machines.

  4. Fine oral filaments in Paramecium: a biochemical and immunological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerot, J; Iftode, F; Budin, K; Jeanmaire-Wolf, R; Coffe, G; Fleury-Aubusson, A

    2001-01-01

    In Paramecium, several kinds of the oral networks of fine filaments are defined at the ultrastructural level. Using the sodium chloride-treated oral apparatus of Paramecium as an antigen to produce monoclonal antibodies, we have begun to identify the proteins constituting these networks. Immunoblotting showed that all positive antibodies were directed against three bands (70-, 75-and 83-kD), which corresponded to quantitatively minor components of the antigen; there was no antibody specific for the quantitatively major components (58- and 62-kD). Immunolocalization with four of these antibodies directed against one or several of these three bands showed that these proteins are components of the fine filaments supporting the oral area; a decoration of the basal bodies and the outer lattice was also observed on the cortex. Immunofluorescence on interphase cells suggested that the three proteins colocalized on the left side of the oral apparatus, whereas only the 70-kD band was detected on the right side. During division, the antigens of the antibodies were detected at different stages after oral basal body assembly. The antibodies cross-reacted with the tetrins, which are oral filament-forming proteins in Tetrahymena, demonstrating that tetrin-related proteins are quantitatively minor components of the oral and the somatic cytoskeleton of Paramecium.

  5. Multi-subunit proteins on the surface of filamentous phage: methodologies for displaying antibody (Fab) heavy and light chains.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogenboom, H R; Griffiths, A D; Johnson, K S; Chiswell, D J; Hudson, P; Winter, G

    1991-01-01

    The display of proteins on the surface of phage offers a powerful means of selecting for rare genes encoding proteins with binding activities. Recently we found that antibody heavy and light chain variable (V) domains fused as a single polypeptide chain to a minor coat protein of filamentous phage fd, could be enriched by successive rounds of phage growth and panning with antigen. This allows the selection of antigen-binding domains directly from diverse libraries of V-genes. Now we show that...

  6. The effect of tapered toothbrush filaments compared to end-rounded filaments on dental plaque, gingivitis and gingival abrasion : a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogteijling, F.C.R.; Hennequin-Hoenderdos, N.L.; van der Weijden, G.A.; Slot, D.E.

    2018-01-01

    Aim: This systematic review was performed to establish the effect of a manual toothbrush with tapered toothbrush filaments (TFTBs) compared to a manual toothbrush with end-rounded toothbrush filaments (ERTB) on clinical parameters of dental plaque, gingivitis and gingival abrasion. Materials and

  7. Effect of pulse biasing on the morphology of diamond films grown by hot filament CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beake, B.D.; Hussain, I.U.; Rego, C.; Ahmed, W.

    1999-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of diamond due to its unique mechanical, optical and electronic properties, which make it useful for many applications. For use in optical and electronic applications further developments in the CVD process are required to control the surface morphology and crystal size of the diamond films. These will require a detailed understanding of both the nucleation and growth processes that effect the properties. The technique of bias enhanced nucleation (BEN) of diamond offers better reproducibility than conventional pre-treatment methods such as mechanical abrasion. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been used study the surface modification of diamond films on silicon substrates during pulse biased growth in a hot filament CVD reactor. Pre-abraded silicon substrates were subjected to a three-step sequential growth process: (i) diamond deposition under standard CVD conditions, (ii) bias pre-treatment and (iii) deposition under standard conditions. The results show that the bias pre-treatment time is a critical parameter controlling the surface morphology and roughness of the diamond films deposited. Biasing reduces the surface roughness from 152 nm for standard CVD diamond to 68 nm for the 2.5 minutes pulse biased film. Further increase in the bias time results in an increase in surface roughness and crystallite size. (author)

  8. Chaperonin filaments : their formation and an evaluation of methods for studying them.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaoi, T.; Kagawa, K. H.; Trent, J. D.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology

    1998-08-01

    Chaperonins are multisubunit protein complexes that can be isolated from cells as high-molecular-weight structures that appear as double rings in the electron microscope. We recently discovered that chaperonin double rings isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, when incubated at physiological temperatures in the presence of ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, stacked into filaments; we hypothesized that these filaments are related to filaments seen inside S. shibatae cells and that chaperonins exist as filaments in vivo. This paper elucidates the conditions under which we have observed S. shibatae chaperonins to form filaments and evaluates native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation as methods for studying these filaments. We observed that in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} combined with ATP, ADP, ATP{gamma}S, or GTP, native PAGE indicated that chaperonin subunits assembled into double rings and that the conformation of these double rings was effected by nucleotide binding, but we saw no indication of chaperonin filament formation. Under these same conditions, however, TEM, spectroscopy, and centrifugation methods indicated that chaperonin subunits and double rings had assembled into filaments. We determined that this discrepancy in the representation of the chaperonin structure was due to the native PAGE method itself. When we exposed chaperonin filaments to the electrophoretic field used in native PAGE, the filaments dissociated into double rings. This suggests that TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation are the preferred methods for studying the higher-order structures of chaperonins, which are likely to be of biological significance.

  9. CARMA LARGE AREA STAR FORMATION SURVEY: OBSERVATIONAL ANALYSIS OF FILAMENTS IN THE SERPENS SOUTH MOLECULAR CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-López, M.; Looney, L.; Lee, K.; Segura-Cox, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana—Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Arce, H. G.; Plunkett, A. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Mundy, L. G.; Storm, S.; Teuben, P. J.; Pound, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Isella, A.; Kauffmann, J. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Tobin, J. J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Rosolowsky, E. [Departments of Physics and Statistics, University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Kwon, W. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747-AD Groningen (Netherlands); Ostriker, E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Tassis, K. [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-710 03 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Shirley, Y. L., E-mail: manferna@gmail.com [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We present the N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1 → 0) map of the Serpens South molecular cloud obtained as part of the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey. The observations cover 250 arcmin{sup 2} and fully sample structures from 3000 AU to 3 pc with a velocity resolution of 0.16 km s{sup –1}, and they can be used to constrain the origin and evolution of molecular cloud filaments. The spatial distribution of the N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission is characterized by long filaments that resemble those observed in the dust continuum emission by Herschel. However, the gas filaments are typically narrower such that, in some cases, two or three quasi-parallel N{sub 2}H{sup +} filaments comprise a single observed dust continuum filament. The difference between the dust and gas filament widths casts doubt on Herschel ability to resolve the Serpens South filaments. Some molecular filaments show velocity gradients along their major axis, and two are characterized by a steep velocity gradient in the direction perpendicular to the filament axis. The observed velocity gradient along one of these filaments was previously postulated as evidence for mass infall toward the central cluster, but these kind of gradients can be interpreted as projection of large-scale turbulence.

  10. In Vitro Assembly Kinetics of Cytoplasmic Intermediate Filaments: A Correlative Monte Carlo Simulation Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Mücke

    Full Text Available Intermediate filament (IF elongation proceeds via full-width "mini-filaments", referred to as "unit-length" filaments (ULFs, which instantaneously form by lateral association of extended coiled-coil complexes after assembly is initiated. In a comparatively much slower process, ULFs longitudinally interact end-to-end with other ULFs to form short filaments, which further anneal with ULFs and with each other to increasingly longer filaments. This assembly concept was derived from time-lapse electron and atomic force microscopy data. We previously have quantitatively verified this concept through the generation of time-dependent filament length-profiles and an analytical model that describes assembly kinetics well for about the first ten minutes. In this time frame, filaments are shorter than one persistence length, i.e. ~1 μm, and thus filaments were treated as stiff rods associating via their ends. However, when filaments grow several μm in length over hours, their flexibility becomes a significant factor for the kinetics of the longitudinal annealing process. Incorporating now additional filament length distributions that we have recorded after extended assembly times by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM, we developed a Monte Carlo simulation procedure that accurately describes the underlying assembly kinetics for large time scales.

  11. Penetration of Magnetosheath Plasma into Dayside Magnetosphere. 2. ; Magnetic Field in Plasma Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyatsky, Wladislaw; Pollock, Craig; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Lyatskaya, Sonya Inna; Avanov, Levon Albert

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we examined plasma structures (filaments), observed in the dayside magnetosphere but containing magnetosheath plasma. These filaments show the stable antisunward motion (while the ambient magnetospheric plasma moved in the opposite direction) and the existence of a strip of magnetospheric plasma, separating these filaments from the magnetosheath. These results, however, contradict both theoretical studies and simulations by Schindler (1979), Ma et al. (1991), Dai and Woodward (1994, 1998), and other researchers, who reported that the motion of such filaments through the magnetosphere is possible only when their magnetic field is directed very close to the ambient magnetic field, which is not the situation that is observed. In this study, we show that this seeming contradiction may be related to different events as the theoretical studies and simulations are related to the case when the filament magnetic field is about aligned with filament orientation, whereas the observations show that the magnetic field in these filaments may be rotating. In this case, the rotating magnetic field, changing incessantly its direction, drastically affects the penetration of plasma filaments into the magnetosphere. In this case, the filaments with rotating magnetic field, even if in each moment it is significantly inclined to the ambient magnetic field, may propagate through the magnetosphere, if their average (for the rotation period) magnetic field is aligned with the ambient magnetic field. This shows that neglecting the rotation of magnetic field in these filaments may lead to wrong results.

  12. Occurrence of proteinaceous 10-nm filaments throughout the cytoplasm of algae of the order Dasycladales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, S; Wittke, W; Traub, P

    1998-05-01

    Previously, whole-mount electron microscopy of nuclei extruded together with residual cytoplasm from the rhizoids of several algal species of the order Dasycladales has revealed the occurrence of an intra- and perinuclear network of 10-nm filaments morphologically indistinguishable from that of mammalian vimentin intermediate filaments. The present investigation demonstrates the existence of a filament system throughout the cytoplasm of the rhizoid, stalk, and apical tip of these giant cells. However, while the perinuclear 10-nm filaments interconnecting the nuclear surface with a perinuclear layer of large, electron-dense bodies filled with nucleoprotein material are of smooth appearance, those continuing within and beyond the perinuclear bodies are densely covered with differently sized, globular structures and, therefore, are of a very rough appearance. The filaments in the very apical tip of the cells are mainly of the smooth type. The transition from smooth to rough filaments seems to occur in the numerous perinuclear dense bodies surrounding the large nucleus. Digestion of the rough filaments with proteinase K removes the globules from the filament surface, revealing that throughout the nonvacuolar, intracellular space the filaments have the same basic 10-nm structure. On the other hand, gold-conjugated RNase A strongly binds to the filament-attached globules but not to the smooth, perinuclear, and the proteinase K-treated, rough filaments. In addition, an antibody raised against Xp54, a highly conserved protein which in Xenopus oocytes is an integral component of stored mRNP particles, decorates the rough but not the smooth 10-nm filaments. These results support the notion that the 10-nm filament system of Dasycladales cells plays a role in the transient storage of ribonucleoprotein particles in the cytoplasm and possibly fulfils a supportive function in the actomyosin-based transport of such material to various cytological destinations.

  13. Filamentous fungi isolated from grape marc as antagonists of Botrytis cinerea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić-Petrović Jelena P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report on the isolation and identification of three filamentous fungi from grape marc, and antifungal effect of their cell-free culture filtrates on the growth of Botrytis cinerea, causal agent of gray mold. Grape marc is a waste material that has been used as soil amendment in sustainable agriculture. Isolates originating from grape marc were identified on the basis of morphological features and internal transcribed spacer rDNA or β-tubulin gene sequencing. The presence of three different species, Penicillium paneum, Penicillium chrysogenum and Aspergillus fumigatus has been detected expressing different effect on the growth of B. cinerea. The effect of crude culture filtrates of selected fungi on B. cinerea growth was tested. Heat sensitivity of the established inhibition effect was examined by autoclaving the crude culture filtrate prior to testing. Additional aim was to determine whether antifungal effect was influenced by previous exposure to B. cinerea in dual liquid cultures. Crude culture filtrate of A. fumigatus K16/2 showed the lowest suppression of B. cinerea growth. A maximal percentage inhibition achieved within the study was 38.2%, 39.8% and 23.8 for crude filtrates of P. paneum K7/1, P. chrysogenum K11/1 and A. fumigatus K16/2, respectively. Presence of B. cinerea in dual liquid culture induced significant increase in antifungal capacity of the culture filtrates in comparison to pure culture filtrates of the chosen isolates. The antifungal activity of all of the isolates’ culture filtrates retained after heat treatment suggesting the presence of some thermostable antifungal metabolites. The results indicate the complexity and specificity of the interaction between filamentous fungi and B. cinerea. Grape marc is a good source for isolation od B. cinerea fungal antagonists and their antifungal metabolites. Specificity of fungal-fungal interactions suggests that further research on the antagonistic mechanisms and

  14. Development of nanodiamond foils for H- stripping to Support the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) using hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vispute, R D [Blue Wave Semiconductors; Ermer, Henry K [Blue Wave Semiconductors; Sinsky, Phillip [Blue Wave Semiconductors; Seiser, Andrew [Blue Wave Semiconductors; Shaw, Robert W [ORNL; Wilson, Leslie L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Thin diamond foils are needed in many particle accelerator experiments regarding nuclear and atomic physics, as well as in some interdisciplinary research. Particularly, nanodiamond texture is attractive for this purpose as it possesses a unique combination of diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity, mechanical strength and high radiation hardness; therefore, it is a potential material for energetic ion beam stripper foils. At the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the installed set of foils must be able to survive a nominal five-month operation period, without the need for unscheduled costly shutdowns and repairs. Thus, a small foil about the size of a postage stamp is critical to the operation of SNS and similar sources in U.S. laboratories and around the world. We are investigating nanocrystalline, polycrystalline and their admixture films fabricated using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system for H- stripping to support the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here we discuss optimization of process variables such as substrate temperature, process gas ratio of H2/Ar/CH4, substrate to filament distance, filament temperature, carburization conditions, and filament geometry to achieve high purity diamond foils on patterned silicon substrates with manageable intrinsic and thermal stresses so that they can be released as free standing foils without curling. An in situ laser reflectance interferometry tool (LRI) is used for monitoring the growth characteristics of the diamond thin film materials. The optimization process has yielded free standing foils with no pinholes. The sp3/sp2 bonds are controlled to optimize electrical resistivity to reduce the possibility of surface charging of the foils. The integrated LRI and HFCVD process provides real time information on the growth of films and can quickly illustrate growth features and control film thickness. The results are discussed in the light of development of nanodiamond foils that

  15. Bacterial growth on stream insects: potential for use in bioassessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Dennis Lemly

    1998-01-01

    Growth of filamentous bacteria (Sphaerotilus sp., Leptothrix sp.) on aquatic insects was evaluated for its usefulness as a bioindicator of detrimental nutrient levels in streams. Field measurements of insect abundance, nutrient concentrations, and incidence/ degree of bacterial growth on insects upstream and downstream of livestock pastures were made in 2 Virginia, USA...

  16. In vitro spore germination and gametophytic growth development of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of sucrose, pH and plant growth hormones on spore germination percentage and gametophyte growths of Pteris tripartita were studied. Various morphological structures of gametophytes were observed namely, filamentous, spatulate and heart stages in the MS culture medium with hormones. After 15 days, the ...

  17. Interaction of cytochalasin D with actin filaments in the presence of ADP and ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, M F; Criquet, P; Pantaloni, D; Korn, E D

    1986-02-15

    Cytochalasin D strongly inhibits the faster components in the reactions of actin filament depolymerization and elongation in the presence of 10 mM Tris-Cl-, pH 7.8, 0.2 mM dithiothreitol, 1 mM MgCl2, 0.1 mM CaCl2, and 0.2 mM ATP or ADP. Assuming an exclusive and total capping of the barbed end by the drug, the kinetic parameters derived at saturation by cytochalasin D refer to the pointed end and are 10-15-fold lower than at the barbed end. In ATP, the critical concentration increases with cytochalasin D up to 12-fold its value when both ends are free; as a result of the lowering of the free energy of nucleation by cytochalasin D, short oligomers of F-actin exist just above and below the critical concentration. Cytochalasin D interacts strongly with the barbed ends independently of the ADP-G-actin concentration (K = 0.5 nM-1). In contrast, the affinity of cytochalasin D decreases cooperatively with increasing ATP-G-actin concentration. These data are equally well accounted for by two different models: either cytochalasin D binds very poorly to ATP-capped filament ends whose proportion increases with actin concentration, or cytochalasin D binds equally well to ATP-ends and ADP-ends and also binds to actin dimers in ATP but not in ADP. A linear actin concentration dependence of the rate of growth was found at the pointed end, consistent with the virtual absence of an ATP cap at that end.

  18. Microevolution of Candida albicans in macrophages restores filamentation in a nonfilamentous mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Wartenberg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Following antifungal treatment, Candida albicans, and other human pathogenic fungi can undergo microevolution, which leads to the emergence of drug resistance. However, the capacity for microevolutionary adaptation of fungi goes beyond the development of resistance against antifungals. Here we used an experimental microevolution approach to show that one of the central pathogenicity mechanisms of C. albicans, the yeast-to-hyphae transition, can be subject to experimental evolution. The C. albicans cph1Δ/efg1Δ mutant is nonfilamentous, as central signaling pathways linking environmental cues to hyphal formation are disrupted. We subjected this mutant to constant selection pressure in the hostile environment of the macrophage phagosome. In a comparatively short time-frame, the mutant evolved the ability to escape macrophages by filamentation. In addition, the evolved mutant exhibited hyper-virulence in a murine infection model and an altered cell wall composition compared to the cph1Δ/efg1Δ strain. Moreover, the transcriptional regulation of hyphae-associated, and other pathogenicity-related genes became re-responsive to environmental cues in the evolved strain. We went on to identify the causative missense mutation via whole genome- and transcriptome-sequencing: a single nucleotide exchange took place within SSN3 that encodes a component of the Cdk8 module of the Mediator complex, which links transcription factors with the general transcription machinery. This mutation was responsible for the reconnection of the hyphal growth program with environmental signals in the evolved strain and was sufficient to bypass Efg1/Cph1-dependent filamentation. These data demonstrate that even central transcriptional networks can be remodeled very quickly under appropriate selection pressure.

  19. Control of femtosecond multi-filamentation in glass by designable patterned optical fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Ping Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a scheme for realizing femtosecond multi-filamentation with designable quantity and locations of filaments, based on the control of multi-focal spots formed by patterned optical fields (POFs composed of multiple individual optical fields (IOFs. A computer-controlled spatial light modulator is used to engineer the POFs. In particular, we introduce a blazed phase grating in any IOF, which increases a degree of freedom, making the engineering of multi-focal spots becomes more flexible. We achieve experimentally the aim controlling femtosecond multi-filamentation in a K9 glass. Our scheme has great flexibility and convenience in controlling the multi-filamentation in quantity and locations of filaments and strength of interaction between filaments.

  20. Accretion-driven turbulence in filaments - I. Non-gravitational accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heigl, S.; Burkert, A.; Gritschneder, M.

    2018-03-01

    We study accretion-driven turbulence for different inflow velocities in star-forming filaments using the code RAMSES. Filaments are rarely isolated objects and their gravitational potential will lead to radially dominated accretion. In the non-gravitational case, accretion by itself can already provoke non-isotropic, radially dominated turbulent motions responsible for the complex structure and non-thermal line widths observed in filaments. We find that there is a direct linear relation between the absolute value of the total density-weighted velocity dispersion and the infall velocity. The turbulent velocity dispersion in the filaments is independent of sound speed or any net flow along the filament. We show that the density-weighted velocity dispersion acts as an additional pressure term, supporting the filament in hydrostatic equilibrium. Comparing to observations, we find that the projected non-thermal line width variation is generally subsonic independent of inflow velocity.

  1. Development and Application of Wood Flour-Filled Polylactic Acid Composite Filament for 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yubo; Wang, Honglei; Li, Zelong; Li, Peng; Shi, Sheldon Q

    2017-03-24

    This paper presents the development of wood flour (WF)-filled polylactic acid (PLA) composite filaments for a fused deposition modeling (FDM) process with the aim of application to 3D printing. The composite filament consists of wood flour (5 wt %) in a PLA matrix. The detailed formulation and characterization of the composite filament were investigated experimentally, including tensile properties, microstructure, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The feedstock filaments of this composite were produced and used successfully in an assembled FDM 3D printer. The research concludes that compared with pure PLA filament, adding WF changed the microstructure of material fracture surface, the initial deformation resistance of the composite was enhanced, the starting thermal degradation temperature of the composite decreased slightly, and there were no effects on the melting temperature. The WF/PLA composite filament is suitable to be printed by the FDM process.

  2. A Nonthermal Radio Filament Connected to the Galactic Black Hole?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Mark R.; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Goss, W. M.

    2017-12-01

    Using the Very Large Array, we have investigated a nonthermal radio filament (NTF) recently found very near the Galactic black hole and its radio counterpart, Sgr A*. While this NTF—the Sgr A West Filament (SgrAWF)—shares many characteristics with the population of NTFs occupying the central few hundred parsecs of the Galaxy, the SgrAWF has the distinction of having an orientation and sky location that suggest an intimate physical connection to Sgr A*. We present 3.3 and 5.5 cm images constructed using an innovative methodology that yields a very high dynamic range, providing an unprecedentedly clear picture of the SgrAWF. While the physical association of the SgrAWF with Sgr A* is not unambiguous, the images decidedly evoke this interesting possibility. Assuming that the SgrAWF bears a physical relationship to Sgr A*, we examine the potential implications. One is that Sgr A* is a source of relativistic particles constrained to diffuse along ordered local field lines. The relativistic particles could also be fed into the local field by a collimated outflow from Sgr A*, perhaps driven by the Poynting flux accompanying the black hole spin in the presence of a magnetic field threading the event horizon. Second, we consider the possibility that the SgrAWF is the manifestation of a low-mass-density cosmic string that has become anchored to the black hole. The simplest form of these hypotheses would predict that the filament be bi-directional, whereas the SgrAWF is only seen on one side of Sgr A*, perhaps because of the dynamics of the local medium.

  3. Undulatory locomotion of finite filaments: lessons from Caenorhabditis elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, R S; Kenneth, O; Sznitman, J; Leshansky, A M

    2013-01-01

    Undulatory swimming is a widespread propulsion strategy adopted by many small-scale organisms including various single-cell eukaryotes and nematodes. In this work, we report a comprehensive study of undulatory locomotion of a finite filament using (i) approximate resistive force theory (RFT) assuming a local nature of hydrodynamic interaction between the filament and the surrounding viscous liquid and (ii) particle-based numerical computations taking into account the intra-filament hydrodynamic interaction. Using the ubiquitous model of a propagating sinusoidal waveform, we identify the limit of applicability of the RFT and determine the optimal propulsion gait in terms of (i) swimming distance per period of undulation and (ii) hydrodynamic propulsion efficiency. The occurrence of the optimal swimming gait maximizing hydrodynamic efficiency at finite wavelength in particle-based computations diverges from the prediction of the RFT. To compare the model swimmer powered by sine wave undulations to biological undulatory swimmers, we apply the particle-based approach to study locomotion of the model organism nematode Caenorhabditis elegans using the swimming gait extracted from experiments. The analysis reveals that even though the amplitude and the wavenumber of undulations are similar to those determined for the best performing sinusoidal swimmer, C. elegans overperforms the latter in terms of both displacement and hydrodynamic efficiency. Further comparison with other undulatory microorganisms reveals that many adopt waveforms with characteristics similar to the optimal model swimmer, yet real swimmers still manage to beat the best performing sine-wave swimmer in terms of distance covered per period. Overall our results underline the importance of further waveform optimization, as periodic undulations adopted by C. elegans and other organisms deviate considerably from a simple sine wave. (paper)

  4. THE FREE-FALL TIME OF FINITE SHEETS AND FILAMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toalá, Jesús A.; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Gómez, Gilberto C.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular clouds often exhibit filamentary or sheet-like shapes. We compute the free-fall time (τ ff ) for finite, uniform, self-gravitating circular sheets and filamentary clouds of small but finite thickness, so that their volume density ρ can still be defined. We find that, for thin sheets, the free-fall time is larger than that of a uniform sphere with the same volume density by a factor proportional to √A, where the aspect ratio A is given by A = R/h, R being the sheet's radius and h is its thickness. For filamentary clouds, the aspect ratio is defined as A=L/R, where L is the filament's half-length and R is its (small) radius, and the modification factor is more complicated, although in the limit of large A it again reduces to nearly √A. We propose that our result for filamentary shapes naturally explains the ubiquitous configuration of clumps fed by filaments observed in the densest structures of molecular clouds. Also, the longer free-fall times for non-spherical geometries in general may contribute toward partially alleviating the 'star formation conundrum', namely, the star formation rate in the Galaxy appears to be proceeding in a timescale much larger than the total molecular mass in the Galaxy divided by its typical free-fall time. If molecular clouds are in general formed by thin sheets and long filaments, then their relevant free-fall time may have been systematically underestimated, possibly by factors of up to one order of magnitude.

  5. CLUSTER FORMATION TRIGGERED BY FILAMENT COLLISIONS IN SERPENS SOUTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Kawabe, Ryohei; Shinnaga, Hiroko [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Sugitani, Koji [Graduate School of Natural Sciences, Nagoya City University, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8501 (Japan); Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Kimihiko; Tokuda, Kazuki; Kozu, Minato; Okada, Nozomi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Ogawa, Hideo [Department of Physical Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuen 1-1, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Nishitani, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Izumi [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, Minamimaki, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi [Department of Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Shimajiri, Yoshito [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Yonekura, Yoshinori [Center for Astronomy, Ibaraki University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Kameno, Seiji [Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Crdova 3107 Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Momose, Munetake [Institute of Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito 310-8512 (Japan); Nakajima, Taku, E-mail: fumitaka.nakamura@nao.ac.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); and others

    2014-08-20

    The Serpens South infrared dark cloud consists of several filamentary ridges, some of which fragment into dense clumps. On the basis of CCS (J{sub N} = 4{sub 3}-3{sub 2}), HC{sub 3}N (J = 5-4), N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1-0), and SiO (J = 2-1, v = 0) observations, we investigated the kinematics and chemical evolution of these filamentary ridges. We find that CCS is extremely abundant along the main filament in the protocluster clump. We emphasize that Serpens South is the first cluster-forming region where extremely strong CCS emission is detected. The CCS-to-N{sub 2}H{sup +} abundance ratio is estimated to be about 0.5 toward the protocluster clump, whereas it is about 3 in the other parts of the main filament. We identify six dense ridges with different V {sub LSR}. These ridges appear to converge toward the protocluster clump, suggesting that the collisions of these ridges may have triggered cluster formation. The collisions presumably happened within a few × 10{sup 5} yr because CCS is abundant only for a short time. The short lifetime agrees with the fact that the number fraction of Class I objects, whose typical lifetime is 0.4 × 10{sup 5} yr, is extremely high, about 70% in the protocluster clump. In the northern part, two ridges appear to have partially collided, forming a V-shape clump. In addition, we detected strong bipolar SiO emission that is due to the molecular outflow blowing out of the protostellar clump, as well as extended weak SiO emission that may originate from the filament collisions.

  6. Tolerance to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs by filamentous fungi isolated from contaminated sediment in the Amazon region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilton Marcelo de Lima Souza

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Tolerance to Polycyclic Hydrocarbons Aromatic (PAHs is considered an important characteristic when assessing the bioremediation potential of microorganisms. Given this, the objective of this research was to assay filamentous fungi from the Amazon region, isolated from sediments with differents levels of contamination by PAHs, for tolerance to phenanthrene and pyrene. To achieve this, fungal cultures plugs (5 mm, obtained after 7 days growth, were transferred to petri dishes containing 20% Sabouraud dextrose agar medium, after surface innoculation with phenanthrene and pyrene crystals, separately. Radial mycelial growth was evaluated after 10 days at five different concentration levels for each contaminant and control group, all in triplicate for each treatment. Fungal growth and growth inhibition rates were calculated. The average growth of the colonies in each treatment was compared with one-way ANOVA, followed by a Tukey Test (p < 0,05. All fungi showed tolerant to phenanthrene and pyrene. However, Hypoxylon sp. showed the lowest growth inhibition rate and average growth rates significantly different of the other six tested species. Hypoxylon sp. has been shown to be a promising genetic resource for use in new studies of PAHs degradation.

  7. Fitoremediasi limbah budidaya sidat menggunakan filamentous algae (Spirogyra sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Apriadi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui potensi dari filamentous algae (Spirogyra sp. sebagai agen bioremediasi dalam mereduksi kandungan bahan organik limbah budidaya sidat. Penelitian menggunakan rancangan acak lengkap dengan perlakuan perbedaan dosis limbah (25 %, 50 %, 75 %, 100%. Wadah penelitian berupa akuarium resirkulasi menggunakan sistem carrousel. Dilakukan pengukuran secara rutin terhadap beberapa parameter kualitas air serta perubahan bobot Spirogyra sp. selama dua minggu retensi. Diperoleh hasil bahwa penurunan konsentrasi bahan organik menggunakan Spirogyra sp. berlangsung efektif hingga hari keenam. Spirogyra sp. mampu mentolelir limbah budidaya sidat pada dosis limbah 25% dan 50%. Spirogyra sp. pada perlakuan dosis limbah 50% memiliki kemampuan yang lebih baik dalam menurunkan bahan organik limbah budidaya sidat.

  8. Effect of friction on the motion of plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Odd Erik; Madsen, Jens; Naulin, Volker

    is influenced by the collisional friction with the neutral gas fluid. In magnetically confined plasmas, the motion of filamentary structures in the edge region can be influenced by parallel dynamics in a manner that resembles an effective friction. In the presence of strong ballooning, such a frictional...... an effective friction, is investigated. In the inertial regime the radial filament velocity scales as the square root of its size. In the limit of strong friction regime the velocity scales as the inverse of the structure size. A discussion of these results will be given in the context of irregularities...

  9. A comparative study on the disintegration of filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubert, J; Krings, U; Berger, R G

    2000-11-01

    Different methods for cell disintegration were tested for their efficacy on filamentous fungi, including percussion grinding, homogenization using an Ultra-Turrax, chemical treatment and lyophylization. The release of protein from Ganoderma applanatum and Pycnoporus cinnabarinus and the activity of cytoplasmatic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the crude extracts were monitored to determine the efficiency of each disintegration technique used. Fungal cells proved to be particularly resistant towards some disintegration methods commonly used for yeasts and bacteria. Best results were obtained using a percussion grinder, if necessary, in combination with an Ultra-Turrax pretreatment.

  10. Fine-Filament MgB2 Superconductor Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, Sherrie

    2015-01-01

    Hyper Tech Research, Inc., has developed fine-filament magnesium diboride (MgB2) superconductor wire for motors and generators used in turboelectric aircraft propulsion systems. In Phase I of the project, Hyper Tech demonstrated that MgB2 multifilament wires (superconductor and engineering current density and AC losses. Hyper Tech also fabricated MgB2 rotor coil packs for a superconducting generator. The ultimate goal is to enable low-cost, round, lightweight, low-AC-loss superconductors for motor and generator stator coils operating at 25 K in next-generation turboelectric aircraft propulsion systems.

  11. Composite Pressure Vessel Variability in Geometry and Filament Winding Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Steven J.; Greene, Nathanael J.

    2012-01-01

    Composite pressure vessels (CPVs) are used in a variety of applications ranging from carbon dioxide canisters for paintball guns to life support and pressurant storage on the International Space Station. With widespread use, it is important to be able to evaluate the effect of variability on structural performance. Data analysis was completed on CPVs to determine the amount of variation that occurs among the same type of CPV, and a filament winding routine was developed to facilitate study of the effect of manufacturing variation on structural response.

  12. Buckling Causes Nonlinear Dynamics of Filamentous Viruses Driven through Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Angus; de Haan, Hendrick W.; Tang, Jay X.; Stein, Derek

    2018-02-01

    Measurements and Langevin dynamics simulations of filamentous viruses driven through solid-state nanopores reveal a superlinear rise in the translocation velocity with driving force. The mobility also scales with the length of the virus in a nontrivial way that depends on the force. These dynamics are consequences of the buckling of the leading portion of a virus as it emerges from the nanopore and is put under compressive stress by the viscous forces it encounters. The leading tip of a buckled virus stalls and this reduces the total viscous drag force. We present a scaling theory that connects the solid mechanics to the nonlinear dynamics of polyelectrolytes translocating nanopores.

  13. Turbulent cascade of Kelvin waves on vortex filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Barenghi, Carlo F

    2011-01-01

    By numerically integrating in time the motion of vortex filaments, we study how the nonlinear interaction of Kelvin waves along vortices generates Kelvin waves of larger and larger wavenumbers (smaller and smaller wavelength). At sufficiently large wavenumbers the angular velocity of the vortices is large enough that kinetic energy is lost by sound emission. This turbulent cascade of Kelvin waves should explain why turbulence, generated in superfluid helium at very low temperature near absolute zero, quickly decays, despite the lack of any viscous dissipation.

  14. Solar filament impact on 21 January 2005: Geospace consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Liemohn, M. W.; Cattell, C.; De Zeeuw, D.; Escoubet, C. P.; Evans, D. S.; Fang, X.; Fok, M.-C.; Frey, H. U.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Hairston, M.; Heelis, R.; Lu, G.; Manchester, W. B.; Mende, S.; Paxton, L. J.; Rastaetter, L.; Ridley, A.; Sandanger, M.; Soraas, F.; Sotirelis, T.; Thomsen, M. W.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Verkhoglyadova, O.

    2014-07-01

    On 21 January 2005, a moderate magnetic storm produced a number of anomalous features, some seen more typically during superstorms. The aim of this study is to establish the differences in the space environment from what we expect (and normally observe) for a storm of this intensity, which make it behave in some ways like a superstorm. The storm was driven by one of the fastest interplanetary coronal mass ejections in solar cycle 23, containing a piece of the dense erupting solar filament material. The momentum of the massive solar filament caused it to push its way through the flux rope as the interplanetary coronal mass ejection decelerated moving toward 1 AU creating the appearance of an eroded flux rope (see companion paper by Manchester et al. (2014)) and, in this case, limiting the intensity of the resulting geomagnetic storm. On impact, the solar filament further disrupted the partial ring current shielding in existence at the time, creating a brief superfountain in the equatorial ionosphere—an unusual occurrence for a moderate storm. Within 1 h after impact, a cold dense plasma sheet (CDPS) formed out of the filament material. As the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) rotated from obliquely to more purely northward, the magnetotail transformed from an open to a closed configuration and the CDPS evolved from warmer to cooler temperatures. Plasma sheet densities reached tens per cubic centimeter along the flanks—high enough to inflate the magnetotail in the simulation under northward IMF conditions despite the cool temperatures. Observational evidence for this stretching was provided by a corresponding expansion and intensification of both the auroral oval and ring current precipitation zones linked to magnetotail stretching by field line curvature scattering. Strong Joule heating in the cusps, a by-product of the CDPS formation process, contributed to an equatorward neutral wind surge that reached low latitudes within 1-2 h and intensified the

  15. Population study of the filamentous sulfur bacteria Thioploca spp. off the Bay of Concepcion, Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Strotmann, B.; Gallardo, VA

    2000-01-01

    A population of filamentous sulfur bacteria Thioploca spp. living in the Bay of Concepcion, Chile, and the adjoining shelf area was sampled for 14 mo at 4 to 6 wk intervals to investigate the influence of seasonal variations in upwelling intensity and oxygen concentrations on the population dynam......, filaments with short cells in sheaths, populating the upper 7 cm of the sediment, and filaments without sheaths living at the sediment surface....

  16. F-actin-like filaments formed by plasmid segregation protein ParM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Ent, Fusinita; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Amos, Linda A.

    2002-01-01

    It was the general belief that DNA partitioning in prokaryotes is independent of a cytoskeletal structure, which in eukaryotic cells is indispensable for DNA segregation. Recently, however, immunofluorescence microscopy revealed highly dynamic, filamentous structures along the longitudinal axis o...... compared with F-actin, despite the similar arrangement of the subunits within the filaments. Thus, there is now evidence for cytoskeletal structures, formed by actin-like filaments that are involved in plasmid partitioning in E.coli. Udgivelsesdato: Dec 16...

  17. Mechanical and microstructural behaviour of alumina-zirconia ceramic filaments for high temperature applications; Comportement mecanique et microstructure de filaments ceramiques alumine-zircone pour applications a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulon-Quintin, A

    2002-04-01

    This thesis is a contribution to the development and to the study of two-phase alumina-zirconia ceramic filaments resistant to creep and chemical and microstructural degradation. The materials studied are experimental two-phase filaments (diameter of few millimeters) with a fibrillary structure obtained by coextrusion of sol-gels or of powder pastes and a nanocrystalline fiber of thin diameter (11{mu}m) with a homogeneous structure. They have been respectively perfected and chosen for their very promising microstructures and compositions concerning the creep resistance. This study is concentrated on the mechanical characterization at high temperature of these materials and especially on the understanding of the deformation and rupture mechanisms in relation with the microstructural evolution. The commercial fiber (Nextel 650) is a {alpha} alumina (grain size {>=}0.1{mu}m) in which the grains of the second phase zirconia are dispersed in a homogeneous way in intra (5-10 nm) as in inter-granular (20-30 nm). After a heat treatment at temperatures superior to 1200 C, it can be noted a strong grains growth preferentially to the axis of the fiber. The tensile properties decrease to a considerable extent with high temperatures ({>=}1000 C). The creep behaviour has been determined between 1000 and 1300 C (value of 2.5 for the stress exponent and of 850 kJ/mol for the activation energy). The evolution of the microstructure to a long grains microstructure is favourable for the creep resistance. A comparison with other fibers of compositions near the Nextel 650 fiber show that the Nextel 650 fiber has interesting properties for being used at high temperatures (until 1200 C). The study of co-extruded alumina-zirconia filaments with a fibrillary structure has at first required those of filaments which composition are each of the phases obtained from pastes (powder-thermoplastics or sol-gels). The composition of each of the phases has been optimized in order to adapt the

  18. Differential proteomics and physiology of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 under filament-inducing conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crabbé Aurélie

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas putida exerts a filamentous phenotype in response to environmental stress conditions that are encountered during its natural life cycle. This study assessed whether P. putida filamentation could confer survival advantages. Filamentation of P. putida was induced through culturing at low shaking speed and was compared to culturing in high shaking speed conditions, after which whole proteomic analysis and stress exposure assays were performed. Results P. putida grown in filament-inducing conditions showed increased resistance to heat and saline stressors compared to non-filamented cultures. Proteomic analysis showed a significant metabolic change and a pronounced induction of the heat shock protein IbpA and recombinase RecA in filament-inducing conditions. Our data further indicated that the associated heat shock resistance, but not filamentation, was dependent of RecA. Conclusions This study provides insights into the altered metabolism of P. putida in filament-inducing conditions, and indicates that the formation of filaments could potentially be utilized by P. putida as a survival strategy in its hostile, recurrently changing habitat.

  19. On the possible mechanism of formation of emission rim in hydrogen filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostik, R.I.; Orlova, T.V.

    1975-01-01

    Hα filtergrams of the chromosphere show an emission rim in many hydrogen filaments. It is supposed that formation of this rim is due to photospheric radiation reflected by the filament in the direction of the chromosphere. The calculations show that: (1) the maximum contrast of the rim relative to the undisturbed chromosphere amounts to 1.4; (2) the larger the optical thickness of the filament and the closer to the solar limb it is situated, the brighter and wider is the rim; (3) the rim was not observed in filaments whose heights exceeds 10000 km above the chromosphere. These results are in close agreement with observations. (Auth.)

  20. Two Types of Long-duration Quasi-static Evolution of Solar Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, C.; Li, H. C.; Jiang, B.; Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.

    2018-04-01

    In this Letter, we investigate the long-duration quasi-static evolution of 12 pre-eruptive filaments (four active region (AR) and eight quiescent filaments), mainly focusing on the evolution of the filament height in 3D and the decay index of the background magnetic field. The filament height in 3D is derived through two-perspective observations of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO). The coronal magnetic field is reconstructed using the potential field source surface model. A new finding is that the filaments we studied show two types of long-duration evolution: one type comprises a long-duration static phase and a short, slow rise phase with a duration of less than 12 hr and a speed of 0.1–0.7 km s‑1, while the other one only presents a slow rise phase but with an extremely long duration of more than 60 hr and a smaller speed of 0.01–0.2 km s‑1. At the moment approaching the eruption, the decay index of the background magnetic field at the filament height is similar for both AR and quiescent filaments. The average value and upper limit are ∼0.9 and ∼1.4, close to the critical index of torus instability. Moreover, the filament height and background magnetic field strength are also found to be linearly and exponentially related with the filament length, respectively.

  1. Cylindrical symmetry breaking leads to multiple filamentation generation when focusing femtosecond lasers with axicons in methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Sun, Xiaodong; Zeng, Bin; Xu, Shengqi; Chu, Wei; Liu, Weiwei; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan; Mu, Guoguang

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate that multiple filaments could be generated when focusing femtosecond laser pulses into methanol solution with an axicon. These long multiple filaments are located on the central spot and ring structures of the quasi-Bessel beam created by the axicon. Further numerical simulation reproduces the key features of the experimental observation. The outcome of simulation suggests that the cylindrical symmetry breaking in the initial beam profile could be responsible for the occurrence of multiple filamentation by using an axicon as focusing optics. Since the quasi-Bessel profile is determined by the axicon properties, the axicon has been suggested as a simple optics component to control multiple filaments.

  2. Non-radially polarized THz pulse emitted from femtosecond laser filament in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Chen, Y; Marceau, C; Liu, W; Sun, Z-D; Xu, S; Théberge, F; Châteauneuf, M; Dubois, J; Chin, S L

    2008-09-29

    Femtosecond laser filament could produce THz wave in forward direction. In our experiment, THz pulse emitted from a femtosecond laser filament has been investigated. It was found that the polarization of the studied THz pulse mainly appears as elliptical. This observation supplements the previous conclusion obtained by C. D'Amico et al. that THz wave emitted by a filament is radially polarized. The mechanism of generating elliptically polarized THz wave has been interpreted by either four-wave optical rectification or second order optical rectification inside the filament zone where centro-symmetry of the air is broken by the femtosecond laser pulse.

  3. Spatial correlation of conductive filaments for multiple switching cycles in CBRAM

    KAUST Repository

    Pey, K. L.

    2014-06-01

    Conducting bridge random access memory (CBRAM) is one of the potential technologies being considered for replacement of Flash memory for non-volatile data storage. CBRAM devices operate on the principle of nucleation and rupture of metallic filaments. One key concern for commercializing this technology is the question of variability which could arise due to nucleation of multiple filaments across the device at spatially different locations. The spatial spread of the filament location may cause long tails at the low and high percentile regions for the switching parameter distribution as the new filament that nucleates may have a completely different shape and size. It is therefore essential to probe whether switching in CBRAM occurs every time at the same filament location or whether there are other new filaments that could nucleate during repeated cycling with some spatial correlation (if any) to the original filament. To investigate this issue, we make use of a metal-insulator-semiconductor (M-I-S) transistor test structure with Ni as the top electrode and HfOx/SiOx as the dielectric stack. In-situ stressing using a nano-tip on the M-I-S stack is performed and the filament is imaged in real-time using a high resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM). We also extract the location of the filament (LFIL) along the channel of the transistor after the nucleation stage using the weighted proportion of the source and drain currents. © 2014 IEEE.

  4. Failure assessment of aluminum liner based filament-wound hybrid riser subjected to internal hydrostatic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikshit, Vishwesh; Seng, Ong Lin; Maheshwari, Muneesh; Asundi, A.

    2015-03-01

    The present study describes the burst behavior of aluminum liner based prototype filament-wound hybrid riser under internal hydrostatic pressure. The main objective of present study is to developed an internal pressure test rig set-up for filament-wound hybrid riser and investigate the failure modes of filament-wound hybrid riser under internal hydrostatic burst pressure loading. The prototype filament-wound hybrid riser used for burst test consists of an internal aluminum liner and outer composite layer. The carbon-epoxy composites as part of the filament-wound hybrid risers were manufactured with [±55o] lay-up pattern with total composite layer thickness of 1.6 mm using a CNC filament-winding machine. The burst test was monitored by video camera which helps to analyze the failure mechanism of the fractured filament-wound hybrid riser. The Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor was used to monitor and record the strain changes during burst test of prototype filament-wound hybrid riser. This study shows good improvements in burst strength of filament-wound hybrid riser compared to the monolithic metallic riser. Since, strain measurement using FBG sensors has been testified as a reliable method, we aim to further understand in detail using this technique.

  5. Pigment Production by the Edible Filamentous Fungus Neurospora Intermedia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Gmoser

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The production of pigments by edible filamentous fungi is gaining attention as a result of the increased interest in natural sources with added functionality in the food, feed, cosmetic, pharmaceutical and textile industries. The filamentous fungus Neurospora intermedia, used for production of the Indonesian food “oncom”, is one potential source of pigments. The objective of the study was to evaluate the fungus’ pigment production. The joint effect from different factors (carbon and nitrogen source, ZnCl2, MgCl2 and MnCl2 on pigment production by N. intermedia is reported for the first time. The scale-up to 4.5 L bubble column bioreactors was also performed to investigate the effect of pH and aeration. Pigment production of the fungus was successfully manipulated by varying several factors. The results showed that the formation of pigments was strongly influenced by light, carbon, pH, the co-factor Zn2+ and first- to fourth-order interactions between factors. The highest pigmentation (1.19 ± 0.08 mg carotenoids/g dry weight biomass was achieved in a bubble column reactor. This study provides important insights into pigmentation of this biotechnologically important fungus and lays a foundation for future utilizations of N. intermedia for pigment production.

  6. Liposome-mediated mycelial transformation of filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Ran; Zhang, Guang; Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Mingyue; Zhao, Shuaiju; Qiu, Liyou

    2013-09-01

    Liposome-mediated transformation is common for cells with no cell wall, but has very limited usage in cells with walls, such as bacteria, fungi, and plants. In this study, we developed a procedure to introduce DNA into mycelium of filamentous fungi, Rhizopus nigricans LH 21 and Pleurotus ostreatus TD 300, by liposome-mediation but with no protoplast preparation. The DNA was transformed into R. nigricans via plasmid pEGFP-C1 and into P. ostreatus via 7.2 kb linear DNA. The mycelia were ground in 0.6 M mannitol without any grinding aids or glass powder for 15 min to make mycelial fragments suspension; the suspension was mixed with a mixture of the DNA and Lipofectamine 2000, and placed on ice for 30 min; 100 μL of the transformation solution was plated on potato dextrose agar (PDA) plate and cultivated at 28 °C for transformant screening. The plasmid and the linear DNA were confirmed to be integrated into the host chromosome, proving the success of transformation. The transformation efficiencies were similar to those of electroporation-mediated protoplast transformation (EMPT) of R. nigricans or PEG/CaCl2-mediated protoplast transformation (PMT) of P. ostreatus, respectively. The results showed that our procedure was effective, fast, and simple transformation method for filamentous fungi. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dark Matter and Synchrotron Emission from Galactic Center Radio Filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, Tim [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Hooper, Dan [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2011-11-10

    The inner degrees of the Galactic center contain a large population of filamentary structures observed at radio frequencies. These so-called non-thermal radio filaments (NRFs) trace magnetic field lines and have attracted significant interest due to their hard (S_v ~ -0.1 +/- 0.4) synchrotron emission spectra. The origin of these filaments remains poorly understood. We show that the electrons and positrons created through the annihilations of a relatively light (~5-10 GeV) dark matter particle with the cross section predicted for a simple thermal relic can provide a compelling match to the intensity, spectral shape, and flux variation of the NRFs. Furthermore, the characteristics of the dark matter particle necessary to explain the synchrotron emission from the NRFs is consistent with those required to explain the excess gamma-ray emission observed from the Galactic center by the Fermi-LAT, as well as the direct detection signals observed by CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA.

  8. Aspergilli: Models for systems biology in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus is a diverse genus of filamentous fungi including common house hold mold as well as human pathogens. More than 350 species are currently part of this genus and all their genomes are soon to be sequenced. The availability of this vast amount of data will allow for more in-depth underst......Aspergillus is a diverse genus of filamentous fungi including common house hold mold as well as human pathogens. More than 350 species are currently part of this genus and all their genomes are soon to be sequenced. The availability of this vast amount of data will allow for more in......-depth understanding of genetic traits governing desirable properties like enzyme production as well as the pathogenic potency of the organisms. In this review we give an overview of the systems biology research conducted in Aspergilli. This research has covered omics technologies like genomics, transcriptomics...... and proteomics where outstanding contributions are highlighted. From past developments it becomes apparent that CRISPR technology will speed up genetic research in the Aspergillus field. This speed up will allow for an increase in systems biology targeted research by accelerating data generation. The increase...

  9. Thin filaments at the Galactic Center: identification and proper motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzic, K [I. Physikalishes Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuepicher Str. 77, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Eckart, A [I. Physikalishes Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuepicher Str. 77, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Schoedel, R [I. Physikalishes Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuepicher Str. 77, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Meyer, L [I. Physikalishes Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuepicher Str. 77, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Zensus, A [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    L'-band (3.8 {mu}m) images of the Galactic Center show a large number of thin filaments in the mini-spiral, located close to the mini-cavity, along the inner edge of the northern arm and in the vicinity of some stars. We interpret them as shock fronts formed by the interaction of a central wind with the mini-spiral or, in some cases, extended dusty stellar envelopes. The observations have been carried out using the NACO adaptive optics system at the ESO VLT, in 5 subsequent epochs from 2002 to 2006. We present a proper motion study of the thin filaments observed in the central parsec around Sgr A*, obtained using the cross- correlation technique. Our interpretation is consistent with a collimated outfbw model from the central few arcseconds. Two possible mechanisms could produce the postulated outfbw: stellar winds originating from the high-mass-loosing He-star cluster as well as a wind from Sgr A* due to accretion from the surrounding disk of stars.

  10. Synthesis of different pectinases by filamentous growing A. niger mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuchtenberger, A; Mayer, G

    1991-01-01

    Mutants of A. niger K 69/26, prepared by multistep mutagenesis (UV, MNNG, heating) have been screened for pectinase activities. Mutants with altered levels of certain pectinases, such as endo- and exopolygalacturonase (PG vis, red), pectinesterase (PE) and pectinlyase (PL), were isolated. The enzyme activities of the best mutants M 1348/126 were increased 2-3-fold compared to the parent strain after a 6-d cultivation of filamentous mycelium on a shaker. Further mutagenesis of mutants with decreased pectinase activities (e.g. Se3) produced revertants. PG (vis) synthesis of revertant Se5 was increased 1.7 times compared to the control strain K 69/26. Independent of these increased rates, the general level of pectinase activities synthesized by the filamentous mycelium of A. niger mutants amounts to about 10-20% compared with those produced by aggregated mycelium. It appears that the enzyme synthesis related to mycelium structure is independent of the mechanism which regulates the level of pectinase synthesis within a specific morphological structure.

  11. Nano-assembly of nanodiamonds by conjugation to actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradac, Carlo; Say, Jana M; Rastogi, Ishan D; Cordina, Nicole M; Volz, Thomas; Brown, Louise J

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) are remarkable objects. They possess unique mechanical and optical properties combined with high surface areas and controllable surface reactivity. They are non-toxic and hence suited for use in biological environments. NDs are also readily available and commercially inexpensive. Here, the exceptional capability of controlling and tailoring their surface chemistry is demonstrated. Small, bright diamond nanocrystals (size ˜30 nm) are conjugated to protein filaments of actin (length ˜3-7 µm). The conjugation to actin filaments is extremely selective and highly target-specific. These unique features, together with the relative simplicity of the conjugation-targeting method, make functionalised nanodiamonds a powerful and versatile platform in biomedicine and quantum nanotechnologies. Applications ranging from using NDs as superior biological markers to, potentially, developing novel bottom-up approaches for the fabrication of hybrid quantum devices that would bridge across the bio/solid-state interface are presented and discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Is Cold Gas Removed from Galaxies in Filaments and Tendrils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone Odekon, Mary; Shah, Ebrahim; Hall, Ryan; Cane, Thomas; Maloney, Erin; Hallenbeck, Gregory; Haynes, Martha P.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; APPSS Team, Undergraduate ALFALFA Team, ALFALFA Team

    2018-01-01

    We present results from an ALFALFA HI study to examine whether the cold gas reservoirs of galaxies are inhibited or enhanced in large-scale filaments, and we discuss implications for follow-up work using the new Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster survey (APPSS). From the ALFALFA survey, we find that the HI deficiency for galaxies in the range 10^8.5-10^10.5 solar masses decreases with distance from the filament spine, suggesting that galaxies are cut off from cold gas, possibly by heating or by dynamical detachment from the smaller-scale cosmic web. This contrasts with previous results for larger galaxies in the HI Parkes All-Sky Survey. We discuss the prospects for elucidating this apparent dependence on galaxy mass with data from the APPSS, which will extend to smaller masses. We also find that the most gas-rich galaxies at fixed local density and stellar mass are those in small, correlated ``tendril” structures within voids: although galaxies in tendrils are in significantly denser environments, on average, than galaxies in voids, they are not redder or more HI deficient. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-1211005 and AST-1637339.

  13. Development of Nylon Based FDM Filament for Rapid Tooling Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R.; Singh, S.

    2014-04-01

    There has been critical need for development of cost effective nylon based wire to be used as feed stock filament for fused deposition modelling (FDM) machine. But hitherto, very less work has been reported for development of alternate solution of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) based wire which is presently used in most of FDM machines. The present research work is focused on development of nylon based wire as an alternative of ABS wire (which is to be used as feedstock filament on FDM) without changing any hardware or software of machine. For the present study aluminium oxide (Al2O3) as additive in different proportion has been used with nylon fibre. Single screw extruder was used for wire preparation and wire thus produced was tested on FDM. Mechanical properties i.e. tensile strength and percentage elongation of finally developed wire have been optimized by Taguchi L9 technique. The work represented major development in reducing cost and time in rapid tooling applications.

  14. Addition of electrophilic lipids to actin alters filament structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayarre, Javier; Sanchez, David; Sanchez-Gomez, Francisco J.; Terron, Maria C.; Llorca, Oscar; Perez-Sala, Dolores

    2006-01-01

    Pathophysiological processes associated with oxidative stress lead to the generation of reactive lipid species. Among them, lipids bearing unsaturated aldehyde or ketone moieties can form covalent adducts with cysteine residues and modulate protein function. Through proteomic techniques we have identified actin as a target for the addition of biotinylated analogs of the cyclopentenone prostaglandins 15-deoxy-Δ 12,14 -PGJ 2 (15d-PGJ 2 ) and PGA 1 in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. This modification could take place in vitro and mapped to the protein C-terminal end. Other electrophilic lipids, like the isoprostane 8-iso-PGA 1 and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, also bound to actin. The C-terminal region of actin is important for monomer-monomer interactions and polymerization. Electron microscopy showed that actin treated with 15d-PGJ 2 or 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal formed filaments which were less abundant and displayed shorter length and altered structure. Streptavidin-gold staining allowed mapping of biotinylated 15d-PGJ 2 at sites of filament disruption. These results shed light on the structural implications of actin modification by lipid electrophiles

  15. Germ tube growth of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, N A

    1997-12-01

    The clinical pathogen Candida albicans is a budding yeast that is capable of forming a range of polarized and expanded cell shapes from pseudohyphae to true nonconstricted hyphae. Filamentous forms consist of contiguous uninucleated compartments that are partitioned by septa. It has long been held that the so-called "dimorphic transition" from a budding to a filamentous form may aid the fungus to penetrate epithelia and may therefore be a virulence factor. This review summarized new information regarding the physiology and ecology of hyphal growth in C. albicans. New evidence has demonstrated that hyphae of C. albicans have a sense of touch so that they grow along grooves and through pores (thigmotropism). This may aid infiltration of epithelial surfaces during tissue invasion. Hyphae are also aerotropic and can form helices when contacting solid surfaces. Growing evidence supports the view that hyphal growth is a response to nutrient deprivation, especially low nitrogen and that filamentous growth enables the fungus to forage for nutrients more effectively. Further insights into the growth of C. albicans have come from the analysis of genes and mutations of Saccharomyces which have begun to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the mechanisms of bud site selection, cell polarity and signal transduction pathways that lead to pseudohyphal development in this and other organisms. For example, it is now clear that a MAP-kinase cascade, homologous to the mating pathway in Saccharomyces, regulates filamentous growth in both fungi. However, this must be only one of several overlapping or separate signal transduction pathways for hyphal development because filamentous growth still occurs in mutants of Candida and Saccharomyces which are blocked in this pathway. Cell cycle analyses have shown that hyphal phase cell cycle of Candida is distinct from that in budding and pseudohyphal formation and so pseudohyphal growth of Saccharomyces is not a true model of germ tube

  16. Structural Properties of Zn-ZnO Core-Shell Microspheres Grown by Hot-Filament CVD Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. López

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD growth of Zn-ZnO core-shell microspheres in the temperature range of 350–650°C only using ZnO pellets as raw material. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques. SEM micrographs showed the presence of solid microspheres and a Zn-ZnO layer in all samples. The observed heterogeneous morphology on each sample suggested two different growth mechanisms. On the one hand, solid microspheres were formed by means of gas phase nucleation of Zn atoms. The Zn-ZnO layer was formed on the substrate as result of surface reactions. It is possible that Zn microspheres condensed during the natural cooling of the HFCVD reactor as they were observed on the Zn-ZnO layer.

  17. Carbonate fabrics in the modern microbialites of Pavilion Lake: two suites of microfabrics that reflect variation in microbial community morphology, growth habit, and lithification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theisen, C Harwood; Sumner, D Y; Mackey, T J; Lim, D S S; Brady, A L; Slater, G F

    2015-07-01

    Modern microbialites in Pavilion Lake, BC, provide an analog for ancient non-stromatolitic microbialites that formed from in situ mineralization. Because Pavilion microbialites are mineralizing under the influence of microbial communities, they provide insights into how biological processes influence microbialite microfabrics and mesostructures. Hemispherical nodules and micrite-microbial crusts are two mesostructures within Pavilion microbialites that are directly associated with photosynthetic communities. Both filamentous cyanobacteria in hemispherical nodules and branching filamentous green algae in micrite-microbial crusts were associated with calcite precipitation at microbialite surfaces and with characteristic microfabrics in the lithified microbialite. Hemispherical nodules formed at microbialite surfaces when calcite precipitated around filamentous cyanobacteria with a radial growth habit. The radial filament pattern was preserved within the microbialite to varying degrees. Some subsurface nodules contained well-defined filaments, whereas others contained only dispersed organic inclusions. Variation in filament preservation is interpreted to reflect differences in timing and amount of carbonate precipitation relative to heterotrophic decay, with more defined filaments reflecting greater lithification prior to degradation than more diffuse filaments. Micrite-microbial crusts produce the second suite of microfabrics and form in association with filamentous green algae oriented perpendicular to the microbialite surface. Some crusts include calcified filaments, whereas others contained voids that reflect the filamentous community in shape, size, and distribution. Pavilion microbialites demonstrate that microfabric variation can reflect differences in lithification processes and microbial metabolisms as well as microbial community morphology and organization. Even when the morphology of individual filaments or cells is not well preserved, the microbial growth

  18. MR imaging of hydrogel filament embolic devices loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide or gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killer, Monika; Schmitt, Anne [Paracelsus Medical University, Neuroscience Institute, Christian Doppler Clinic, Salzburg (Austria); Keeley, Edward M.; Cruise, Gregory M. [MicroVention Terumo, Tustin, CA (United States); McCoy, Mark R. [Paracelsus Medical University, Departments of Radiology and MRI, Christian Doppler Clinic, Salzburg (Austria)

    2011-06-15

    We evaluated hydrogel filaments loaded with barium sulphate and either gadolinium or superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) in an effort to develop an embolic material that is visible with fluoroscopic and magnetic resonance imaging. Hydrogel filaments were prepared with gadolinium and iron concentrations ranging from 1,500 to 7,500 and 500 to 2,500 ppm, respectively. The filaments were encased in agar and imaged using an MR scanner. Embolisation of eight aneurysms (seven bifurcation, one sidewall) in seven rabbits was performed using hydrogel filaments loaded with gadolinium (n = 4) or SPIO (n = 4). Angiographic evaluations occurred immediately post-treatment and at 13 weeks. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) evaluations occurred immediately post-treatment or 13 weeks post-treatment. Based on the in vitro results, we selected 4,500 and 2,000 ppm for gadolinium and iron loadings, respectively, for the in vivo experiments. Loading the filaments with gadolinium or SPIO did not affect the angiographic results, as embolic masses were readily evident with some distinguishing of individual filaments. In MRA, the hydrogel filaments loaded with SPIO were hypointense, and the hydrogel filaments loaded with Gd were hyperintense. The hyperintensity of the Gd-loaded filaments confounded the ability to distinguish between flow and the embolic devices. The hypointensity of the hydrogel filaments loaded with SPIO provided sufficient contrast between the embolic devices and the blood flow to allow of aneurysm occlusion evaluation using MRA. Based on these results, we are focusing on loading hydrogel filaments with SPIO in an effort to provide adequate visualisation for use in MR-guided interventions. (orig.)

  19. Laser filamentation in air via Mathieu modulation: ranging from trajectory-predesigned curved filament to quasi-soliton and ring light bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuze; Nie, Jinsong

    2017-06-26

    We propose theoretically various kinds of filaments via the Mathieu modulation. Our results indicate curved filaments, in-phase and out-of-phase quasi-solitons and nonlinear light bullets can be formed successfully in air. Through calculated initial Mathieu accelerating beam (MAB), curved filament is able to propagate along a predesigned elliptical trajectory. By transforming the MAB into an axial symmetrical structure with in-phase and out-of-phase modulations, we obtain two kinds of quasi-solitons in air, respectively. The latter case can even propagate in a breathing fashion. With a ring structure of MAB, we successfully form a light bullet in air that generates a chain of intensity peaks over extended distances. These unique filaments can offer significant advantages for numerous applications, such as micro engineering of materials, THz radiation generation and attosecond physics.

  20. Dynamics of RecA filaments on single-stranded DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loenhout, M.T.J.; Van der Heijden, T.; Kanaar, R.; Wyman, C.; Dekker, C.

    2009-01-01

    RecA, the key protein in homologous recombination, performs its actions as a helical filament on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). ATP hydrolysis makes the RecA–ssDNA filament dynamic and is essential for successful recombination. RecA has been studied extensively by single-molecule techniques on

  1. Mechanosensitive kinetic preference of actin-binding protein to actin filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Taiji

    2016-04-01

    The kinetic preference of actin-binding proteins to actin filaments is altered by external forces on the filament. Such an altered kinetic preference is largely responsible for remodeling the actin cytoskeletal structure in response to intracellular forces. During remodeling, actin-binding proteins and actin filaments interact under isothermal conditions, because the cells are homeostatic. In such a temperature homeostatic state, we can rigorously and thermodynamically link the chemical potential of actin-binding proteins to stresses on the actin filaments. From this relationship, we can construct a physical model that explains the force-dependent kinetic preference of actin-binding proteins to actin filaments. To confirm the model, we have analyzed the mechanosensitive alternation of the kinetic preference of Arp2/3 and cofilin to actin filaments. We show that this model captures the qualitative responses of these actin-binding proteins to the forces, as observed experimentally. Moreover, our theoretical results demonstrate that, depending on the structural parameters of the binding region, actin-binding proteins can show different kinetic responses even to the same mechanical signal tension, in which the double-helix nature of the actin filament also plays a critical role in a stretch-twist coupling of the filament.

  2. Pre-eruption Oscillations in Thin and Long Features in a Quiescent Filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anand D.; Hanaoka, Yoichiro; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Morita, Satoshi; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the eruption of a quiescent filament located close to an active region. Large-scale activation was observed in only half of the filament in the form of pre-eruption oscillations. Consequently only this half erupted nearly 30 hr after the oscillations commenced. Time-slice diagrams of 171 Å images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly were used to study the oscillations. These were observed in several thin and long features connecting the filament spine to the chromosphere below. This study traces the origin of such features and proposes their possible interpretation. Small-scale magnetic flux cancellation accompanied by a brightening was observed at the footpoint of the features shortly before their appearance, in images recorded by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. A slow rise of the filament was detected in addition to the oscillations, indicating a gradual loss of equilibrium. Our analysis indicates that a change in magnetic field connectivity between two neighbouring active regions and the quiescent filament resulted in a weakening of the overlying arcade of the filament, leading to its eruption. It is also suggested that the oscillating features are filament barbs, and the oscillations are a manifestation during the pre-eruption phase of the filaments.

  3. Septin9 is involved in septin filament formation and cellular stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Füchtbauer, Annette C.; Lassen, Louise Berkhoudt; Jensen, Astrid Bøgh

    2011-01-01

    knockout cells showed a reduced resistance to hypo-osmotic stress. Stress fiber and vinculin staining at focal adhesion points was less prominent. Long septin filaments stained for Sept7 disappeared. Instead, staining was found in short, often curved filaments and rings. Furthermore, Sept7 was no longer...

  4. PRE-ERUPTION OSCILLATIONS IN THIN AND LONG FEATURES IN A QUIESCENT FILAMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Anand D.; Hanaoka, Yoichiro; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Morita, Satoshi; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the eruption of a quiescent filament located close to an active region. Large-scale activation was observed in only half of the filament in the form of pre-eruption oscillations. Consequently only this half erupted nearly 30 hr after the oscillations commenced. Time-slice diagrams of 171 Å images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly were used to study the oscillations. These were observed in several thin and long features connecting the filament spine to the chromosphere below. This study traces the origin of such features and proposes their possible interpretation. Small-scale magnetic flux cancellation accompanied by a brightening was observed at the footpoint of the features shortly before their appearance, in images recorded by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. A slow rise of the filament was detected in addition to the oscillations, indicating a gradual loss of equilibrium. Our analysis indicates that a change in magnetic field connectivity between two neighbouring active regions and the quiescent filament resulted in a weakening of the overlying arcade of the filament, leading to its eruption. It is also suggested that the oscillating features are filament barbs, and the oscillations are a manifestation during the pre-eruption phase of the filaments.

  5. PRE-ERUPTION OSCILLATIONS IN THIN AND LONG FEATURES IN A QUIESCENT FILAMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Anand D.; Hanaoka, Yoichiro; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Morita, Satoshi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Cho, Kyung-Suk, E-mail: anand.joshi@nao.ac.jp [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-20

    We investigate the eruption of a quiescent filament located close to an active region. Large-scale activation was observed in only half of the filament in the form of pre-eruption oscillations. Consequently only this half erupted nearly 30 hr after the oscillations commenced. Time-slice diagrams of 171 Å images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly were used to study the oscillations. These were observed in several thin and long features connecting the filament spine to the chromosphere below. This study traces the origin of such features and proposes their possible interpretation. Small-scale magnetic flux cancellation accompanied by a brightening was observed at the footpoint of the features shortly before their appearance, in images recorded by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. A slow rise of the filament was detected in addition to the oscillations, indicating a gradual loss of equilibrium. Our analysis indicates that a change in magnetic field connectivity between two neighbouring active regions and the quiescent filament resulted in a weakening of the overlying arcade of the filament, leading to its eruption. It is also suggested that the oscillating features are filament barbs, and the oscillations are a manifestation during the pre-eruption phase of the filaments.

  6. Three-halves harmonic emission from a laser filament in a plasma channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, G.; Talukdar, I.; Tripathi, V.; Tripathi, V.K. (Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi (India). Dept. of Physics)

    1989-12-01

    A self-trapped laser filament is susceptible to decay-producing radially localized Langmuir waves. A nonlinear interaction of the pump wave with the density oscillation at the Langmuir frequency gives rise to three-halves harmonic emissions. Using a basis-function expansion technique, the emitted power in the backward direction is obtained. It decreases with the increasing size of the filament.

  7. Rotational effects of polymeric fluids on shape of filaments in melt extruded net structures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rawal, A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available -circular geometries on their peripheries and the filaments are produced when the slots in disk and annulus are offset from each other. The effect of die rotation on the shape of filament is investigated by analysing the polymer flow inside the complex die slots...

  8. A hot X-ray filament associated with A3017 galaxy cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, V.; Durret, F.; Padmanabh, P.; Pandge, M. B.

    2017-09-01

    Recent simulations and observations have shown large-scale filaments in the cosmic web connecting nodes, with accreting materials (baryonic and dark matter) flowing through them. Current high-sensitivity observations also show that the propagation of shocks through filaments can heat them up and make filaments visible between two or more galaxy clusters or around massive clusters, based on optical and/or X-ray observations. We are reporting here the special case of the cluster A3017 associated with a hot filament. The temperature of the filament is 3.4^{-0.77}_{+1.30} keV and its length is ∼1 Mpc. We have analysed its archival Chandra data and report various properties. We also analysed GMRT 235/610 MHz radio data. Radio observations have revealed symmetric two-sided lobes that fill cavities in the A3017 cluster core region, associated with central active galactic nucleus. In the radio map, we also noticed a peculiar linear vertical radio structure in the X-ray filament region which might be associated with a cosmic filament shock. This radio structure could be a radio phoenix or old plasma where an old relativistic population is re-accelerated by shock propagation. Finally, we put an upper limit on the radio luminosity of the filament region.

  9. Titin Isoform Size is Not Correlated with Thin Filament Length in Rat Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Lewis Greaser

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms controlling thin filament length in muscle remain controversial. It was recently reported that thin filament length was related to titin size, and that the latter might be involved in thin filament length determination. Titin plays several crucial roles in the sarcomere, but its function as it pertains to the thin filament has not been explored. We tested this relationship using several muscles from wild type rats and from a mutant rat model which results in increased titin size. Myofibrils were isolated from skeletal muscles (extensor digitorum longus, external oblique, gastrocnemius, longissimus dorsi, psoas major, and tibialis anterior using both adult wild type (WT and homozygous mutant (HM rats. Phalloidin and antibodies against tropomodulin-4 and nebulin’s N-terminus were used to determine thin filament length. The WT rats studied express skeletal muscle titin sizes ranging from 3.2 to 3.7 MDa, while the HM rats express a giant titin isoform sized at 3.7 MDa. No differences in phalloidin-based thin filament length, nebulin N terminus distances from the Z line, or tropomodulin distances from the Z line were observed across genotypes. The data indicates that, although titin performs many sarcomeric functions, its correlation with thin filament length and structure could not be demonstrated in the rat. Current models of thin filament assembly are inadequate to explain the phalloidin, nebulin N terminus, and tropomodulin staining patterns in the myofibril.

  10. Continuous, flexible, and high-strength superconducting Nb3Ge and Nb3Sn filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.; Heffernan, W.J.

    1976-01-01

    Fabrication of continuous, flexible, and high-strength (1600 MN/m 2 ) composite filaments of Nb 3 Ge (T/subc/ 18 0 K) and Nb 3 Sn is reported, involving chemical vapor deposition of these compounds on Nb-coated high-strength W--1% ThO 2 filaments

  11. Activity Cycle of Solar Filaments KJ Li , QX Li , PX Gao , J. Mu , HD ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    95% confidence spectrum during the whole consideration time, but over the mean red-noise spectrum of α = 0.72 before approximate Carrington rotation number 1500, and after that the filament activity does not statisti- cally show the period. Wavelet reconstruction indicates that the early data of the filament archive (in and ...

  12. [The structure of thick filaments on longitudinal sections of rabbit psoas muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlubnaia, Z A; Latsabidze, I L; Lednev, V V

    1989-01-01

    By means of electron microscopy the longitudinal sections of chemically skinned fibres of rigorised rabbit psoas muscle have been examined at pH of rigorising solutions equal to 6, 7, 8 (I = 0.125) and ionic strengths equal to 0.04, 0.125, 0.34 (pH 7.0). It has been revealed that at pH 6.0 the bands of minor proteins localization in A-disks were seen very distinctly, while at pH 7.0 and I = 0.125 these bands can be revealed only by means of antibody labelling technique. At the ionic strength of 0.34 (pH 7.0) the periodicity of 14.3 nm in thick filaments was clearly observed, which was determined by packing of the myosin rods into the filament shaft and of the myosin heads (cross-bridges) on the filament surface. The number of cross-bridge rows in the filament equals 102. A new scheme of myosin cross-bridge distribution in thick filaments of rabbit psoas muscle has been suggested according to which two rows of cross-bridges at each end of a thick filament are absent. The filament length equals 1.64 +/- 0.01 micron. It has been shown that the length of thick filament as well as the structural organization of their end regions in rabbit psoas muscle and frog sartorius one are different.

  13. Actin filaments as the fast pathways for calcium ions involved in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We investigated the polyelectrolyte properties of actin filaments which are in interaction with myosin motors, basic participants in mechano-electrical transduction in the stereocilia of the inner ear. Here, we elaborated a model in which actin filaments play the role of guides or pathways for localized flow of calcium ions.

  14. Micro- and Mesozooplankton Distribution Related to an Upwelling Filament in the Northern Benguela Current Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelmann, R.; Bohata, K.

    2016-02-01

    Upwelling filaments are formations of cold upwelled water which develop near the coast and extend up to hundreds of kilometers offshore. They are important for the dynamics of upwelling systems as they transport nutrients and plankton to the open ocean. On regional scales, the transport of water masses by upwelling filaments occasionally can be higher and more important than the Ekman transport. Such filaments are able to transport a large fraction of coastal primary production even during low upwelling intensity. However, the dimension and nature of transported organic matter depends largely on the size structure of the involved plankton community. In the course of the GENUS project (Geochemistry and Ecology of the Namibian Upwelling System), we investigated the micro- and mesozooplankton community associated with upwelling filaments. Small-scale differences in the distribution of micro- and mesozooplankton species were detected and related to different water masses. Depending on the developmental stage of the filament, zooplankton abundance can be higher or lower than in the surrounding offshore waters. Along the filament, the microzooplankton composition changed from ciliates-dominated in the in the centre of the filament to dinoflagellate-dominated further offshore. Several mechanisms like the exhaustion of available nutrients and the subsequent die off and sinking of the community or increased predation pressure within the filament are discussed to enlighten the fate of the transported organic material.

  15. Multi-code analysis of scrape-off layer filament dynamics in MAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Militello, F.; Walkden, N. R.; Farley, T.

    2016-01-01

    Four numerical codes are employed to investigate the dynamics of scrape-off layer filaments in tokamak relevant conditions. Experimental measurements were taken in the MAST device using visual camera imaging, which allows the evaluation of the perpendicular size and velocity of the filaments...

  16. Structural and functional properties of chimeric EspA-FliCi filaments of EPEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepin, Valerie F; Martinez, Eric; Shaw, Robert K; Frankel, Gad; Daniell, Sarah J

    2008-04-18

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli utilise a filamentous type III secretion system to translocate effector proteins into host gut epithelial cells. The primary constituent of the extracellular component of the filamentous type III secretion system is EspA. This forms a long flexible helical conduit between the bacterium and host and has a structure almost identical to that of the flagella filament. We have inserted the D3 domain of FliCi (from Salmonella typhimurium) into the outer domain of EspA and have studied the structure and function of modified filaments when expressed in an enteropathogenic E. coli espA mutant. We found that the chimeric protein EspA-FliCi filaments were biologically active as they supported protein secretion and translocation [assessed by their ability to trigger actin polymerisation beneath adherent bacteria (fluorescent actin staining test)]. The expressed filaments were recognised by both EspA and FliCi antisera. Visualisation and analysis of the chimeric filaments by electron microscopy after negative staining showed that, remarkably, EspA filaments are able to tolerate a large protein insertion without a significant effect on their helical architecture.

  17. Food Preference of Fresh-Water Invertebrates - Comparing Fresh and Decomposed Angiosperm and a Filamentous Alga

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornijow, R.; Gulati, R.D.; Ozimek, T.

    1995-01-01

    1. Fresh and decomposed Mougeotia sp. (a filamentous green alga) and Elodea nuttallii (a vascular plant) were offered as food to three species of aquatic macroinvertebrates (Lymnnea peregra, Asellus meridianus and Endochironomus albipennis) to test: (i) if filamentous algae are preferred to aquatic

  18. A study of a coronal hole associated with a large filament eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Heidy; Taliashvili, Lela; Lazarian, Alexandre; Mouradian, Zadig

    2017-11-01

    We report the results of a detailed study of an equatorial coronal hole and a dimming region related to the eruptions of a nearby large filament and subsequent coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The dynamic eruptions of the filament and the associated CMEs are probably related to the magnetic reconnection involving the magnetic field lines at the filament footpoints. During the starting processes of the filament eruption, we observed several newly emerged small magnetic flux concentrations close to the filament footpoints. Disturbance increase in the prominence body was observed during the pre-eruption processes. After the filament eruption, we observed evacuated filament material from the filament channel towards the coronal hole. Thus, all the region is perturbed and EUV loops and bright points are observed before and after the eruptions. Additionally, after the CME, we observed the disappearance of the dimming region and the coronal hole, followed by photospheric magnetic diffusion. We discussed a possible magnetic reconnection scenario and MHD waves involved during these processes.

  19. Caveolae in fibroblast-like synoviocytes: static structures associated with vimentin-based intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper; Tamas, Raluca; Riemann, Anne

    2008-01-01

    . Vimentin was identified as the most abundant protein in detergent resistant membranes (DRM's), and by immunogold electron microscopy caveolae were seen in intimate contact with intermediate-size filaments. These observations indicate that vimentin-based filaments are responsible for the spatio...

  20. Structures of actin-like ParM filaments show architecture of plasmid-segregating spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Murshudov, Garib N; Sachse, Carsten; Löwe, Jan

    2015-07-02

    Active segregation of Escherichia coli low-copy-number plasmid R1 involves formation of a bipolar spindle made of left-handed double-helical actin-like ParM filaments. ParR links the filaments with centromeric parC plasmid DNA, while facilitating the addition of subunits to ParM filaments. Growing ParMRC spindles push sister plasmids to the cell poles. Here, using modern electron cryomicroscopy methods, we investigate the structures and arrangements of ParM filaments in vitro and in cells, revealing at near-atomic resolution how subunits and filaments come together to produce the simplest known mitotic machinery. To understand the mechanism of dynamic instability, we determine structures of ParM filaments in different nucleotide states. The structure of filaments bound to the ATP analogue AMPPNP is determined at 4.3 Å resolution and refined. The ParM filament structure shows strong longitudinal interfaces and weaker lateral interactions. Also using electron cryomicroscopy, we reconstruct ParM doublets forming antiparallel spindles. Finally, with whole-cell electron cryotomography, we show that doublets are abundant in bacterial cells containing low-copy-number plasmids with the ParMRC locus, leading to an asynchronous model of R1 plasmid segregation.