WorldWideScience

Sample records for stakeholder satisfaction expectations

  1. Stakeholder expectation and satisfaction in road maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hietbrink, M.; Hartmann, Andreas; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the process of stakeholder satisfaction is a prerequisite for successful stakeholder management. The expectancy disconfirmation model describes the process of stakeholder satisfaction by relating customers’ satisfaction with a product or service to discrepancy between the perceived

  2. Portuguese Public University Student Satisfaction: A Stakeholder Theory-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardes, Emerson; Alves, Helena; Raposo, Mario

    2013-01-01

    In accordance with the importance of the student stakeholder to universities, the objective of this research project was to evaluate student satisfaction at Portuguese public universities as regards their self-expressed core expectations. The research was based both on stakeholder theory itself and on previous studies of university stakeholders.…

  3. Citizen Expectations and Satisfaction Over Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortskov, Morten

    2018-01-01

    Expectations are thought to affect how citizens form their attitudes and behavior toward public services. Such attitudes may include citizen satisfaction, where expectations play a fundamental role, and relevant behaviors include choice of services and the decision to voice opinions about them....... However, there are few investigations into what drives citizen expectations and even fewer that consider these relationships across time. This article tests whether prior expectations, perceived performance, and citizen satisfaction influence future expectations, using a unique dataset that follows...... individual citizens across two subsequent school satisfaction surveys from 2011 and 2013. The results show that prior expectations have a large and consistent influence on future expectations, as predicted by the literature, whereas the influence from prior perceived performance seems less consistent. Prior...

  4. Retirement expectations and satisfaction with retirement provisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bresser, Jochem; van Soest, Arthur

    This paper investigates the relationship between subjective expectations regarding the replacement rate of income at retirement and several measures of pension satisfaction. We use panel data on Dutch employees, analyzed with fixed effects models, allowing for correlation between unobserved

  5. Stakeholder Expectations of Service Quality in a University Web Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Mary; Evermann, Joerg; Hope, Beverley; Barnes, Stuart

    Online service quality is a much-studied concept. There is considerable evidence that user expectations and perceptions of self-service and online service quality differ in different business domains. In addition, the nature of online services is continually changing and universities have been at the forefront of this change, with university websites increasingly acting as a portal for a wide range of online transactions for a wide range of stakeholders. In this qualitative study, we conduct focus groups with a range of stakeholders in a university web portal. Our study offers a number of insights into the changing nature of the relationship between organisations and customers. New technologies are influencing customer expectations. Customers increasingly expect organisations to have integrated information systems, and to utilise new technologies such as SMS and web portals. Organisations can be slow to adopt a customer-centric viewpoint, and persist in providing interfaces that are inconsistent or require inside knowledge of organisational structures and processes. This has a negative effect on customer perceptions.

  6. Soldier's Expectancies, Implications for Recruitment and Job Satisfaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gelooven, Renier

    1999-01-01

    .... Also expectancies about a job influence attrition and job satisfaction. This paper uses results of several studies to describe the image of the soldiers job and its effects on recruitment, early attrition and job satisfaction.

  7. Expectations, Performance, and Citizen Satisfaction with Urban Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ryzin, Gregg G.

    2004-01-01

    The expectancy disconfirmation model has dominated private-sector research on customer satisfaction for several decades, yet it has not been applied to citizen satisfaction with urban services. The model views satisfaction judgments as determined--not just by product or service performance--but by a process in which consumers compare performance…

  8. Impact of social responsibility programmes in stakeholder satisfaction: an empirical study of Portuguese managers' perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, L.; Ramos, A.; Rosa, A.; Sampaio, P.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between social responsibility programmes of organizations and stakeholder satisfaction. Based on stakeholder theory, an online survey was administered to managers of Portuguese organizations with certified management systems. The findings suggest that stakeholder satisfaction is indeed increased with a social responsibility programme, as suggested by Freeman’s stakeholder theory. The components of social responsibility programmes that we discussed in t...

  9. Performance satisfaction, shareholder and stakeholder orientations: Managers´ perceptions in three countries across continents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Angelopoulos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Managers working in South Africa, Peru and the United States were classified as stakeholder- and/or shareholder-oriented along the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility (PRESOR scale. The relationship between stakeholder/shareholder orientation and perceptions of organisational performance was further explored. In South Africa and overall, respondents with both high stakeholder and low shareholder orientations reported the greatest performance satisfaction. In Peru, managers with a high stakeholder orientation reported the greatest satisfaction with organisational performance. A significant link between stakeholder or shareholder orientation and performance satisfaction was not found in the United States, however. Directions for future research are outlined.

  10. Gender difference on patients' satisfaction and expectation towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Recognizing patient satisfaction and expectation is considered as important components of assessing quality of care. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the gender difference on the patient satisfaction with psychiatrists and explore their expectation from physicians to mental health care needs. Design: ...

  11. A Qualitative Assessment and Analysis of Stakeholder Expectations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bullard, Steven

    2003-01-01

    A Department of Defense acquisition program is influenced by a large number of external stakeholders, including operational users, oversight authorities, contractors and suppliers, and interfacing program managers...

  12. Stakeholder Engagement in Sustainability Reporting in Higher Education: An Analysis of Key Internal Stakeholders' Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero-Ferrero, Idoya; Fernández-Izquierdo, María Ángeles; Muñoz-Torres, María Jesús; Bellés-Colomer, Lucía

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to improve the understanding of stakeholder engagement in the context of sustainability reporting (SR) for higher education institutions (HEIs), together with the materiality principle and stakeholder expectations. Design/methodology/approach: This research uses an exploratory approach based on content…

  13. Aligning Career Expectations with the Practice of Medicine: Physician Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Denise D.; Borges, Nicole J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined physicians' level of satisfaction with their job and the match between expectations and actual practice of specialty. Quantitative results suggested that physicians (N = 211) had a moderately high level of overall job satisfaction with no significant differences found between men and women physicians. Among those in primary…

  14. Rising stakeholder expectations and the changing role of public relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossberndt, D. [BP Canada Energy Company, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    The role of public relations is changing along with growing public awareness of stakeholder's ability to intervene in the development of energy projects. Public relations and community consultation departments must work closely together to ensure that consistent messages are being delivered to the public. This presentation explained how to develop a successful public relations strategy ranging from environmental risk assessment to community consultation. It also discussed the degree to which effective and ongoing communication with stakeholders prevents opposition and negative media coverage.

  15. Expectations and satisfaction of denture patients in a university clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E L; Albino, J E; Tedesco, L A; Portenoy, B S; Ortman, L F

    1986-01-01

    These results indicate that patients' expectations of dentures before treatment were unrealistically high and that informational videotapes did not significantly affect these expectations. Satisfaction with current dentures was surprisingly high before treatment and increased significantly from pretreatment to postreatment for both groups in the study. While it is likely that this increase in satisfaction reflects a change from poor to excellent denture status, this finding may also be attributed to cognitive dissonance theory; that is, high satisfaction may represent the means by which patients justify the expenses of their denture treatment. Although the videotape presentations did not alter the expectations of patients and their satisfaction with dentures, the tapes represent a potential source of accurate, standardized information for both patient and student dentist.

  16. Corporate Response to Climate Change: What do Stakeholders Expect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S.V. Prasad

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines different perceptions on climate change management and disclosuresfrom the viewpoint of stakeholders in Indian Corporations. The paper shows how climatechange strategies and disclosures at different organizational levels can be linked to thesocietal and competitive contexts that companies face, embedded in a stakeholder view.Companies are divided according to certain attributes - location, geographical spread,industry, degree of vertical integration and diversification, companies prioritizing particularstakeholder groups, and their climate change strategies and disclosures including internalmeasures, supply-chain measures and/or market-based measures that move beyond the supplychain are analyzed.This paper attempts to illustrate how institutional, resource-based, supply chain andstakeholder views are all important to characterize and understand corporate strategicresponses to a sustainability issue.

  17. Stakeholder versus Shareholder Satisfaction in Corporate Risk Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Tom

    2006-01-01

    Inherent in corporate governance is the conflict between satisfying stakeholders in general versus satisfying shareholders in particular. This empirical study of Danish non-financial companies finds that companies which state that their aim is to satisfy stakeholders in general ("stakeholder...

  18. The expected impacts of mining : Stakeholder perceptions of a proposed mineral sands mine in rural Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plank, van der S.; Walsh, B.; Behrens, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    The form and evolution of stakeholder perceptions toward renewable energy (RE) developments continue to be investigated, but there has been little similar research regarding mines. Responses of community members and other stakeholders cannot be expected to evolve the same way between different

  19. Medical students' experience in practical skills is far from stakeholders' expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Charlotte; Schroeder, Torben V.; Henriksen, Jørgen

    2001-01-01

    This study compares medical graduates' experience in practical skills with a range of stakeholders' expectations. A questionnaire listing 58 practical skills was sent out to a group of graduating medical students. The medical students were asked to indicate their experience in each skill during...... medical school. A similar questionnaire was sent out to five groups of stakeholders asking for their expectations regarding graduates' experience. The stakeholders were: faculty members; consultants at clinical departments with interns in training; general practitioners; nurses; recently graduated junior...... doctors. A total of 472 questionnaires were sent out and 315 (67%) were returned. Medical graduates showed substantial variation in level of experience, and their experience was substantially lower than the expectations of the stakeholders. Nurses and junior doctors tended to have higher expectations...

  20. A Comparison of Tourist Expectations and Satisfaction: A Case Study from Antalya Region of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akın Aksu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available For several years the number of tourists visiting Antalya Region has been increasing. It could be argued that Antalya is comparable with a capital city in terms of tourist numbers. Antalya Region hosted over 9 million tourists in 2008. To sustain demand and increase competition of operators in Antalya, it is necessary to create a powerful brand image. This will require a combination effort from all tourism stakeholders. Consequently, it is important to define the current tourist profile visiting Antalya Region, evaluate tourists’ expectations and satisfaction, and identify future tourism related research. These outcomes are all important in developing regional tourism. The aim of this study is comparison of expectation-levels and satisfaction-levels of a selected sample of tourists. The findings culminate from research conducted in Antalya Region from a sample of 10.393 tourists during 2008.

  1. Stakeholder Versus Shareholder Satisfaction in Corporate Risk Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Tom

    Inherent in corporate governance is the conflict between satisfying stakeholders in general and satisfying shareholders in particular. This empirical study of Danish non-financial companies enhances the understanding of the interaction between corporate risk management and corporate governance...

  2. The Nature of Stakeholder Satisfaction with Marketing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Steven A.; Judson, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The current article represents a cautionary tale in continuing emerging marketization practices as the dominant form of marketing with higher education. Specifically, a review of three important emerging literature streams (i.e., quality-of-life, service-dominant logic, and stakeholder orientation) all appear to support calls for moving beyond…

  3. Impact of Social Responsibility Programmes in Stakeholder Satisfaction: An Empirical Study of Portuguese Managers’ Perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Luis; Ramos, Amílcar; Rosa, Álvaro; Braga, Ana Cristina; Sampaio, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Investigação no âmbito do Projeto de Doutoramento(PhD), especialidade de Gestão Global, Estratégia e Desenvolvimento Empresarial (ISCTE-IUL - 2012, classificação de “Aprovado com Muito Bom”). This study investigates the relationship between social responsibility programmes of organizations and stakeholder satisfaction. Based on stakeholder theory, an online survey was administered to managers of Portuguese organizations with certified management systems. The findings suggest that sta...

  4. Ownership and Risk Management: Shareholder versus Stakeholder Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Aabo, Tom

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between ownership structure and performance has received considerable attention in the literature. This paper focuses on the relationship between ownership structure and risk management. Specifically, the paper addresses the relationship between (1) the identity and influence of the largest shareholder and (2) whether risk management decisions are made in order to satisfy shareholders in particular or stakeholders in general. Covering a sample of Danish, non-financial compani...

  5. Eumorphic Plastic Surgery: Expectation Versus Satisfaction in Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Paolo Giovanni; Micai, Alessandro; Boriani, Filippo

    2016-08-01

    Eumorphic Plastic Surgery aims at improving the severe psychosocial pain caused by a deformity. Dysmorphopathology is an increasingly relevant problem facing the plastic surgeon. The aim of this study is to describe the perioperative questionnaires created by the senior author and to present a cohort of plastic surgery patients suffering from dysmorphopathies. These patients were prospectively followed and evaluated with the proposed questionnaires through their surgical pathway to explore the degree of satisfaction or disappointment compared to expectations. All candidates for plastic surgery procedures between April 2011 and June 2013 were included in the study. Preoperatively, all patients completed the Patient Expectation Questionnaire (E-pgm). Twelve months postoperatively, they completed the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (S-pgm). The E-pgm and S-pgm were compared to evaluate the consistency between the patient's preoperative expectations and postoperative evaluations. A total of 158 patients were included in the study. Out of them, 79 % experienced an improvement or no variation between preoperative expectations and postoperative satisfaction. With regard to the motivation for undergoing surgery, 91 % showed that the surgical procedure met the motivation. An overall positive perioperative change in life was experienced by 93 % of patients. The E-pgm questionnaire proved to be a valid and reliable tool for the selection of suitable candidates for surgery and for identification of dysmorphophobic patients. Enhancing the doctor-patient relationship and communication can reduce ambiguity and avoid troublesome misunderstandings, litigation and other legal implications. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  6. Information diffused by the operator on the nuclear risk: which answer to stakeholders expectations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plot-Vicard, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the practices of environmental information diffusion, and aims at identifying the possible discrepancies between information diffused by a company and the expectations of stakeholders, more particularly in the case of the nuclear risk. The first part presents the theoretical framework (notably the legitimacy theory) and determines the expectations of stakeholders as far as information on the nuclear risk is concerned. The second part describes and discusses information on nuclear risk diffused by operators in their annual reports, proposes an assessment of this information, and relates this assessment with the previous theoretical framework

  7. Personal-organisational value conflicts and job satisfaction of internal construction stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Panahi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the issue of value conflicts in construction organizations. This research was conducted in the Malaysian construction industry to fill the gap in the knowledge in areas of organizational behaviour in the construction industry in terms of the possible effects of conflicts on the job satisfaction of internal construction stakeholders. The conflicts considered are those rooted in differences between personal and organizational values. This research targeted professional project consultants identified as architects, engineers, and quantity surveyors as the internal construction stakeholders in Malaysia. The personal-organizational values and the level of job satisfaction of the stakeholders were assessed using a questionnaire survey. To achieve the research objective, comparative and hierarchical regression analyses were performed. The results generated by the analyses indicated a high level of value conflicts in the construction organizations which significantly and negatively affected job satisfaction of the internal stakeholders. Therefore this research, through investigating the potential effect of value conflicts on the stakeholders’ job satisfaction, reveals the importance of the interaction between personal and organizational values in construction organizations which contributes to the extant literature of organizational behaviour in construction.

  8. Ownership and Risk Management: Shareholder versus Stakeholder Satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Tom

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between ownership structure and performance has received considerable attention in the literature. This paper focuses on the relationship between ownership structure and risk management. Specifically, the paper addresses the relationship between (1) the identity and influence...... of the largest shareholder and (2) whether risk management decisions are made in order to satisfy shareholders in particular or stakeholders in general. Covering a sample of Danish, non-financial companies a statistically significant, negative relationship is found between personal ownership and the likelihood...... that the aim of risk management is to satisfy shareholders in particular. No significant relationship is found for foundation-owned companies. Furthermore, a positive relationship is found between the size of the company and the tendency to satisfy shareholders in particular. The finding in relation...

  9. "Expectations to Change" ((E2C): A Participatory Method for Facilitating Stakeholder Engagement with Evaluation Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Adrienne E.; Nnawulezi, Nkiru A.; Vandenberg, Lela

    2015-01-01

    From a utilization-focused evaluation perspective, the success of an evaluation is rooted in the extent to which the evaluation was used by stakeholders. This paper details the "Expectations to Change" (E2C) process, an interactive, workshop-based method designed to engage primary users with their evaluation findings as a means of…

  10. Public University Students' Expectations: An Empirical Study Based on the Stakeholders Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Wagner MAINARDES

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the importance that the student stakeholder represents to universities, the objective of this research project was to identify and classify the leading expectations of students at public universities. In order to achieve this, the study adopted both the premises of Stakeholder Theory and the approaches of earlier studies on the management of university stakeholders. This empirical study began with an exploratory study of students, at one university, to identify their expectations this resulting in a list of a total of twenty-five confirmed expectations. This provided the basis for the subsequent quantitative study involving students attending eleven Portuguese public universities. Through recourse to an online questionnaire, we obtained 1,669 correctly completed surveys that provided the input for data analysis deploying descriptive statistical processes and multiple linear regressions. Our findings show that the most important student expectations are the academic level of demand, the university’s connections with the employment market, student personal self-fulfillment and the prevailing university environment. According to students, these expectations should gain priority attention by university managers, once they consider them the most relevant aspects to the relationship between the student and the university.

  11. Collegiate Schemas: The Influence of Institutional Met Expectations on Tenure-Track Faculty Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontius, Jason Lewis

    2012-01-01

    "Met expectations" research into job satisfaction (Locke, 1976; Porter & Steers, 1973) has shown that the expectations employees bring to their jobs influence their overall job satisfaction. At colleges and universities, faculty job satisfaction is important because it can provide a measure of overall institutional effectiveness…

  12. Finding First-Year Success in Extension: Navigating Stakeholders Needs and Institutional Expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald A. Llewellyn

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Functioning within a defined administrative framework and meeting the needs of the stakeholders are essential in an Extension appointment. The first day of employment starts the promotion and tenure clock. It is the responsibility of the new Extension professional to take immediate steps to move forward with development of programming and application of the skill set that they bring to the job. Finding success in the first year of an Extension appointment revolves around understanding the expectations of the institution and the needs of the stakeholders. Once the institutional expectations and programming needs are understood, formulating a strategy that includes plans of work and logic models, measurement of outcomes and impacts, team building, professional development, peer mentoring, grant writing, and scholarship will provide a foundation for first year success in Extension. A willingness to follow a timely and systematic approach to meeting the expectations of the institution and stakeholders will provide for an efficient transition and relieve many of the stressors associated with a new appointment. This paper is based primarily on the author’s first year experience as an Extension faculty member and summarizes several best practices.

  13. What Chinese Workers Value: An Analysis of Job Satisfaction, Job Expectations, and Labor Turnover in China

    OpenAIRE

    Nie, Peng; Sousa-Poza, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    This study uses data from the 2012 China Labor Force Dynamics Survey and 2010–2012 China Family Panel Studies to investigate job satisfaction and job expectations, as well as the association between job satisfaction and job turnover by gender among employees aged 16–65. We find not only that job satisfaction levels are relatively low, with only 46% of workers explicitly satisfied, but also that worker expectations differ significantly from what their jobs actually provide. In particular, many...

  14. Patient expectations and their satisfaction in the context of public hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhane A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Adugnaw Berhane,1 Fikre Enquselassie2 1College of Health Sciences, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia; 2School of Public Health, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Background: Patient expectations have been recognized as a factor for patient satisfaction in medical consultations. Although various studies explored the relationship between patient expectations and patient satisfaction in developed countries, there is a lack of research evidence in Ethiopia where the meeting of patient expectations could relate to satisfaction.Objective: To assess the relationship between patients’ expectations and their satisfaction in the consultation of patients at the outpatient department.Study design: Data were collected regarding preconsultation expectations and postconsultation experiences of adult patients attending nine public hospitals. A systematic random sampling method was used where every fifth patient attending an outpatient department was selected. The patients were interviewed before consultation and after consulta­tion to assess whether their pre-consultation expectations were met and to assess how satisfied they were with the consultation. Cronbach’s alpha statistic was used to assess the reliability of the expectation questionnaires, and paired t-test was used to assess any differences between previsit expectations and postvisit experiences. Logistic regression techniques were used to assess variables considered as independent factors for patient satisfaction.Results: A total of 776 patients were interviewed, giving a response rate of 92.3%. About 93.7% mentioned a diagnosis for their condition as a reason for their current hospital visits. There is a significant difference between preconsultation expectation and postconsultation expectation. Postconsultation expectation, perceived health status, and perceived control on health were factors identified as increasing patient satisfaction. In addition, the presence of

  15. Professional midwifery in Guatemala: A qualitative exploration of perceptions, attitudes and expectations among stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summer, Anna; Guendelman, Sylvia; Kestler, Edgar; Walker, Dilys

    2017-07-01

    Despite recommendations that women give birth with a skilled birth attendant (SBA), 70% of births in Guatemala occur outside health facilities with informally trained traditional birth attendants (TBAs). To increase SBA in rural, indigenous communities, a professional midwifery school accredited by the government is scheduled to open in 2017. Drawing from Filby's model on barriers to the successful integration of professional midwifery into health systems, this paper aims to identify threats - and facilitators-toward professional midwifery's re-introduction in Guatemala. To elucidate perceptions, attitudes and expectations towards professional midwifery, qualitative, in-depth interviews were conducted with 32 physicians, nurses, and TBAs in six health centers and with key decision makers and professional midwives (PMs) in Guatemala City. We conducted open and axial coding in Atlas.ti and performed normative comparisons of participants' attitudes, perceptions, and expectations with the National Vision for professional midwifery and relative comparisons within and across disciplinary subgroups. Unprompted, physicians, nurses and TBAs were unable to correctly define professional midwifery. Yet, when professional midwifery was defined for them, they expressed willingness to work with PMs, seeing them as a needed human resource, instrumental in providing intercultural care and strengthening facility relationships with TBAs. Some stakeholders anticipated resistance toward PMs due to provider turf issues. Notable differences in expectations among all groups included ideas for supervision of and by the PMs and the PM's role in monitoring women and conducting births in communities alongside TBAs. Facilitators to professional midwifery's success include national political will, stakeholders' uniformity of vision, and the potential for improved intercultural care. Barriers are mostly professional in nature, including impediments to autonomous practice by PMs, hierarchical

  16. What Students Want: Elements of Job Satisfaction Expectations among Multicultural Cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dannie L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to assess students' expectations of future job satisfaction. Data were collected from 484 students enrolled in the BBA programme at Cape Breton University, Nova Scotia, Canada. Locke's job satisfaction theory and Hackman and Oldham's job characteristics model provided the theoretical foundation for the study.…

  17. Clinical information systems end user satisfaction: the expectations and needs congruencies effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Faezeh; Poo, Danny C C; Tan, Yung Ming

    2015-02-01

    Prior research on information systems (IS) shows that users' attitudes and continuance intentions are associated with their satisfaction with information systems. As such, the increasing amount of investments in clinical information systems (CIS) signifies the importance of understanding CIS end users' (i.e., clinicians) satisfaction. In this study, we develop a conceptual framework to identify the cognitive determinants of clinicians' satisfaction formation. The disconfirmation paradigm serves as the core of the framework. The expectations and needs congruency models are the two models of this paradigm, and perceived performance is the basis of the comparisons in the models. The needs and expectations associated with the models are also specified. The survey methodology is adopted in this study to empirically validate the proposed research model. The survey is conducted at a public hospital and results in 112 and 203 valid responses (56% and 98% response rates) from doctors and nurses respectively. The partial least squares (PLS) method is used to analyze the data. The results of the study show that perceived CIS performance is the most influential factor on clinicians' (i.e., doctors and nurses) satisfaction. Doctors' expectations congruency is the next significant determinant of their satisfaction. Contrary to most previous findings, nurses' expectations and expectations congruency do not show a significant effect on their satisfaction. However, the needs congruency is found to significantly affect nurses' satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Relationships Between Expectations and Life and Job Satisfaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baker, Herbert

    1998-01-01

    .... For the job seeker, the expectations may be as clear as the money that will be earned and the training that will be received, as vague as wanting "good opportunity for advancement" or as difficult...

  19. Self-Efficacy, Satisfaction, and Academic Achievement: The Mediator Role of Students' Expectancy-Value Beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doménech-Betoret, Fernando; Abellán-Roselló, Laura; Gómez-Artiga, Amparo

    2017-01-01

    Although there is considerable evidence to support the direct effects of self-efficacy beliefs on academic achievement, very few studies have explored the motivational mechanism that mediates the self-efficacy-achievement relationship, and they are necessary to understand how and why self-efficacy affects students' academic achievement. Based on a socio-cognitive perspective of motivation, this study examines the relationships among academic self-efficacy, students' expectancy-value beliefs, teaching process satisfaction, and academic achievement. Its main aim is to identify some motivational-underlying processes through which students' academic self-efficacy affects student achievement and satisfaction. Student achievement and satisfaction are two of the most important learning outcomes, and are considered key indicators of education quality. The sample comprises 797 Spanish secondary education students from 36 educational settings and three schools. The scales that referred to self-efficacy and expectancy-value beliefs were administered at the beginning of the course, while student satisfaction and achievement were measured at the end of the course. The data analysis was conducted by structural equation modeling (SEM). The results revealed that students' expectancy-value beliefs (Subject value, Process expectancy, Achievement expectancy, Cost expectancy) played a mediator role between academic self-efficacy and the achievement/satisfaction relationship. These results provided empirical evidence to better understand the mechanism that mediates self-efficacy-achievement and efficacy-course satisfaction relationships. The implications of these findings for teaching and learning in secondary education are discussed.

  20. Self-Efficacy, Satisfaction, and Academic Achievement: The Mediator Role of Students' Expectancy-Value Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Doménech-Betoret

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although there is considerable evidence to support the direct effects of self-efficacy beliefs on academic achievement, very few studies have explored the motivational mechanism that mediates the self-efficacy–achievement relationship, and they are necessary to understand how and why self-efficacy affects students' academic achievement. Based on a socio-cognitive perspective of motivation, this study examines the relationships among academic self-efficacy, students' expectancy-value beliefs, teaching process satisfaction, and academic achievement. Its main aim is to identify some motivational-underlying processes through which students' academic self-efficacy affects student achievement and satisfaction. Student achievement and satisfaction are two of the most important learning outcomes, and are considered key indicators of education quality. The sample comprises 797 Spanish secondary education students from 36 educational settings and three schools. The scales that referred to self-efficacy and expectancy-value beliefs were administered at the beginning of the course, while student satisfaction and achievement were measured at the end of the course. The data analysis was conducted by structural equation modeling (SEM. The results revealed that students' expectancy-value beliefs (Subject value, Process expectancy, Achievement expectancy, Cost expectancy played a mediator role between academic self-efficacy and the achievement/satisfaction relationship. These results provided empirical evidence to better understand the mechanism that mediates self-efficacy–achievement and efficacy–course satisfaction relationships. The implications of these findings for teaching and learning in secondary education are discussed.

  1. Effect of service quality on coffee based economic cluster development on farmers and other stakeholders satisfaction in Bondowoso district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lya Aklimawati

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Economic cluster approach can be used to enhance economic growth of a region by optimizing local resources. Coffee is one of plantation commodity which is developed in Bondowoso district through economic cluster model. Low quality coffee beans and inefficiency marketing system were the basic problems at farmer level that pushed for developing economic coffee cluster. The aim of this research was to analyze the effect of service quality on economic coffee cluster development toward farmers and stakeholders satisfaction. This research was carried out at Bondowoso District, East Java. Direct observation and interviews coffee farmers and stakeholders using closed questions was conducted in this study. Data collected consisted of primary and secondary data. The number of respondents were 47 stakeholders consisted of 5 bank officers, 5 officers from district plantation service, 2 officers from foresty company and 35 farmers. Respondens selection was based on convenience sampling method. Primary data was analyzed by using correlation and multiple linear regression analysis. The result showed that the relationship between dimensions of service quality with each other varies from weak to strong. Stakeholders satisfaction (included farmers on economic coffee cluster implementation was influenced significantly by tangible. While reliability, responsiveness, assurance and empathy had no effect on stakeholders satisfaction.

  2. Predicting Postsurgical Satisfaction in Adolescents With Idiopathic Scoliosis: The Role of Presurgical Functioning and Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieberg, Christine B; Manganella, Juliana; Manalo, Gem; Simons, Laura E; Hresko, M Timothy

    2017-12-01

    There is a need to better assess patient satisfaction and surgical outcomes. The purpose of the current study is to identify how preoperative expectations can impact postsurgical satisfaction among youth with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion surgery. The present study includes patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion surgery enrolled in a prospective, multicentered registry examining postsurgical outcomes. The Scoliosis Research Society Questionnaire-Version 30, which assesses pain, self-image, mental health, and satisfaction with management, along with the Spinal Appearance Questionnaire, which measures surgical expectations was administered to 190 patients before surgery and 1 and 2 years postoperatively. Regression analyses with bootstrapping (with n=5000 bootstrap samples) were conducted with 99% bias-corrected confidence intervals to examine the extent to which preoperative expectations for spinal appearance mediated the relationship between presurgical mental health and pain and 2-year postsurgical satisfaction. Results indicate that preoperative mental health, pain, and expectations are predictive of postsurgical satisfaction. With the shifting health care system, physicians may want to consider patient mental health, pain, and expectations before surgery to optimize satisfaction and ultimately improve clinical care and patient outcomes. Level I-prognostic study.

  3. Patients' Expectations Impact Their Satisfaction following Total Hip or Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuprez, Audrey; Delcour, Jean-Pierre; Fatemi, Firouzeh; Gillet, Philippe; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Bruyère, Olivier; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the number and magnitude of preoperative expectations and to correlate them with the degree of satisfaction expressed one year after Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) or Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA), in patients with severe and painful osteoarthritis (OA). Preoperative expectations (within 20 days prior to surgery) and postoperative satisfaction (one year after the intervention) were measured using the previously validated French version of the Hospital for Special Surgery Hip or Knee Replacement Expectations Survey. Postoperative satisfaction was measured using a specific scale, following the same methodology as that used for the assessment of expectations. Prediction of the satisfaction of the patients was performed using multivariate linear regression modelling. A total of 138 patients (80 THA and 58 TKA) completed the two parts of the study. The expectations score (mean ± SD) (range 0-100) was 72.58 ± 12.63 before THA and 69.10 ± 13.72 before TKA (p = 0.13). The number of expectations expressed was 14.34 ± 1.32 (out of a potential maximum of 18) before THA and 14.70 ± 2.29 (out of a potential maximum of 19) before TKA. After 1 year, THA generated a significantly higher degree of satisfaction compared to TKA (69.70 ± 14.46 v 60.44 ± 17.54, poptimal preoperative interaction between health care providers and patients, to allow patients a chance to foresee a reasonable outcome after TJA.

  4. How do GPs in Switzerland perceive their patients' satisfaction and expectations? An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebo, Paul; Herrmann, François R; Haller, Dagmar M

    2015-06-10

    To assess doctors' perceptions of their patients' satisfaction and expectations in primary care. Cross-sectional study using questionnaires completed by general practitioners (GPs) and their patients. Primary care practices in Geneva, Switzerland. 23 GPs from a random list of 75 GPs practising in the canton of Geneva (participation rate 31%), who each recruited between 50 and 100 consecutive patients coming to the practice for a scheduled medical consultation, leading to a total of 1637 patients (participation rate: 97%, women: 63%, mean age: 54 years). Patient exclusion criteria were: new patients, those consulting in an emergency situation or suffering from disorders affecting their ability to consent, and those who did not speak French. Patients satisfaction with and expectations from the care they received in this practice; GPs perceptions of their patient's satisfaction and expectations. GPs underestimated all patient satisfaction items (p<0.001 for all items) whereas they overestimated their expectations, except for equipment (laboratory and X-ray) and some accessibility items. In a multivariate analysis to assess which GP factors were associated with correct assessment of their patients' views, only GPs' certification status was a significant factor. GPs tend to underestimate patients' satisfaction but overestimate their expectations in primary care. These findings may help GPs to understand patients' views in order to adequately meet their expectations and concerns. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. An Experimental Test of the Expectancy-Disconfirmation Theory of Citizen Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ryzin, Gregg G.

    2013-01-01

    A number of prior studies have found evidence for the expectancy-disconfirmation theory of citizen satisfaction with public services, which holds that citizens judge public services not only on experienced service quality but also on an implicit comparison of service quality with prior expectations. But the evidence to date has been based on…

  6. Developing anchored measures of patient satisfaction with pharmaceutical care delivery: Experiences versus expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemin Kassam

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Rosemin Kassam1, John B Collins2, Jonathan Berkowitz31Structured Practice Education Program, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences; 2Department of Educational Studies; 3Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaBackground: A pilot study was undertaken to evaluate patients’ satisfaction with pharmaceutical care (PC activities delivered at community pharmacies. The objectives of the study were to: (1 operationalize patient satisfaction in terms of the advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE PC activities, (2 conduct psychometric analysis of the satisfaction instrument, and (3 assess the sensitivity of the instrument to detect any differences that may exist between what patients expect to receive versus what is actually experienced.Methods: Pharmacies affiliated with two national chains were recruited to participate. Asthma patients at each of these sites were invited to complete a survey designed to assess their expectations of and their experiences with PC at the respective site.Results: One hundred forty-seven surveys were completed from patients in 19 community pharmacies. Psychometric analysis confirmed the survey’s internal reliability and sensitivity to be very high. Data analysis suggested that most patients expect more from PC services than they actually experienced.Conclusion: Unlike other PC satisfaction surveys, this instrument allows patient experiences to be anchored against their expectations. The results suggest that most patients would be willing to engage in PC activities outlined in the survey.Keywords: satisfaction survey, pharmaceutical care, community-APPE

  7. Engineering Graduates' Skill Sets in the MENA Region: A Gap Analysis of Industry Expectations and Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadi, Eric; Ramadi, Serge; Nasr, Karim

    2016-01-01

    This study explored gaps between industry expectations and perceptions of engineering graduates' skill sets in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. This study measured the importance that managers of engineers placed on 36 skills relevant to engineers. Also measured was managers' satisfaction with engineering graduates' skill sets.…

  8. [Expectations and patient satisfaction in hospitals: construction and application of an expectation-based experience typology and its use in the management of quality and expectations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrlach, Christoph; Güntert, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Patient satisfaction (PS) surveys are frequently used evaluation methods to show performance from the customer's view. This approach has some fundamental deficits, especially with respect to theory, methodology and usage. Because of the significant theoretical value of the expectation confirmation/disconfirmation concept in the development of PS, an expectation-based experience typology has been developed and tested to check whether this approach could be a theoretical and practical alternative to the survey of PS. Due to the mainly cognitive-rational process of comparison between expectations and expectation fulfilment, it is easier to make changes in this stage of the process than in the subsequent stage of the development of PS that is mainly based on emotional-affective processes. The paper contains a literature review of the common concept of PS and its causal and influencing factors. Based on the theoretical part of this study, an expectation-based experience typology was developed. In the next step, the typology was subjected to exploratory testing, based on two patient surveys. In some parts of the tested typology explorative differences could be found between hospitals. Despite this rather more complex and unusual approach to expectation-based experience typology, this concept offers the chance to change conditions not only retrospectively (based on data), but also in a prospective way in terms of a "management of expectations". Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  9. Assessment of users’ expectations, perceived quality and satisfaction with primary care in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilios Raftopoulos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To explore users’ expectations, their perceived quality and their satisfaction with primary care services an anonymous questionnaire has been administered to a sample of 212 users.Background: Patient satisfaction with quality of primary care is a dominant concept in quality assurance and quality improvement programs.Methods: It has been used the Expectations-Perceived Quality-Satisfaction with Primary Care Services Scale (E-PQ-SPCSS that was developed and validated in this study. Data were analysed using SPSS, version 18.Results: The overall satisfaction with the primary care services was 97.2%, with the medical care provided was 95.3% and with nursing care was 92.5%. Nursing care was provided to 126 (59.4% users. These users were more satisfied (p<0.0001 with global nursing care provided (4.52±0.70 than those who were not provided a nursing care intervention (3.53±1.73. Age correlated with global satisfaction with primary care (r=0.315, p<0.001 with medical (r=0.194, p<0.001 and nursing care (r=0.183, p<0.001 as well as with expectations totalscore (r=0.295, p<0.001, perceived quality of care total score (r=0.366, p<0.001 and satisfaction with care total score (r=0.207, p=0.002. Based on Cattell’s visual scree plot, four factors accounting for 64.34% of the item covariance were extracted and rotated through factor analysis (nurse’s technical and interpersonal competence, physician’s interpersonal competence, physician’s technical competence and structure characteristics.Conclusions: The psychometric properties of the E-PQ-SPCSS were good enough indicating that the scales are reliable and adequate for group comparisons.

  10. Transformational leadership in primary care: Clinicians' patterned approaches to care predict patient satisfaction and health expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Ho Phi; Sweeny, Kate; Miller, Tricia

    2018-04-01

    Clinicians face the complex challenge of motivating their patients to achieve optimal health while also ensuring their satisfaction. Inspired by transformational leadership theory, we proposed that clinicians' motivational behaviors can be organized into three patient care styles (transformational, transactional, and passive-avoidant) and that these styles differentially predict patient health outcomes. In two studies using patient-reported data and observer ratings, we found that transformational patient care style positively predicted patients' satisfaction and health expectations above and beyond transactional and passive-avoidant patient care style. These findings provide initial support for the patient care style approach and suggest novel directions for the study of clinicians' motivational behaviors.

  11. Collaboration in natural resource governance: reconciling stakeholder expectations in deer management in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Althea L; White, Rehema M

    2012-12-15

    The challenges of integrated, adaptive and ecosystem management are leading government agencies to adopt participatory modes of engagement. Collaborative governance is a form of participation in which stakeholders co-produce goals and strategies and share responsibilities and resources. We assess the potential and challenges of collaborative governance as a mechanism to provide an integrated, ecosystem approach to natural resource management, using red deer in Scotland as a case study. Collaborative Deer Management Groups offer a well-established example of a 'bridging organisation', intended to reduce costs and facilitate decision making and learning across institutions and scales. We examine who initiates collaborative processes and why, what roles different actors adopt and how these factors influence the outcomes, particularly at a time of changing values, management and legislative priorities. Our findings demonstrate the need for careful consideration of where and how shared responsibility might be best implemented and sustained as state agencies often remain key to the process, despite the partnership intention. Differing interpretations between agencies and landowners of the degree of autonomy and division of responsibilities involved in 'collaboration' can create tension, while the diversity of landowner priorities brings additional challenges for defining shared goals in red deer management and in other cases. Effective maintenance depends on appropriate role allocation and adoption of responsibilities, definition of convergent values and goals, and establishing communication and trust in institutional networks. Options that may help private stakeholders offset the costs of accepting responsibility for delivering public benefits need to be explicitly addressed to build capacity and support adaptation. This study indicates that collaborative governance has the potential to help reconcile statutory obligations with stakeholder empowerment. The potential of

  12. Job Satisfaction and Expected Turnover Among Federal, State, and Local Public Health Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leider, Jonathon P; Harper, Elizabeth; Shon, Ji Won; Sellers, Katie; Castrucci, Brian C

    2016-10-01

    To use data on the governmental public health workforce to examine demographics and elucidate drivers of job satisfaction and intent to leave one's organization. Using microdata from the 2014 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey and 2014 Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey, we drew comparisons between federal, state, and local public health staff. We fitted logistic regressions to examine correlates of both job satisfaction and intent to leave one's organization within the coming year. Correlates of job satisfaction included pay satisfaction, organizational support, and employee involvement. Approximately 40% of federal, state, and local staff said they were either considering leaving their organization in the next year or were planning to retire by 2020. Public health practitioners largely like their jobs, but many are dissatisfied with their pay and are considering working elsewhere. More should be done to understand the determinants of job satisfaction and how to successfully retain high-quality staff. Public health is at a crossroads. Significant turnover is expected in the coming years. Retention efforts should engage staff across all levels of public health.

  13. Expectation of fairness: a turning point in the professional satisfaction of Iranian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Forough; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Forooshani, Zahra Sadat Dibaji

    2016-06-01

    The professional satisfaction of staff is one of the most challenging organizational concepts that can enhance the efficiency level of organizations. In a similar vein, the professional satisfaction of nurses is of considerable importance, in that, professional dissatisfaction among nurses could result in emotional detachment, depression, anger, evasion from work, and inefficacy and would negatively impact the organization's work rate. The aim of this study was to understand Iranian nurses' experiences of the concept of professional satisfaction. This was a qualitative study conducted with a targeted sampling of 10 nurses (4 men and 6 women) in 2015. The data were collected through conducting in-depth interviews, and textual data were analyzed subsequently using the Qualitative Content Analysis (QCA) method. The findings of this study pointed to "fair conduct," which was comprised of three sub-categories, i.e., expectation of fairness in social-professional settings, expectation of fairness in receiving professional benefits, and expectation of fairness in the area of professional interactions. There are various ups and downs in nursing due to the challenging nature of the profession, from the initial education at the university until retirement. According to the findings of this study, a lack of fairness in social-professional settings, a lack of fairness in receiving professional benefits, and a lack of fairness in the area of professional interactions were among the factors that have great impacts on the degree of professional dissatisfaction among nurses.

  14. Sexually Explicit Online Media, Body Satisfaction, and Partner Expectations Among Men who have Sex with Men: a Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leickly, Emily; Nelson, Kimberly; Simoni, Jane

    2017-09-01

    Limited research has investigated the perceived influence of sexually explicit online media (SEOM) on body satisfaction and partner expectations of men who have sex with men (MSM). Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 16 MSM, covering the perceived influence of MSM-specific SEOM. All nine men who broached the topics of body satisfaction and partner expectations reported that MSM-specific SEOM set unreasonably high physical appearance expectations for themselves and/or their potential partners. Although MSM-specific SEOM might be negatively affecting body satisfaction and partner expectations among MSM, its ubiquity may make it a useful tool to support body positivity.

  15. Wellness Tourism among Seniors in Taiwan: Previous Experience, Service Encounter Expectations, Organizational Characteristics, Employee Characteristics, and Customer Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaung-Hwa Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the influence of the service encounter expectations of senior customers during wellness tours on customer satisfaction. The organizational attributes of hotels, organizational characteristics and employee characteristics, were adopted as mediating variables. A total of 346 valid questionnaires were retrieved from 50 year-old and above seniors in Taiwan. The results showed that the service encounter expectations of seniors had an indirect influence on customer satisfaction and the organizational attributes mediated the service encounter expectations of seniors and customer satisfaction. The moment of truth in the interactions between service staff members and seniors represents the pivotal management implication of this study.

  16. Stakeholders' expectations and perceived effects of the pharmacy ownership liberalization reform in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisell, Kristin; Winblad, Ulrika; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark

    2016-01-01

    were developed in an inductive manner. RESULTS: One expectation among the political organization participants was that the ownership liberalization would create opportunities for ideas. The competition introduced in the market was supposed to lead to a more diversified pharmacy sector. After......BACKGROUND: Reforms in the health-care sector, including the pharmacy sector, can have different rationales. The Swedish pharmacies were prior to 2009 organized in a state-owned monopoly. In 2009, a liberalization of the ownership took place, in which a majority of the pharmacies were sold...... to private owners. The rationales for this liberalization changed profoundly during the preparatory work, making it probable that other rationales than the ones first expressed existed. The aim of this study was to explore the underlying rationales (not stated in official documents) for the liberalization...

  17. Acne treatment patterns, expectations, and satisfaction among adult females of different races/ethnicities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rendon MI

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Marta I Rendon,1 David A Rodriguez,2 Ariane K Kawata,3 Arnold N Degboe,4 Teresa K Wilcox,3 Caroline T Burk,5 Selena R Daniels,4 Wendy E Roberts6 1Rendon Center for Dermatology and Aesthetic Medicine, Boca Raton, FL, USA; 2Dermatology Associates and Research, Coral Gables, FL, USA; 3Evidera, Bethesda, MD, USA; 4Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA; 5Health Outcomes Consultant, Laguna Beach, CA, USA; 6Generational and Cosmetic Dermatology, Rancho Mirage, CA, USA Background: Limited data are available on acne treatment patterns, expectations, and satisfaction in the adult female subpopulation, particularly among different racial and ethnic groups. Objective: Describe acne treatment patterns and expectations in adult females of different racial/ethnic groups and analyze and explore their potential effects on medication compliance and treatment satisfaction. Methods: A cross-sectional, Web-based survey was administered to US females (25–45 years with facial acne (≥25 visible lesions. Data collected included sociodemographics, self-reported clinical characteristics, acne treatment use, and treatment expectations and satisfaction. Results: Three hundred twelve subjects completed the survey (mean age, 35.3±5.9 years, comprising black (30.8%, Hispanic (17.6%, Asian/other (17.3%, and white (34.3%. More than half of the subjects in each racial group recently used an acne treatment or procedure (black, 63.5%; Hispanic, 54.5%; Asian/other, 66.7%; white, 66.4%. Treatment use was predominantly over-the-counter (OTC (47.4% versus prescription medications (16.6%. OTC use was highest in white subjects (black, 42.7%; Hispanic, 34.5%; Asian/other, 44.4%; white, 59.8%; P<0.05. The most frequently used OTC treatments in all racial/ethnic groups were salicylic acid (SA (34.3% and benzoyl peroxide (BP (32.1%. Overall, compliance with acne medications was highest in white versus black (57.0±32.4 vs 42.7±33.5 days, P>0.05, Hispanic (57.0±32.4 vs 43.2±32.9 days, P>0

  18. Women's perceptions, expectations and satisfaction with induced labour--a questionnaire-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Ashalatha; Burt, Rhona; Rice, Pat; Templeton, Allan

    2005-11-01

    To evaluate the understanding and expectations of women undergoing labour induction, to assess their actual experience of the process and to compare their satisfaction with labour to those labouring spontaneously. Four hundred and fifty women at term undergoing induction of labour and cervical ripening with prostaglandinE2 vaginal tablets and 450 women labouring spontaneously were recruited into the study. The induction group were requested to complete a questionnaire prior to the start of their induction process and another questionnaire post-delivery. The post-delivery questionnaire contained two sections, one pertaining to issues to do with the induction and the second with the actual labour process. The spontaneously labouring group was requested to complete a questionnaire post-delivery, which only contained the section pertaining to the actual labour process. The main outcome measures were satisfaction with labour, perception of pain and length of labour between the induced and spontaneous labour groups, and issues that the women might wish changed about their induction. In the induction group, 34.7% were not satisfied with the information they received about the induction prior to the procedure and 27.2% expected to deliver within 12h of the administration of the inducing agent. Post-induction, 40% of the women felt the most important aspect they would like to change about their induction were they to have another one, would be the speed of the induction, 13.6% felt they might wish to take the inducing agent orally, 7% to have fewer vaginal examinations and 9% to have fewer complications. Among the women who returned questionnaires, 26.3% had a caesarean delivery in the induction group and 21.4% in the spontaneous labour group. Significantly more women were satisfied with their labour in the spontaneous labour group 79.5% versus 70.4%, RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.8-0.96, P=0.006). Labour that is artificially induced does result in lower satisfaction rates as compared

  19. Patients' preoperative expectations and postoperative satisfaction of dysgnathic patients operated on with resorbable osteosyntheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballon, Alexander; Laudemann, Katharina; Sader, Robert; Landes, Constantin A

    2011-03-01

    This study evaluated whether personal expectations and satisfaction throughout orthognathic surgery were fulfilled. In addition, patients were interrogated about their experience of resorbable osteosynthesis. A total of 50 patients were interviewed 3 times each throughout the study by a mixed questionnaire of standard psychologic tests and a tailored itemized questionnaire regarding their expectations regarding resorbable osteofixation and their postoperative satisfaction. A postoperative increase in self-esteem and approach to life were evident. An examination of Oral Health-Related Quality of Life showed constant quality of life; an examination of Oral Health Impact Profile-Germany) showed no postoperative difficulties in dental hygiene and nutrition. No statistically significant change in any of the tests could be expressly determined. Avoidance of secondary surgery motivated 94% to choose resorbable osteofixations, although a mere 66% had heard of them before; 90% of patients were satisfied with the operation result. Orthognathic surgery cannot change preexistent depression or a problematic social background. Mastication and oral health improved, and postoperative happiness and confidence increased. When given the choice between resorbable fixation and titanium osteofixation, patients generally preferred resorbable fixations.

  20. Expectations and satisfaction of pregnant women: unveiling prenatal care in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparecida Maciel Cardelli, Alexandrina; Li Marrero, Tai; Aparecida Pimenta Ferrari, Rosângela; Trevisan Martins, Júlia; Serafim, Deise

    2016-06-01

    To analyze the perception of primiparous women about prenatal care in Basic Health Units in a municipality in southern Brazil. This is a qualitative research from the perspective of Social Representation Theory, from the following question: How has been the pre-natal care for you? Eighteen pregnant women were interviewed. The analysis resulted in three categories: Expectation representation about prenatal care; Rescuing the care offered in prenatal consultation; Unveiling the (dis) satisfaction with prenatal consultation. The prenatal care was apprehended as an essential moment for safe pregnancy, although centered on the doctor's figure and guarantee access to early laboratory and imaging tests. On the other hand, dissatisfaction was revealed from the reception at the entrance to the health unit to the consultations access, although some statements suggest timely satisfaction. Prenatal care did not meet the specific expectations of the study group and unveiled that the nurse did not supply it, as a member of the multidisciplinary team. The organization of the nursing work process in primary care, related to prenatal care, needs to be revisited to promote the effectiveness of its actions.

  1. Expectations and satisfaction of pregnant women: unveiling prenatal care in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandrina Aparecida Maciel Cardelli

    Full Text Available Objective.To analyze the perception of primiparous women about prenatal care in Basic Health Units in a municipality in southern Brazil. Methods. This is a qualitative research from the perspective of Social Representation Theory, from the following question: How has been the pre-natal care for you? Eighteen pregnant women were interviewed. Results. The analysis resulted in three categories: Expectation representation about prenatal care; Rescuing the care offered in prenatal consultation; Unveiling the (dis satisfaction with prenatal consultation. The prenatal care was apprehended as an essential moment for safe pregnancy, although centered on the doctor's figure and guarantee access to early laboratory and imaging tests. On the other hand, dissatisfaction was revealed from the reception at the entrance to the health unit to the consultations access, although some statements suggest timely satisfaction. Conclusion. Prenatal care did not meet the specific expectations of the study group and unveiled that the nurse did not supply it, as a member of the multidisciplinary team. The organization of the nursing work process in primary care, related to prenatal care, needs to be revisited to promote the effectiveness of its actions.

  2. Teaching implementation science in a new Master of Science Program in Germany: a survey of stakeholder expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Charlotte; Mahler, Cornelia; Forstner, Johanna; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Wensing, Michel

    2017-04-27

    Implementation science in healthcare is an evolving discipline in German-speaking countries. In 2015, the Medical Faculty of the University of Heidelberg, Germany, implemented a two-year full-time Master of Science program Health Services Research and Implementation Science. The curriculum introduces implementation science in the context of a broader program that also covers health services research, healthcare systems, research methods, and generic academic skills. Our aim was to assess the expectations of different stakeholder groups regarding the master's program. An online survey listing desired competencies of prospective graduates was developed and administered to four groups: national experts in the field (including potential employers of graduates), teaching staff, enrolled students, and prospective students (N = 169). Competencies were extracted from the curriculum's module handbook. A five-point Likert scale was used for the assessment of 42 specific items. Data were analyzed descriptively. A total of 83 people participated in the survey (response rate 49%). The online survey showed a strong agreement across the groups concerning the desired competencies of graduates. About two-thirds of the listed competencies (27 items) were felt to be crucial or very important by 80% or more of participants, with little difference between stakeholder groups. Of the eight items specifically related to implementation in practice, six were in this category. Knowledge of implementation strategies (90% very important), knowledge of barriers and enablers of implementation (89%), and knowledge of evidence-based practice (89%) were the top priorities. The master's program is largely orientated towards the desired competencies of graduates according to students, teaching staff, and national experts.

  3. A Smart Telecare System at Digital Home: Perceived Usefulness, Satisfaction, and Expectations for Healthcare Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Vadillo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensors, combined with intelligent systems, can enhance the quality of the Telecare services deployed at home, improving the capability for detection of risk situations and the users care. However, there are no specific studies that evaluate this kind of Telecare systems by professionals that work in a Telecare center. This paper shows the results of an assessment of the current satisfaction and future expectations of the Telecare professionals when using advanced Telecare solutions deployed at home. The study has been conducted through structured interviews with 24 Telecare experts working in the Telecare center of the Spanish Red Cross for attending alarm calls for elderly people. The interviews had the support of the TALISMAN Telecare system that is a next-generation Telecare service deployed in the accessible digital home of Universidad Politécnica de Madrid. All participants showed overall satisfaction with TALISMAN and their intention to use it. Results showed that perceived usefulness is an important influencing factor to the intention to use it and the Quality of the Information is a key factor in the perceived usefulness. TALISMAN, as an example of a next-generation Telecare system, is seen as a tool with high potential for improving the care of elderly people at home.

  4. Satisfaction, fulfillment of expectations and adherence to subcutaneous biological drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: ARCO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Alén, Jaime; Vela, Paloma; Bustabad, Sagrario; Maceiras, Francisco; Carmona, Loreto; Cea-Calvo, Luis

    2018-05-15

    In the ARCO study, adherence to subcutaneous biological agents by patients with rheumatoid arthritis improved with monthly administration. We assess whether adherence can be related to fulfillment of expectations and satisfaction with treatment. Adherence was assessed by calculating the Medication Possession Ratio, and satisfaction and fulfillment of expectations using the «EXPRESAR» group questionnaire. In 346 patients, those who were satisfied/very satisfied with efficacy and tolerability were ≥80% and 64.4%, with no differences between weekly, biweekly or monthly administration regimens. Regarding the fulfillment of expectations, 59.9% considered the effect of the treatment greater than expected and 52.6% reported lower/much lower than expected discomfort; the latter percentage was higher in patients with monthly administration (P=.049). The percentages for nonadherence were 15.6% (discomfort greater than expected), 18.5% (expected discomfort) and 11.1% (lower than expected or no discomfort) (P=.189). Satisfaction and fulfillment of expectations were high. Fulfillment of expectations of tolerability was better with monthly administration, which could contribute to better adherence. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. [A cross-level analysis of the links between service quality and disconfirmation of expectations and customer satisfaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Hernández, Rosa M; Martínez-Tur, Vicente; González-Morales, M Gloria; Ramos, José; Peiró, José M

    2009-08-01

    This article examines links between disconfirmation of expectations and functional and relational service quality perceived by employees and customer satisfaction. A total of 156 employees, who were working in 52 work units, participated in the research study. In addition, 517 customers who were assisted by these work units were surveyed. Using a cross-level approach, we used a random coefficient model to test the aforementioned relationships. A strong relationship between disconfirmation of expectations and customer satisfaction was observed. Also, the results confirmed that functional service quality maintains an additional and significant association with customer satisfaction. In contrast, there were no significant relationships between relational service quality and customer satisfaction. The article concludes with a discussion of these results.

  6. Fractional carbon dioxide laser resurfacing of rhytides and photoaged skin--a prospective clinical study on patient expectation and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Elisabeth; Meierhöfer, Julia; Koller, Michael; Zeman, Florian; Groesser, Leopold; Karrer, Sigrid; Hohenleutner, Ulrich; Landthaler, Michael; Hohenleutner, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    Fractional CO2 -laser resurfacing is increasingly used for treating rhytides and photoaged skin because of its favorable benefit-risk ratio. A key outcome measure and treatment goal in aesthetic laser therapy is patient satisfaction. However, few data are available on patient-reported outcomes after fractional ablative skin-resurfacing. To compare patient expectations before and patient satisfaction after three fractional CO2 -laser treatments and to correlate objectively measured wrinkle reduction with patient satisfaction after treatment. We investigated patient expectation and satisfaction using a 14-item questionnaire in 24 female patients. We assessed the skin-related quality of life and patient satisfaction with skin appearance. We profilometrically measured wrinkle size in four facial areas before and three months after treatment and investigated correlations between wrinkle reduction and patient satisfaction. The high patient expectations before treatment (ceiling effect) were actually slightly exceeded. The average score of 14 items delineating patient satisfaction with laser treatment was higher (4.64 ± 0.82; n = 24) than the respective expectations before treatment (4.43 ± 0.88; n = 24). Skin-related quality of life and patient satisfaction with skin appearance had significantly improved after the last treatment. Patients dissatisfied with their skin appearance before treatment (mean 2.1 ± 1.5; evaluated on a scale ranging from 0-6) were satisfied (mean 5.1 ± 1.2) (P skin appearance at the follow-up. Patient satisfaction with skin appearance was not correlated to the profilometrically measured reduction of wrinkle size of any facial area. Our results show high patient satisfaction with ablative fractional skin resurfacing, also regarding improved self-esteem and self-satisfaction despite high pre-treatment expectations. Skin-specific quality of life had significantly improved. Thus, this treatment modality can be recommended

  7. The importance of patient expectations as a determinant of satisfaction with waiting times for hip and knee replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner-Spady, Barbara L; Sanmartin, Claudia; Johnston, Geoffrey H; McGurran, John J; Kehler, Melissa; Noseworthy, Tom W

    2011-08-01

    The disconfirmation model hypothesizes that satisfaction is a function of a perceived discrepancy from an initial expectation. Our objectives were: (1) to test the disconfirmation model as it applies to patient satisfaction with waiting time (WT) and (2) to build an explanatory model of the determinants of satisfaction with WT for hip and knee replacement. We mailed 1000 questionnaires to 2 random samples: patients waiting or those who had received a joint replacement within the preceding 3-12 months. We used ordinal logistic regression analysis to build an explanatory model of the determinants of satisfaction. Of the 1330 returned surveys, 1240 contained patient satisfaction data. The sample was 57% female; mean age was 70 years (SD 11). Consistent with the disconfirmation model, when their WTs were longer than expected, both waiting (OR 5.77, 95% CI 3.57-9.32) and post-surgery patients (OR 6.57, 95% CI 4.21-10.26) had greater odds of dissatisfaction, adjusting for the other variables in the model. Compared to those who waited 3 months or less, post-surgery patients who waited 6 to 12 months (OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.27-5.27) and over 12 months (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.65-6.58) had greater odds of being dissatisfied with their waiting time. Patients who felt they were treated unfairly had greater odds of being dissatisfied (OR 4.74, 95% CI 2.60-8.62). In patients on waiting lists and post-surgery for hip and knee replacement, satisfaction with waiting times is related to fulfillment of expectations about waiting, as well as a perception of fairness. Measures to modify expectations and increase perceived fairness, such as informing patients of a realistic WT and communication during the waiting period, may increase satisfaction with WTs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Relevance between expectations before treatment, new symptoms and satisfaction after treatment in patients with pelvic organ prolapse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Han, Jinsong; Zhang, Kun; Zhu, Fuli; Yang, Junfang; Wang, Yiting

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the relevance between expectations before treatment, new symptoms and satisfaction after treatment of the pelvic organ prolapse (POP) patients. Made a collection of 75 cases of POP patients at Peking University Third Hospital, who were affected by the POP symptoms and came to our clinic for treatment from January to December in 2013. Prospectively investigate the patients' expectations before treatment, which were the most troubling symptoms to be solved. According to treatment we divided the patients into surgery and pessary groups. Two groups were followed up with the degree to achieve the desired goals using patient global impression of improvement (PGI-I), new symptoms and satisfaction after treatment, try to find the relevance between expectations before treatment, new symptoms and satisfaction after treatment. There were 47 (63%, 47/75) patients in the surgical group and 28 (37%, 28/75) patients in the pessary group. The top three problems for patients were friction when walking (25%, 19/75), dysuria (23%, 17/75) and the feeling of vaginal prolapse (19%, 14/75). The follow-up rate was of 93% (70/75), follow-up time was (5 ± 4) months. Satisfaction score after treatment of surgical group was higher than that of pessary group [(4.9 ± 0.4) versus (4.0 ± 1.3) scores, P satisfaction scores was relevant (P = 0.021). The availability of new symptoms and satisfaction scores was relevant (P = 0.001). When achieving higher expectations to the treatment and no more new symptoms, the satisfaction score after treatment is higher.

  9. THE RELATIONSHIP OF COMPANY PERFORMANCE WITH EXTERNAL STAKEHOLDER SATISFACTION (STUDY AT INDUSTRIAL METAL PROCESSING COMPANY IN SULAWESI)

    OpenAIRE

    Amar, Muh Yunus

    2011-01-01

    Attainment of company performance relates to participation of its external stakeholder. External stakeholder here defined as the group which having importance with company and cannot be controlled by company management. Existence of external stakeholder becomes of vital importance and influential to performance and continuity of company life (Kasali, 1990). Therefore, management of the company needs to paying attention more to the importance of the external stakeholder. External stakeholders ...

  10. The Relationship between Inpatient Expectations of Staff Responsiveness and Empathy with Inpatient Satisfaction at Wangaya District Hospital Denpasar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwidyaniti Wira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The evaluation of quality of service within inpatient and outpatient services is very critical to be done. This research aimed to explore the relationship between inpatient expectations of the quality of nursing service and inpatient satisfaction, in the third-class ward Wangaya District General Hospital, Denpasar.Methods: This research was a quantitative study using cross-sectional design. A sample of 111 was selected by simple random sampling. The data was analysed by using univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analysis with logistic regression.Results: The analysis indicated that the level of actual satisfaction compared to inpatient expectations was as low as 45%. Perception of responsiveness with OR=2.404 (95%CI: 1.076–5.373 and perception of empathy with OR=2.594 (95%CI: 1.165-5.779 had a significant relationship with inpatient satisfaction.Conclusion: The study concluded that the patient satisfaction rate is moderate and found to have significant correlation with perceptions of responsiveness and empathy.Keywords: inpatient expectations, nursing service provision, inpatient satisfaction

  11. Expectations and satisfaction of academic investigators in nonclinical collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Marjan; Michel, Martin C

    2015-06-01

    In light of a growing role of research collaborations between academia and the pharmaceutical industry, we have explored expectations and experience of academic investigators with preclinical collaborations. Researchers from Western Europe, North America, and Japan with preclinical publications in the obstructed airways or diabetes fields were invited to anonymously participate in a web-based survey. A total of 134 investigators (28 % of invitees) participated in the two sequentially performed surveys with similar responses in both therapeutic areas. A secondary but prespecified subgroup analysis was based on region of residence, gender, and career level of the investigator. Across all groups, responders considered freedom to publish, obtaining funding and obtaining compounds to be the most important objectives of nonclinical collaborations with the pharmaceutical industry, whereas cultivating professional relationships, getting external scientific input, direct relationship to disease treatment, and involvement with drug development were less important. Among eight attributes of the primary contact person in the company, trustworthiness ranked highest, followed by a collaborative spirit and transparent information sharing; supportiveness, scientific qualification, accessibility, and timeliness of responses ranked lower, and friendliness, lowest. Related to their most recent collaboration, investigators also expressed the highest level of satisfaction with the trustworthiness attribute. On the other hand, the process of reaching a contract was often considered too long and difficult, for which both university and company legal departments were reported as culprits. We conclude that academic researchers are generally satisfied with their preclinical collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry but look for improved contracting procedures.

  12. Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    depend on the reader’s own experiences, individual feelings, personal associations or on conventions of reading, interpretive communities and cultural conditions? This volume brings together narrative theory, fictionality theory and speech act theory to address such questions of expectations...

  13. Should providers encourage realistic weight expectations and satisfaction with lost weight in commercial weight loss programs? a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Gretchen E; Thomas, Colleen S; Patel, Roshni H; McMullen, Jillian S; Lutes, Lesley D

    2014-01-01

    Attrition is a problem among patients who participate in commercial weight loss programs. One possible explanation is that if patients are unable to reach a weight that they expect to achieve, they may be more likely to drop out of treatment. This study investigated variables associated with attrition among 30 obese patients who completed a liquid meal replacement program (LMR) and enrolled in a 52-week Small Changes Maintenance intervention (SCM). Patients lost a median 18% of body weight during LMR and completed assessments about weight expectations and weight satisfaction pre- and post-SCM. Of the 30 patients who started SCM, 8 (27%) were lost to attrition. Odds of SCM attrition were higher in patients who lost ≤ 18.2% of pre-LMR weight (OR: 12.25, P = 0.035), had lower satisfaction (≤7) pre-SCM (OR: 10.11, P = 0.040), and who expected further weight loss of 9.1 kg or more pre-SCM (OR: 10.11, P = 0.040). SCM completers significantly increased weight loss expectations by a median of 2.3 kg from pre-SCM to post-SCM (WSR P = 0.049) that paralleled weight regained post-SCM (2.7 kg). After completion of a medically-supervised commercial weight loss program, patients with the greatest expectations for further weight loss and the lowest weight satisfaction were more likely to drop out of SCM. Failure to participate in maintenance treatment may lead to regain of greater than half of lost weight over the next year. Among SCM completers, lower expectations for further weight loss and greater weight satisfaction appeared to be associated with continued engagement in maintenance treatment.

  14. Do expectancies of return to work and Job satisfaction predict actual return to work in workers with long lasting LBP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opsahl, Jon; Eriksen, Hege R; Tveito, Torill H

    2016-11-17

    Musculoskeletal disorders including low back pain have major individual and socioeconomic consequences as it often leads to disability and long-term sick leave and exclusion from working life. Predictors of disability and return to work often differ, and the dominant knowledge is on predictors for prolonged sick leave and disability. Therefore it is also important to identify key predictors for return to work. The aim of the study was to assess if overall job satisfaction and expectancies of return to work predicts actual return to work after 12 months, among employees with long lasting low back pain, and to assess if there were gender differences in the predictors. Data from the Cognitive interventions and nutritional supplements trial (CINS Trial) was used. Predictors for return to work were examined in 574 employees that had been on sick leave 2-10 months for low back pain, before entering the trial. Data were analysed with multiple logistic regression models stratified by gender, and adjusted for potential confounders. Regardless of gender high expectancies were a strong and significant predictor of return to work at 12 months, while high levels of job satisfaction were not a significant predictor. There were no differences in the levels of expectancies or overall job satisfaction between men and women. However, men had in general higher odds of returning to work compared with women. Among individuals with long lasting low back pain high expectancies of returning to work were strongly associated with successful return to work. We do not know what factors influence individual expectancies of return to work. Screening expectancies and giving individuals with low expectancies interventions with a goal to change expectancies of return to work, such as CBT or self-management interventions, may contribute to increase actual return to work. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ , with registration number NCT00463970 . The trial was registered at the 18th of April 2007.

  15. Stakeholder's experiences, expectations and decision making on reproductive care: An ethnographic study of three districts in northern Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Amogre Ayanore

    Full Text Available In Ghana, priority-setting for reproductive health service interventions is known to be rudimentary with little wider stakeholder involvement. In recognizing the need for broad stakeholder engagement to advance reproductive care provision and utilization, it is necessary to jointly study the varied stakeholder views on reproductive care services.We applied an ethnographic study approach where field data was collected between March-May 2015 in three rural districts of northern Ghana. Data was collected among women with recent births experiences (n = 90, health care providers (n = 16 and policy actors (n = 6. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions was applied to collect all data. Each stakeholder participant's audio file was transcribed, and repeatedly read through to identify similar and divergent views in data. A coding scheme guided coding processes. All transcripts were then imported into QSR NVivo 11 for further analysis.Four themes emerged. Women participants accentuated that sex and sexuality values of men have changed over time, and drives gender roles, parity levels and decision making on reproductive care needs at community levels. Sexual stigma on reproductive care reduces the willingness of women to voice poor experiences related to their previous reproductive experiences. All stakeholders' highlighted clinical treatments for post-abortion care are minimally covered under the fee exemption policy for antenatal and postnatal care. Policy processes on service delivery protocols still is top-down in Ghana.Health teams working to improve sexual and reproductive health care must find suitable context strategies that effectively work to improve women reproductive care needs at their operational levels. Private sector participation and informal community support clutches are encouraged to advance the delivery of reproductive care services.

  16. The Influence of Brand Image Quality to Students’ Expectation and Satisfaction of Lecture at Politeknik Indonusa Surakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anditha Sari

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available An educational institution should be able to prove the quality of education. Consumers, in this case are students, need the proof of achievement, assessment, certification of quality, and the success of the alumni in getting work related to the field of knowledge. Evaluation is also needed to gain recognition from the community, as well as changes in curriculum and teaching methods that impact to better quality of the graduates. This study aims to analyze brand image influence to the expectations and satisfaction of students by taking sample 100 students from 5 study program i.e D3 Mass Communication, Hospitality, Informatics Management, Automotive, and Pharmacy by using systematic sample technique. Sample criteria that are students who have studied in semester 3 because students with the criteria should be able to evaluate their campus. The result of study indicates that brand image has significant effects to the expectation and satisfaction of the students.

  17. Cupping Therapy Simulation Course; A Pilot Study Assessing Self Reporting of Confidence, Expectations/Satisfaction and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Aboushanab, Tamer; Khalil, Mohammed; El-Olemy, Ahmed; Alsanad, Saud

    2017-01-01

    This paper aimed to assess self-reporting of confidence, expectations/satisfaction, and performance of medical students before and after the cupping therapy simulation training course and to validate cupping simulation training evaluation questionnaire (CSTEQ). It was a pilot study to evaluate cupping therapy simulation course provided by National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM).  The number of participants was 29/41 (70.7%) (20 females and 9 males) before train...

  18. Satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Voordt, Theo; Brunia, Sandra; Appel - Meulenbroek, Rianne; Jensen, P.A.; van der Voordt, T.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents some findings from surveys on employee satisfaction in different work environments in the Netherlands and various other European countries. It first discusses why employee satisfaction is relevant for organisations and which factors may influence employee satisfaction. Then the

  19. The Linkage Between Work Unit Performance Perceptions of U.S. Federal Employees and Their Job Satisfaction: An Expectancy Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyoung PARK

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Public organizations are interested in how to improve their performance. Performance in a work unit can also influence employee job satisfaction due to positive expectations based on higher performance. Thus, our study attempts to investigate if organizational performance has an impact on employee motivation under the premise that employees who perform better in a work unit expect greater professional recognition and rewards. By using data from the 2013 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey (FEVS, we find that employees who perceive higher levels of performance in a work unit have a higher level of job satisfaction. This paper further shows that performance perception based on rewards is also positively related to job satisfaction.However, underrepresented groups (female and non-white, older employees and mid-level (work experience from 6 to 14 years employees are less satisfied with higher work unit performance. Finally, employees in the distributive agency category are more satisfied with work unit performance while those in the regulatory agency category are less satisfied with work unit performance. In conclusion, organizations should recognize particular characteristics of employees to develop the policies related to performance management, and effectively utilize these policies in order to attract and retain proficient workers.

  20. [Clinical pharmacy: Evaluation of physician's satisfactions and expectations in a French regional hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, P; Lotito, A; Baysson, H; Pineau-Blondel, E; Berlioz, J

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate physician's satisfaction with the clinical pharmacy activities in a French regional hospital. Data were collected by face-to-face interviews carried out by a public health intern with physicians from 14 different departments of medicine and surgery. A specifically designed questionnaire was used for this study. This contained 18 closed-ended questions, 3 open-ended questions and 6 questions relating to the multidisciplinary analysis of prescriptions of elderly patients. The questionnaire was proposed to 78 physicians, of which 62 replied (participation rate of 79%). Thirty-seven percent were interns (23/62), 19% were assistants (12/62) and 44% were senior physicians (27/62). Clinical pharmacy satisfaction levels were generally very high. In regard to clinical skills, 87% of the physicians were satisfied with pharmacists' competencies and 91% by the pertinence of transmitted information. Ninety-five percent of the physicians were also satisfied by the logistical aspect and the relationship with pharmacists (reactivity, availability and communication). Analysis of the open-ended questions showed that physicians were in favour of the increased presence of clinical pharmacists on the wards. This study shows a high level of physician satisfaction in relation to the clinical pharmacy activities in our hospital, and should be viewed as a strong endorsement of the work of the clinical pharmacy. This study highlights some areas of improvement such as increase presence of the clinical pharmacists on the wards. In order to assess periodically our activity, this study must be repeated in the future. Copyright © 2016 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Expectancy Theory as a Predictor of Grade-Point Averages, Satisfaction, and Participation in the College Environment. ASHE 1983 Annual Meeting Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Yvonna S.; And Others

    The ability of Vroom's expectancy motivation theory to predict student satisfaction with the college environment, student participation at school, and student academic performance was studied. Specific objectives of the study were as follows: to test the ability of Vroom's valence model to predict student satisfaction, to test the ability of…

  2. Beyond satisfaction, what service users expect of inpatient mental health care: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, J E; Loeb, S J; Fick, D M

    2009-12-01

    To provide efficient and effective inpatient mental health services, it is imperative to not only ascertain if service users are satisfied with the care received from nurses, but also the degree to which initial expectations are being met. Ten reports of primary research on service users' experiences, perceptions and expectations of inpatient mental health care were examined to understand what service users' expect of inpatient mental health care and the implications for nursing practice. The World Health Organization's description of responsiveness to service users' non-medical expectations of care was used as a framework for retrieving literature and organizing the research outcomes. Responsiveness includes seven categories of healthcare performance ranging from respect for the dignity of the person, to adequacy of amenities, and choice of provider. Service users expect to form interpersonal relationships with nurses; however, non-clinical responsibilities serve as barriers which consume considerable available nursing time that otherwise could be spent developing therapeutic relationships. In addition, inpatient programming ideas are identified for the provision of better services. Hospitals' expectations of mental health nurses will need to be reconsidered if these nurses are to provide the time and resources necessary to meet current service users' expectations.

  3. The Effect of Broadened Ranges of Expectancy on Satisfaction with Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    Campbell, D.T. (1971). Hedonic relativism and planning the good society . In M.H. Appley (Ed.), Adaptation-level theory. New York: Academic Press. "€ Brickman...a lower plausible outcome within the expectancy range and see the current outcome as favorable (e.g. This is a good score. It was possible that I...improvement). Persons with narrow ranges of expectancies cannot make these hedonically preferable selective comparisons. Giving Up Too Early and

  4. Adaptation and validation of the Patient Expectations and Satisfaction with Prenatal Care instrument among Brazilian pregnant women Adaptación y validación del Patient Expectations and Satisfaction with Prenatal Care para embarazadas brasileñas Adaptação e validação do Patient Expectations and Satisfaction with Prenatal Care para gestantes brasileiras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Santos Prudêncio

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to adapt and validate the Patient Expectations and Satisfaction with Prenatal Care instrument for use in Brazil. It contains 41 items divided into two dimensions: expectations and satisfaction. The adapted version was submitted to analysis for stability, convergent construct validity, and internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha for distinct groups and dimensions. METHOD: 119 pregnant women receiving prenatal care were interviewed and 26 of these women answered the instrument twice (retest. Internal consistency was appropriate (Cronbach's alpha ≥ 0.70; test-retest presented strong correlation (r=0.82; p OBJETIVO: adaptar para uso en Brasil y validar el instrumento Patient Expectations and Satisfaction with Prenatal Care que contiene 41 ítems, divididos en dos dominios (expectativa y satisfacción. La versión adaptada fue sometida al análisis de validez de constructo convergente, de grupos distintos y dimensionalidad y de la consistencia interna (alfa de Cronbach y estabilidad. MÉTODO: fueron entrevistadas 119 embarazadas en acompañamiento prenatal, de esas 26 respondieron dos veces el instrumento (reprueba. La consistencia interna fue adecuada (Alfa de Cronbach ≥ 0,70 y la prueba-reprueba presentó correlación fuerte (r=0,82; p OBJETIVO: adaptar para uso no Brasil e validar o instrumento Patient Expectations and Satisfaction with Prenatal Care, que contém 41 itens, divididos em dois domínios (expectativa e satisfação. A versão adaptada foi submetida à análise da validade de constructo convergente, de grupos distintos, e dimensionalidade, além da análise da consistência interna (alfa de Cronbach e estabilidade. MÉTODO: foram entrevistadas 119 gestantes em acompanhamento pré-natal; dessas, 26 responderam duas vezes ao instrumento (reteste. A consistência interna foi adequada (alfa de Cronbach ≥ 0,70 e o teste/reteste apresentou correlação forte (r=0,82; p<0,001 para a expectativa e correlação moderada (r=0

  5. Survey of customer expectation and satisfaction: preliminary research of a modular product design approach for sheep cage design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochman Yuli Agusti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to produce a modular sheep cage design. Feeding, maintenance and integrated waste management are taking into account in the design. The modular and integrated product design provides advantages such as (1 easy way of making and modifying the product, (2 enabling the utilization of existing facilities such as shade, (3 giving the user a sense of convenience as the waste can be processed and not being a source of pollution. The Modular Quality Function Deployment (QFD method is applied to identify modules associated with the customer needs of the product. A survey about customer expectation and satisfaction was conducted in order to evaluate the gap of both. The highest value of gap between customer expectation and satisfaction of products indicates that the customer needs are the focus of the problems. The most important customer needs are considered in modification and improvement of design. These are (1 the cage is not easy to fall down, (2 the sheep cage can last for long time, (3 it uses a strong frame, (4 the roof section materials is not easy to leak, and (5 It can be used even if one part of the cage is damaged.

  6. Finding the expectations of smart home and designing the meaningful technology for delivering customers’ satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chuang, Y.; Chen, L.; Chen, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Smart home is becoming a focus in both literature and product development practices. The current study employed a human-centered design approach to understand users desires and expectations from their living context. Six critical themes were developed via in-deep interview, field observation, and

  7. Stakeholders in support systems for self-care for chronic illness: the gap between expectations and reality regarding their identity, roles and relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumar-Méndez, María J; Mujika, Agurtzane; Regaira, Elena; Vassilev, Ivaylo; Portillo, Mari Carmen; Foss, Christina; Todorova, Elka; Roukova, Poli; Ruud Knutsen, Ingrid A; Serrano, Manuel; Lionis, Christos; Wensing, Michel; Rogers, Anne

    2017-06-01

    The spread of self-care holds the promise of containing chronic illness burden. Falling within the framework of a FP7 collaborative research project, this paper reports the views of key informants from six countries regarding who the main stakeholders are at different levels in the support system for self-care for patients with chronic illness (SSSC) and how they accomplish their role and collaborate. 90 Interviews with purposefully selected key informants from Bulgaria, Greece, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain and United Kingdom were conducted. Interviews involved government and local authorities, politicians, academics, health professionals and private sector representatives. Interviewers followed an expert opinion-based guide. Analysis involved a cross-country examination with thematic analysis and framework method techniques. Key informants described the ideal SSSC as inclusive, interdependent and patient-centred. The following main stakeholders in SSSC were identified: patients, governments, health-care professionals, associations, private companies and the media. In the current SSSCs, collaboration among stakeholders within and across different levels was said to be lacking. Patients were seen as playing a passive subordinate role based on the following: their own attitudes; the paternalistic and medicalized attitudes of the health-care professionals; their misrepresentation by patient associations; and their exposure to the damaging influences of media and industries. Making SSSC patient-centred constitutes the greatest challenge for European authorities. Strategies must be revised for promoting patient participation. They should undergo changes so as to promote industry and media social responsibility and patient association advocacy capacity. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. How accurately do instructors judge students' attitudes online? A measurement of expectations and level of satisfaction with an Online Information Systems masters program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren-Nicole Macht

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to run a successful educational program, instructors as well as staff members must constantly review and adapt to the expectations, concerns, demographics and satisfaction level of their student consumers. This study was conducted in order to examine these issues in an online educational setting. First, interviews were given to the program instructors in order to determine their opinions about the students' expectations and satisfaction levels. This information was then used to create a student survey that assessed the students' expectations and level of satisfaction. These two sets of results were then compared This comparison revealed that the online instructors did have a good grasp of the online students' expectations, concerns, demographics and satisfaction level. The only areas where the instructors' concepts of student views were slightly less accurate was student concerns and student feelings about the program administration, where the instructors overestimated the level of concern the students had about successfully returning to the learning environment and underestimated the students' satisfaction with the program's administration. This leads us to conclude that, even with the added online factor, instructors strongly understand student expectations, satisfaction levels, demographics and concerns.

  9. Adolescents’ willingness for intergenerational support: Relations to maternal expectations and mothers’ life satisfaction in 14 cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Boris; Schwarz, Beate; Trommsdorff, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    How is adolescents’ willingness for intergenerational support affected by parents’ expectations and parenting behavior? Does youths’ willingness for intergenerational support in turn affect parents’ well-being? The current study addresses these questions from a cross-cultural perspective, using data from connected samples of mother-adolescent dyads (N = 4162) from 14 diverse cultural contexts as part of the “Value of Children and Intergenerational Relations Study” (Trommsdorff & Nauck, 2005)....

  10. Question order sensitivity of subjective well-being measures: focus on life satisfaction, self-rated health, and subjective life expectancy in survey instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunghee; McClain, Colleen; Webster, Noah; Han, Saram

    2016-10-01

    This study examines the effect of question context created by order in questionnaires on three subjective well-being measures: life satisfaction, self-rated health, and subjective life expectancy. We conducted two Web survey experiments. The first experiment (n = 648) altered the order of life satisfaction and self-rated health: (1) life satisfaction asked immediately after self-rated health; (2) self-rated health immediately after life satisfaction; and (3) two items placed apart. We examined their correlation coefficient by experimental condition and further examined its interaction with objective health. The second experiment (n = 479) asked life expectancy before and after parental mortality questions. Responses to life expectancy were compared by order using ANOVA, and we examined interaction with parental mortality status using ANCOVA. Additionally, response time and probes were examined. Correlation coefficients between self-rated health and life satisfaction differed significantly by order: 0.313 (life satisfaction first), 0.508 (apart), and 0.643 (self-rated health first). Differences were larger among respondents with chronic conditions. Response times were the shortest when self-rated health was asked first. When life expectancy asked after parental mortality questions, respondents reported considering parents more for answering life expectancy; and respondents with deceased parents reported significantly lower expectancy, but not those whose parents were alive. Question context effects exist. Findings suggest placing life satisfaction and self-rated health apart to avoid artificial attenuation or inflation in their association. Asking about parental mortality prior to life expectancy appears advantageous as this leads respondents to consider parental longevity more, an important factor for true longevity.

  11. Effect of an e-Learning Tool on Expectations and Satisfaction Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culliton, Sharon E; Bryant, Dianne M; MacDonald, Steven J; Hibbert, Kathy M; Chesworth, Bert M

    2018-07-01

    Orthopedic surgeons recognize patient expectations of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can be managed through education. E-learning is the application of educational technology. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether an e-learning tool could affect whether patients' expectations were met and they were satisfied 1 year following TKA. Patients with osteoarthritis from the London Health Sciences Centre, Canada, were randomly assigned to either a control group (n = 207) receiving standard patient education or an intervention group (n = 209) using the e-learning tool in addition to the standard. We used a web-based system with permuted block sizes, stratified by surgeon and first or second TKA. Preoperative measures were completed following the patients' preadmission clinic visit. Postoperative patient-reported outcome measures were completed at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 1 year after TKA. One year after TKA, risk difference was used to determine between-group differences for patient satisfaction and expectations being met. One year postoperatively, the risk that expectations of patients were not met was 21.8% in the control group and 21.4% in the intervention group for an adjusted risk difference of 1.3% (95% confidence interval, -7.8% to 10.4%, P = .78). The proportion of patients satisfied with their TKA at 1 year postoperative was 78.6% in the intervention and 78.2% in the control groups. There was no between-group difference at 1 year between intervention and control groups for either the risk that expectations of patients were not met or the proportion of patients who were dissatisfied with their TKA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An empirical study of patients' expectations and satisfactions in Egyptian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Mohamed M

    2005-01-01

    This paper seeks to investigate how patients perceive service quality in Egypt's public and private hospitals. The paper also tests the SERVQUAL dimensions in hospitals within an Arab, non-Western context. The authors used a cross-sectional questionnaire survey, performed in 2005. A sample of 332 patients from eight hospitals in Egypt participated in the study. The results highlighted a three-factor solution for the SERVQUAL instrument with 67 per cent of variance explained. This result does not support the five-components original SERVQUAL. A discriminant function was estimated for patients who selected public hospitals and those who selected private hospitals. The model was found to be significant in explaining patients' choice of the type of hospital. The use of quantitative methods alone is valuable in establishing relationships between variables, but is considered weak when attempting to identify the reasons for those relationships. Patients may have a complex set of important beliefs that cannot be captured in the questionnaire. Therefore, using qualitative research along quantitative methods in future studies may enhance the findings of this study. This article will be of interest to both public and private hospitals wishing to determine what patients expect from the quality of service provided to them.

  13. Differentiating innovation priorities among stakeholder in hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambooij, Mattijs S; Hummel, Marjan J

    2013-08-16

    Decisions to adopt a particular innovation may vary between stakeholders because individual stakeholders may disagree on the costs and benefits involved. This may translate to disagreement between stakeholders on priorities in the implementation process, possibly explaining the slow diffusion of innovations in health care. In this study, we explore the differences in stakeholder preferences for innovations, and quantify the difference in stakeholder priorities regarding costs and benefits. The decision support technique called the analytic hierarchy process was used to quantify the preferences of stakeholders for nine information technology (IT) innovations in hospital care. The selection of the innovations was based on a literature review and expert judgments. Decision criteria related to the costs and benefits of the innovations were defined. These criteria were improvement in efficiency, health gains, satisfaction with care process, and investments required. Stakeholders judged the importance of the decision criteria and subsequently prioritized the selected IT innovations according to their expectations of how well the innovations would perform for these decision criteria. The stakeholder groups (patients, nurses, physicians, managers, health care insurers, and policy makers) had different preference structures for the innovations selected. For instance, self-tests were one of the innovations most preferred by health care insurers and managers, owing to their expected positive impacts on efficiency and health gains. However, physicians, nurses and patients strongly doubted the health gains of self-tests, and accordingly ranked self-tests as the least-preferred innovation. The various stakeholder groups had different expectations of the value of the nine IT innovations. The differences are likely due to perceived stakeholder benefits of each innovation, and less to the costs to individual stakeholder groups. This study provides a first exploratory quantitative

  14. Electronic health record in the internal medicine clinic of a Brazilian university hospital: Expectations and satisfaction of physicians and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Jurandir Godoy; Azevedo, Raymundo Soares

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the satisfaction and expectations of patients and physicians before and after the implementation of an electronic health record (EHR) in the outpatient clinic of a university hospital. We conducted 389 interviews with patients and 151 with physicians before and after the implementation of a commercial EHR at the internal medicine clinic of Hospital das Clínicas of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (HC-FMUSP), Brazil. The physicians were identified by their connection to the outpatient clinic and categorized by their years since graduation: residents and preceptors (with 10 years or less of graduation) or assistants (with more than 10 years of graduation). The answers to the questionnaire given by the physicians were classified as favorable or against the use of EHR, before and after the implementation of this system in this clinic, receiving 1 or 0 points, respectively. The sum of these points generated a multiple regression score to determine which factors contribute to the acceptance of EHR by physicians. We also did a third survey, after the EHR was routinely established in the outpatient clinic. The degree of patient satisfaction was the same before and after implementation, with more than 90% positive evaluations. They noted the use of the computer during the consultation and valued such use. Resident (younger) physicians had more positive expectations than assistants (older physicians) before EHR implementation. This optimism was reduced after implementation. In the third evaluation the use of EHR was higher among resident physicians. Resident physicians perceived and valued the EHR more and used it more. In 28 of the 57 questions on performance of clinical tasks, resident physicians found it easier to use EHR than assistant physicians with significant differences (pclinical setting should be preceded by careful planning to improve physician's adherence to the use of EHR. Patients do not seem to notice much difference to the

  15. Job satisfaction among Iranian hospital-based practicing nurses: examining the influence of self-expectation, social interaction and organisational situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravari, Ali; Bazargan, Mohsen; Vanaki, Zohre; Mirzaei, Tayebe

    2012-05-01

    The influence of self-expectation, social interaction, and organisational situation on job satisfaction among nurses is examined. Understanding determinants and correlates of job satisfaction are important factors that help to reduce the problem of nurse attrition. Utilizing the Hybrid Model of concept development, job satisfaction was examined in three phases: (1) the theoretical phase, a working definition and the dimensions of job satisfaction were established; (2) the fieldwork phase, a qualitative semi-structured interview was employed to capture participants' perceptions of the concept; and (3) the analytical phase, the experiences of nurses were evaluated using the conceptual model. The results indicate that personal beliefs, rather than social interaction or organisational situation, constitute the core of job satisfaction. Despite the variety of dissatisfaction factors rooted in social interaction and organisational situation, participants achieved the highest job satisfaction when trusting in self-value systems and the spiritual value of their job objectives. Intervention is needed to increase organisational and professional support for nurses. However, highlighting the sacred and spiritual value of the nursing profession, which is rooted in religious values and culture, provides additional reinforcement for enhancing the job satisfaction among this segment of health care providers. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. An Analysis of Patient Perceptions and Expectations to Dental Implants: Is There a Significant Effect on Long-Term Satisfaction Levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Here we present an analysis of patient perceptions and expectations to dental implant placement and their prosthetic reconstruction, to then consider whether they have an effect on long-term satisfaction levels. A Post-Treatment Completion Questionnaire was designed to analyse whether patient satisfaction is influenced by age and/or gender; has an effect on patient-reported self-confidence levels; contributes to increased levels of oral hygiene; provides further insight into the average pain levels during and after the surgical intervention; or influences further acceptance of dental implant surgery. And then whether relationships exist between any of these factors. 182 consecutive patients completed the survey: 68 males and 114 females (age mean 64.68 years ± 11.23 SD); the average number of months since treatment completion was 37.4 (males) and 62.6 (females). There is a significant relationship between comfort rating and “how well informed” the patient was (p = 0.015). A significantly positive relationship exists between “considering dental implants in the future” and “overall experience” (p = 0.001). A significantly positive relationship exists between “overall satisfaction with appearance” and “satisfaction with comfort” (p = 0.011). A significant relationship exists between “overall satisfaction with appearance,” “satisfaction with comfort,” and “overall satisfaction with experience” (p = 0.001). The results amplify the need to transmit logical, truthful information to patients when dental implant treatment is being considered. The “fully informed” patient will have realistic expectations that lead to high degrees of satisfaction. PMID:28928771

  17. Customer needs, expectations, and satisfaction with clinical neurophysiology services in Ireland: a case for tele-neurophysiology development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimons, M; Ronan, L; Murphy, K; Browne, G; Connolly, S; McMenamin, J; Delanty, N

    2004-01-01

    Although equitable access to services should be based on need, geographical location of patients and their clinicians can give rise to inequalities in healthcare delivery. Development of tele-medicine services can improve equity of access. The specialty of Clinical Neurophysiology (CN), currently under-developed in Ireland provides an example of such potential. This study aimed to determine the needs, expectations, and satisfaction of CN customers, namely patients and referring clinicians. The goal was to examine geographical impediments to access that might be addressed by the introduction of tele-neurophysiology. Two customer surveys were conducted: CN referring clinicians and CN patients. Thirty-one North Western Health Board (NWHB) consultant clinicians responded to a postal survey. Distance and delays caused by long waiting lists were felt to deter or make CN referral irrelevant. Ninety-seven percent believed the lack of a local service negatively impacts on patient management and 93% would welcome the introduction of a tele-neurophysiology service. The geographical location of patient's residence and/or the location of the referring clinician's practice influenced waiting lists for CN. Fifty-eight (105/182) percent of patients living in a region with a CN service compared to 39% (50/128) of those living in a region with no service received an appointment within one month. In addition to the current insufficient CN service capacity in Ireland, these surveys highlighted geographical inequities. Tele-neurophysiology has the potential to speed-up diagnosis, result in more patients being appropriately investigated and be fairer to patients.

  18. Expectation and satisfaction of HIV/AIDS patients toward the pharmaceutical care provided at Gondar University Referral Hospital, Northwestern Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abebe TB

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tamrat Befekadu Abebe,1 Daniel Asfaw Erku,2 Begashaw Melaku Gebresillassie,1 Kaleab Taye Haile,3 Abebe Basazn Mekuria4 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 3Department of Pharmaceutics, 4Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Purpose: Measurements of patient satisfaction help to assess the performance of health service provision and predict treatment adherence and outcomes. This study aimed to assess human HIV/AIDS patients’ expectation of and satisfaction with the pharmaceutical service delivered at Gondar University Referral Hospital, Ethiopia. Patients and methods: An institution-based cross-sectional study was performed from May 11 to 25, 2015. A total of 291 patients living with HIV/AIDS were included using a simple random sampling method. Data were collected using structured questionnaires measuring expectation and satisfaction of respondents using a Likert scale of 1–5 through face-to-face interviews. The data collected were entered into and analyzed using Statistical Packages for Social Sciences. Comparison was made between those respondents who lived in and outside the town. Results: The overall mean expectation and satisfaction of respondents toward pharmacy setting and services were 3.62 and 3.13, respectively. More than half (56.1% of the participants were dissatisfied with the comfort and convenience of waiting area and private counseling room. Similarly, 69.3% of the respondents claimed that pharmacy professionals did not give information about side effects and drug–drug and drug–food interactions of antiretroviral medications. There was a statistically significant difference between respondents who live in and outside Gondar town in overall expectation (t=3.415, P=0.001 with the pharmacy setting and services. Conclusion: In this study, the overall satisfaction level of respondents with pharmaceutical service (pharmacy setting and services

  19. ANALYSIS OF MOTIVATION, EXPECTATIONS ATTAINMENT AND SATISFACTION OF GRADUATE STUDENTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY, UNIVERSITY OF SÃO PAULO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Santos Arini

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Aspects such as motivation, attainment of the expectations and satisfaction of students have been the target of studies aimed at improving teaching. Investigate the perception of graduate students and their experiences, as they progress in educational programs, provides data that can help improve these programs and support services. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed at analyzing the motivation, attainment of the expectations and satisfaction of graduate students in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of São Paulo regarding their own training as scientists and/or teachers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were collected on October and November 2015, through the application of a questionnaire composed of three major categories: motivation, attainment of the expectations and satisfaction, and twelve subcategories: extrinsic, intrinsic and influenced by the environment motivation; attainment of expectations; satisfaction with the project; courses; scholarship; supervision; work environment; workload; deadlines; formation. The results were validated through Cronbach's Alpha (greater than 0,7 and the item-total correlation index, larger than 0.2 in all items of the questionnaire. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS: Extrinsic motivation of students is strongly influenced by the perspective of progress in career (more than 65%. Intrinsic motivation is influenced by the aspiration to become scientists (85.4%, learn more about their work (94.3% and contribute to the construction of Science (83.1%. The motivation influenced by the environment affects these students for the high productivity of the program (69.7%, the solid education it offers (84.3% and its reputation (74.1%. The program has met the students’ expectations (72%; they are satisfied with their project (77.6%, with the courses (62.5%, and the supervision received (76.4%, with the work environment (83.2% intralaboratory; 64.1% extralaboratory, with the deadlines (over 61% and formation

  20. A randomized trial of written emotional disclosure interventions in school teachers: controlling for positive expectancies and effects on health and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Laura; O'Connor, Daryl B; Jones, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Writing expressively about distressing experiences has been found to have beneficial health effects. This study examined the effects of written emotional disclosure (WED) interventions on the self-reported health and job satisfaction of school teachers, and compared standard WED instructions with two commonly used more prescriptive variants. The study also controlled and measured the between-condition comparability of participants' post-writing benefit expectations. Teachers (final N = 77) were randomized to a control writing condition or one of three WED conditions that varied the number and/or type of experiences participants wrote about. All teachers wrote for 20 min on three consecutive days at home. Psychological health, physical health, and job satisfaction were assessed at baseline, two weeks, two months, and six months post-intervention. Participants' expectations of benefit following writing were equivalent across conditions. There was no significant effect of any of the three WED interventions, compared to control writing, on psychological or physical health or job satisfaction. There was, however, a significant and sizeable improvement in physical health across writing conditions from baseline to two-month follow-up, and this was maintained at six months. The findings show that control writing can produce comparable expectations of benefit to WED, and are consistent with the possibility that benefit expectancies can effect health improvements following disclosure or control writing. Most previous studies have examined WED with students or patient groups, and the findings also raise an important question about the feasibility of multi-session writing interventions for mid-life working samples. Further studies with occupational groups are warranted, as is further investigation into the role of positive expectancies in WED effects.

  1. Stakeholders' expectations on connectivity research for water and land management addressed by a survey in the collaborative EU-COST Connecteur network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetanova, Anna; Paton, Eva N.; Keesstra, Saskia

    2016-04-01

    Transfer of knowledge across the science-society interface is essential for both, ethical and economic reasons, and inevitable for successful climate change adaptation and integrated management of sustainable, resilient landscapes. The transdisciplinary research of connectivity (which is the degree to which a system facilitates the movement of matter and energy through itself. It is an emergent property of the system state, Connecteur web resources,2015) has the potential to supply monitoring, modelling and management tools to land and water managers in order to reach these goals. The research of water and sediment connectivity has received significant and increasing scientific attention across the entire realm of the environmental disciplines, and the COST Action ES 1306 Connecteur facilitates the multi-sectorial collaboration in connectivity research at EU level. In order to appropriately address the transfer of the cutting edge research developments of the Connecteur network, the collaborative research project on stakeholders' perception of connectivity was conducted by the Working Group 5 "Transition of connectivity research towards sustainable land and water management". The questionnaire survey on stakeholder perception was conducted by volunteering scientist involved in the Connecteur network together from 19 European countries. Together 84 stakeholders from all mayor sectors in water and land management were asked about the main challenges of their work, their understanding of connectivity, the desired areas of cooperation with connectivity science, and the best tools for transferring knowledge. The results showed differences between different stakeholders groups in the way they percept and work with connectivity, as well as their requirement of knowledge transfers. While farmers, and (in lower extend) the agricultural administration officers articulated no, or little need for connectivity management, the majority of stakeholders involved in land and water

  2. The treatment of patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms in China: a study comparing expectations and treatment satisfaction in psychosomatic medicine, biomedicine, and traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, Kurt; Xudong, Zhao; Anselm, Kathrin; Kern, Stephanie; Wirsching, Michael; Schaefert, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about treatment for patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) in China. This study investigates the treatment expectations and treatment satisfaction of patients with MUS in psychosomatic medicine, biomedicine, and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). In a cross-sectional survey, n = 96 (10.3%) out of 931 participating patients were screened positive for multiple somatoform symptoms. These patients answered questionnaires concerning symptom duration, number of doctor visits, functional impairment, emotional distress, treatment expectations, treatment satisfaction, and empathy in the consultation. The physicians filled in a questionnaire about applied or recommended treatment. Most of the patients from psychosomatic medicine wanted psychotherapy. In TCM, 55% of the patients had already received TCM treatment and most of them wanted to continue TCM treatment. Patients in biomedicine did not express clear expectations; most of them had had no previous treatment. A combination of treatment methods was most prevalent in biomedicine in comparison to psychosomatic medicine and TCM. The outcome from the patients' point of view was significantly better in TCM than in psychosomatic medicine and biomedicine. Psychosomatic medicine's strength was the empathetic physician-patient interaction. From a biopsychosocial perspective, these results suggest that various treatment approaches with various emphases can be effective depending on the patient's complaints, his illness beliefs, and what the physician offers. The results will be verified in a larger multicenter longitudinal study.

  3. The Mediation Effect of Trusting Beliefs on The Relationship between Expectation-Confirmation and Satisfaction with The Usage of Online Product Recommendation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ashraf

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Online Product Recommendations (OPRs are increasingly available to onlinecustomers as a value-added self-service in evaluating and choosing a product.Research has highlighted several advantages that customers can gain from usingOPRs. However, the realization of these advantages depends on whether and towhat extent customers embrace and fully utilise them. The relatively low OPR usagerate indicates that customers have not yet developed trust in OPRs’ performance.Past studies also have established that satisfaction is a valid measure of systemperformance and a consistent significant determinant of users’ continuous systemusage. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the mediation effect of trustingbeliefs on the relationship between expectation-confirmation and satisfaction. Theproposed research model is tested using data collected via an online survey from626 existing users of OPRs. The empirical results revealed that social-psychologicalbeliefs (perceived confirmation and trust are significant contributors to customersatisfaction with OPRs. Additionally, trusting beliefs partially mediate the impactof perceived confirmation on customer satisfaction. Moreover, this study validatesthe extensions of the interpersonal trust construct to trust in OPRs and examinesthe nomological validity of trust in terms of competence, benevolence, andintegrity. The findings provide a number of theoretical and practical implications. 

  4. The acceptability of an Internet-based exposure treatment for flying phobia with and without therapist guidance: patients’ expectations, satisfaction, treatment preferences, and usability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Daniel; Mira, Adriana; Bretón-López, Juana; Castilla, Diana; Botella, Cristina; Baños, Rosa Maria; Quero, Soledad

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Internet-based treatments have been tested for several psychological disorders. However, few studies have directly assessed the acceptability of these self-applied interventions in terms of expectations, satisfaction, treatment preferences, and usability. Moreover, no studies provide this type of data on Internet-based treatment for flying phobia (FP), with or without therapist guidance. The aim of this study was to analyze the acceptability of an Internet-based treatment for FP (NO-FEAR Airlines) that includes exposure scenarios composed of images and real sounds. A secondary aim was to compare patients’ acceptance of two ways of delivering this treatment (with or without therapist guidance). Patients and methods The sample included 46 participants from a randomized controlled trial who had received the self-applied intervention with (n = 23) or without (n = 23) therapist guidance. All participants completed an assessment protocol conducted online and by telephone at both pre- and posttreatment. Results Results showed good expectations, satisfaction, opinion, and usability, regardless of the presence of therapist guidance, including low aversiveness levels from before to after the intervention. However, participants generally preferred the therapist-supported condition. Conclusion NO-FEAR Airlines is a well-accepted Internet-based treatment that can help enhance the application of the exposure technique, improving patient acceptance and access to FP treatment. PMID:29636613

  5. How countries cope with competing demands and expectations: perspectives of different stakeholders on priority setting and resource allocation for health in the era of HIV and AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Françoise; Tiendrebeogo, Georges; Coolen, Anne; Blok, Lucie; Kouanda, Seni; Sataru, Fuseini; Ralisimalala, Andriamampianina; Mwapasa, Victor; Kiyombo, Mbela; Plummer, David

    2012-12-11

    Health systems have experienced unprecedented stress in recent years, and as yet no consensus has emerged as to how to deal with the multiple burden of disease in the context of HIV and AIDS and other competing health priorities. Priority setting is essential, yet this is a complex, multifaceted process. Drawing on a study conducted in five African countries, this paper explores different stakeholders' perceptions of health priorities, how priorities are defined in practice, the process of resource allocation for HIV and Health and how different stakeholders perceive this. A sub-analysis was conducted of selected data from a wider qualitative study that explored the interactions between health systems and HIV and AIDS responses in five sub-Saharan countries (Burkina Faso, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Madagascar and Malawi). Key background documents were analysed and semi-structured interviews (n = 258) and focus group discussions (n = 45) were held with representatives of communities, health personnel, decision makers, civil society representatives and development partners at both national and district level. Health priorities were expressed either in terms of specific health problems and diseases or gaps in service delivery requiring a strengthening of the overall health system. In all five countries study respondents (with the exception of community members in Ghana) identified malaria and HIV as the two top health priorities. Community representatives were more likely to report concerns about accessibility of services and quality of care. National level respondents often referred to wider systemic challenges in relation to achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Indeed, actual priority setting was heavily influenced by international agendas (e.g. MDGs) and by the ways in which development partners were supporting national strategic planning processes. At the same time, multi-stakeholder processes were increasingly used to identify

  6. Higher Education Quality: Perception Differences among Internal and External Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Munirul

    2015-01-01

    Conceptually, education quality of higher education can be determined by evaluation of their stakeholders's satisfaction level. The purpose of this study is to describe how students as external stakeholder and lecturers as internal stakeholder, perceived their satisfaction of learning experience in the university. This study was conducted in…

  7. Community Opinion and Satisfaction with the Leadership at an Urban Community Educational Learning Center during an Organizational Transformation Process: A Frontline Perspective from Community Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Joseph Lee

    2013-01-01

    This study examined selected community stakeholders' perception of the current leadership at their local community educational learning center during an organizational transformation and cultural change process. The transition from a community college to an educational learning center, mandated in 2006 by the Accredition Commission and agreed on…

  8. Stakeholder Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flak, Leif Skiftenes; Rose, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    to e-Government. Originally a management theory, stakeholder theory advocates addressing the concerns of all stakeholders in a firm, as opposed to concentration on the interests of senior managers and stockholders. Apart from the original profit focus, there is no serious conceptual mismatch between...... of governance. Finally, the paper makes recommendations for future work in adapting ST to the e-government context....

  9. How countries cope with competing demands and expectations: perspectives of different stakeholders on priority setting and resource allocation for health in the era of HIV and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenniskens Françoise

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health systems have experienced unprecedented stress in recent years, and as yet no consensus has emerged as to how to deal with the multiple burden of disease in the context of HIV and AIDS and other competing health priorities. Priority setting is essential, yet this is a complex, multifaceted process. Drawing on a study conducted in five African countries, this paper explores different stakeholders′ perceptions of health priorities, how priorities are defined in practice, the process of resource allocation for HIV and Health and how different stakeholders perceive this. Methods A sub-analysis was conducted of selected data from a wider qualitative study that explored the interactions between health systems and HIV and AIDS responses in five sub-Saharan countries (Burkina Faso, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Madagascar and Malawi. Key background documents were analysed and semi-structured interviews (n = 258 and focus group discussions (n = 45 were held with representatives of communities, health personnel, decision makers, civil society representatives and development partners at both national and district level. Results Health priorities were expressed either in terms of specific health problems and diseases or gaps in service delivery requiring a strengthening of the overall health system. In all five countries study respondents (with the exception of community members in Ghana identified malaria and HIV as the two top health priorities. Community representatives were more likely to report concerns about accessibility of services and quality of care. National level respondents often referred to wider systemic challenges in relation to achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs. Indeed, actual priority setting was heavily influenced by international agendas (e.g. MDGs and by the ways in which development partners were supporting national strategic planning processes. At the same time, multi-stakeholder

  10. THE FEATURES OF MUSEUM COMMUNICATION: THE JUSTIFICATION OF EXPECTATIONS AND THE SATISFACTION OF AESTHETIC NEED (ON THE EXAMPLE OF THE MUSEUM VISITORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Dzakhotovna Gurieva

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of interaction between the museum and visitors, actual in the modern society. It presents the results of empirical researches, held in the Museum (General Staff Building of the State Hermitage Museum. 2500 persons participated in this research. The subject of analysis is the correlation of aesthetic needs, the museum communication, the justification of expectations, and personal differences of the visitors, depending on the awareness and satisfaction of aesthetic need. Based on the scientific literature review, we concluded that it is necessary to approach to the study of the museum communication in terms of a socio-psychological process, considering that the aesthetic need expresses outwardly the inner psychological characteristics of a person. To analyze the structure of the museum communication, and justification of expectations we used the questionnaire surveys including the value judgments of the visitors. To explore personal characteristics of the museum visitors have been used: the test of hardiness S. Maddi, D.A. Leontiev, the brief version of E.N. Osin and E.I. Rasskazova the test of life orientations (DLC D.A. Leontiev, the questionnaire “Importance and satisfaction of needs” of L.V. Kulikov. As the mathematical-statistical methods were applied: the correlation analysis with the r-Spearman correlation coefficient; comparative analysis of mean values; comparative analysis of nominative variables of independent samples with the χ2-Pearson; factor analysis of the principal component with Varimax rotation. Statistical data processing was performed with the SPSS Statistica v. 20. The results can be applied in the field of socio-psychological researches and the practice of visitor’s museum activities.

  11. Experiences with and expectations of maternity waiting homes in Luapula Province, Zambia: a mixed-methods, cross-sectional study with women, community groups and stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibuye, Peggy S; Bazant, Eva S; Wallon, Michelle; Rao, Namratha; Fruhauf, Timothee

    2018-01-25

    models was not certain. Women and communities in the selected facilities accept and value maternity homes. However, interventions are needed to address women's needs for better infrastructure, services, food, security, privacy and transportation. Strengthening relationships between the managers of the homes and their communities can serve as the foundation to meet the needs and expectations of pregnant women. Particular attention should be paid to ensuring that maternity homes meet quality standards and remain sustainable.

  12. Stakeholder Involvement Throughout the Life Cycle of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This report demonstrates the importance of stakeholder involvement throughout the life cycle of all nuclear facilities; including operating reactors, temporary spent fuel storage facilities and final radioactive waste repositories and follows what is defined in the IAEA Safety Standards GS-R-3 where the stakeholders' expectations (identified as 'interested parties' in GS-R-3) shall be taken into consideration 'in the activities and interactions in the processes of the management system, with the aim of enhancing the satisfaction of interested parties while at the same time ensuring that safety is not compromised'. This report explains how involving stakeholders in decision making processes, even for those stakeholder groups that do not have a direct role in making those decisions, can enhance public confidence in the application of nuclear science and technology. In addition, this report presents general guidance on stakeholder involvement. It does not provide detailed procedures for developing and implementing stakeholder involvement programmes, and specifics regarding stakeholder involvement for particular types of nuclear facilities. However, this publication references reports that provide such details. This publication provides assistance to those responsible for planning, designing, constructing, operating or decommissioning a nuclear facility. In addition, regulatory organizations and other authorities overseeing nuclear activities or managing nuclear facility licensing processes are often seen as the main source of independent information for the general public; therefore, stakeholder involvement can demonstrate capability and trustworthiness of regulatory organizations as well. The role of stakeholder involvement at different stages of a facility's life cycle is discussed, with suggestions on developing the components of a comprehensive stakeholder involvement plan. Included is guidance on focusing communication with certain stakeholders, applying various

  13. Tools for Stakeholder Involvement in Facility Management Service Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia; Scupola, Ada

    that are more in line with the stakeholder needs and expectations, and may thus result in increased customer satisfaction, better services and, at the very end, an increased competitive advantage for the organization. Background: The background of this study lies in user involvement in service design...... in the design process as well as FM service provision processes. Research limitations: The major limitation of the study consists of the relatively small amount of interviews conducted, which is the basis for finding the tools in FM service design processes....

  14. Corporate responses to stakeholder activism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldam, Julie; Krause Hansen, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Corporations are increasingly expected to act responsibly. The purpose of this paper is to examine two types of corporate responses to these expectations: overt and covert responses. Specifically, it examines oil companies’ involvement in multi-stakeholder initiatives and sponsorships (overt...

  15. Referral expectations of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.L.; Altmaier, E.; Berberoglu, L.; Morris, K.

    1989-01-01

    The expectation of the referring physician are key to developing a successful practice in radiology. Structured interviews with 17 clinicians in both community care and academic practice documented that accuracy of the radiologic report was the single most important factor in clinician satisfaction. Data intercorrelation showed that accuracy of report correlated with frequency of referral (r = .49). Overall satisfaction of the referring physician with radiology correlated with accuracy (r = .69), patient satisfaction (r = .36), and efficiency in archiving (r = .42). These data may be weighted by departmental managers to allocate resources for improving referring physician satisfaction

  16. STAKEHOLDER LINKAGES FOR SUSTAINABLE LAND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    Key words: Stakeholders; farmer-expert linkages; resource management; Ethiopia. Introduction ... decentralized democratic decision making processes and thus ..... district offices within the given time limits. They were often .... -less willing and less ready to hearing weaker performance reports (expect more success with ...

  17. Disparities in new graduate transition from multiple stakeholder perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamack, Monica; Rush, Kathy L

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand multiple stakeholder perspectives of new graduate (NG) transition programs. It was part of a larger mixed-methods study (2011) designed to provide a comprehensive assessment of new graduate nurse transition best practices, across six British Columbia health authorities. Data collection involved individual interviews with academic nurse educators (n=4) and separate focus groups with new graduate (n=48) and front-line nurse leaders (n=69). Disparity emerged as the overriding theme and described differences between stakeholder group perspectives, between expectations and reality, and within and across programs. Four disparities emerged: entry-level education and practice, perspectives on employment and career planning, transition program elements and support. Despite general satisfaction with undergraduate preparation, theory-practice gaps were identified. New Graduates experienced misalignments between their employment expectations and their realities. The employed student nurse program in which many new graduates had participated did not always yield employment, but when it did, differences in transitional expectations arose between new graduates and leaders. There was considerable variation across and within provincial new graduate programs with respect to orientation, supernumerary time and preceptorship characteristics, including lack of training. Disparities arose in the nature, amount of and access to support and the monitoring of new graduate progress. Findings reinforced organizational complexities and the importance of communication across education and practice sectors. This paper uncovers the tensions between the perspectives of new graduates and nurse leaders about transitional programs and opens the opportunity to collaborate in aligning the perspectives.

  18. PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND RELATIONSHIP MARKETING: INTERSECTIONS FOR STAKEHOLDER MANAGEMENT IN PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronielton Rezende Oliveira

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Projects development is essential for organizations. Among the factors originated in projects that influence performance is quality. This variable must be managed to meet the expectations of the stakeholders and this can only be achieved through effective monitoring and control. It can be seen that relationship marketing is relevant to the competitive reality of contemporary organizations. With the purpose of contributing to organizational studies, this theoretical essay proposes to approach project management in relationship marketing. In the context of integrated management, it is discussed how management action can be applied to engage and involve stakeholders in projects, in order to create value and achieve the expectations sustained by the execution of the projects. Based on the reflection, the quality of relationship management is pointed out as a construct of higher order, composed of at least two dimensions: trust and satisfaction.

  19. Expectancy Theory Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    accomplish the task, (2) the instrumentality of task performance for job outcomes, and (3) the instrumentality of outcomes for need satisfaction . We...in this discussion: effort, performance , outcomes, and needs. In order to present briefly the conventional approach to the Vroom models, another...Presumably, this is the final event in the sequence of effort, performance , outcome, and need satisfaction . The actual research reported in expectancy

  20. An Investigation of the Effects of Customer’s Expectations and Perceived Quality on Customer’s Loyalty with the Mediating Role of the Perceived Value and Customer’s Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoudreza Mostaghimi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to investigate the effect of customer’s expectations and the perceived quality on customer’s loyalty with the mediating role of the perceived value and customer’s satisfaction. The statistic population of the article includes the customers of the agencies of Iran Khodro Company in Gilan province, the city of Rasht and due to the infinity of statistic population, the sample volume has been considered from the amount of 384, based on the Morgan table. After the collection of questionnaires, data has been analyzed by means of LISREL Software. The analysis of findings indicates that customer’s expectations of the products of Iran Khodro Company affected the perceived quality of the product as well as customer’s satisfaction positively and meaningfully. The research results have also indicated that the perceived quality of the products of Iran Khodro Company also has affected the perceived value of the product and the customer’s satisfaction, which has been representative of customer’s loyalty. In the area of customer’s perceptions of the quality of hardware, managers must pay more attention to beauty and charm of the surroundings and try to provide enough explanation and necessary response to customer’s questions about the selected automobiles. It is suggested to managers that by means of improving one of the dimensions of quality, they also improve customer’s perceptions and requests in other dimensions. Planning is necessary and required in order to improve the local space of agencies, improving the quality, and decreasing components prices. Planning for decreasing final price and supplying components with lower prices will be important.

  1. Initiation and Maintenance of Weight Loss after Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding. The role of Outcome Expectation and Satisfaction with the Psychosocial Outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, H.; Larsen, J.K.; Ridder, D.T.D. de; Ramshorst, B. van; Geenen, R.

    2009-01-01

    A premise of this study was that different psychological processes would predict the initiation and maintenance of weight loss after surgery for morbid obesity. Our aim was to examine whether more favorable preoperative expectations of psychosocial outcomes predict weight loss in the first year

  2. An Analysis of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR on Stakeholders Loyalty: Perceptions of Malaysian Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmi Mohd Isa, PhD (Hull, UK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR and stakeholder loyalty to the Malaysian organisations. Stakeholder satisfaction was used to measure the mediating effects between CSR and stakeholder loyalty. A developed CSR items were used to measure the CSR of an organisation The research was conducted using online survey to reach 377 organisations that have CSR’s initiatives. Results showed that Malaysian stakeholders were loyal with organisations that have CSR. Stakeholder satisfaction also found to fully mediate the relationship between CSR and stakeholder loyalty. Furthermore, a constructive CSR dimension(s would be better to measure the stakeholders’ relationship. Importantly, the study shows the importance of CSR towards stakeholder loyalty. Once the needs are more clearly identified and understood, organisation will be in a better position to also anticipate stakeholders’ satisfaction in order to gain loyalty from the stakeholders.

  3. A Simulation Model for Measuring Customer Satisfaction through Employee Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zondiros, Dimitris; Konstantopoulos, Nikolaos; Tomaras, Petros

    2007-12-01

    Customer satisfaction is defined as a measure of how a firm's product or service performs compared to customer's expectations. It has long been a subject of research due to its importance for measuring marketing and business performance. A lot of models have been developed for its measurement. This paper propose a simulation model using employee satisfaction as one of the most important factors leading to customer satisfaction (the others being expectations and disconfirmation of expectations). Data obtained from a two-year survey in customers of banks in Greece were used. The application of three approaches regarding employee satisfaction resulted in greater customer satisfaction when there is serious effort to keep employees satisfied.

  4. Project stakeholder management

    CERN Document Server

    Eskerod, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    Carrying out a project as planned is not a guarantee for success. Projects may fail because project management does not take the requirements, wishes and concerns of stakeholders sufficiently into account. Projects can only be successful though contributions from stakeholders. And in the end, it is the stakeholders that evaluate whether they find that the project is a success. To manage stakeholders effectively, you need to know your stakeholders, their behaviours and attitudes towards the project. In Project Stakeholder Management, the authors give guidance on how to adopt an analytical and s

  5. Stakeholder Analysis Worksheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakeholder Analysis WorksheetA worksheet that can be used to document potential stakeholder groups, the information or expertise they hold, the role that they can play, their interests or concerns about the HIA

  6. Customer satisfaction research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tormasi, T

    1987-03-01

    A review of four aspects of the Gas and Fuel Corporation of Victoria's study of customer satisfaction covers: (1) corporate goals to meet its responsibility as a public utility and operate as a successful marketing organization, (2) the history of customer satisfaction research by GFC, (3) measurements of customer satisfaction through expectations research, and (4) case studies involving domestic appliance maintenance and gas mains renewal. Continuous validation of GFC's policies and procedures is the basis for future growth and success. 3 tables.

  7. Managing Diverse Stakeholders

    OpenAIRE

    Pipkin, Erin; Porter, Sean; Clark, Rickie

    2017-01-01

    For every public project, there is a diverse group of stakeholders who need and want information. During this session we outline important stakeholders, how and when to involve them in the planning process, and how targeted messaging might be the key to your project’s success. We also discuss how to identify and manage stakeholders who oppose your project.

  8. Stakeholder Relationships in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Juha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a stakeholder map to describe the most important stakeholders and the process of stakeholder relationships in higher education. According to the perspective of the balanced scorecard, the classification of stakeholders integrates stakeholders into strategic management. Stakeholder maps are essential in…

  9. Stakeholder involvement in CSR strategy-making?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Leila

    2014-01-01

    A given characteristic of successful corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs is that they reflect stakeholder expectations and preferences for corporate behavior. This study examines the process by which this alignment is sought by CSR managers in the CSR strategy-making process. Through...... listening to others in the strategy-making process rather than directly involving others in decision-making. Also, because non-stakeholders, such as paid-for consultants, are found to be note-worthy influencers in the CSR strategy-making process, it is concluded that the process is not only a stakeholder...

  10. Impact of Stakeholder Psychological Empowerment on Project Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herry Pintardi Chandra

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between psychological empowerment of stakeholders and project success is an important thing that must be known by project manager. This research developed and tested the model to predict how well the impact of stakeholder psychological empowerment on project success. Stakeholder psychological empowerment was defined to have five indicator variables covering intrinsic motivation, opportunity to perform, ability to perform, task behaviors, and contextual behaviors. Meanwhile, project success can be measured by cost performance, time performance, quality performance, profitability, and customer satisfaction. In this study, it was hypothesized that stakeholder psychological empowerment influenced project success. Based on the data obtained from a questionnaire survey carried out to 204 respondents, structural equation modeling (SEM was used for predicting the performance of project success. It was found that stakeholder psychological empowerment influenced project success, especially on the ability to perform of stakeholders.

  11. Measuring satisfaction with public services

    OpenAIRE

    Senior, Nicki

    2011-01-01

    This study used the 'delivery paradox' (Blaug et al. 2006, p.6) as a catalyst to examine customer satisfaction with the public services. The 'delivery paradox' exists where the rise in the level of delivery improvements does not elicit a corresponding rise in public satisfaction with services (ibid). Expectancy Disconfirmation Theory underpins the measurement of customer satisfaction. However, a review of the literature by MORl (2002) concluded that whilst expectations are known to be shaped ...

  12. Intelligence, Education, and Facets of Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzach, Yoav

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of two sets of National Longitudinal Survey data found that intelligence had a strong negative effect on intrinsic satisfaction, little effect on pay satisfaction, and positive association with desired job complexity, not expected pay. Education had a strong negative effect on pay satisfaction, little effect on intrinsic satisfaction, and…

  13. The Probability Model of Expectation Disconfirmation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Hsin HUANG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a probability model to explore the dynamic process of customer’s satisfaction. Bases on expectation disconfirmation theory, the satisfaction is constructed with customer’s expectation before buying behavior and the perceived performance after purchase. The experiment method is designed to measure expectation disconfirmation effects and we also use the collection data to estimate the overall satisfaction and model calibration. The results show good fitness between the model and the real data. This model has application for business marketing areas in order to manage relationship satisfaction.

  14. Stakeholder approach for evaluating organizational change projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltokorpi, Antti; Alho, Antti; Kujala, Jaakko; Aitamurto, Johanna; Parvinen, Petri

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to create a model for evaluating organizational change initiatives from a stakeholder resistance viewpoint. The paper presents a model to evaluate change projects and their expected benefits. Factors affecting the challenge to implement change were defined based on stakeholder theory literature. The authors test the model's practical validity for screening change initiatives to improve operating room productivity. Change initiatives can be evaluated using six factors: the effect of the planned intervention on stakeholders' actions and position; stakeholders' capability to influence the project's implementation; motivation to participate; capability to change; change complexity; and management capability. The presented model's generalizability should be explored by filtering presented factors through a larger number of historical cases operating in different healthcare contexts. The link between stakeholders, the change challenge and the outcomes of change projects needs to be empirically tested. The proposed model can be used to prioritize change projects, manage stakeholder resistance and establish a better organizational and professional competence for managing healthcare organization change projects. New insights into existing stakeholder-related understanding of change project successes are provided.

  15. Performance expectation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, P.E.

    1998-09-04

    This document outlines the significant accomplishments of fiscal year 1998 for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) team. Opportunities for improvement to better meet some performance expectations have been identified. The PHMC has performed at an excellent level in administration of leadership, planning, and technical direction. The contractor has met and made notable improvement of attaining customer satisfaction in mission execution. This document includes the team`s recommendation that the PHMC TWRS Performance Expectation Plan evaluation rating for fiscal year 1998 be an Excellent.

  16. Stakeholder analysis of Agroparks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubben, E.F.M.; Isakhanyan, G.

    2011-01-01

    An agropark is a cluster in which several primary producers and processors cooperate to enhance sustainable agrofood production. Because agroparks represent complex system innovations, this article studies their realisation trajectories from the stakeholder management perspective. By using the case

  17. Stakeholder Attitudes EBM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) conducted a survey of fisheries stakeholders on the Gulf and East Coasts of the United States seeking their views on...

  18. Collaborative learning framework for online stakeholder engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodyakov, Dmitry; Savitsky, Terrance D; Dalal, Siddhartha

    2016-08-01

    Public and stakeholder engagement can improve the quality of both research and policy decision making. However, such engagement poses significant methodological challenges in terms of collecting and analysing input from large, diverse groups. To explain how online approaches can facilitate iterative stakeholder engagement, to describe how input from large and diverse stakeholder groups can be analysed and to propose a collaborative learning framework (CLF) to interpret stakeholder engagement results. We use 'A National Conversation on Reducing the Burden of Suicide in the United States' as a case study of online stakeholder engagement and employ a Bayesian data modelling approach to develop a CLF. Our data modelling results identified six distinct stakeholder clusters that varied in the degree of individual articulation and group agreement and exhibited one of the three learning styles: learning towards consensus, learning by contrast and groupthink. Learning by contrast was the most common, or dominant, learning style in this study. Study results were used to develop a CLF, which helps explore multitude of stakeholder perspectives; identifies clusters of participants with similar shifts in beliefs; offers an empirically derived indicator of engagement quality; and helps determine the dominant learning style. The ability to detect learning by contrast helps illustrate differences in stakeholder perspectives, which may help policymakers, including Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, make better decisions by soliciting and incorporating input from patients, caregivers, health-care providers and researchers. Study results have important implications for soliciting and incorporating input from stakeholders with different interests and perspectives. © 2015 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Stakeholders: theory and practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedman, Andrew L; Miles, Samantha

    2006-01-01

    ... of the concept on practice and policy. However, as the concept has become more popular, the path has become tangled with the many different ways the concept has been used. For example, different practices have come to be called stakeholder activities, particularly by those seeking to use the label to legitimize their actions. Also, a range of different definitions as to what a stakeholder is has emerged. Concentrating on these issues encourages a view of a second future path of the stake...

  20. Engaging stakeholder networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svendsen, A. [CoreRelation Consulting Inc., Delta, BC (Canada)]|[Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada); Laberge, M. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Management philosophies concerning stakeholder engagement were reviewed. This presentation provided guidelines for managers working from a sustainability value creation framework who wish to develop more effective ways to engage with stakeholders and high stakes issues that cross political, social and organizational boundaries. It was suggested that conflicts over resources, the demand for participation and the increasing power of Non-Governmental Organizations have all contributed to the increased need for stakeholder engagement. A review of different types of stakeholders was provided. Earlier strategies of managing stakeholders were examined, in which externalities such as environmental cost were not accounted for. By contrast, the emerging management philosophy presented here stressed a recognition that long term survival relied on the good health of external and internal environments. Core business strategies were discussed with reference to core values. It was suggested that a longer term focus, inclusiveness, and integration were beneficial to businesses as a whole. A case study of Clayoquot Sound was presented. The concept of social capital was examined. Individual and collective learning were evaluated. A model for engaging stakeholder networks was presented as well as a step by step procedural guide, which included the creation of a solid foundation; organizational alignment; strategy; the importance of asking questions; trust building; evaluation; and renewal. Challenges to stakeholder engagement included finding resources; ensuring consistency; patience; a tendency in business to measure success in short term payoffs; and maintaining a stakeholder perspective. It was concluded that the benefits of a sustainability value creation framework for businesses far outweighed any initial disadvantages. refs., tabs., figs.

  1. Stakeholder Values and Ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Sveinsdottir, Thordis; Wessels, Bridgette; Smallwood, Rod; Linde, Peter; Kalla, Vasso; Tsoukala, Victoria; Sondervan, Jeroen

    2013-01-01

    This report is the deliverable for Work Package 1 (WP1), Stakeholder Values and Ecosystems, of the EU FP7 funded project RECODE (Grant Agreement No: 321463), which focuses on developing Policy Recommendations for Open Access to Research Data in Europe. WP1 focuses on understanding stakeholder values and ecosystems in Open Access, dissemination and preservation in the area of scientific and scholarly data (thus not government data). The objectives of this WP are as follows: • Identify and map ...

  2. THE STAKEHOLDER MODEL REFINED

    OpenAIRE

    Y. FASSIN

    2008-01-01

    The popularity of the stakeholder model has been achieved thanks to its powerful visual scheme and its very simplicity. Stakeholder management has become an important tool to transfer ethics to management practice and strategy. Nevertheless, legitimate criticism continues to insist on clarification and emphasises on the perfectible nature of the model. Here, rather than building on the discussion from a philosophical or theoretical point of view, a different and innovative approach has been c...

  3. Introducing legal method when teaching stakeholder theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Governments are particularly salient stakeholders for business ethics. They act on societal needs and social expectations, and have the political and legal powers to restrict or expand the economic freedoms of business as well as the legitimacy and often urgency to do so. We draw on two examples:...

  4. Part A: An Exploration of Stakeholder Engagement in Social Enterprise

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, Roopam

    2008-01-01

    This report sets out to explore stakeholder engagement as currently practised in social enterprises in Nottingham City. The literature displays confusion about many of the characteristics of social enterprise, but there is overwhelming consensus that social enterprises are built on stakeholder engagement. Given the debate about definitions of and this expectation of stakeholder involvement in Social Enterprise, this report addresses the following questions in the context of three social e...

  5. IMPLICATIONS OF CSR ON CORPORATE STAKEHOLDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crisan Catalina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Companies’ strategies and values must be in accordance to stakeholders’ expectations and needs because their role and influences on companies’ activity are decisive for companies future development. Corporate Social Responsibility is a meaningful way through which companies can pursue sustainable development by having a coherent economical, social and environmental perspective on how the business should be managed. CSR must become an integral part of corporate management system, because it has a major role in distressing the relation between company and major stakeholders, both internally and externally. CSR is a global phenomenon, which draws the attention of a growing number of partisans, from public private and social sector. To demonstrate the applicability of the theoretical approaches deduced from the existing literature, the authors recourse to an empirical qualitative research, conducted through a questionnaire implemented to top managers, HR managers and heads of CSR departments within large companies that operate in Romania. The research is based on the analysis of a number of 87 questionnaires and aims to highlight major stakeholders and finding how companies’ responsible activities can influence stakeholders. This study is designed to highlight how prioritization of stakeholders influences CSR initiatives within large companies that operate in Romania, and to present a perspective of company’s approach towards shared value influence major stakeholders. The conclusions drawn have a greater relevance both theoretically and especially practically because provides insights on how large companies perceive CSR and how stakeholders influence responsible initiatives in emergent country like Romania where stereotypes are difficult to manage.

  6. STAKEHOLDER DISTRUST - Implications of Distrust Research for Stakeholder Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Laude, Daniel; Weibel, Antoinette; Sachs, Sybille; Schafheitle, Simon Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Stakeholder theory has addressed the role of trust in organization-stakeholder relationships in depth. Although it is similarly relevant, distrust as a distinct construct from (low) trust has received relatively little consideration by stakeholder theorists. Thus, this article focuses on stakeholder distrust and reflects on the findings of distrust research in organizational studies and the implications for stakeholder theory. For this purpose, we conduct a systematic literature review of org...

  7. Shareholder, stakeholder-owner or broad stakeholder maximization

    OpenAIRE

    Mygind, Niels

    2004-01-01

    With reference to the discussion about shareholder versus stakeholder maximization it is argued that the normal type of maximization is in fact stakeholder-owner maxi-mization. This means maximization of the sum of the value of the shares and stake-holder benefits belonging to the dominating stakeholder-owner. Maximization of shareholder value is a special case of owner-maximization, and only under quite re-strictive assumptions shareholder maximization is larger or equal to stakeholder-owner...

  8. Childbirth expectations and correlates at the final stage of pregnancy in Chinese expectant parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: This study adds to understanding of the childbirth expectations of Chinese expectant parents. It is suggested that maternity healthcare providers pay close attention to the childbirth expectations of expectant parents, and improve the nursing care service to promote positive childbirth experiences and satisfaction of expectant parents.

  9. Corporate Stakeholding and Globalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauesen, Linne Marie

    2016-01-01

    , the global warming, the disasters of global consumerism in terms of the collapse of the Rana Plaza factory in the fashion industry, are examples of how the stakeholder concept cannot continue to be defined as narrow as corporations usually does. The butterfly effect of globalism has shown to be – yes, global....... Even the smallest company, the single consumer and the tiniest decision made by anyone may in the future – perhaps even tomorrow – affect stakeholders, we didn’t know existed. The future generation is also to be considered as stakeholders, which decisions made today may affect. Companies, consumers......, everyday people including children already know this even from the first day at school if not before. What we need is not knowledge about these phenomena – it is how to think globally when we decide locally: in companies, in daily households, in education of our future generations. This chapter discusses...

  10. EDUCATIONAL PROJECTS STAKEHOLDER MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юлія Юріївна ГУСЄВА

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An approach based on an integration of requirements breakdown structure and work breakdown structure of the project is proposed. It can complement existing methods of project stakeholders classification with the indicator of resource input, which can be defined in monetary terms. A method of requirements monitoring is proposed, which allows you to track the requirements of project stakeholders over time according to the actual amount of resources spent by analogy with the earned value method. Proposed indexes are the basis not only for monitoring but for the forecast of the project. The need of creating of a mechanism for getting baseline data taking into account the existence of different types of requirements of project stakeholders is grounded.

  11. Patient satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanu Prakash

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Patient satisfaction is an important and commonly used indicator for measuring the quality in health care. Patient satisfaction affects clinical outcomes, patient retention, and medical malpractice claims. It affects the timely, efficient, and patient-centered delivery of quality health care. Patient satisfaction is thus a proxy but a very effective indicator to measure the success of doctors and hospitals. This article discusses as to how to ensure patient satisfaction in dermatological practice.

  12. Job satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    PODROUŽKOVÁ, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    Bachelor thesis deals with job satisfaction. It is often given to a context with the attitude to work which is very much connected to job satisfaction. Thesis summarises all the pieces of information about job satisfacion, factors that affect it negatively and positively, interconnection of work satisfaction and work motivation, work behaviour and performance of workers, relationship of a man and work and at last general job satisfaction and its individual aspects. In the thesis I shortly pay...

  13. Patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Bhanu

    2010-09-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important and commonly used indicator for measuring the quality in health care. Patient satisfaction affects clinical outcomes, patient retention, and medical malpractice claims. It affects the timely, efficient, and patient-centered delivery of quality health care. Patient satisfaction is thus a proxy but a very effective indicator to measure the success of doctors and hospitals. This article discusses as to how to ensure patient satisfaction in dermatological practice.

  14. A comparative study of expectant parents ' childbirth expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Bi-Chin; Gau, Meei-Ling; Wu, Shian-Feng; Kuo, Bih-Jaw; Lee, Tsorng-Yeh

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand childbirth expectations and differences in childbirth expectations among expectant parents. For convenience sampling, 200 couples willing to participate in this study were chosen from two hospitals in central Taiwan. Inclusion criteria were at least 36 weeks of gestation, aged 18 and above, no prenatal complications, and willing to consent to participate in this study. Instruments used to collect data included basic demographic data and the Childbirth Expectations Questionnaire. Findings of the study revealed that (1) five factors were identified by expectant parents regarding childbirth expectations including the caregiving environment, expectation of labor pain, spousal support, control and participation, and medical and nursing support; (2) no general differences were identified in the childbirth expectations between expectant fathers and expectant mothers; and (3) expectant fathers with a higher socioeconomic status and who had received prenatal (childbirth) education had higher childbirth expectations, whereas mothers displayed no differences in demographic characteristics. The study results may help clinical healthcare providers better understand differences in expectations during labor and birth and childbirth expectations by expectant parents in order to improve the medical and nursing system and promote positive childbirth experiences and satisfaction for expectant parents.

  15. Perspectives on User Satisfaction Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Rowena

    2001-01-01

    Discusses academic libraries, digital environments, increasing competition, the relationship between service quality and user satisfaction, and user surveys. Describes the SERVQUAL model that measures service quality and user satisfaction in academic libraries; considers gaps between user expectations and managers' perceptions of user…

  16. Shaping a valued learning journey: Student satisfaction with learning in undergraduate nursing programs, a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Morgan R; Grealish, Laurie; Henderson, Saras

    2018-05-01

    Student satisfaction is a quality measure of increasing importance in undergraduate programs, including nursing programs. To date theories of student satisfaction have focused primarily on students' perceptions of the educational environment rather than their perceptions of learning. Understanding how students determine satisfaction with learning is necessary to facilitate student learning across a range of educational contexts and meet the expectations of diverse stakeholders. To understand undergraduate nursing students' satisfaction with learning. Constructivist grounded theory methodology was used to identify how nursing students determined satisfaction with learning. Two large, multi-campus, nursing schools in Australia. Seventeen demographically diverse undergraduate nursing students studying different stages of a three year program participated in the study. Twenty nine semi-structured interviews were conducted. Students were invited to describe situations where they had been satisfied or dissatisfied with their learning. A constructivist grounded theory approach was used to analyse the data. Students are satisfied with learning when they shape a valued learning journey that accommodates social contexts of self, university and nursing workplace. The theory has three phases. Phase 1 - orienting self to valued learning in the pedagogical landscape; phase 2 - engaging with valued learning experiences across diverse pedagogical terrain; and phase 3 - recognising valued achievement along the way. When students experience a valued learning journey they are satisfied with their learning. Student satisfaction with learning is unique to the individual, changes over time and maybe transient or sustained, mild or intense. Finding from the research indicate areas where nurse academics may facilitate satisfaction with learning in undergraduate nursing programs while mindful of the expectations of other stakeholders such as the university, nurse registering authorities

  17. Workplace-based assessment for general practitioners: using stakeholder perception to aid blueprinting of an assessment battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Douglas J; Bruce, David; Eva, Kevin W

    2008-01-01

    The implementation of an assessment system may be facilitated by stakeholder agreement that appropriate qualities are being tested. This study investigated the extent to which stakeholders perceived 8 assessment formats (multiple-choice questions, objective structured clinical examination, video, significant event analysis, criterion audit, multi-source feedback, case analysis and patient satisfaction questionnaire) as able to assess varying qualities of doctors training in UK general practice. Educationalists, general practice trainers and registrars completed a blueprinting style of exercise to rate the extent to which each evaluation format was perceived to assess each of 8 competencies derived primarily from the General Medical Council document 'Good Medical Practice'. There were high levels of agreement among stakeholders regarding the perceived qualities tested by the proposed formats (G = 0.82-0.93). Differences were found in participants' perceptions of how well qualities were able to be assessed and in the ability of the respective formats to test each quality. Multi-source feedback (MSF) was expected to assess a wide range of qualities, whereas Probity, Health and Ability to work with colleagues were limited in terms of how well they could be tested by the proposed formats. Awareness of the perceptions of stakeholders should facilitate the development and implementation of workplace-based assessment (WPBA) systems. These data shed light on the acceptability of various formats in a way that will inform further investigation of WPBA formats' validity and feasibility, while also providing evidence on which to base educational efforts regarding the value of each format.

  18. A framework for multi-stakeholder decision-making and conflict resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    We propose a decision-making framework to compute compromise solutions that balance conflicting priorities of multiple stakeholders on multiple objectives. In our setting, we shape the stakeholder dis-satisfaction distribution by solving a conditional-value-at-risk (CVaR) minimiz...

  19. Evolutionary Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, Ulrik William

    2014-01-01

    , they are correlated among people who share environments because these individuals satisfice within their cognitive bounds by using cues in order of validity, as opposed to using cues arbitrarily. Any difference in expectations thereby arise from differences in cognitive ability, because two individuals with identical...... cognitive bounds will perceive business opportunities identically. In addition, because cues provide information about latent causal structures of the environment, changes in causality must be accompanied by changes in cognitive representations if adaptation is to be maintained. The concept of evolutionary......The concept of evolutionary expectations descends from cue learning psychology, synthesizing ideas on rational expectations with ideas on bounded rationality, to provide support for these ideas simultaneously. Evolutionary expectations are rational, but within cognitive bounds. Moreover...

  20. Unequal Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    the role of causal inference in social science; and it discusses the potential of the findings of the dissertation to inform educational policy. In Chapters II and III, constituting the substantive contribution of the dissertation, I examine the process through which students form expectations...... of the relation between the self and educational prospects; evaluations that are socially bounded in that students take their family's social position into consideration when forming their educational expectations. One important consequence of this learning process is that equally talented students tend to make...... for their educational futures. Focusing on the causes rather than the consequences of educational expectations, I argue that students shape their expectations in response to the signals about their academic performance they receive from institutionalized performance indicators in schools. Chapter II considers...

  1. Multicriteria mapping of stakeholder preferences in regulating nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2010-01-01

    In order to facilitate stakeholder discussions on how to regulate nanotechnology, the opensource program multicriteria mapping (MCM) was used to structure 26 interviews with stakeholders in the USA. MCM offers a systematic part quantitative, part qualitative approach to clarify why some regulatory options (bans, moratoriums, voluntary measures, etc.) were deemed to be acceptable/unacceptable by various stakeholders and which criteria stakeholders used to evaluate the different regulatory options. Adopting an incremental approach and implementing a new regulatory framework was evaluated as the best options whereas a complete ban and no additional regulation of nanotechnology were found to be the least favorable. Criteria applied differed substantially among stakeholders and included social, ethical, regulatory, environmental, and health issues. Opinions on future regulation seem far less polarized than expected and it seems that stakeholders would welcome a combination of voluntary measures, an incremental approach and forming of a new regulatory framework.

  2. Multicriteria mapping of stakeholder preferences in regulating nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2010-08-01

    In order to facilitate stakeholder discussions on how to regulate nanotechnology, the opensource program multicriteria mapping (MCM) was used to structure 26 interviews with stakeholders in the USA. MCM offers a systematic part quantitative, part qualitative approach to clarify why some regulatory options (bans, moratoriums, voluntary measures, etc.) were deemed to be acceptable/unacceptable by various stakeholders and which criteria stakeholders used to evaluate the different regulatory options. Adopting an incremental approach and implementing a new regulatory framework was evaluated as the best options whereas a complete ban and no additional regulation of nanotechnology were found to be the least favorable. Criteria applied differed substantially among stakeholders and included social, ethical, regulatory, environmental, and health issues. Opinions on future regulation seem far less polarized than expected and it seems that stakeholders would welcome a combination of voluntary measures, an incremental approach and forming of a new regulatory framework.

  3. Deliberating Together on Geological Repository Siting: Expectations and Challenges in the Czech Republic. Synthesis and International Perspective of the 9. Community Visit and National Workshop of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) - Czech Republic, 24-26 October 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The 9. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency 'Forum on Stakeholder Confidence' Community Visit and National Workshop was held in Karlovy Vary, Chyse and Blatno in the Czech Republic in October 2012. Entitled 'Deliberating Together on Geological Repository Siting', the workshop focussed on the process for siting an installation for the final management of spent nuclear fuel, and the expectations and challenges raised by this process. Three themes were examined: developing confidence in a participatory process; local and regional partnership and added value; and expectations for safety assurance by national, local and regional authorities. The workshop was held under the patronage of the Minister of Industry and Trade of the Czech Republic. It was hosted by SURAO, the state-controlled Radioactive Waste Repository Authority, in cooperation with the pluralistic Working Group for Dialogue on the Site Selection Process for a Deep Geological Repository (including representatives from directly concerned municipalities and civil society, as well as from the national authorities, technical organisations; the group is chaired by a professor of sociology from the Czech Academy of Sciences). A large number of mayors and community representatives attended the full workshop. The international FSC contingent was made up of 49 delegates from 14 countries as well as the European Commission. Several citizens attended from municipalities across Europe, of which all had hosted FSC workshops in the past. For the first time in an FSC event, the Community Visit took the form of a public meeting. This was created as a neutral platform to enable debate about Czech and international siting experience. About one hundred residents of communities concerned by the Czech siting process attended this 2-hour meeting hosted by a mayor and chaired by the FSC Secretariat. A small panel of Czech stakeholders from both the national technical level and local civil society presented their positions and concerns

  4. Survivorship care plans: are randomized controlled trials assessing outcomes that are relevant to stakeholders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birken, Sarah A; Urquhart, Robin; Munoz-Plaza, Corrine; Zizzi, Alexandra R; Haines, Emily; Stover, Angela; Mayer, Deborah K; Hahn, Erin E

    2018-03-23

    The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes assessed in extant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to outcomes that stakeholders expect from survivorship care plans (SCPs). To facilitate the transition from active treatment to follow-up care for the 15.5 million US cancer survivors, many organizations require SCP use. However, results of several RCTs of SCPs' effectiveness have been null, possibly because they have evaluated outcomes on which SCPs should be expected to have limited influence. Stakeholders (e.g., survivors, oncologists) may expect outcomes that differ from RCTs' outcomes. We identified RCTs' outcomes using a PubMed literature review. We identified outcomes that stakeholders expect from SCPs using semistructured interviews with stakeholders in three healthcare systems in the USA and Canada. Finally, we mapped RCTs' outcomes onto stakeholder-identified outcomes. RCT outcomes did not fully address outcomes that stakeholders expected from SCPs, and RCTs assessed outcomes that stakeholders did not expect from SCPs. RCTs often assessed outcomes only from survivors' perspectives. RCTs of SCPs' effectiveness have not assessed outcomes that stakeholders expect. To better understand SCPs' effectiveness, future RCTs should assess outcomes of SCP use that are relevant from the perspective of multiple stakeholders. SCPs' effectiveness may be optimized when used with an eye toward outcomes that stakeholders expect from SCPs. For survivors, this means using SCPs as a map to guide them with respect to what kind of follow-up care they should seek, when they should seek it, and from whom they should seek it.

  5. Shareholder, stakeholder-owner or broad stakeholder maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Niels

    2004-01-01

    With reference to the discussion about shareholder versus stakeholder maximization it is argued that the normal type of maximization is in fact stakeholder-owner maxi-mization. This means maximization of the sum of the value of the shares and stake-holder benefits belonging to the dominating...... including the shareholders of a company. Although it may be the ultimate goal for Corporate Social Responsibility to achieve this kind of maximization, broad stakeholder maximization is quite difficult to give a precise definition. There is no one-dimensional measure to add different stakeholder benefits...... not traded on the mar-ket, and therefore there is no possibility for practical application. Broad stakeholder maximization instead in practical applications becomes satisfying certain stakeholder demands, so that the practical application will be stakeholder-owner maximization un-der constraints defined...

  6. Microfoundations for stakeholder theory: Managing stakeholders with heterogeneous motives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bridoux, F.; Stoelhorst, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Instrumental stakeholder theory proposes a positive relationship between fairness toward stakeholders and firm performance. Yet, some firms are successful with an arms-length approach to stakeholder management, based on bargaining power rather than fairness. We address this puzzle by relaxing the

  7. Great Expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickens, Charles

    2005-01-01

    One of Dickens's most renowned and enjoyable novels, Great Expectations tells the story of Pip, an orphan boy who wishes to transcend his humble origins and finds himself unexpectedly given the opportunity to live a life of wealth and respectability. Over the course of the tale, in which Pip

  8. Patient (customer) expectations in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostan, Sedat; Acuner, Taner; Yilmaz, Gökhan

    2007-06-01

    The expectations of patient are one of the determining factors of healthcare service. The purpose of this study is to measure the Patients' Expectations, based on Patient's Rights. This study was done with Likert-Survey in Trabzon population. The analyses showed that the level of the expectations of the patient was high on the factor of receiving information and at an acceptable level on the other factors. Statistical meaningfulness was determined between age, sex, education, health insurance, and the income of the family and the expectations of the patients (pstudy, the current legal regulations have higher standards than the expectations of the patients. The reason that the satisfaction of the patients high level is interpreted due to the fact that the level of the expectation is low. It is suggested that the educational and public awareness studies on the patients' rights must be done in order to increase the expectations of the patients.

  9. Multi-stakeholder Virtual Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Niels; Mühlbacher, Hans

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces the special issue on multi-stakeholder virtual dialogue. Research as well as managerial practice in marketing has traditionally focused on single stakeholders and a one-way communication perspective. This special issue takes a novel approach by directing attention...... success. While marketing literature increasingly recognizes that divers stakeholders have an impact on a company''s success, little is known about how virtual multi-stakeholder dialogue changes marketing research and management. This special issue provides insights on what roles stakeholders may play...... to the simultaneous interaction with and of a variety of stakeholders and the fact that customers and other stakeholders of a company can take the initiative to that interaction. Stakeholders can launch a discussion, spread news, participate in value creation, can heavily influence each other and a company''s market...

  10. Theory-Based Stakeholder Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Morten Balle; Vedung, Evert

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a new approach to program theory evaluation called theory-based stakeholder evaluation or the TSE model for short. Most theory-based approaches are program theory driven and some are stakeholder oriented as well. Practically, all of the latter fuse the program perceptions of the various stakeholder groups into one unitary…

  11. Managing stakeholders in transformational government

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinwald, Anja Kaldahl; Kræmmergaard, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    a stakeholder perspective. The paper reports how they succeeded in involving the most important stakeholders in the process of reaching transformational government. Finally the paper offers six lessons learned, based on the case study, about how to manage the involved stakeholders to reach transformational...

  12. Ontario Energy Board 2005 survey of stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    A survey was conducted among members of the Ontario Energy Board's (OEB) various stakeholder groups in order to measure the Board's performance and to help the Board identify areas for improvement in the way it operates. The survey included telephone interviews with consumer groups, advocacy groups, the energy sector, electricity and gas distributors, financial organizations as well as other stakeholders. The topics addressed in the survey were key energy issues and priority issues; the perceived role of the OEB; the OEB strengths and weaknesses; the importance of various OEB functions; the overall performance of the OEB; an evaluation of OEB communication with industry and consumers; an evaluation of service quality; and, awareness and participation in regulatory policy initiatives. Respondents used a 10-point scale in their evaluation. This report presented the main findings and their interpretations. Major stakeholders identified electricity supply issues and the price of electricity as being the most important energy issues facing Ontario. This report also presented the detailed findings for questions regarding the lack of generator capacity, policy stability, the coal phase out program, electricity blackouts, conservation, electricity restructuring and investment. The major finding of the survey was an overall increase in satisfaction with the OEB's performance. It was suggested that the OEB can improve in timeliness and providing consumer information. The major areas of strength were found to be its professionalism in conducting hearings and the fairness of the Board's decisions and regulations. tabs

  13. Strengthening stakeholder-engaged research and research on stakeholder engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Kristin N; Miller, Elizabeth

    2017-06-01

    Stakeholder engagement is an emerging field with little evidence to inform best practices. Guidelines are needed to improve the quality of research on stakeholder engagement through more intentional planning, evaluation and reporting. We developed a preliminary framework for planning, evaluating and reporting stakeholder engagement, informed by published conceptual models and recommendations and then refined through our own stakeholder engagement experience. Our proposed exploratory framework highlights contexts and processes to be addressed in planning stakeholder engagement, and potential immediate, intermediate and long-term outcomes that warrant evaluation. We use this framework to illustrate both the minimum information needed for reporting stakeholder-engaged research and the comprehensive detail needed for reporting research on stakeholder engagement.

  14. Experiments expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Gorini, B; Meschi, E

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the expectations and the constraints of the experiments relatively to the commissioning procedure and the running conditions for the 2015 data taking period. The views about the various beam parameters for the p-p period, like beam energy, maximum pileup, bunch spacing and luminosity limitation in IP2 and IP8, are discussed. The goals and the constraints of the 2015 physics program are also presented, including the heavy ions period as well as the special...

  15. Earning empowerment from stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.T.

    1994-01-01

    If you want to be stopped in your tracks today through political action, litigation or both, then ignore the concerns of stakeholders who believe that they have been or will be adversely impacted by what you want to do. The frustrated attempts by the United States to permanently dispose of its high level radioactive waste confirm this reality. Unless and until fundamental changes are made in the decision making process, the gridlock of litigation and political maneuvering precipitated by efforts to perfect a permanent repository will remain and likely intensify

  16. The Impacts of Tourism Development on Stakeholders\\' Quality of Life (QOL): A comparison between community residents and employed residents in the hospitality and tourism industry

    OpenAIRE

    Woo, Eunju

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of this dissertation is to determine the relationship between the effects of tourism and stakeholders\\' quality of life. Specifically, the research investigates stakeholders\\' perception of the impact of tourism on their life domains, their satisfaction with life domains, and their overall life satisfaction. The relationships among these three components are examined. Depending on the types of stakeholders, their perceptions of and attitudes toward the impact of tourism and q...

  17. Stakeholder Relations Office

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Scientists, politicians, the public, school children, our neighbours, you. All of these groups of people have a stake in CERN, and all are important to us.   The list of stakeholders in an organisation as large and complex as CERN is a long and ever lengthening one. Each group has its own specific interests and needs in terms of what kind of information it requires from CERN and how we should engage. It’s important, therefore, for us to ensure that we’re communicating optimally with everyone we care about and who cares about us. This is something that CERN has always taken seriously. The CERN Courier, for example, was first published in 1959 and we had a pro-active public information office right from the start. Today, our stakeholder relations are spread between several groups and teams, reflecting the nature of CERN today. But while we’re already doing a good job, I think we can do better by exploiting the synergies between these teams, and that’s wh...

  18. Evaluation Of International Tourist Satisfaction In Weh Island Indonesia Using HOLSAT Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Syafruddin Chan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to examine international tourist satisfaction in marine tourism especially diving and snorkeling in Weh Island Indonesia using Holsat Model. The data for this study come from survey in the field by using questioners and interview not only to tourists but also to other stakeholder such hotel owner government officials international NGO officers and other related parties. 200 Respondents were drawn from four 4 locations most tourists concentrated in Iboih Sumur Tiga Kota and Gapang by using stratified random sampling. The data was tabulated and processed by using Holsat Model that was developed by Tribe and Snaith 1998 as a research instrument for measuring holiday satisfaction. The international travelers were not really satisfied when visited Weh Island. This was because most of the attributes used to measure their satisfaction were still below their expectation. Thus this finding is important for service providers like restaurants travel agents hotels and tourist information centers in Weh Island to improve all the poor indicators rated by tourists. Furthermore the findings demonstrate the usefulness of the HOLSAT model in three aspects First this study identifies tourists sense of satisfaction or dissatisfaction in terms of the various attributes of Weh Island as a holiday destination. Second this study provides insights on how Weh Island is perceived as a holiday destination by international tourists. Third this study provide a better approach to understanding of tourist behavior while they are visiting Weh Island Based on the results of the comparison between expectations and experiences.

  19. Satisfaction with nursing education, job satisfaction, and work intentions of new graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Patricia; Reeve, Rebecca; Hall, Jane

    2016-01-01

    In the context of predictions of future shortages of nurses, retaining new graduate nurses in the nursing workforce is essential to ensure sufficient nurses in the future. This paper investigates the links between satisfaction with nursing education and job satisfaction, and job dissatisfaction and intentions to leave a nursing job. It uses survey data from a cohort study of nursing students recruited through two Australian universities and followed after graduation and workforce entry. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to simultaneously estimate the impact of educational satisfaction (work preparation component) on job satisfaction and the impact of job satisfaction on the expectation of leaving the current job. Two job satisfaction sub-scales were identified: 1) work environment satisfaction and 2) work hours and wages satisfaction. Work preparation satisfaction was significantly and positively associated with both job satisfaction scales but only work environment satisfaction was significantly associated with the expectation to stay in the job; a one standard deviation increase in work environment satisfaction was associated with a 13.5 percentage point reduction in the probability of expecting to leave. The estimated effect of satisfaction with education on expecting to leave, occurring indirectly through job satisfaction, was small (reducing the probability by less than 3 percentage points for a 1 point increase in work preparation satisfaction). Participating in a graduate transition program had the largest effect, reducing the probability of expecting to leave by 26 percentage points, on average. The study results suggest policies which focus on improving satisfaction with the work environment would be more effective at retaining nurses early in their career than improvements to conditions such as work hours and wages. Investment in new graduate transition programs would potentially have the largest impact on retention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  20. Learning and teaching in the regional learning environment : enabling students and teachers to cross boundaries in multi-stakeholder practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Finding solutions for complex societal problems requires cross-boundary collaboration between multiple stakeholders who represent various practices, disciplines and perspectives. The authentic, multi-stakeholder Regional Learning Environment (RLE) is expected to develop higher education students’

  1. ORGANIZATION PERFORMANCE AND EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION

    OpenAIRE

    Milica Jakšiæ, Miloš Jakšiæ

    2014-01-01

    Employee satisfaction related to their job, possibilities of career development, mechanisms of performance measurement and reward, as remuneration systems are of growing importance. Expectations of highly educated workforce continuously increase, so recruiting and retention of such workers becomes key factor of success for modern companies. Success of companies is expected to change together with employee saticfaction.

  2. CAN CSR INFLUENCE EMPLOYEES SATISFACTION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Gazzola

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The study shows how CSR for employees may represent a special opportunity to influence: employees’ general impression of the company and expectations about how the organization treats its employees. Companies have very important role to affect change in their communities and the environment by adopting CSR initiatives. Though short-term benefits might be few, it is likely that the importance of CSR will increase in years to come as people become more interested in the social and environmental effects of companies There’s a debate over whether CSR initiatives, that are socially responsible or environmentally friendly improves employees’ perceptions of the company. When a company has CSR initiatives, employees are more proud of and committed to the organization. This is because the personal identities are partly tied up in the companies that person works for. If a company is saving the world, reflects positively on employees and makes them feel good about the work they do for the company. The role CSR plays in enhancing a company's reputation among its own employees, subsequently boosting their motivation and engagement, is perhaps underrated, which is particularly problematic for companies that are inconsistent in their approach to implementing CSR initiatives. Studies involving CSR have not fully explored how organizational social performance impacts individual employee behaviors nor examined the attributes of individuals comprising stakeholder groups such as employees. The objectives of this study are to analyze the implementation of CSR programs and its impact on employees. The main underlying proposition is that organization can influence its employee through his or her own ethical and responsible behavior. The work culture built upon this sense of organization’s voluntary contribution toward a wide number of stakeholders could invite and encourage employee to adopt the same voluntary attitude and behavior to their own fellow

  3. Stakeholder analysis methodologies resource book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babiuch, W.M.; Farhar, B.C.

    1994-03-01

    Stakeholder analysis allows analysts to identify how parties might be affected by government projects. This process involves identifying the likely impacts of a proposed action and stakeholder groups affected by that action. Additionally, the process involves assessing how these groups might be affected and suggesting measures to mitigate any adverse effects. Evidence suggests that the efficiency and effectiveness of government actions can be increased and adverse social impacts mitigated when officials understand how a proposed action might affect stakeholders. This report discusses how to conduct useful stakeholder analyses for government officials making decisions on energy-efficiency and renewable-energy technologies and their commercialization. It discusses methodological issues that may affect the validity and reliability of findings, including sampling, generalizability, validity, ``uncooperative`` stakeholder groups, using social indicators, and the effect of government regulations. The Appendix contains resource directories and a list of specialists in stakeholder analysis and involvement.

  4. Community expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, L.

    2004-01-01

    Historically, the relationship between the nuclear generator and the local community has been one of stability and co-operation. However in more recent times (2000-2003) the nuclear landscape has had several major issues that directly effect the local nuclear host communities. - The associations mandate is to be supportive of the nuclear industry through ongoing dialogue, mutual cooperation and education, - To strengthen community representation with the nuclear industry and politically through networking with other nuclear host communities. As a result of these issues, the Mayors of a number of communities started having informal meetings to discuss the issues at hand and how they effect their constituents. These meetings led to the official formation of the CANHC with representation from: In Canada it is almost impossible to discuss decommissioning and dismantling of Nuclear Facilities without also discussing Nuclear Waste disposal for reasons that I will soon make clear. Also I would like to briefly touch on how and why expectation of communities may differ by geography and circumstance. (author)

  5. Social responsible communication of nuclear power plant with external stakeholders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoncic, Milan [Nuclear Power Plant Krsko (Slovenia); Zurga, Gordana [Faculty of Organisation Studies in Novo Mesto (Slovenia)

    2016-11-15

    Implications that nuclear technology brings to common physical and social environment, are on daily lists of questions that stakeholders address to owners and operators of nuclear power plants. In this respect, stakeholders expect and demand narrow and explicit answers to concrete questions set. We claim that the acceptability of the NPP in the society can be achieved and maintained also through active communication and trust building between NPP and its stakeholders. A research in this respect was conducted on case of the Krsko NPP, Slovenia. Some institutional and international implications are presented, as well as possible areas for further investigation and research.

  6. Multi-stakeholder perspectives in defining health-services quality in cataract care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolk-Vos, Aline C; van de Klundert, Joris J; Maijers, Niels; Zijlmans, Bart L M; Busschbach, Jan J V

    2017-08-01

    To develop a method to define a multi-stakeholder perspective on health-service quality that enables the expression of differences in systematically identified stakeholders' perspectives, and to pilot the approach for cataract care. Mixed-method study between 2014 and 2015. Cataract care in the Netherlands. Stakeholder representatives. We first identified and classified stakeholders using stakeholder theory. Participants established a multi-stakeholder perspective on quality of cataract care using concept mapping, this yielded a cluster map based on multivariate statistical analyses. Consensus-based quality dimensions were subsequently defined in a plenary stakeholder session. Stakeholders and multi-stakeholder perspective on health-service quality. Our analysis identified seven definitive stakeholders, as follows: the Dutch Ophthalmology Society, ophthalmologists, general practitioners, optometrists, health insurers, hospitals and private clinics. Patients, as dependent stakeholders, were considered to lack power by other stakeholders; hence, they were not classified as definitive stakeholders. Overall, 18 stakeholders representing ophthalmologists, general practitioners, optometrists, health insurers, hospitals, private clinics, patients, patient federations and the Dutch Healthcare Institute sorted 125 systematically collected indicators into the seven following clusters: patient centeredness and accessibility, interpersonal conduct and expectations, experienced outcome, clinical outcome, process and structure, medical technical acting and safety. Importance scores from stakeholders directly involved in the cataract service delivery process correlated strongly, as did scores from stakeholders not directly involved in this process. Using a case study on cataract care, the proposed methods enable different views among stakeholders concerning quality dimensions to be systematically revealed, and the stakeholders jointly agreed on these dimensions. The methods

  7. Stakeholder Salience in ERP Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Salhotra, Eashan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine stakeholder involvement in an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) System project that involves implementation and improvement of the implemented system. The study targets stakeholders, their classification, and their degree of importance during different phases of an ERP project life cycle, i.e. planning, implementation, stabilisation and improvement. The study shows that stakeholder involvement and their salience vary along the ERP project life cycle a...

  8. Customer satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukmir, Rade B

    2006-01-01

    This paper seeks to present an analysis of the literature examining objective information concerning the subject of customer service, as it applies to the current medical practice. Hopefully, this information will be synthesized to generate a cogent approach to correlate customer service with quality. Articles were obtained by an English language search of MEDLINE from January 1976 to July 2005. This computerized search was supplemented with literature from the author's personal collection of peer-reviewed articles on customer service in a medical setting. This information was presented in a qualitative fashion. There is a significant lack of objective data correlating customer service objectives, patient satisfaction and quality of care. Patients present predominantly for the convenience of emergency department care. Specifics of satisfaction are directed to the timing, and amount of "caring". Demographic correlates including symptom presentation, practice style, location and physician issues directly impact on satisfaction. It is most helpful to develop a productive plan for the "difficult patient", emphasizing communication and empathy. Profiling of the customer satisfaction experience is best accomplished by examining the specifics of satisfaction, nature of the ED patient, demographic profile, symptom presentation and physician interventions emphasizing communication--especially with the difficult patient. The current emergency medicine customer service dilemmas are a complex interaction of both patient and physician factors specifically targeting both efficiency and patient satisfaction. Awareness of these issues particular to the emergency patient can help to maximize efficiency, minimize subsequent medicolegal risk and improve patient care if a tailored management plan is formulated.

  9. Stakeholder analysis in the management of irrigation in Kampili area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumiati; Ali, M. S. S.; Fahmid, I. M.; Mahyuddin

    2018-05-01

    Irrigation has appreciable contribution in building food security, particularly rice crops. This study aims to analyze the role of stakeholders involved in distributing of irrigation water. The study was conducted in the Kampili Irrigation Area in South Sulawesi Province Indonesia, the data were obtained through observation and interviews with stakeholders involved, and analysed by stakeholder analysis, based on the interests and power held by the actors. This analysis is intended to provide an optimal picture of the expected role of each stakeholder in the management of irrigation resources. The results show that there were many stakeholders involved in irrigation management. In the arrangement of irrigation distribution there was overlapping authority of the stakeholders to its management, every stakeholder had different interests and power between each other. The existence have given positive and negative values in distributing irrigation water management, then in the stakeholder collaboration there was contestation between them. This contestation took place between the agriculture department, PSDA province, the Jeneberang River Region Hall, the Farmers Group and the P3A.

  10. Integrating Environmental and Stakeholder Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2001-01-01

    Regulation has been an important instrument in pushing the business community towards im-proved environmental performance. However, there has also been increasing pressure from a growing number of stakeholders, including employees, customers, neighbours and NGOs, etc. In order to improve corporate...... relationships with various stakeholders, companies need to be able to identify these stakeholders and assess their influence. The first part of this paper will discuss the relevant theory and introduce a model to analyse and identify the most significant stakeholder groups and their influence on corporate...

  11. Individual differences in satisfaction with activity-based work environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoendervanger, Jan; Ernst, Anja F.; Albers, Casper; Mobach, Mark; Van Yperen, Nico W.

    2018-01-01

    Satisfaction with activity-based work environments (ABW environments) often falls short of expectations, with striking differences among individual workers. A better understanding of these differences may provide clues for optimising satisfaction with ABW environments and associated organisational

  12. Collaborative Stakeholder Engagement. Special Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Matt; Chrislip, David; Workman, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Stakeholder engagement and collaboration are essential to the development of an effective state plan. Engaging a diverse group of stakeholders tasked with working together to create education policies that will have a positive, lasting impact on students is not as easy as it sounds. Experts in the field argue that the traditional stakeholder…

  13. Stakeholder relations and financial performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, B.; Zhou, Y.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze how shareholder performance can be associated with stakeholder relations. As such, we try to find out whether there is an association between financial performance and stakeholder relations with respect to different theoretical notions about the firm. Financial performance is

  14. Stakeholder orientation vs. shareholder value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Caspar

    2003-01-01

    management in listed firms and other traditional remedies. The theoretical insightsare applied on a case from the Danish Supreme Court (Louis Poulsen A/S) where theinterests of the stakeholders were decisive. However, it is shown that the verdict mayinstead harm the relevant stakeholders illustrating how...

  15. Open Innovation and Stakeholder Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Wayne Gould

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paradox of open innovation lies in the conflict between the practical desire to reap the benefits of open innovation and concern over the risk that others will misappropriate those benefits. Stakeholder theory and recent developments in value creation through stakeholder engagement can assist with reconciliation of this inherent structural risk. The limitations of existing open innovation typologies are identified, and a process-based model of open innovation is proposed. The model is then expanded to include stakeholder engagement. When integrated with stakeholder engagement, open innovation processes can be understood to generate benefits beyond the acquisition of specific information sought from external experts. The addition of stakeholder engagement to the open innovation model allows for greater understanding and easier acceptance of the risks inherent in the open innovation process.

  16. Stakeholder Thinking in Sustainability Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Hove Henriksen, Morten; Frier, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The objective of the paper is to describe and discuss how the biotech company Novozymes integrates stakeholder thinking into everyday sustainability practices. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on first-hand experiences as well as secondary information from Novozymes' sta...... to make sense of stakeholder thinking. Originality/value – The contribution of this paper is to provide a detailed analysis of how various stakeholder relations management methods can be used in practice to integrate sustainability in an organisation.......' stakeholder-oriented sustainability activities. Findings – The paper illustrates how a company is striving to transform the general stakeholder principles into concrete, manageable actions. Moreover, the paper describes some of the needs, challenges, and paradoxes experienced by an organisation that is trying...

  17. Online Company-stakeholder Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Rikke Augustinus; Morsing, Mette

    Based on a systematic data collection we study one of the first pioneering company-stakeholder communication campaigns in social media: the case of energy company Vattenfall A/S’s pan-European campaign ‘The Climate Manifesto’. Our findings challenge the general assumption, that stakeholder...... lacked between the company and stakeholders. Vattenfall was accused of green-washing, resulting in a communications crisis. Negative stakeholder reactions consisted of prejudiced and non-negotiable argumentation indicating that social media imposes new managerial challenges since communication processes...... technologies and we question to what extent social media serve the enhancement of improved understandings across corporate and civil society on CSR issues. This paper suggests that managers face a risk of the “double-edge of stakeholder communication” when incorporating social media into their CSR strategies...

  18. Stakeholder involvement in the decommissioning of Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrisson, Norman; LOVE, June; Murray, Marc

    2006-01-01

    participation by the publication of Public Participation Newsletter No 1. The newsletter outlined the progress expected at the site over the coming years and described the criteria and methodology used for involving stakeholders. The process adopted was a two-stage process: Stakeholder panels (internal and external) and Summary paper for wider distribution (to all registered stakeholders, posted on the web site with an electronic questionnaire if participants wish to respond electronically, and distributed to local libraries). The Dounreay Bulletin is the main vehicle for promoting and updating specific issues for the site and for publishing the results of the consultation. It is issued to all staff and registered stakeholders on a fortnightly basis and highlights the main activities of the site. In 2004 UKAEA announced a new decommissioning plan providing more details on its approach to decommissioning, accelerating the programme from 2060 to 2036 and providing important savings from the previous programme. However UKAEA recognises that it needs to retain support from its local community and stakeholders if it is to achieve its acceleration goals. In addition, UKAEA is about to embark on a big consultation about how to deal with radioactive particles in the marine environment and has taken on board the need to get stakeholders involved at the earliest opportunity

  19. Stakeholder Involvement in Swedish Nuclear Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran

    2006-01-01

    The focus in this paper is on past, current and emerging patterns of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a deep repository for final disposal of Sweden's spent nuclear fuel. In particular, we concentrate on how the two municipalities of Oskarshamn and Oesthammar have acted as engaged stakeholders, and have gained recognition as such, in the siting process. In general: How has stakeholder involvement gained acceptance as an activity of value in the siting of major waste facilities? What are the issues currently subject to stakeholder involvement and how have these been decided upon? An effect of the history of nuclear activity in Oskarshamn and Oesthammar is that stakeholder involvement over a final repository can be divided into social and technical issues. Both municipalities have out of tradition, as part of their social acceptance of a new repository, been prepared to surrender extended involvement in key safety issues. They have been prepared to do this because they also see themselves being able to delegate these safety issues to the government authorities SSI and SKI. These two authorities have been acceptable to the two municipalities as their legitimate 'technological guardians'. As physical geology re-enters the siting process for a deep repository, Oskarshamn appear more prepared to break with tradition than Oesthammar. Oskarshamn are currently demanding transparency from SKB in relation to the exact technical and geological criteria they will use to choose between them and Oesthammar as a repository site. In contrast to Oesthammar, Oskarshamn are preparing with the expected help of SKI and SSI to dispute their geology and its relation to nuclear safety with SKB if they consider it necessary. If Oskarshamn act to draw safety issues in relation to alternative methods and sitings into the EIA process where might this lead? As environmental groups now enter the process (three groups were granted funding in the first round - 2005) the character of site

  20. Customer satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Jacob Kjær; Kristensen, Kai

    2007-01-01

    & Westlund, 2003) as well as the structure of the framework (Eskildsen et al., 2004). We know however very little about how the structure of the individual markets with respect to, for instance, how the transparency of products and services affects customer satisfaction. The aim of this article is to analyze...... the effect of the transparency of products and services on customer satisfaction with respect to Danish mobile phone companies, banks and supermarkets from 2004 based on the authors' experiences from the various analyses conducted within the EPSI rating initiative....

  1. Stakeholder analysis for coppice forestry in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IvayloVelichkov

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The study analyzes the state of coppice forestry in Bulgaria during last 18 years. Stakeholders and their interests and preferences in coppice forests are explored and assessed. Forests restitution process in Bulgaria started in 1997 and has not been finished yet. Nevertheless, significant further changes of the current ownershipdistribution are not expected. By the end of 2007, the state was the biggest coppice forest owner/stakeholder in Bulgaria with 71.3% of all coppice forests being state property. The other two important stakeholders are the municipalities (14.0% and private owners (12.0%. Currently, forest owners' number in Bulgaria exceeds 1million, the average holding area being smaller than 1 ha. Only 150 individual plots are larger than 50 ha. The majority of private owners aim at taking maximum and immediate profit from their recently restituted forest properties. In most cases that reflects in clearcuts. Coppice forests management has been one of the problematicissues of Bulgarian forestry for decades. Despite of forest authorities significant efforts, the area of coppice forests in Bulgaria (1.78 million ha in 2007 remained unchanged for a period of 50 years. The official forest policy is still aimed at conversionof coppice forests into seed ones through different silvicultural methods. That policy is applied to almost all coppice forests regardless of their ownership.

  2. Lessons learned on stakeholder issues in decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, P.; Pescatore, C.

    2008-01-01

    Issues of public concern during decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) are partly the same and partly different from those of the preceding phases (planning, construction and operation). While in the course of construction and operation the main challenges include meeting expectations of a higher quality of life, accommodating a growing population, mitigating construction nuisances, and assuring the safe operation of the facility, the main concerns in the D and D phase are decreasing employment rate, the eventual reduction of revenues for the municipality, the future use of the affected land and negative social impacts (e.g., out-migration). The decommissioning phase is characterised by heterogeneity of stakeholder interests and values, difficulties of reaching consensus or compromise, and difficulties in connection with the harmonization of energy production, environmental protection and sustainable socio-economic development considerations. Typically, there might also be tensions between local and regional decisions. As in other phases, the building of trust between stakeholder is crucial from the point of view of conflict management, and social lessons learnt from the siting and developments of nuclear facilities are widely applicable in the field of D and D as well. A review is presented of major lessons to be learnt from NEA activities in the field of decommissioning and stakeholder involvement. (author)

  3. Lessons learned on stakeholder issues in decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Sullivan, P.; Pescatore, C. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 92 - Issy les Moulineaux (France)

    2008-07-01

    Issues of public concern during decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) are partly the same and partly different from those of the preceding phases (planning, construction and operation). While in the course of construction and operation the main challenges include meeting expectations of a higher quality of life, accommodating a growing population, mitigating construction nuisances, and assuring the safe operation of the facility, the main concerns in the D and D phase are decreasing employment rate, the eventual reduction of revenues for the municipality, the future use of the affected land and negative social impacts (e.g., out-migration). The decommissioning phase is characterised by heterogeneity of stakeholder interests and values, difficulties of reaching consensus or compromise, and difficulties in connection with the harmonization of energy production, environmental protection and sustainable socio-economic development considerations. Typically, there might also be tensions between local and regional decisions. As in other phases, the building of trust between stakeholder is crucial from the point of view of conflict management, and social lessons learnt from the siting and developments of nuclear facilities are widely applicable in the field of D and D as well. A review is presented of major lessons to be learnt from NEA activities in the field of decommissioning and stakeholder involvement. (author)

  4. Patient satisfaction with medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Sadovoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients’ evaluation of medical care is becoming more and more important due to expanding patient-centered care. For this purpose a complex index of patient satisfaction with healthcare is used. This parameter reflects the correspondence of actual healthcare services to patient’s expectations that were formed under the influence of cultural, social, economic factors, and personal experience of each patient. Satisfaction is a subjective parameter, thus, a grade of satisfaction is barely connected with quality of healthcare services itself. Moreover, medical organizations should always take into account specific features of each patient, since they can have an influence on customer attitude to medical services.This article comprises the review of publications studying determinants of patient satisfaction. In the course of the study, we analyzed data received by research teams from different countries.According to the review, we made some conclusions. First, determinants of patient satisfaction with healthcare can be divided in two groups. The first group of factors includes patients’ characteristics such as age, gender, ethnical and cultural features. However, researches from different countries revealed that there is a difference in the importance of factors belonging to this group and their influence on satisfaction of certain patient cohorts. The second group includes factors that belong to the process of healthcare services delivery and its organization. Moreover, it was found that patient satisfaction level is changing in a waveform. Thus, medical organization should not only try to increase patient satisfaction level but also maintain it. AS a result, it necessary to monitor patient satisfaction with healthcare services. That is why there is a distinct need for the development of a new tool or adaptation of existing instrument of satisfaction measurement, which would be unitized for all medical organizations in the Russian Federation 

  5. Modeling Customer's Satisfaction Behavior through Uninorms

    OpenAIRE

    Depaire, Benoit; Vanhoof, Koen; Wets, Geert

    2006-01-01

    During the last three decades, the focus of customer satisfaction research has shifted from what it was about the product or service that customers found satisfying to how and why customers became satisfied. This resulted into several models that try to explain the customer's satisfaction behaviour, among which the expectancy-disconfirmation paradigm is one of the most prominent models. This model identifies three elements which have an influence on the customer's satisfaction level: i.e perf...

  6. Job Satisfaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Job Satisfaction: Rural Versus Urban Primary Health Care Workers'. Perception in ... doing it well, and being suitably rewarded for one's efforts. Several ... community recognition of their work and improved staff relationship. ..... study found important differences about attractors to ... their work, work-life balance, bureaucracy.

  7. [Hospital biomedical research through the satisfaction of a Health Research Institute professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, C; Plá, R; Bellón, J M; Bardinet, T; Buño, I; Bañares, R

    2015-01-01

    A Health Research Institute is a powerful strategic commitment to promote biomedical research in hospitals. To assess user satisfaction is an essential quality requirement. The aim of this study is to evaluate the professional satisfaction in a Health Research Institute, a hospital biomedical research centre par excellence. Observational study was conducted using a satisfaction questionnaire on Health Research Institute researchers. The explored dimensions were derived from the services offered by the Institute to researchers, and are structured around 4 axes of a five-year Strategic Plan. A descriptive and analytical study was performed depending on adjustment variables. Internal consistency was also calculated. The questionnaire was completed by 108 researchers (15% response). The most valued strategic aspect was the structuring Areas and Research Groups and political communication and dissemination. The overall rating was 7.25 out of 10. Suggestions for improvement refer to the need for help in recruitment, and research infrastructures. High internal consistency was found in the questionnaire (Cronbach alpha of 0.9). So far research policies in health and biomedical environment have not been sufficiently evaluated by professionals in our field. Systematic evaluations of satisfaction and expectations of key stakeholders is an essential tool for analysis, participation in continuous improvement and advancing excellence in health research. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients' expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved.

  9. HOW CONTEXT AFFECTS COUPLE SATISFACTION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozzana Sánchez-Aragón

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There are few studies that focus on the influence that contextual aspects have in marital satisfaction (Meléndez, Aleixandre,& Saez, 1993.However, nowadays the reasons for a divorce are related to the actual social situation (Khalfani-Cox, 2009. Thus, the aim of this study is to identify contextual aspects that are associ-ated with marital satisfaction; in order to accomplish this objective, we conducted two studies. The purpose of the first study was to identify recent context aspects that influence marital satisfaction throughout an open question, which was ap-plied to 131 people. The results indicate that the dimensions of economic, labor time, home safety, stress in the environment, and the place where they live influ-ence marital satisfaction. In the second study, based on the information obtained previously, we formed indicators that were applied together with a scale of mari-tal satisfaction to105 couples. The results show that the context is closely related to marital satisfaction. In addition, the results determine that men give greater importance to the economic and employment situation than women do. Overall, this study indicates that sex differences prove that the roles and cultural expecta-tions have remained in the dynamics of the relationship and thus influence the assessment of marital satisfaction.

  10. CUSTOMER SATISFACTION AS AN INDICATOR OF SERVICE QUALITY IN TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Stranjancevic; Iva Bulatovic

    2015-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges for stakeholders is to ensure customer satisfaction, especially in service industries such as tourism and hospitality. The aim of this paper is to show that restaurant guest satisfaction depends on numerous factors as well as to show the connection between satisfaction and loyalty. Customer satisfaction and loyalty are excellent indicators of service quality. For the purpose of this paper, empirical survey was conducted and the results of the research were analy...

  11. Linking environmental and stakeholder management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    1999-01-01

    is to discuss how the influence from an increasing number of stakeholders may influence the companies to adopt a more proactive attitude towards environmentally related initiatives. The first part of the paper will discuss the relevant theory and introduce a model to analyse and identify the most relevant......Regulation has been an important instrument in pushing the business community towards a more sustainable way of conduct. But recently an increasing pressure from a growing number of stakeholders including employees, customers, neighbours, NGO's etc has been observed. The purpose of this paper...... stakeholder groups and their influence. Based on a recent survey among Danish companies the second part of the paper will report on the actual perceived influence from a variety of stakeholders to force companies to introduce environmentally-related initiatives. The results will then be discussed in light...

  12. Port Stakeholder Summit - April 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's National Port Stakeholders Summit, Advancing More Sustainable Ports, focused on actions to protect air quality while reducing climate risk and supporting economic growth, making ports more environmentally sustainable.

  13. Stakeholder collaboration and heritage management

    OpenAIRE

    Aas, C.; Ladkin, Adele; Fletcher, John

    2005-01-01

    This article examines a collaborative approach to the relationship between heritage management and tourism development in Luang Prabang, Laos. The purpose is to examine stakeholder collaboration and management roles, heritage tourism development, as well as the interdependence of the heritage conservation and tourism relationship. The research examines a UNESCO/Norwegian government project, which aiming to promote collaboration between heritage conservation and tourism through stakeholder inv...

  14. Stakeholder conflicts and dividend policy

    OpenAIRE

    Bøhren, Øyvind; Josefsen, Morten G.; Steen, Pål E.

    2012-01-01

    This is the authors’ final, accepted and refereed manuscript to the article This paper compares the dividend policy of owner-controlled firms with that of firms where the owners are a minority relative to non-owner employees, customers, and community citizens. We find that regardless of whether owners or non-owners control the firm, the strong stakeholder uses the dividend payout decision to mitigate rather than to intensify the conflict of interest with the weak stakeholder. H...

  15. Relationship intention and satisfaction as predictors of wholesale ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Building long term relationships and satisfying customer expectations could be an ... between customer relationships, customer satisfaction and customer loyalty. ... marketing efforts only towards customers who have relationship intentions.

  16. Development of a comprehensive model for stakeholder management in mental healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbooms, Joyce; Van Oers, Hans; Rijkers, Jeroen; Bongers, Inge

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - Stakeholder management is not yet incorporated into the standard practice of most healthcare providers. The purpose of this paper is to assess the applicability of a comprehensive model for stakeholder management in mental healthcare organization for more evidence-based (stakeholder) management. Design/methodology/approach - The assessment was performed in two research parts: the steps described in the model were executed in a single case study at a mental healthcare organization in the Netherlands; and a process and effect evaluation was done to find the supporting and impeding factors with regard to the applicability of the model. Interviews were held with managers and directors to evaluate the effectiveness of the model with a view to stakeholder management. Findings - The stakeholder analysis resulted in the identification of eight stakeholder groups. Different expectations were identified for each of these groups. The analysis on performance gaps revealed that stakeholders generally find the collaboration with a mental healthcare provider "sufficient." Finally a prioritization showed that five stakeholder groups were seen as "definite" stakeholders by the organization. Practical implications - The assessment of the model showed that it generated useful knowledge for more evidence-based (stakeholder) management. Adaptation of the model is needed to increase its feasibility in practice. Originality/value - Provided that the model is properly adapted for the specific field, the analysis can provide more knowledge on stakeholders and can help integrate stakeholder management as a comprehensive process in policy planning.

  17. Key Challenges to the introduction of hydrogen - European stakeholder views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seymour, E. Hugo; Murray, Luke; Fernandes, Rei

    2008-01-01

    Recent hydrogen policy initiatives focus on fostering the market introduction of hydrogen technologies. These initiatives include hydrogen roadmapping projects. Stakeholder involvement in strategic planning is of key importance to the successful implementation of the strategy. Thus, the views of the stakeholder group involved in the European roadmapping project HyWays are pertinent to the introduction of hydrogen in Europe. A qualitative assessment using the Key Changes and Actor Mapping (KCAM) methodology showed that on average stakeholders expect hydrogen systems to begin to be introduced over the next 15 years. Hydrogen production is expected to be based initially on steam methane reforming of natural gas and onsite electrolysis using wind power, and any hydrogen transport is likely to be by truck. The major challenges envisaged are to do with carbon capture and storage, high-temperature hydrogen production technologies and hydrogen pipeline development. (author)

  18. Strategic stakeholder management by corporate social responsibility: Some conceptual thoughts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Stiglbauer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The sustainability and responsibility of corporate strategic management has become an important issue in recent years, not only against the background of the current financial and economic crisis. Companies are expected not only to succeed economically, but also ecologically and socially. Companies can use the issue of corporate responsibility to capture new markets and opportunities. But new requirements arise. Thus, stakeholders may exert pressure on companies to assume social responsibility, whereas executives shall lead by example. This paper tries to assess possiblities to meet stakeholder expectations towards companies by implementing corporate social responsibility concepts. We identify primary and secondary stakeholders of companies by using salience theory and try to give conceptual answers how the well-known concept of Caroll‟s corporate social responsibility pyramid my help to improve the current situation and to take top management and supervisory boards into account to establish a change of focus on corporate social responsibility not just as a hot topic.

  19. Corporate communications and stakeholder management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Mira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporate communications represent a modern communications discipline used by businesses across the globe to communicate with key stakeholders. Chief executive officers and executive management teams strive to create, protect and advance corporate reputation through corporate communications. Further, by communicating with key stakeholders the company adequately prepares for good news and future problems. With the benefit of technology and greater transparency, corporations of the future will continue to use corporate communications approaches to advance their business. Company's reputation derives from the way stakeholders perceive the organization, how they think, feel or act towards it. It is therefore vital that organizations interested in developing and building their reputational capital; pay careful attention to the way they are perceived and that they manage the relationships with their various stakeholders like a strategic resource. Stakeholders represent both opportunity and threat for the organizations. For instance, if an institution has a good reputation with stakeholders they may provide the organization more latitude to operate. On the other hand a poor reputation may result in creating the legislative that can make it more difficult for an institution to operate.

  20. Physician career satisfaction within specialties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravitz Richard L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specialty-specific data on career satisfaction may be useful for understanding physician workforce trends and for counseling medical students about career options. Methods We analyzed cross-sectional data from 6,590 physicians (response rate, 53% in Round 4 (2004-2005 of the Community Tracking Study Physician Survey. The dependent variable ranged from +1 to -1 and measured satisfaction and dissatisfaction with career. Forty-two specialties were analyzed with survey-adjusted linear regressions Results After adjusting for physician, practice, and community characteristics, the following specialties had significantly higher satisfaction levels than family medicine: pediatric emergency medicine (regression coefficient = 0.349; geriatric medicine (0.323; other pediatric subspecialties (0.270; neonatal/prenatal medicine (0.266; internal medicine and pediatrics (combined practice (0.250; pediatrics (0.250; dermatology (0.249;and child and adolescent psychiatry (0.203. The following specialties had significantly lower satisfaction levels than family medicine: neurological surgery (-0.707; pulmonary critical care medicine (-0.273; nephrology (-0.206; and obstetrics and gynecology (-0.188. We also found satisfaction was significantly and positively related to income and employment in a medical school but negatively associated with more than 50 work-hours per-week, being a full-owner of the practice, greater reliance on managed care revenue, and uncontrollable lifestyle. We observed no statistically significant gender differences and no differences between African-Americans and whites. Conclusion Career satisfaction varied across specialties. A number of stakeholders will likely be interested in these findings including physicians in specialties that rank high and low and students contemplating specialty. Our findings regarding "less satisfied" specialties should elicit concern from residency directors and policy makers since they

  1. Impact of stakeholders' interests on financial accounting policy-making : the case of Lithuania

    OpenAIRE

    Rudžionienė, Kristina

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyses the expectations of particular stakeholder groups’ impact on corporate financial accounting policy-making in Lithuanian enterprises from Stakeholder theory perspective. Companies should seek to present a true and fair view of their financial performance and results while making financial accounting policy because stakeholders need informative and truthful accounting data for making right decisions. On the basis of empirical results it could be stated that the impact of dif...

  2. Stakeholder views on pharmacogenomic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Haridarshan N; Ursan, Iulia D; Zueger, Patrick M; Cavallari, Larisa H; Pickard, A Simon

    2014-02-01

    Pharmacogenomics has an important role in the evolution of personalized medicine, and its widespread uptake may ultimately depend on the interests and perspectives of key players in health care. Our aim was to summarize studies on stakeholder perspectives and attitudes toward pharmacogenomic testing. Thus, we conducted a review of original research studies that reported stakeholder views on pharmacogenomic testing using a structured approach in PubMed, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and EMBASE. A standardized data abstraction form was developed that included stakeholder group of interest-patients, general public, providers, and payers. Stakeholder views regarding barriers to pharmacogenetic implementation were organized into the following themes: ancillary information-related, clinical, economic, educational, ethical or legal, medical mistrust, and practicality. Of 34 studies that met our inclusion criteria, 37 perspectives were reported (15 on providers, 9 on the general public, 9 on patients, and 4 on payers). The most common topics that arose in studies of providers related to clinical usefulness of genetic data (n=11) and educational needs (n=11). Among the general public, the most common concerns were medical mistrust (n=5), insufficient education (n=5), and practicality (n=5). The most prevalent issues from the patient perspective were ethical or legal (n=6) and economic (n=5) issues. Among payers, leading issues were practicality (n=4) and clinical usefulness (n=3). There was overlap in the topics and concerns across stakeholder perspectives, including lack of knowledge about pharmacogenomic testing. Views on issues related to privacy, cost, and test result dissemination varied by stakeholder perspective. Limited research had been conducted in underrepresented groups. Efforts to address the issues raised by stakeholders may facilitate the implementation of pharmacogenomic testing into

  3. Satisfaction Formation Processes in Library Users: Understanding Multisource Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xi; Holahan, Patricia J.; Jurkat, M. Peter

    2004-01-01

    This study explores whether disconfirmation theory can explain satisfaction formation processes in library users. Both library users' needs and expectations are investigated as disconfirmation standards. Overall library user satisfaction is predicted to be a function of two independent sources--satisfaction with the information product received…

  4. Relational Expectancy Fulfillment as an Explanatory Variable for Distinguishing Couple Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Douglas L.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the differences in marital satisfaction across couple type. Indicates that traditional couple types generally reported more expectancy fulfillment and relational satisfaction than did other couple types. Suggests that "separates" experienced more negative violations than did other couple types. (CR)

  5. Planning that works: Empowerment through stakeholder focused interactive planning (SFIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, J.E.; Ison, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a powerful planning tool that can enable government, private industries, and public interest organizations to actualize their visions through sound decision making. The stakeholder focused interactive planning model is designed to integrate and ultimately gain stakeholder investment in the success of attainment of their vision. The only concessions required of the planning organization using this process is the acceptance of the premise that sustained vision success requires the support of both internal and external stakeholders and that each step in the process must be used as a validation of the previous step and essential to the completion of the next step. What is stakeholder/public involvement? It is the process in which the stakeholders (both internal and external) values, interests and expectations are included in decision-making processes. The primary goal of public involvement efforts is to include all those who have a stake in the decision, whether or not they have already been identified. Stakeholders are individuals, contractors, clients, suppliers, public organizations, state and local governments, Indian tribes, federal agencies, and other parties affected by decisions

  6. Stakeholder analysis: theAndalusian Agency For Healthcare Quality case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Alcázar, Víctor; Casas-Delgado, Marta; Herrera-Usagre, Manuel; Torres-Olivera, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the different groups that can affect or be affected by an agency charged with the promoting and guaranteeing of health care quality in Andalusian region (Spain) and to provide a framework with the stakeholders included in different categories. The study adopted a cross-sectional research design. A case study with structured interviews among Andalusian Agency for Healthcare Quality Steering Committee members was carried out in 2010 to define stakeholders' categories and map the interest groups using 5 attributes: influence, importance, legitimacy, power, and urgency. After identification and categorization, stakeholders were weighted qualitatively according to the attributes of importance and influence using 4 possible levels. A matrix was made with the collected data relating both attributes. Furthermore, 8 different types of stakeholders were identified according to attributes power, legitimacy, and urgency. The study concludes that identifying and classifying stakeholders are fundamental to ensuring the success of an organization that must respond to needs and expectations, especially those of its clients. Moreover, knowing stakeholder linkages can contribute to increase organizational worth. This is essential for organizations basically directed to the provision of services in the scope of health care.

  7. MHS Stakeholder’s Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    sedentary lifestyle, alcohol abuse and family violence reduce well-being and readiness. The MHS strives to engage with all beneficiaries and enable them... Obstetric Surgical 2006 2007 2008 2009 2006 2007 2008 2009 2006 2007 2008 2009 Satisfaction with Inpatient Care (Overall Hospital Rating) Direct...Patients receiving obstetrical care at TRICARE network hospitals report higher satisfaction with health care. Patients enrolled to TRICARE network

  8. Stakeholder involvement - a japanese perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, S.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional societal and cultural background of Japanese in general indicates the intrinsic difficulty in involving the public as stakeholders in the process of any type of decision making in policy matters. It is characterized by the long-taught virtue of harmonization and obedience to others. In addition, characteristic system of Japanese traditional industrial society, such as lifetime employment, seniority-based wage system, and enterprise-based labour union, encourages the loyalty to the employer/company, but not to the public. The public or ordinary citizens would seldom come out as stakeholders and express their true feelings or real opinions, even though younger generation is notably getting out from such a trend. On the other hand, it is a common practice in Japanese society for any business or administrative transactions to try to obtain 'consensus' among relevant parties concerned (stakeholders) by negotiations behind the curtain prior to the formal discussion. In this sense, 'stakeholders involvement' is accepted and practised as a matter of course, but mostly for actions between parties of equivalently influential status levels or between 'directly relevant' parties such as those between the different government agencies, between regulators and industries. The concept of 'Involving the public in decision making as stakeholders' is not yet fully understood nor accepted in Japan both by regulators and by the public so far as the issue of radiation protection is concerned. These situations are explained with some examples. (author)

  9. IMPLEMENTASI RELATIONSHIP MARKETING UNTUK MENCIPTAKAN CUSTOMER SATISFACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinda Frismandiri

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan menguji dampak relationship marketing inputs melalui understanding customer expectation, building service partnership, total quality management, dan empowering employees terhadap customer satisfaction. Penelitian dilakukan pada nasabah Bank Central Asia Cabang Malang. Sampel diambil dengan metode accidental sampling, dengan jumlah sampel sebanyak 100 nasabah. Metode analisis menggunakan Regresi Berganda. Hasil analisis menunjukkan bahwa understanding customer expectation, building service partnership, total quality management, dan empowering employees teruji mampu menciptakan customer satisfaction nasabah. Di antara variabel relationship marketing inputs ternyata building service partnership memberikan dampak yang paling besar dalam menciptakan customer satisfaction nasabah.

  10. Stakeholder Evaluation for Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge: Completion Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Burkardt, Nina; Swann, Margaret Earlene; Stewart, Susan C.

    2009-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System, managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), is the largest system of public lands in the world dedicated to wildlife conservation. There are over 545 national wildlife refuges nationwide, encompassing 95 million acres. As part of the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, each refuge is developing 15-year comprehensive conservation plans (CCPs). Each CCP describes a vision and desired future condition for the refuge and outlines goals, objectives, and management strategies for each refuge's habitat and visitor service programs. The CCP process for Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) in Davis, West Virginia was initiated in 2006. This planning process provides a unique opportunity for public input and involvement. Public involvement is an important part of the CCP process. Participation by parties with a stake in the resource (stakeholders) has the potential to increase understanding and support and reduce conflicts. Additionally, meaningful public participation in a decision process may increase trust and provide satisfaction in terms of both process and outcome for management and the public. Public meetings are a common way to obtain input from community members, visitors, and potential visitors. An 'Issues Workbook' is another tool the FWS uses to obtain public input and participation early in the planning process. Sometimes, however, these traditional methods do not capture the full range of perspectives that exist. A stakeholder evaluation is a way to more fully understand community preferences and opinions related to key topics in refuge planning. It can also help refuge staff understand how changes in management affect individuals in terms of their preference for services and experiences. Secondarily, a process such as this can address 'social goals' such as fostering trust in regulating agencies and reducing conflict among stakeholders. As part of the CCP planning effort at Canaan

  11. The Pennsylvania quality initiative : a synthesis of customer satisfaction and additional research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-29

    Customer satisfaction is at the heart of the Pennsylvania Quality Initiative (PQI), which was created in 1994 to build a more effective partnership among all the stakeholders involved in the process of designing, building, operating, and maintaining ...

  12. Developing a Stakeholder-Driven Anticipated Timeline of Impact for Evaluation of Social Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Sanjeev; Campbell, Bernadette; Zinzow, Heidi

    2006-01-01

    The authors present a stakeholder-driven method, the earliest anticipated timeline of impact, which is designed to assess stakeholder expectations for the earliest time frame in which social programs are likely to affect outcomes. The utility of the anticipated timeline of impact is illustrated using an example from an evaluation of a…

  13. Student satisfaction and loyalty in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Tina; Sudzina, Frantisek

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring and managing customers’ satisfaction are key features to benefit from today’s competitive environment. In higher education context, only a few studies are available on satisfaction and loyalty of the main customers who are the students, which signifies the need to investigate the field...... more thoroughly. The aim of this research is to measure the strength of determinants of students’ satisfaction and the importance of antecedents in students’ satisfaction and loyalty in Denmark. Our research model is the modification of European Performance Satisfaction Index (EPSI), which takes...... the university’s image direct effects on students’ expectations into account from students’ perspective. The structural equation model of student satisfaction and loyalty has been evaluated using partial least square path modelling. Our findings confirm that the EPSI framework is applicable on student...

  14. One Health stakeholder and institutional analysis in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimani, Tabitha; Ngigi, Margaret; Schelling, Esther; Randolph, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Introduction One Health (OH) can be considered a complex emerging policy to resolve health issues at the animal–human and environmental interface. It is expected to drive system changes in terms of new formal and informal institutional and organisational arrangements. This study, using Rift Valley fever (RVF) as a zoonotic problem requiring an OH approach, sought to understand the institutionalisation process at national and subnational levels in an early adopting country, Kenya. Materials and methods Social network analysis methodologies were used. Stakeholder roles and relational data were collected at national and subnational levels in 2012. Key informants from stakeholder organisations were interviewed, guided by a checklist. Public sector animal and public health organisations were interviewed first to identify other stakeholders with whom they had financial, information sharing and joint cooperation relationships. Visualisation of the OH social network and relationships were shown in sociograms and mathematical (degree and centrality) characteristics of the network summarised. Results and discussion Thirty-two and 20 stakeholders relevant to OH were identified at national and subnational levels, respectively. Their roles spanned wildlife, livestock, and public health sectors as well as weather prediction. About 50% of national-level stakeholders had made significant progress on OH institutionalisation to an extent that formal coordination structures (zoonoses disease unit and a technical working group) had been created. However, the process had not trickled down to subnational levels although cross-sectoral and sectoral collaborations were identified. The overall binary social network density for the stakeholders showed that 35 and 21% of the possible ties between the RVF and OH stakeholders existed at national and subnational levels, respectively, while public health actors’ collaborations were identified at community/grassroots level. We recommend

  15. Nuclear regulatory organisations: Learning from stakeholders to enhance communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorin, Aurelie

    2015-01-01

    Since its creation 15 years ago, the NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) Working Group on Public Communication of Nuclear Regulatory Organisations (WGPC) has been addressing a broad range of communication issues, with two reports recently issued on Nuclear Regulatory Organisations, the Internet and Social Media: The What, How and Why of Their Use as Communication Tools and on Nuclear Regulatory Organisations and Communication Strategies. After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in 2011, nuclear regulatory organisations around the world reaffirmed the need to strengthen stakeholder outreach and communication, and to create more robust avenues for stakeholder involvement in regulatory matters. The WGPC proposed a means for stakeholders to play a more active role in the group by holding one-day workshops in conjunction with regular meetings. These workshops offer a platform for stakeholder exchange with communication experts from nuclear regulatory organisations (NROs). The objective is to stimulate co-operation and improve communication by better understanding stakeholder perceptions, needs and expectations, and by discussing how to use traditional and social media more effectively. While nuclear regulatory organisations may have a common willingness to improve their communication methods and to build constructive relationships with stakeholders, every country has its own practices and cultural background, and thus its own challenges. Following the first workshop in Paris, which brought together European stakeholders, and the second in North America, the NEA is now organising a third workshop in Asia (Japan) to be held in April 2016. This third workshop will enable the NEA to gather stakeholder views from a third continent. A report on the workshops' findings will be issued after the completion of this third workshop, thus giving a broader idea of how to improve the overall communication methods of nuclear regulatory

  16. Angler satisfaction in South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Kjetil R.; Gigliotti, Larry M.

    2015-01-01

    Many industries use satisfaction measures to evaluate performance. The South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and Parks identified satisfaction as one of their performance measures for evaluating fishing in South Dakota. In fisheries management, the perspectives’ of license buyers are valuable to determine if management activities are providing the benefits anticipated by biologists. Surveys of South Dakota anglers are conducted to better understand licensees in order to promote satisfying angling experiences. Internet surveys were distributed to all license buyers providing email addresses in 2011 and 2012. Angler satisfaction was analyzed by angler type (demographics and fishing characteristics) to further clarify performance measures. Most anglers (> 70%) were satisfied with their angling experiences. Nonresidents expressed higher levels of satisfaction with fishing in South Dakota in 2011 and 2012 than residents. Anglers’ rating of fishing quality was more strongly correlated with satisfaction than their reported number of fish harvested, which suggests that strategies to influence angler perceptions and expectations can also be employed to influence satisfaction (in addition to techniques influencing fish populations). This research further integrates sociological data into South Dakota fisheries management processes.

  17. 78 FR 20119 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2012-0042] Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY... concerning the Broad Stakeholder Survey. DHS previously published this ICR in the Federal Register on August... across the Nation. The Broad Stakeholder Survey is designed to gather stakeholder feedback on the...

  18. Stakeholder Engagement in HIV Cure Research: Lessons Learned from Other HIV Interventions and the Way Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ying-Ru; Chu, Carissa; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Excler, Jean-Louis; Tucker, Joseph D

    2015-07-01

    Clinical and basic science advances have raised considerable hope for achieving an HIV cure by accelerating research. This research is dominated primarily by issues about the nature and design of current and future clinical trials. Stakeholder engagement for HIV cure remains in its early stages. Our analysis examines timing and mechanisms of historical stakeholder engagement in other HIV research areas for HIV-uninfected individuals [vaccine development and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)], and HIV-infected individuals (treatment as prevention, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and treatment of acute HIV infection) and articulate a plan for HIV cure stakeholder engagement. The experience from HIV vaccine development shows that early engagement of stakeholders helped manage expectations, mitigating the failure of several vaccine trials, while paving the way for subsequent trials. The relatively late engagement of HIV stakeholders in PrEP research may partly explain some of the implementation challenges. The treatment-related stakeholder engagement was strong and community-led from the onset and helped translation from research to implementation. We outline five steps to initiate and sustain stakeholder engagement in HIV cure research and conclude that stakeholder engagement represents a key investment in which stakeholders mutually agree to share knowledge, benefits, and risk of failure. Effective stakeholder engagement prevents misconceptions. As HIV cure research advances from early trials involving subjects with generally favorable prognosis to studies involving greater risk and uncertainty, success may depend on early and deliberate engagement of stakeholders.

  19. THE LINK BETWEEN STUDENTS' SATISFACTION WITH FACULTY, OVERALL STUDENTS' SATISFACTION WITH STUDENT LIFE AND STUDENT PERFORMANCES

    OpenAIRE

    Mihanović, Zoran; Batinić, Ana Barbara; Pavičić, Jurica

    2016-01-01

    Customer satisfaction has long been recognized as a central concept of all business activities. Satisfaction can serve as an indicator of success of the company, both in the past and present, as well as an indicator of future performance. High quality service to students is a prerequisite of maintaining competitiveness in the market of higher education. A relationship that is created between the expectations of students and their satisfaction with the quality of service that provides educatio...

  20. THE LINK BETWEEN STUDENTS' SATISFACTION WITH FACULTY, OVERALL STUDENTS' SATISFACTION WITH STUDENT LIFE AND STUDENT PERFORMANCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Mihanović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Customer satisfaction has long been recognized as a central concept of all business activities. Satisfaction can serve as an indicator of success of the company, both in the past and present, as well as an indicator of future performance. High quality service to students is a prerequisite of maintaining competitiveness in the market of higher education. A relationship that is created between the expectations of students and their satisfaction with the quality of service that provides educational institution plays an important role in shaping the reputation of academic institutions. Academic institutions are becoming aware of the importance of student satisfaction, because satisfaction positively influences their decision to continue their education at this institution, and the positive word of mouth that will attract prospective students. Satisfaction will affect student motivation, and therefore their performance. This paper provides insight into the marketing aspects of customer satisfaction, primarily insight into the satisfaction of students in the educational sector. The aim is to establish the influence of satisfaction various factors related to the university and higher education to the satisfaction of student life, and does student life satisfaction affect the overall happiness and student performance. The research was conducted on the student population of the University of Split, on a sample of 191 respondents. The research was conducted with the help of online survey questionnaire. The claim that student’s satisfactions with housing affect the satisfaction with the quality of student life is rejected. The results confirmed that the student’s satisfaction with university contents, university bodies and services, teaching, teaching methods and academic reputation affects the satisfaction of student life and student life satisfaction affect the student performance.

  1. Business resiliency and stakeholder management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Noel; Perry, Tony

    2014-01-01

    The authors facilitated separate round table discussions at the City and Financial Conference in London on 29th January, 2014. The theme of these discussions was business resiliency and stakeholder management. This topic attracted the largest group of all the breakout sessions, as the issue continues to generate much interest across the business resilience community. In this paper, the authors summarise the discussions held at the event and add their own insights into the subject of who are stakeholders, and the different means and messages to communicate to them.

  2. Stakeholder roles within the IMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowbourne, D.; Chuddy, B.; Gregg, L.

    2003-01-01

    This session presents the comments of 3 guest speakers who described the role of stakeholders within Ontario's Independent Electricity Market Operator (IMO). The IMO is committed to achieving a successful electricity market through its governance process. The IMO's 3 main objectives are: (1) give participants and stakeholders an effective say in the evolution of the electricity market, particularly in the area of commercial and reliability impact, (2) enable the market to evolve in a timely manner in step with participant needs, advancements in market technology and the objectives of provincial legislation, and (3) to provide advice on relevant issues and decisions. figs

  3. Stakeholder Engagement Through Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etter, Michael; Castello, Itziar

    competing logics of stakeholder engagement: the current (influence logic) and the new logic underlying social media (logic of community). With a longitudinal study of 26 months we observe how engagements failed since managers were not able to integrate certain symbolic and substantive elements of the new......The introduction of new information and communication technologies such social media platforms in organizations results in a new emerging logic of stakeholder engagement around sustainable development issues. We investigate how middle managers of a pharmaceutical corporation navigate between two...... introduced by social media....

  4. The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility Perception on The Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Arcan TUZCU

    2014-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility activities influence the stakeholders in the first place, hence the employees, one of the vital stakeholders of the organizations. Social responsibility activities can have a direct effect on the job satisfaction and organizational commitment of employees. This paper investigates the employees’ perception on corporate social responsibility, and examines the effect of this perception on organizational commitment and job satisfaction. Hence, the individual factor...

  5. Knee arthroplasty: are patients' expectations fulfilled?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsdotter, Anna K; Toksvig-Larsen, Sören; Roos, Ewa

    2009-01-01

    to pain and physical function after knee arthroplasty. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 102 patients (39 men) with knee osteoarthritis and who were assigned for TKR (mean age 71 (51-86) years) were investigated with KOOS, SF-36, and additional questions concerning physical activity level, expectations, satisfaction...

  6. The Effect of Customer Satisfaction on Word of Mouth Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Houshang Taghizadeh; Mohammad Javad Taghipourian; Amir Khazaei

    2013-01-01

    Today, customer satisfaction is an important issue for organizations. Being a winner or loser is based on the percentage of customers that they have retained. This is why many scholars and researchers have continually stressed the importance of customer satisfaction. On the other hand, customer is one of the most important stakeholders in any organization because, without the customer, the organization probably will not succeed. So a customer behavioral intentions and responses, is one of the...

  7. Managing resources through stakeholder networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogada, Job Ochieng; Krhoda, George Okoye; Veen, Van Der Anne; Marani, Martin; Oel, van Pieter Richards

    2017-01-01

    Stakeholder analysis and social network analysis were used to analyze stakeholders’ social and structural characteristics based on their interests, influence and interactions in Lake Naivasha basin, Kenya. Even though the Kenyan government and its agencies seem to command higher influence and

  8. Modelling with stakeholders - Next generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinov, Alexey; Kolagani, Nagesh; McCall, Michael K; Glynn, Pierre D.; Kragt, Marit E; Ostermann, Frank O; Pierce, Suzanne A; Ramu, Palaniappan

    2016-01-01

    This paper updates and builds on ‘Modelling with Stakeholders’ Voinov and Bousquet, 2010 which demonstrated the importance of, and demand for, stakeholder participation in resource and environmental modelling. This position paper returns to the concepts of that publication and reviews the progress made since 2010. A new development is the wide introduction and acceptance of social media and web applications, which dramatically changes the context and scale of stakeholder interactions and participation. Technology advances make it easier to incorporate information in interactive formats via visualization and games to augment participatory experiences. Citizens as stakeholders are increasingly demanding to be engaged in planning decisions that affect them and their communities, at scales from local to global. How people interact with and access models and data is rapidly evolving. In turn, this requires changes in how models are built, packaged, and disseminated: citizens are less in awe of experts and external authorities, and they are increasingly aware of their own capabilities to provide inputs to planning processes, including models. The continued acceleration of environmental degradation and natural resource depletion accompanies these societal changes, even as there is a growing acceptance of the need to transition to alternative, possibly very different, life styles. Substantive transitions cannot occur without significant changes in human behaviour and perceptions. The important and diverse roles that models can play in guiding human behaviour, and in disseminating and increasing societal knowledge, are a feature of stakeholder processes today.

  9. Engaging Stakeholders in Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jo Nell

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the importance of parent and community engagement in curriculum development, along with curriculum leadership, engaging stakeholders, and the importance of curriculum. Parent and community member engagement is examined in light of curriculum committee participation as reported by Missouri superintendents. Survey responses…

  10. Effective factors on mobile phone customer satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Mohafez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular phone is one of the most profitable industries in the world and especially in middle east regions. There is a growing competition among different firms in this market and the market share is exchanged very quickly depending on the features and equipments introduced. Customer satisfaction plays an important role on retaining present marker share or absorbing new customers. In this paper, we present an empirical study to measure the effects of different factors influencing customer satisfaction such as the effect of perceived expectations on perceived quality and the effect of perceived expectation on perceived value. The survey is performed among customers who live in Tehran, the capital city of Iran and it shows there are some meaningful and positive relationship between perceived expectations and other factors such as perceived quality and perceived value. There is also positive relationship between perceived quality and perceived value. perceived expectation and customer satisfaction.

  11. A customer satisfaction model for a utility service industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Jastini Mohd; Nawawi, Mohd Kamal Mohd; Ramli, Razamin

    2016-08-01

    This paper explores the effect of Image, Customer Expectation, Perceived Quality and Perceived Value on Customer Satisfaction, and to investigate the effect of Image and Customer Satisfaction on Customer Loyalty of mobile phone provider in Malaysia. The result of this research is based on data gathered online from international students in one of the public university in Malaysia. Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) has been used to analyze the data that have been collected from the international students' perceptions. The results found that Image and Perceived Quality have significant impact on Customer Satisfaction. Image and Customer Satisfaction ware also found to have significantly related to Customer Loyalty. However, no significant impact has been found between Customer Expectation with Customer Satisfaction, Perceived Value with Customer Satisfaction, and Customer Expectation with Perceived Value. We hope that the findings may assist the mobile phone provider in production and promotion of their services.

  12. From Customer to Stakeholder Management: Quality Managers perceptions of Sustainability and Social Responsibility concepts, motivations and impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Luis

    2013-01-01

    57Th EOQ Congress, Quality Renaissance - Co-creating a Viable Future" The research proves that under certain conditions: The economic, environmental and social dimensions are key to organizational sustainable success; Stakeholder satisfaction is significantly higher when a Social Responsibility program is present and it is relevant for the organizational sustainable success and competitive position, as suggested by Freeman (1984) Stakeholder Theory and in line with ISO...

  13. Expectations from implementers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biurrun, E.; Zuidema, P.

    2008-01-01

    Enrique Biurrun (DBE) presented the expectations from the implementer. He explained that the implementer needs a framework to successfully develop a repository which means the definition of requirements and guidance (for repository system development, analysis, licences, etc.) as well as the decision-making process (stepwise approach, roles of different players, etc.). He also needs a reasonable stability of the regulatory system. The regulatory framework should be developed in a clear, reasonable and consistent manner. In the context of the long duration of the project (100 years) there will be technological progress. In that context E. Biurrun asked what is the meaning of best practice. How can one deal with judgmental issues in a step-wise approach? Regulatory criteria and guidance must deal with the repository system for which an iterative process is necessary where dialogue is needed with the regulator despite the need to maintain his independence. The safety case, which is a periodic documentation of the status of the project, must provide a synthesis of the underlying scientific understanding and evidence and becomes part of the design process through feedback. E. Biurrun pointed out that safety is not calculated or assessed, but designed and built into the repository system (by geological and engineered barriers). He stressed the importance of the operational aspects since the implementer has to build and operate the repository safely. He asked the question: is it 'Ethical' to buy 'peace of mind' of some stakeholders with casualties of the implementer's staff because of mining accidents if the repository is left open during a phase of reversibility. The implementer needs dependable criteria, legal security and investment security. He interpreted the 'Precautionary principle' as meaning 'do it now'. Long-lasting solutions are very uncertain. Will we heave the money and the technology to do it later? He made some reflections regarding the ethical need to

  14. Stakeholder involvement in developing brochures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, M.; Garing, K.; Waldrop, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management involved stakeholders (i.e., people who perceive themselves to be affected by the DOE's activities) in a pre-decisional draft of a DOE public document-a practice that the public has called for if the DOE is to begin real public participation. Early and ongoing public input is key to realizing Environmental Management's goal of increasing public participation. The stakeholder review process employed in the development of this document, a brochure outlining public participation information, demonstrates that Environmental Management is open-quotes practicing what it preachesclose quotes about institutionalizing public participation in its program. environmental Management's objective for the brochure is to create a document that uses plain, direct language that encourages citizens to become involved in its decision making process. The information in the brochure provides the public with the information they need to become involved stakeholders. The breadth and volume of comments received assisted in the development of a brochure that includes many viewpoints

  15. Bridging clinical researcher perceptions and health IT realities: A case study of stakeholder creep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyard, Daniel J; Ramly, Edmond; Dean, Shannon M; Bartels, Christie M

    2018-02-01

    We present a case report detailing a challenge in health information technology (HIT) project implementations we term "stakeholder creep": not thoroughly identifying which stakeholders need to be involved and why before starting a project, consequently not understanding the true effort, skill sets, social capital, and time required to complete the project. A root cause analysis was performed post-implementation to understand what led to stakeholder creep. HIT project stakeholders were given a questionnaire to comment on these misconceptions and a proposed implementation tool to help mitigate stakeholder creep. Stakeholder creep contributed to an unexpected increase in time (3-month delayed go-live) and effort (68% over expected HIT work hours). Four main clinician/researcher misconceptions were identified that contributed to the development of stakeholder creep: 1) that EHR IT is a single group; 2) that all EHR IT members know the entire EHR functionality; 3) that changes to an EHR need the input of just a single EHR IT member; and 4) that the technological complexity of a project mirrors the clinical complexity. HIT project stakeholders similarly perceived clinicians/researchers to hold these misconceptions. The proposed stakeholder planning tool was perceived to be feasible and helpful. Stakeholder creep can negatively affect HIT project implementations. Projects may be susceptible to stakeholder creep when clinicians/researchers hold misconceptions related to HIT organization and processes. Implementation tools, such as the proposed stakeholder checklist, could be helpful in preempting and mitigating the effect of stakeholder creep. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. How We Engage Our Pesticide Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    The success of EPA's pesticide program is directly connected to our efforts to engage all stakeholders. In addition to meetings on pesticide-specific actions, we sponsor advisory committees that include diverse, independent stakeholders.

  17. Older people, food and satisfaction with life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, Moira; Raats, Monique M.; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter discusses food-related satisfaction with life of older people, identifying some of the determinants and barriers to satisfaction with food-related quality of life, and discusses possible ways of enhancing older people's quality of life in the domain of food. Despite being strongly...... associated with life, and heavily contributing to the quality of life, food has so far been neglected and not much research has been conducted into people's satisfaction with their food-related life and its relationship to overall life satisfaction. As people age, their goals and available resources in terms...... of health, social networks, income and skills change. Changes in resources can be expected to have an impact on satisfaction with life....

  18. Compensating need satisfaction across life boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hewett, Rebecca; Haun, Verena; Demerouti, Evangelia

    2017-01-01

    Self-determination theory suggests that satisfaction of an individual's basic psychological needs (for competence, autonomy, and relatedness) is a key for well-being. This has gained empirical support in multiple life domains, but little is known about the way that need satisfaction interacts...... between work and home. Drawing from ideas of work–home compensation, we expect that the benefits of need satisfaction in the home domain are reduced when needs are satisfied in the work domain. We tested this hypothesis with a daily diary study involving 91 workers. Results showed that individuals...... particularly benefit from satisfaction of their need for competence in the home domain when it is not satisfied during the working day. No such interactions were found between the needs for autonomy or relatedness. Our study highlights that the interaction of need satisfaction across domains represents...

  19. Measuring customer satisfaction: Evidence from digital library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jafarzadeh Kermani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation on user’s satisfaction based on the expectation disconfirmation paradigm theory. The study selects a sample of 332 people from 2449 graduate students who were enrolled at the Birjand University. The study uses a questionnaire developed by Isac and Rusu (2014 [Isac, F. L., & Rusu, S. (2014. Theories of user’s satisfaction and the operationalization of the expectation disconfirmation paradigm. Economic series, university of Targu, 2 (1, 82-88.]. Using path analysis, the study has determined that perceived usefulness and personal experience had the highest impact on users’ satisfaction in electronic library usage. In addition, there was a negative relationship between user interface and users’ satisfaction.

  20. Consumers’ view on determinants to food satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Barbara Vad; Hyldig, Grethe

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to gain a better understanding of the multiple determinants to food satisfaction from a consumer perspective. The study includes two focus groups with a total of 20 consumers varying in gender, age, employment and food interest. The results were divided into sections...... based on the main themes that arose from analysing the focus groups; i) sensory properties, ii) physical wellbeing, iii) expectations and desires, iv) the food context and v) comparison of the importance of the various determinants to satisfaction. Factors important for food satisfaction appear before...... as well as during and after intake. Before intake, the important factors are; expectations and desires based on memories about previous food experiences and the context in which the food is perceived. Physical wellbeing was mentioned important for the feeling of satisfaction, included in physical...

  1. Stakeholder Governance, Competition and Firm Value

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Franklin; Carletti, Elena; Marquez, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In many countries, the legal system or social norms ensure that firms are stakeholder oriented. We analyze the advantages and disadvantages of stakeholder-oriented firms that are concerned with employees and suppliers compared to shareholder-oriented firms in a model of imperfect competition. Stakeholder firms are more (less) valuable than shareholder firms when marginal cost uncertainty is greater (less) than demand uncertainty. With globalization shareholder firms and stakeholder firms ofte...

  2. Faculty Professional Development and Student Satisfaction in Online Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Robert Todd; Shaw, Melanie; Pang, Sangho; Salley, Witt; Snider, J. Blake

    2016-01-01

    With the ever-increasing availability of online education opportunities, understanding the factors that influence online student satisfaction and success is vital to enable administrators to engage and retain this important stakeholder group. The purpose of this ex-post-facto, nonexperimental quantitative study was to investigate the impact of…

  3. Info avond Go&Learn stakeholders

    OpenAIRE

    Brabant, Karen

    2014-01-01

    De infoavond licht de stakeholders in over de planning en invulling van de circuits en de praktische organisatie ervan. De stakeholders worden ingelicht over de huidige realisaties binnen het project, zowel op nationaal als internationaal niveau. Het geeft aan de stakeholders eveneens de kans om te netwerken.

  4. CSR Model Implementation from School Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Suzannah

    2006-01-01

    Despite comprehensive school reform (CSR) model developers' best intentions to make school stakeholders adhere strictly to the implementation of model components, school stakeholders implementing CSR models inevitably make adaptations to the CSR model. Adaptations are made to CSR models because school stakeholders internalize CSR model practices…

  5. 18 CFR 50.4 - Stakeholder participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stakeholder... ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION FACILITIES § 50.4 Stakeholder participation. A Project Participation Plan is required to ensure stakeholders have access to accurate and timely information on the proposed project and...

  6. 40 CFR 155.52 - Stakeholder engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stakeholder engagement. 155.52 Section... REGISTRATION STANDARDS AND REGISTRATION REVIEW Registration Review Procedures § 155.52 Stakeholder engagement... Agency may meet with stakeholders regarding a forthcoming or ongoing registration review. For example...

  7. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION... § 3430.607 Stakeholder input. CSREES shall seek and obtain stakeholder input through a variety of forums...

  8. 7 CFR 3430.15 - Stakeholder input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.15 Section 3430.15... Stakeholder input. Section 103(c)(2) of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998... RFAs for competitive programs. CSREES will provide instructions for submission of stakeholder input in...

  9. Men's sexual orientation and job satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Drydakis, Nick

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the differences in three aspects of job satisfaction – total pay, promotion prospects, and respect received from one's supervisor – between male heterosexual and gay employees in Athens, Greece. Gay employees are found to be less satisfied according to all job satisfaction measures. Affect Theory proposes that the extent to which one values a given facet of work moderates how dissatisfied one becomes when one's expectations are not met. Furthermore, the data enable us ...

  10. The Modalities to Resolve Conflicts of Interest between Stakeholders

    OpenAIRE

    Georgescu Cristina Elena

    2012-01-01

    The corporate governance is a complex system of relations and interactions, between various interest groups within and outside a company, aiming to maximize its own expectations. This paper discusses the relation between stakeholders and the means of resolving the conflicts between them. We intend to present main types of conflicts emerging within a company, such us: the shareholders-managers conflict, the shareholders-creditors conflict and the conflict between shareholders. Finnaly, we also...

  11. Strategic stakeholder management by corporate social responsibility: Some conceptual thoughts

    OpenAIRE

    Markus Stiglbauer

    2011-01-01

    The sustainability and responsibility of corporate strategic management has become an important issue in recent years, not only against the background of the current financial and economic crisis. Companies are expected not only to succeed economically, but also ecologically and socially. Companies can use the issue of corporate responsibility to capture new markets and opportunities. But new requirements arise. Thus, stakeholders may exert pressure on companies to assume social responsibilit...

  12. Stakeholder Definition for Indonesian Integrated Agriculture Information System (IAIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi Santoso, Halim; Delima, Rosa

    2017-03-01

    Stakeholders plays an important roles to determine the system requirements. Stakeholders are people or organizations that has an interest to the enterprise. Timely and effective consultation of relevant stakeholders is a paramount importance in the requirements engineering process. From the research and analysis of system stakeholder finds that there are four stakeholder groups in IAIS. Stakeholder analysis is being implemented by identifying stakeholder, stakeholder category, and analysis interaction between stakeholders.

  13. Achieving patient satisfaction: resolving patient complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxler, K F

    1997-07-01

    Patients demand to be active participants on and partners with the health care team to design their care regimen. Patients bring unique perceptions and expectations and use these to evaluate service quality and satisfaction. If customer satisfaction is not achieved and a patient complaint results, staff must have the skills to respond and launch a service recovery program. Service recovery, when done with style and panache, can retain loyal customers. Achieving patient satisfaction and resolving patient complaints require commitment from top leadership and commitment from providers to dedicate the time to understand their patients' needs.

  14. Alcohol policy in a Russian region: a stakeholder analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Artyom; Polikina, Olga; Koroleva, Natalia; Leon, David A; McKee, Martin

    2010-10-01

    Male life expectancy in the Russian Federation, at 60 years, is the lowest in Europe. Several factors contribute to this situation, but hazardous consumption of alcohol is especially a key factor. We undertook a stakeholder analysis in a typical Russian region located on the western side of the Urals. Organizations with a stake in alcohol policy in the region were identified by snowball sampling and information on their position and influence on alcohol policy was elicited from interviews with key informants. Their interests and influence were mapped and their relationships plotted. Twenty-nine stakeholder organizations were identified and 43 interviews were conducted with their staff. The most influential actors were the Federal and regional governments, large beer producers and manufacturers of strong alcohols. However, the majority of organizations that might be expected to play a role in developing or implementing alcohol control policies were almost entirely disengaged and fragmented. No evidence was found of an existing or emerging multi-sectoral coalition for developing alcohol policy to improve health. Organizations that might be expected to contribute to tackling hazardous drinking had little understanding of what might be effective. While stakeholders with an interest in maintaining or increasing alcohol consumption are engaged and influential, those who might seek to reduce it either take a very narrow perspective or are disengaged from the policy agenda. There is a need to mobilize actors who might contribute to effective policies while challenging those who can block them.

  15. Multiple forms of stakeholder interaction in environmental management: business arguments regarding differences in stakeholder relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Onkila, Tiina

    2011-01-01

    This study describes and interprets differences in stakeholder interaction as rhetorically constructed in environmental reports and in interviews with environmental managers. It also interprets the role of the natural environment among stakeholders, and discusses how that role is justified or not justified. The study focuses in a business perspective on stakeholder interaction in environmental management. Characteristically, stakeholder studies of environmental management have concentrated on...

  16. Stakeholders, responsabilidad social en ecuador Stakeholders, social responsibility in ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Morán

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available La importancia de la responsabilidad social empresarial (RSE radica en el involucramiento y el compromiso de la empresa hacia los diferentes grupos de interés que interactúan. Algunos grupos son afectados a causa de las actividades operacionales de las organizaciones, generando impactos en dimensiones sociales, económicas y ambientales. El enfoque central de la investigación es la determinación de la incidencia de la RSE en los patrones de vida de los grupos que intervienen en la cadena de valor ecuatoriana. En adelante estos son llamados stakeholders. Se precisa como antesala, los hechos y precedentes que marcaron la evolución y participación del modelo de negocio en los diferentes países de Latinoamérica. Sobre esta base, se realiza una revisión conceptual de la responsabilidad social en las empresas, la ISO 26000 y la posición de los stakeholders. El estudio se fundamenta en un análisis comparativo de países como: Chile, Colombia y Ecuador; identificando similitudes de su entorno, particularidades, fortalezas y debilidades en materia de RSE.

  17. Areva Resources Namibia. Report to Stakeholders 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This document is Areva Namibia's stakeholder report for 2015. After some turbulent years, the company has now settled into the routine of care and maintenance and expect it to continue until the over-supply of uranium on the world market is depleted and the market conditions improve sustainably. Until then the Care and Maintenance team will continue protecting the mine's infrastructure so that it can be commissioned without delay as soon as the economic conditions become more favourable. The company also maintains its focus on process development and optimisation, on safety, occupational health and protection of the environment. The care and maintenance phase is giving an opportunity to thoroughly research the alkaline heap leach process and make improvements to the uranium recovery methods. The third phase of metallurgical test work will explore some new options to further reduce the cost of production and enhance the economic viability of Trekkopje mine. Preliminary bench testing carried out in mid-2015 at the Process Development Laboratory in France delivered promising results. The on-site testing program started in October 2015 and will continue into 2016. Areva Namibia has been very active in the community. Thanks to the desalination plant NamWater has been able to meet the water demand of the other uranium mines when pumping from the Omaruru Delta (Omdel) aquifer had to be reduced. Negotiations about the sale of the plant are at an advanced stage. The company is supporting social projects in the areas of economic development, education, culture and sport in its neighbouring communities of Arandis and Swakopmund and in the wider Erongo region. This report presents some of the highlights of this active engagement with stakeholders at the local, regional and national level. Content: Health and Safety; People; Environment; Community; Care and Maintenance; Process Development; Sustainability Indicators

  18. Determining customer satisfaction in anatomic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarbo, Richard J

    2006-05-01

    Measurement of physicians' and patients' satisfaction with laboratory services has become a standard practice in the United States, prompted by national accreditation requirements. Unlike other surveys of hospital-, outpatient care-, or physician-related activities, no ongoing, comprehensive customer satisfaction survey of anatomic pathology services is available for subscription that would allow continual benchmarking against peer laboratories. Pathologists, therefore, must often design their own local assessment tools to determine physician satisfaction in anatomic pathology. To describe satisfaction survey design that would elicit specific information from physician customers about key elements of anatomic pathology services. The author shares his experience in biannually assessing customer satisfaction in anatomic pathology with survey tools designed at the Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich. Benchmarks for physician satisfaction, opportunities for improvement, and characteristics that correlated with a high level of physician satisfaction were identified nationally from a standardized survey tool used by 94 laboratories in the 2001 College of American Pathologists Q-Probes quality improvement program. In general, physicians are most satisfied with professional diagnostic services and least satisfied with pathology services related to poor communication. A well-designed and conducted customer satisfaction survey is an opportunity for pathologists to periodically educate physician customers about services offered, manage unrealistic expectations, and understand the evolving needs of the physician customer. Armed with current information from physician customers, the pathologist is better able to strategically plan for resources that facilitate performance improvements in anatomic pathology laboratory services that align with evolving clinical needs in health care delivery.

  19. Object of intervention or stakeholder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Ann-Merete

    (Sanders & Stappers, 2008) or radical organizational innovation (Scharmer & Kaüfer, 2014). Taking co-creation processes into the world of social work however, envokes a number of questions. Basically; what is the problem and to whom? Who are the stakeholders and what is their motivation? How is power...... are equal partners (Fenwick 2012), which in some cases is not entirely true. Preliminary findings indicate that the mindset required for co-creation to take place is not necessarily in tune with professional habits in social work nor with public governance. A gap between political vision and paedagogical...

  20. The municipality as a stakeholder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmqvist, Roland

    2006-01-01

    The author explains how local politicians look upon the dialogue regarding nuclear installations in their municipalities. As seen from the map of European reactors there is a lot of local districts affected by nuclear operations. What has a mayor from such a community to say about the shut-down phase of such operations and especially about the need for communication between stakeholders when closing and decommissioning a nuclear power reactor? To answer this question the author has structured his presentation into 4 parts as follows: 1. The European municipalities ? some characteristics; 2. The siting of NPPs (nuclear power plants) in Europe; 3. The shutdown, decommissioning and the dismantling phases; 4. Lessons learnt

  1. National stakeholder workshop summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This is a summary of the plenary sessions and small group discussion sessions from the fourth National Stakeholder Workshop sponsored by the DOE Office of Worker and Community Transition held in Atlanta, Georgia on March 13--15, 1996. Topics of the sessions included work force planning and restructuring, worker participation in health and safety, review of actions and commitments, lessons learned in collective bargaining agreements, work force restructuring guidance, work force planning, update on community transition activities. Also included are appendices listing the participants and DOE contacts.

  2. Stakeholder Alignment and Changing Geospatial Information Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S.; Cutcher-Gershenfeld, J.; King, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Changing geospatial information capabilities can have major economic and social effects on activities such as drought monitoring, weather forecasts, agricultural productivity projections, water and air quality assessments, the effects of forestry practices and so on. Whose interests are served by such changes? Two common mistakes are assuming stability in the community of stakeholders and consistency in stakeholder behavior. Stakeholder communities can reconfigure dramatically as some leave the discussion, others enter, and circumstances shift — all resulting in dynamic points of alignment and misalignment . New stakeholders can bring new interests, and existing stakeholders can change their positions. Stakeholders and their interests need to be be considered as geospatial information capabilities change, but this is easier said than done. New ways of thinking about stakeholder alignment in light of changes in capability are presented.

  3. Towards a More Holistic Stakeholder Analysis Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedereviciute, Kristina; Valentini, Chiara

    2011-01-01

    are identified based on the dimensions of connectivity and the content shared. Accordingly, the study introduces four groups of important actors from social media: unconcerned lurkers, unconcerned influencers, concerned lurkers and concerned influencers and integrates them into the existing Stakeholder Salience...... in finding stakeholders on new environments (social media), where connectivity and relationships play a key role. The argument stems from the need to assess stakeholder presence beyond the dyadic ties. Consequently, the combination of the Stakeholder Salience Model (SSM) and social network analysis (SNA......) is proposed as a more holistic solution for stakeholder identification including those from social media. A process of finding “unknown” but important stakeholders from social media was identified incorporating the content search and the principles of SNA. Consequently, stakeholders from social media...

  4. Reliability and concurrent validity of the Dutch hip and knee replacement expectations surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; van Raay, Jos J. A. M.; Reininga, Inge H. F.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Stevens, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Background: Preoperative expectations of outcome of total hip and knee arthroplasty are important determinants of patients' satisfaction and functional outcome. Aims of the study were (1) to translate the Hospital for Special Surgery Hip Replacement Expectations Survey and Knee Replacement

  5. Developing a stakeholder engagement strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Shell Canada's social performance plan was outlined in this presentation. Stakeholder engagement is a key strategy in the company's response to the concerns and broader priorities of different groups and individuals affected by their operations. A review of the business and societal values of stakeholder engagement was presented. Key benefits include greater profitability; protection of the environment; effective resource management; community benefits; and the delivery of value to customers. It was suggested that a continuous engagement process helps companies to assess impacts and work on strategies to avoid and mitigate negative impacts. A framework for social performance management was presented. It was noted that accountability and transparency are key components of Shell's progress towards sustainable development, and their direct and indirect contributions to the communities and societies where they operate. The social impact of core business operations is now a focus of the company. Key concerns of the social performance plan include environmental and health impacts; land use and changes in local economies; cultural concerns; and infrastructure impacts. An outline of Shell's Listening and Responding Program was also provided. refs., tabs., figs

  6. Developing a stakeholder engagement strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nixon, J.A. [Shell Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Shell Canada's social performance plan was outlined in this presentation. Stakeholder engagement is a key strategy in the company's response to the concerns and broader priorities of different groups and individuals affected by their operations. A review of the business and societal values of stakeholder engagement was presented. Key benefits include greater profitability; protection of the environment; effective resource management; community benefits; and the delivery of value to customers. It was suggested that a continuous engagement process helps companies to assess impacts and work on strategies to avoid and mitigate negative impacts. A framework for social performance management was presented. It was noted that accountability and transparency are key components of Shell's progress towards sustainable development, and their direct and indirect contributions to the communities and societies where they operate. The social impact of core business operations is now a focus of the company. Key concerns of the social performance plan include environmental and health impacts; land use and changes in local economies; cultural concerns; and infrastructure impacts. An outline of Shell's Listening and Responding Program was also provided. refs., tabs., figs.

  7. The development of the Patient Expectations of Shoulder Surgery survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koorevaar, Rinco C T; Haanstra, Tsjitske; Van't Riet, Esther; Lambers Heerspink, Okke F O; Bulstra, Sjoerd K

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient satisfaction after a surgical procedure is dependent on meeting preoperative expectations. There is currently no patient expectations survey available for patients undergoing shoulder surgery that is validated, reliable, and easy to use in daily practice. The aim of this study

  8. Conference Attendees’ Satisfaction: Evidence from Belgrade (Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunjić Jelena

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Conference industry brings significant economic effects and that is one of the reasons why many destinations around the world strive to organize conferences, especially the international ones, which make bigger economic effects. According to the Strategy of tourism development of the Republic of Serbia (2005-2015, city break and business tourism are tourism products of high priority, which can provide short-term positioning of Novi Sad and Belgrade, at the first place, at the international tourism market, and contribute to the growth of tourism turnover of foreign travellers.Belgrade is the capital and the largest city in Serbia. It is very well equipped with necessary infrastructure for organizing business events such as conferences, congresses, meetings etc. Lately, the number of international business events in Serbia is increasing and the majority of those events are organized in Belgrade. However, there are very few surveys which are examining satisfaction of the conference attendees in Serbia. This topic is often ignored despite the fact that the attendees satisfaction is substantial for organizers and all other relevant stakeholders at host destination. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to analyze the satisfaction of the conference attendees, as they are final consumers of conference tourist product and their experience regarding both conference and host destination is thus essential to destination marketing and management organizations, conference centres, hotel managers, meeting planners and all other stakeholders involved in conference industry and tourism

  9. Effective stakeholder management for medical practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Zigiriadis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of organizational-stakeholder relationships is highlighted in most organizational studies literature. This article investigates the relationship between medical practices and their stakeholders and has been developed to provide guidance on stakeholder engagement and communication. It is intended to provide a useful reference point for all medical practices concerning stakeholder engagement activities. Direction is provided on how to identify and ultimately engage with stakeholders. It should hopefully further develop the effectiveness of engagement efforts that are undertaken between a medical practice and its stakeholders. The ability of a medical practice to cultivate and sustain strong relationships with its prominent stakeholder groups greatly enhances the likelihood that the relationship will endure. Medical practitioners in South Africa are generally in urgent need of pursuing new ways of delivering quality health care through developing new service models that have been developed with the help of relevant stakeholders. Since stakeholder relationship management is critical for corporate sustainability, medical practice management should seek strategic direction by investigating the relative competitive threat and relative supportive value of each stakeholder and then classify them accordingly.

  10. Engaging stakeholders on complex, and potentially contested, science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, John; Atherton, Elizabeth; Tweed, Cherry

    2014-01-01

    An effective process for engaging stakeholders on the science underpinning radioactive waste disposal will be essential for the successful implementation of geological disposal in the United Kingdom. Of particular importance are those stakeholders representing, and living in, volunteer communities. There have been two major shifts over the last 10-20 years in society's engagement with science which are particularly relevant to the Radioactive Waste Management Directorate's (RWMD) stakeholder engagement: - a shift to a more inclusive approach in which the public have more of a say about science and its uses; - a shift to a more evidence-based approach to societal decision making. Significant challenges to effective communication and confidence building in geological disposal arise from: - the complexities and uncertainties inherent in the relevant science; - the sensitivities and 'high stakes' (locally and nationally) associated with a disposal facility; - the expectation that there will continue to be vocal stakeholders who are fundamentally opposed to geological disposal of radioactive wastes who will focus on any remaining uncertainties as just cause for their position. This abstract summarises the findings of a project to evaluate approaches to engaging with stakeholders on the science underpinning sensitive decisions in sectors other than radioactive waste disposal and to identify elements of good practice which may help RWMD in taking forward the implementation of a geological disposal facility for the United Kingdom's radioactive wastes. Six elements of good practice are listed and discussed below: - Using science appropriately: Taking an inclusive, evidence-based approach in which collaborative inquiry takes a holistic, weight-of-evidence view of the science rather than focusing on items of evidence in isolation, using them to prove or disprove a particular point of view. - Building trust: Ensuring that processes of engagement engender trust, and that trust

  11. Comparison of students' foodservice satisfaction between Korea and US

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Eunkyung; Chun, Youngah; Joo, Nami; Yoon, Ji-young

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes important factors of foodservice in school through comparison of students' satisfaction of using foodservice in Korea and US in order to meet students' expectations. The survey was composed of 4 categories including menu, service, hygiene, and facility and it was carried out in both countries to evaluate satisfaction. First, comparison of satisfaction between two countries was made using t-test. Secondly, multiple regression was performed to identify factors affecting sati...

  12. Physician Assistant Job Satisfaction: A Narrative Review of Empirical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Roderick S; Kuilman, Luppo; Everett, Christine M

    2015-12-01

    To examine physician assistant (PA) job satisfaction and identify factors predicting job satisfaction and identify areas of needed research. With a global PA movement underway and a half-century in development, the empirical basis for informing employers of approaches to improve job satisfaction has not received a careful review. A narrative review of empirical research was undertaken to inform stakeholders about PA employment with a goal of improved management. The a priori criteria included published studies that asked PAs about job satisfaction. Articles addressing PA job satisfaction, written in English, were reviewed and categorized according to the Job Characteristics Model. Of 68 publications reviewed, 29 met criteria and were categorized in a Job Characteristics Model. Most studies report a high degree of job satisfaction when autonomy, income, patient responsibility, physician support, and career advancement opportunities are surveyed. Age, sex, specialty, and occupational background are needed to understand the effect on job satisfaction. Quality of studies varies widely. Employers may want to examine their relationships with PAs periodically. The factors of job satisfaction may assist policymakers and health administrators in creating welcoming professional employment environments. The main limitation: no study comprehensively evaluated all the antecedents of job satisfaction. PAs seem to experience job satisfaction supported by low attrition rates and competitive wages. Contributing factors are autonomy, experienced responsibility, pay, and supportive supervising physician. A number of intrinsic rewards derived from the performance of the job within the social environment, along with extrinsic rewards, may contribute to overall job satisfaction. PA job satisfaction research is underdeveloped; investigations should include longitudinal studies, cohort analyses, and economic determinants.

  13. Nuclear Energy Stakeholders in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadano, Julian

    2017-01-01

    Mr Gadano, Undersecretary for Nuclear Energy, Argentina spoke from the perspective of a country looking forward to becoming a member of the NEA. He reviewed the place of nuclear energy in his country's energy mix and called attention to its role in positively addressing the global challenges of climate change and energy security. Mr Gadano also described the federal system which governs Argentina. Drawing on his expertise as a lawmaker and nuclear regulator but also as an academic sociologist, he stressed that reaching agreement on siting initiatives for example requires a sustainable relation with stakeholders, including regional governments. This is important because in the end, 'the best project is the one you can finish'

  14. Combining Human Resource and Stakeholder Management Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravazzani, Silvia; Mormino, Sara

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores collaborative learning activities involving HR and external stakeholders that organizations decide to plan and implement in order to obtain benefits in terms of knowledge sharing, stakeholder understanding and value creation. The increasing uncertainty and multiplicity of comp...... and corporate learning in a stakeholder-oriented perspective can play a strategic role in supporting business strategy, providing organizations the resources to meet internal and external needs (Wilson, 2005) and to interconnect with their value network.......This paper explores collaborative learning activities involving HR and external stakeholders that organizations decide to plan and implement in order to obtain benefits in terms of knowledge sharing, stakeholder understanding and value creation. The increasing uncertainty and multiplicity...... of competitive pressures and stakeholder demands (Harrison, St. John, 1996) require organizations, and in particular HR, to take on a more strategic role aimed to build new capability and support the overarching business strategy (Ulrich, Beatty 2001). This study draws on Strategic Human Resource Management...

  15. Defining the Stakeholder Concept for Political Marketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormrod, Robert

    The concept of a ‘stakeholder’ is often misused in the academic literature; stakeholders can range from the few actors with which the organisation has a direct interaction (Carroll 1993), to anything that can exert some form of influence over the organisation, including nature, the deceased...... and the unborn (Starik 1995). It is therefore necessary to provide a precise definition of the stakeholder concept to maintain academic rigour. However, a specification of the nature of the stakeholder concept is generally missing in political marketing literature. This paper addresses this issue by discussing...... how the stakeholder concept is understood, and then applies the stakeholder concept to the political marketing context, proposing a definition of the stakeholder concept for political marketing research....

  16. Stakeholders in the Political Marketing Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormrod, Robert

    Stakeholders influence the ability of organisations to achieve their aims, but little work has been carried out into understanding the stakeholder concept as applied to the political marketing context. This paper first discusses the contextual nature of stakeholders using normative...... occurs in. Finally, it is proposed that in the political marketing context, the stakeholder concept can be defined as ‘context-specific actors that directly or indirectly influence or are influenced by the political actor’......./strategic and broad/narrow dimensions. Building on the assumption that ‘political marketing is different’, the paper argues that stakeholders can be considered as direct or indirect depending on which of the three interaction marketplaces of the political exchange triad the political actor-stakeholder interaction...

  17. Satisfaction and 'comparison sharing'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amilon, Anna

    2009-01-01

    the probability of satisfaction. Results show that comparison sharing impacts satisfaction for women, and that those women who share more equally than their peers are more likely to be satisfied, whereas comparison sharing has no influence on satisfaction for men. Also, parents are less likely to be satisfied...

  18. Linking advanced biofuels policies with stakeholder interests: A method building on Quality Function Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schillo, R. Sandra; Isabelle, Diane A.; Shakiba, Abtin

    2017-01-01

    The field of renewable energy policy is inherently complex due to the long-term impacts of its policies, the broad range of potential stakeholders, the intricacy of scientific, engineering and technological developments, and the interplay of complex policy mixes that may result in unintended consequences. Quality Function Deployment (QFD) provides a systematic consideration of all relevant stakeholders, a rigorous analysis of the needs of stakeholders, and a prioritization of design features based on stakeholders needs. We build on QFD combined with Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) to develop a novel method applied to the area of advanced biofuel policies. This Multi-Stakeholder Policy QFD (MSP QFD) provides a systematic approach to capture the voice of the stakeholders and align it with the broad range of potential advanced biofuels policies. To account for the policy environment, the MSP QFD utilizes a novel approach to stakeholder importance weights. This MSP QFD adds to the literature as it permits the analysis of the broad range of relevant national policies with regards to the development of advanced biofuels, as compared to more narrowly focused typical QFD applications. It also allows policy developers to gain additional insights into the perceived impacts of policies, as well as international comparisons. - Highlights: • Advanced biofuels are mostly still in research and early commercialization stages. • Government policies are expected to support biofuels stakeholders in market entry. • A Multi-Stakeholder Policy QFD (MSP QFD) links biofuels policies with stakeholders. • MSP QFD employs novel stakeholder weights method. • The case of advanced biofuels in Canada shows comparative importance of policies.

  19. Understanding perceptions of stakeholder groups about Forestry Best Management Practices in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumpach, Chantal; Dwivedi, Puneet; Izlar, Robert; Cook, Chase

    2018-05-01

    Forestry Best Management Practices (BMPs) are critical in ensuring sustainable forest management in the United States because of their effectiveness in protecting water quality, reducing soil erosion, maintaining riparian habitat, and sustaining site productivity. The success of forestry BMPs depends heavily on coordination among primary stakeholder groups. It is important to understand perceptions of such groups for a successful forest policy formulation. We used the SWOT-AHP (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats analysis with the Analytical Hierarchy Process) framework to assess perceptions of three stakeholder groups (loggers, landowners, agency foresters) about forestry BMPs in Georgia, the largest roundwood producing state in the United States. The agency and logger stakeholder groups gave the highest priority to improved reputation under the strength category, whereas the landowner stakeholder group perceived sustainable forestry as the highest priority under the same category. Lack of landowner education was the highest priority under the weakness category for landowner and agency stakeholder groups, whereas the logger stakeholder group selected lack of trained personnel as the highest priority under the same category. Agency and landowner stakeholder groups gave the highest priority to training and education while loggers indicated maintenance of forest-based environmental benefits as their highest priority under the opportunity category. Finally, landowners and agency stakeholder groups perceived more regulations and restrictions as most significant in the threat category whereas the logger stakeholder group was most concerned about the insufficient accounting of cost sharing under the same category. Overall, selected stakeholder groups recognize the importance of forestry BMPs and had positive perceptions about them. A collaborative approach based on continuous feedback can streamline expectations of stakeholder groups about forestry BMPs in

  20. Stakeholder mapping of CSR in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Looser, S; Wehrmeyer, WCH

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to investigate, using stakeholder map methodology, showing power, urgency, legitimacy and concerns of different actors, the current state of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Switzerland. Previous research on CSR in Europe has made few attempts to identify stakeholders and their contribution to this topic. Design/methodology/approach – To derive this map, publicly available documents were explored, augmented by 27 interviews with key stakeholders (consumers, m...

  1. Stakeholder capitalism, corporate governance and firm value

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Franklin; Carletti, Elena; Marquez, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In countries such as Germany, the legal system is such that firms are necessarily stakeholder oriented. In others like Japan social convention achieves a similar effect. We analyze the advantages and disadvantages of stakeholder-oriented firms that are concerned with employees and suppliers compared to pure shareholder-oriented firms. We show that in a context of imperfect competition stakeholder firms have higher prices and lower output than shareholder-oriented firms. Surprisingly, we also ...

  2. Continued usage of e-learning: Expectations and performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Antonio de Melo Pereira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to investigate the determinants of satisfaction and the resulting continuance intention use in e-learning context. The constructs of decomposed expectancy disconfirmation theory (DEDT are evaluated from the perspective of users of a virtual learning environment (VLE in relation to expectations and perceived performance. An online survey collected responses from 197 students of a public management course in distance mode. Structural equation modeling was operationalized by the method of partial least squares in Smart PLS software. The results showed that there is a relationship between quality, usability, value and value disconfirmation with satisfaction. Likewise, satisfaction proved to be decisive for the continuance intention use. However, there were no significant relationships between quality disconfirmation and usability disconfirmation with satisfaction. Based on the results, is discussed the theoretical and practical implications of the structural model found by the search.

  3. Organising stakeholder workshops in research and innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Velsing; Bryndum, Nina; Bedsted, Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    This article addresses the theory and practice of creating responsiveness among actors through deliberative dialogue processes with stakeholders from diverse institutional settings. The EU’s decision to mainstream stakeholder deliberation in research and innovation, as part of its focus......, the article illustrates the challenges of applying theory to five European stakeholder workshops co-organised by the authors. The illustration highlights the difficult interaction between theory and practice. The article concludes that while theoretical perspectives can provide general guidance, practical...... experience is essential when dealing with the trade-offs that are an intrinsic part of organising stakeholder workshops....

  4. Student satisfaction and loyalty in Denmark: Application of EPSI methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavar, Tina; Sudzina, Frantisek

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring and managing customers' satisfaction are key features to benefit from today's competitive environment. In higher education context, only a few studies are available on satisfaction and loyalty of the main customers who are the students, which signifies the need to investigate the field more thoroughly. The aim of this research is to measure the strength of determinants of students' satisfaction and the importance of antecedents in students' satisfaction and loyalty in Denmark. Our research model is the modification of European Performance Satisfaction Index (EPSI), which takes the university's image direct effects on students' expectations into account from students' perspective. The structural equation model of student satisfaction and loyalty has been evaluated using partial least square path modelling. Our findings confirm that the EPSI framework is applicable on student satisfaction and loyalty among Danish universities. We show that all the relationships among variables of the research model are significant except the relationship between quality of software and students' loyalty. Results further verify the significance of antecedents in students' satisfaction and loyalty at Danish universities; the university image and student satisfaction are the antecedents of student loyalty with a significant direct effect, while perceived value, quality of hardware, quality of software, expectations, and university image are antecedents of student satisfaction. Eventually, our findings may be of an inspiration to maintain and improve students' experiences during their study at the university. Dedicating resources to identified important factors from students' perception enable universities to attract more students, make them highly satisfied and loyal.

  5. Student satisfaction and loyalty in Denmark: Application of EPSI methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavar, Tina

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring and managing customers’ satisfaction are key features to benefit from today’s competitive environment. In higher education context, only a few studies are available on satisfaction and loyalty of the main customers who are the students, which signifies the need to investigate the field more thoroughly. The aim of this research is to measure the strength of determinants of students’ satisfaction and the importance of antecedents in students’ satisfaction and loyalty in Denmark. Our research model is the modification of European Performance Satisfaction Index (EPSI), which takes the university’s image direct effects on students’ expectations into account from students’ perspective. The structural equation model of student satisfaction and loyalty has been evaluated using partial least square path modelling. Our findings confirm that the EPSI framework is applicable on student satisfaction and loyalty among Danish universities. We show that all the relationships among variables of the research model are significant except the relationship between quality of software and students’ loyalty. Results further verify the significance of antecedents in students’ satisfaction and loyalty at Danish universities; the university image and student satisfaction are the antecedents of student loyalty with a significant direct effect, while perceived value, quality of hardware, quality of software, expectations, and university image are antecedents of student satisfaction. Eventually, our findings may be of an inspiration to maintain and improve students’ experiences during their study at the university. Dedicating resources to identified important factors from students’ perception enable universities to attract more students, make them highly satisfied and loyal. PMID:29240801

  6. Expecting the unexpected

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mcneill, Ilona M.; Dunlop, Patrick D.; Heath, Jonathan B.

    2013-01-01

    People who live in wildfire-prone communities tend to form their own hazard-related expectations, which may influence their willingness to prepare for a fire. Past research has already identified two important expectancy-based factors associated with people's intentions to prepare for a natural......) and measured actual rather than intended preparedness. In addition, we tested the relation between preparedness and two additional threat-related expectations: the expectation that one can rely on an official warning and the expectation of encountering obstacles (e.g., the loss of utilities) during a fire...

  7. The Relationship between Grandparent Satisfaction, Meaning, and Generativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Dianne M.; Whelan, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated predictors of grandparent satisfaction. Participants were 149 non-custodial grandparents (100 grandmothers, 49 grandfathers) aged up to 80 years. They completed grandparent satisfaction, meaning, and generativity scales, and indicated levels of weekly childcare contact with grandchildren. As expected, increasing levels of…

  8. Best Practice Life Expectancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medford, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    been reported previously by various authors. Though remarkable, this is simply an empirical observation. Objective: We examine best-practice life expectancy more formally by using extreme value theory. Methods: Extreme value distributions are fit to the time series (1900 to 2012) of maximum life......Background: Whereas the rise in human life expectancy has been extensively studied, the evolution of maximum life expectancies, i.e., the rise in best-practice life expectancy in a group of populations, has not been examined to the same extent. The linear rise in best-practice life expectancy has...... expectancies at birth and age 65, for both sexes, using data from the Human Mortality Database and the United Nations. Conclusions: Generalized extreme value distributions offer a theoretically justified way to model best-practice life expectancies. Using this framework one can straightforwardly obtain...

  9. Communication and Stakeholder Involvement in Environmental Remediation Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-05-15

    The way in which members of the public perceive a contamination situation and an approach to the remediation of contaminated land will influence the decision making process in a variety of ways. Through communication between experts, decision makers and members of stakeholder communities, participatory processes and negotiation between different interest groups can sometimes be used effectively as mechanisms for improving the overall decision making process. The intention is to ensure a technically sound and socially acceptable decision that meets norms of adequacy or satisfactory performance in relation to a whole range of different concerns. Good communication strategies will encourage cooperation and understanding between different interested parties in remediation projects. Involvement of affected or interested persons can prevent fear driven reactions, which potentially damage public response and create undue expectations or unnecessary anxiety. For all environmental remediation (ER) cases, there is a risk that the process will fail if it does not respect social, environmental, political and economic dimensions. This requires open, clear and mutually agreed lines of communication among stakeholders within a well defined legal framework. A general recommendation is to involve them from a very early point in the process. This publication presents ER in plain language in such a way that implementers and regulators can communicate the motives and objectives of remediation projects to a variety of stakeholder communities in order to improve mutual understanding and facilitate dialogue between interested parties. ER is considered from two perspectives: technical and non-technical. A section that gives general ideas on the strategies to deal with stakeholder involvement and which discusses different aspects of the communication approaches in ER is then included. It is recognized that social, cultural and political situations are very diverse in different countries in

  10. Communication and Stakeholder Involvement in Environmental Remediation Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The way in which members of the public perceive a contamination situation and an approach to the remediation of contaminated land will influence the decision making process in a variety of ways. Through communication between experts, decision makers and members of stakeholder communities, participatory processes and negotiation between different interest groups can sometimes be used effectively as mechanisms for improving the overall decision making process. The intention is to ensure a technically sound and socially acceptable decision that meets norms of adequacy or satisfactory performance in relation to a whole range of different concerns. Good communication strategies will encourage cooperation and understanding between different interested parties in remediation projects. Involvement of affected or interested persons can prevent fear driven reactions, which potentially damage public response and create undue expectations or unnecessary anxiety. For all environmental remediation (ER) cases, there is a risk that the process will fail if it does not respect social, environmental, political and economic dimensions. This requires open, clear and mutually agreed lines of communication among stakeholders within a well defined legal framework. A general recommendation is to involve them from a very early point in the process. This publication presents ER in plain language in such a way that implementers and regulators can communicate the motives and objectives of remediation projects to a variety of stakeholder communities in order to improve mutual understanding and facilitate dialogue between interested parties. ER is considered from two perspectives: technical and non-technical. A section that gives general ideas on the strategies to deal with stakeholder involvement and which discusses different aspects of the communication approaches in ER is then included. It is recognized that social, cultural and political situations are very diverse in different countries in

  11. Governance of environmental risk: new approaches to managing stakeholder involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Suzanne; Dunphy, Dexter; Martin, Andrew

    2009-04-01

    Disputes concerning industrial legacies such as the disposal of toxic wastes illustrate changing pressures on corporations and governments. Business and governments are now confronted with managing the expectations of a society increasingly aware of the social and environmental impacts and risks associated with economic development and demanding more equitable distribution and democratic management of such risks. The closed managerialist decision-making of the powerful bureaucracies and corporations of the industrial era is informed by traditional management theory which cannot provide a framework for the adequate governance of these risks. Recent socio-political theories have conceptualised some key themes that must be addressed in a more fitting approach to governance. We identify more recent management and governance theory which addresses these themes and develop a process-based approach to governance of environmental disputes that allows for the evolving nature of stakeholder relations in a highly complex multiple stakeholder arena.

  12. Innovation in Services and Stakeholder Interactions: Cases from Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia

    Services are increasingly becoming a crucial driver of the economies of developed countries. At the same time, innovation is not only recommended, but also required, to ensure survival and growth of organisations, within the manufacturing as well as the service sectors. Given globalisation...... and the development of information and communication technologies, more and more heterogeneous parties are and might be involved in innovation processes; meaning that both manufacturers and service providers shall take into consideration a more diverse set of needs and expectations when developing new offerings....... Within the service context, specifically, empirical evidence and existing research suggest that interactions between stakeholders are an important element of innovation processes. Therefore, when managing and studying innovation in the service context, interactions between stakeholders should be taken...

  13. Stakeholders' Perspectives About and Priorities for Economic Evaluation of Health and Safety Programs in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompa, Emile; de Boer, Henriette; Macdonald, Sara; Alamgir, Hasanat; Koehoorn, Mieke; Guzman, Jaime

    2016-04-01

    This study identified and prioritized resources and outcomes that should be considered in more comprehensive and scientifically rigorous health and safety economic evaluations according to healthcare sector stakeholders. A literature review and stakeholder interviews identified candidate resources and outcomes and then a Delphi panel ranked them. According to the panel, the top five resources were (a) health and safety staff time; (b) training workers; (c) program planning, promotion, and evaluation costs; (d) equipment purchases and upgrades; and (e) administration costs. The top five outcomes were (a) number of injuries, illnesses, and general sickness absences; (b) safety climate; (c) days lost due to injuries, illnesses, and general sickness absences; (d) job satisfaction and engagement; and (e) quality of care and patient safety. These findings emphasize stakeholders' stated priorities and are useful as a benchmark for assessing the quality of health and safety economic evaluations and the comprehensiveness of these findings. © 2016 The Author(s).

  14. Stakeholder Involvement in Tourism Destination Development: A Case of Dunga Beach and Wetland, Kisumu County, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Otieno Wanga

    2014-09-01

    In Kenya, Tourism is the second largest source of foreign exchange revenue following agriculture; it however, faces numerous challenges sustainability due the complex nature of tourism destinations. Tourism destinations are complex and dynamic systems that involve various stakeholders each with different understanding of same tourism system. These different perceptions can be tapped to develop a common tourism model that helps achieve the overall sustainable tourism development objective of a given destination. This paper describes participatory systems approach to develop a shared understanding amongst stakeholders of the tourism system in Dunga Beach and Wetland, in Kisumu County, Kenya. The process includes the development of a systems model that represents a holistic understanding of the interconnectedness and relationships between the various components that impact on sustainable development of tourism in Dunga. The model is intended for use as a framework for enhancing ecotourism experiences by stakeholders who are ecotourism experience providers in Dunga for the satisfaction of tourists in Dunga beach and wetland.

  15. Using Participatory Learning & Action (PLA) research techniques for inter-stakeholder dialogue in primary healthcare: an analysis of stakeholders' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brún, T; O'Reilly-de Brún, M; Van Weel-Baumgarten, E; Burns, N; Dowrick, C; Lionis, C; O'Donnell, C; Mair, F S; Papadakaki, M; Saridaki, A; Spiegel, W; Van Weel, C; Van den Muijsenbergh, M; MacFarlane, A

    2017-01-01

    It is important for health care workers to know the needs and expectations of their patients. Therefore, service users have to be involved in research. To achieve a meaningful dialogue between service users, healthcare workers and researchers, participatory methods are needed. This paper describes how the application of a specific participatory methodology, Participatory Learning and Action (PLA) can lead to such a meaningful dialogue. In PLA all stakeholders are regarded as equal partners and collaborators in research.During 2011-2015, a European project called RESTORE used PLA in Austria, Greece, Ireland, The Netherlands and the UK to investigate how communication between primary health care workers and their migrant patients could be improved.Seventy eight migrants, interpreters, doctors, nurses and other key stakeholders (see Table 2) participated in 62 PLA sessions. These dialogues (involving discussions, activities, PLA techniques and evaluations) were generally 2-3 h long and were recorded and analysed by the researchers.Participants reported many positive experiences about their dialogues with other stakeholders. There was a positive, trusting atmosphere in which all stakeholders could express their views despite differences in social power. This made for better understanding within and across stakeholder groups. For instance a doctor changed her view on the use of interpreters after a migrant explained why this was important. Negative experiences were rare: some doctors and healthcare workers thought the PLA sessions took a lot of time; and despite the good dialogue, there was disappointment that very few migrants used the new interpreting service. Background In order to be effective, primary healthcare must understand the health needs, values and expectations of the population it serves. Recent research has shown that the involvement of service users and other stakeholders and gathering information on their perspectives can contribute positively to many

  16. Stakeholder engagement in dredged material management decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Zachary A; Bates, Matthew E; Wood, Matthew D; Linkov, Igor

    2014-10-15

    Dredging and disposal issues often become controversial with local stakeholders because of their competing interests. These interests tend to manifest themselves in stakeholders holding onto entrenched positions, and deadlock can result without a methodology to move the stakeholder group past the status quo. However, these situations can be represented as multi-stakeholder, multi-criteria decision problems. In this paper, we describe a case study in which multi-criteria decision analysis was implemented in a multi-stakeholder setting in order to generate recommendations on dredged material placement for Long Island Sound's Dredged Material Management Plan. A working-group of representatives from various stakeholder organizations was formed and consulted to help prioritize sediment placement sites for each dredging center in the region by collaboratively building a multi-criteria decision model. The resulting model framed the problem as several alternatives, criteria, sub-criteria, and metrics relevant to stakeholder interests in the Long Island Sound region. An elicitation of values, represented as criteria weights, was then conducted. Results show that in general, stakeholders tended to agree that all criteria were at least somewhat important, and on average there was strong agreement on the order of preferences among the diverse groups of stakeholders. By developing the decision model iteratively with stakeholders as a group and soliciting their preferences, the process sought to increase stakeholder involvement at the front-end of the prioritization process and lead to increased knowledge and consensus regarding the importance of site-specific criteria. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. assessment of clients' satisfaction with health service deliveries at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abrham

    Hence, the objective of this study was to assess the perceived levels of clients' ... doctor. Furthermore, satisfaction with the health care was found to have a significant association with the age ... those client values and expectations, which are.

  18. Evaluating stakeholder management performance using a stakeholder report card: the next step in theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvey, Donna; Fottler, Myron D; Slovensky, Donna J

    2002-01-01

    In the highly competitive health care environment, the survival of an organization may depend on how well powerful stakeholders are managed. Yet, the existing strategic stakeholder management process does not include evaluation of stakeholder management performance. To address this critical gap, this paper proposes a systematic method for evaluation using a stakeholder report card. An example of a physician report card based on this methodology is presented.

  19. Quality partnerships: The community stakeholders' view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vhonani Netshandama

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Since 1997 universities in South Africa have been encouraged to be responsive to the needs of communities, to encourage broader participation and to address issues of access in higher education (Department of Education 1997. This transformative agenda was found to be especially compelling in the case of rural-based South African universities, which often serve historically disadvantaged black populations in areas that are both under-resourced and underdeveloped (Nkomo & Sehoole 2007, pp. 235–36. In 2006 the traditional leadership of a local community approached the University of Venda to propose a partnership. This prompted the researcher to conduct a qualitative study, which sought to explore and describe community members’ views of what they understood to be a quality partnership. Thirty-seven community representatives were engaged in individual as well as focus group interviews. These representatives were identified first through a stakeholder analysis procedure that sought to determine who in the community would have valuable input for the university-community partnership. As a point of departure, the following two questions were asked consecutively: What are your needs and expectations of a partnership with the university and what would you regard as a quality partnership between the HEI and the community? The sample selection was purposive, utilising the snowball technique. Data was transcribed and analysed using Tesch’s eight-step method (Tesch 1990, in Creswell 1994, p. 155. Interview data and field notes were co-coded, crosschecked and triangulated. Feedback workshops were conducted with the community to confirm the findings. A consensus was reached that four main requirements emerged from the data: —Balance the partnership objectives of both parties —Ensure an unexploitative partnership —Share power and control in the partnership —Maintain and monitor the partnership. This article provides a brief overview of the national

  20. Measurement of patient satisfaction with community pharmacy services: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik Panvelkar, Pradnya; Saini, Bandana; Armour, Carol

    2009-10-01

    trials and to measure changes in satisfaction over time. Novel approaches involving an understanding of expectations and preferences of patients and matching these to the services provided also need to be explored.

  1. Stakeholder Value Matrix - Die VErbindung zwischen Shareholder Value und Stakeholder Value

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Figge

    2004-01-01

    Die Studie zeigt, was unter Stakeholder Value verstanden werden kann, wie Shareholder Value und Stakeholder Value gemessen werden können und welche Verbindung zwischen beiden Konzepten besteht. In dieser Studie wird erstmals die Wertbeitragsanalyse von Stakeholderbeziehungen vorgestellt. Anhand der Stakeholder Value Matrix lässt sich zeigen, welche Stakeholdergruppen zusammen positiv zum Unternehmenswert beitragen.

  2. Stakeholder initiatives in flood risk management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelenbos, Jurian; Buuren, Van Arwin; Roth, Dik; Winnubst, Madelinde

    2017-01-01

    In recent years stakeholder participation has become a popular topic in flood management. Little is known about how and under which circumstances local stakeholders initiate and develop successful flood management strategies and how governmental actors respond to them. Drawing on theories of

  3. Perceptions of European stakeholders of pulse fishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, M.L.; Trapman, B.K.; Rasenberg, M.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    This research project examines the concerns and questions of European stakeholders about pulse fishing, in order to assess to what extent the knowledge agenda on pulse fishing covers these issues. To get a first impression of the concerns about pulse fishing, and to get an idea of the stakeholders

  4. Accountability in Community Colleges Using Stakeholder Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Paula R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to analyze stakeholder theory and its applicability to community college accountability. Community colleges have been using strategic planning as a management approach that includes the process of strategic action, and many organizations claim that they collaborate with their stakeholders during this process.…

  5. Stakeholder integration : Building Mutually Enforcing Relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P.M.A.R. Heugens (Pursey); F.A.J. van den Bosch (Frans); C.B.M. van Riel (Cees)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis study examines the central contention ofinstrumental stakeholder theory— namely, that firms that breed trust-based, cooperative ties with their stakeholders will have a competitive advantage over firms that do not.Acase study of the introduction ofgenetically modified food products

  6. Stakeholder mismanagement and corporate social responsibility crises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.; Pinkse, J.

    2006-01-01

    In the past decade, the stakeholder approach has gained much acceptance among academics and practitioners. Noticeably, there has been little consideration of the motivations and processes used by businesses to avoid or neglect stakeholder power and pressures. This is all the more remarkable in the

  7. DG CONNECT’s stakeholder engagement strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheyden, M.; Glidden, J.; Shahin, J.

    2013-01-01

    How do we ensure that public policy represents the interests of all, rather than a select few? How will we ensure it draws upon the best insights and talents of key stakeholders? The European Commission’s DG CONNECT recently announced the results of its Stakeholder Engagement Survey, which is

  8. Stakeholders' Perceptions of School Counselling in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Poi Kee

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study that set out to understand stakeholders' perception of the school counselling service in Singapore. Using semi-structured interviews, this study explored the perceptions of three main stakeholder groups, namely teachers and counsellors working within the schools and those working in the communities.…

  9. 77 FR 50144 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2012-0042] Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY... Information Collection Request: 1670-NEW. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National... (Pub. L. 104-13, 44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). NPPD is soliciting comments concerning the Broad Stakeholder...

  10. 76 FR 34087 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2011-0027] Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY... Information Collection Request: 1670-NEW. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National... (Pub. L. 104-13, 44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). NPPD is soliciting comments concerning the Broad Stakeholder...

  11. Smart Mobility Stakeholders - Curating Urban Data & Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperling, Joshua [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the curation of urban data and models through engaging SMART mobility stakeholders. SMART Mobility Urban Science Efforts are helping to expose key data sets, models, and roles for the U.S. Department of Energy in engaging across stakeholders to ensure useful insights. This will help to support other Urban Science and broader SMART initiatives.

  12. Forum on stakeholder confidence: Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vari, A.; Pescatore, C.

    2006-01-01

    The FSC workshop in Spain provided an important opportunity to carry out an in-depth examination of decision-making processes undertaken in an NEA member country, and to reflect on the evolution that has taken place over time. It offered a well-rounded perspective on the inclusion of stakeholders in decision making, and the atmosphere of the meetings was conducive to an honest and open exchange of ideas. The workshop started with the introduction of two case studies: the earlier attempt in Spain to locate a potential site for a high-level waste (HLW) disposal facility, and the dismantling of the Vandellos-I nuclear power plant. This was followed by two days of presentations and round-table discussions based on the recent COWAM Spain initiative (stemming from the EU-wide project on Community Waste Management), which aims at developing recommendations for institutional arrangements and decision-making processes concerning the siting of waste management facilities in Spain. This article provides a brief summary of the case studies and the COWAM Spain initiative, followed by some of the lessons learnt from an international perspective. (authors)

  13. Stakeholder views of superfund sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Nearly ten years have passed since the enactment of the federal Comprehensive Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), usually referred to as open-quotes Superfundclose quotes. Nearly four years have passed since CERCLA's major overhaul through the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). Although much still remains to be done under Superfund, there is now enough experience to assess how effectively it is working. A study being undertaken by the University of Tennessee's Waste Management Research and Education Institute will supply a portion of that assessment. The study was completed in the fall of 1990. Our study examines two related issues: the resources that will be needed in the coming years to fulfill the mandate of Superfund and other hazardous waste remediation programs, and the site-level experience to date in implementing CERCLA and SARA. This chapter discusses only the open-quotes site-level experienceclose quotes effort, and only its methodological approach. The purpose of the open-quotes site-level experienceclose quotes effort is to explore what counts as a open-quotes successfulclose quotes site in the eyes of different stakeholders in a Superfund cleanup - e.g., the affected community, the potentially responsible parties (PRPs), state and local officials, and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

  14. Determining health expectancies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robine, Jean-Marie

    2003-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jean-Marie Robine 9 1 Increase in Life Expectancy and Concentration of Ages at Death . . . . France Mesle´ and Jacques Vallin 13 2 Compression of Morbidity...

  15. Individual cognitions as antecedents of emotional competence and job satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Spörrle, Matthias; Welpe, Isabell

    2005-01-01

    A model linking cognitions to emotional competence is presented and tested. The model is based on the four domains of Emotional Intelligence (Goleman, 2002) and on the theoretical framework of Rational-Emotive-Behavior Therapy (Ellis, 1962, 1994). In this respect, we expect irrational beliefs to be negatively associated with both emotional competence and job satisfaction. Furthermore, we expect emotional competence to be positively associated with job satisfaction. Additionally, it is propose...

  16. Environmental management initiatives and stakeholder influences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    1999-01-01

    in Danish industrial companies. These findings are discussed in the light of similar reported results and case studies of companies which are reportedly pioneers in the introduction of environmental initiatives from a number of EU countries. Implications for theory, practice and training are addressed...... of change, from the point of view of stakeholder theory, from a merely reactive attitude in industry, where companies only tend to respond to stakeholder pressure which cannot be ignored (e.g. ex post responses to one or two stakeholders, such as regulators and customers), towards an increasingly proactive...... attitude characterised by ex ante responses to several strategic groups of stakeholders (including NGOs, employees, neighbours, etc.). The present situation is illustrated by the findings in two recent surveys concerning perceived stakeholder influence in relation to environmental management initiatives...

  17. Co-creating Stakeholder and Brand Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Wallpach, Sylvia; Voyer, Benjamin; Kastanakis, Minas

    2017-01-01

    This article introduces the special section on reciprocal co-creation of stakeholder and brand identities. Branding research and practice traditionally focus on the managerial creation and implementation of brand identity. Based on recent paradigmatic shifts from managerial to co-creative branding...... and from consumer to multi-stakeholder approaches in marketing, this special section develops a dynamic, process-oriented perspective on brand identity. Brand identity continuously emerges as a dynamic outcome of social processes of stakeholder interaction. Reciprocally, brand identity plays a potentially...... important role in ongoing interactive identity development processes of stakeholders. The special section contributes to deepening the understanding of this reciprocal co-creation of stakeholder and brand identities, through a series of conceptual and empirical articles. The Introduction reviews four...

  18. How can stakeholder involvement be improved?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-12-01

    Radioactive waste management is embedded in broader societal issues such as environment, risk management, sustainability, energy and health policy. In all these fields, there is an increasing demand for public involvement, participation or engagement. Guidance for public authorities also generally encourages greater involvement of the public. Involvement may take different forms at different phases and can include sharing information, consulting, dialoguing or deliberating on decisions with relevant stakeholders. Stakeholder involvement should be seen as a meaningful part of formulating and implementing public policy. There is no single technique for organising engagement. Initiatives should respond to their context and to stakeholders' particular needs. As the number of stakeholder involvement approaches and publications describing them continues to grow, new opportunities are opening up through social media, which has become an important tool for stakeholder involvement in recent years

  19. STAKEHOLDERS’ OPINIONS AND EXPECTATIONS OF THE GLOBAL FUND AND THEIR POTENTIAL ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galárraga, Omar; Bertozzi, Stefano M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To analyze stakeholder opinions and expectations of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, and to discuss their potential economic and financial implications. Design The Global Fund commissioned an independent study, the “360° Stakeholder Assessment,” to canvas feedback on the organization’s reputation and performance with an on-line survey of 909 respondents representing major stakeholders worldwide. We created a proxy for expectations based on categorical responses for specific Global Fund attributes’ importance to the stakeholders, and current perceived performance. Methods Using multivariate regression, we analyzed 23 unfulfilled expectations related to: resource mobilization; impact measurement; harmonization and inclusion; effectiveness of the Global Fund partner environment; and portfolio characteristics. The independent variables are personal- and regional-level characteristics that affect expectations. Results The largest unfulfilled expectations relate to: mobilization of private sector resources; efficiency in disbursing funds; and assurance that people affected by the three diseases are reached. Stakeholders involved with the Fund through the Country Coordinating Mechanisms, those working in multilateral organizations, and persons living with HIV are more likely to have unfulfilled expectations. In contrast, higher levels of involvement with the Fund correlate with fulfilled expectations. Stakeholders living in sub-Saharan Africa were less likely to have their expectations met. Conclusions Stakeholders unfulfilled expectations result largely from factors external to them, but also from factors over which they have influence. In particular, attributes related to partnership score poorly even though stakeholders have influence in that area. Joint efforts to address perceived performance gaps may improve future performance, and positively influence investment levels and economic viability. PMID:18664957

  20. COMMUNICATION STRATEGY ABOUT BUSINESS MODELS: STAKEHOLDERS PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojoagă Alexandru

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Organizations inform stakeholders about their current and future activities, processes, created value, strategic intentions, and other information that may influence the established relationships. Organizations choose to communicate with stakeholders by different means and in varied ways. The annual report represents a way of communicating between companies and their stakeholders, and it is offering comprehensive information about how companies operates and creates value. The business model is an emerging concept in management literature and practice. The concept describes the logic by which a organization creates, maintains and delivers value for its stakeholders. Through annual reports organisations can communicate to stakeholders information about their business models.We investigated how information about business models is explicitly communicated through annual reports, and how this information is reffering to stakeholders. Our paper aims to reveal which stakeholders are more often mentioned when organizations are communicating about business models through annual reports. This approach shows the attention degree given by organizations to stakeholders. We perceived this from a strategic point of view, as a strategic signal. Thus, we considered if the stakeholder is mentioned more frequent in the communicated message it has a greater role in communication strategy about business model. We conducted an exploratory research and have realized a content analysis.The analysed data consist in over a thousand annual reports from 96 organizations. We analysed the informations transmitted by organizations through annual reports. The annual reports were for a time period of 12 years. Most of the selected companies are multi-business, and are operating in different industries. The results show the stakeholder’s hierarchy based on how often they were mentioned in the communicated messages about business models through annual reports. Based on our

  1. Personal Factors that Affect the Satisfaction of Female Patients Undergoing Esthetic Suture after Typical Thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo Young; Kim, Jung Won; Park, Jin Hyung; Kim, Jung Hun; Han, Yea Sik

    2013-07-01

    In esthetic surgery, understanding the factors that influence patient satisfaction is important for successful practice. We hypothesize that the factors that influence patient satisfaction include not only aesthetic and functional outcomes, but also personal factors such as the level of familiarity with factors affecting wound healing and expectations regarding aesthetic outcome. One hundred patients who underwent esthetic closure after thyroidectomy were included in this study. In order to evaluate the individual characteristics of the patients, a preoperative survey was administered to the patients. We estimated the patient satisfaction six months postoperatively and assessed the aesthetic and functional outcomes using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale. According to the results of correlation analysis, level of familiarity with wound healing factors had a positive correlation with satisfaction. High expectations, pain, itching, and high observer scale score had negative correlations with satisfaction. The factors that were correlated with satisfaction were included in the multiple regression analysis. Level of familiarity with wound healing factors was found to have a positive relationship with satisfaction, while itching and observer scale were found to have a negative relationship with satisfaction. After excluding 10 patients who had hypertrophic scars, only level of familiarity with wound healing factors and expectations affected satisfaction. The level of familiarity with factors affecting wound healing and expectations were found to independently affect satisfaction. Improving patients' level of familiarity with wound healing factors and reducing their expectations by providing suitable preoperative education has the potential to improve patient satisfaction.

  2. Performance appraisal of expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russkikh G.A.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available this article provides basic concepts for teachers to estimate and reach planned students’ expectations, describes functions and elements of expectations; nature of external and internal estimate, technology to estimate the results, gives recommendations how to create diagnostic assignments.

  3. Spiking the expectancy profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels Chr.; Loui, Psyche; Vuust, Peter

    Melodic expectations are generated with different degrees of certainty. Given distributions of expectedness ratings for multiple continuations of each context, as obtained with the probe-tone paradigm, this certainty can be quantified in terms of Shannon entropy. Because expectations arise from s...

  4. Involving stakeholders and developing a policy for stakeholder involvement in the European network for Health Technology Assessment, EUnetHTA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmhøj Nielsen, Camilla; Wadmann, Sarah; Børlum Kristensen, Finn

    2009-01-01

    in national/regional policy making. A stakeholder Web site, analyses of stakeholder opinions on HTA and EUnetHTA in a discussion topic catalog, and a draft stakeholder policy resulted from the work. Conclusions: Stakeholder involvement in EUnetHTA is necessary to ensure the legitimacy and prospects...... be continued. Our experience shows the challenge of obtaining balanced stakeholder representation across the identified stakeholder groups. Continued attention should be given to achieving balanced stakeholder representation....

  5. Conceptualisation of patient satisfaction: a systematic narrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batbaatar, Enkhjargal; Dorjdagva, Javkhlanbayar; Luvsannyam, Ariunbat; Amenta, Pietro

    2015-09-01

    Patient satisfaction concept is widely measured due to its appropriateness to health service; however, evidence suggests that it is a poorly developed concept. This article is a first part of a two-part series of research with a goal to review a current conceptual framework of patient satisfaction and to bring the concept for further operationalisation procedures. The current article aimed to review a theoretical framework that helps the next article to review determinants of patient satisfaction for designing a measurement system. The study used a systematic review method, meta-narrative review, based on the RAMESES guideline with the phases of screening evidence, appraisal evidence, data extraction and synthesis. Patient satisfaction theoretical articles were searched on the two databases MEDLINE and CINAHL. Inclusion criteria were articles published between 1980 and 2014, and English language papers only. There were 36 articles selected for the synthesis. Results showed that most of the patient satisfaction theories and formulations are based on marketing theories and defined as how well health service fulfils patient expectations. However, review demonstrated that a relationship between expectation and satisfaction is unclear and the concept expectation itself is not distinctly theorised as well. Researchers brought satisfaction theories from other fields to the current healthcare literature without much adaptation. Thus, there is a need to attempt to define the patient satisfaction concept from other perspectives or to learn how patients evaluate the care rather than struggling to describe it by consumerist theories. © Royal Society for Public Health 2015.

  6. Maslow and the motivation hierarchy: measuring satisfaction of the needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, Robert J; Gao, Jennifer H

    2013-01-01

    For each of the 5 needs in Maslow's motivational hierarchy (physiological, safety-security, belongingness, esteem, and self-actualization), operational definitions were developed from Maslow's theory of motivation. New measures were created based on the operational definitions (1) to assess the satisfaction of each need, (2) to assess their expected correlations (a) with each of the other needs and (b) with four social and personality measures (i.e., family support, traditional values, anxiety/worry, and life satisfaction), and (3) to test the ability of the satisfaction level of each need to statistically predict the satisfaction level of the next higher-level need. Psychometric tests of the scales conducted on questionnaire results from 386 adult respondents from the general population lent strong support for the validity and reliability of all 5 needs measures. Significant positive correlations among the scales were also found; that is, the more each lower-level need was satisfied, the more the next higher-level need was satisfied. Additionally, as predicted, family support, traditional values, and life satisfaction had significant positive correlations with the satisfaction of all 5 needs, and the anxiety/worry facet of neuroticism had significant negative correlations with the satisfaction of all the needs. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the satisfaction of each higher-level need was statistically predicted by the satisfaction of the need immediately below it in the hierarchy, as expected from Maslow's theory.

  7. Patient satisfaction in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zissiadis, Y.; Provis, A.; Dhaliwal, S.S.

    2003-01-01

    In this current economic climate where the costs of providing a good medical service are escalating, patients are demanding a higher level of service from the Radiation Oncology providers. This coupled with the rising level of patients' expectations make it absolutely paramount for Radiation Oncology providers to offer the best possible service to their patients. In order to do this, it is essential to assess the present level of patient satisfaction prior to deciding which aspects of the current service need to be changed. In this pilot study, we assess the level of patient satisfaction with aspects of the radiotherapy service and the level of patient anxiety both prior to and following radiotherapy at the Perth Radiation Oncology Centre. A questionnaire was created using a combination of the Information Satisfaction Questionnaire-1 (ISQ-1), the Very Short Questionnaire 9 (VSQ 9) and the State Trait Anxiety Index (STAI). One hundred new patients were studied, all of whom were to have radiotherapy with curative intent. The results of this study are reviewed in this presentation

  8. Environmental Assessments and Stakeholder Involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesolowski, Cassandra

    2006-01-01

    Directives and legislation on EIA and SEA need to provide more guidance on how and when public participation should be used. There are now several examples of how well public participation can be performed and the methods are becoming more proactive and innovative. By increasing the role of public participation within the Environmental Assessment process, plans, programmes and projects will become more publicly acceptable. There does need to be a balance as to where public participation is performed in the system, as too much can be a stress on resources and time, as well as producing ineffective results. Key stages such as scoping, preparing the environmental statement or report and decision-making need to be highlighted for the benefits public participation can have. The Aarhus Convention is certainly making a difference in the UK; however it is difficult to judge exactly how much difference yet. It was only fully implemented in the UK in 2005 although some Authorities were applying the three pillars prior to implementation. It is not clear how aware the general public are of the Convention and their rights. Empowering communities in the UK. will communities for decision-making in Environmental Assessments? Providing the public with resources to enable them to fully engage in the process will improve the participation and increase their confidence, but how will this increase their influence within the decision-making process? Ultimately, should the stakeholders and public just influence the incremental decisions made in Environmental Assessments or have more responsibility within the major decisions taken? It will be interesting to see how these issues are addressed over the coming years

  9. Environmental Assessments and Stakeholder Involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesolowski, Cassandra [Univ. of Manchester, School of Environment and Development (United Kingdom). Planning and Landscape

    2006-09-15

    Directives and legislation on EIA and SEA need to provide more guidance on how and when public participation should be used. There are now several examples of how well public participation can be performed and the methods are becoming more proactive and innovative. By increasing the role of public participation within the Environmental Assessment process, plans, programmes and projects will become more publicly acceptable. There does need to be a balance as to where public participation is performed in the system, as too much can be a stress on resources and time, as well as producing ineffective results. Key stages such as scoping, preparing the environmental statement or report and decision-making need to be highlighted for the benefits public participation can have. The Aarhus Convention is certainly making a difference in the UK; however it is difficult to judge exactly how much difference yet. It was only fully implemented in the UK in 2005 although some Authorities were applying the three pillars prior to implementation. It is not clear how aware the general public are of the Convention and their rights. Empowering communities in the UK. will communities for decision-making in Environmental Assessments? Providing the public with resources to enable them to fully engage in the process will improve the participation and increase their confidence, but how will this increase their influence within the decision-making process? Ultimately, should the stakeholders and public just influence the incremental decisions made in Environmental Assessments or have more responsibility within the major decisions taken? It will be interesting to see how these issues are addressed over the coming years.

  10. Existing and Expected Service Quality of Grameenphone Users in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmat Ullah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Grameenphone (GP is a market leader in the telecommunication industry in Bangladesh. This study investigates the existing and expected service quality of Grameenphone users in Bangladesh. The Study reveals that there are significant gap between existing and expected perceived service network, 3G, customer care, physical facilities, billing cost, information service, mobile banking and GP offers. The study concludes that customer satisfaction is a dynamic phenomenon. Maintaining desired level of customer satisfaction requires corporate proactive responsiveness in accessing, building & retaining satisfied customers for sustainable competitive advantages in the marketplace.

  11. Stakeholder successes in global environmental management. Report of workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welp, M. (ed.)

    2001-04-01

    The workshop had two main objectives: (a) to identify stakeholders who have perspectives and knowledge needed to develop good solutions to global change problems and to create long lasting, stable relationships with them and (b) to learn about the participants' perceptions of global change problems, future expectations and their views on global change research. For this purpose the workshop was organised around 'success stories', which provided a stimulus for discussion. Presentations were given by people from organisations that have a pioneering role, for example in emission trading, in linking paper consumption with forest management by forest certification and in creating sustainable investment mechanisms. (orig.)

  12. Defining the Perception and Experiences of Educational Service Stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleiman Ahmady

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The office of educational services at universities is a very important division and it is necessary for employees to strive towards providing suitable services to students. The quality of educational services has always been a major concern for higher education managers. Interviewing stakeholders and experts increases our understanding of different aspects of the subject in order to create a native model with high performance capability based on existing conditions and the cultural and political infrastructure of our country. Therefore, we aimed to define the perception and experiences of educational service stakeholders.Methods: In this qualitative thematic content analysis that adapted a deductive approach using Graneheim and Lundman’s method. Initially, purposeful sampling was done to identify and select the students (as first level stakeholders studying paramedical majors at one of the medical science universities of the country during the educational year 2015-2016. Altogether, 20 people were interviewed consisting of 6 students, 4 faculty members, 2 student affairs employees, 1 counselor, 2 education officers, and 2 education office managers.Data were analyzed and coded using MAXQDA software.Results: Of the 400 initial codes extracted through data analysis, 336 abstract codes, 48 sub-categories, 20 categories, and 7 themes were obtained. The level of abstraction was different in the categories. The extracted themes were as follows: information gap before and after entering university, the difference between expected and perceived services and factors contributing to expectations, the university’s approach in enhancing service quality, the student and management of educational problems, the system-student interaction in educational planning, and the professors’ responsibilities and performance in enhancing quality, and the role on the university management system in enhancing the quality of services

  13. Stakeholder successes in global environmental management. Report of workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welp, M [ed.

    2001-04-01

    The workshop had two main objectives: (a) to identify stakeholders who have perspectives and knowledge needed to develop good solutions to global change problems and to create long lasting, stable relationships with them and (b) to learn about the participants' perceptions of global change problems, future expectations and their views on global change research. For this purpose the workshop was organised around 'success stories', which provided a stimulus for discussion. Presentations were given by people from organisations that have a pioneering role, for example in emission trading, in linking paper consumption with forest management by forest certification and in creating sustainable investment mechanisms. (orig.)

  14. Political Regime and Learning Outcomes of Stakeholder Participation: Cross-National Study of 81 Biosphere Reserves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Mohedano Roldán

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Stakeholder participation in natural resource management has spread widely, even to nondemocracies, driven by expectations of beneficial outcomes such as multidirectional learning. However, can we expect participation to be equally effective in achieving multidirectional learning in democracies and nondemocracies? Unsurprisingly, previous studies indicate the relevance of power distribution for learning. Higher levels of repression and accumulation of political capital in nondemocracies should limit the distribution of power across stakeholders. Yet, the relationship between political regime, participation, and learning has rarely been studied empirically. I address this gap by analysing multidirectional learning in stakeholder participation in 81 Man and the Biosphere reserves across 35 countries using ordinary least squares regression, Firth logistic regression, and heat maps. The results suggest that the amount of stakeholders sharing knowledge and learning is similar in both regimes. However, a closer analysis reveals differences in the impact different stakeholders have on the learning process. More concretely, local actors share knowledge more often and have a greater impact on stakeholders’ learning in democracies, while state actors display similar behavior across regimes in terms of learning and sharing knowledge. Thus, although there are notable similarities across regimes, multidirectional learning through stakeholder participation is influenced by the political context.

  15. AIRNET stakeholder survey. A report of end-users' air pollution and health information needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fudge, N.; Totlandsdal, A.I. [Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Sanderson, E. [Institute of Risk Assessment Sciences IRAS, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2003-12-15

    This report presents the results of the AIRNET stakeholder survey, which was conducted in order to identify the questions and issues of concern of AIRNET's end-users, how they would like their information to be presented and what they expect from AIRNET. In total 277 questionnaires were sent to a wide range of stakeholders employed in government agencies, the European parliament, the private sector (industry), NGOs and research institutes. 65 respondents returned their questionnaire resulting in an overall response rate of 24%. This survey has generated a list of stakeholder questions, which the AIRNET working groups will take into account when writing their state of the art reports. When discussing these questions during the 2nd annual AIRNET conference it became evident that stakeholder questions are more general than what scientists would prefer. Regarding the information needs the overwhelming response across all stakeholder categories was not the unavailability of sources, but the lack of time available to read and adsorb the information. The respondents expressed their preference for information that: Is presented as short overviews of about 1-2 pages, synthetic executive summaries and non-specialist summaries; Is ready for policy use by including a practical linkage between the research findings and implementation of public protection; Can be passed on to other users. Finally, the respondents' expectations of AIRNET can be summarised as AIRNET having a policy support role, an information role, a network role and as a project that identifies and considers stakeholders views.

  16. ISLAMIC CARING MODEL ON INCREASE PATIENT SATISFACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muh. Abdurrouf

    2017-04-01

    could be applied in providing nursing care, further studies of other variables that had not been examined in accordance expectancy-disconfirmation theory according Wodruff and Gardial 2002 of comparison standard and satisfaction outcome.

  17. Improving customer satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Yu

    2011-01-01

    Today, the competition among enterprises is growing in intensity and organizations of all types and sizes have increasingly come to understand the importance of customer satisfaction and good services. The purpose of this study is to investigate the present level of customer satisfaction with language training institutes and find out any possible areas of improvement. This thesis will discuss and analyze the factors that influence the customer’s level of satisfaction and assist the case compa...

  18. STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT IN HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT AT NATIONAL LEVEL: A STUDY FROM IRAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdizadeh, Bahareh; Shahmoradi, Safoura; Majdzadeh, Reza; Doaee, Shila; Bazyar, Mohammad; Souresrafil, Aghdas; Olyaeemanesh, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the opinions of stakeholders on their roles in health technology assessment (HTA) in Iran and to determine the barriers and facilitators existing in the organizations to help increase their involvement in the HTA program. The study was conducted in two stages, semi-structured interviews, and "policy dialogue" with stakeholders. The data were analyzed through the framework approach. The interviews were held with ten stakeholder representatives from various organizations. In addition, Twenty-one representatives participated in the policy dialogue. Based on the findings, all the stakeholder organizations considered themselves as interest groups in all the stages of the HTA process; however, their tendencies and methods of involvement differed from one another. According to the participants, the most important issue to be considered in the context of HTA was that the structures, stages, and procedures of the HTA process must be made transparent. Stakeholder involvement in the HTA program cannot readily take place. Various stakeholders have different interests, responsibilities, infrastructures, and barriers. If a program does not meet these considerations, its chances of succeeding will substantially decrease. Therefore, to prevent overlooking the needs and expectations of stakeholders from the HTA process, it is essential to create opportunities in which their thoughts and ideas are taken into account.

  19. Determinants of Hospital Pharmacists’ Job Satisfaction in Romanian Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Iorga

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study is to identify the level of job satisfaction among hospital pharmacists in Romania in relation to environmental, socio-demographic, and individual factors. Material and Methods: Seventy-eight hospital pharmacists were included in the research. The Job Satisfaction Scale was used to measure the level of satisfaction with their current jobs, and the TAS-20 was used to evaluate emotional experience and awareness. Additionally, 12 items were formulated in order to identify the reasons for dissatisfaction with jobs, such as budget, number of working hours, legislation, relationships with colleagues, hospital departments, or stakeholders. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics version 23. Results: The analyses of the data revealed a low level of satisfaction regarding the pay–promotion subscale, a high level of satisfaction with the management–interpersonal relationship dimension, and a high level of satisfaction regarding the organization–communication subscale. Seventy-four percent of subjects are dissatisfied about the annual budget, and 86.3% are not at all satisfied with present legislation. Conclusions: These results are important for hospital pharmacists and hospital management in order to focus on health policies, management, and environmental issues, with the purpose of increasing the level of satisfaction among hospital pharmacists.

  20. Determinants of Hospital Pharmacists' Job Satisfaction in Romanian Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorga, Magdalena; Dondaș, Corina; Soponaru, Camelia; Antofie, Ioan

    2017-12-11

    Aim : The purpose of this study is to identify the level of job satisfaction among hospital pharmacists in Romania in relation to environmental, socio-demographic, and individual factors. Material and Methods : Seventy-eight hospital pharmacists were included in the research. The Job Satisfaction Scale was used to measure the level of satisfaction with their current jobs, and the TAS-20 was used to evaluate emotional experience and awareness. Additionally, 12 items were formulated in order to identify the reasons for dissatisfaction with jobs, such as budget, number of working hours, legislation, relationships with colleagues, hospital departments, or stakeholders. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics version 23. Results : The analyses of the data revealed a low level of satisfaction regarding the pay-promotion subscale, a high level of satisfaction with the management-interpersonal relationship dimension, and a high level of satisfaction regarding the organization-communication subscale. Seventy-four percent of subjects are dissatisfied about the annual budget, and 86.3% are not at all satisfied with present legislation. Conclusions : These results are important for hospital pharmacists and hospital management in order to focus on health policies, management, and environmental issues, with the purpose of increasing the level of satisfaction among hospital pharmacists.

  1. Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on Value Creation from a Stakeholder Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Fernández-Guadaño

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, we have witnessed how companies and institutions have devoted significant effort to developing Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR policies, basing their decision on the improvement in company results and the subsequent benefits for shareholders and other stakeholders. CSR means that managers must go beyond the mere satisfaction of the shareholders and take steps to establish balanced relations with all their stakeholders. The principles behind the CSR approach empower stakeholder governance. To test whether CSR policy constitutes a factor in value creation for shareholders and certain stakeholders such as employees, creditors and the State, we conducted an explanatory study, using a Correlated Random Effects approach, which compares the socially responsible companies included in the Spanish sustainability index, FTSE4Good Ibex, with the companies listed on the other indices of the IBEX family. On the one hand, the data show that sustainability reporting is well established in large companies in Spain but that it needs to be introduced more extensively in small and medium-sized enterprises. On the other hand, the findings point out that CSR has a positive and significant influence on the distribution of value in favor of the State, a negative influence for employees and no influence on other stakeholders.

  2. Management Satisfaction Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Chief Human Capital Officers' Managers' Satisfaction Survey asks managers to rate their perception of workforce planning, interaction with and levels of support...

  3. [Nurses' professional satisfaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cura, M L; Rodrigues, A R

    1999-10-01

    We carried out a study with 91 nurses, trying to find out about the feelings of these professionals regarding their satisfaction at work. We used the Work Satisfaction Assessment Questionnaire (WSAQ), drawn up and validated by Siqueira (1978) and adapted with the analysis of seven factors: General Satisfaction; Physical and Psychological Stress; "Status" of the Job; Location of the Company; Compensating Benefits; Recognition and Personal Development. Data showed nurses satisfied with their work, in its intrinsic aspects (Accomplishment, Recognition and Autonomy). The psychiatric nurses were the most mature, most experienced, showing a higher satisfaction level, whereas the pediatric nurses were the youngest, most inexperienced and presenting the highest level of dissatisfaction at work.

  4. Why Stakeholder Engagement will not be Tweeted

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castello, Itziar; Etter, Michael

    social media (logic of community). With a longitudinal study of 26 months we find that managers are able to integrate symbolic and substantive elements of the new logic but elements of the conditions of authority and hierarchy remain unchanged constraining new forms of stakeholder engagement. We relate......We analyze the role of power transforming stakeholder engagement practices under the conditions of the network society. We look at how Global Health (pseudonym) managers navigate between two competing logics of stakeholder engagement: the current (influence logic) and the new logic underlying...

  5. Stakeholder involvement in Swedish nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran

    2006-09-01

    This report concerning Swedish nuclear waste management has been produced as part of a cross national research project: CARL - A Social Science Research Project into the Effects of Stakeholder involvement on Decision-Making in Radioactive Waste Management. Besides Sweden, the participating countries are Belgium, Canada, Finland, Slovenia and United Kingdom. A social science research team, working for three years, is in the first phase conducting research in their own countries in order to produce 6 country reports. During the next years the focus will shift to comparisons of stakeholder involvement practices in the participating countries. The report addresses current practices of Swedish nuclear waste management and their historical development. The main focus is on past, current and emerging patterns of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a deep repository for the final disposal of Sweden's spent nuclear fuel. The general questions attended to in the report are: Who are the main stakeholders, and how have they emerged and gained recognition as such? What are the issues currently subject to stakeholder involvement and how have these been decided upon? How is stakeholder involvement organized locally and nationally and how has this changed over time? How has stakeholder involvement gained acceptance as an activity of value in the siting of major waste facilities? The report have attempted to show the development of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a final repository for Sweden's spent nuclear fuel as resembling something other than a straightforward linear process of improvement and refinement. Stakeholder involvement has developed, over the past 15 years or so, into something more like a patchwork of different shapes and forms. Some of the forces that may well contribute to the further elaboration of the patchwork of stakeholder involvement have been pointed out, contingently modifying once more its overall colour and orientation. Questions have been

  6. Stakeholder involvement in Swedish nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Section for Science and Technology Studies

    2006-09-15

    This report concerning Swedish nuclear waste management has been produced as part of a cross national research project: CARL - A Social Science Research Project into the Effects of Stakeholder involvement on Decision-Making in Radioactive Waste Management. Besides Sweden, the participating countries are Belgium, Canada, Finland, Slovenia and United Kingdom. A social science research team, working for three years, is in the first phase conducting research in their own countries in order to produce 6 country reports. During the next years the focus will shift to comparisons of stakeholder involvement practices in the participating countries. The report addresses current practices of Swedish nuclear waste management and their historical development. The main focus is on past, current and emerging patterns of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a deep repository for the final disposal of Sweden's spent nuclear fuel. The general questions attended to in the report are: Who are the main stakeholders, and how have they emerged and gained recognition as such? What are the issues currently subject to stakeholder involvement and how have these been decided upon? How is stakeholder involvement organized locally and nationally and how has this changed over time? How has stakeholder involvement gained acceptance as an activity of value in the siting of major waste facilities? The report have attempted to show the development of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a final repository for Sweden's spent nuclear fuel as resembling something other than a straightforward linear process of improvement and refinement. Stakeholder involvement has developed, over the past 15 years or so, into something more like a patchwork of different shapes and forms. Some of the forces that may well contribute to the further elaboration of the patchwork of stakeholder involvement have been pointed out, contingently modifying once more its overall colour and orientation. Questions

  7. Measurement of Leisure Traveler’s Satisfaction: Evidence From North Cyprus Hotels

    OpenAIRE

    Jahani, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: This research aims to measure tourist satisfaction in five stars hotels in North Cyprus using American Customer Satisfaction Index. American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) is comprehensive model that includes six variables, namely, perceived quality, perceived value, customer expectations, customer satisfaction, customer loyalty and customer complaints. As previous scholars proposed as future research direction, international and national tourists are selected in sample of the s...

  8. Competitive Success in Responsible Regional Ecosystems: An Empirical Approach in Spain Focused on the Firms’ Relationship with Stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Isabel Sánchez-Hernández

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, any business manager is concerned about sustainability issues and is wondering how to implement social and environmental practices creating economic and social value at the same time. The implementation of social responsibility programs is justified by the benefits that result from a good relationship of the firm with key stakeholders. The present research investigates the links among firms’ relationship with stakeholders, firms’ champion behavior, stakeholders’ satisfaction and firms’ competitive success in regional contexts where social responsibility is promoted. Using the resource-based theory and the concept of shared value, a conceptual model is proposed in which a strong firm relationship with stakeholders will cause the stakeholder’ satisfaction and will help the firm to become a champion in the market, contributing to improved competitiveness. This empirical analysis was based on survey data through partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM from 130 Spanish firms in the Region of Extremadura. Participants were firm managers in regional clusters involved in the social responsibility journey promoted by the local government. The results suggest that a good relationship of the frim with stakeholders directly and positively influences firm competitive success, and also, it is enhanced by improvements in stakeholders’ satisfaction and firm champion behavior.

  9. Factors affecting job satisfaction among the radiologic technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Ho; Jeong, Won Mee; Yu, Seung Hum; Lee Sun Hee; Sohn, Tae Yong

    1997-01-01

    Job satisfaction is very important for adequate manpower management in the medical field. To study job satisfaction among the radiologic technologists, 344 cases were reviewed in five university hospitals and one general hospital. Self-administered questionnaire was used to study their socioeconomic characteristics, working conditions, job satisfaction, and the factors affecting there job satisfaction. The results were as follows : 1. There was statistically significant difference in job satisfaction according to the their department of employment, position, and hospital characteristics. 2. The group that was satisfied with their salary had a higher job satisfaction score, whereas others who were not satisfied ranked lower. 3. The positive answering group on the ability and job recognition ranked higher score on the job satisfaction than the negative answering group. 4. The group that was in good relationship with their superiors and co-workers scored higher on job satisfaction. From the above results, the job satisfaction was high for the group with positive thinking and reply, but the intentin to change their job was low. Considering the fact that these results represent only 6 hospitals from limited arease, therefore, necessary to include more medical facilities nationwide, especially small-medium sized clinics or hospitals where the difficulty with high turnover rate of employment is expected, to study further various factors involving job satisfaction in the future

  10. Life expectancy and education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Casper Worm; Strulik, Holger

    2017-01-01

    , we find that US states with higher mortality rates from cardiovascular disease prior to the 1970s experienced greater increases in adult life expectancy and higher education enrollment. Our estimates suggest that a one-standard deviation higher treatment intensity is associated with an increase...... in adult life expectancy of 0.37 years and 0.07–0.15 more years of higher education....

  11. Expected Classification Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence M. Rudner

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Every time we make a classification based on a test score, we should expect some number..of misclassifications. Some examinees whose true ability is within a score range will have..observed scores outside of that range. A procedure for providing a classification table of..true and expected scores is developed for polytomously scored items under item response..theory and applied to state assessment data. A simplified procedure for estimating the..table entries is also presented.

  12. Expected utility without utility

    OpenAIRE

    Castagnoli, E.; Licalzi, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper advances an interpretation of Von Neumann–Morgenstern’s expected utility model for preferences over lotteries which does not require the notion of a cardinal utility over prizes and can be phrased entirely in the language of probability. According to it, the expected utility of a lottery can be read as the probability that this lottery outperforms another given independent lottery. The implications of this interpretation for some topics and models in decision theory are considered....

  13. Communication and collaboration among return-to-work stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Elizabeth; Kosny, Agnieszka

    2018-05-17

    Workers who are injured or become ill on the job are best able to return-to-work when stakeholders involved in their case collaborate and communicate. This study examined health care providers' and case managers' engagement in rehabilitation and return-to-work following workplace injury or illness. In-depth interviews were conducted with 97 health care providers and 34 case managers in four Canadian provinces about their experiences facilitating rehabilitation and return-to-work, and interacting with system stakeholders. A qualitative thematic content analysis demonstrated two key findings. Firstly, stakeholders were challenged to collaborate as a result of: barriers to interdisciplinary and cross-professional communication; philosophical differences about the timing and appropriateness of return-to-work; and confusion among health care providers about the workers' compensation system. Secondly, these challenges adversely affected the co-ordination of patient care, and consequentially, injured workers often became information conduits, and effective and timely treatment and return-to-work was sometimes negatively impacted. Communication challenges between health care providers and case managers may negatively impact patient care and alienate treating health care providers. Discussion about role clarification, the appropriateness of early return-to-work, how paperwork shapes health care providers' role expectations, and strengthened inter-professional communication are considered. Implications for Rehabilitation Administrative and conceptual barriers in workers' compensation systems challenge collaboration and communication between health care providers and case managers. Injured workers may become conduits of incorrect information, resulting in adversarial relationships, overturned health care providers' recommendations, and their disengagement from rehabilitation and return-to-work. Stakeholders should clarify the role of health care providers during

  14. Maternal role satisfaction: a new approach to assessing parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, J P

    1992-01-01

    There is a need to study the maternal role beyond the child's first year of life. This investigation, using a framework of Locke's expectancy theory, describes the expectations, surprises, values, and satisfactions experienced by 102 mothers of teens. Content analysis of written narratives describing surprises encountered by these mothers is also presented. Data were collected by questionnaire. Findings offer support for Locke's theory in two ways: (1) expectation for role was less important than value attainment in predicting the level of maternal role satisfaction, and (2) encountering at least one positive surprise was associated with a higher level of maternal role satisfaction. These variables are offered as a useful nursing approach to the assessment of the parenting experience. Knowledge of the satisfactions reported may be encouraging to mothers anticipating this stage of life.

  15. How to measure employee satisfaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillejo, A.

    1998-01-01

    Competitiveness is impossible without satisfied employees. Excellent organisations base their success on customer loyalty, providing products and services which exceed expectations, which are always increasing. For this reason it is necessary to continually improve the organisation's performance and, therefore the activities which lead to this performance. This is not possible to do without the involvement and commitment of the persons carrying out the activities: employees. The presentation places employee satisfaction within the EFQM Business Excellent Model. The persons most adequate for improving the activities carried out by the organisation are those most familiar with them: employees. To bring this about it is necessary to develop capacities, provide tools necessary for improvement, and provide adequate motivation; indeed, satisfy them. In a society such as today's human resources are the most valuable asset. The aim of the presentation is to introduce the Coopers and Lybrand-Galdano model to measure employee satisfaction, based on the comparison of expectations and perceptions with respect to the organisation. (Author)

  16. Tracking the employee satisfaction-life satisfaction binary: The case of South African academics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengedzai Mafini

    2014-11-01

    Research purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between employee satisfaction and life satisfaction amongst university academics in South Africa. Motivation for the study: The study occupies the gap in literature focusing on the interaction between employee satisfaction and life satisfaction amongst South African university academics. Research design, approach and method: A three-section survey questionnaire was administered to 273 academics recruited from three universities in Gauteng, South Africa. After a confirmatory factor analysis, hypotheses were tested using a combination of Kendall’s tau correlation coefficient and regression analysis. Main findings: Correlation tests revealed strong positive relationships between life satisfaction and three factors: workplace flexibility, skills utilisation and autonomy. Regression analysis showed that workplace flexibility, skills utilisation and autonomy were statistically significant. Practical/managerial implications: Research findings could expedite the generation of strategies for meeting the employment needs and expectations of university academics, thereby reducing the shortage of university academics in South Africa. Contributions/value-add: The conceptual framework proposed in this study is a useful tool for conceptualising the relationship between employee satisfaction and life satisfaction in the higher education environment.

  17. Marketing health services: the engineering of satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacStravic, R S

    1984-12-01

    Service marketing is the engineering of satisfaction, and the key to success is to identify and influence potential customers' expectations and then to fulfill those expectations. Patient satisfaction largely determines both a program's revenues and expenditures and the effectiveness of care received by patients. A program's ability to satisfy patients rests upon three basic elements: research, design, and communication. Research should be on two levels. The first is basic market assessment and analysis, and should reveal overall market potential by focusing on consumers' expectations, unmet needs, and level of satisfaction. From this stage of research, the organization should be able to identify current programs that are secure and stable, those which have significant growth potential, those which are threatened by competition, and those which have little future. This research also should indicate the potential for new programs and for new markets for existing programs. The second level of research focuses on a specific program (whether current or proposed) and is the basis for program design. The organization can tailor the program to consumers' expectations in everything from services provided to price of parking and other amenities. Research also provides a basis for communications. Not only can communications influence a potential customer to try a provider, but also care providers can use communications during and after the service experience to reinforce what might have been a casual decision. Ideally, all communication that occurs between patients and providers should serve marketing as well as diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It can shape patients' expectations, reinforce satisfaction when those expectations have been fulfilled, and convey the provider's caring and concern.

  18. Summary of stakeholder engagement session of WPDD topical session on stakeholder involvement in decommissioning projects - November 14, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, Steve

    2006-01-01

    as important as technical rigour in these documents. The Italian presentation mentioned setting up a bilateral agreement on monitoring with local authorities. This seems like a step in the right direction, but the FSC would recommend far more than that to build public confidence. Today the public expects to be directly involved in decision making on major issues that affect them, not just via elected representatives. As I mentioned in my presentation on the situation in the UK, it is also important not to raise unrealistic expectations of how much the public can influence our decisions. In much UK legislation, decisions can only be made on a strictly technical basis and the opportunity for public influence is very limited. The presentation by EDF highlighted another vital requirement for successful stakeholder engagement. That is a disciplined, project based approach within the leading organizations. If stakeholder engagement is not meticulously planned it will flat on its face, as people will be given different messages at different times. So it is very important that this disciplined approach includes both local and national players to ensure consistency. Finally, the presentation from Germany mentioned the stepwise approach to decision making. This is very much in line with FSC recommendations. It is important that stakeholders are involved right from the start of the process, and not just in the final site selection stage. The steps involved in reaching a decision must be transparent and the opportunity for stakeholder involvement in each one needs to be clear. If the legal and procedural framework incorporate this stepwise approach explicitly it is a great help for stakeholder participation

  19. Understanding and Modeling Freight Stakeholder Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    This project developed a conceptual model of private-sector freight stakeholder decisions and interactions for : forecasting freight demands in response to key policy variables. Using East Central Wisconsin as a study area, empirical : models were de...

  20. Supporting multi-stakeholder environmental decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajkowicz, Stefan A

    2008-09-01

    This paper examines how multiple criteria analysis (MCA) can be used to support multi-stakeholder environmental management decisions. It presents a study through which 48 stakeholders from environmental, primary production and community interest groups used MCA to prioritise 30 environmental management problems in the Mackay-Whitsunday region of Queensland, Australia. The MCA model, with procedures for aggregating multi-stakeholder output, was used to inform a final decision on the priority of the region's environmental management problems. The result was used in the region's environmental management plan as required under Australia's Natural Heritage Trust programme. The study shows how relatively simple MCA methods can help stakeholders make group decisions, even when they hold strongly conflicting preferences.

  1. Stakeholder interaction within the ERICA Integrated Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinger, I; Oughton, D H; Jones, S R

    2008-09-01

    Within the ERICA project, stakeholder involvement has been addressed within three main areas: generic interactions throughout the project, specific consultation by means of attendance to events and considerations as part of the ERICA Integrated Approach and Assessment Tool. The word stakeholders meant namely any individual or group who may be affected by or have an interest in an issue, and to include experts, lay-people and the public. An End-Users-Group (EUG) was set up to facilitate the two-way dialogue between the ERICA Consortium and stakeholders. The ERICA EUG consisted of representatives of 60 organisations ranging from regulatory bodies, national advisory bodies, academia, non-governmental organisations, industry, consultants and inter-governmental organisations. Stakeholder interaction was included from the very start of the project. Inputs from the EUG were recorded and in most instances incorporated within the development of the project and thus influenced and helped to shape some of the ERICA deliverables.

  2. Tribal and stakeholder involvement in systems analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, L.; Swartz, G.; Cooley, C.

    1997-01-01

    Beginning in early 1995, U.S. Department of Energy began an experiment to link tribal and stakeholder representatives into technology assessment activities related to an Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study. The INTS study moved outside the framework of after-the-fact public involvement by providing the opportunity for technical and non-technical stakeholders alike to work together in the early predecision stages of the criteria development and assessment of options for innovative mixed waste treatment. The stakeholders gained an appreciation of the intense level of effort required to complete such an analysis. The engineers and scientists conducting the systems analyses had the opportunity (some for the first time) to learn more about tribal and stakeholder issues and how they might apply to the technical tasks related to technology assessment and selection

  3. 77 FR 38306 - GFIRST Conference Stakeholder Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ...), National Cyber Security Division (NCSD), United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) will... of Homeland Security, National Protection and Programs Directorate, Office of Cybersecurity and... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2011-0116] GFIRST Conference Stakeholder...

  4. Designing satisfaction studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kai; Eskildsen, Jacob Kjær

    2007-01-01

    In the effect sampling method, presentation of researcher, the intro text, the order of questions in the questionnaire along with the number of categories in the rating scale is tested in relation to the design of satisfaction studies. Based on the analyses specific recommendations for designing...... satisfaction studies are given....

  5. Customer satisfaction measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maričić Branko R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Customer satisfaction is important in business management as a basis for long-term profitability of a single line of products and services and the company as a whole. Customer satisfaction in modern market conditions is characterized by a large number of alternatives that can satisfy the same need or desire of consumers, and are a prerequisite for the retention, loyalty, and positive verbal communication between companies and vendors on one hand and consumers on the other. Companies are investing more and more investment and management efforts in improving customer satisfaction. Improving customer satisfaction and its measurement involves the taking of appropriate marketing strategies and tactics, as well as corrective measures. This paper presents the well-known attempts to measure customers' satisfaction at the macro and micro level of marketing analysis. The index of consumer satisfaction is an important indicator of achieved quality and market performance of companies and can be measured on a micro and macro level. National customer satisfaction indexes are useful framework for analyzing the competitiveness of national economies, industries and individual companies and are used for a variety of other aspects of observation and analysis. Standardization of consumer satisfaction indexes in different countries allows comparability of the data, giving a new quality of analysis in the era of globalization and internationalization of business.

  6. Measuring patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Roger

    2005-03-01

    Many businesses use customer satisfaction surveys successfully. You may notice that you find one in almost every restaurant or hotel room. I do not think it is a coincidence that the hotel industry provides some of the finest customer service available. When it comes to providing excellent customer service, dental practices can learn from businesses that regularly assess customer satisfaction.

  7. Stakeholder management from the business perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In an increasingly global and highly competitive business world of today, the business sector pays meticulous attention to stakeholders - groups or individuals, which affect or are affected by business decisions. The paper examines the methodology of identifying key stakeholders, demonstrates the process of their various mapping models, as well as the manner in which stakeholders, in cooperation with a corporation, create the opportunity to be engaged at an early stage of a project, activity or business decision, thus establishing a precedent according to which both sides benefit. By doing so, the business sector can ensure that its actions will receive 'a social licence to operate', whereas various groups of stakeholders will be offered a possibility to be included in business dealings for the sake of protecting their interests. The authors of the paper have analysed a two-way process of stakeholder management in establishing corporate reputation which is reflected in business performance and results. It was concluded that stakeholder engagement should foster innovation and lead to broader social prosperity, achieving the main goal of sustainability: business excellence according to the principles of the triple final result, by realizing synergy between the social community, environment and profit.

  8. Citizen (Dis)satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Asmus Leth

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces the importance of equivalence framing for understanding how satisfaction measures affect citizens’ evaluation of public services. Does a 90 percent satisfaction rate have a different effect than a logically equivalent 10 percent dissatisfaction rate? Two experiments were...... conducted on citizens’ evaluations of hospital services in a large, nationally representative sample of Danish citizens. Both experiments found that exposing citizens to a patient dissatisfaction measure led to more negative views of public service than exposing them to a logically equivalent satisfaction...... metric. There is some support for part of the shift in evaluations being caused by a negativity bias: dissatisfaction has a larger negative impact than satisfaction has a positive impact. Both professional experience at a hospital and prior exposure to satisfaction rates reduced the negative response...

  9. Sex and life expectancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifarth, Joshua E; McGowan, Cheri L; Milne, Kevin J

    2012-12-01

    A sexual dimorphism in human life expectancy has existed in almost every country for as long as records have been kept. Although human life expectancy has increased each year, females still live longer, on average, than males. Undoubtedly, the reasons for the sex gap in life expectancy are multifaceted, and it has been discussed from both sociological and biological perspectives. However, even if biological factors make up only a small percentage of the determinants of the sex difference in this phenomenon, parity in average life expectancy should not be anticipated. The aim of this review is to highlight biological mechanisms that may underlie the sexual dimorphism in life expectancy. Using PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Google Scholar, as well as cited and citing reference histories of articles through August 2012, English-language articles were identified, read, and synthesized into categories that could account for biological sex differences in human life expectancy. The examination of biological mechanisms accounting for the female-based advantage in human life expectancy has been an active area of inquiry; however, it is still difficult to prove the relative importance of any 1 factor. Nonetheless, biological differences between the sexes do exist and include differences in genetic and physiological factors such as progressive skewing of X chromosome inactivation, telomere attrition, mitochondrial inheritance, hormonal and cellular responses to stress, immune function, and metabolic substrate handling among others. These factors may account for at least a part of the female advantage in human life expectancy. Despite noted gaps in sex equality, higher body fat percentages and lower physical activity levels globally at all ages, a sex-based gap in life expectancy exists in nearly every country for which data exist. There are several biological mechanisms that may contribute to explaining why females live longer than men on average, but the complexity of the

  10. Anomalous vacuum expectation values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H.

    1986-01-01

    The anomalous vacuum expectation value is defined as the expectation value of a quantity that vanishes by means of the field equations. Although this value is expected to vanish in quantum systems, regularization in general produces a finite value of this quantity. Calculation of this anomalous vacuum expectation value can be carried out in the general framework of field theory. The result is derived by subtraction of divergences and by zeta-function regularization. Various anomalies are included in these anomalous vacuum expectation values. This method is useful for deriving not only the conformal, chiral, and gravitational anomalies but also the supercurrent anomaly. The supercurrent anomaly is obtained in the case of N = 1 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory in four, six, and ten dimensions. The original form of the energy-momentum tensor and the supercurrent have anomalies in their conservation laws. But the modification of these quantities to be equivalent to the original one on-shell causes no anomaly in their conservation laws and gives rise to anomalous traces

  11. Stakeholder approach, Stakeholders mental model: A visualization test with cognitive mapping technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garoui Nassreddine

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The idea of this paper is to determine the mental models of actors in the firm with respect to the stakeholder approach of corporate governance. The use of the cognitive map to view these diagrams to show the ways of thinking and conceptualization of the stakeholder approach. The paper takes a corporate governance perspective, discusses stakeholder model. It takes also a cognitive mapping technique.

  12. Building Stakeholder Trust: Defensible Government Decisions - 13110

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklin, Victor A. [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Bldg. 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Administrative decisions must be grounded in reasonable expectations, founded on sound principles, and bounded by societal norms. Without these first principles, attaining and retaining public trust is a Herculean task. Decisions made by governmental administrators must be both transparent and defensible: without the former the agency will lose the public's trust and support (possibly prompting a legal challenge to the decision) and without the latter the decision may fail to withstand judicial scrutiny. This presentation and accompanying paper delves into the process by which governmental decisions can achieve both defensibility and openness through building stakeholder trust with transparency. Achieving and maintaining stakeholder trust is crucial, especially in the environs of nuclear waste management. Proving confidence, stability, and security to the surrounding citizenry as well as those throughout the country is the goal of governmental nuclear waste remediation. Guiding administrative decision-making processes and maintaining a broad bandwidth of communication are of incalculable importance to all those charged with serving the public, but are especially essential to those whose decisional impacts will be felt for millennia. A strong, clear, and concise administrative record documenting discrete decisions and overarching policy choices is the strongest defense to a decisional challenge. However, this can be accomplished using transparency as the fundamental building block. This documentation allows the decision-makers to demonstrate the synthesis of legal and technical challenges and fortifies the ground from which challenges will be defended when necessary. Further, administrative actions which capture the public's interest and captivate that interest throughout the process will result in a better-informed, more deeply-involved, and more heavily-invested group of interested parties. Management of information, involvement, and investment on the

  13. Building Stakeholder Trust: Defensible Government Decisions - 13110

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    Administrative decisions must be grounded in reasonable expectations, founded on sound principles, and bounded by societal norms. Without these first principles, attaining and retaining public trust is a Herculean task. Decisions made by governmental administrators must be both transparent and defensible: without the former the agency will lose the public's trust and support (possibly prompting a legal challenge to the decision) and without the latter the decision may fail to withstand judicial scrutiny. This presentation and accompanying paper delves into the process by which governmental decisions can achieve both defensibility and openness through building stakeholder trust with transparency. Achieving and maintaining stakeholder trust is crucial, especially in the environs of nuclear waste management. Proving confidence, stability, and security to the surrounding citizenry as well as those throughout the country is the goal of governmental nuclear waste remediation. Guiding administrative decision-making processes and maintaining a broad bandwidth of communication are of incalculable importance to all those charged with serving the public, but are especially essential to those whose decisional impacts will be felt for millennia. A strong, clear, and concise administrative record documenting discrete decisions and overarching policy choices is the strongest defense to a decisional challenge. However, this can be accomplished using transparency as the fundamental building block. This documentation allows the decision-makers to demonstrate the synthesis of legal and technical challenges and fortifies the ground from which challenges will be defended when necessary. Further, administrative actions which capture the public's interest and captivate that interest throughout the process will result in a better-informed, more deeply-involved, and more heavily-invested group of interested parties. Management of information, involvement, and investment on the front-end of

  14. Measuring Quality Satisfaction with Servqual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Păuna

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The orientation to customer satisfaction is not a recent phenomenon, many very successfulbusinesspeople from the beginning of the 20th century, such as Sir Henry Royce, a name synonymous withRoll – Royce vehicles, stated the first principle regarding customer satisfaction “Our interest in the Roll-Royce cars does not end at the moment when the owner pays for and takes delivery the car. Our interest in thecar never wanes. Our ambition is that every purchaser of the Rolls - Royce car shall continue to be more thansatisfied (Rolls-Royce.” The following paper tries to deal with the important qualities of the concept for themeasuring of the gap between expected costumer services satisfactions, and perceived services like a routinecustomer feedback process, by means of a relatively new model, the Servqual model.

  15. Surgical inpatient satisfaction: what are the real drivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danforth, Rachel M; Pitt, Henry A; Flanagan, Mindy E; Brewster, Benjamin D; Brand, Elizabeth W; Frankel, Richard M

    2014-08-01

    Inpatient satisfaction is a key element of hospital pay-for-performance programs. Communication and pain management are known to influence results, but additional factors may affect satisfaction scores. We tested the hypothesis that patient factors and outcome parameters not considered previously are clinically important drivers of inpatient satisfaction. Medical records were reviewed for 1,340 surgical patients who returned nationally standardized inpatient satisfaction questionnaires. These patients were managed by 41 surgeons in seven specialties at two academic medical centers. Thirty-two parameters based on the patient, surgeon, outcomes, and survey were measured. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed. Inpatients rated their overall experience favorably 75.7% of the time. Less-satisfied patients were more likely to be female, younger, less ill, taking outpatient narcotics, and admitted via the emergency department (all P expectations of patients with cancer, and postoperative complications are important and clinically relevant drivers of surgical inpatient satisfaction. Programs to manage expectations of cancer patient expectations and decrease postoperative morbidity should improve surgical inpatient satisfaction. Further efforts to risk-adjust patient satisfaction scores should be undertaken. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydman, Roman; Johansen, Søren; Rahbek, Anders

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis (QEH) as a new approach to modeling macroeconomic and financial outcomes. Building on John Muth's seminal insight underpinning the Rational Expectations Hypothesis (REH), QEH represents the market's forecasts to be consistent with the predictions...... of an economistís model. However, by assuming that outcomes lie within stochastic intervals, QEH, unlike REH, recognizes the ambiguity faced by an economist and market participants alike. Moreover, QEH leaves the model open to ambiguity by not specifying a mechanism determining specific values that outcomes take...

  17. The Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydman, Roman; Johansen, Søren; Rahbek, Anders

    We introduce the Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis (QEH) as a new approach to modeling macroeconomic and financial outcomes. Building on John Muth's seminal insight underpinning the Rational Expectations Hypothesis (REH), QEH represents the market's forecasts to be consistent with the predictions...... of an economist's model. However, by assuming that outcomes lie within stochastic intervals, QEH, unlike REH, recognizes the ambiguity faced by an economist and market participants alike. Moreover, QEH leaves the model open to ambiguity by not specifying a mechanism determining specific values that outcomes take...

  18. Continued usage of e-learning: Expectations and performance

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Antonio de Melo Pereira; Anatália Saraiva Martins Ramos; Adrianne Paula Vieira de Andrade; Bruna Miyuki Kasuya de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the determinants of satisfaction and the resulting continuance intention use in e-learning context. The constructs of decomposed expectancy disconfirmation theory (DEDT) are evaluated from the perspective of users of a virtual learning environment (VLE) in relation to expectations and perceived performance. An online survey collected responses from 197 students of a public management course in distance mode. Structural equation modeling was operationalize...

  19. Auxiliares de enfermagem: mercado de trabalho, perfil, satisfação e expectativas no Programa de Saúde da Família na cidade de São Paulo Nursing assistants: job market, profile of professionals, satisfaction and expectations in the Family Health Program of the city of São Paulo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Maria Giffoni Marsiglia

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available São escassos os estudos sobre os auxiliares de enfermagem, mesmo nas equipes de saúde da família. Este artigo se baseia em estudo que procurou identificar o perfil dos auxiliares de enfermagem do Programa de Saúde da Família (PSF na Região Metropolitana de São Paulo, o grau de satisfação com o trabalho, sugestões para melhorar o PSF e expectativas quanto ao futuro profissional. Em 2004, o Departamento de Atenção Primária à Saúde e Programa de Saúde da Família da Secretaria Municipal de Saúde da Cidade de São Paulo, aplicou um questionário entre os integrantes das equipes implantadas no município. A análise das respostas de 901 auxiliares de enfermagem contou com o apoio da Unesco. Os principais resultados apresentados neste artigo são: predominância de mulheres, jovens, nível médio de escolarização; capacitação inicial para o PSF, baixa proporção de profissionais com nível técnico. As relações e o processo de trabalho constituem motivos de maior satisfação e as condições de trabalho são pouco satisfatórias. Razões mais citadas para a escolha da profissão, solidariedade e cuidado com o 'próximo'; para a inserção no PSF, nova alternativa no mercado de trabalho e reconhecimento da sociedade. A maioria pretende continuar sua formação, com graduação em Enfermagem e especialização em Saúde Pública ou Saúde da Família².Studies on nursing assistants are rare, even on nursing assistants in family health teams. The article is based on a study that intended to determine the profile of Nursing Assistants in the Family Health Program in the Metropolitan Area of São Paulo, to identify their level of satisfaction with work, to seek suggestions for improving the Family Health Program, and to assess their expectations as to their professional future. In 2004, the Department of Primary Health Care and Family Health Program of the Municipal Health Secretariat of São Paulo sent out a questionnaire to the

  20. The Nature of E-Learning Adoption by Stakeholders of a University in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansong, Eric; Boateng, Richard; Boateng, Sheena L.; Anderson, Augustus B.

    2017-01-01

    Studies looking at the nature of technology adoption from a multi-dimensional perspective have remained below expectation especially in African countries. This study, therefore, sought to explore the nature of e-learning adoption in the University of Ghana using a multi-stakeholder approach. A quantitative survey approach was adopted for this…

  1. Effective Stakeholder involvement at the Base of the Pyramid: The case of Rabobank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, V.; Sjauw-Koen-Fa, A.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, we explore the role of Rabobank in dealing with the wicked problem of food security in general and of smallholder inclusion into food value chains in particular. In the first part of the essay, we focus on the (social) expectations of stakeholders with regard to Rabobank’s role in BoP

  2. Insights from stakeholders of five residential smart grid pilot projects in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obinna, U.; Joore, P.; Wauben, L.; Reinders, Angelina H.M.E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents insights and perceptions of stakeholders involved in the development and implementation of residential smart grid pilot projects in the Netherlands, adding to the limited information that is currently available in this area, while expectations about the potential benefits of

  3. Patients' Preoperative Expectation and Outcome of Cataract Surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Patient's satisfaction for a given treatment is an important clinical outcome because a satisfied patient is more likely to comply with treatments, attend follow-ups and advocate the service to others. Therefore, knowing patients' expectations before a planned procedure or treatment and the actual level of ...

  4. Service-Learning in Nonprofit Organizations: Motivations, Expectations, and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinger, Nancy; Bartholomew, Keith

    2006-01-01

    This article applies theories of giving from philanthropic studies to enhance understanding of service-learning relationships between students and community partners. Focusing on the participation motivations, outcome expectations, and satisfaction levels of community partners who have recently completed work with service-learning students, the…

  5. Expectations and experiences of customers in formal full service ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The DINESERV gap was -0.47, which indicates that overall customers' experiences fell below customers' expectations. Restaurateurs should improve customers' experiences to reduce the DINESERV gap. The results of this study could help restaurateurs to identify areas of improvement and increase customer satisfaction.

  6. Consumers satisfaction in the energy sector in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutua, John; Ngui, Dianah; Osiolo, Helen; Aligula, Eric; Gachanja, James

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes consumer satisfaction in the energy sector in Kenya to assess the quality and level of service delivery. By use of the European Consumer Satisfaction Index (ECSI), the paper estimates consumer satisfaction in biomass, petroleum, electricity and renewable energy subsectors. The findings are that consumer satisfaction is highest in the renewable energy sub sector at 74.7% followed by petroleum at 62.8%. The electricity sub sector has the lowest consumer satisfaction of 53.06%. Further, it is found that the image of renewable energy providers is also the highest at 72.5% followed by that of petroleum companies at 63.1%. In the electricity sub sector, perceived value scored the highest at 64.2%. The paper concludes that image of a service provider, loyalty of consumers, consumer expectations, perceived value, perceived quality and the way complains are handled are very important factors that determine consumer satisfaction levels. It is recommended that for monitoring and evaluation purposes in the performance of the energy sector, the Energy RegulatoryCommission(ERC) could use the consumer satisfaction index level to evaluate whether the regulatory policies and their implementation are bearing fruit where a high index would be associated with good performance and vice versa. - Highlights: ► The paper estimates consumer satisfaction in biomass, petroleum, electricity and renewable energy subsectors. ► Consumer satisfaction is highest in the renewable energy sub sector at 74.7%. ► The electricity sub sector has the lowest consumer satisfaction of 53.06%. ► Image of renewable energy providers is also the highest at 72.5%. ► Factors explaining consumer satisfaction are; Image, consumers’ loyalty, expectations, perceived value, and perceived quality.

  7. Perspectives of Stakeholders on Implementing a Farm-to-University Program at an HBCU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilme, Helene; López, Ivette A; Walters, Lurleen; Suther, Sandra; Brown, C Perry; Dutton, Matthew; Barber, Janet

    2015-07-01

    To explore the perspectives of various stakeholders on whether an HBCU has the resources to establish a farm-to-university program that can improve fruits and vegetables intake among African American students. Additionally, this study assessed students' satisfaction with fruits and vegetables served in University dining halls, and their desire for changes in policies to increase local fruits and vegetables access on campus. This study employed a mixed method data collection strategy. Semi-structured interviews were used to explore the stakeholders' perspectives and self-administered questionnaires were used to assess students' satisfaction with fruits and vegetables and desire for policy changes. Barriers reported by both food service administrators and farmers were cost and variation in supply and demand. Students expressed lack of satisfaction with fresh produce served in campus dining halls and a desire for change in policies to increase local fruits and vegetables access on campus. While there is student desire for improved access to fresh produce on campus, there are perceived barriers to overcome. University partnerships are needed to address the desired nutritional improvements.

  8. Employment in the Catering & Hospitality Industry--Employee Attitudes and Career Expectations. Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotel and Catering Training Co., London (England).

    A study examined the attitudes and career expectations of a random sample of catering and hospitality industry employees in the United Kingdom. The survey focused on the following: aspiration and career intentions, factors causing job satisfaction/dissatisfaction, employment patterns in the industry, satisfaction with/access to…

  9. Behavior, Expectations and Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Jr, Murray; Rashotte, Lisa Slattery

    2010-01-01

    We predict effects of behavior patterns and status on performance expectations and group inequality using an integrated theory developed by Fisek, Berger and Norman (1991). We next test those predictions using new experimental techniques we developed to control behavior patterns as independent variables. In a 10-condition experiment, predictions…

  10. Life Expectancy in 2040

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canudas-Romo, Vladimir; DuGoff, Eva H; Wu, Albert W.

    2016-01-01

    We use expert clinical and public health opinion to estimate likely changes in the prevention and treatment of important disease conditions and how they will affect future life expectancy. Focus groups were held including clinical and public health faculty with expertise in the six leading causes...

  11. Mapping the Views of Adolescent Health Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewan, Lindsay A; McLinden, Daniel; Biro, Frank; DeJonckheere, Melissa; Vaughn, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Health research that includes youth and family stakeholders increases the contextual relevance of findings, which can benefit both the researchers and stakeholders involved. The goal of this study was to identify youth and family adolescent health priorities and to explore strategies to address these concerns. Stakeholders identified important adolescent health concerns, perceptions of which were then explored using concept mapping. Concept mapping is a mixed-method participatory research approach that invites input from various stakeholders. In response to prompts, stakeholders suggested ways to address the identified health conditions. Adolescent participants then sorted the statements into groups based on content similarity and rated the statements for importance and feasibility. Multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis were then applied to create the concept maps. Stakeholders identified sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and obesity as the health conditions they considered most important. The concept map for STIs identified 7 clusters: General sex education, support and empowerment, testing and treatment, community involvement and awareness, prevention and protection, parental involvement in sex education, and media. The obesity concept map portrayed 8 clusters: Healthy food choices, obesity education, support systems, clinical and community involvement, community support for exercise, physical activity, nutrition support, and nutrition education. Ratings were generally higher for importance than for feasibility. The concept maps demonstrate stakeholder-driven ideas about approaches to target STIs and obesity in this context. Strategies at multiple social ecological levels were emphasized. The concept maps can be used to generate discussion regarding these topics and to identify interventions. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. STRATEGIES FOR HIGHER SATISFACTION OF THE ROMANIAN BANKING CUSTOMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danciu Victor

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A bank must identify, assesses and clearly and fully understands customers’ values and expectations if it’s target is their higher satisfaction. The banking customers are expecting to receive individual attention and support and good quality banking prod

  13. Patient satisfaction in neurological second opinions and tertiary referrals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, D.; Wieske, L.; Vergouwen, M. D. I.; Richard, E.; Stam, J.; Smets, E. M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the number of neurological second opinions (SOs) and tertiary referrals (TRs) is increasing, only little is known about expectations and patient satisfaction in this group of patients. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore expectations of patients who get a neurological SO or

  14. Customer Satisfaction with Air Force Civil Engineering Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    organization seeking to promote customer satisfaction. The answer is yes to both. Through advertising and interaction with consumers , companies...Many companies manage customer expectations by overpromising performance through unreliable and sometimes intentionally misleading advertising . Many... customers ’ expectations by only advertising and making commitments they can meet. Then they do whatever it takes to keep their word (Lele, 1987: 148

  15. A Comprehensive Expectancy Motivation Model: Implications for Adult Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Kenneth W.

    1989-01-01

    The Comprehensive Expectancy Motivation Model is based on valence-instrumentality-expectancy theory. It describes expectancy motivation as part of a larger process that includes past experience, motivation, effort, performance, reward, and need satisfaction. The model has significant implications for the design, marketing, and delivery of adult…

  16. Registered nurses' self-nurturance and life and career satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemcek, Mary Ann

    2007-08-01

    Knowledge of factors that help nurses thrive, including satisfaction with life and self-nurturance, can be used to enhance retention of a healthy work force. This study determined whether nurses are happy or satisfied with their lives; how self-nurturing or "good to self" they are; and whether a relationship exists among self-nurturance, life satisfaction, and career satisfaction. A descriptive, correlational study of 136 registered nurses involving measures of self-nurturance and life and career satisfaction was conducted. Mean scores for life satisfaction and self-nurturance were consistent with those from studies of well adults. Self-nurturance, life satisfaction, and career satisfaction were positively correlated with each other; thus, improving one is expected to improve the others. Knowledge of the significant positive correlation among life satisfaction, self-nurturance, and career satisfaction may prove useful in improving the mental health and safety of nurses. Strategies consistent with Magnet hospital characteristics are suggested for the occupational health nurse.

  17. Survey of pay satisfaction, job satisfaction and employee turnover in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Survey of pay satisfaction, job satisfaction and employee turnover in selected business organisations in Lagos, Nigeria. ... Global Journal of Social Sciences ... The study was an attempt at investigating the relatedness of pay satisfaction, job satisfaction and employee turnover in business organizations in Lagos Nigeria.

  18. Structure and Extensions of the User Information Satisfaction Construct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive Wrigley

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available User Information Satisfaction (UIS remains one of the most important constructs in Information Systems research. This paper investigates the application of them UIS instrument across a number of key variables including respondent characteristics. Several findings emerge from a survey of 379 IS and non-IS managers: First, the UIS factors are stable and generalizable. Second, the level of satisfaction varies quite substantially when compared to prior UIS reports, although the IS product satisfaction dominates. Third, IS managers, not surprisingly, evaluate their systems significantly higher than non-IS managers, indicating the importance of stakeholders in evaluating Information Systems success. Finally, respondents evaluate their internal systems differently than their inter-organizational systems, indicating that in the IS evaluation process system type must be considered as a moderating variable.

  19. Downscaling SSPs in the GBM Delta - Integrating Science, Modelling and Stakeholders Through Qualitative and Quantitative Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Andrew; Barbour, Emily; Salehin, Mashfiqus; Munsur Rahman, Md.; Hutton, Craig; Lazar, Attila

    2016-04-01

    A downscaled scenario development process was adopted in the context of a project seeking to understand relationships between ecosystem services and human well-being in the Ganges-Brahmaputra delta. The aim was to link the concerns and priorities of relevant stakeholders with the integrated biophysical and poverty models used in the project. A 2-stage process was used to facilitate the connection between stakeholders concerns and available modelling capacity: the first to qualitatively describe what the future might look like in 2050; the second to translate these qualitative descriptions into the quantitative form required by the numerical models. An extended, modified SSP approach was adopted, with stakeholders downscaling issues identified through interviews as being priorities for the southwest of Bangladesh. Detailed qualitative futures were produced, before modellable elements were quantified in conjunction with an expert stakeholder cadre. Stakeholder input, using the methods adopted here, allows the top-down focus of the RCPs to be aligned with the bottom-up approach needed to make the SSPs appropriate at the more local scale, and also facilitates the translation of qualitative narrative scenarios into a quantitative form that lends itself to incorporation of biophysical and socio-economic indicators. The presentation will describe the downscaling process in detail, and conclude with findings regarding the importance of stakeholder involvement (and logistical considerations), balancing model capacity with expectations and recommendations on SSP refinement at local levels.

  20. Downscaling SSPs in Bangladesh - Integrating Science, Modelling and Stakeholders Through Qualitative and Quantitative Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, A.; Barbour, E.; Salehin, M.; Hutton, C.; Lázár, A. N.; Nicholls, R. J.; Rahman, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    A downscaled scenario development process was adopted in the context of a project seeking to understand relationships between ecosystem services and human well-being in the Ganges-Brahmaputra delta. The aim was to link the concerns and priorities of relevant stakeholders with the integrated biophysical and poverty models used in the project. A 2-stage process was used to facilitate the connection between stakeholders concerns and available modelling capacity: the first to qualitatively describe what the future might look like in 2050; the second to translate these qualitative descriptions into the quantitative form required by the numerical models. An extended, modified SSP approach was adopted, with stakeholders downscaling issues identified through interviews as being priorities for the southwest of Bangladesh. Detailed qualitative futures were produced, before modellable elements were quantified in conjunction with an expert stakeholder cadre. Stakeholder input, using the methods adopted here, allows the top-down focus of the RCPs to be aligned with the bottom-up approach needed to make the SSPs appropriate at the more local scale, and also facilitates the translation of qualitative narrative scenarios into a quantitative form that lends itself to incorporation of biophysical and socio-economic indicators. The presentation will describe the downscaling process in detail, and conclude with findings regarding the importance of stakeholder involvement (and logistical considerations), balancing model capacity with expectations and recommendations on SSP refinement at local levels.

  1. Divergent stakeholder views of corporate social responsibility in the Australian forest plantation sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Melissa; Lockwood, Michael; Vanclay, Frank; Hanson, Dallas; Schirmer, Jacki

    2012-12-30

    Although the Australian forest plantation industry acknowledges that there is a role for corporate social responsibility (CSR) in forest management, there is confusion as to what this constitutes in practice. This paper describes the conflicts between internal and external stakeholder views on CSR in plantation forestry. We conducted in-depth interviews with key informants across three plantation management regions in Australia: Tasmania, the Green Triangle and south-west Western Australia. We interviewed a range of stakeholders including forest company employees, local councils, Indigenous representatives, and environmental non-government organisations. CSR-related initiatives that stakeholders believed were important for plantation management included the need for community engagement, accountability towards stakeholders, and contribution to community development and well-being. Although there was wide support for these initiatives, some stakeholders were not satisfied that forest companies were actively implementing them. Due to the perception that forest companies are not committed to CSR initiatives such as community engagement, some stakeholder expectations are not being satisfied. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Attitudes towards evaluation of psychiatric disability claims: a survey of Swiss stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schandelmaier, Stefan; Leibold, Andrea; Fischer, Katrin; Mager, Ralph; Hoffmann-Richter, Ulrike; Bachmann, Monica Susanne; Kedzia, Sarah; Busse, Jason Walter; Guyatt, Gordon Henry; Jeger, Joerg; Marelli, Renato; De Boer, Wout Ernst Lodewijk; Kunz, Regina

    2015-01-01

    In Switzerland, evaluation of work capacity in individuals with mental disorders has come under criticism. We surveyed stakeholders about their concerns and expectations of the current claim process. We conducted a nationwide online survey among five stakeholder groups. We asked 37 questions addressing the claim process and the evaluation of work capacity, the maximum acceptable disagreement in judgments on work capacity, and its documentation. Response rate among 704 stakeholders (95 plaintiff lawyers, 285 treating psychiatrists, 129 expert psychiatrists evaluating work capacity, 64 social judges, 131 insurers) varied between 71% and 29%. Of the lawyers, 92% were dissatisfied with the current claim process, as were psychiatrists (73%) and experts (64%), whereas the majority of judges (72%) and insurers (81%) were satisfied. Stakeholders agreed in their concerns, such as the lack of a transparent relationship between the experts' findings and their conclusions regarding work capacity, medical evaluations inappropriately addressing legal issues, and the experts' delay in finalising the report. Findings mirror the characteristics that stakeholders consider important for an optimal work capacity evaluation. For a scenario where two experts evaluate the same claimant, stakeholders considered an inter-rater difference of 10%‒20% in work capacity at maximum acceptable. Plaintiff lawyers, treating psychiatrists and experts perceive major problems in work capacity evaluation of psychiatric claims whereas judges and insurers see the process more positively. Efforts to improve the process should include clarifying the basis on which judgments are made, restricting judgments to areas of expertise, and ensuring prompt submission of evaluations.

  3. Social cognitive predictors of first- and non-first-generation college students' academic and life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garriott, Patton O; Hudyma, Aaron; Keene, Chesleigh; Santiago, Dana

    2015-04-01

    The present study tested Lent's (2004) social-cognitive model of normative well-being in a sample (N = 414) of first- and non-first-generation college students. A model depicting relationships between: positive affect, environmental supports, college self-efficacy, college outcome expectations, academic progress, academic satisfaction, and life satisfaction was examined using structural equation modeling. The moderating roles of perceived importance of attending college and intrinsic goal motivation were also explored. Results suggested the hypothesized model provided an adequate fit to the data while hypothesized relationships in the model were partially supported. Environmental supports predicted college self-efficacy, college outcome expectations, and academic satisfaction. Furthermore, college self-efficacy predicted academic progress while college outcome expectations predicted academic satisfaction. Academic satisfaction, but not academic progress predicted life satisfaction. The structural model explained 44% of the variance in academic progress, 56% of the variance in academic satisfaction, and 28% of the variance in life satisfaction. Mediation analyses indicated several significant indirect effects between variables in the model while moderation analyses revealed a 3-way interaction between academic satisfaction, intrinsic motivation for attending college, and first-generation college student status on life satisfaction. Results are discussed in terms of applying the normative model of well-being to promote first- and non-first-generation college students' academic and life satisfaction. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Patient Satisfaction Reporting for the Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, Cynthia A; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Schairer, William W; McCormick, Frank; Ranawat, Anil S

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate how patient satisfaction after surgical femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) treatment is measured and reported in the current evidence base. A review of the MEDLINE database was performed. Clinical outcome studies of FAI that reported a measure of patient satisfaction were included. Patient demographics, clinical outcome scores, and patient satisfaction measures were extracted. The NewCastle Ottawa Scale (NOS) was used to grade quality. Statistical analysis was primarily descriptive. Twenty-six studies met inclusion criteria; the mean NOS score among included studies was 5.7. Most studies were level 3 or 4 (n = 25, 96.1%). A 0 to 10 numeric scale, described by some studies as a visual analog scale, was the most commonly used method to assess satisfaction (n = 21; 80.8%), and mean reported scores ranged from 6.8 to 9.2 out of 10. Four studies (15.4%) used an ordinal scale, and 1 study (3.8%) used willingness to undergo surgery again as the measure of satisfaction. None of the included studies assessed preoperative satisfaction or patient expectation. Pooled cohort analysis was limited by significant overlapping study populations. Predictors of patients' satisfaction identified in included studies were presence of arthritis and postoperative outcome scores. Patient satisfaction was not uniformly assessed in the literature. Most studies used a 0- to 10-point satisfaction scale, but none distinguished between the process of care and the outcome of care. Although satisfaction scores were generally high, the quality of the methodologies in the studies that reported satisfaction was low, and the studies likely included overlapping patient populations. More work needs to be done to develop standardized ways for assessing patient satisfaction after arthroscopic hip surgery and other procedures in orthopaedic sports medicine. Level III, systematic review of Level III studies. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North

  5. Stakeholder Valuing: A Process for Identifying the Interrelationships between Firm and Stakeholder Attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. Carlon

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As firms are creating and recreating themselves as stakeholder corporations, tensions mount between a firm’s fiduciary duties to its shareholders and the broader responsibilities inherent in a stakeholder focus. Firms have employed several techniques to help resolve this tension with limited success. We suggest that the next step in reducing this tension is formally accounting for stakeholder value through changes in financial reporting. We contend that stakeholders have a financial value to the firm that can and should be accounted for through the firm’s financial reporting system. We propose a three-step process we call stakeholder valuing (SV to begin a conversation regarding how such a method can be created. SV begins with codifying the firm’s identity as a stakeholder entity, moves to assessing stakeholder value that’s consistent with that identity, and concludes with accounting for and reporting that value. What we are suggesting will be seen by some as a radical change in accounting practices but we believe it is necessary as we move toward a consistent, reliable, verifiable, transparent, and comparable means of accounting for the true value of a stakeholder corporation.

  6. Governing for Stakeholders : How Organizations May Create or Destroy Value for their Stakeholders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Vishwanathan (Pushpika)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThis PhD thesis lies at the intersection of stakeholder theory and corporate governance research. Stakeholder theory proposes that firms are best understood as a set of relationships among groups that have a stake in the activities of the firm. Corporate governance research, on the

  7. Reviewing the role of stakeholders in Operational Research; A stakeholder theory perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooyert, V. de; Rouwette, E.A.J.A.; Kranenburg, H.L. van; Freeman, R.E.

    2017-01-01

    The role of stakeholders in organizational decision-making is gaining more and more attention. Managers find that in order to create value sustainably and ethically, it is necessary to balance the interests of various stakeholders. This trend is reflected in the management literature, where much

  8. Analysing stakeholder power dynamics in multi-stakeholder processes : insights of practice from Africa and Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, J.H.; Hiemstra, W.; Vugt, van S.M.; Walters, H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines different practical methods for stakeholders to analyse power dynamics in multi-stakeholders processes (MSPs), taking into account the ambiguous and uncertain nature of complex adaptive systems. It reflects on an action learning programme which focused on 12 cases in Africa and

  9. Ethical theory and stakeholder-related decisions: The role of stakeholder culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M. Jones; W.A. Felps (William); G. Bigley

    2007-01-01

    textabstractWe use convergent elements of major ethical theories to create a typology of corporate stakeholder cultures—the aspects of organizational culture consisting of the beliefs, values, and practices that have evolved for solving problems and otherwise managing stakeholder relationships. We

  10. Spiking the expectancy profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels Chr.; Loui, Psyche; Vuust, Peter

    Melodic expectations have long been quantified using expectedness ratings. Motivated by statistical learning and sharper key profiles in musicians, we model musical learning as a process of reducing the relative entropy between listeners' prior expectancy profiles and probability distributions...... of a given musical style or of stimuli used in short-term experiments. Five previous probe-tone experiments with musicians and non-musicians are revisited. Exp. 1-2 used jazz, classical and hymn melodies. Exp. 3-5 collected ratings before and after exposure to 5, 15 or 400 novel melodies generated from...... a finite-state grammar using the Bohlen-Pierce scale. We find group differences in entropy corresponding to degree and relevance of musical training and within-participant decreases after short-term exposure. Thus, whereas inexperienced listeners make high-entropy predictions by default, statistical...

  11. Identifying Estonian Stakeholder Views as the Bases for Designing Science Teachers' In-Service Course Which Support Promotion of Competence Based Curriculum Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laius, A.; Post, A.; Rannikmäe, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study solicits views about the goals of science education from a range of stakeholders within the science education community and society. It also compares students' needs, expressed through stakeholder expectations, with the current learning situation of gymnasium graduates. The study uses a Delphi method to solicit views with 111…

  12. Chinese students' great expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, Stig

    2013-01-01

    The article focuses on Chinese students' hopes and expectations before leaving to study abroad. The national political environment for their decision to go abroad is shaped by an official narrative of China's transition to a more creative and innovative economy. Students draw on this narrative to...... system, they think of themselves as having a role in the transformation of Chinese attitudes to education and parent-child relations....

  13. Development and Psychometric Testing of a Novel Food Service Satisfaction Questionnaire for Food Service Staff of Aged Care Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M; Hamilton, J; Scupham, R; Matwiejczyk, L; Prichard, I; Farrer, O; Yaxley, A

    2018-01-01

    Food service staff are integral to delivery of quality food in aged care homes yet measurement of their satisfaction is unable to be performed due to an absence of a valid and reliable questionnaire. The aim of this study was to develop and perform psychometric testing for a new Food Service Satisfaction Questionnaire developed in Australia specifically for use by food service staff working in residential aged care homes (Flinders FSSQFSAC). A mixed methods design utilizing both a qualitative (in-depth interviews, focus groups) and a quantitative approach (cross sectional survey) was used. Content validity was determined from focus groups and interviews with food service staff currently working in aged care homes, related questionnaires from the literature and consultation with an expert panel. The questionnaire was tested for construct validity and internal consistency using data from food service staff currently working in aged care homes that responded to an electronic invitation circulated to Australian aged care homes using a national database of email addresses. Construct validity was tested via principle components analysis and internal consistency through Cronbach's alpha. Temporal stability of the questionnaire was determined from food service staff undertaking the Flinders FSSQFSAC on two occasions, two weeks apart, and analysed using Pearson's correlations. Content validity for the Flinders FSSQFSAC was established from a panel of experts and stakeholders. Principle components analysis revealed food service staff satisfaction was represented by 61-items divided into eight domains: job satisfaction (α=0.832), food quality (α=0.871), staff training (α=0.922), consultation (α=0.840), eating environment (α=0.777), reliability (α=0.695), family expectations (α=0.781) and resident relationships (α=0.429), establishing construct validity in all domains, and internal consistency in all (α>0.5) except for "resident relationships" (α=0.429). Test

  14. Expectations from the child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Atabek

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Transition from agricultural society to industry society, from industrial society to science society has taken place. In all these societies, expectations from children also vary. In the agricultural community, human labor is based on arm power. For this reason, expectation from children is to increase work power. Having more children is the basis for the expectations in this community to see that the boy is valuable because he has increased his work power. In the industrial society, the power of the arm changed its place with the machine power. The knowledgeable person is not a family grown-up but a foreman. Childhood was distinguished during this period. It has been investigated that the child has a separate development.  In the information society, communication and information has never been as fast as it is in this period.  The widespread use of the Internet, and the use of social networks such as Facebook and Twitter are in this period. In this society, families are panicked to prepare a future in their own heads for their children. Because the parents thought of their children, they decided about the child's life instead of the child making these decisions. This has had a negative impact on children's sense of autonomy and their ability to take responsibility. To change this, parents should train their children in auto control and develop children's impulse control skills. The children should be able to understand their emotions and make decisions by reasoning and reasoning.

  15. Physicians' Job Satisfaction.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AmL

    doctors and retention of the existing doctors, in addition to the ... an employee's well-being Examples of job resources are job ..... increase physician job satisfaction for ensuring the .... both pay and benefits physicians at private hospitals.

  16. ASD Customer Satisfaction Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — ASD implemented a customer satisfaction survey for our products and services. This feedback will provide a better understanding of how ASD products and services can...

  17. Applicant Satisfaction Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Chief Human Capital Officers developed 3 surveys that asks applicants to assess their satisfaction with the application process on a 1-10 point scale, with 10...

  18. Measuring customer satisfaction using SERQUAL survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardeshir Tajzadeh Namin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this research is on assessing the quality of services of Tehran’s Saman bank and the available gap between customer’s expectation and perception. Also the relationship between customer’s satisfaction and each dimension of service quality (ie: reliability, tangibility, responsiveness, assurance and empathy and ranking them accordingly, is investigated. The statistical population of this research is consisted of Tehran’s Saman bank customers. The research methods of this study are descriptive-survey as well as correlation. The statistical approaches of this study are correlation, t-student as well as Friedman tests. The results from a sample of 276, shows the service quality dimensions affect customers' perception based on SERQUAL. In addition, there are significant relationship between customers' perception and their satisfaction of the offered services. However, there are negative gaps between customers' perception and their level of expectation.

  19. 76 FR 62093 - Preventing Occupational Hearing Loss: Stakeholder Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... Loss: Stakeholder Meeting AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION... stakeholder meeting on preventing occupational hearing loss. Every year, between 20,000 and 25,000 workers... controls. OSHA is holding this stakeholder meeting as part of its commitment to work with stakeholders on...

  20. A stakeholder-driven approach to improve the informed consent process for palliative chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzinger, Andrea C; Wind, Jennifer K; Frank, Elizabeth; McCleary, Nadine J; Porter, Laura; Cushing, Heather; Abbott, Caroline; Cronin, Christine; Enzinger, Peter C; Meropol, Neal J; Schrag, Deborah

    2017-08-01

    Patients often anticipate cure from palliative chemotherapy. Better resources are needed to convey its risks and benefits. We describe the stakeholder-driven development and acceptability testing of a prototype video and companion booklet supporting informed consent (IC) for a common palliative chemotherapy regimen. Our multidisciplinary team (researchers, advocates, clinicians) employed a multistep process of content development, production, critical evaluation, and iterative revisions. Patient/clinician stakeholders were engaged throughout using stakeholder advisory panels, featuring their voices within the intervention, conducting surveys and qualitative interviews. A national panel of 57 patient advocates, and 25 oncologists from nine US practices critiqued the intervention and rated its clarity, accuracy, balance, tone, and utility. Participants also reported satisfaction with existing chemotherapy IC materials. Few oncologists (5/25, 20%) or advocates (10/22, 45%) were satisfied with existing IC materials. In contrast, most rated our intervention highly, with 89-96% agreeing it would be useful and promote informed decisions. Patient voices were considered a key strength. Every oncologist indicated they would use the intervention regularly. Our intervention was acceptable to advocates and oncologists. A randomized trial is evaluating its impact on the chemotherapy IC process. Stakeholder-driven methods can be valuable for developing patient educational interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Tunable hybrid plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report resents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning Tunable Hybrid Plasma (THP) derived from a three-year program of stake holder involvement. THP destroys volatile organic compounds by directing a moderate energy electron beam into a flow of air containing organic contaminants. This report is for technology developers and for those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of THP to the remediation problems the face. In addition, this report presents data requirements for the technology`s field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on THP from stakeholders from four other sites throughout the western United States.

  2. Community stakeholder responses to advocacy advertising

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, B.; Sinclair, J. [Elon University, Elon, NC (United States). School Community

    2009-07-01

    Focus group research was used to examine how community stakeholders, a group with local industry experience, responded to coal industry advocacy messages. The stakeholders expressed beliefs about both the advertiser and the coal industry, and while their knowledge led to critical consideration of the industry campaign, they also expressed a desire to identify with positive messages about their community. Applying a postpositivist research perspective, a new model is introduced to integrate these beliefs in terms of advertiser trust and industry accountability under the existing theoretical framework of persuasion knowledge. Agent and topic knowledge are combined in this model based on responses to the industry advocacy campaign. In doing so, this study integrates a priori theory within a new context, extending the current theoretical framework to include an understanding of how community stakeholders - a common target for marketplace advocacy - interpret industry messages.

  3. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Tunable hybrid plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report resents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning Tunable Hybrid Plasma (THP) derived from a three-year program of stake holder involvement. THP destroys volatile organic compounds by directing a moderate energy electron beam into a flow of air containing organic contaminants. This report is for technology developers and for those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders' perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of THP to the remediation problems the face. In addition, this report presents data requirements for the technology's field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on THP from stakeholders from four other sites throughout the western United States

  4. STAKEHOLDER THEORY DAN KARYA KESELAMATAN SCHINDLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Nicodemus Lontah

    2015-04-01

    Donaldson and Peterson studies have shown that stakeholder theory has a more solid foundation than the epistemology of shareholder theory to analyze the performance of business ethics and moral duty of a company. This article discussed the business activities of Oskar Schindler, an industrialist war-profiteer during World War II. Schindler's business which was originally run by the government under the Nazi regime, eventually opposed the mission of economic and legal liability imposed by the regime. Schindler's transformation of vision and business mission in this article demonstrate the characteristics and connection of layers in descriptive, instrumental and normative stakeholder theory in the concept of "normative, instrumental and descriptive stakeholder theory" according to Donaldson and Peterson.

  5. Stakeholder Risk Management in Ethical Decision Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauesen, Linne Marie

    evidence from hybrid organizations as Publicly Owned Enterprises (POEs) mixed of private corporations and political administration. The model offers a new way of combining risk management with ethical decisionmaking processes by the inclusion of multiple stakeholders. Not only does the model apply...... to these kinds of hybrid organizations, but it is easily adopted and tested for other private business models too. The findings and the conceptualization of the model enhances business ethics in decision making by managing and balancing stakeholder concerns with the same concerns as the traditional risk......Stakeholder management has for the last three decades been concerned either with strategic business management or business ethics, values and quality. Many models have been developed, but recently the literature asks for more dynamic models instead of the staticism that characterizes some models...

  6. Relations, interactions and networks of cultural tourism stakeholders in rural areas of Vojvodina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary trends, which are characterized by a very strong level of competition and the maturity of the market, become more than ever essential for success of tourist destinations. Rural areas in Vojvodina, because of its authentic atmosphere and multiculturalism, have significant advantages for cultural tourism. Each participant who creates a tourism product in toda y's competitive environment aims to have a strong focus on customer satisfaction, which indicates the necessity of adopting the concept of total relationship marketing. The aim of this paper is to show how cultural institutions, souvenir craftsmen, tourism organizations, travel agencies and other stakeholders achieve cooperation and apply modern concept of total relationship marketing for the purposes of satisfying the needs of tourists. The paper will explore the fundamental postulates of relationship marketing applied by key stakeholders of cultural tourism in rural areas, and will get reference results on relations, interactions and networks.

  7. Effects of work participation, intergenerational transfers and savings on life satisfaction of older Malaysians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Sor-Tho; Hamid, Tengku-Aizan

    2013-12-01

    To examine the effects of work participation, intergenerational transfers and savings on the life satisfaction of older community-dwelling Malaysians. Data from the 1999 Survey on Perceptions of Needs and Problems of the Elderly on people aged 60 and over were used. The life satisfaction score was constructed from 10 questions adopted from the Life Satisfaction Inventory-A by Neugarten, Havighurst and Tobin. Multiple regression analysis was used to estimate the expected level of life satisfaction. Controlling for other variables in the model, respondents who provided assistance to and received assistance from children with savings had significantly higher life satisfaction than their counterparts, while work participation did not have any significant effect on life satisfaction. Intergenerational transfers and savings are important predictors of life satisfaction. The interdependence between generations should remain and savings habits need to be cultivated to ensure a higher life satisfaction in old age. © 2012 The Authors. Australasian Journal on Ageing © 2012 ACOTA.

  8. A Study of Crisis Management Based on Stakeholders Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qingchun, Yue

    2017-11-01

    From the view of stakeholder theory, not only the enterprises should provide services to shareholders, but also take care of the demands of stakeholders. Stakeholders for the enterprise crisis are the organizations and individuals, which cause crisis, respond to the crisis and affected by the enterprise crisis. In this paper, first of all, to comb the development of stakeholder theory systematically; secondly, with the help of the enterprise crisis stakeholder analysis model, analyze the concept of stakeholders for the enterprise crisis and membership, and with the example of Shuanghui Group for further analysis; finally, we put forward relevant proposals for the enterprise crisis from the view of stakeholders.

  9. Measuring customer satisfaction using SERQUAL survey

    OpenAIRE

    Ardeshir Tajzadeh Namin; Niko Pilevary; Aidin Tajzadeh Namin

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this research is on assessing the quality of services of Tehran’s Saman bank and the available gap between customer’s expectation and perception. Also the relationship between customer’s satisfaction and each dimension of service quality (ie: reliability, tangibility, responsiveness, assurance and empathy) and ranking them accordingly, is investigated. The statistical population of this research is consisted of Tehran’s Saman bank customers. The research methods of this study are...

  10. Stakeholder involvement in decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Significant numbers of nuclear facilities will need to be decommissioned in the coming decades. In this context, NEA member countries are placing increasing emphasis on the involvement of stakeholders in the associated decision procedures. This study reviews decommissioning experience with a view to identifying stakeholder concerns and best practice in addressing them. The lessons learnt about the end of the facility life cycle can also contribute to better foresight in siting and building new facilities. This report will be of interest to all major players in the field of decommissioning, in particular policy makers, implementers, regulators and representatives of local host communities

  11. Improving Urban Freight Governance and Stakeholder Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Britta; Bech Godskesen Andersen, Christina; Figueroa, Maria J.

    2017-01-01

    Urban freight transport is a complex field characterised by many actors and stakeholders and thus many rationalities are at stake. This paper contributes to literature on urban freight governance by approaching the field with social system theory combined with the concepts of relationship platforms...... and value co-creation. This approach facilitates an improved process to foster implementation of innovative urban freight solutions that is illustrated by means of an analysis of the Copenhagen Citylogistik-kbh demonstration project. The results of this analysis indicate that attaining a shared sense...... of value creation among stakeholders through this process is key to implementation of new urban freight solutions....

  12. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration stakeholder involvement model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaupanger, R.M.; Kostelnik, K.M.; Milam, L.M.

    1994-04-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. Stakeholder participation in the DOE Environmental Management decision-making process is critical to remediation efforts. Appropriate mechanisms for communication with the public, private sector, regulators, elected officials, and others are being aggressively pursued by BWID to permit informed participation. This document summarizes public outreach efforts during FY-93 and presents a strategy for expanded stakeholder involvement during FY-94

  13. School Environment and Satisfaction with Schooling among Primary School Pupils in Ondo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aina, Stephen Ileoye

    2015-01-01

    Modern school environments put emphasis on adequate and qualitative facilities to promote conducive teaching and learning environments, the deplorable conditions of the primary schools has become worrisome to the state government and education stakeholders. The study investigated the school environment and pupils' satisfaction with schooling in…

  14. Customer satisfaction and business excellence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kai; Martensen, Anne; Grønholdt, Lars

    The topic for this paper is the link between customer satisfaction and business performance, which makes it possible to use customer satisfaction measures as basis for creating business excellence. First, the paper presents microeconomic models for the relationship between customer satisfaction......, customer loyalty and performance, and optimal customer satisfaction is characterized which will help management choose the right quality parameters for improvement. Second, the paper describes empirical evidence that customer satisfaction measures, based on a modelling approach, have impact on economic...

  15. Job Satisfaction of Nursing Managers

    OpenAIRE

    Petrosova, Liana; Pokhilenko, Irina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to research levels of job satisfaction, factors affecting job satisfaction/dissatisfaction, and ways to improve job satisfaction among nursing managers. The purposes of the study were to extend knowledge in the field of healthcare management, to raise awareness about factors that affect job satisfaction in nursing management career, and to provide suggestions regarding how to increase job satisfaction among nursing managers. The method of this study is literature r...

  16. Corporate Citizenship and Stakeholder Engagement : Maintaining an Equitable Power Balance

    OpenAIRE

    Ihugba, Bethel Uzoma; Osuji, Onyeka K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an engagement oriented corporation-stakeholder relationship in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programmes. It is a proposition which poses the two connected questions of how to move from solely public relation driven stakeholder management to social development oriented stakeholder participation (engagement) and how Stakeholder Engagement can be measured. On the backdrop of Arnstein’s (1969) citizenship participation model and reasons for Stakeholder Engagement frame...

  17. Identification of stakeholder perspectives on future flood management in the Rhine basin using Q methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raadgever, G. T.; Mostert, E.; van de Giesen, N. C.

    2008-08-01

    This article identifies different stakeholder perspectives on future flood management in the downstream parts of the Rhine basin in Germany and The Netherlands. The perspectives were identified using Q methodology, which proved to be a good, but time-intensive, method for eliciting and analyzing stakeholder perspectives in a structured and unbiased way. Three shared perspectives were found: A) "Anticipation and institutions", B) "Space for flooding" and C) "Knowledge and engineering". These three perspectives share a central concern for the provision of safety against flooding, but disagree on the expected autonomous developments and the preferred measures. In perspective A, the expected climate change and economic growth call for fast action. To deal with the increasing flood risk, mostly institutional measures are proposed, such as the development of a stronger basin commission. In perspective B, an increasing spatial pressure on the river area is expected, and the proposed measures are focused on mitigating damage, e.g., through controlled flooding and compartmentalization. In perspective C, the role of expert knowledge and technological improvements is emphasized. Preferred strategies include strengthening the dikes and differentiation of safety standards. An overview of stakeholder perspectives can be useful in natural resources management for 1) setting the research agenda, 2) identifying differences in values and interests that need to be discussed, 3) creating awareness among a broad range of stakeholders, and 4) developing scenarios.

  18. Development of Family Medicine training in Botswana: Views of key stakeholders in Ngamiland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogundipe, Radiance M; Mash, Robert

    2018-08-31

    Family Medicine training commenced in Botswana in 2011, and Maun was one of the two sites chosen as a training complex. If it is to be successful there has to be investment in the training programme by all stakeholders in healthcare delivery in the district. The aim of the study was to explore the attitudes of stakeholders to initiation of Family Medicine training and their perspectives on the future roles of family physicians in Ngami district, Botswana. Maun and the surrounding Ngami subdistrict of Botswana. Thirteen in-depth interviews were conducted with purposively selected key stakeholders in the district health services. Data were recorded, transcribed and analysed using the framework method. Participants welcomed the development of Family Medicine training in Maun and expect that this will result in improved quality of primary care. Participants expect the registrars and family physicians to provide holistic health care that is of higher quality and expertise than currently experienced, relevant research into the health needs of the community, and reduced need for referrals. Inadequate personal welfare facilities, erratic ancillary support services and an inadequate complement of mentors and supervisors for the programme were some of the gaps and challenges highlighted by participants. Family Medicine training is welcomed by stakeholders in Ngamiland. With proper planning introduction of the family physician in the district is expected to result in improvement of primary care.

  19. CUSTOMER SATISFACTION AND LOYALTY IN A FINANCIAL INSTITUTION

    OpenAIRE

    Mankem, Relindis

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to examine the correlations between customer satisfaction and customer loyalty. “Customers became a center for all banking activities due to increased competition for greater market share. Focusing on customer satisfaction has been the key to increasing service quality according to customers’ expectations in the banking sector,” suggested that the level of service quality is an indication of the organization's ability to meet customers' desires and demands. There...

  20. Gender inequality and the gender job satisfaction paradox in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Vladisavljević, Marko; Perugini, Cristiano

    2018-01-01

    Although women are paid less than men, face worse working conditions, lower promotion opportunities, and work-place discrimination, they typically report job satisfaction higher or similar to men's. Twenty years ago Clark (Clark, 1997) suggested that the reason behind women's higher job satisfaction are their lower expectations, driven by a number of factors related to current and past positions of women on the labour market. Although this hypothesis is one of the leading explanations of the ...

  1. Expected Term Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buraschi, Andrea; Piatti, Ilaria; Whelan, Paul

    We construct and study the cross-sectional properties of survey-based bond risk premia and compare them to their traditional statistical counterparts. We document large heterogeneity in skill, identify top forecasters, and learn about the importance of subjective risk premia in long-term bonds...... dynamics. The consensus is not a sufficient statistics of the cross-section of expectations and we propose an alternative real-time aggregate measure of risk premia consistent with Friedmans market selection hypothesis. We then use this measure to evaluate structural models and find support...

  2. Agreeing on expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Bentsen, Martin Juul

    Commitment and trust are often mentioned as important aspects of creating a perception of reliability between counterparts. In the context of university-industry collaborations (UICs), agreeing on ambitions and expectations are adamant to achieving outcomes that are equally valuable to all parties...... involved. Despite this, our initial probing indicated that such covenants rarely exist. As such, this paper draws on project management theory and proposes the possibility of structuring assessments of potential partners before university-industry collaborations are brought to life. Our analysis suggests...

  3. Shared Relationship Efficacy of Dyad Can Increase Life Satisfaction in Close Relationships: Multilevel Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kenichi; Yoshida, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Characteristics of relationship itself play an important role in determining well-being of individuals who participate in the relationship. We used efficacy expectations mutually shared between close friends or romantic partners as a characteristic of relationship and investigated its impact on their life satisfaction. In Study 1, we conducted a cross-sectional study among 137 pairs of close same-sex friends to test whether the efficacy expectations shared between friends are associated with levels of life satisfaction. In Study 2, we conducted a longitudinal study among 114 heterosexual romantic couples to test predictive validity of the efficacy expectations shared between couples predict levels of life satisfaction 2 month later. In both studies we found a consistent result that as degrees of the efficacy expectations shared between individuals in a relationship increased, the degree of their life satisfaction also increased. Underlying mechanisms that explain how characteristics of relationship itself increase life satisfaction are discussed. PMID:27437946

  4. Midwifery at the crossroads in Estonia: attitudes of midwives and other key stakeholders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V; Rasch, Vibeke; Liljestrand, Jerker

    2005-01-01

    were obtained by sending a 32-question questionnaire, based on an agenda developed through semistructured interviews, to all midwives in Estonia. A nominal group technique was employed with key stakeholders to determine the extent of their agreement with the questionnaire's major findings. RESULTS......: The response rate to the questionnaire was 75%. There was no significant association between work satisfaction and independent variables of age, ethnicity, work abroad, increased responsibility, and involvement in postpartum care and counseling. There was, however, a significant association between work...... satisfaction and salary. The group process revealed that although there is no agreement on the role of family doctors and midwives in antenatal care, there is a general agreement that midwives should be more involved in postpartum care and that their tasks need to be better defined. CONCLUSIONS: Almost half...

  5. Commercial Bank Efficiency Evaluation in Consideration of the Undesirable Output and Its Link with Stakeholders Relationship: An Application of China’s Commercial Banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyue Ji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the modern contract theory, expectancy theory, and stakeholder theory, this paper analyzes how stakeholders relationship influences the efficiency of commercial banks and finds that the efficiency is a function of stakeholders relationship. A DEA model with Seiford's linear transformation function is developed to evaluate the efficiency in consideration of the undesirable output. The panel Tobit model is established to conduct empirical research with data of 14 Chinese commercial banks from 2004 to 2012. The study finds that except for business customer relation, stakeholder relationship is the key variable that influences comprehensive efficiency of commercial banks.

  6. Probability via expectation

    CERN Document Server

    Whittle, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This book is a complete revision of the earlier work Probability which ap­ peared in 1970. While revised so radically and incorporating so much new material as to amount to a new text, it preserves both the aim and the approach of the original. That aim was stated as the provision of a 'first text in probability, de­ manding a reasonable but not extensive knowledge of mathematics, and taking the reader to what one might describe as a good intermediate level'. In doing so it attempted to break away from stereotyped applications, and consider applications of a more novel and significant character. The particular novelty of the approach was that expectation was taken as the prime concept, and the concept of expectation axiomatized rather than that of a probability measure. In the preface to the original text of 1970 (reproduced below, together with that to the Russian edition of 1982) I listed what I saw as the advantages of the approach in as unlaboured a fashion as I could. I also took the view that the text...

  7. Gender Roles and Expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana A. Eisenchlas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available One consequence of the advent of cyber communication is that increasing numbers of people go online to ask for, obtain, and presumably act upon advice dispensed by unknown peers. Just as advice seekers may not have access to information about the identities, ideologies, and other personal characteristics of advice givers, advice givers are equally ignorant about their interlocutors except for the bits of demographic information that the latter may offer freely. In the present study, that information concerns sex. As the sex of the advice seeker may be the only, or the predominant, contextual variable at hand, it is expected that that identifier will guide advice givers in formulating their advice. The aim of this project is to investigate whether and how the sex of advice givers and receivers affects the type of advice, through the empirical analysis of a corpus of web-based Spanish language forums on personal relationship difficulties. The data revealed that, in the absence of individuating information beyond that implicit in the advice request, internalized gender expectations along the lines of agency and communality are the sources from which advice givers draw to guide their counsel. This is despite the trend in discursive practices used in formulating advice, suggesting greater language convergence across sexes.

  8. ATLAS: Exceeding all expectations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    “One year ago it would have been impossible for us to guess that the machine and the experiments could achieve so much so quickly”, says Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson. The whole chain – from collision to data analysis – has worked remarkably well in ATLAS.   The first LHC proton run undoubtedly exceeded expectations for the ATLAS experiment. “ATLAS has worked very well since the beginning. Its overall data-taking efficiency is greater than 90%”, says Fabiola Gianotti. “The quality and maturity of the reconstruction and simulation software turned out to be better than we expected for this initial stage of the experiment. The Grid is a great success, and right from the beginning it has allowed members of the collaboration all over the world to participate in the data analysis in an effective and timely manner, and to deliver physics results very quickly”. In just a few months of data taking, ATLAS has observed t...

  9. Lifelong learning in medical radiation science: stakeholders' views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, J.; Zadnik, M.G.; Radloff, A.

    2002-01-01

    Following the Australian Institute of Radiography promotion of Continuing Professional Development, a nationwide survey on lifelong learning in Medical Radiation Science (MRS) was conducted in June 1999. It is the first national study, which collates various stakeholders' views on the essential attributes of MRS practitioners and how respondents view lifelong learning. A total of twenty-five attributes (professional, generic and lifelong learning) were included in the survey. For each attribute listed, respondents were asked to rate its importance and the perceived level of attainment. The three major groups of stakeholders who participated in the survey were MRS practitioners, Heads of MRS clinical Departments and students from the eight Australian universities. Analysis of survey responses showed that all respondents regard lifelong learning attributes to be important for MRS practitioners. As might have been expected, professional attributes and generic attributes were regarded as more important than lifelong learning attributes. Moreover, for each attribute surveyed, there was a statistically significant difference between the perceived level of importance and perceived level of attainment, with the attainment level being lower than the level of importance. The implications of these findings for the profession and recommendations for continuing professional development are discussed. Copyright (2002) Australian Institute of Radiography

  10. Stakeholder Perspectives on Research and Practice in Autism and Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Alice A; Crapnell, Tara; Lau, Lynette; Anderson, Kristy A; Shattuck, Paul

    2018-04-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are reported to experience significant challenges during the transition to adulthood. Although recent evidence indicates that individuals with ASD experience poor outcomes in adulthood, little is understood about the contributing factors. In this qualitative study, we investigated the barriers to and needs in research and practice in the transition to adulthood among individuals with ASD. Thirteen researchers, including service providers, family members, and an individual with ASD participated in 30- to 60-minute, semistructured, open-ended telephone interviews. Interviews were transcribed, and data were analyzed by using an inductive approach to identify themes related to barriers to and needs in the transition to adulthood for youth with ASD. Stakeholders identified the need for transition planning and preparation to begin earlier and for systems to better accommodate the interests and varying abilities of individuals with ASD. Stakeholders also felt that parent and service provider expectations and perceptions influence early opportunities and experiences offered throughout the transition process. This study reveals the multilevel barriers to and needs in the transition to adulthood and the need for interagency and multidisciplinary collaboration and research to address the varying levels of needs, abilities, and multisector challenges. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. Evaluating outcomes from stakeholders' perception: evidence from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The need for the appreciation of values and knowledge diversity has contributed to the increasing relevance of stakeholder participation in the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of development projects. Using mixed methods research design and indicators, this paper assesses the outcomes of the participatory monitoring ...

  12. Introducing legal method when teaching stakeholder theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    2015-01-01

    : the Business & Human Rights regime from a UN Global Compact perspective; and mandatory CSR reporting. Supplying integrated teaching notes and generalising on the examples, we explain how legal method may help students of business ethics, organisation and management – future managers – in their analysis...... to the business ethics literature by explaining how legal method complements stakeholder theory for organisational practice....

  13. Stakeholder Analisys of Higher Education Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Maric

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, knowledge, the human capital, and learning organizations have become the key determinants of current global progress. Higher educational sector has been faced with globalization and strong competition. Therefore, the need has arisen for professional management structures and more entrepreneurial style of leadership. Organizations have been transformed to learning organizations by the life long learning concept, while the knowledge management has become the leading tool in building competitive advantages. High education organizations are being pushed forward by competitiveness. That pressure requires continuous improvement emphasizing the need for measuring outcomes and building excellence. The paradigm of stakeholder analysis, applied to specific determinations of the system of higher education institutions, could be a good way for comprehending and predicting interests, needs and requirements of all key players in the environment. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the possibility of understanding the connection between higher education institutions and its environment in context of stakeholder analysis. The paper uses literature as a basis in identifying critical parameters for stakeholder analysis and its implementation to higher education sector. The findings of the paper reveal that the concept of stakeholders is critical and difficult to implement everywhere and to everything. There is a clear attempt of all organizations, especially those that create and encourage knowledge, to understand the actions of all participants and predictions of interests and requirements of the changing environment.

  14. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA FEDERAL...

  15. Management of the Stakeholder Driven Company

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolffsen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    Ideen er at vise at en virksomhed, som samtidigt skal tilgode ledelsen og forbrugerne, må have en monopollignende stilling på markedet og benytte en bizar prisdiskriminering, hvilket vises men en Nash forhandlingsligevægt. Desuden inddrages en ekstensiv diskussion af stakeholder-begrebet....

  16. Stakeholder Analysis To Shape the Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughin, Keith; Derosa, Joseph

    An enterprise is a complex adaptive social system that should maximize stakeholder, not shareholder, value — value to employees, customers, shareholders and others. We expand upon Russell Ackoff s direction to distribute value among stakeholders, to propose a schema of rules that guide the interactions among autonomous agents in the transactional environment of an enterprise. We define an enterprise as an organization and its transactional environment interacting with and adapting to each other. Enterprise behavior can only be understood in the context of this transactional environment where everything depends on everything else and interactions cannot be controlled, but can be influenced if they are guided by an understanding of the internal rules of the autonomous agents. The schema has four complementary rules (control, autonomy, return and value) derived from the work of Russell Ackoff and Michael Porter. The basic rules are applied in combination to eight stakeholder types derived from Richard Hopeman and Raymond McLeod (Leaders, Competitors, Customers, Public, Workers, Collaborators, Suppliers and Regulators). An enterprise can use this schema and rules in a process of stakeholder analysis to develop and continually refine strategies to encourage behaviors that benefit the enterprise and discourage behaviors that harm the enterprise. These strategies are implemented in a relationship management program in support of enterprise strategic management to consciously and explicitly shape the environment to reduce risks and increase opportunities for success.

  17. Incident Management Organization succession planning stakeholder feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne E. Black

    2013-01-01

    This report presents complete results of a 2011 stakeholder feedback effort conducted for the National Wildfire Coordination Group (NWCG) Executive Board concerning how best to organize and manage national wildland fire Incident Management Teams in the future to meet the needs of the public, agencies, fire service and Team members. Feedback was collected from 858...

  18. Discrepant Stakeholder Perspectives on Graduate Employability Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinash, Shelley; Crane, Linda; Judd, Madelaine-Marie; Knight, Cecily

    2016-01-01

    A literature review identified 12 strategies that have been empirically linked to improvements in graduate employability. A survey methodology was used to investigate self-reported use and/or perspectives on these strategies among four stakeholder groups. The following questions were asked: to students--What strategies are you using to improve…

  19. Sustainable food and agriculture: stakeholder's frames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gorp, B.; van der Goot, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite its importance, the notion of sustainability is open for discursive struggle. This article's primary objective is to acquire insight into the manner in which the principal stakeholders strategically use frames in their public communication about sustainable food and agriculture. A framing

  20. Exploring Stakeholder Values and Interests in Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Shannon K.

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges facing program evaluation education is how to bridge the need to train students in theoretical and methodological foundations, and also prepare them for the unpredictability and complex environment outside the classroom. This issue is particularly challenging in terms of understanding stakeholder values and interests. The…

  1. Listed Firm's Level of Stakeholder Transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Caspar

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes how Danish listed firms comply with the Danish Corporate Governance Code's recommendations regarding the categories: Role of shareholders, role of stakeholders and transparency. It is shown that the number of recommendations can be explained by six different underlying facto...

  2. Stakeholder Support for School Food Policy Expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Simone; Pescud, Melanie; Donovan, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which parents and school-based stakeholders (principals, teachers, canteen managers and Parents & Citizen Committee presidents) are supportive of potential expansions to a new school food policy. Eight additional policy components elicited in preliminary focus groups with parents and 19 additional…

  3. Stakeholders' Perceptions of Parcelization in Wisconsin's Northwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark G. Rickenbach; Paul H. Gobster

    2003-01-01

    Parcelization, the process by which relatively large forest ownerships become subdivided into smaller ones, is often related to changes in ownership and can bring changes to the use of the land. Landowners, resource professionals, and others interested in Wisconsin's Northwoods were asked their views on parcelization in a series of stakeholder forums. We analyzed...

  4. Safety Outreach and Incident Response Stakeholder Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosewater, David Martin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Conover, David [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this document is to set out a strategy to reach all stakeholders that can impact the timely deployment of safe stationary energy storage systems in the built environment with information on ESS technology and safety that is relevant to their role in deployment of the technology.

  5. Stakeholders and Apart Hotels: Multiple Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Kyoko Wada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Means of accommodation involve a wide range of social actors and agents, as well as different business models. Management strategies in this sector have been increasingly important for long-term sustainability and competitiveness of business organizations. This study aims to analyze the interactions between apart-hotels and their stakeholders to foster an improvement of services provided, aligning the interface of strategic management from the point of view of managers and their key stakeholders. It is an exploratory study, with qualitative chacter, along with multiple case studies of the following establishments: Travel Inn, Hotels Slaviero and Etoile george v. Brazilian enterprises, which manage lodging facilities with apart-hotel concepts, combining features that enable comparative analysis of the study. For conceptual understanding, this study was based on literature about stakeholders, taking the work of Freeman (1984 and Freeman et al (2010 as main references. The research was conducted through semi-structured interviews with managers of lodging facilities and their key stakeholders and through direct observation and documentation. We found that not all groups of influence are considered in the planning of service flats. However, the organizations surveyed indicated that the market has realized the importance of the groups that exert influence and are influenced by their goals, and are therefore increasingly alert for integration of such groups in their strategic planning.

  6. Stakeholders and quality assurance in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leisyte, Liudvika; Westerheijden, Donald F.; Eggins, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The various changes in post-bureaucratic organising, which are moving towards network approaches, coupled with the managerial agenda of corporate governance, have redefined the roles of various internal and external stakeholders in the governance of higher education institutions (Leisyte and Dee,

  7. Stakeholder Perceptions of Risk in Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dong; McCoy, Andrew P.; Kleiner, Brian M.; Mills, Thomas H.; Lingard, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Safety management in construction is an integral effort and its success requires inputs from all stakeholders across design and construction phases. Effective risk mitigation relies on the concordance of all stakeholders’ risk perceptions. Many researchers have noticed the discordance of risk perceptions among critical stakeholders in safe construction work, however few have provided quantifiable evidence describing them. In an effort to fill this perception gap, this research performs an experiment that investigates stakeholder perceptions of risk in construction. Data analysis confirms the existence of such discordance, and indicates a trend in risk likelihood estimation. With risk perceptions from low to high, the stakeholders are architects, contractors/safety professionals, and engineers. Including prior studies, results also suggest that designers have improved their knowledge in building construction safety, but compared to builders they present more difficultly in reaching a consensus of perception. Findings of this research are intended to be used by risk management and decision makers to reassess stakeholders’ varying judgments when considering injury prevention and hazard assessment. PMID:26441481

  8. Software Architecture : Framing Stakeholders' Concerns introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lago, Patricia; Avgeriou, Paris; Hilliard, Rich

    2010-01-01

    As noted earlier, some stakeholder concerns are well-served today by available architecture viewpoints, frameworks, or ADLs, while others aren't expressible with available, off-the-shelf approaches. Hence the theme of this special issue: exploring the space of architecting in the face of multiple

  9. Sixth national stakeholder workshop summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    On June 17--18, 1998, the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Worker and Community Transition convened its sixth National Stakeholder Workshop at the Ramada Plaza Hotel Old Town in Alexandria, Virginia. Approximately 325 stakeholders attended representing DOE headquarters and field offices, contractors, labor organizations, state and local government, education and community interest groups. The meeting addressed the progress made on the issues and challenges identified at the last stakeholder`s meeting in Oakland, California on April 9--11, 1997. Also discussed were the full range of the Department`s work force issues and creative solutions to the inherent challenges of simultaneously implementing the Department`s post Cold-War mission, work force restructuring guidance, contract reform objectives, asset disposition, performance-based management requirements, and business process improvement policies. The format of the Workshop included several plenary sessions and a number of small group discussion sessions. The small group sessions focused on topics related to labor issues, work force restructuring, work force planning, community transition, and employee concerns. The sessions provided a wide range of views on worker and community transition issues. The plenary sessions of the Workshop included presentations on the following topics: welcome and introductions; opening remarks; building a better labor-management relationship; keynote speech from Secretary of Energy Federico Pena; meeting tomorrow`s challenges (early site closures); harnessing the contracting process to encourage local growth; and, the British experience in economic conversion.

  10. Employee satisfaction and employee retention: catalysts to patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kevin S; Collins, Sandra K; McKinnies, Richard; Jensen, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few years, most health care facilities have become intensely aware of the need to increase patient satisfaction. However, with today's more consumer-driven market, this can be a daunting task for even the most experienced health care manager. Recent studies indicate that focusing on employee satisfaction and subsequent employee retention may be strong catalysts to patient satisfaction. This study offers a review of how employee satisfaction and retention correlate with patient satisfaction and also examines the current ways health care organizations are focusing on employee satisfaction and retention.

  11. Basic Features of Customer Satisfaction with Train Schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakoshi, Akiko; Kunimatsu, Taketoshi; Saito, Ayano

    This paper aims to reveal the fundamental features of customer satisfaction with train schedules, which is one of the most basic services provided by a railway company. A customer satisfaction survey of passengers who frequently utilize three lines in the metropolitan area was conducted; we obtained the following findings: (a) out of nine factors to evaluate a train schedule from a passenger's viewpoint, the four most important ones are the frequency of trains running, punctuality, congestion rate, and time distance; (b) the ride-frequency influences the degree of satisfaction with train schedules in a particular line; and (c) it is important to set a numeric goal for the level of customer satisfaction by grasping the relationship between the transport service and a passenger's satisfaction with that service. The difference between customer satisfaction and passenger disutility is also discussed. The findings are expected to help conduct customer satisfaction surveys and also to form the basis for establishing a method by which to evaluate a train schedule from passengers' satisfaction ratings.

  12. Viewls - Stakeholder views on biofuels. WP1 final report about the results of the stakeholder questionnaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-03-15

    For the VIEWLS project an internet-based questionnaire on biofuels was distributed among a large group of stakeholders in the European Union, Accession Countries and the Americas in the second half of 2003. The purpose of the questionnaire was to collect information on stakeholders' opinion on biofuel related topics including the future potential of biofuels and drivers and barriers for the market introduction. Here the main results are presented. The results should only be regarded as indicative because no detailed statistical analysis was performed due to the difference in representation from different countries and stakeholder groups. (au)

  13. Stakeholder views on biofuels. WP1 Final report about the results of the stakeholder questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    For the VIEWLS project an internet-based questionnaire on biofuels was distributed among a large group of stakeholders in the European Union, Accession Countries and the Americas in the second half of 2003. The purpose of the questionnaire was to collect information on stakeholders' opinion on biofuel related topics including the future potential of biofuels and drivers and barriers for the market introduction. Here the main results are presented. The results should only be regarded as indicative because no detailed statistical analysis was performed due to the difference in representation from different countries and stakeholder groups

  14. Conducting research in risk communication that is both beneficial for stakeholders and scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrière, Marie; Bogaard, Thom; Junier, Sandra; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Mostert, Erik

    2015-04-01

    One of the key tasks for disaster risk reduction is raising awareness. On way to increase it is through risk communication, including visual risk communication. Previous research showed that visual risk communication linked to natural hazards is mostly evaluated in terms of user's requirements, ability to understand the content, or satisfaction with the diverse components of the tool(s): Its impact on risk awareness is not researched. Most of the risk communication evaluations are performed in a lab-type environments and thus their conclusions might not be fully valid in real life settings. Our approach differs in the sense that we decided to test a real communication effort. However, we did not use an existing one but designed our own. This process was conducted according to collaborative research principles, meaning that we created the communication effort in collaboration with the local stakeholders in order to respect the social environment of the case study. Moreover, our research activity should be beneficial and significant for the community in which we work as well as for science. This contribution will present the process that allowed us to design an exhibition in the Ubaye Valley (France) and the methodology that was developed to measure changes in risk awareness. During a 2-years project, we collaborated with local and regional stakeholders (politicians and technicians). Informal meetings with local stakeholders were organized to determine what they perceived as the needs in term of risk communication and to investigate the potential to develop activities that would benefit both them and us. We were offered the opportunity to design an exhibition for the local public library. We proposed the content and this was adjusted in interaction with the stakeholders. Later local technicians and inhabitants contributed to the content of the exhibition and regional stakeholders helped with the funding of the exhibition. Finally, employees of the public library took

  15. [Job satisfaction among Norwegian doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylenna, Magne; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløw

    2010-05-20

    Doctors' job satisfaction has been discussed internationally in recent years based on reports of increasing professional dissatisfaction. We have studied Norwegian doctors' job satisfaction and their general satisfaction with life. A survey was conducted among a representative sample of practicing Norwegian doctors in 2008. The validated 10-item Job Satisfaction Scale was used to assess job satisfaction. 1,072 (65 %) doctors responded. They reported a mean job satisfaction of 5.3 on a scale from 1 (very dissatisfied) to 7 (very satisfied). Job satisfaction increased with increasing age. Private practice specialists reported the highest level of job satisfaction (5.8), and general practitioners reported higher job satisfaction (5.5) than hospital doctors (5.1). Among specialty groups, community doctors scored highest (5.6) and doctors in surgical disciplines lowest (5.0). While long working hours was negatively correlated with job satisfaction, the perception of being professionally updated and having part-time affiliation(s) in addition to a regular job were positively correlated with job satisfaction. 52.9 % of doctors reported a very high general satisfaction. Norwegian doctors have a high level of job satisfaction. Satisfaction with life in general is also high and at least in line with that in the Norwegian population.

  16. Energy providers: customer expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pridham, N.F.

    1997-01-01

    The deregulation of the gas and electric power industries, and how it will impact on customer service and pricing rates was discussed. This paper described the present situation, reviewed core competencies, and outlined future expectations. The bottom line is that major energy consumers are very conscious of energy costs and go to great lengths to keep them under control. At the same time, solutions proposed to reduce energy costs must benefit all classes of consumers, be they industrial, commercial, institutional or residential. Deregulation and competition at an accelerated pace is the most likely answer. This may be forced by external forces such as foreign energy providers who are eager to enter the Canadian energy market. It is also likely that the competition and convergence between gas and electricity is just the beginning, and may well be overshadowed by other deregulated industries as they determine their core competencies

  17. Customer experiences and expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, C. R.

    1997-01-01

    Customer experiences and expectations from competition and cogeneration in the power industry were reviewed by Charles Morton, Director of Energy at CPC International, by describing Casco's decision to get into cogeneration in the early 1990s in three small corn milling plants in Cardinal, London and Port Colborne, Ontario, mainly as result of the threat of a 40 per cent increase in power prices. He stressed that cost competitiveness of cogeneration is entirely site-specific, but it is generally more attractive in larger facilities that operate 24 hours a day, where grid power is expensive or unreliable. Because it is reliable, cogeneration holds out the prospect of increased production-up time, as well as offering a hedge against higher energy costs, reducing the company's variable costs when incoming revenues fall short of costs, and providing an additional tool in head-to-head competition

  18. Stakeholder analysis in the portuguese artificial reef context: winners and losers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ramos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this stakeholder analysis related to the artificial reef (AR program located in the Algarve (Southern Portugal mainland 21 different stakeholder clusters were identified. Stakeholders were classified as primary, secondary and external. It was found that stakeholder interaction with the structures can be of private, public or cooperative interest. In the analysis there were also identified and mapped the impact of the program on stakeholders and their power to influence the ARs' outcomes. Stakeholders' interactions with the ARs were studied, along with their likely attitudes and behavior towards the man-made structures. Finally, all stakeholder clusters were classified according to their expected degree of involvement throughout the different AR stages. The purpose of this stakeholder analysis was to find out winners and losers connected with the reef deployment. It was found that most stakeholder clusters were affected positively, but also four clusters affected negatively. However, it is believed that those that may be affected negatively do not pose a serious threat to the expected AR development along its lifetime.Nesta análise de intervenientes relativa ao programa de recifes artificiais (RAs localizado na costa do Algarve (Sul de Portugal continental foram identificados 21 grupos de atores distintos. Os intervenientes foram classificados em 3 grupos: primários, secundários e externos. Verificou-se que o interesse dos intervenientes face às estruturas recifais (interação pode ser do tipo privado, público ou cooperativo. Na análise foram identificados os impactos do projeto sobre os intervenientes e o poder destes para influenciar os resultados do programa recifal. Foram definidas quais as interações e possíveis atitudes e comportamento dos intervenientes em relação aos RAs. Finalmente, todos os grupos de intervenientes foram classificados de acordo com o grau de envolvimento esperado ao longo das diferentes fases do programa

  19. Stakeholder involvement in systematic reviews: a protocol for a systematic review of methods, outcomes and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Alex; Campbell, Pauline; Struthers, Caroline; Synnot, Anneliese; Nunn, Jack; Hill, Sophie; Goodare, Heather; Watts, Chris; Morley, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Researchers are expected to actively involve stakeholders (including patients, the public, health professionals, and others) in their research. Although researchers increasingly recognise that this is good practice, there is limited practical guidance about how to involve stakeholders. Systematic reviews are a research method in which international literature is brought together, using carefully designed and rigorous methods to answer a specified question about healthcare. We want to investigate how researchers have involved stakeholders in systematic reviews, and how involvement has potentially affected the quality and impact of reviews. We plan to bring this information together by searching and reviewing the literature for reports of stakeholder involvement in systematic reviews. This paper describes in detail the methods that we plan to use to do this. After carrying out comprehensive searches for literature, we will: 1. Provide an overview of identified reports, describing key information such as types of stakeholders involved, and how. 2. Pick out reports of involvement which include detailed descriptions of how researchers involved people in a systematic review and summarise the methods they used. We will consider who was involved, how people were recruited, and how the involvement was organised and managed. 3. Bring together any reports which have explored the effect, or impact, of involving stakeholders in a systematic review. We will assess the quality of these reports, and summarise their findings. Once completed, our review will be used to produce training resources aimed at helping researchers to improve ways of involving stakeholders in systematic reviews. Background There is an expectation for stakeholders (including patients, the public, health professionals, and others) to be involved in research. Researchers are increasingly recognising that it is good practice to involve stakeholders in systematic reviews. There is currently a lack of evidence

  20. Macro Expectations, Aggregate Uncertainty, and Expected Term Premia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick, Christian D.; Schmeling, Maik; Schrimpf, Andreas

    Based on individual expectations from the Survey of Professional Forecasters, we construct a realtime proxy for expected term premium changes on long-term bonds. We empirically investigate the relation of these bond term premium expectations with expectations about key macroeconomic variables as ...