WorldWideScience

Sample records for stakeholder roles power

  1. Techno-economic assessment and policy of gas power generation considering the role of multiple stakeholders in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Jun; Zhang Xu; Xu Xiaolin

    2012-01-01

    In accordance with the energy planning in China, within the “Twelfth Five-Year” period (2011–2015), the proportion of natural gas among primary energy consumption is expected to increase from the current 4% to 8%. In 2015, about 17 natural gas pipelines will be completed. This paper reviews the current situation of gas power generation, analyzes the main opportunities and obstacles of gas power generation development in China, and conducts a techno-economic assessment of the natural gas power generation, taking into account the role and the interaction of the multiple stakeholders in the natural gas industry chain. Taking a power plant fueled with the natural gas transported by the second West-to-East Pipeline as an example, it is found that the on-grid power price fluctuates upward with the rise of gas price and downward with the increase of annual utilization hours, and the influences of tax policies on the on-grid power price prove to be highly significant. As the analysis and calculation indicate, the environmental benefits of natural gas power generation ought to be strongly emphasized, compared with coal-fired power generation. Finally, this paper puts forward specific policy recommendations, from the perspectives of electricity price, gas price, tax, power grid dispatching, etc. - Highlights: ► Presents the opportunities and obstacles of gas power generation development in China. ► Analyzes the interactions of multiple stakeholders in the natural gas industry chain. ► Conducts a techno-economic assessment on the natural gas power generation. ► Discusses the responsibilities and risks of multiple stakeholders. ► Puts forward policy recommendations, from electricity price, gas price, tax, etc.

  2. How stakeholder roles, power, and negotiation impact natural resource policy: A political economy view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughlan, L.

    2002-01-01

    Natural resource management decisions are complicated by multiple property rights, management objectives, and stakeholders with varying degrees of influence over the decision making process. In order to make efficient decisions, managers must incorporate the opinions and values of the involved stakeholders as well as understand the complex institutional constraints and opportunities that influence the decision-making process. Often this type of information is not understood until after a decision has been made, which can result in wasted time and effort.The purpose of my dissertation was to show how institutional frameworks and stakeholder involvement influence the various phases of the resource management decision-making process in a public choice framework. The intent was to assist decision makers and stakeholders by developing a methodology for formally incorporating stakeholders'' objectives and influence into the resource management planning process and to predict the potential success of rent-seeking activity based on stakeholder preferences and level of influence. Concepts from decision analysis, institutional analysis, and public choice economics were used in designing this interdisciplinary framework. The framework was then applied to an actual case study concerning elk and bison management on the National Elk Refuge and Grand Teton National Park near Jackson, Wyoming. The framework allowed for the prediction of the level of support and conflict for all relevant policy decisions, and the identification of each stakeholder''s level of support or opposition for each management decision.

  3. Stakeholder roles within the IMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowbourne, D.; Chuddy, B.; Gregg, L.

    2003-01-01

    This session presents the comments of 3 guest speakers who described the role of stakeholders within Ontario's Independent Electricity Market Operator (IMO). The IMO is committed to achieving a successful electricity market through its governance process. The IMO's 3 main objectives are: (1) give participants and stakeholders an effective say in the evolution of the electricity market, particularly in the area of commercial and reliability impact, (2) enable the market to evolve in a timely manner in step with participant needs, advancements in market technology and the objectives of provincial legislation, and (3) to provide advice on relevant issues and decisions. figs

  4. Ecosystem Services Flows: Why Stakeholders' Power Relationships Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipe-Lucia, María R; Martín-López, Berta; Lavorel, Sandra; Berraquero-Díaz, Luis; Escalera-Reyes, Javier; Comín, Francisco A

    2015-01-01

    The ecosystem services framework has enabled the broader public to acknowledge the benefits nature provides to different stakeholders. However, not all stakeholders benefit equally from these services. Rather, power relationships are a key factor influencing the access of individuals or groups to ecosystem services. In this paper, we propose an adaptation of the "cascade" framework for ecosystem services to integrate the analysis of ecological interactions among ecosystem services and stakeholders' interactions, reflecting power relationships that mediate ecosystem services flows. We illustrate its application using the floodplain of the River Piedra (Spain) as a case study. First, we used structural equation modelling (SEM) to model the dependence relationships among ecosystem services. Second, we performed semi-structured interviews to identify formal power relationships among stakeholders. Third, we depicted ecosystem services according to stakeholders' ability to use, manage or impair ecosystem services in order to expose how power relationships mediate access to ecosystem services. Our results revealed that the strongest power was held by those stakeholders who managed (although did not use) those keystone ecosystem properties and services that determine the provision of other services (i.e., intermediate regulating and final services). In contrast, non-empowered stakeholders were only able to access the remaining non-excludable and non-rival ecosystem services (i.e., some of the cultural services, freshwater supply, water quality, and biological control). In addition, land stewardship, access rights, and governance appeared as critical factors determining the status of ecosystem services. Finally, we stress the need to analyse the role of stakeholders and their relationships to foster equal access to ecosystem services.

  5. Analysing stakeholder power dynamics in multi-stakeholder processes : insights of practice from Africa and Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, J.H.; Hiemstra, W.; Vugt, van S.M.; Walters, H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines different practical methods for stakeholders to analyse power dynamics in multi-stakeholders processes (MSPs), taking into account the ambiguous and uncertain nature of complex adaptive systems. It reflects on an action learning programme which focused on 12 cases in Africa and

  6. Reviewing the role of stakeholders in Operational Research; A stakeholder theory perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooyert, V. de; Rouwette, E.A.J.A.; Kranenburg, H.L. van; Freeman, R.E.

    2017-01-01

    The role of stakeholders in organizational decision-making is gaining more and more attention. Managers find that in order to create value sustainably and ethically, it is necessary to balance the interests of various stakeholders. This trend is reflected in the management literature, where much

  7. Improving Quality Higher Education in Nigeria: The Roles of Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiyai, Romina Ifeoma

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the roles of stakeholders in improving quality of university education in Nigeria. Internal and external stakeholders are identified and the various roles they could play in improving the quality of university education are discussed. The paper contends that continuous and holistic improvement in university education system…

  8. The IMO Technical Panel, its role and its stakeholdering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cary, R.

    1999-01-01

    Some insight is provided for IPPSO members into the IMO Technical Panel (TP), its scope, modus operandi, and stakeholdering process. The TP is one of 3 panels recommended by the MDC and defined in the IMP bylaws. Its role is to consider rule changes and make recommendations to the IMO board. The aims of the Technical Panel are listed. The priority issues with significant direct impact on generators are: import and export transmission, including access to the inter-ties, and the Financial Transmission Rights associated with inter-ties, procedures governing new investment in transmission, participation and prudential requirements, and residual risk location, facility aggregation rules, local market power migration, must-run contracts; principles and forms of agreement, penalties for non-compliance with rules, and transitional provisions around market opening. The excluded major market design principles to be resolved by others are covered, as well as how it is decided what issues need attention. The TP does its work by: work planning, policy consultation, rule guidance and direction requests, and proposed rule amendments. Further points are listed concerning: how the TP secures stakeholder input, how the IPPSO stakeholder consultation process works, import and export transmission issues, and accreditation and prudential requirements

  9. Social responsible communication of nuclear power plant with external stakeholders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoncic, Milan [Nuclear Power Plant Krsko (Slovenia); Zurga, Gordana [Faculty of Organisation Studies in Novo Mesto (Slovenia)

    2016-11-15

    Implications that nuclear technology brings to common physical and social environment, are on daily lists of questions that stakeholders address to owners and operators of nuclear power plants. In this respect, stakeholders expect and demand narrow and explicit answers to concrete questions set. We claim that the acceptability of the NPP in the society can be achieved and maintained also through active communication and trust building between NPP and its stakeholders. A research in this respect was conducted on case of the Krsko NPP, Slovenia. Some institutional and international implications are presented, as well as possible areas for further investigation and research.

  10. Simulating stakeholder behavior in a marine setting: Integrated coastal zone planning and the influential power of selected stakeholders in Frøya, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Gjelsvik Tiller

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aquaculture expansion is a political priority in Norway, despite simmering conflicts and competing claims. We expand on this hypothesis and analyze the Norwegian governance system by adding stakeholder theory in case of a simulated model of the effects of municipal coastal zone planning in the municipality of Frøya, Norway. One cannot analyze the governance system in Norway without fully comprehending the perspectives of the stakeholders involved. Different stakeholders will react and respond differently and have conflicting presumptions basing their actions towards the planning process for coastal areas. They will also have different levels of power and abilities to influence the system. The article presents the interdisciplinary, first generation development of an agent based simulation model that mimics the outcomes of coastal zone planning for a stakeholder groups, the commercial fishers and the aquaculture industry, based on qualitative input from legislation, regulations and stakeholder workshops. We proceed with verifying the applicability of this simulator in light of the key actors involved, namely the commercial fishers. We found that the simulator had two outcomes for the commercial fishers that were consistently recurring, namely collapse and stability, based on the simulated occurrences of complaints by the stakeholders, with the latter being the de facto perceptions of actuality by the commercial fishers. Using stakeholder theory, we argue that the aquaculture industry’s role has the saliency of an Important Stakeholder in Frøya has steered the commercial fishers, who has the role of Dependent Stakeholders according to stakeholder theory, to no longer see any legitimacy in the process in that their complaints were never upheld because of their lack of the attribute Power.

  11. The Research of Stakeholder Power Impact on Project Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Biskupek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the article: The article show summarized information about stakeholders and their role in project implementation based on literature review. The second part of the article is dedicated for the research about stakeholder influence on project implementation. The only condition to participate in the survey was managing projects. Although the respondents are employed in the area of south Poland, they implement projects all over Poland. The research tool was a questionnaire which was sent by e-mail to the respondents. 90 project managers from the area of south Poland were invited to join the project, and 62 people sent back a completed questionnaire. Methodology/methods: The research was done by a questionnaire with twenty two question, which was divided into three parts. The first part was the imprint, which consisted of three questions. The second part consisted of two questions, which concerned the way of defining the word “stakeholder”. The third part concerned the topic of the research and consisted of seventeen questions. Scientific aim: The aim of the article is presenting the results of the research which was done, to show the research results of project stakeholder influence on the project implementation. Findings: The results received from the survey in the process of analysis and interpretation allow to put forward a thesis that stakeholders as a whole group are significant for the implementation of the whole project. Their impact is so important that it is possible to tell that they decide also about the project success or failure. Conclusions: The respondents show that stakeholders affect every area in large extent or very big extent. The fact has been proved in table 1 which shows the most frequently chosen answers by responders. However, by conducted analysis by the standard deviation it is possible to see a large dispersion of the results.

  12. Role of Stakeholders at Cape Coast PPAG Youth Centre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated whether the activities or the roles performed by the various stakeholders at the Cape Coast Planned Parenthood Association of Ghana (PPAG) youth centre impacted positively on the youth behaviour and performance at the centre. The sample comprised 22 teachers, 50 parents and 3 social welfare ...

  13. Rising stakeholder expectations and the changing role of public relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossberndt, D. [BP Canada Energy Company, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    The role of public relations is changing along with growing public awareness of stakeholder's ability to intervene in the development of energy projects. Public relations and community consultation departments must work closely together to ensure that consistent messages are being delivered to the public. This presentation explained how to develop a successful public relations strategy ranging from environmental risk assessment to community consultation. It also discussed the degree to which effective and ongoing communication with stakeholders prevents opposition and negative media coverage.

  14. Corporate Citizenship and Stakeholder Engagement : Maintaining an Equitable Power Balance

    OpenAIRE

    Ihugba, Bethel Uzoma; Osuji, Onyeka K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an engagement oriented corporation-stakeholder relationship in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programmes. It is a proposition which poses the two connected questions of how to move from solely public relation driven stakeholder management to social development oriented stakeholder participation (engagement) and how Stakeholder Engagement can be measured. On the backdrop of Arnstein’s (1969) citizenship participation model and reasons for Stakeholder Engagement frame...

  15. Stakeholder consultations regarding centralized power procurement processes in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, Ontario held 4 Requests for Proposals (RFPs) to encourage the development of new clean renewable combined heat and power generation and the implementation of conservation and demand management programs. Details of a stakeholder consultation related to the RFP process were presented were in this paper. The aim of the consultation was to synthesize stakeholder comments and to provide appropriate recommendations for future RFPs held by the Ontario Power Authority (OPA). The financial burden of bidding was discussed, as well as communications procedures and contract ambiguities. Issues concerning the criteria used for qualifying potential bidders and evaluating project submissions were reviewed. Recommendations for future processes included prequalification, a simplification in collusion requirements, and a fixed time response. It was also recommended that the process should not emphasize financing as lenders do not make firm commitments to bidders prior to a bid being accepted. It was suggested that the amount of bid security should vary with the project size and phase of development, and that the contracts for differences format should be refined to allow participants to propose parameters. Issues concerning audit procedures and performance deviations were reviewed. It was suggested that contract terms should be compatible with gas markets. It was also suggested that the OPA should adopt a more simplified approach to co-generation proposals, where proponents can specify amounts of energy and required prices. The adoption of the Swiss challenge approach of allowing other vendors an opportunity to match or beat terms on an offer was recommended. It was suggested that renewables should be acquired through a targeted and volume limited standard-offer process to be set yearly. Conservation and demand management recommendations were also presented. It was suggested that the OPA should serve as a facilitator of clean development mechanism (CDM) programs. It was

  16. The Role of Private Stakeholders in Disaster and Humanitarian Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharcisio Cotta Fontainha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of private stakeholders in disaster operations goes far beyond the delivery of profits to its shareholders. Disasters and humanitarian operations literature acknowledges the importance of private sector in disaster lifecycle; however, it lacks an analysis of the risks and benefits of each different form of their engagement in such operations (contractual relationships, one-off relationships and CSR - Corporate Social Responsibility partnerships. To address this research gap, a literature review was conducted on papers covering the perspective of private stakeholders when engaging in disaster and humanitarian operations with stakeholders from public and social groups. The results revealed that some challenges are specific from one approach and others are common for all of them. Moreover, despite the increasing of reputation capital and organizational learning being used to motivate CSR approach, they are mentioned as benefits in approaches with lower engagement - contractual and one-off relationship approaches. Thus, the benefits and risks of each approach need to be carefully addressed by scholars and field professionals in order to seek better results from the engagement of private organizations.

  17. Stakeholder views addressing the development and uptake of powered wheelchair assistive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillham, Michael; Pepper, Matthew; Kelly, Steve; Howells, Gareth

    2017-12-14

    The objective of this research is to identify stakeholder views with regard to the development of effective powered wheelchair assistive technologies more suited to the user and carer needs, whilst also meeting the requirements for other stakeholders, such that developers can be better guided towards producing solutions which have a better chance of getting to the market place and hence to the end user. A questionnaire was designed to collect the views of all stakeholders and circulated to a statistically representative number of them. The question rating data were then checked for correlation between groups, and within groups, to establish validity. The 74 stakeholders across the eight classes who responded had a good correlation between each other, with a cross class "Pearson's correlation" ranging between 0.7 and 0.95, and the "Fleiss's Kappa reliability of agreement" within each class ranging between 0.07 and 0.36. This research has identified that all stakeholders should be involved in the development of the technology and that some may benefit in 'role-reversal' to help understand user problems and stakeholder concerns more clearly. Cost was a significant barrier to the uptake of appropriate technology, and training of users and carers was a major issue. Furthermore, development should not increase user isolation and the impact on the user must be monitored for 'quality of life'. Technical support and training should be given to the user and their carers, and equipment must be adaptive to meet the changing needs of the user. Implications for Rehabilitation Improved acceptance and use of technology by the user and their carers. Reduced rejection of appropriate provision. Improved mobility and interaction with others. Improved quality of life for users and carers.

  18. Ethical theory and stakeholder-related decisions: The role of stakeholder culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M. Jones; W.A. Felps (William); G. Bigley

    2007-01-01

    textabstractWe use convergent elements of major ethical theories to create a typology of corporate stakeholder cultures—the aspects of organizational culture consisting of the beliefs, values, and practices that have evolved for solving problems and otherwise managing stakeholder relationships. We

  19. Views from stakeholders regarding stakeholder involvement and their own role - Views from Operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baecker, Axel

    2006-01-01

    The German unification caused enormous economic and social impacts on the previous East German state. The nuclear power plant complex in Greifswald and the surrounding region was no exception. Energiewerke Nord GmbH (EWN) as owner of the NPP site in Greifswald must stop the operation of all fife operating 440 MW units with Russian type rectors and also all construction works on the other three NPP units and the decision was taken to decommission all plants, mainly due to a lack of political acceptance and secured financial basis. Thus, EWN was faced with a formidable task, virtually from one day to another, to close down and decommission a major nuclear site under the mentioned boundary conditions. Initially, difficulties were caused by massive personnel reductions (from around 4900 operational and 8000 construction staff to just 1200 employees), in combination with the introduction of a market economy and West German laws and procedures. In a closed co-operation with all stakeholders EWN has now reached an optimal size for its decommissioning tasks as well as for the future industrial use of the former NPP site

  20. role of stakeholders at cape coast ppag youth centre

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elizabeth

    They also knew that film and talk shows, were used to educate the .... stakeholders or through the various mass media to educate the .... be empathic understanding on the part of the stakeholders to resolve the ... Communication Programmes.

  1. The role of Stakeholders on implementing Universal Services in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do Manh, Thai; Falch, Morten; Williams, Idongesit

    2015-01-01

    This paper looks at the universal services policy in Vietnam (interval 2005-2010) via analysing stakeholders in order to clarify how they exerted influence and how they implemented the policy. The stakeholder theory is employed to identify and categorize the stakeholders who participated in perfo......This paper looks at the universal services policy in Vietnam (interval 2005-2010) via analysing stakeholders in order to clarify how they exerted influence and how they implemented the policy. The stakeholder theory is employed to identify and categorize the stakeholders who participated...... in performing the policy. The authors are to examine the stakeholders such as the national government, international organizations, policy intermediaries, companies, and customers/citizens via applying the qualitative method to gather data and analyse the secondary document. The qualitative approach...... of interviews on some officials was also conducted. The results demonstrate that stakeholders had a huge impact on the success of the universal service policy....

  2. The Role of Stakeholders in Cultural Entrepreneurship Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemite Ieva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The skills and knowledge of the owners and employees of cultural enterprises on economic use of financial resources do not guarantee valuable artistic results. Therefore, a substantiated question has arisen: how to evaluate management in enterprises with bad financial ratios and outstanding artistic indicators. The existing definitions of cultural management (Aageson, 2008; Hagoort, 2007; Klamer, 1999; Stam, 2006; Nordman, 2003 also do not provide precise suggestions for determining the most important indicators in the evaluation of cultural management. The question is how to evaluate management in cultural entrepreneurship by determining the most important indicators for a cultural enterprise’s performance improvement. In order to define the goal of the stakeholders’ (artists, clients, media, arts scholars, third parties providing funds, cooperation partners engagement, it is necessary to analyse the area of an enterprise’s activities, and in what way and by what kind of activities it is possible to engage the stakeholders. During the course of empirical research, it is planned to disclose, analyse and interpret the subjective reasons of pursuit. Although a numerical evaluation of stakeholders was obtained during the research and data analysis performed by Spearman’s rho correlation calculations, the obtained results during the interpretation have not been generalised. The research results reveal the role of the cultural enterprise’s stakeholders’ engagement in the evaluation of management, point to the importance of the goals’ analysis as well as the analysis of each stakeholder’s engagement, and define the criteria for evaluating the activities in cultural entrepreneurship.

  3. ENHANCING THE ROLE OF STAKEHOLDERS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF UPSTREAM CILIWUNG WATERSHED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iis Alviya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stakeholders have a ver y important role interm of the management of upstream watershed. Thus, the common understanding on the existence and role of stakeholders is an important factor in order to achieve good governance of watershed management, leading to the attainment of environmental, social and economic benefits. This paper aims to analyse the role, interests, and cooperation among stakeholders and its relationship with the condition of upper Ciliwung watershed. Stakeholder analysis was used in this study to identify stakeholders, to categorize them, and to investigate the relationship between stakeholders. The analysis showed the lack of cooperation among stakeholders both between key stakeholders with primar y stakeholders. This resulted in lack of communities' understanding on the benefits and the importance of conservation activities in the upstream Ciliwung watershed. Meanwhile, the cooperation between key stakeholders and supporting stakeholders, especially the providers of funds, was relatively better/stronger. This can be seen from a better management of inter-agency cooperation in the upstream Ciliwung watershed, although the effort was tend to be project-oriented. Therefore, communication forum need to be established, to taking role for synchronizing , collaborating and coordinating stakeholders' efforts, so that the management programs of upstream Ciliwung watershed can be integrated.

  4. Stakeholders in nursing education: their role and involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgolesi, M; Marchetti, A; Piredda, M; Pulimeno, A M L; Rocco, G; Stievano, A; De Marinis, M G

    2014-01-01

    In literature, there is evidence that all stakeholders need to be involved in the curricula building process to make sure that health professionals are "educated" to meet the stakeholders' "demands". In Italy, the involvement of stakeholders in the definition of university curricula is ratified by various regulations. To describe the major experiences of stakeholder involvement in nursing education, identify the main stakeholders for nursing education, and the processes in which they are involved. The search strategy included an electronic exploration of the relevant databases. The search terms were: Stakeholders, Curriculum, Nursing Education combined with Boolean operators. The references of the retrieved articles were hand searched for additional related studies. Most of the studies identified were from the United Kingdom, Australia, and the USA. In Italy, no relevant studies were found. The most frequently identified stakeholders were: students, clinicians, educators, nurse managers. They were mainly involved during profound changes in the curricula and the implementation of new educational approaches. Stakeholders are mostly involved in countries with a private funding system for universities. Such funding systems have probably developed in the academia a greater propensity to involve stakeholders, to provide recognition of success when starting new programs, and are perceived more as marketing research. This seems contrary to the spirit of the Italian and European regulatory interventions, which instead, provide a structured commitment to consolidating and expanding the collaboration among universities, users, and the world of labor. This latter collaboration should facilitate internship activities, lifelong learning, and employability of the newly-graduated professionals.

  5. Strengthening stakeholder involvement in health workforce governance: why we need to talk about power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Ellen; Burau, Viola

    2018-01-01

    There is now widespread agreement on the benefits of an integrated, people-centred health workforce, but the implementation of new models is difficult. We argue that we need to think about stakeholders and power, if we want to ensure change in the health workforce. We discuss these issues from a governance perspective and suggest a critical approach to stakeholder involvement as an indicator of good governance. Three models of involving stakeholders in health workforce governance can be identified: corporatist professional involvement either in a continental European model of conservative corporatism or in a Nordic model of public corporatism; managerialist and market-centred involvement of professions as organizational agents; and a more inclusive, network-based involvement of plural professional experts at different levels of governance. The power relations embedded in these models of stakeholder involvement have different effects on capacity building for an integrated health workforce.

  6. Multi-Stakeholder Aid to Education: Power in the Context of Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menashy, Francine

    2018-01-01

    This study examines power asymmetries within the largest multi-stakeholder agency in the education sector: the Global Partnership for Education (GPE). Drawing from data collected through key informant interviews and document analyses, this research asks if the establishment of the GPE has altered power arrangements in educational aid. The study…

  7. Space Nuclear Power Public and Stakeholder Risk Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Sandra M.; Sklar, Maria

    2005-01-01

    The 1986 Challenger accident coupled with the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident increased public concern about the safety of spacecraft using nuclear technology. While three nuclear powered spacecraft had been launched before 1986 with little public interest, future nuclear powered missions would see significantly more public concern and require NASA to increase its efforts to communicate mission risks to the public. In 1987 a separate risk communication area within the Launch Approval Planning Group of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory was created to address public concern about the health, environmental, and safety risks of NASA missions. The lessons learned from the risk communication strategies developed for the nuclear powered Galileo, Ulysses, and Cassini missions are reviewed in this paper and recommendations are given as to how these lessons can be applied to future NASA missions that may use nuclear power systems and other potentially controversial NASA missions.

  8. Stakeholder involvement in the decommissioning of Trojan and Maine Yankee nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, Bruce A.; Orlando, Dominick A.

    2006-01-01

    Trojan Nuclear Plant (Trojan) and Maine Yankee Nuclear Plant (Maine Yankee) were the first two power reactors to complete decommissioning under the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) License Termination Rule (LTR), 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E. The respective owners' decisions to decommission the sites resulted in different approaches to both the physical aspects of the decommissioning, and the approach for obtaining approval for completing the decommissioning in accordance with regulations. Being in different States, the two single-unit pressurized water reactor sites had different State requirements and levels of public interest that impacted the decommissioning approaches. This resulted in significant differences in the decommissioning planning, the conduct of decommissioning operations, the volume of low-level radioactive waste, and the final status survey (FSS) program. While both licensees have Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations (ISFSIs), Trojan obtained a separate license for the ISFSI in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR Part 72 and terminated its 10 CFR Part 50 license. Maine Yankee elected to reduce the 10 CFR Part 50 license to only the requirements for the ISFSI. While the NRC regulations are flexible and allow different approaches to ISFSI licensing, there are separate licensing requirements that must be addressed. In 10 CFR 50.82, the NRC mandates public participation in the decommissioning process. For Maine Yankee, stakeholder and public input resulted in the licensee entering into an agreement with a citizen group and resulted in State legislation that lowered the dose limit below the NRC radiological criteria of 0.25 milli-Sievert/year (mSv/yr) (25 mrem/yr) in 10 CFR 20.1402 for unrestricted use. The lowering of the radiological criteria resulted in a significant dose modeling effort using site-specific Derived Concentrations Guideline Levels (DCGLs) that were well below the NRC DCGL screening values. This contributed to

  9. Perspectives on the role of stakeholders in knowledge translation in health policy development in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabyonga Orem, Juliet; Marchal, Bruno; Mafigiri, DavidKaawa; Ssengooba, Freddie; Macq, Jean; Da Silveira, Valeria Campos; Criel, Bart

    2013-08-19

    Stakeholder roles in the application of evidence are influenced by context, the nature of the evidence, the policy development process, and stakeholder interactions. Past research has highlighted the role of stakeholders in knowledge translation (KT) without paying adequate attention to the peculiarities of low-income countries. Here we identify the roles, relations, and interactions among the key stakeholders involved in KT in Uganda and the challenges that they face. This study employed qualitative approaches to examine the roles of and links among various stakeholders in KT. In-depth interviews were conducted with 21 key informants and focused on the key actors in KT, their perceived roles, and challenges. Major stakeholders included civil society organizations with perceived roles of advocacy, community mobilization, and implementation. These stakeholders may ignore unconvincing evidence. The community's role was perceived as advocacy and participation in setting research priorities. The key role of the media was perceived as knowledge dissemination, but respondents noted that the media may misrepresent evidence if it is received in a poorly packaged form. The perceived roles of policy makers were evidence uptake, establishing platforms for KT and stewardship; negative roles included ignoring or even misrepresenting evidence that is not in their favor. The roles of parliamentarians were perceived as advocacy and community mobilization, but they were noted to pursue objectives that may not be supported by the evidence. The researchers' main role was defined as evidence generation, but focusing disproportionately on academic interests was cited as a concern. The donors' main role was defined as funding research and KT, but respondents were concerned about the local relevance of donor-supported research. Respondents reported that links among stakeholders were weak due to the absence of institutionalized, inclusive platforms. Challenges facing the stakeholders in

  10. Stakeholders' roles and responsibilities regarding quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huotari, Päivi; Havrdová, Zuzana

    2016-10-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe how different stakeholders (society, managers, employees and clients) can together ensure the quality of care. Design/methodology/approach Qualitative data were collected from four focus group interviews conducted in three countries. All interviewees were pursuing a master's degree in social and/or health care management and had begun working in their field after completing their bachelor's degree. The data were analysed using inductive content analysis. Findings The society and managers are responsible for the care system as a whole and must apply system-oriented, rather than sector-oriented, thinking. Employees are responsible for ensuring the continuity of client services in their work, and managers and employees share the responsibility of achieving the organisational goals and quality standards. The clients are responsible for acting as responsible service users and providing the required information to obtain care. Communication was strongly emphasised in the data, and it necessitates cross-professional and organisational boundaries, professional and political boundaries, as well as boundaries between the professional and the client. Research limitations/implications Since the interviewees were all pursuing a master's degree in social and/or health care management, when reflecting on their work experience, they may have also been reflecting what they had learned in university. Practical implications This study emphasises the importance of collaboration and communication between stakeholders in ensuring the quality of care. Unpredictable economies, the ageing population and the ongoing integration and reorganisation of health and social care services in Europe highlight systematic and strategic approach in quality of care. Originality/value This paper claims that communication between different care stakeholders gives a more systematic and coherent framework for the quality of care. Quality of care is a

  11. The role of stakeholder involvement in risk communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renn, O.

    2004-01-01

    Inviting stakeholders to be part of the decision making process in risk analysis and management improves the likelihood that the resulting decision will be accepted. Unfortunately, early public involvement may compromise, however, the objective of efficient and effective risk reduction or violate the principle of fairness. Another problem is that the public consists of many groups with different value structures and preferences. Without a systematic procedure to reach consensus on values and preferences, the public's position often appears as unclear. Participatory processes are thus needed that combine technical expertise, rational decision making, and public values and preferences. The recent report by the National Academy of Sciences encourages risk professionals to foster citizen participation and public involvement in risk management. The report emphasizes the need for a combination of assessment and dialogue which the authors have framed the 'analytic-deliberative' approach. The popularity associated with the concepts of two-way-communication, trust-building, and citizen participation, however, obscures the challenge of how to put these noble goals into practice and how to ensure that risk management reflects competence, efficiency, and fair burden sharing. This paper discusses the potential and requirements for stakeholder participation in the field of risk management and communication. (orig.)

  12. Dealing with distrust and power dynamics: asymmetric relations among stakeholders in responsive evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baur, V.E.; van Elteren, A.H.G.; Nierse, C.J.; Abma, T.A.

    2010-01-01

    Asymmetric relations among stakeholders create challenges in participatory evaluation processes. Power and conflict may hinder equal and genuine communication about the value of the practices evaluated. Guidelines to deal with these sociopolitical challenges are scarce and usually focus on the need

  13. Towards sustainable biotechnology innovation in Africa: The roles of stakeholders in local contexts

    OpenAIRE

    Roelofs, Caspar

    2015-01-01

    Aim To contribute to sustainable crop-biotechnology innovation in African contexts by operationalizing guiding concepts from Science, Technology and Society (STS) studies. Objectives To explore the roles of different stakeholders in crop-biotechnology innovation processes in Africa; To explore how local contexts shape crop-biotechnology differently; To explore how crop-biotechnology shapes different contexts differently; To make policy recommendations on stakeholder involvement in decision-ma...

  14. The Role of Stakeholders in the Decommissioning of Salaspils Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramenkovs, A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes the role of different stakeholders in the decommissioning of the Salaspils Research Reactor. Decommissioning was a large challenge for the Latvia, since the country in this moment had no decommissioning experience and necessary technologies for the implementation of the defined goals by the Government. In this case for facilitation of the decommissioning of Salaspils Research Reactor (SRR), the significant role plays the local and international stakeholders. The paper deals with information on the basic stages of decommissioning of SRR and the role of the wide spectrum of stakeholders in preparation, upgrade and implementation of the decommissioning plan. The role of governmental institutions in the decommissioning of Salaspils research reactor is discussed. It was shown, that local municipalities are very important stakeholders, which significantly influence the decommissioning of SRR. The Salaspils municipalities positive impact on the decommissioning processes are discussed. Basic problems with the Baldone municipality in context of radioactive wastes management are indicated. The role of international stakeholders in decommissioning of Salaspils research reactor is discussed. It was shown, that the support from International Atomic Energy Agency significantly promotes the decommissioning of SRR. The main issues were expert support for solution of different technical problems in radioactive wastes management, area monitoring, and verification of decommissioning plans, training of staff and technical expertise during whole process of decommissioning. It was shown, that technical and economical support from DOE, USA provides the possibility to solve the fuel problem during decommissioning of SRR, as well as, to increase the physical safety of SRR and repository 'Radons'. It was shown, that a proper coordination of all activities and using the services from stakeholders can significantly reduce the total project expenses. The cooperation between

  15. Complicity Revisited: Balancing Stakeholder Input and Roles in Evaluation Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturges, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on a qualitative study of an educational reform and its external evaluation, I describe how a well-intentioned but poorly conceptualized evaluation helped perpetuate asymmetries in the generation and use of evaluation findings. This article explores this project's failure to clarify evaluator roles, identify intended users and expected…

  16. Incorporating Role of Stakeholders into Corporate CSR Strategy For Sustainable Growth: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanggamani Vani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In today’s modern day context, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR become the mantra for businesses as it can be seen as a strategic approach for firms to be succeed in their business endeavours. Hence, it remains the most widely used concept to refer to organizational- stakeholder relationships. An understanding about a stakeholder approach to CSR is an important means for a firm to enhance their commitment to operate in an economically, socially and environmentally sustainable manner. In support with above arguments, this article presents a theoretical proposition based on stakeholder theory for better CSR and firm performance. By drawing upon classic work in the field, the paper offers conceptual discussion and then systematically develops a means of stakeholder approach into corporate CSR strategy. The aim of this paper is to demonstrates the need for a firm to enhance further understanding about the role of stakeholders in the context of corporate CSR strategy, which is increasingly necessary in view of the fact that business entities are absolutely essential for economic development, but at the same time, their business activities pose a huge impact to society and the environment. Thus, firm's CSR disclosure is a pivotal tool to establish a relationship of working together with the stakeholders that ensures mutual benefit and continue to be a firm that is needed by society. This article contributes to the literature by providing a fundamental explanation of how a business should embrace responsibility for the impact of its activities on the stakeholders across various levels of the value chain. By doing so, firms are offered a means to take a much more proactive approach to CSR through the stakeholder approach which is precisely helpful in measuring the effectiveness of any CSR initiative on the society to foster business sustainability.

  17. 75 FR 41858 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Southwest Power Pool ICT Stakeholder Policy Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Southwest Power Pool ICT Stakeholder Policy Committee Meeting July 12, 2010. The Federal Energy Regulatory... is part of the Commission's ongoing outreach efforts. ICT Stakeholder Policy Committee Meeting July...

  18. Towards sustainable biotechnology innovation in Africa : The roles of stakeholders in local contexts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Caspar

    2015-01-01

    Aim To contribute to sustainable crop-biotechnology innovation in African contexts by operationalizing guiding concepts from Science, Technology and Society (STS) studies. Objectives To explore the roles of different stakeholders in crop-biotechnology innovation processes in Africa; To explore how

  19. Role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eklund, S.

    1982-01-01

    A survey of world nuclear installations, the operating experiences of power reactors, and estimates of future nuclear growth leads to the conclusion that nuclear power's share of world electric power supply will grow slowly, but steadily during this decade. This growth will lead advanced countries to use the commercial breeder by the end of the century. Nuclear power is economically viable for most industrialized and many developing countries if public acceptance problems can be resolved. A restructuring of operational safety and regulations must occur first, as well as a resolution of the safeguards and technology transfer issue. 7 figures, 7 tables

  20. The Changing Role of External Stakeholders: From Imaginary Friends to Effective Actors or Non-Interfering Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, António; Veiga, Amélia; Amaral, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    Recent shifts in university governance have relied on increased autonomy. Within this context, the enhanced role attributed to governance boards at the expense of academic bodies and the role of external stakeholders has gained momentum. With the aim of understanding the extent of the influence of external stakeholders at the institutional level,…

  1. Competing Structure, Competing Views: The Role of Formal and Informal Social Structures in Shaping Stakeholder Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Prell

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available What is social structure, and how does it influence the views and behaviors of land managers? In this paper, we unpack the term "social structure" in the context of current research on institutions, social networks, and their role(s in resource management. We identify two different kinds of structure, formal and informal, and explore how these link to views of land management and management practice. Formal structures refer to intentionally designed organizations that arise out of larger institutional arrangements; informal ones refer to social networks, based on the communication contacts individuals possess. Our findings show significant correlations between respondents' views regarding land management and their social networks; it is these informal structures that have greater influence on what stakeholders perceive. These findings suggest that stakeholders are less influenced by their particular organizational affiliation or category (e.g., "conservationist" versus "farmer", and more by whom they speak with on a regular basis regarding land management. We conclude with a discussion on the practical implications for resource managers wishing to "design" participatory management, arguing that, if "diversity" is the goal in designing such participatory processes, then diversity needs to translate beyond stakeholder categories to include consideration for the personal, social networks surrounding stakeholders.

  2. External Stakeholders' Roles and Factors Influencing Their Participation in Developing Generic Skills for Students in Vietnamese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghia, Tran Le Huu

    2018-01-01

    External stakeholders have increasingly participated in instructional and training activities in higher education; however, their contribution has not yet been adequately documented, especially in non-Western university contexts. This article reports a study that examined external stakeholders' roles and factors influencing their participation in…

  3. Contrasting the core beliefs regarding the effective implementation of wind power: an international study of stakeholder perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolsink, M.; Breukers, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses patterns in beliefs about the implementation of wind power as part of a geographical comparison of onshore wind power developments in the Netherlands, North-Rhine Westphalia and England. Q methodology is applied, in order to systematically compare the patterns in stakeholder

  4. Evaluation of the Role of Public Outreach and Stakeholder Engagement in Stormwater Funding Decisions in New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    A detailed report examining the role of public outreach and stakeholder engagement in stormwater funding decisions based on the experiences of eleven small and medium-sized communities in New England.

  5. The Impact of Stakeholders' Roles within the Livestock Industry on Their Attitudes to Livestock Welfare in Southeast and East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Michelle; Zito, Sarah; Phillips, Clive J C

    2017-01-25

    Stakeholders in the livestock industry are in a position to make critical choices that directly impact on animal welfare during slaughter and transport. Understanding the attitudes of stakeholders in livestock-importing countries, including factors that motivate the stakeholders to improve animal welfare, can lead to improved trade relations with exporting developed countries and improved animal welfare initiatives in the importing countries. Improving stakeholder attitudes to livestock welfare may help to facilitate the better welfare that is increasingly demanded by the public for livestock. Knowledge of the existing attitudes towards the welfare of livestock during transport and slaughter provides a starting point that may help to target efforts. This study aimed to investigate the animal welfare attitudes of livestock stakeholders (farmers, team leaders, veterinarians, business owners, business managers, and those working directly with animals) in selected countries in E and SE Asia (China, Thailand, Viet Nam, and Malaysia). The factors that motivated them to improve animal welfare (in particular their religion, knowledge levels, monetary gain, the availability of tools and resources, more pressing community issues, and the approval of their supervisor and peers) were assessed for their relationships to stakeholder role and ranked according to their importance. Stakeholder roles influenced attitudes to animal welfare during livestock transport and slaughter. Farmers were more motivated by their peers compared to other stakeholders. Business owners reported higher levels of motivation from monetary gain, while business managers were mainly motivated by what was prescribed by the company for which they worked. Veterinarians reported the highest levels of perceived approval for improving animal welfare, and all stakeholder groups were least likely to be encouraged to change by a 'western' international organization. This study demonstrates the differences in

  6. Power and Agenda-Setting in Tanzanian Health Policy: An Analysis of Stakeholder Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Sara Elisa; Strandberg-Larsen, Martin

    2016-02-09

    Global health policy is created largely through a collaborative process between development agencies and aid-recipient governments, yet it remains unclear whether governments retain ownership over the creation of policy in their own countries. An assessment of the power structure in this relationship and its influence over agenda-setting is thus the first step towards understanding where progress is still needed in policy-making for development. This study employed qualitative policy analysis methodology to examine how health-related policy agendas are adopted in low-income countries, using Tanzania as a case study. Semi-structured, in-depth, key informant interviews with 11 policy-makers were conducted on perspectives of the agenda-setting process and its actors. Kingdon's stream theory was chosen as the lens through which to interpret the data analysis. This study demonstrates that while stakeholders each have ways of influencing the process, the power to do so can be assessed based on three major factors: financial incentives, technical expertise, and influential position. Since donors often have two or all of these elements simultaneously a natural power imbalance ensues, whereby donor interests tend to prevail over recipient government limitations in prioritization of agendas. One way to mediate these imbalances seems to be the initiation of meaningful policy dialogue. In Tanzania, the agenda-setting process operates within a complex network of factors that interact until a "policy window" opens and a decision is made. Power in this process often lies not with the Tanzanian government but with the donors, and the contrast between latent presence and deliberate use of this power seems to be based on the donor ideology behind giving aid (defined here by funding modality). Donors who used pooled funding (PF) modalities were less likely to exploit their inherent power, whereas those who preferred to maintain maximum control over the aid they provided (ie, non

  7. Pharmacy clients' attitudes to expanded pharmacist prescribing and the role of agency theory on involved stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoti, Kreshnik; Hughes, Jeffery; Sunderland, Bruce

    2011-02-01

    To examine the views of regular pharmacy clients on pharmacist prescribing and employ agency theory in considering the relationship between the stakeholders involved. Computer assisted telephone interviews were conducted with 400 pharmacy clients recruited around Australia. Potential respondents were identified using a random number generation function in Microsoft Excel. Data were analysed with SPSS version 17 using one-way analysis of variance, principal component analysis and linear regression. The relationships between the main stakeholders involved were explored using agency theory. A total of 1153 answered calls recruited 400 consenting pharmacy clients. Most respondents (71%) trusted pharmacists adopting an expanded role in prescribing, however the majority (66%) supported this only after a diagnosis had been made by a doctor. Those who accepted pharmacist diagnosing and prescribing preferred that this was limited to pain management and antibiotics. Most respondents (64%) considered that expanded pharmacist prescribing would improve their access to prescription medicines, although those over 65 years of age were less supportive than younger respondents. Factors which contributed positively to clients' perception of trust in an expanded prescribing role for pharmacists were identified, and improved access to medicines was found to be the strongest predictor (P Agency theory would conceptualize the introduction of pharmacist prescribers, as disrupting the principal (patient) agent (doctor) relationship. Its introduction would best be facilitated by careful change management. © 2011 The Authors. IJPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  8. 75 FR 63168 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Southwest Power Pool ICT Stakeholder Policy Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Southwest Power Pool ICT Stakeholder Policy Committee Meeting and the Entergy Regional State Committee... members of its staff may attend the meetings noted below. Their attendance is part of the Commission's...

  9. 75 FR 23262 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Southwest Power Pool ICT Stakeholder Policy Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Southwest Power Pool ICT Stakeholder Policy Committee Meeting and the Entergy Regional State Committee... staff may attend the meetings noted below. Their attendance is part of the Commission's ongoing outreach...

  10. Investigating the role of Clinical Nurse Consultants in one health district from multiple stakeholder perspectives: a cooperative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kenneth; Bothe, Janine; Edgar, Denise; Beaven, Geraldine; Burgess, Bernadette; Dickson, Vhari; Dunn, Stephen; Horning, Lynda; Jensen, Janice; Kandl, Bronia; Nonu, Miriam; Owen, Fran; Moss, Cheryle

    2015-01-01

    The impetus for this research came from a group of 11 Clinical Nurse Consultants (CNCs) within a health service in NSW, Australia, who wanted to investigate the CNC role from multiple stakeholder perspectives. With support from academic researchers, the CNCs designed and implemented the study. The aim of this research project was to investigate the role of the CNC from the multiple perspectives of CNCs and other stakeholders who work with CNCs in the Health District. This was a co-operative inquiry that utilised qualitative descriptive research approach. Co-operative inquiry methods enabled 11 CNCs to work as co-researchers and to conduct the investigation. The co-researchers implemented a qualitative descriptive design for the research and used interviews (7) and focus groups (16) with CNC stakeholders (n = 103) to gather sufficient data to investigate the role of the CNC in the organisation. Thematic analysis was undertaken to obtain the results. The CNC role is invaluable to all stakeholders and it was seen as the "glue" which holds teams together. Stakeholder expectations of the CNC role were multiple and generally agreed. Five themes derived from the data are reported as "clinical leadership as core", "making a direct difference to patient care", "service development as an outcome", "role breadth or narrowness and boundaries", and "career development". There was clear appreciation of the work that CNCs do in their roles, and the part that the CNC role plays in achieving quality health outcomes. The role of the CNC is complex and the CNCs themselves often negotiate these complexities to ensure beneficial outcomes for the patient and organisation. For the wider audience this study has given further insights into the role of these nurses and the perspectives of those with whom they work.

  11. The clinical role of lecturers in nursing in Ireland: perceptions from key stakeholder groups in nurse education on the role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskell, Pauline; Murphy, Kathleen; Shaw, David

    2009-10-01

    The clinical role of lecturers in nursing has been a focus of debate since the integration of nurse education into higher education institutions. The purpose of this paper is to report the findings from the preliminary phase of a study, undertaken to investigate the perceptions of key stakeholder groups in nurse education, regarding the current clinical role of nurse lecturers in Ireland. A descriptive exploratory design was used involving focus group and individual interviews, soliciting views of purposefully selected educationalists, clinicians, policy formulators and students. The issue was examined from a policy perspective, aiming to collectively represent views of all participant groups. This approach facilitated a more complete picture of perceptions of the role to emerge, to better inform future decision making. Twenty two focus group interviews and twenty one individual interviews were conducted. Content analysis was used to identify themes. All groups were in agreement that role definition was urgently required to dispel ambiguities surrounding what the clinical role should involve. Conflicting views were evident among groups regarding lecturers' clinical credibility, visibility and teaching effectiveness. Findings highlight the essential nature of nurse lecturers engaging with clinical areas to maintain their skills, demonstrate a value for the practice component of the role and provide a link between education and practice.

  12. Value-Driven Population Health: An Emerging Focus for Improving Stakeholder Role Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Harris; Burton, Wayne N; Fabius, Raymond

    2017-12-01

    Health and health care in the United States are being jeopardized by top-end spending whose share of the gross domestic product continues to increase even as aggregate health outcomes remain mediocre. This paper focuses on a new approach for improving stakeholder role performance in the marketplace, value-driven population health (VDPH SM ). Devoted to maximizing the value of every dollar spent on population health, VDPH holds much promise for ameliorating this dilemma and exerting a constructive influence on the reshaping of the Affordable Care Act. This paper introduces VDPH and differentiates the science underlying it from the management that serves to make good on its potential. To highlight what VDPH brings to the table, comparisons are made with 3 like-minded approaches to health reform. Next, 2 areas are highlighted, workplace wellness and the quality and cost of health care, where without necessarily being recognized as such, VDPH has gained real traction among 2 groups: leading employers and, more recently, leading providers. Key findings with respect to workplace wellness are assessed in terms of psychometric performance to evaluate workplace wellness and to point out how VDPH can help direct future employer initiatives toward firmer scientific footing. Then, insights gleaned from the employer experience are applied to illustrate how VDPH can help guide future provider efforts to build on the model developed. This paper concludes with a framework for the use of VDPH by each of 5 stakeholder groups. The discussion centers on how VDPH transcends and differentiates these groups. Implications for health reform in the recently altered political landscape are explored.

  13. Stakeholder Analysis Worksheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakeholder Analysis WorksheetA worksheet that can be used to document potential stakeholder groups, the information or expertise they hold, the role that they can play, their interests or concerns about the HIA

  14. Key challenges of offshore wind power: Three essays addressing public acceptance, stakeholder conflict, and wildlife impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Alison Waterbury

    energy. Areas that are highly valuable to the fishing industry are determined by examining fishing effort in three high-value fishing sectors (sea scallops, clam fisheries, and high-value mobile fisheries). Ultimately, the results identify locations where the industries are conflicting and where they are compatible. This quantitative analysis of the potential tradeoffs between the commercial fishing industry and offshore wind development benefits wind developers, states, and federal regulators by helping advance offshore wind power to meet national priorities. Finally, the third essay addresses wildlife impacts through a comprehensive review of the impacts to marine mammals and the regulatory context to manage these impacts. Regulators, scientists, and stakeholders are interested in the potential impacts from pre-construction surveys, turbine installation, operation and maintenance, and decommissioning of offshore wind sites. This article reviews both commissioned reports and peer-reviewed literature to provide a comprehensive overview of the expected impacts of offshore wind energy to marine mammals. Impacts include noise, which is generated during three stages of development: investigation/construction, operation, and decommissioning. Additional potential effects arise from electromagnetic fields, changes in prey abundance and distribution, and the creation of artificial reefs and 'de-facto' marine protected areas. Because offshore wind power may also deliver substantial long-term benefits to wildlife and humans in the form of reduced CO2 emissions, implementation of mitigation measures to reduce negative impacts to marine mammals may be a plausible option to help this industry advance. An overview of mitigation options is reviewed, as well as the legal framework protecting marine mammals from anthropogenic impacts. Finally, the essay makes several recommendations where government and wind developers can improve research and regulatory processes to increase efficiency

  15. Providing Quality Therapeutics in Switzerland: Role of the Stakeholders and Recent Incentives for Further Improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Marie; Samer, Caroline; Rollason, Victoria; Dayer, Pierre; Desmeules, Jules

    2015-07-01

    Quality therapeutics play an important role in Switzerland's health care and economy. Switzerland holds a key position in the world of research and development, as well as in drug production. Recently, new emphasis has been placed on promoting clinical research and maintaining Switzerland's position as a center of excellence in the field. Recent revisions to the law regarding medical trials in human research allow for better allocation of regulatory resources and simplified procedures for drugs already authorized in Switzerland. The country has its own regulatory agency, the Swiss Agency for Therapeutic Products (Swissmedic), which is a public institution of the Swiss government. Swissmedic is responsible for ensuring safety in medicines, particularly regarding authorizations and market surveillance in the sector of medicinal products and medical devices. Although the centralized authorization procedure of the European Union for medicines does not apply to Switzerland, there are mutual recognition mechanisms between the Swiss medicine regulatory authority and the European Medicines Agency. Swissmedic is also in charge of postmarketing safety and oversees the national pharmacovigilance center, which collaborates closely with the World Health Organization center in Uppsala. In addition, university hospital-based clinical pharmacologists, who are involved in basic science and clinical research, regulatory affairs, ethics committees, and pharmacovigilance, promote quality therapeutics. This article discusses the role of the various stakeholders and the recent efforts made to provide a better allocation of resources aimed at further improving quality therapeutics in Switzerland. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Energy Justice and the Stakeholders Involved: A Case Study of Solar Power in Rural Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romulus, Elijah Rey Asse

    This paper explores and analyzes energy justice and the stakeholders involved. Energy insecurity, specifically the lack of access to electricity effects over 1.3 billion people worldwide and energy justice is a way to address it. This paper is supported by a case study with data collected in the southern rural regions of Haiti regarding energy justice communities. Three cities were studied: Les Cayes, Anse-a-Veau, and Les Anglais. It examines how solar businesses can aid energy justice communities seeking access to electricity. Stakeholders such as the communities themselves, solar businesses, and nonprofits in the region are studied and analyzed. The paper concludes solar businesses are helping said communities but needs participation from other stakeholders to be successful. Finally, there are five recommendations to build capacity, develop infrastructure in the region, explore the possibility of solar cooperatives, strengthen the solar economy in Haiti, and demand reparations.

  17. Determining barriers to developing geothermal power generation in Japan: Societal acceptance by stakeholders involved in hot springs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Hiromi; Hondo, Hiroki; Hienuki, Shunichi; Kaieda, Hideshi

    2013-01-01

    After many years of stagnant growth in geothermal power generation, development plans for new geothermal plants have recently emerged throughout Japan. Through a literature review, we investigated the relationships between the principal barriers to geothermal development and we thereby analyzed the deciding factors in the future success of such enterprises. The results show that the societal acceptance of geothermal power by local stakeholders is the fundamental barrier as it affects almost all other barriers, such as financial, technical, and political risks. Thus, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 26 stakeholders including developers, hot spring inn managers, and local government officials. Some hot spring inn managers and local government officials noted that they have always been strongly concerned about the adverse effects of geothermal power generation on hot springs; their opposition has delayed decision-making by local governments regarding drilling permits, prolonged lead times, and caused other difficulties. A key reason for opposition was identified as uncertainty about the reversibility and predictability of the adverse effects on hot springs and other underground structures by geothermal power production and reinjection of hot water from reservoirs. Therefore, we discuss and recommend options for improving the risk management of hot springs near geothermal power plants. - Highlights: • We clarify relationships between barriers to geothermal power development in Japan. • Local acceptance by hot spring managers is the most prominent barrier. • Uncertainty of reversibility and predictability induces low acceptance. • Risk transfer system and dialogue are needed to alleviate concerns

  18. Reviewing the Role of Stakeholders in Operational Research: Opportunities for Group Model Building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooyert, V. de; Rouwette, E.A.J.A.; Kranenburg, H.L. van

    2013-01-01

    Stakeholders have always received much attention in system dynamics, especially in the group model building tradition, which emphasizes the deep involvement of a client group in building a system dynamics model. In organizations, stakeholders are gaining more and more attention by managers who try

  19. The moderating role of stakeholder pressure in the relationship between CSR practices and financial performance in a globalizing world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haleem, Fazli; Farooq, Sami; Boer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Studies based on the role of context and stakeholder pressures on the relationship between CSR practices and financial performance are few and inconclusive. Aimed at contributing to filling this gap, the paper is based on data collected in 2013 from the sixth round of the International Manufactur...

  20. Substitution treatment in the era of "recovery": An analysis of stakeholder roles and policy windows in Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Karen; Herring, Rachel; Thickett, Anthony; Thom, Betsy

    2013-08-01

    Based on documentary analyses and interviews with twenty key informants in 2012, this paper analyses the shift in British drugs policy towards "recovery" from the perspectives of major stakeholders. The processes involved in reopening the debate surrounding the role of substitution treatment and its re-emergence on to the policy agenda are examined. Drawing on Kingdon's work on agenda-setting, the ways in which methadone maintenance was challenged and defended by key stakeholders in the initial phase of policy development and the negotiation of a "recovery" focus as the organizing concept for British drugs policy are explored. Study limitations are noted.

  1. The role of primary care in adult weight management: qualitative interviews with key stakeholders in weight management services

    OpenAIRE

    Blane, David N.; Macdonald, Sara; Morrison, David; O’Donnell, Catherine A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Primary care has a key role to play in the prevention and management of obesity, but there remain barriers to engagement in weight management by primary care practitioners. The aim of this study was to explore the views of key stakeholders in adult weight management services on the role of primary care in adult weight management. Methods Qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews with nine senior dietitians involved in NHS weight management from seven Scottish health bo...

  2. Understanding stakeholders' attitudes toward water management interventions: Role of place meanings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Maarten H.; Buijs, Arjen E.

    2011-01-01

    Water resource managers increasingly need to take the opinions of stakeholders into account when planning interventions. We studied stakeholders' concerns in two water management planning contexts, focusing on the meanings assigned to places and on attitudes toward proposed interventions. Semistructured interviews were held, and public meetings were observed in order to collect data. Five categories of place meanings emerged from the analysis: beauty (esthetic judgments), functionality (ways of use), attachment (feelings of belonging), biodiversity (meanings pertaining to nature), and risk (worries about current or future events). These categories reflect the basic dimensions of sense of place. Our results suggest that stakeholders' attitudes toward proposed interventions are, to a great extent, derived from their place meanings. Discussing place meanings during participatory planning processes could contribute substantially to successful water management.

  3. Regulator's role in sustainability of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansal, Parikshat; Sinha, Soumen; Bhattacharya, Ramdas

    2015-01-01

    A development which is environmentally benign, economically viable as well socially acceptable is regarded as sustainable development. Nuclear power scores extremely well with the first two parameters: i.e its cost of production is competitive with that of other power sources and is considered a clean source of power as the greenhouse gas emissions and discharge of other hazardous pollutants are insignificant. However, when it comes to acceptability by the society at large, there are issues. Early shutting down of power plants like Superphénix at France, abandonment of Yucca mountain project, agitation during commissioning of KKNPP etc. are few examples where the public perception was the main reason for such actions. These events tell us about the importance of public perception in sustainability of a project or nuclear power as a whole. In this backdrop, the role of regulator to present the safety aspects in correct perspective assumes enormous significance and goes in a long way in clearing unwarranted apprehensions, thereby playing a pivotal role in sustainability of nuclear power. The nuclear regulator needs to build long lasting trust and confidence with stakeholders. Therefore it needs to be continuously in touch with public, not only during crisis but also during peace time, disseminating information on safe use of ionizing radiation and atomic energy without undue risk to the health of the people and environment. (author)

  4. Employee stakeholders' role in ensuring alignment between employee and organizational branding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Elisabeth Houe

    2014-01-01

    by Crane and Ruebottom (2012) may prove more relevant. Stakeholders may construe more than one identity - e.g. be both employees and customers. As Merkur is a sustainable bank and focuses on supporting sustainable businesses, CSR will be the branding issue of interest. Furthermore, studies have indicated...

  5. Stakeholder diversity and the comprehensiveness of sustainability decisions : the role of collaboration and conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curşeu, Petru Lucian; Schruijer, S.G.L.

    2017-01-01

    We review the literature (2007–2016) on the quality of sustainability decisions and we introduce an integrative conceptual framework that distinguishes between a beneficial and a detrimental path that explain the influence of stakeholder diversity on the comprehensiveness of sustainability

  6. A quick needs assessment of key stakeholder groups on the role of family medicine in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Sanders

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Zambia is a nation of nine million people, and has too few physicians to meet the country’s health needs. Following the strategy of other sub-Saharan countries, Zambia has developed a training programme in family medicine to help improve the medical competencies of its physician workforce. A needs assessment was undertaken to better understand the landscape into which Zambian family medicine is being placed. Methods. In 2014, a nine-question survey in Likert-scale format was developed, validated, and then delivered to four stakeholder groups: (i practicing clinical physicians, (ii the general public, (iii the University of Zambia’s School of Medicine’s academic faculty and (iv medical students. The needs assessment was delivered through several different mechanisms: via web-based service, to respondents’ email addresses; in paper form, to population samples of convenience; and verbally, through face-to-face encounters. Results. The number of stakeholders from each group who responded to the needs assessment were: clinical physicians, 27; general public, 15; academic faculty, 14; and medical students, 31. Five of the nine survey statements achieved super-majority consensus, with >66% of stakeholders in each group agreeing. Two additional statements achieved a simple-majority consensus with >50% agreement within each stakeholder group. Conclusion. This survey suggests that there is a broad-based a priori understanding of family medicine in Zambia, and general agreement that its presence would be valuable to Zambia’s healthcare system.

  7. How stakeholders frame dam removal: The role of current and anticipated future ecosystem service use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Kate; Adamowski, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Many river restoration projects, including dam removal, are controversial and can trigger conflicts between stakeholders who are for and against the proposed project. The study of environmental conflicts suggests that differences in how stakeholders 'frame', or make sense of a situation based on their prior knowledge and experiences, can perpetuate conflicts. Understanding different stakeholders' frames, particularly how they converge, can form the basis of successful conflict resolution. In the case of dam removals, it is often assumed that emphasising increased provision of ecosystem services can be a point of convergence between those advocating for ecological restoration and those opposed to removal because of negative human impacts. However, how exactly stakeholders frame a contentious proposed dam removal and how those frames relate to ecosystem services has been little studied. Here we used the case of a potential dam removal in New Brunswick to investigate how people frame the issue and how that relates to their current and anticipated future use of ecosystem services. Based on in-depth interviews with 30 stakeholders in the area, including both people for and against dam removal, we found that both groups currently used ecosystem services and were in favour of ecosystem protection. However, they differed in how they framed the issue of the potential dam removal. The group against dam removal framed the issue as one of loss and risk - they thought that any potential benefits to the ecosystem would be outweighed by the high risk of negative social impacts caused by a loss of access to ecosystem services, such as recreation and aesthetic enjoyment. By contrast, the group in favour of the dam framed the issue as one of opportunity and justice. They thought that following a short transition period, all stakeholders would benefit from the restored river, particularly from a restored salmon fishery, improved aesthetic appeal and the long-term sustainability of an

  8. Stakeholder Views of Nanosilver Linings: Macroethics Education and Automated Text Analysis Through Participatory Governance Role Play in a Workshop Format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Joshua; Stamets, Justin; Eggleson, Kathleen

    2017-06-01

    The Nanosilver Linings role play case offers participants first-person experience with interpersonal interaction in the context of the wicked problems of emerging technology macroethics. In the fictional scenario, diverse societal stakeholders convene at a town hall meeting to consider whether a nanotechnology-enabled food packaging industry should be offered incentives to establish an operation in their economically struggling Midwestern city. This original creative work was built with a combination of elements, selected for their established pedagogical efficacy (e.g. active learning, case-based learning) and as topical dimensions of the realistic scenario (e.g. nanosilver in food packaging, occupational safety and health). The product life cycle is used as a framework for integrated consideration of scientific, societal, and ethical issues. The Nanosilver Linings hypothetical case was delivered through the format of the 3-hour workshop Ethics when Biocomplexity meets Human Complexity, providing an immersive, holistic ethics learning experience for STEM graduate students. Through their participation in the Nanosilver Linings case and Ethics when Biocomplexity meets Human Complexity workshop, four cohorts of science and engineering doctoral students reported the achievement of specific learning objectives pertaining to a range of macroethics concepts and professional practices, including stakeholder perspectives, communication, human values, and ethical frameworks. Automated text analysis of workshop transcripts revealed differences in sentiment and in ethical framework (consequentialism/deontology) preference between societal stakeholder roles. These resources have been recognized as ethics education exemplars by the U.S. National Academy of Engineering .

  9. Why Stakeholder Engagement will not be Tweeted

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castello, Itziar; Etter, Michael

    social media (logic of community). With a longitudinal study of 26 months we find that managers are able to integrate symbolic and substantive elements of the new logic but elements of the conditions of authority and hierarchy remain unchanged constraining new forms of stakeholder engagement. We relate......We analyze the role of power transforming stakeholder engagement practices under the conditions of the network society. We look at how Global Health (pseudonym) managers navigate between two competing logics of stakeholder engagement: the current (influence logic) and the new logic underlying...

  10. Unleashing the power of human genetic variation knowledge: New Zealand stakeholder perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yulong; Warren, James Roy; Day, Karen Jean

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the challenges in using genetic information in health care and to identify opportunities for improvement. Taking a grounded theory approach, semistructured interviews were conducted with 48 participants to collect multiple stakeholder perspectives on genetic services in New Zealand. Three themes emerged from the data: (1) four service delivery models were identified in operation, including both those expected models involving genetic counselors and variations that do not route through the formal genetic service program; (2) multiple barriers to sharing and using genetic information were perceived, including technological, organizational, institutional, legal, ethical, and social issues; and (3) impediments to wider use of genetic testing technology, including variable understanding of genetic test utilities among clinicians and the limited capacity of clinical genetic services. Targeting these problems, information technologies and knowledge management tools have the potential to support key tasks in genetic services delivery, improve knowledge processes, and enhance knowledge networks. Because of the effect of issues in genetic information and knowledge management, the potential of human genetic variation knowledge to enhance health care delivery has been put on a "leash."

  11. An Empirical Analysis of Stakeholders' Influence on Policy Development: the Role of Uncertainty Handling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rianne M. Bijlsma

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Stakeholder participation is advocated widely, but there is little structured, empirical research into its influence on policy development. We aim to further the insight into the characteristics of participatory policy development by comparing it to expert-based policy development for the same case. We describe the process of problem framing and analysis, as well as the knowledge base used. We apply an uncertainty perspective to reveal differences between the approaches and speculate about possible explanations. We view policy development as a continuous handling of substantive uncertainty and process uncertainty, and investigate how the methods of handling uncertainty of actors influence the policy development. Our findings suggest that the wider frame that was adopted in the participatory approach was the result of a more active handling of process uncertainty. The stakeholders handled institutional uncertainty by broadening the problem frame, and they handled strategic uncertainty by negotiating commitment and by including all important stakeholder criteria in the frame. In the expert-based approach, we observed a more passive handling of uncertainty, apparently to avoid complexity. The experts handled institutional uncertainty by reducing the scope and by anticipating windows of opportunity in other policy arenas. Strategic uncertainty was handled by assuming stakeholders' acceptance of noncontroversial measures that balanced benefits and sacrifices. Three other observations are of interest to the scientific debate on participatory policy processes. Firstly, the participatory policy was less adaptive than the expert-based policy. The observed low tolerance for process uncertainty of participants made them opt for a rigorous "once and for all" settling of the conflict. Secondly, in the participatory approach, actors preferred procedures of traceable knowledge acquisition over controversial topics to handle substantive uncertainty. This

  12. Solar power role in the future power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strebkov, D.S.

    2006-01-01

    One studied the most essential factors, materials and processes governing the role of the solar power in the future power generation. Paper describes new principles to convert solar energy, to produce solar silicon and solar elements, to encapsulate solar modules, to make use of stationary solar concentrators [ru

  13. The role played by stakeholders in the public debate that brought Italy out of the club of nuclear energy producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantone, Marie Claire; Sturloni, Giancarlo; Brunelli, Giancarlo

    2007-10-01

    In 1964, Italy was the fourth largest world producer of electricity generated by nuclear reactors, second in Europe only to United Kingdom. In subsequent years, various controversial political events contributed towards drastically slowing down the development of the Italian national nuclear program. The 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, which caused a public outcry all over Europe, had particularly serious repercussions in Italy. In a controversial referendum, held in November 1987, Italian citizens voted to repeal three laws promoting the installation of nuclear power plants (NPP) on Italian soil and allowing the National Institute for Electrical Energy (ENEL) to participate in the construction of NPP's abroad. This work analyzes the reasons for that decision and the communication strategies of the stakeholders that took part in the public debate on nuclear energy during the weeks following the Chernobyl accident. Drawing from the methodologies used in media studies, a quantitative and qualitative analysis of two leading Italian newspapers was performed. The results reveal that a variety of stakeholders, upholding different values and interests, took part in the debate. There being no tradition of a public dialogue and participation in Italy, the debate was polarized to a "yes/no choice," which eventually caused Italy to abandon the production of nuclear power for civilian use.

  14. STAKEHOLDER DISTRUST - Implications of Distrust Research for Stakeholder Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Laude, Daniel; Weibel, Antoinette; Sachs, Sybille; Schafheitle, Simon Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Stakeholder theory has addressed the role of trust in organization-stakeholder relationships in depth. Although it is similarly relevant, distrust as a distinct construct from (low) trust has received relatively little consideration by stakeholder theorists. Thus, this article focuses on stakeholder distrust and reflects on the findings of distrust research in organizational studies and the implications for stakeholder theory. For this purpose, we conduct a systematic literature review of org...

  15. Crucial role for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dastidar, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    Generation of electricity by a nuclear reactor is explained. After taking a survey of the hydro-electric potential and coal deposits of India and considering their limitations, the need for nuclear power becomes evident. It is also economically competitive. The strategy for nuclear power development in India is to use natural uranium fuel based heavy water moderated thermal reactors to produce plutonium-239 and to use thorium based fast breeder reactors to breed plutonium-239 and uranium-233, and in turn these radioisotopes will be used to fuel FBR type reactors. This strategy maximises the energy obtainable from natural uranium by a factor of 400. The present state of nuclear power generation in India and the research programmes of the FBR type reactor are outlined. Other benefits from nuclear energy research are mentioned. Some of them are leak detection techniques, radiosterilisation and plant breeding by radiation mutation. The spin-off of the Indian atomic energy programme are : development of radiation detection instruments and other sophisticated electronic instruments, development of methods of preparation of ultra-pure materials, fabrication of components such as seamless tubes, non-destructive testing methods, and reliability evaluation techniques. Other applications of nuclear energy are mentioned. (M.G.B.)

  16. Crucial role for nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dastidar, P R

    1980-01-01

    Generation of electricity by a nuclear reactor is explained. After taking a survey of the hydro-electric potential and coal deposits of India and considering their limitations, the need for nuclear power becomes evident. It is also economically competitive. The strategy for nuclear power development in India is to use natural uranium fuel based heavy water moderated thermal reactors to produce plutonium-239 and to use thorium based fast breeder reactors to breed plutonium-239 and uranium-233, and in turn these radioisotopes will be used to fuel FBR type reactors. This strategy maximises the energy obtainable from natural uranium by a factor of 400. The present state of nuclear power generation in India and the research programmes of the FBR type reactor are outlined. Other benefits from nuclear energy research are mentioned. Some of them are leak detection techniques, radiosterilisation and plant breeding by radiation mutation. The spin-off of the Indian atomic energy programme are: development of radiation detection instruments and other sophisticated electronic instruments, development of methods of preparation of ultra-pure materials, fabrication of components such as seamless tubes, non-destructive testing methods, and reliability evaluation techniques. Other applications of nuclear energy are mentioned.

  17. The role of symbolic capital in stakeholder disputes: decision-making concerning intractable wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Suzanne; Jones, Richard

    2009-04-01

    This paper examines almost 30 years of disputation concerning the disposal of the world's largest stockpile of the toxic organochlorine, hexachlorbenzene. It describes the study of a chemicals company in its attempt to manage the disposal of the toxic waste in a collaborative fashion with government, environmentalists and the local community. The study describes the new processes and structures specifically designed to address the decision-making and the issues of stakeholder perception and identity construction which have influenced the outcomes. Decision-making in such disputes is often theorized from the perspective of the emergence of highly individualized and reflexive risk communities and changing modes and expectations of corporate responsibility as a result of detraditionalization. We argue that the stakeholder interaction in this study reflects competing discourses in which corporate actors prioritize the building and maintaining of identity and symbolic capital rather than an active collaboration to solve the ongoing issue of the waste. As well, issues of access to expert knowledge highlight the relationship between conditions of uncertainty, technoscientific expertise and identity. The events of the study highlight the challenges faced by contemporary technoscientific corporations such as chemicals companies as they must deliver on requirements of transparency and openness, while maintaining technoscientific capacity and strong internal identity. We conclude that the study demonstrates the co-existence of social processes of individualization and detraditionalization with quasi-traditions which maintain authority, thus challenging the radical distinctions made in the literature between modernity and late or reflexive modernity.

  18. Innovation in cardiovascular disease in Europe with focus on arrhythmias: current status, opportunities, roadblocks, and the role of multiple stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzen, Frits W; Dagres, Nikolaos; Bollmann, Andreas; Arnar, David O; Bove, Sylvie; Camm, John; Casadei, Barbara; Kirchhof, Paulus; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Lumens, Joost; Michel, Martin C; Schwartz, Peter J; Van Vleymen, Betty; Vardas, Panos; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2018-05-01

    The European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) held an Innovation Forum in February 2016, to consider issues around innovation. The objective of the forum was to extend the innovation debate outside of the narrow world of arrhythmia specialists and cardiology in general, and seek input from all stakeholders including regulators, strategists, technologists, industry, academia, health providers, medical societies, payers, and patients. Innovation is indispensable for a continuing improvement in health care, preferably at higher efficacy and lower costs. It requires people who have been trained in a good scientific environment, high-quality research for achieving ground breaking inventions and the certainty of return on innovation investments. In the context of cardiovascular disease, innovation can imply better risk assessment and stratification, device technology, drug development, and process design. Several areas of promising developments were identified as well as several roadblocks to innovation. To drive innovation forward all stakeholders need to play a significant role. In a globalized and extremely competitive world, the leading role of Europe in medical innovation can only be achieved through a combined and well-coordinated effort from all involved parties.

  19. Using Role-Play for Expert Science Communication with Professional Stakeholders in Flood Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Lindsey; Stokes, Alison; Crowley, Kate; Roberts, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores role-play pedagogies in learning and communicating about cutting-edge flood science by flood risk management professionals in local government. It outlines role-play process/structure and evaluates participant perceptions of their learning experiences. Issues were impacts of prior role-play experience on attitudes brought to…

  20. Microfoundations for stakeholder theory: Managing stakeholders with heterogeneous motives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bridoux, F.; Stoelhorst, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Instrumental stakeholder theory proposes a positive relationship between fairness toward stakeholders and firm performance. Yet, some firms are successful with an arms-length approach to stakeholder management, based on bargaining power rather than fairness. We address this puzzle by relaxing the

  1. Wind Powering America's Regional Stakeholder Meetings and Priority State Reports: FY11 Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-06-01

    Beginning in 2010, DOE conducted an assessment of Wind Powering America (WPA) activities to determine whether the methods the department had used to help grow the wind industry to provide 2% of the nation's electrical energy should be the same methods used to achieve 20% of the nation's energy from wind (as described in the report 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply). After the assessment, it was determined that the initiative's state-based activities should be phased out as part of a shift to regional-based approaches. To assist with this transition, WPA hosted a series of 1-day regional meetings at six strategic locations around the country and a single teleconference for island states, U.S. territories, and remote communities. This report summarizes the results of the inaugural regional meetings and the state reports with a focus on ongoing wind deployment barriers in each region.

  2. Wind Powering America's Regional Stakeholder Meetings and Priority State Reports: FY11 Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baring-Gould, Ian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Beginning in 2010, DOE conducted an assessment of Wind Powering America (WPA) activities to determine whether the methods the department had used to help grow the wind industry to provide 2% of the nation's electrical energy should be the same methods used to achieve 20% of the nation's energy from wind (as described in the report 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution toU.S. Electricity Supply). After the assessment, it was determined that the initiative's state-based activities should be phased out as part of a shift to regional-based approaches. To assist with this transition, WPA hosted a series of 1-day regional meetings at six strategic locations around the country and a single teleconference for island states, U.S. territories, and remote communities.This report summarizes the results of the inaugural regional meetings and the state reports with a focus on ongoing wind deployment barriers in each region.

  3. Workplace health promotion and stakeholder positions: a Finnish case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvinen, Ari-Matti; Kohtamäki, Kari; Ilvesmäki Msc, Antti

    2012-01-01

    Modern workplace health promotion (WHP) requires collaboration, partnerships, and alliances with both internal and external stakeholders. However, the identification of the key stakeholders as well as the systematic mapping of their views has barely been covered in the existing research literature. This article describes the stakeholders and stakeholder positions in WHP in Finland. In this study, the stakeholders were classified as internal, interface, and external stakeholders. Furthermore, based on the authors' research, stakeholders and their positions were represented on a stakeholder map as well as by the power-interest matrix of the stakeholders. The governmental authorities play a key role in driving the strategic change toward WHP by preparing the required legislation and regulatory measures. However, both active employers and active employees can through their own work accelerate the development of new WHP services. Close collaboration between employers and employees is required at the individual workplaces. Some stakeholders, such as pension funds and occupational health services (OHS) providers, can act as important driving forces and support the strategic implementation of WHP in the workplaces. However, alone they have only limited opportunities to organize the WHP activities. Understanding the various stakeholders and the systematic mapping of their positions is essential for the successful planning and implementation of WHP activities.

  4. Analysis on The Roles of Stakeholders in The Management of Integrated Breeding Beef Cattle Farm Program at PT KPC East Kutai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ariansyah

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the roles of stakeholders was conducted as a continuity program of Peternakan Sapi Terpadu (PESAT; integrated beef cattle farm following the coal mining deactivation by PT Kaltim Prima Coal (KPC of East Kutai, East Kalimantan. The purpose of this study was to formulate stakeholders relation in the future program. The stakeholders involved in this program were PT KPC, local breeders, Sekolah Tinggi Ilmu Pertanian (STIPER; Agriculture Academy of East Kutai, and the local government of East Kutai. The stakeholders analysis was based on the variables of the importance and influence from every analyzed stakeholder. The analysis model used here was the model introduced by Reed et al. (2009. According to the result of the stakeholders analysis, PT KPC was in the key-player quadrant, which score is 25 in both of the interest and the influencial level, while the three others, such as, local breeders, STIPER of East Kutai, and the East Kutai Government were in the subject quadrant. Their score were 24 and 7 for Local breeders, 21 and 9 for STIPER of East Kutai, and 16 and 13 for The East Kutai Government. It means, they had high interest but low influence to the program. The conclusion of this analysis shows that PT KPC is still dominating in the PESAT program management, whereas the three other stakeholders are acting merely as program users that have low involvement in the program management.

  5. Information management to enable personalized medicine: stakeholder roles in building clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Gregory J; Boyle, Scott N; Brinner, Kristin M; Osheroff, Jerome A

    2009-10-08

    Advances in technology and the scientific understanding of disease processes are presenting new opportunities to improve health through individualized approaches to patient management referred to as personalized medicine. Future health care strategies that deploy genomic technologies and molecular therapies will bring opportunities to prevent, predict, and pre-empt disease processes but will be dependent on knowledge management capabilities for health care providers that are not currently available. A key cornerstone to the potential application of this knowledge will be effective use of electronic health records. In particular, appropriate clinical use of genomic test results and molecularly-targeted therapies present important challenges in patient management that can be effectively addressed using electronic clinical decision support technologies. Approaches to shaping future health information needs for personalized medicine were undertaken by a work group of the American Health Information Community. A needs assessment for clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to support personalized medical practices was conducted to guide health future development activities. Further, a suggested action plan was developed for government, researchers and research institutions, developers of electronic information tools (including clinical guidelines, and quality measures), and standards development organizations to meet the needs for personalized approaches to medical practice. In this article, we focus these activities on stakeholder organizations as an operational framework to help identify and coordinate needs and opportunities for clinical decision support tools to enable personalized medicine. This perspective addresses conceptual approaches that can be undertaken to develop and apply clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to achieve personalized medical care. In addition, to represent meaningful benefits to personalized

  6. Information management to enable personalized medicine: stakeholder roles in building clinical decision support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinner Kristin M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in technology and the scientific understanding of disease processes are presenting new opportunities to improve health through individualized approaches to patient management referred to as personalized medicine. Future health care strategies that deploy genomic technologies and molecular therapies will bring opportunities to prevent, predict, and pre-empt disease processes but will be dependent on knowledge management capabilities for health care providers that are not currently available. A key cornerstone to the potential application of this knowledge will be effective use of electronic health records. In particular, appropriate clinical use of genomic test results and molecularly-targeted therapies present important challenges in patient management that can be effectively addressed using electronic clinical decision support technologies. Discussion Approaches to shaping future health information needs for personalized medicine were undertaken by a work group of the American Health Information Community. A needs assessment for clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to support personalized medical practices was conducted to guide health future development activities. Further, a suggested action plan was developed for government, researchers and research institutions, developers of electronic information tools (including clinical guidelines, and quality measures, and standards development organizations to meet the needs for personalized approaches to medical practice. In this article, we focus these activities on stakeholder organizations as an operational framework to help identify and coordinate needs and opportunities for clinical decision support tools to enable personalized medicine. Summary This perspective addresses conceptual approaches that can be undertaken to develop and apply clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to achieve personalized medical care. In

  7. Stakeholder Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flak, Leif Skiftenes; Rose, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    to e-Government. Originally a management theory, stakeholder theory advocates addressing the concerns of all stakeholders in a firm, as opposed to concentration on the interests of senior managers and stockholders. Apart from the original profit focus, there is no serious conceptual mismatch between...... of governance. Finally, the paper makes recommendations for future work in adapting ST to the e-government context....

  8. The Role of Nuclear Power in Eurpoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-01-15

    The World Energy Council has published the results of an in-depth review of the current state of nuclear power in Europe, and the possible role of this energy source in Europe's energy future. This regional study combines policy insights, technical details and an analysis of the potential for nuclear as a part of the energy-mix.

  9. THE STAKEHOLDER MODEL REFINED

    OpenAIRE

    Y. FASSIN

    2008-01-01

    The popularity of the stakeholder model has been achieved thanks to its powerful visual scheme and its very simplicity. Stakeholder management has become an important tool to transfer ethics to management practice and strategy. Nevertheless, legitimate criticism continues to insist on clarification and emphasises on the perfectible nature of the model. Here, rather than building on the discussion from a philosophical or theoretical point of view, a different and innovative approach has been c...

  10. Stakeholder Definition for Indonesian Integrated Agriculture Information System (IAIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi Santoso, Halim; Delima, Rosa

    2017-03-01

    Stakeholders plays an important roles to determine the system requirements. Stakeholders are people or organizations that has an interest to the enterprise. Timely and effective consultation of relevant stakeholders is a paramount importance in the requirements engineering process. From the research and analysis of system stakeholder finds that there are four stakeholder groups in IAIS. Stakeholder analysis is being implemented by identifying stakeholder, stakeholder category, and analysis interaction between stakeholders.

  11. The moderating role of stakeholder management and societal characteristics in the relationship between corporate environmental and financial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Maso, Lorenzo; Mazzi, Francesco; Soscia, Manuel; Terzani, Simone

    2018-07-15

    This study contributes to the debate about the moderating factors that affect the relationship between environmental and financial performance. Combining stakeholder theory, stakeholder salience, and legitimacy theory, and based on a large international sample, we demonstrate that stakeholder prioritization and engagement jointly positively moderate the relationship between environmental and financial performance. However, this moderating effect is only found when both formal and informal societal characteristics are strong and support the business environment surrounding the firm and its stakeholders. Contributions and implications for managers and regulators are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Stakeholder analysis in the management of irrigation in Kampili area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumiati; Ali, M. S. S.; Fahmid, I. M.; Mahyuddin

    2018-05-01

    Irrigation has appreciable contribution in building food security, particularly rice crops. This study aims to analyze the role of stakeholders involved in distributing of irrigation water. The study was conducted in the Kampili Irrigation Area in South Sulawesi Province Indonesia, the data were obtained through observation and interviews with stakeholders involved, and analysed by stakeholder analysis, based on the interests and power held by the actors. This analysis is intended to provide an optimal picture of the expected role of each stakeholder in the management of irrigation resources. The results show that there were many stakeholders involved in irrigation management. In the arrangement of irrigation distribution there was overlapping authority of the stakeholders to its management, every stakeholder had different interests and power between each other. The existence have given positive and negative values in distributing irrigation water management, then in the stakeholder collaboration there was contestation between them. This contestation took place between the agriculture department, PSDA province, the Jeneberang River Region Hall, the Farmers Group and the P3A.

  13. Barriers and Opportunities to Advancing Women in Leadership Roles in Vector Control: Perspectives from a Stakeholder Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Mary H; Barrett, Erika; Bernard, Guyah; Toko, Eunice N; Agawo, Maurice; Okello, Amanda M; Gunn, Jayleen K L; Ernst, Kacey C

    2018-05-01

    Increasing the active participation of professional women in vector control (VC) activities may help promote greater gender equity in the workplace and reduce the burden of vector-borne diseases. This stakeholder survey examined the current roles and perspective of professionals employed in the VC sector in Kenya, Indonesia, India, and other countries. The largest barriers that women face in pursuing leadership roles in the VC sector include lack of awareness of career opportunities, limitations based on cultural norms, and the belief that VC is men's work. These barriers could be addressed through improving education and recruitment campaigns, as well as supporting higher education and mentoring programs. Females were almost six times more likely to be encouraged to pursue leadership positions in their organization compared with male respondents (odds ratio = 5.9, P > 0.03, 95% confidence interval: 1.19, 29.42). These findings suggest that once women are recruited into the VC workforce, they face minimal discrimination and have increased leadership opportunities.

  14. Multi-stakeholder Virtual Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Niels; Mühlbacher, Hans

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces the special issue on multi-stakeholder virtual dialogue. Research as well as managerial practice in marketing has traditionally focused on single stakeholders and a one-way communication perspective. This special issue takes a novel approach by directing attention...... success. While marketing literature increasingly recognizes that divers stakeholders have an impact on a company''s success, little is known about how virtual multi-stakeholder dialogue changes marketing research and management. This special issue provides insights on what roles stakeholders may play...... to the simultaneous interaction with and of a variety of stakeholders and the fact that customers and other stakeholders of a company can take the initiative to that interaction. Stakeholders can launch a discussion, spread news, participate in value creation, can heavily influence each other and a company''s market...

  15. Understanding the perceptions, roles and interactions of stakeholder networks managing health-care waste: A case study of the Gaza Strip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniato, M; Tudor, T; Vaccari, M

    2015-01-01

    The sustainable management of waste requires a holistic approach involving a range of stakeholders. What can often be difficult is to understand the manner in which different types of stakeholder networks are composed and work, and how best to enhance their effectiveness. Using social network analysis and stakeholder analysis of healthcare waste management stakeholders in the case study region of the Gaza Strip, this study aimed to understand and examine the manner in which the networks functioned. The Ministry of Health was found to be the most important stakeholder, followed by municipalities and solid waste management councils. Some international agencies were also mentioned, with specific roles, while other local institutions had a limited influence. Finally while health-care facilities had a strong interest in waste management, they were generally poorly informed and had limited links to each other. The manner in which the networks operated was complicated and influenced by differences in perception, sharing of information, access to finance and levels of awareness. The lack of a clear legal framework generated various mistakes about roles and responsibilities in the system, and evidently regulation was not an effective driver for improvement. Finally stakeholders had different priorities according to the waste management issues they were involved with, however segregation at the source was identified as a key requirement by most. Areas for improving the effectiveness of the networks are suggested. The analysis utilized an innovative methodology, which involved a large number of stakeholders. Such an approach served to raise interest and awareness at different levels (public authorities, health providers, supporting actors, others), stimulate the discussion about the adoption of specific policies, and identify the effective way forward. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of customers in higher education: Are students active stakeholders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Mihanović

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available As the primary subject of research, this paper puts forward the issue of students’ role in Croatian institutions of higher education, taking into consideration the multiplicity of constituents and the complexity of relationships established by an institution of higher education with target groups as potential donors. In order to determine the position of students in higher education in relation to a dependency on the sources of financing, the research includes students as the main target group as well as potential students and the competent Ministry. They are the ones the institution of higher education establishes relations with, while representing a source of financing at the same time. For the purpose of research a model was created and the research carried out in May and June 2006 on a sample that included all public colleges in Croatia (87 of them, with their executives participating as respondents. According to research results, institutions of higher education, whether being largely financed by students or the Ministry, have not focused sufficiently on students or potential students. There are significant differences in the orientation of institutions of higher education to the Ministry. The institutions that are mainly financed by students show a higher degree of orientation toward the Ministry than those financed by the Ministry itself. Both the orientation and development of the relationships with students and potential students depend on the financing sources of institutions of higher education in Croatia. Therefore, students are not recognized as primary/original partners of the Croatian higher education and, in accordance with the mission and objectives of education, they are not adequately taken care of.

  17. The continuing role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCollam, W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Although nuclear power at this particular time is popularly assumed to have uncertain future prospects, the fact remains that electricity from the atom is essential to the nation's electric power supply and will play an even larger role in the years ahead. The precise, exact amount of future growth of electricity demand, of course, remains uncertain and controversial. Long-run estimates of electricity growth generally range from 1.0 to 4.0 percent annually, accompanied by an average annual growth rate of GNP in the 2.5 to 3.5 percent range. The electric utility industry, as reported by the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC), is projecting growth in kilowatthour requirements of 2.4 percent and in peak demand of 2.2 percent from 1985 to 1994

  18. Engaging stakeholder networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svendsen, A. [CoreRelation Consulting Inc., Delta, BC (Canada)]|[Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada); Laberge, M. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Management philosophies concerning stakeholder engagement were reviewed. This presentation provided guidelines for managers working from a sustainability value creation framework who wish to develop more effective ways to engage with stakeholders and high stakes issues that cross political, social and organizational boundaries. It was suggested that conflicts over resources, the demand for participation and the increasing power of Non-Governmental Organizations have all contributed to the increased need for stakeholder engagement. A review of different types of stakeholders was provided. Earlier strategies of managing stakeholders were examined, in which externalities such as environmental cost were not accounted for. By contrast, the emerging management philosophy presented here stressed a recognition that long term survival relied on the good health of external and internal environments. Core business strategies were discussed with reference to core values. It was suggested that a longer term focus, inclusiveness, and integration were beneficial to businesses as a whole. A case study of Clayoquot Sound was presented. The concept of social capital was examined. Individual and collective learning were evaluated. A model for engaging stakeholder networks was presented as well as a step by step procedural guide, which included the creation of a solid foundation; organizational alignment; strategy; the importance of asking questions; trust building; evaluation; and renewal. Challenges to stakeholder engagement included finding resources; ensuring consistency; patience; a tendency in business to measure success in short term payoffs; and maintaining a stakeholder perspective. It was concluded that the benefits of a sustainability value creation framework for businesses far outweighed any initial disadvantages. refs., tabs., figs.

  19. Learning from Stakeholder Pressure and Embeddedness: The Roles of Absorptive Capacity in the Corporate Social Responsibility of Dutch Agribusinesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T. M. Ingenbleek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In spite of much research on corporate social responsibility (CSR responses to secondary stakeholders (i.e., social movements, activists, media, civil society and non-governmental organizations, the debate on how companies learn from pressure and collaboration with these societal groups is still open. Building upon stakeholder and knowledge management theories, this paper analyzes how secondary stakeholder pressure and embeddedness influence agribusiness companies’ absorptive capacity and their CSR strategies. Data are obtained from 152 Dutch agribusiness company managers. The results highlight that, first, absorptive capacity influences companies’ new product innovation, product positioning and organizational innovation to be more oriented towards CSR. Second, stakeholder embeddedness of agribusiness companies triggers absorptive capacity more than pressure from them. Third, stakeholder pressure and embeddedness also have direct (i.e., not mediated by companies’ absorptive capacity yet weaker effects on CSR organizational innovation and product positioning. Findings corroborate the idea that firms develop innovative CSR strategies when they combine internal reflection processes and partnerships with secondary stakeholders.

  20. Multiple forms of stakeholder interaction in environmental management: business arguments regarding differences in stakeholder relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Onkila, Tiina

    2011-01-01

    This study describes and interprets differences in stakeholder interaction as rhetorically constructed in environmental reports and in interviews with environmental managers. It also interprets the role of the natural environment among stakeholders, and discusses how that role is justified or not justified. The study focuses in a business perspective on stakeholder interaction in environmental management. Characteristically, stakeholder studies of environmental management have concentrated on...

  1. The impact of stakeholder values and power relations on community-based health insurance coverage: qualitative evidence from three Senegalese case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladovsky, Philipa; Ndiaye, Pascal; Ndiaye, Alfred; Criel, Bart

    2015-07-01

    Continued low rates of enrolment in community-based health insurance (CBHI) suggest that strategies proposed for scaling up are unsuccessfully implemented or inadequately address underlying limitations of CBHI. One reason may be a lack of incorporation of social and political context into CBHI policy. In this study, the hypothesis is proposed that values and power relations inherent in social networks of CBHI stakeholders can explain levels of CBHI coverage. To test this, three case studies constituting Senegalese CBHI schemes were studied. Transcripts of interviews with 64 CBHI stakeholders were analysed using inductive coding. The five most important themes pertaining to social values and power relations were: voluntarism, trust, solidarity, political engagement and social movements. Analysis of these themes raises a number of policy and implementation challenges for expanding CBHI coverage. First is the need to subsidize salaries for CBHI scheme staff. Second is the need to develop more sustainable internal and external governance structures through CBHI federations. Third is ensuring that CBHI resonates with local values concerning four dimensions of solidarity (health risk, vertical equity, scale and source). Government subsidies is one of the several potential strategies to achieve this. Fourth is the need for increased transparency in national policy. Fifth is the need for CBHI scheme leaders to increase their negotiating power vis-à-vis health service providers who control the resources needed for expanding CBHI coverage, through federations and a social movement dynamic. Systematically addressing all these challenges would represent a fundamental reform of the current CBHI model promoted in Senegal and in Africa more widely; this raises issues of feasibility in practice. From a theoretical perspective, the results suggest that studying values and power relations among stakeholders in multiple case studies is a useful complement to traditional health

  2. The Indian power sector - Role of appellate tribunal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajaj, Harbans; Sharma, Deepak

    2010-09-15

    India's electricity-supply industry mainly owned and operated by the public sector has been facing endemic energy and peaking shortages with huge commercial losses. Power sector reforms initiated in 1990s culminated with enactment of The Electricity Act, 2003 is briefly discussed here. Appellate Tribunal for Electricity - a unique feature of the Act - constituted to redress grievances of stakeholders has set ground rules for the power sector having harmonizing effect on the various power sector issues and have reduced the element of uncertainty which was prevalent hitherto fore as revealed by the several case studies this paper presents.

  3. Strategic Role of Financial Institutions in Sustainable Development of Indian Power Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, V K

    2007-07-01

    Paper focuses on appraisal of Indian power sector, its achievements and inadequacies, measures and initiatives taken by Government of India (GOI) and blueprint for the development of power sector in next five years i.e. XI Plan (2007-2012); the role played by various Financial Institutions, Banks, Bilateral/Multilateral agencies etc. with focus on role of Power Finance Corporation (PFC) in development and financing of Indian Power sector and in Institutional development of State power utilities by facilitating in their reform and restructuring process and improving their financial health; role played by PFC in implementation of various policies and programmes of GOI; its competitive edge in Indian financial sector and growth strategies for enriching the stakeholders' value and acting as a significant partner in the development of power sector and growth of the nation. The paper provides information on capacity addition planned along with matching transmission and distribution system in the next five years to achieve GOI's 'Mission 2012: Power for All'; estimated funds required; funds that can be generated both in the form of Debt and Equity; the funding gap; proposed measures to meet overall funding requirement for sustainable development of the power sector. (auth)

  4. Strategic Role of Financial Institutions in Sustainable Development of Indian Power Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, V.K.

    2007-07-01

    Paper focuses on appraisal of Indian power sector, its achievements and inadequacies, measures and initiatives taken by Government of India (GOI) and blueprint for the development of power sector in next five years i.e. XI Plan (2007-2012); the role played by various Financial Institutions, Banks, Bilateral/Multilateral agencies etc. with focus on role of Power Finance Corporation (PFC) in development and financing of Indian Power sector and in Institutional development of State power utilities by facilitating in their reform and restructuring process and improving their financial health; role played by PFC in implementation of various policies and programmes of GOI; its competitive edge in Indian financial sector and growth strategies for enriching the stakeholders' value and acting as a significant partner in the development of power sector and growth of the nation. The paper provides information on capacity addition planned along with matching transmission and distribution system in the next five years to achieve GOI's 'Mission 2012: Power for All'; estimated funds required; funds that can be generated both in the form of Debt and Equity; the funding gap; proposed measures to meet overall funding requirement for sustainable development of the power sector. (auth)

  5. Potential for social learning in sustainable regional development: analysis of stakeholder interaction with a focus on the role of scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Dlouhá

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with regional development and its dimension of (unsustainability: it analyses conditions for the success or failure of environmental or SD strategies from a social point of view. The authors share their experience acquired within the process of compiling a database of case studies from different regions of the Czech Republic and from abroad, and subsequently provide a brief analytical overview of cases in this special issue. The analytical perspective focuses on the roles of actors in a dialogue about regional sustainability issues within cooperative or conflict situations, and a description of the communication processes at play, especially within the science – policy interface. An analytical tool (actor analysis is employed to explore network characteristics, the relationships of the actors involved and the process of deliberation itself where different approaches to “nature”, “environment”, and/or “sustainable development” were conceived but often not agreed upon. A comparative meta-analysis of different cases helped to formulate several hypotheses: for a successful sustainability transition on a regional level, future visions are necessary and should be discussed and shared by stakeholders. Necessary innovation is often the result of the involvement of experts and might be provided from outside the region. Dialogue should be based on respect for actor diversity and their viewpoints (this is a condition for social learning, as well as a commitment to contribute to the “common good”. Where local actors had only to choose between controversial extant solutions, a deadlock in communication often resulted. The establishment of a communication framework for actor involvement appeared to be beneficial, which is also an opportunity for facilitation of these processes in practice.

  6. The Role of Nuclear Power in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvez, A.; Iqleem, J.

    2002-01-01

    Although the energy and electricity demand in Pakistan have been steadily growing, the per capita electricity consumption at around 300 kWh is still rather small when compared to most countries. The current installed capacity is around 17,700 MW with fossil fuels providing nearly two-third of this capacity, hydro a little less than one-third and nuclear around 2.5%. A major fraction of the oil used in Pakistan has to be imported while hydro remains subject to seasonal changes. The next 20 year projections point to a serious electrical energy generation shortfall even when the contribution from indigenous gas, coal, and hydro is increased optimistically. It is estimated that a deficit of some 3000-5000 MW may exist which will have to be met from an alternate energy resource like nuclear. Two small nuclear power plants (KANUPP, a 137 MWe CANDU which has been operating safely for nearly three decades, and CHASNUPP, the newly built 325 MWe PWR supplied by China) are already on-line. KANUPP has essentially been operated without any vendor support thanks to a systematic self-reliance program. The experience gained through procuring, operating and maintaining these power plants, coupled with the need to meet the projected electrical energy shortfall which cannot be met through conventional resources, makes nuclear a very viable option, and Pakistan an ideal case to study the current and future role of nuclear in a developing country with medium sized grid. This paper will describe an overview of the experience of development of nuclear power in Pakistan. Future strategies, which involve negotiating a case for nuclear with the energy policy makers, interacting with the vendor on matters of obtaining new plants, and increasing self-reliance in the area of nuclear power technology, will also be discussed. (author)

  7. Policy stakeholders and deployment of wind power in the sub-national context: A comparison of four U.S. states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischlein, Miriam; Larson, Joel; Hall, Damon M.; Chaudhry, Rumika; Rai Peterson, Tarla; Stephens, Jennie C.; Wilson, Elizabeth J.

    2010-01-01

    As climate change mitigation gains attention in the United States, low-carbon energy technologies such as wind power encounter both opportunities and barriers en route to deployment. This paper provides a state-level context for examining wind power deployment and presents research on how policy stakeholders perceive wind energy in four states: Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, and Texas. Through semi-structured interviews, state-level energy policy stakeholders were asked to explain their perceptions of wind energy technology within their state. Interview texts were coded to assess how various drivers promote or hinder the deployment of wind power in sub-national contexts. Responses were dominated by technical, political, and economic frames in all four states, but were often driven by a very different rationale. Environmental, aesthetic, and health/safety frames appeared less often in the discourse. This analysis demonstrates that each state arrived at its current level of deployment via very different political, economic, and technical paths. In addition to helping explain why and how wind technology was - or was not - deployed in each of these states, these findings provide insight into the diversity of sub-national dialogues on deployment of low-carbon energy technologies.

  8. Stakeholder confidence in effective safety regulation. A regulator's view on the role of independent research capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotra, Janet; Mohanty, Sitakanto

    2006-01-01

    The authors provided a regulator's view on the role of independent research capability and its relationship to stakeholder confidence. They underscored the NRC's commitment to regulatory openness in its Strategic Plan. A number of actions have been adopted to achieve openness: public access to information about risks, safety and licensee performance that is accurate and timely; enhanced awareness of NRC as an independent regulator; fair and timely process for public involvement in NRC's decision-making; and early public involvement and two-way communication to enhance public confidence in NRC's regulatory process. The presentation reviewed the ways through which the NRC seeks to inspire confidence in its process as independent regulator and in future decisions concerning whether to authorize the U.S. DOE to construct the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. Key to this will be reviewing all information objectively, making open decisions based on sound, scientific judgements about the facts; and maintaining an open and fair public process, and accessing independent R and D. It was noted that among the requirements for the safety review for the Yucca Mountain repository will be extensive technical and scientific analyses, evaluation of expert judgement, and long-range modelling assessments of expected repository performance. NRC requires independent scientific and engineering analyses to develop technical bases for regulations and guidance; evaluate adequacy of DOE's safety case for a potential repository; assist preparation of NRC Safety Evaluation Report; provide technical support for NRC testimony during licensing hearing; and develop effective outreach and communication tools. Confidence in NRC's use of science and engineering will depend upon: competence; independence; open and fair process; regulatory outcomes that are subject to verification and monitoring. To assist, the NRC established the Centre for Nuclear Waste Regulatory

  9. Role of nuclear power in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyshnevskyi, I.M.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear power of Ukraine commenced from Chernobyl NPP, where the first unit was put into operation at 1977. At present in Ukraine there are 4 running NPPs with a total installed capacity 11880 MW where more than 40 % of electricity is generated. Elaborated Atomic Energy Strategy Development for the period till 2030 after the commissioning of two new units in 2004 foresees to keep the total installed capacity around 14000 MW. Analysis on the maintenance of such level and the solution of other problems, related to nuclear energy is carried out. Among them: nuclear fuel cycle, handling of radioactive wastes, decommissioning and others. Thus nuclear energy plays and will play the important role to ensure the electricity generation in Ukraine

  10. The Role of Stakeholder Relationship Management Crisis Management Processes within the Hotel Industry in a Tourism Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola ZECH

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Rates of worldwide environmental, social, technological and other crises are perceived to be constantly increasing - if nothing else due to almost instant broadcasting by media and internet. The Tourism Industry is especially vulnerable to such crises as numerous Stakeholder Groups on the one hand and large numbers of travelers on the other hand are or might be affected. Therefore, Tourism Industry Stakeholder Groups claims regarding transparency can t be denied. This Research Paper focuses on Crisis Management processes from the aspect of the Hotel Industry in a Tourism Context considering a variety of Tourism Market Players. Theoretical foundations combined with empirical research reveal prerequisites, Status Quo as well as opportunities and challenges towards an integrated Crisis Management Model. Finally, key success factors for a Stakeholder Relationship Management based approach are introduced.

  11. Understanding the perceptions, roles and interactions of stakeholder networks managing health-care waste: A case study of the Gaza Strip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caniato, M.; Tudor, T.; Vaccari, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We systematically review scientific literature about health-care waste management. • We identify and discuss gaps, trends, efforts, and key-factors. • We suggest areas for improvement and best practices reported in literature. • We include recommendations for policy makers, practitioners and researchers. • We promote a holistic and harmonized approach to health-care waste management. - Abstract: The sustainable management of waste requires a holistic approach involving a range of stakeholders. What can often be difficult is to understand the manner in which different types of stakeholder networks are composed and work, and how best to enhance their effectiveness. Using social network analysis and stakeholder analysis of healthcare waste management stakeholders in the case study region of the Gaza Strip, this study aimed to understand and examine the manner in which the networks functioned. The Ministry of Health was found to be the most important stakeholder, followed by municipalities and solid waste management councils. Some international agencies were also mentioned, with specific roles, while other local institutions had a limited influence. Finally while health-care facilities had a strong interest in waste management, they were generally poorly informed and had limited links to each other. The manner in which the networks operated was complicated and influenced by differences in perception, sharing of information, access to finance and levels of awareness. The lack of a clear legal framework generated various mistakes about roles and responsibilities in the system, and evidently regulation was not an effective driver for improvement. Finally stakeholders had different priorities according to the waste management issues they were involved with, however segregation at the source was identified as a key requirement by most. Areas for improving the effectiveness of the networks are suggested. The analysis utilized an innovative methodology

  12. Understanding the perceptions, roles and interactions of stakeholder networks managing health-care waste: A case study of the Gaza Strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caniato, M., E-mail: marcocaniato@gmail.com [Research Centre on Appropriate Technologies for Environmental Management in Developing Countries (CeTAmb), University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Tudor, T. [Centre for Sustainable Waste Management, School of Science and Technology, University of Northampton, Northampton (United Kingdom); Vaccari, M. [Research Centre on Appropriate Technologies for Environmental Management in Developing Countries (CeTAmb), University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • We systematically review scientific literature about health-care waste management. • We identify and discuss gaps, trends, efforts, and key-factors. • We suggest areas for improvement and best practices reported in literature. • We include recommendations for policy makers, practitioners and researchers. • We promote a holistic and harmonized approach to health-care waste management. - Abstract: The sustainable management of waste requires a holistic approach involving a range of stakeholders. What can often be difficult is to understand the manner in which different types of stakeholder networks are composed and work, and how best to enhance their effectiveness. Using social network analysis and stakeholder analysis of healthcare waste management stakeholders in the case study region of the Gaza Strip, this study aimed to understand and examine the manner in which the networks functioned. The Ministry of Health was found to be the most important stakeholder, followed by municipalities and solid waste management councils. Some international agencies were also mentioned, with specific roles, while other local institutions had a limited influence. Finally while health-care facilities had a strong interest in waste management, they were generally poorly informed and had limited links to each other. The manner in which the networks operated was complicated and influenced by differences in perception, sharing of information, access to finance and levels of awareness. The lack of a clear legal framework generated various mistakes about roles and responsibilities in the system, and evidently regulation was not an effective driver for improvement. Finally stakeholders had different priorities according to the waste management issues they were involved with, however segregation at the source was identified as a key requirement by most. Areas for improving the effectiveness of the networks are suggested. The analysis utilized an innovative methodology

  13. ANALISIS STAKEHOLDER PENGELOLAAN TAMAN NASIONAL BANTIMURUNG BULUSARAUNG, PROPVINSI SULAWESI SELATAN (Stakeholder Analysis of Bantimurung Bulusaraung National Park Management, South Sulawesi Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd. W Kadir

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Para pihak (stakeholder yang terkait dalam pengelolaan TN Babul memiliki kepentingan dan pengaruh yang beragam sehingga harus dapat dikelola dengan baik dalam mencapai tujuan pengelolaan TN Babul. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengidentifikasi stakeholder dalam pengelolaan TN Babul, mendapatkan penjelasan tentang kepentingan dan pengaruh setiap stakeholder dalam pengelolaan TN Babul, serta peran stakeholder dalam mengakomodir kepentingan masyarakat sekitar TN Babul. Penelitian ini dilaksanakan di Kabupaten Maros pada Kawasan TN Babul, Propinsi Sulawesi Selatan. Pengumpulan data dilakukan melalui observasi dan wawancara kepada sejumlah informan kunci. Data dianalisis dengan teknik analisis deskriptif kualitatif. Hasil analisis stakeholder menunjukkan bahwa stakeholder primer dalam pengelolaan TN Babul terdiri dari Balai TN Babul, Masyarakat sekitar TN Babul, PDAM Maros, Disparbud Maros, Lembaga Pengelola Air Desa. Sedangkan stakeholder sekunder terdiri dari Dishutbun Maros, Dinas Pertanian Maros, Pemerintah desa dan kecamatan, BP2KP Maros, BPN Maros, PNPM Mandiri, LSM, dan Perguruan Tinggi dan lembaga penelitian. Keberadaan stakeholder tersebut dapat memberikan pengaruh positif dan negatif terhadap kawasan TN Babul. Peran yang dapat dilakukan oleh stakeholder dalam mengakomodir kepentingan masyarakat dapat berupa fungsi kontrol, bantuan fisik, bantuan teknis, dan dukungan penelitian. Pengelolaan kolaborasi dapat menjadi alternatif model pengelolaan TN Babul dalam mengakomodir kepentingan stakeholder yang beragam.   ABSTRACT Stakeholders involved in management of the Babul National Park have diverse interest and power that must be managed well in achieving Babul National Park management objectives. This study aims to identify the stakeholders in Babul National Park management, an explanation of the intersest and power of each stakeholder, and the role of stakeholders in accommodating the interests of communities around Babul National

  14. [The role, power and health of women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-O; Chen, Chung-Hey

    2007-04-01

    Women's health issues, often addressed together with reproduction and children's health under the broad based "women and children's health" category, receive inadequate attention from the medical system. In retrospect, the social construct of the female role has been grounded in the physiological nature of sex. Thus, women are often treated based on their stereotypical roles (e.g., mother, daughter-in-law, wife, daughter) rather than on their needs as distinct individuals. Although modern society was built by women and men together, patriarchal values continue to relegate the social status and value of women to that of assistant. Social opportunity remains significantly different for men and women, with discrimination persisting. The status and value of women are often ignored in both the public and private sectors. While status and power influences the health of women, such mechanisms are rarely discussed in the medical field. This paper discusses how women's social status has been formed by social and economic development, how it has been ignored, and the influence of such developments on women's health.

  15. Learning from Stakeholder Pressure and Embeddedness: The Roles of Absorptive Capacity in the Corporate Social Responsibility of Dutch Agribusinesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingenbleek, Paul; Dentoni, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    In spite of much research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) responses to secondary stakeholders (i.e., social movements, activists, media, civil society and non-governmental organizations), the debate on how companies learn from pressure and collaboration with these societal groups is still

  16. Policy Reforms, Trojan Horses, and Imaginary Friends: The Role of External Stakeholders in Internal Quality Assurance Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Maria João; Teixeira, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The governance of higher education has been changing across Europe, most notably in response to the reform agenda that has been pervading many higher education systems. This wave of reforms has given enhanced visibility to external stakeholders, which has been often received with contrasting views. Some regarded it as a factor that would undermine…

  17. The role of intra-organisational stakeholder dynamics in IT-based innovation adoption processes in hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, T.R.F.

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of new information technology in hospitals seems to lead to mixed results in practice; projects are delayed or cost more than budgeted thus severely affecting projected goals of quality or efficiency improvement. A project’s stakeholder environment is in continuous movement, both in

  18. Limitations on the Role of Stakeholders and the Diverse Effects of Market Conditions: College and University Finances, 1980-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Sondra N.

    2013-01-01

    In this dissertation I analyze the financial behaviors of public and private nonprofit higher education organizations in the U.S. from 1980 to 2010. The three analyses examine organizational change in the financial behaviors of these institutions and the effects of two sources of organizational interdependencies, stakeholder influence and…

  19. 18 CFR 50.4 - Stakeholder participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stakeholder... ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION FACILITIES § 50.4 Stakeholder participation. A Project Participation Plan is required to ensure stakeholders have access to accurate and timely information on the proposed project and...

  20. Future Roles of Air and Space Power in Combatting Terrorism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McAlpine, Mark

    1997-01-01

    .... The political, economic, and informational instruments of power play primary roles in addressing and eliminating the root causes behind terrorism attacks, but the military instrument will prevent...

  1. The exercise of power through multi-stakeholder initiatives for sustainable agriculture and its inclusion and exclusion outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheyns, Emmanuelle; Riisgaard, Lone

    2014-01-01

    they generate. In this introduction, we highlight differences in theoretical approaches to analyzing MSIs and to the manifestation of power through them. We distinguish between more traditional political-economy approaches and approaches concerned with ideational and normative power such as convention theory...... with a balance of power is at the heart of a new type of action that forms part of a broader political liberal model for building coalitions of interest groups. The intention of this symposium is to assess the nature of processes and outcomes of this model and in particular the forms of inclusion and exclusion...

  2. Governments' role in decommissioning nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guindon, S.; Wendling, R.D.; Gordelier, S.; Soederberg, O.; Averous, J.; Orlando, D.

    2005-01-01

    Many nuclear power plants will reach the end of their operating lives over the next 20 years; some may be life-extended, others may not. This development will precipitate enhanced industrial and regulatory activities in the area of decommissioning. We are also witnessing in many countries a significant shift in the role of government itself: new pressures on governments, such as enhanced attention on environmental impact/mitigation and strategies to implement market-oriented approaches in a variety of sectors, including the energy sector are driving the public policy agenda. The paper will examine the range of policy issues, drawing from recent NEA studies on decommissioning policies and the recent NEA study on Government and Nuclear Energy and, strategies and costs, and other current trends and developments in the nuclear industry and in the nuclear policy fields. The paper will reflect on issues to be addressed during the conference and draw conclusions on the appropriate role of government in this area. Decommissioning policy is very specific and focused: it is not a high level policy/political issue in most instances and rarely gets the same attention as the issue surrounding the future of nuclear energy itself and public concerns regarding safety, waste and economics. One reason why decommissioning does not get the same attention as for example disposal of spent nuclear fuel might be the fact that technology is available for decommissioning, while technology for disposal of spent nuclear fuel is under development. High profile or not, it will remain an important issue for governments and industry alike particularly because of the cost and long lead times involved. In some instances, governments are the owners of the facilities to be decommissioned. In addition, decommissioning factors into issues surrounding the economics of nuclear energy and the sustainability of the nuclear option. Based on results of the Tarragona Seminar (Spain, September 2-4, 2003) and

  3. Review on the role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Chi; Le Van Hong; Nguyen Tri Ho

    1993-03-01

    This report consists of 2 parts. The first part reviews opinions against nuclear power on the aspects: waste disposal, safety and environment, financial; technology, etc. and gives results of a preliminary survey for nuclear power in Vietnam among scientists in 1990. The second part presents advanced reactor concepts and advantages of nuclear power to economy and environment in comparison with other energy sources. (N.H.A). 39 refs, 9 figs, 2 tabs

  4. Evaluation of the role of risk perception in stakeholder engagement to prevent lead exposure in an urban setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harclerode, Melissa A; Lal, Pankaj; Vedwan, Neeraj; Wolde, Bernabas; Miller, Michael E

    2016-12-15

    Stakeholder engagement is a vital sustainable remediation practice for obtaining useful feedback and identifying societal needs. Evaluating and integrating risk perception of stakeholders into remediation and outreach efforts allows for greater insight, increases the likelihood of success and ultimately, benefits the community by protecting its members from environmental hazards. In this study, we identified risk perception factors that influenced residents' level of concern for mitigating their exposure to elevated concentrations of lead in household paint and historic fill material. Risk perception factors were assessed by an in-person survey conducted in public green spaces. The analysis of survey participants' responses indicated that their perception of risk to exposed lead was mostly influenced by the presence of hazardous materials in close proximity to their residence, the ability to address pollution, and awareness, interest, and individual accountability in mitigating environmental risks. Responses also revealed that residents considered risk of lead and soil pollution as less menacing than the presence of more immediate and perceptible risks posed by factors such as air and water pollution. In addition, the community seemed to exhibit "optimism bias" and did not identify itself at high risk to susceptible and immediate hazards, including lead exposure. This lack of concern over lead exposure created a significant obstacle to community participation in state-led education and outreach programs. By integrating risk perception analysis and increasing stakeholder engagement, we can bring more attention to this issue, educate the public about the threat of lead pollution, and efficiently use financial resources to implement a more sustainable solution. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Stakeholder perspectives on new ways of delivering unscheduled health care: the role of ownership and organizational identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddow, Gill; O'Donnell, Catherine A; Heaney, David

    2007-04-01

    To explore stakeholder perspectives of the implementation of a new, national integrated nurse-led telephone advice and consultation service [National Health Service 24 (NHS 24)], comparing the views of stakeholders from different health care organizations. Semi-structured interviews with 26 stakeholders including partner organizations located in primary and secondary unscheduled care settings [general practitioner (GP) out-of-hours cooperative; accident and emergency department; national ambulance service, members of NHS 24 and national policy makers. Attendance at key meetings, documentary review and email implementation diaries provided a contextual history of events with which interview data could be compared. The contextual history of events highlighted a fast-paced implementation process, with little time for reflection. Key areas of partner concern were increasing workload, the clinical safety of nurse triage and the lack of communication across the organizations. Concerns were most apparent within the GP out-of-hours cooperative, leading to calls for the dissolution of the partnership. Accident and emergency and ambulance service responses were more conciliatory, suggesting that such problems were to be expected within the developmental phase of a new organization. Further exploration of these responses highlighted the sense of ownership within the GP cooperative, with GPs having both financial and philosophical ownership of the cooperative. This was not apparent within the other two partner organizations, in particular the ambulance service, which operated on a regional model very similar to that of NHS 24. As the delivery of unscheduled primary health care crosses professional boundaries and locations, different organizations and professional groups must develop new ways of partnership working, developing trust and confidence in each other. The results of this study highlight, for the first time, the key importance of understanding the professional

  6. Power and the Role of the Superintendent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Teresa Northern; Salsberry, Trudy A.; Devin, Mary A.

    2009-01-01

    This study of the superintendent focus group interviews from the "Voices 3" project adds to the research base with regard to the range and nature of the types of power experienced or used by superintendents. Using the French & Raven/Andrews & Baird model of seven types of power, the authors analyzed superintendents'…

  7. Stakeholders in support systems for self-care for chronic illness: the gap between expectations and reality regarding their identity, roles and relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumar-Méndez, María J; Mujika, Agurtzane; Regaira, Elena; Vassilev, Ivaylo; Portillo, Mari Carmen; Foss, Christina; Todorova, Elka; Roukova, Poli; Ruud Knutsen, Ingrid A; Serrano, Manuel; Lionis, Christos; Wensing, Michel; Rogers, Anne

    2017-06-01

    The spread of self-care holds the promise of containing chronic illness burden. Falling within the framework of a FP7 collaborative research project, this paper reports the views of key informants from six countries regarding who the main stakeholders are at different levels in the support system for self-care for patients with chronic illness (SSSC) and how they accomplish their role and collaborate. 90 Interviews with purposefully selected key informants from Bulgaria, Greece, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain and United Kingdom were conducted. Interviews involved government and local authorities, politicians, academics, health professionals and private sector representatives. Interviewers followed an expert opinion-based guide. Analysis involved a cross-country examination with thematic analysis and framework method techniques. Key informants described the ideal SSSC as inclusive, interdependent and patient-centred. The following main stakeholders in SSSC were identified: patients, governments, health-care professionals, associations, private companies and the media. In the current SSSCs, collaboration among stakeholders within and across different levels was said to be lacking. Patients were seen as playing a passive subordinate role based on the following: their own attitudes; the paternalistic and medicalized attitudes of the health-care professionals; their misrepresentation by patient associations; and their exposure to the damaging influences of media and industries. Making SSSC patient-centred constitutes the greatest challenge for European authorities. Strategies must be revised for promoting patient participation. They should undergo changes so as to promote industry and media social responsibility and patient association advocacy capacity. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The role of regional information in the dose rate estimation of biota: from the view point of stakeholder involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urabe, Itsumasa

    2008-01-01

    A dose evaluation system developed to judge environmental radiation safety was proposed in order to evaluate the effect on environmental flora and fauna. However, it was noted that large differences exist between biota doses based on the regional data and those determined by the dose evaluation system developed. In order to realize successful mutual communication among stakeholders, information needed for environmental radiation protection has been investigated in various kinds of exposure situations, because the Japanese tend to act following the standards set by them to get the most appropriate results in the situations they are faced with. It became clear from the investigation on beliefs about environmental issues that the Japanese are concerned about regional characteristics of natural environments and biota through which they observe variations in their living conditions. Furthermore, the systematic approach for compilation of the regional environmental parameters and data becomes important to accomplish a social agreement on environmental safety. (author)

  9. The Role of social media discourses on stakeholder crises awareness and perception – A meta-theoretical framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentini, Chiara; Romenti, Stefania; Kruckeberg, Dean

    , such perspective is best suited to explain the relationships between publics and organizations in the online environment. According to this perspective, organizations are not the hub of stakeholder communications and interactions, but rather they are simply spikes in a more complex network. Public......This paper provides a meta-theoretical framework to examine social media communications and crisis communication in these social media through the lens of communicative constitution of reality. Our claim is that discourse and online conversations are significant in shaping publics’ opinions...... in social media, both in general and specifically in discussions about crisis situations. Therefore, studying language and discourse becomes paramount to understand how conversations structure relationships and public opinions. We approach this task through a network-based perspective because, we argue...

  10. The Role of Stakeholders Related to the Management of Ecological Function of Urban Green Open Space. Case Study: City of Depok, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangopa Malik, Andy Anton

    2017-12-01

    Urban green open space is one of the assets that provide substantial benefits to the urban community. One important function of urban green open space is a function of ecology. This study will provide initial explanation on the various studies related to the ecological function of urban green open space. The study of urban space management approach related to ecological function will explain the extent of the role of stakeholders in the urban areas that will further strengthen the importance of the existence of green open space, especially in city of Depok. With so many problems related to the supply and use of green open space in the city of Depok. This approach was originally applied by the private sector and many applications made a great contribution, so it began to be used by the government in managing public assets there. This study will use descriptive method, at the beginning of the study will explain the existence of the reality of urban green open space as part of the urban space by viewing it from theoretical overview of space, function and role of the various problems that occur in it. The results of this study indicate there are six problems in the management of green open spaces in city of Depok. Using the stages in asset management will provide space for participation of existing stakeholders in the management of green open spaces in city of Depok.

  11. Stakeholder collaboration and heritage management

    OpenAIRE

    Aas, C.; Ladkin, Adele; Fletcher, John

    2005-01-01

    This article examines a collaborative approach to the relationship between heritage management and tourism development in Luang Prabang, Laos. The purpose is to examine stakeholder collaboration and management roles, heritage tourism development, as well as the interdependence of the heritage conservation and tourism relationship. The research examines a UNESCO/Norwegian government project, which aiming to promote collaboration between heritage conservation and tourism through stakeholder inv...

  12. The role of nuclear power in the global electric power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorenko, V.A.; Chernilin, Yu.F.

    1992-01-01

    Basic conclusions and recommendations developed in the process of preparing and conducting the symposium discussed are presented. All methods of electric power production, their prospects and effects on man and environment were discussed during the symposium. This paper is devoted mainly to nuclear power engineering only, its prospects and possible role in general electric power generation

  13. Evaluating stakeholder management performance using a stakeholder report card: the next step in theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvey, Donna; Fottler, Myron D; Slovensky, Donna J

    2002-01-01

    In the highly competitive health care environment, the survival of an organization may depend on how well powerful stakeholders are managed. Yet, the existing strategic stakeholder management process does not include evaluation of stakeholder management performance. To address this critical gap, this paper proposes a systematic method for evaluation using a stakeholder report card. An example of a physician report card based on this methodology is presented.

  14. The future role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkwood, J. B.

    1981-11-01

    In some regions of the United States and Europe nuclear power supplies over 30 percent of the total electricity demand. It supplies 11 percent in developed western nations and about 2.4 percent of total world primary energy demand. The installed nuclear capacity in OECD countries, which accounts for 94 percent of world nuclear capacity, is currently expected to increase from the 113 GWin 1980 to 220 GW by 1985 and 330 GW by 1990. In addition to impediments to nuclear programmes that have arisen from a lack of public acceptance, procedural problems have arisen through uncertainties in the regulatory processes, particularly in the USA and West Germany

  15. Stakeholder Dissonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauesen, Linne Marie

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to investigate the question of whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) can be used as a link of trust between business and society, and which role CSR plays in recovering distrust in businesses. It uses a mixed methods study of processes of moving businesses...... within the Danish water sector from a general trust-breakdown to trust recovery from 2003 to 2013. Trust recovery is found to depend on stakeholders’ mutual engagement with each other and their willingness to share knowledge and learn from each other’s professional and institutional cultures...... and languages. An alignment of vocabularies of motives between regulation and voluntary CSR is found to be useful for building trust between conflicting parties. Furthermore the findings shows that the more stakeholders’ languages, motives and logics can coexist, the more trust can be recovered. The research...

  16. Stakeholder Dissonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauesen, Linne Marie

    2013-01-01

    of motives between regulation and voluntary corporate social responsibility is found viable for building trust between the conflicting parties. The findings have prospects reaching out of its local context and can be used in processing trust1recovery in other sectors that suffers from severe trust......After the recent financial crisis issues of trust-breakdown in various business sectors and the public sector have occurred. The question of whether corporate social responsibility can be used as a link of trust between business and society is the issue that this paper wants to explore. This paper...... investigate how trust in businesses and institutions can be recovered and which role if any corporate social responsibility plays in it. A study of a process from trust1 breakdown to trust1recovery in the Danish water sector from 2003 till 2013 is revealed, which can be used to inform other kinds of trust...

  17. The Role of Marital Power in Depression and Marital Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, Elizabeth C.

    1998-01-01

    Drawing on sex-role theory, the learned-helplessness model of depression, and a review of empirical research, this article explores inequity in marital power as a potential third variable that explains how depression and the quality of marriage are related. Aims to generate broad-minded thinking about how marital power, depression, and marital…

  18. The growing role of biologics and biosimilars in the United States: Perspectives from the APhA Biologics and Biosimilars Stakeholder Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi-Lofton, Judy; Skelton, Jann B

    The American Pharmacists Association (APhA) convened the Biologics and Biosimilars Stakeholder Conference on November 30, 2016, in Washington DC. The objectives of the Conference were to determine the key issues and challenges within the marketplace for biologics, follow-on biologics (FOBs), and biosimilars, identify potential roles and responsibilities of pharmacists regarding biologic and biosimilar medications, and identify actions or activities that pharmacists may take to optimize the safe and cost-effective use of biologics and biosimilars. National thought leaders and stakeholder representatives, including individuals from the Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, a private third-party payer, manufacturers, and several national organizations of health care professionals, participated in the conference. Information shared by this group was supplemented with relevant legal and regulatory information and published literature. Biologics play a valuable role in the treatment of numerous health conditions, but their associated costs, which tend to be greater than those of small-molecule drugs, place a burden on the health care system. Biosimilars (both noninterchangeable and interchangeable) are highly similar copies of the originator biologic and offer the potential to reduce costs and improve patient access to biological products by increasing treatment options and creating a more competitive market. Despite the potential benefits of biosimilars, certain factors may limit their uptake. The conference participants explored issues that different stakeholders think influence the use of biologics, including biosimilars, in the United States. Barriers included technology, prescriber-pharmacist communication, legislation and regulations, limited patient and health care practitioner knowledge of biological products, patient and health care practitioner perceptions of biosimilars, and evolving science or lack of long-term data. After

  19. The role of RD and D for stakeholder confidence as seen by non-institutional actors. The Perspective of a Municipality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aahagen, Harald

    2006-01-01

    The author set the context for his presentation by profiling the geographic location and history of Oskarshamn including the feasibility study and the council's 2002 unanimous vote to accept site investigation with 13 conditions and clarifications. The municipality's policy places an emphasis on ensuring safety first, providing information on the table from all parties at all times, and ensuring active engagement and influence. Working groups were established by the municipality to follow the safety issues and ensure that the 13 conditions are fulfilled, require investigations enhance citizens' competence; collect and forward questions and issues; and draw experience from local participation in other national programmes. Reaching informed consent in siting depends upon many factors, a key factor of which is RD and D. The author identified two components that he believes to be key to achieving informed stakeholder consent: first a need to build local competence on local terms, allowing the municipality to have the capacity to independently judge the project. The second challenge is to achieve consent - a conclusion by a majority that the repository can be accepted and is compatible with the broader visions for the municipality. R and D, together with parameters from site investigations form the basic safety case for repository siting. It was noted that evaluations of safety also are based on assumptions and value judgements. The author underscored that the public has a much better understanding of R and D than most experts are aware of, and that implementers should have faith in the public and trust the public's ability to absorb the facts and follow the issues. Citizens understand the quality aspects of R and D, including the role for peer reviews. The public is also aware that facts change over time and that scientists may hold different opinions. The presentation emphasized the importance of capacity-building at the local level. Stable local

  20. Energy controversy: the role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, F.H.; Bodansky, D.

    1975-02-01

    The objective of the paper presented is to show that nuclear fission power is the best, and maybe the only, alternative source of energy. It is written for a wide range of readers, including non-scientists and scientists who are not particularly informed on the issues involved. The first question considered concerns man's need for energy; it is concluded that conservation measures alone cannot suffice. Next, the earth's energy sources are examined, and the extent of each is estimated in the simple context of the length of time it could last at present use rates. Only nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, and solar energy can provide for future time scales commensurate with man's historic past, while avoiding the possibility of catastrophic social upheaval. Fusion and solar energy are rejected on technological grounds because the world energy problem is so pressing that one cannot gamble on hopes for future technological breakthroughs. Thus, only nuclear fission meets the twin criteria of technological feasibility and adequate resource base. Each of the controversial issues surrounding nuclear fission energy is examined in some detail. The conclusion is reached that none is serious, and that nuclear fission offers by far the best energy source from environmental, economic, longevity, and overall safety standpoints

  1. Nuclear regulatory organisations: Learning from stakeholders to enhance communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorin, Aurelie

    2015-01-01

    Since its creation 15 years ago, the NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) Working Group on Public Communication of Nuclear Regulatory Organisations (WGPC) has been addressing a broad range of communication issues, with two reports recently issued on Nuclear Regulatory Organisations, the Internet and Social Media: The What, How and Why of Their Use as Communication Tools and on Nuclear Regulatory Organisations and Communication Strategies. After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in 2011, nuclear regulatory organisations around the world reaffirmed the need to strengthen stakeholder outreach and communication, and to create more robust avenues for stakeholder involvement in regulatory matters. The WGPC proposed a means for stakeholders to play a more active role in the group by holding one-day workshops in conjunction with regular meetings. These workshops offer a platform for stakeholder exchange with communication experts from nuclear regulatory organisations (NROs). The objective is to stimulate co-operation and improve communication by better understanding stakeholder perceptions, needs and expectations, and by discussing how to use traditional and social media more effectively. While nuclear regulatory organisations may have a common willingness to improve their communication methods and to build constructive relationships with stakeholders, every country has its own practices and cultural background, and thus its own challenges. Following the first workshop in Paris, which brought together European stakeholders, and the second in North America, the NEA is now organising a third workshop in Asia (Japan) to be held in April 2016. This third workshop will enable the NEA to gather stakeholder views from a third continent. A report on the workshops' findings will be issued after the completion of this third workshop, thus giving a broader idea of how to improve the overall communication methods of nuclear regulatory

  2. Stakeholder mapping of CSR in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Looser, S; Wehrmeyer, WCH

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to investigate, using stakeholder map methodology, showing power, urgency, legitimacy and concerns of different actors, the current state of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Switzerland. Previous research on CSR in Europe has made few attempts to identify stakeholders and their contribution to this topic. Design/methodology/approach – To derive this map, publicly available documents were explored, augmented by 27 interviews with key stakeholders (consumers, m...

  3. Towards a More Holistic Stakeholder Analysis Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedereviciute, Kristina; Valentini, Chiara

    2011-01-01

    are identified based on the dimensions of connectivity and the content shared. Accordingly, the study introduces four groups of important actors from social media: unconcerned lurkers, unconcerned influencers, concerned lurkers and concerned influencers and integrates them into the existing Stakeholder Salience...... in finding stakeholders on new environments (social media), where connectivity and relationships play a key role. The argument stems from the need to assess stakeholder presence beyond the dyadic ties. Consequently, the combination of the Stakeholder Salience Model (SSM) and social network analysis (SNA......) is proposed as a more holistic solution for stakeholder identification including those from social media. A process of finding “unknown” but important stakeholders from social media was identified incorporating the content search and the principles of SNA. Consequently, stakeholders from social media...

  4. Role of nuclear engineering in the national power complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petros'yants, A.M.; Baturov, B.B.

    1981-01-01

    Role of nuclear power in power engineering and fuel-power system of the country in the whole is discussed. Economic advantages of NPP's as compared with thermal power plants for district heating (TPP) are grounded. Advisability of combined production of thermal and electric power at TPP as compared with separate heat generation at NPP for district heating and electric power generation at NPP is reported. Data on perspectives of development of nuclear engineering in the light of ''Main directions of economic and social development of the USSR in 1981-1985 and up to 1990'' are presented. It is concluded that nuclear power introduction into national economy would bring important technical, economic and social consequences. Large-scale NPP construction would result in radical revision of the industry structure in the whole fuel-power system including output and transport on the base of modern technology and recent scientific-technical achievements providing essential economic and national economic effect essentially higher labour productivity in fuel power branches of industry. Besides, nuclear engineering creates conditions for better preservation of environment, reduction of expenditures for power and fuel transport, bringing industry centres nearer to centres of energy consumption as well as pre-conditions for removing threat of the so-called ''power hunger'' [ru

  5. Project stakeholder management

    CERN Document Server

    Eskerod, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    Carrying out a project as planned is not a guarantee for success. Projects may fail because project management does not take the requirements, wishes and concerns of stakeholders sufficiently into account. Projects can only be successful though contributions from stakeholders. And in the end, it is the stakeholders that evaluate whether they find that the project is a success. To manage stakeholders effectively, you need to know your stakeholders, their behaviours and attitudes towards the project. In Project Stakeholder Management, the authors give guidance on how to adopt an analytical and s

  6. Combining Human Resource and Stakeholder Management Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravazzani, Silvia; Mormino, Sara

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores collaborative learning activities involving HR and external stakeholders that organizations decide to plan and implement in order to obtain benefits in terms of knowledge sharing, stakeholder understanding and value creation. The increasing uncertainty and multiplicity of comp...... and corporate learning in a stakeholder-oriented perspective can play a strategic role in supporting business strategy, providing organizations the resources to meet internal and external needs (Wilson, 2005) and to interconnect with their value network.......This paper explores collaborative learning activities involving HR and external stakeholders that organizations decide to plan and implement in order to obtain benefits in terms of knowledge sharing, stakeholder understanding and value creation. The increasing uncertainty and multiplicity...... of competitive pressures and stakeholder demands (Harrison, St. John, 1996) require organizations, and in particular HR, to take on a more strategic role aimed to build new capability and support the overarching business strategy (Ulrich, Beatty 2001). This study draws on Strategic Human Resource Management...

  7. The role of Swissgrid in a liberalised power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walser, M.

    2007-01-01

    This article takes a look at the role that the Swiss electricity grid operator Swissgrid plays in the open, competition-oriented electricity market in Switzerland. Background information on the founding of this grid operator is presented and the increasingly important role played by international power transfer is discussed. The importance of Switzerland's central position in the European power grid is looked at as well as the balance-groups in Switzerland itself. Swiss and European regulations and stipulations in the electricity area are examined. The article also deals with topics such as security of supply and electricity generation using renewable forms of energy. Production certification and its role in the export, for example of hydro-power, are also commented on

  8. Economy and technology roles played by nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Eiji

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of the survey analysis made by Atomic Energy Commission on the roles in economy and technology played in the nuclear energy development and utilization, the following are described: economic roles in nuclear energy development and utilization (the present state of nuclear power industry in Japan and the economy effects); technological roles in the same (the present state of nuclear power technology in Japan and the technology effects). The economy effects in other areas are on higher level than in other industries etc. Then, in the technology effects, system technology and quality control in the nuclear power possess significant effects in other areas. While the nuclear energy development and utilization is important in Japan's energy security, it is contributing largely to the economy and society in Japan. (Mori, K.)

  9. Hospital board oversight of quality and safety: a stakeholder analysis exploring the role of trust and intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Ross; Freeman, Tim; Mannion, Russell

    2015-06-16

    Hospital boards, those executive members charged with developing appropriate organisational strategies and cultures, have an important role to play in safeguarding the care provided by their organisation. However, recent concerns have been raised over boards' ability to enact their duty to ensure the quality and safety of care. This paper offers critical reflection on the relationship between hospital board oversight and patient safety. In doing so it highlights new perspectives and suggestions for developing this area of study. The article draws on 10 interviews with key informants and policy actors who form part of the 'issue network' interested in the promotion of patient safety in the English National Health Service. The interviews surfaced a series of narratives regarding hospital board oversight of patient safety. These elaborated on the role of trust and intelligence in highlighting the potential dangers and limitations of approaches to hospital board oversight which have been narrowly focused on a risk-based view of organisational performance. In response, a need to engage with the development of trust based organisational relationships is identified, in which effective board oversight is built on 'trust' characterised by styles of leadership and behaviours that are attentive to the needs and concerns of both staff and patients. Effective board oversight also requires the gathering and triangulating of 'intelligence' generated from both national and local information sources. We call for a re-imagination of hospital board oversight in the light of these different perspectives and articulate an emerging research agenda in this area.

  10. Stakeholder mismanagement and corporate social responsibility crises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.; Pinkse, J.

    2006-01-01

    In the past decade, the stakeholder approach has gained much acceptance among academics and practitioners. Noticeably, there has been little consideration of the motivations and processes used by businesses to avoid or neglect stakeholder power and pressures. This is all the more remarkable in the

  11. Role of pump hydro in electric power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessa, R.; Moreira, C.; Silva, B.; Filipe, J.; Fulgêncio, N.

    2017-04-01

    This paper provides an overview of the expected role that variable speed hydro power plants can have in future electric power systems characterized by a massive integration of highly variable sources. Therefore, it is discussed the development of a methodology for optimising the operation of hydropower plants under increasing contribution from new renewable energy sources, addressing the participation of a hydropower plant with variable speed pumping in reserve markets. Complementarily, it is also discussed the active role variable speed generators can have in the provision of advanced frequency regulation services.

  12. Final disposal of spent nuclear fuels - regulations and the roles of different stakeholders during the decision making process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-05-01

    In November 2006 Swedish Nuclear Fuels Co. applied for a license to build a plant for encapsulation of spent nuclear fuels at Oskarshamn, Sweden. The company also have plans to apply, in 2009, for a license to construct a underground repository for spent nuclear fuels. KASAM arranged a seminar in November 2006 in order to describe and discuss the licensing rules and regulations and the roles of different parties in the decision making. Another objective of the seminar was to point out possible ambiguities in this process. Another interesting question under discussion was in what ways the basic data for the decision should be produced. The seminar covered the part of the process beginning with the application for a license and ending with the government approval/rejection of the application. Most time was spent on the legal aspects of the process

  13. Gestão social e ambiental em pequenas e médias empresas: influência e poder dos stakeholders Social and enviromental management in small and medium enterprises: power and influence of stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Edson Moysés Filho

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi analisar como grandes empresas influenciam seus fornecedores, nesse caso Pequenas e Médias Empresas PME , em prol da adoção de práticas de gestão sociais e ambientais responsáveis. Utilizou-se para esse propósito a perspectiva da Responsabilidade Social Empresarial RSE que, embora careça de uma unidade teórica consistente, revelou-se mais adequada ao caso. A relevância do estudo se justifica pelo número restrito de trabalhos sobre a RSE em PME e a influência que os stakeholders - conceito usado neste caso no sentido de grupos de interesse - exercem sobre essa relação. O estudo foi realizado dentro do âmbito do Programa Tear - Tecendo Redes Sustentáveis -, que teve como objetivo mobilizar, por meio de grandes empresas ou âncoras, a adoção de práticas de gestão sociais e ambientais responsáveis por seus fornecedores. Utilizou-se a metodologia do estudo múltiplo de casos com o propósito de analisar tais impactos por meio de três empresas-âncoras e seis PME. Pelos resultados auferidos, pode-se verificar que a influência dos stakeholders acentua a importância e acelera a adoção das práticas de RSE, contudo carece de força para garantir incremento no desempenho, competitividade e oportunidades de mercado. Tal descoberta contraria o objetivo inicial do Programa Tear, conforme foi pregado às PME por seus organizadores.The aim of this study was to analyze how large companies influence their suppliers, in this case Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs, in favor of adopting social and environmental responsibility practices. It was used for this purpose the perspective of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR that, although lacks a consistent theoretical unit, was more appropriate to the case. The relevance of the study was justified by the limited number of studies on CSR on SMEs and the influence that stakeholders - in this particular case the concept was used in the sense of interested groups

  14. Engaging stakeholders in rehabilitation research: a scoping review of strategies used in partnerships and evaluation of impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camden, Chantal; Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Nguyen, Tram; Graham, Emma; Thomas, Aliki; Sprung, Jennifer; Morris, Christopher; Russell, Dianne J

    2015-01-01

    To describe how stakeholder engagement has been undertaken and evaluated in rehabilitation research. A scoping review of the scientific literature using five search strategies. Quantitative and qualitative analyses using extracted data. Interpretation of results was iteratively discussed within the team, which included a parent stakeholder. Searches identified 101 candidate papers; 28 were read in full to assess eligibility and 19 were included in the review. People with disabilities and their families were more frequently involved compared to other stakeholders. Stakeholders were often involved in planning and evaluating service delivery. A key issue was identifying stakeholders; strategies used to support their involvement included creating committees, organizing meetings, clarifying roles and offering training. Communication, power sharing and resources influenced how stakeholders could be engaged in the research. Perceived outcomes of stakeholder engagement included the creation of partnerships, facilitating the research process and the application of the results, and empowering stakeholders. Stakeholder engagement outcomes were rarely formally evaluated. There is a great interest in rehabilitation to engage stakeholders in the research process. However, further evidence is needed to identify effective strategies for meaningful stakeholder engagement that leads to more useful research that positively impacts practice. Implications for Rehabilitation Using several strategies to engage various stakeholders throughout the research process is thought to increase the quality of the research and the rehabilitation process by developing proposals and programs responding better to their needs. Engagement strategies need to be better reported and evaluated in the literature. Engagement facilitate uptake of research findings by increasing stakeholders' awareness of the evidence, the resources available and their own ability to act upon a situation. Factors influencing

  15. The Unique Role of the Survivalist Retail Entrepreneur in Job Creation and Poverty Reduction. Implications for Active Stakeholder Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chux Gervase Iwu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This is an applied study endeavour with the aim of exploring the specific role of survivalist retail entrepreneurship in job creation and poverty reduction. Two hundred (200 subjects were sampled using snowballing technique. Structured questionnaires as well as semi-structured interviews were employed to collect data. 182 usable questionnaires were analysed with the help of SPSS version 23. The results indicate that retail entrepreneurship is evolving in Khayelitsha, especially when one does not only focus on spaza shops, but looks at the entire survivalist retail industry. This sector is capable of creating jobs, reducing poverty and aiding economic growth of the country even more, should measures to boost motivation levels and self-efficacy of the entrepreneurs emerge. These measures, among others could include support programmes for survivalist entrepreneurial ventures that present greater potential for growth and job creation. Part of the support programmes should include business skills training (such as simple bookkeeping practices and human resource management. Importantly, this study is the first of its kind in the community of Khayelitsha; an emerging black-populated township in South Africa, indicating a new vista for retail entrepreneurship research.

  16. Managing Diverse Stakeholders

    OpenAIRE

    Pipkin, Erin; Porter, Sean; Clark, Rickie

    2017-01-01

    For every public project, there is a diverse group of stakeholders who need and want information. During this session we outline important stakeholders, how and when to involve them in the planning process, and how targeted messaging might be the key to your project’s success. We also discuss how to identify and manage stakeholders who oppose your project.

  17. Stakeholder initiatives in flood risk management: exploring the role and impact of bottom-up initiatives in three ‘Room for the River’ projects in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Edelenbos (Jurian); M.W. van Buuren (Arwin); D. Roth (Dik); M.H. Winnubst (Madelinde)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years stakeholder participation has become a popular topic in flood management. Little is known about how and under which circumstances local stakeholders initiate and develop successful flood management strategies and how governmental actors respond to them. Drawing on

  18. Stakeholder views on pharmacogenomic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Haridarshan N; Ursan, Iulia D; Zueger, Patrick M; Cavallari, Larisa H; Pickard, A Simon

    2014-02-01

    Pharmacogenomics has an important role in the evolution of personalized medicine, and its widespread uptake may ultimately depend on the interests and perspectives of key players in health care. Our aim was to summarize studies on stakeholder perspectives and attitudes toward pharmacogenomic testing. Thus, we conducted a review of original research studies that reported stakeholder views on pharmacogenomic testing using a structured approach in PubMed, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and EMBASE. A standardized data abstraction form was developed that included stakeholder group of interest-patients, general public, providers, and payers. Stakeholder views regarding barriers to pharmacogenetic implementation were organized into the following themes: ancillary information-related, clinical, economic, educational, ethical or legal, medical mistrust, and practicality. Of 34 studies that met our inclusion criteria, 37 perspectives were reported (15 on providers, 9 on the general public, 9 on patients, and 4 on payers). The most common topics that arose in studies of providers related to clinical usefulness of genetic data (n=11) and educational needs (n=11). Among the general public, the most common concerns were medical mistrust (n=5), insufficient education (n=5), and practicality (n=5). The most prevalent issues from the patient perspective were ethical or legal (n=6) and economic (n=5) issues. Among payers, leading issues were practicality (n=4) and clinical usefulness (n=3). There was overlap in the topics and concerns across stakeholder perspectives, including lack of knowledge about pharmacogenomic testing. Views on issues related to privacy, cost, and test result dissemination varied by stakeholder perspective. Limited research had been conducted in underrepresented groups. Efforts to address the issues raised by stakeholders may facilitate the implementation of pharmacogenomic testing into

  19. Smart Mobility Stakeholders - Curating Urban Data & Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperling, Joshua [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the curation of urban data and models through engaging SMART mobility stakeholders. SMART Mobility Urban Science Efforts are helping to expose key data sets, models, and roles for the U.S. Department of Energy in engaging across stakeholders to ensure useful insights. This will help to support other Urban Science and broader SMART initiatives.

  20. Universal Health Insurance Coverage in Vietnam: A Stakeholder Analysis From Policy Proposal (1989) to Implementation (2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Chi K; Hill, Peter; Nguyen, Huong T

    In 1989, health insurance (HI) was introduced in Vietnam and began to be implemented in 1992. There was limited progress until the 2014 Law on HI that was revised with the aim of universal health insurance coverage (UHIC) by 2020. This article explores stakeholder roles and positions from the initial introduction of HI to the implementation of the Master Plan accelerating UHIC. To better understand the influence of stakeholders in accelerating UHIC to achieve equity in health care. Using a qualitative study design, we conducted content analysis of HI-related documents and interviewed social security and health system key informants, government representatives, and community stakeholders to determine their positions and influence on UHIC. Our findings demonstrate different levels of support of stakeholders that influence in the HI formulation and implementation, from opposition when HI was first introduced in 1989 to collaboration of stakeholders from 2013 when the Master Plan for UHIC was implemented. Despite an initial failure to secure the support of the Parliament for a Law on HI, a subsequent series of alternative legislative strategies brought limited increases in HI coverage. With government financial subsidization, the involvement of multiple stakeholders, political commitment, and flexible working mechanisms among stakeholders have remained important, with an increasing recognition that HI is not only a technical aspect of the health system but also a broader socioeconomic and governance issue. The different levels of power and influence among stakeholders, together with their commercial and political interests and their different perceptions of HI, have influenced stakeholders' support or opposition to HI policies. Despite high-level policy support, stakeholders' positions may vary, depending on their perceptions of the policy implications. A shift in government stakeholder positions, especially at the provincial level, has been necessary to accelerate

  1. Stakeholder Participation in REDD+ Readiness Activities for Three Collaborative Projects in Lao PDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saykham Boutthavong

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A key challenge for reducing emission from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD in developing countries is to balance the power of various stakeholders in decision making. This study explores the forms of stakeholder participation in the implementation of three pilot projects in Laos, with a focus on who actually makes decisions on project activities. We found that stakeholder roles in making decisions were imbalanced. The central government and development partner organizations were the ones who actually fulfill the roles of decision-makers in most project activities. Although local communities were not the key stakeholders in decision making in most activities, their roles seem to have increased in the activities where participatory approaches were applied. Participation of the private sector, non-governmental organizations, academic and research institutes and mass organizations was limited. Opportunities to reach decision-makers regarding project activities came through service contract agreements. Our findings suggest that an understanding of who fulfills the key roles will support a decentralization of decision making by balancing power and redistributing the roles from dominant to weaker stakeholders. In addition, the private sector’s participation may enhance opportunities to harmonize their investments for supporting REDD+ development and reduce the negative impacts on the forests and the environment.

  2. Micro power plants - interests, conflicts and possibilities - a focus group study with emphasis on business and environmental stakeholders; Smaakraftverk - interesser, konflikter og muligheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerck, M.; Vistad, O.I.

    2009-05-15

    of small-scale hydropower development and the risk of environmental loss, and is skeptical of the alleged financial subsidy as small hydro power development is said to contribute to the community. Thus we see clear differences between the groups because they have different interests in relation to small hydro power development. But our results also show that it is too easy to say that the industry group for small hydro power development, while the environmental group is opposed. Group participants expressed a far more nuanced picture in which there is consensus among stakeholders around several themes. The main conflict lies in the view of the extent and risk of adverse environmental effects of development. Conservation interests expressed fear that important biological qualities can be lost as a result of the knowledge base is often very weak. And many are very afraid that total effects of all developments are not taken sufficiently seriously. Attitudes to development can be characterized by a precautionary approach, ie a resistance. Also, since the industry says that knowledge of the biological condition is inadequate, both before and after development. The resulting inter alias in that it is difficult to recommend mitigating measures on a scientific basis: it applies to actions like today's 'standard required' in most developments. We believe there are grounds for saying that the actual lack of knowledge (especially about existing biological qualities and therefore also on the consequences of development) is conflict-driving. For this reason it is also where there is particular need to strengthen the scientific basis for evaluating the applications and impacts of development, and to see the various waterways in context. The general attitude of small power plants seem to be more accepting of the environmental group in southern than in the equivalent on the West Coast. The general impression from the focus groups is that the developments that are

  3. The role of NDT in nuclear power development in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asghar Ali Khan; Sabir Choudhary, M.; Arif Iftikhar, M.; Afaque, A. S.; Yousaf Raza Zaidi, S.

    2003-01-01

    Pakistan has two operating nuclear power plants namely, Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (KANUPP) which is 137 MW Candu type Canadian reactor using natural uranium fuel and the Chashma Nuclear Power Plant (CHASNUPP) which is a 300 MW PWR type Chinese built reactor using 3% enriched uranium fuel. A third nuclear power plant is being negotiated for construction. This would most probably be the twin unit of CHASNUPP and the construction might begin early next year.Non destructive testing (NDT) has an important role in the development and safe operation of the nuclear power plants by providing the Pre-Service Inspection (PSI) services during the manufacturing and installation phase, and the In-Service Inspection (ISI) services during the operation and maintenance phase. ISI of various components of nuclear power plants is an essential activity which has to be carried out either on emergency basis on as and when required basis or periodically at regular intervals described in the quality assurance QA manuals of the plant. There are numerous components and systems in the nuclear power plants working together. The failure of one system affects the performance of the whole plant. There are two main divisions, called the Nuclear Island and Conventional Island. Main components of Nuclear Island are reactor pressure vessel, reactor core, steam generators, pressurizer, primary coolant pumps and primary piping, etc. and the main components in Conventional Island are turbine, condensers, pre-heaters, moisture separators, secondary heat treatment system and piping etc. (Author)

  4. The role of corruption and unethical behaviour in precluding the placement of industry sponsored clinical trials in sub-Saharan Africa: Stakeholder views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efe Egharevba

    2016-08-01

    More discussion around corruption with all relevant stakeholders is required in order for progress to be made and to enable greater involvement of sub-Saharan African countries in the conduct of industry sponsored clinical trials.

  5. Global warming---The role for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.E. Jr.; Fulkerson, W.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear power is currently making an important contribution to our energy requirements. It provides 17% of the world's electricity today --- almost 20% in the US. Reducing the emissions of carbon dioxide over the next 30 to 50 years sufficiently to address the issue of global warming can only be accomplished by a combination of much improved energy efficiency, substantial growth in use of nuclear power, and substantial growth in use of renewable energy. This paper discusses new initiatives in the major nuclear technologies (LWR, HTGR, LMR) which are emerging from a fundamental reexamination of nuclear power in response to the challenges and opportunities in the 21st century. To fulfill its role, nuclear power must gain worldwide acceptance as a viable energy option. The use of modern technology and ''passive'' safety features in next-generation nuclear power plants offers the potential to simplify their design and operation, enhance their safety, and reduce the cost of electricity. With such improvements, we believe nuclear power can regain public confidence and make a significant contribution to our energy future. 24 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  6. Stakeholder Relationships in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Juha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a stakeholder map to describe the most important stakeholders and the process of stakeholder relationships in higher education. According to the perspective of the balanced scorecard, the classification of stakeholders integrates stakeholders into strategic management. Stakeholder maps are essential in…

  7. The Role of Power and Negotiation in Online Deception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Albrecht

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to advance theoretical understanding of the important role of both power and negotiation during online deception.  By so doing, the paper provides insight into the relationship between perpetrator and victim in Internet fraud. The growing prevalence of Internet Fraud continues to be a burden to both society and individuals. In an attempt to better understand Internet fraud and online deception, this article attempts to build an interactive model, based upon the dimensions of power and negotiation from the management and psychology literature. Using the model presented, the article examines the effects of the Internet on the communication process that takes place between perpetrator and victim. Finally, the article discusses some of the major tactics employed to appeal to each power type in predominant fraud forms, as well exploring future types of fraud.

  8. The role and behaviour of the experts and how to expose the experts' value system in order to gain stakeholder confidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Kjell

    2006-01-01

    The author discussed the role and behaviour of experts in the context of gaining stakeholder confidence. The author underscored the many reasons to make explicit experts' values. Complex policy issues often involve many challenges, factual issues with uncertainties, values, emotions and vested interests. All of these factors should be exposed to policy makers and the public before decisions are made. Experts may set the agendas too narrowly, there may be mistrust in expertise and authorities, and there may be low awareness in the political system. Excessively narrow framing of the issues can result in frustration and inability to solve important societal problems. It was noted further, that in a democratic society decisions are based not on expert values, but on citizen values. Democracy implies accountability and requires awareness and transparency. Modern society is demanding higher levels of transparency and public participation dialogue and incorporation of public values. The author reviewed some of the models which have been advanced for awareness building with transparency and participation within frameworks of representative democracy. The RISKOM model was discussed, as was the VALDOC model, both of which invoke the practice of 'stretching' - inviting questions to be raised from new angles through challenges from society. Another key element of the RISKOM model is 'intelligence' - understanding future developments and outside forces, as well as studying and planning for the future. Crucial aspects of the VALDOC methodology include the authenticity of the approach itself, its identity in awareness and transparency, fairness in process setting and ensure neutral venues for hearings and transparency arenas. The presentation highlighted some applications of these models in a variety of industries in Sweden. The presentation reviewed a number of arenas in which experts' value systems may be exposed. Within the expert arena, it was

  9. Energy Security and the Role of Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jinwoo

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear power is expected to play a more important role to cope with rapidly changing energy market environment. Recently re-evaluation on nuclear energy is taking place in major countries like USA, Japan, and Sweden. It is of particular interest in Korea to make out optimal level of nuclear power from energy security perspectives. This paper is aiming to derive options for optimal fuel mix and sets up scenarios on major premises such back-end costs and fuel price of nuclear, and CO 2 emission cost. Six scenarios are analyzed for optimal fuel mix and additional cases are examined for the effect on CO 2 emission. The model outcomes suggest to construct 3∼13 units of 1,400 MW nuclear reactors by 2030 to meet ever-growing power demand. It is found that base-load facilities are taking about 70% of total installed capacity in any case. As a reasonable option, 9 units (12.6 GW) of nuclear is recommended to be built, taking 37.0% of total installed capacity in 2030. CO 2 emission turns out to be largely affected by nuclear proportion, which is sensitive to environmental cost. However, expansion of renewable energy or demand side management is found to have rather on CO 2 emission. Energy security aspects need to be considered in developing an optimal fuel mix of power generation. But In-depth studies are needed to obtain a practical range of optimal level of nuclear power from energy security point of view

  10. Stakeholders' analysis of the medical tourism industry: development strategies in Isfahan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Alireza; Ferdosi, Masoud; Keyvanara, Mahmoud; Agharahimi, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Policy makers and decision makers must identify the stakeholders in medical tourism, who will be affected by and/or affect this industry, and determine their status for partnership. The aim of this study was to identify the main stakeholders in Isfahan's medical tourism, analyze them, and provide strategies for developing this industry. A qualitative study was conducted in 2011. At first, the key stakeholders in medical tourism were identified in accordance with the experts' idea and literature review. Then we interviewed the key stakeholders. Data analysis was conducted using the stakeholders' analyses, which helped in developing strategies. The result showed that the key stakeholders were made up of nine groups. They included the provincial governance of Isfahan, the Cultural Heritage and Tourism Organization of Isfahan, the Chamber of Commerce, the Medical Council, the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, health service providers, tourism services providers, investors, and the Tosea Saderat Bank. The rate of knowledge of the Cultural Heritage and Tourism Organization of Isfahan, clinic and international relationship of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences from government policy about medical tourism were very much. Private Hospitals, the Medical Council, investors, and the University of Medical Sciences had great power. Private hospitals, clinics, the Cultural Heritage and Tourism Organization of Isfahan, and the University of Medical Sciences were in the supporter position. The effected strategies were the included strategies, focused on increasing power; increasing support, and on maintaining the position. There are different stakeholders in the medical tourism industry. Thus, policy makers can plan, make a policy and decision, and use effective strategies to develop medical tourism by designing a medical tourism stakeholders' network, a medical tourism provincial council, and clarify the roles and responsibilities of stakeholders.

  11. Role of nuclear power in Romania's sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Anca; Lavrov, George; Costea, Diana; Vasile, Camelia

    2002-01-01

    The role of nuclear power in Romania can be assessed by taking into account the present situation of Romania electro-power systems, the socio-economic and technological evolution, of Romania as well as world wide evolution of the unique power market according the 'Green Card - Towards an European strategy for power securement' endorsed by the European Commission in November 2000. The Romanian electro-power systems is currently undergoing a restructuring process aiming at efficiency improvement, cost reduction, private investment encouraging, efficient use of available national resources. The energy demand in Romania decreased in the period 1989-2000 by an annual rate of 3.8% due to the new trends in the Romanian economy. A thorough analysis for the 2002-2020 showed the necessity for installing a capacity of about 9,000 MW what implies: - achievement of about 1935 MW in hydroelectric plants and 2,100 MW from the Cernavoda NPP; - construction of new condensation groups operating with domestic lignite and pitcoal from import; - new groups with combined cycle based on natural gas; - new nuclear units with 700 MW CANDU type reactors. Achievement of the nuclear program will reduce the Romania's dependences on fossil fuel import enhance will secure the fulfilment of the provisions of European Union's Green Card. It will require important investments what will entailed a rice in cost of the electric energy for end consumers. Although a moderate nuclear power realization is a viable solution for Romania ensuring both the levelling of prices and taxes for fuel and energy to those of European countries and the fulfilment of the Kyoto protocol requirements. Decision for the proper sizing of nuclear program will be made according to many factors implied in the Romanian electro-power system development, as well as by using the experience acquired from the Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 operation

  12. The municipality as a stakeholder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmqvist, Roland

    2006-01-01

    The author explains how local politicians look upon the dialogue regarding nuclear installations in their municipalities. As seen from the map of European reactors there is a lot of local districts affected by nuclear operations. What has a mayor from such a community to say about the shut-down phase of such operations and especially about the need for communication between stakeholders when closing and decommissioning a nuclear power reactor? To answer this question the author has structured his presentation into 4 parts as follows: 1. The European municipalities ? some characteristics; 2. The siting of NPPs (nuclear power plants) in Europe; 3. The shutdown, decommissioning and the dismantling phases; 4. Lessons learnt

  13. Modelling with stakeholders - Next generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinov, Alexey; Kolagani, Nagesh; McCall, Michael K; Glynn, Pierre D.; Kragt, Marit E; Ostermann, Frank O; Pierce, Suzanne A; Ramu, Palaniappan

    2016-01-01

    This paper updates and builds on ‘Modelling with Stakeholders’ Voinov and Bousquet, 2010 which demonstrated the importance of, and demand for, stakeholder participation in resource and environmental modelling. This position paper returns to the concepts of that publication and reviews the progress made since 2010. A new development is the wide introduction and acceptance of social media and web applications, which dramatically changes the context and scale of stakeholder interactions and participation. Technology advances make it easier to incorporate information in interactive formats via visualization and games to augment participatory experiences. Citizens as stakeholders are increasingly demanding to be engaged in planning decisions that affect them and their communities, at scales from local to global. How people interact with and access models and data is rapidly evolving. In turn, this requires changes in how models are built, packaged, and disseminated: citizens are less in awe of experts and external authorities, and they are increasingly aware of their own capabilities to provide inputs to planning processes, including models. The continued acceleration of environmental degradation and natural resource depletion accompanies these societal changes, even as there is a growing acceptance of the need to transition to alternative, possibly very different, life styles. Substantive transitions cannot occur without significant changes in human behaviour and perceptions. The important and diverse roles that models can play in guiding human behaviour, and in disseminating and increasing societal knowledge, are a feature of stakeholder processes today.

  14. Stakeholders of Voluntary Forest Carbon Offset Projects in China: An Empirical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derong Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is one of the defining challenges facing the planet. Voluntary forest carbon offset project which has the potential to boost forest carbon storage and mitigate global warming has aroused the global concern. The objective of this paper is to model the game situation and analyze the game behaviors of stakeholders of voluntary forest carbon offset projects in China. A stakeholder model and a Power-Benefit Matrix are constructed to analyze the roles, behaviors, and conflicts of stakeholders including farmers, planting entities, communities, government, and China Green Carbon Foundation. The empirical analysis results show that although the stakeholders have diverse interests and different goals, a win-win solution is still possible through their joint participation and compromise in the voluntary forest carbon offset project. A wide governance structure laying emphasis on benefit balance, equality, and information exchanges and being regulated by all stakeholders has been constructed. It facilitates the agreement among the stakeholders with conflicting or different interests. The joint participation of stakeholders in voluntary forest carbon offset projects might change the government-dominated afforestation/reforestation into a market, where all participators including government are encouraged to cooperate with each other to improve the condition of fund shortage and low efficiency.

  15. The role of nuclear power in sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourogov, V.M.; Juhn, P.E.; Kagramanian, V.S.

    1999-01-01

    Today's developing countries, with some three-quarters of the world population, consume only one-fourth of the global energy. In coming decades, the global energy consumption is anticipated to increase substantially, to a large extent driven by the developing world. Responsive long-term energy strategies that exploit energy sources with a minimum of greenhouse-gas emissions need be developed and implemented as rapidly as possible to limit environmental pollution. The energy mix that evolves will not depend only on environmental considerations, but also on economic, technological, supply and political factors. On the global level, fossil fuels will continue to be the major energy source, probably with natural gas as the major component. Nuclear power is currently a significant source of energy supply, but there is no consensus regarding its future role. Its use has stagnated in Europe and in North America, but it maintains its position as a strong option in Asian countries. Economy and security of supply, along with an awareness of environmental benefits, have been principal considerations in the choice of nuclear power and these three factors will also determine its long-term role in a sustainable energy future. Comparative assessments of the full energy chain of energy options consider a number of issues: fuel and land requirements; environmental pollutants; confinement vs. dispersion of waste; greenhouse gas emissions; natural resources; and external costs, e.g. interest and depreciation, waste management, and energy taxes. Such assessments will help clarify the merits of nuclear power. (author)

  16. Co-creating Stakeholder and Brand Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Wallpach, Sylvia; Voyer, Benjamin; Kastanakis, Minas

    2017-01-01

    This article introduces the special section on reciprocal co-creation of stakeholder and brand identities. Branding research and practice traditionally focus on the managerial creation and implementation of brand identity. Based on recent paradigmatic shifts from managerial to co-creative branding...... and from consumer to multi-stakeholder approaches in marketing, this special section develops a dynamic, process-oriented perspective on brand identity. Brand identity continuously emerges as a dynamic outcome of social processes of stakeholder interaction. Reciprocally, brand identity plays a potentially...... important role in ongoing interactive identity development processes of stakeholders. The special section contributes to deepening the understanding of this reciprocal co-creation of stakeholder and brand identities, through a series of conceptual and empirical articles. The Introduction reviews four...

  17. The role of nuclear power in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, E.I.

    1977-01-01

    The role of nuclear energy in the world is discussed from the near term and long term. For the period through the mid 1980s sufficient nuclear capacity is considered critical to forestall serious shortages of oil and possible high prices leading to economic stagnation. Over the next 30-35 years it is estimated that world nuclear power will reach a capacity of approx. 3 million megawatts electrical when world electrical capacity will be about 8 million megawatts. With this nuclear capacity and if a annual growth rate of 5% is achieved for coal, oil and gas would remain at their present rate of consumption and would be increasingly reserved for specialized uses where substitution is not feasible. Caution is stressed, however, especially in using long term forecasts except for overall guidance and even in short term projections frequent up-dating and revision is recommended. The factors which have inhibited nuclear power growth are discussed including: 1) rapidly rising capital costs and financing problems, 2) rising and uncertain fuel cycle costs, 3) uncertainties in licensing and public acceptance. Despite the foregoing, nuclear power still retains an economic edge over fossil-fired units in substantial portions of the world. Assuming satisfactory solution of its major problems it is estimated that about 27-40% of the electrical capacity of developing countries will be nuclear by the year 2000. This nuclear capacity will comprise approx. 20% of the world's total nuclear power capacity around the turn of the century. (orig.) [de

  18. Nuclear power and its role in limiting CO2 emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suparman

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the proper role of nuclear power in the long term energy planning by comparing different type of scenarios in terms of CO2 emission reduction, based on the Business-as-Usual (BAU) scenario. For this purpose, a MESSAGE (Model of Energy Supply Systems and their General Environmental impacts) was used to develop energy planning as well as CO2 emission projection. A sensitivity analysis for CO2 reduction rates of 2.%, 3%, 4% and 5% have been done. From this sensitivity analysis, it can be concluded that nuclear will be a part of optimum solution under CO2 limitation of at least 3% from BAU condition. The more the environmental standards are tightened and enforced the more and the earlier nuclear power becomes part of the optimum generation mix. (author)

  19. Potential role of nuclear power in developing and transition economies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganiage, D.; Dierstein, P.

    1995-01-01

    The potential role of nuclear power is different in developing or in transition economies; in developing countries such as China, the growth of electricity consumption is high and the construction of several standardized plants is economically justified; in transitional economies, such as Ukraine, the needs are uncertain, old and unsafe plants have to be decommissioned and uncompleted nuclear plants (due to financial problems) should be completed. Nuclear power may provide the developing and transition economies with several advantages such as energy independence and fuel supply security, minimal environmental pollution, support to local industry and employment. It also means the support of national authorities and the development of a suitable infrastructure for plant safety and waste management, financial help and local population acceptance

  20. A dynamic perspective in Freeman’s stakeholder model

    OpenAIRE

    Y. FASSIN

    2011-01-01

    Stakeholder literature has acknowledged the need to complement the extant theory on stakeholder management by more dynamic perspectives. This article makes use of the recent terminology of stakewatcher and stakeseeker to illustrate the dynamic aspect of stakeholder theory transposed in the graphical representation of Freeman’s stakeholder model. Presenting a few selected case studies, it applies the scheme on the concept of value responsibility chain; it exemplifies the role of stakeseekers i...

  1. The role of instrumentation and control systems in power uprating projects for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The IAEA's activities in nuclear power plant operating performance and life cycle management are aimed at increasing Member State capabilities in utilizing good engineering and management practices developed and transferred by the IAEA. In particular, the IAEA supports activities focusing on the improvement of nuclear power plant (NPP) performance, plant life management, training, power uprating, operational licence renewal, and the modernization of instrumentation and control (I and C) systems of NPPs in Member States. The subject of the I and C systems' role in power uprating projects in NPPs was suggested by the Technical Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation in 2003. The subject was then approved by the IAEA and included in the programmes for 2004-2007. The increasing importance of power uprating projects can be attributed to the general worldwide tendency to the deregulation of the electricity market. The greater demand for electricity and the available capacity and safety margins, as well as the pressure from several operating NPPs resulted in requests for licence modification to enable operation at a higher power level, beyond the original licence provisions. A number of nuclear utilities have already gone through the uprating process for their nuclear reactors, and many more are planning to go through this modification process. In addition to mechanical and process equipment changes, parts of the electrical and I and C systems and components may also need to be altered to accommodate the new operating conditions and safety limits. This report addresses the role of I and C systems in NPP power uprating projects. The objective of the report is to provide guidance to utilities, safety analysts, regulators and others involved in the preparation, implementation and licensing of power uprating projects, with particular emphasis on the I and C aspects of these projects. As the average age of NPPs is increasing, it is becoming common for

  2. The role of stakeholders in Murray-Darling Basin water management: How do irrigators make water use decisions and how can this influence water policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, E. M.; Wheeler, S. A.; Smith, D. J.; Gray, S.; Overton, I. C.; Crossman, N. D.; Doody, T.

    2014-12-01

    their communities and appreciated for their role in the sustainability of the Basin. The mental modelling approach used in this research could be used to educate all stakeholders in differences in perspectives and common goals and bridge the gap into how to implement sustainable management practices.

  3. Management of sustainable tourism destination through stakeholder cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božena Krce Miočić

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Destination presents a set of different organizations and individuals who can work towards realising the same objectives or their objectives can be diametrically opposed. Harmonisation of such objectives in a unique strategic development of the entire destination is usually taken over by destination management organization (DMO established to accomplish the mentioned objective. The opposed interests in such a system as complex as tourism result in the degradation of space and society in which tourism takes place. Therefore sustainable development in tourism represents a primary concept of development today. Tourism is a fast growing phenomenon and its sustainable development represents a necessity. Besides the positive economic outputs of tourism, we should also mention its negative impact on the particular destination, the environmental degradation to some extent, as well as socio-economic elements of local community. Accordingly, multi-stakeholder concept in destination management should include all interest and influential groups in tourism development planning. Such integrated destination management connects all stakeholders independent from influence or interest powers to participate directly or indirectly in creating and implementing the quality tourism development. This concept’s basic function is connecting and coordinating stakeholders with different interests within a tourism destination, in order to create quality product and a recognizable destination image, and to achieve a long-term sustainable competitiveness on the market. However, based on the stakeholder approach, the most emphasized issue in sustainable tourism development concept is the government that holds a key role in socio-economic development. In this paper, we analysed current involvement of stakeholders in Zadar County tourism development and examined their interest in future involvement in sustainable destination development. Based on the analysis of focus group

  4. Energy Outlook and the role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, Morris

    1998-01-01

    With projections of sharply rising energy consumption and continuing global dependence on fossil fuel sources, environmental pollution and greenhouse gas emission could reach severe damaging levels. The global challenge is to develop strategies that foster a sustainable energy future less dependent on fossil fuels. Low environmental impacts and a vast fuel resource potential should allow nuclear power to have a meaningful role in the supply of energy during the next century. Nuclear power for over 40 years has contributed significantly to world energy needs, currently providing more than 6% of primary energy and 17% of global electricity. Low environmental impacts and a vast fuel resource potential should allowed to contribute substantially to meeting the sustainable energy challenge.. Although there is some awareness on both the technical and political level of nuclear power's advantages, it is not a globally favored option in a sustainable energy future. A sizeable sector of public opinion remains hesitant or opposed to its increased use, some even to a continuation at present levels. This paper, after some discussion of the rising energy consumption, concentrates on a comparison of the environmental impacts of the available energy options. (author)

  5. Stakeholder analysis of Agroparks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubben, E.F.M.; Isakhanyan, G.

    2011-01-01

    An agropark is a cluster in which several primary producers and processors cooperate to enhance sustainable agrofood production. Because agroparks represent complex system innovations, this article studies their realisation trajectories from the stakeholder management perspective. By using the case

  6. Stakeholder Attitudes EBM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) conducted a survey of fisheries stakeholders on the Gulf and East Coasts of the United States seeking their views on...

  7. Stakeholders: theory and practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedman, Andrew L; Miles, Samantha

    2006-01-01

    ... of the concept on practice and policy. However, as the concept has become more popular, the path has become tangled with the many different ways the concept has been used. For example, different practices have come to be called stakeholder activities, particularly by those seeking to use the label to legitimize their actions. Also, a range of different definitions as to what a stakeholder is has emerged. Concentrating on these issues encourages a view of a second future path of the stake...

  8. Stakeholder Values and Ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Sveinsdottir, Thordis; Wessels, Bridgette; Smallwood, Rod; Linde, Peter; Kalla, Vasso; Tsoukala, Victoria; Sondervan, Jeroen

    2013-01-01

    This report is the deliverable for Work Package 1 (WP1), Stakeholder Values and Ecosystems, of the EU FP7 funded project RECODE (Grant Agreement No: 321463), which focuses on developing Policy Recommendations for Open Access to Research Data in Europe. WP1 focuses on understanding stakeholder values and ecosystems in Open Access, dissemination and preservation in the area of scientific and scholarly data (thus not government data). The objectives of this WP are as follows: • Identify and map ...

  9. COMMUNICATION STRATEGY ABOUT BUSINESS MODELS: STAKEHOLDERS PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojoagă Alexandru

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Organizations inform stakeholders about their current and future activities, processes, created value, strategic intentions, and other information that may influence the established relationships. Organizations choose to communicate with stakeholders by different means and in varied ways. The annual report represents a way of communicating between companies and their stakeholders, and it is offering comprehensive information about how companies operates and creates value. The business model is an emerging concept in management literature and practice. The concept describes the logic by which a organization creates, maintains and delivers value for its stakeholders. Through annual reports organisations can communicate to stakeholders information about their business models.We investigated how information about business models is explicitly communicated through annual reports, and how this information is reffering to stakeholders. Our paper aims to reveal which stakeholders are more often mentioned when organizations are communicating about business models through annual reports. This approach shows the attention degree given by organizations to stakeholders. We perceived this from a strategic point of view, as a strategic signal. Thus, we considered if the stakeholder is mentioned more frequent in the communicated message it has a greater role in communication strategy about business model. We conducted an exploratory research and have realized a content analysis.The analysed data consist in over a thousand annual reports from 96 organizations. We analysed the informations transmitted by organizations through annual reports. The annual reports were for a time period of 12 years. Most of the selected companies are multi-business, and are operating in different industries. The results show the stakeholder’s hierarchy based on how often they were mentioned in the communicated messages about business models through annual reports. Based on our

  10. The energy transition: new dialogues between cities and local stakeholders. Exploratory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxer, Olivia; Lacassagne, Sylvie; Guerin, Laura; Dupas, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Energy Cities has carried out an exploratory study for cities and diverse project leaders desiring to start a sustainable energy transition in collaboration with all stakeholders in their territory. Local authorities have a key role to play in climate and energy policies and in the energy transition towards a low carbon, energy efficient and sustainable society. However, they cannot act alone. They often control only a small percentage of the emissions of local greenhouse gases directly, and this percentage rarely exceeds a quarter. It is therefore necessary to rely on the involvement of local stakeholders, which in turn will provide an opportunity for these stakeholders to be ambitious through innovative actions. How to stimulate stakeholders' involvement? In the past several years, a number of citizens', economic actors' or other local actors' initiatives have contributed to the energy transition of territories. These initiatives are based on empowerment. For instance, stakeholders can get access and the power to act on innovative tools and approaches, such as social economy, stakeholders' participation, crowd-funding, renewable energy citizen cooperatives and fab labs. Two primary questions to explore: As coordinators and pilots of local strategies for energy transition, how can local authorities foster, identify, support and replicate local energy transition initiatives? What dialogue should local authorities and leaders of local initiatives engage in? How can they drive new modes of governance, where stakeholders share responsibility to co-develop public policies, manage their city, and encourage the energy transition at the local level? We selected more than ten European energy transition initiatives, as diverse as they are innovative, anticipating new forms of governance and new ways to act and collaborate. The exploratory study does not only describe their process but it also analyses the synergies between the different stakeholders and the role the

  11. Object of intervention or stakeholder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Ann-Merete

    (Sanders & Stappers, 2008) or radical organizational innovation (Scharmer & Kaüfer, 2014). Taking co-creation processes into the world of social work however, envokes a number of questions. Basically; what is the problem and to whom? Who are the stakeholders and what is their motivation? How is power...... are equal partners (Fenwick 2012), which in some cases is not entirely true. Preliminary findings indicate that the mindset required for co-creation to take place is not necessarily in tune with professional habits in social work nor with public governance. A gap between political vision and paedagogical...

  12. The role and significance of nuclear power in China in response to climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Huiqun; Wu Jin; Bai Yunsheng

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes international climate negotiations and the domestic situation. In accordance with the development goal of 2020, the emission reduction of nuclear power is measured as compared with thermal power from the sector of power generation and nuclear power chain respectively. It emphasized that nuclear power can play a significant role in the emission reduction with corresponding policy recommendations. (authors)

  13. The role of fusion as a future power source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kintner, E.E.; Hirsch, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    potentials of fusion power in relation to nuclear fission, solar and other future energy sources can be assessed in general terms. The probability of success in fusion development, while not susceptible to measurement, continues to improve. Fusion can be expected to play an increasingly important role in energy supply world-wide in the early decades of the 21st century. If a commercial scale demonstration reactor (greater than or equal to 500 MWe) operates successfully by 2000, it is reasonable to anticipate as many as 20 to 100 large (1000 MWe) plants by 2020 and an increasing percentage of fusion electrical generating stations thereafter

  14. Government's role in power supply security. A working group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The working group was to analyse the Government's role in terms of improving the security of supply of the electricity market in exceptionally difficult capacity situations and to make propositions for the ways of arranging a tendering procedure concerning security of supply and capacity control, so as to meet the requirements of the EC Energy Internal Market Directives after 1 July 2004. The Working Group considers that there is no need at this stage to introduce a separate new system intended as a supplement to technical reserves in Finland. Such a system would not bring new capacity for the use of the power system, and in the case of existing capacity, production would only be transferred from one market to another. However, the situation may change from this, if there occur such factors on the market that aim to raise the market price of electricity or if it turned out that reserve power plants would be decommissioned on a large scale. The working group proposes that such a provision be added to the Electricity Market Act that would oblige the electricity supplier to notify the Energy Market Authority of a planned service outage of a power plant of at least 100 MVA producing electricity separately, which would fall within the time period 1 December - 28 February. The Energy Market Authority would be vested with the powers to postpone the outage due to a tight output situation, if there are not technical or safety- bound obstacles to this. It is important for the sufficiency of the power need of the Internal Market that the price signals of the market are reflected to both producers and consumers of electricity. The working group further proposes that the Ministry of Trade and Industry would look into development of the meter-reading requirements, so that they would, for their part, create the conditions for price flexibility in power consumption and for new sales products of electricity. In addition, tightening of the hourly metering requirement related to the

  15. The future of nuclear power: The role of the IFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.

    1995-01-01

    The author is in favor of nuclear energy for three major reasons: (1) a nuclear power station emits no particulates or sulfur; (2) a nuclear power station emits no carbon dioxide and therefore does not contribute (appreciably) to the possibility of global warming which is a major environmental issue of this century; (3) nuclear energy offers the opportunity to have an energy supply sustainable for the next hundred thousands years, and is the only supply presently known to be able to do so at a reasonable cost. He notes that at Rio de Janeiro, the USA joined other countries in calling for an approach to an indefinitely sustainable future. Alas, they were not bold or honest enough to state that using nuclear power, combined with considerable increase in energy efficiency and prudent use of renewables, is the only known way of achieving one other than massive population reduction or poverty. It is unlikely that improved energy efficiency can do the job alone. If the first two were the only issues, ordinary light water reactors would be adequate. One would not need the breeder reactor. But unless huge quantities of high quality uranium are found, or a cheap way of extracting it from seawater, one will need to have a way of using the uranium 238 or thorium. This is the role of this meeting. The author arrives at a set of criteria for a breeder reactor system: (1) it must be safe (secure against major accidents); (2) the system must be proliferation resistant; (3) the cost of the produced electricity must be competitive with other sources of energy--with perhaps a small margin for environmental advantage; (4) it must be capable of rapid expansion if and when needed

  16. Stakeholder engagement for improved school policy: development and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The health and education departments of government share a responsibility for promoting the health of children through policies in the school setting. These policies can be enhanced through the involvement of such stakeholders as school personnel, students, parents or caregivers, health professionals, the non-profit sector and industry. Although there is little evidence-based literature on the roles of stakeholders in school policy development and implementation, stakeholder involvement appears to be critical throughout the policy process. This article discusses stakeholder involvement in the development and implementation of school policies that promote and support healthy eating and physical activity. Canadian examples illustrate stakeholder engagement in this context.

  17. Shareholder, stakeholder-owner or broad stakeholder maximization

    OpenAIRE

    Mygind, Niels

    2004-01-01

    With reference to the discussion about shareholder versus stakeholder maximization it is argued that the normal type of maximization is in fact stakeholder-owner maxi-mization. This means maximization of the sum of the value of the shares and stake-holder benefits belonging to the dominating stakeholder-owner. Maximization of shareholder value is a special case of owner-maximization, and only under quite re-strictive assumptions shareholder maximization is larger or equal to stakeholder-owner...

  18. Listed Firm's Level of Stakeholder Transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Caspar

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes how Danish listed firms comply with the Danish Corporate Governance Code's recommendations regarding the categories: Role of shareholders, role of stakeholders and transparency. It is shown that the number of recommendations can be explained by six different underlying facto...

  19. IMPLICATIONS OF CSR ON CORPORATE STAKEHOLDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crisan Catalina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Companies’ strategies and values must be in accordance to stakeholders’ expectations and needs because their role and influences on companies’ activity are decisive for companies future development. Corporate Social Responsibility is a meaningful way through which companies can pursue sustainable development by having a coherent economical, social and environmental perspective on how the business should be managed. CSR must become an integral part of corporate management system, because it has a major role in distressing the relation between company and major stakeholders, both internally and externally. CSR is a global phenomenon, which draws the attention of a growing number of partisans, from public private and social sector. To demonstrate the applicability of the theoretical approaches deduced from the existing literature, the authors recourse to an empirical qualitative research, conducted through a questionnaire implemented to top managers, HR managers and heads of CSR departments within large companies that operate in Romania. The research is based on the analysis of a number of 87 questionnaires and aims to highlight major stakeholders and finding how companies’ responsible activities can influence stakeholders. This study is designed to highlight how prioritization of stakeholders influences CSR initiatives within large companies that operate in Romania, and to present a perspective of company’s approach towards shared value influence major stakeholders. The conclusions drawn have a greater relevance both theoretically and especially practically because provides insights on how large companies perceive CSR and how stakeholders influence responsible initiatives in emergent country like Romania where stereotypes are difficult to manage.

  20. Corporate Stakeholding and Globalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauesen, Linne Marie

    2016-01-01

    , the global warming, the disasters of global consumerism in terms of the collapse of the Rana Plaza factory in the fashion industry, are examples of how the stakeholder concept cannot continue to be defined as narrow as corporations usually does. The butterfly effect of globalism has shown to be – yes, global....... Even the smallest company, the single consumer and the tiniest decision made by anyone may in the future – perhaps even tomorrow – affect stakeholders, we didn’t know existed. The future generation is also to be considered as stakeholders, which decisions made today may affect. Companies, consumers......, everyday people including children already know this even from the first day at school if not before. What we need is not knowledge about these phenomena – it is how to think globally when we decide locally: in companies, in daily households, in education of our future generations. This chapter discusses...

  1. EDUCATIONAL PROJECTS STAKEHOLDER MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юлія Юріївна ГУСЄВА

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An approach based on an integration of requirements breakdown structure and work breakdown structure of the project is proposed. It can complement existing methods of project stakeholders classification with the indicator of resource input, which can be defined in monetary terms. A method of requirements monitoring is proposed, which allows you to track the requirements of project stakeholders over time according to the actual amount of resources spent by analogy with the earned value method. Proposed indexes are the basis not only for monitoring but for the forecast of the project. The need of creating of a mechanism for getting baseline data taking into account the existence of different types of requirements of project stakeholders is grounded.

  2. Stakeholder involvement in Swedish nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran

    2006-09-01

    raised about whether the European Union will become an important stakeholder in Swedish waste management, if climate change means new opportunities for nuclear power, if the national government and the Environmental Court will grow stronger as stakeholders, if environmental organisations will succeed in re-opening the big issues of method and site for a final repository, and if the strong social-technical divide will dissolve

  3. Stakeholder involvement in Swedish nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Section for Science and Technology Studies

    2006-09-15

    have been raised about whether the European Union will become an important stakeholder in Swedish waste management, if climate change means new opportunities for nuclear power, if the national government and the Environmental Court will grow stronger as stakeholders, if environmental organisations will succeed in re-opening the big issues of method and site for a final repository, and if the strong social-technical divide will dissolve.

  4. Couples' Career Orientation, Gender Role Orientation, and Perceived Equity as Determinants of Marital Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Christine S.; Perlman, Daniel S.

    1989-01-01

    Investigated influence of resource exchanges and gender role on marital power. Compared dual-career (N=50) and single-career (N=50) couples. Found two couple types did not differ in perceived power nor in self-reported strategies for influencing spouses. Found gender role orientation did not affect marital power. (Author/CM)

  5. The role of corruption and unethical behaviour in precluding the placement of industry sponsored clinical trials in sub-Saharan Africa: Stakeholder views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egharevba, Efe; Atkinson, Jacqueline

    2016-08-15

    Clinical trials still represent the gold standard in testing the safety and efficacy of new and existing treatments. However, developing regions including sub-Saharan Africa remain underrepresented in pharmaceutical industry sponsored trials for a number of reasons including fear of corruption and unethical behaviour. This fear exists both on the part of pharmaceutical companies, and investigators carrying out research in the region. The objective of this research was to understand the ethical considerations associated with the conduct of pharmaceutical industry sponsored clinical trials in sub-Saharan Africa. Corruption was identified as a significant issue by a number of stakeholders who participated in semi-structured interviews and completed questionnaires. Additionally, fear of being perceived as corrupt or unethical even when conducting ethically sound research was raised as a concern. Thus corruption, whether actual or perceived, is one of a number of issues which have precluded the placement of a greater number of pharmaceutical sponsored clinical trials in this region. More discussion around corruption with all relevant stakeholders is required in order for progress to be made and to enable greater involvement of sub-Saharan African countries in the conduct of industry sponsored clinical trials.

  6. Global Sustainable Development: The Role of Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, Stanley R.

    1990-01-01

    The inevitable growth in the world's population and the need for a reasonable standard of living for all nations will drive the demand for energy to much higher levels than the world has yet experienced. A radical improvement in energy efficiency and conservation could limit the global annual demand to 100 GJ per person. consumption of North America. With the developing nations achieving a standard of living commensurate with this level, the global energy demand would increase by a factor of 2.5 to 1000 EJ per year. Concern over the impact of CO 2 emissions on global warming will likely lead to an international consensus on some reduction in the use of fossil fuels. To maintain environmental sustainability, all nations of the world would need to limit their fossil fuel consumption, particularly those in North America and Europe. Other energy sources will play an important role in all regions. However, the main burden is likely to fall upon nuclear energy as an essential element of the total energy supply. The danger eliminated while sustaining global development if the governments of the world commit to the use of nuclear power on a global scale. The industrial intrastucture can be put in place for such a major international program. A more difficult question is the availability of the necessary financing. On a global scale the financial requirement is within the range of current military expenditures. However, it is clear that not all the countries of Asia, Africa and Latin America will be able to finance their own needs. A new international cooperative program will be necessary. The needed change in energy patterns is dramatic and will take time to implement. The change should be underway by the beginning of the next century. Otherwise the world faces the prospect of environmental disaster and social disruption as the nations struggle to improve their living standards through the increased use of fossil fuels. The role of nuclear power in providing the energy for

  7. Low-power critical facilities: their role in the nuclear renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didsbury, R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of low power critical facilities and their role in the nuclear renaissance. It outline the role of human capital in some detail. sufficient conditions for the renaissance are that nuclear power is safe, sustainable, economical and proliferation resistant.

  8. Introducing legal method when teaching stakeholder theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Governments are particularly salient stakeholders for business ethics. They act on societal needs and social expectations, and have the political and legal powers to restrict or expand the economic freedoms of business as well as the legitimacy and often urgency to do so. We draw on two examples:...

  9. Relation among Stakeholders in HIV/AIDS Response Case Study: Palu Municipality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustika Sari

    2017-06-01

    research results show that the increasing trend of HIV/AIDS found in the Palu Municipality is due to the poorly established relation among stakeholders, be it key stakeholders, primary stakeholders, or secondary stakeholders. In addition to the poor relationship established among stakeholders being observable through a number of negative characteristics seen in their interactional and relational paterns, it was also found that the said relation was influenced by each of the stakeholders’ power and interests.

  10. Shareholder, stakeholder-owner or broad stakeholder maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Niels

    2004-01-01

    With reference to the discussion about shareholder versus stakeholder maximization it is argued that the normal type of maximization is in fact stakeholder-owner maxi-mization. This means maximization of the sum of the value of the shares and stake-holder benefits belonging to the dominating...... including the shareholders of a company. Although it may be the ultimate goal for Corporate Social Responsibility to achieve this kind of maximization, broad stakeholder maximization is quite difficult to give a precise definition. There is no one-dimensional measure to add different stakeholder benefits...... not traded on the mar-ket, and therefore there is no possibility for practical application. Broad stakeholder maximization instead in practical applications becomes satisfying certain stakeholder demands, so that the practical application will be stakeholder-owner maximization un-der constraints defined...

  11. Role of nuclear power in securing future energy supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Kuster, J.

    1982-01-01

    Status of nuclear power engineering development in the FRG is considered. The problems of NPP waste and spent fuel reprocessing and problems of fast and high-temperature reactor design are discussed. It is noted that in 1980 the NPP registered power in the FRG amounted to about 9300 MW, that corresponds to approximately 14% of power production in the country. NPPs with power of 30000 MW (el.) are under construction or prepared for it at present. It is concluded that the prospects of nuclear power engineering development in the FRG are good now though in the past it developed too slowly

  12. Stakeholder involvement in nuclear issues. INSAG-20. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Many of the world's nuclear power plants were constructed long ago without much public involvement in the associated decision making. It is anticipated, however, that a variety of stakeholders will seek participation in such decisions now as the nuclear option is being revisited in many places. Accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, among other places, have served to arouse public concern. The development of 'here-and-now' media capabilities has created an awareness that may not have previously existed. Improvements in educational systems and the development of the Internet have made technical information and expertise available to individuals and locations that were previously without them. In addition, consideration of the environmental impacts of various energy strategies has moved to the fore. INSAG has concluded that the expectations of stakeholders of a right to participate in energy decisions are something that the nuclear community must address. Decisions regarding such matters as the siting and construction of a nuclear power plant are no longer largely the domain of a closed community of technical experts and utility executives. Today, the concerns and expectations of all manner of persons and organizations - from the local farmer to the international financial institution - must be considered. This report is intended for use by all stakeholders in the nuclear community - national regulatory authorities, nuclear power plant designers and operators, public interest organizations and individuals, the media and, not to be forgotten, local and national populations. INSAG's fundamental conclusion is that all stakeholders with an interest in nuclear decisions should be provided with an opportunity for full and effective participation in them. With this right, however, come certain obligations on all sides for openness, candour and civility. INSAG is hopeful that this report will help define the interests and roles of the stakeholders in the nuclear

  13. The role of power in financial statement fraud schemes

    OpenAIRE

    Albrecht, Chad; Holland, Daniel; Malagueño, Ricardo; Dolan, Simon; Tzafrir, Shay

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate a large-scale financial statement fraud to better understand the process by which individuals are recruited to participate in financial statement fraud schemes. The case reveals that perpetrators often use power to recruit others to participate in fraudulent acts. To illustrate how power is used, we propose a model, based upon the classical French and Raven taxonomy of power, that explains how one individual influences another individual to participate in financi...

  14. The Role of United States Air Power in Peacekeeping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bash, Brooks

    1994-01-01

    .... Recognizing this trend and the fact that peacekeeping can serve US national security interests, US policymakers have earmarked military peacekeeping involvement, the employment of air power will...

  15. Safety Outreach and Incident Response Stakeholder Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosewater, David Martin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Conover, David [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this document is to set out a strategy to reach all stakeholders that can impact the timely deployment of safe stationary energy storage systems in the built environment with information on ESS technology and safety that is relevant to their role in deployment of the technology.

  16. Stakeholders and quality assurance in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leisyte, Liudvika; Westerheijden, Donald F.; Eggins, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The various changes in post-bureaucratic organising, which are moving towards network approaches, coupled with the managerial agenda of corporate governance, have redefined the roles of various internal and external stakeholders in the governance of higher education institutions (Leisyte and Dee,

  17. Direct Stakeholder's Perception of PPA Clauses In The Nepalese Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.B. Shrestha

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the perceptions of the stakeholders regarding the key issues in Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs in the Nepalese Environment. A total of 90 questionnaires representing sponsors, utility, lenders and government officials were used for the study. The questionnaire sought the perception of the stakeholders regarding the significance (importance of the clauses and the likelihood of inclusion of the clauses in PPAs. Comparison of the ranks of means was conducted by Kruskal-Wallis tests to see the significance of the differences in responses of the stakeholders and Mann-Whitney tests to see the significance of the differences of the pairs of stakeholders. Data analysis showed clauses where the prime stakeholders have similar stand and clauses where the perceptions are divergent. The findings of this paper will help the stakeholders in negotiating PPAs.

  18. Theory-Based Stakeholder Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Morten Balle; Vedung, Evert

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a new approach to program theory evaluation called theory-based stakeholder evaluation or the TSE model for short. Most theory-based approaches are program theory driven and some are stakeholder oriented as well. Practically, all of the latter fuse the program perceptions of the various stakeholder groups into one unitary…

  19. Managing stakeholders in transformational government

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinwald, Anja Kaldahl; Kræmmergaard, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    a stakeholder perspective. The paper reports how they succeeded in involving the most important stakeholders in the process of reaching transformational government. Finally the paper offers six lessons learned, based on the case study, about how to manage the involved stakeholders to reach transformational...

  20. Strengthening stakeholder-engaged research and research on stakeholder engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Kristin N; Miller, Elizabeth

    2017-06-01

    Stakeholder engagement is an emerging field with little evidence to inform best practices. Guidelines are needed to improve the quality of research on stakeholder engagement through more intentional planning, evaluation and reporting. We developed a preliminary framework for planning, evaluating and reporting stakeholder engagement, informed by published conceptual models and recommendations and then refined through our own stakeholder engagement experience. Our proposed exploratory framework highlights contexts and processes to be addressed in planning stakeholder engagement, and potential immediate, intermediate and long-term outcomes that warrant evaluation. We use this framework to illustrate both the minimum information needed for reporting stakeholder-engaged research and the comprehensive detail needed for reporting research on stakeholder engagement.

  1. Popularization of the role of nuclear power construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ying

    2010-01-01

    Scientific popularization shall be promoted in advance before nuclear power development. Since it was founded, Jiangsu Nuclear Power Corporation (JNPC) has always focused on the popularization of nuclear power knowledge to enable the public understand and access to nuclear power. Adhering to the center 'Popularizing nuclear power knowledge, correct steering of the public, serving the construction of TNPS and promoting the corporation development', the way of 'going out and coming in' for publicizing nuclear power knowledge has been gradually formed in line with the principle of 'close to the society, close to the people and close to the life'. The scientific popularization resources have been deeply dug out, and the education mode innovated. The healthy and continuous development of scientific popularization and education work are recognized and appraised highly by all circles of the society. Nowadays, a good atmosphere of 'everyone contends to popularize nuclear power knowledge' has formed in JNPC, and internal and external popularization and education work have yielded good results, which have created favorable social environment for the safe, proper and fast development of Tianwan Nuclear Power Station. (author)

  2. Power Play: Rethinking Roles in the Art Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, Melanie L.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how art teachers can work toward changing the power dynamics in their classrooms by using a student centered approach, as demonstrated by an example lesson about contemporary painter Kehinde Wiley. As the class unpacked the idea of power prevalent in Wiley's portraits, the students gave relevant examples of how power…

  3. The role of hydroelectric power in energy economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allet, B.

    1989-01-01

    The state of development and the technical potential of hydroelectric power worldwide, in Europe and in Switzerland are briefly compared with each other. Afterwards, the most important types of hydroelectric power stations and their function in the electricity-distribution network, are put forward. The realistic possibilities of development in Switzerland, up to the year 2025, of each type of hydroelectric power station is judged with regard to the currently valid regulations. The effects of the peoples' initiative - 'towards the salvation of our waters' or for stricter regulations for the protection of water - on the chances of realisation of these possibilities of development are shown. The forseeable decrease in the production of energy by the existing hydroelectric power stations, as a result of the regulation planned for rest water, is judged. Various forecasts for the future quantity of hydroelectric power production in Switzerland are put forward. 6 figs., 7 tabs., 12 refs

  4. AN INSIGHT INTO STAKEHOLDER-LED CSR COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesia Mihai

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Although companies have always been engaged in communicating strategically with the main stakeholders, recent developments have shown that the corporate communication function has been redefined as a complex activity of communicating with both internal and external stakeholders. The authors use stakeholder theory to provide insight into CSR on-line communication by analyzing the content available to the general public of three major Romanian companies. The analysis shows that Romanian companies have adopted mainly the engagement rhetoric, one of the explanations being the fact that many domestic stakeholders still fail to understand the key role of CSR in developing corporate identity and reputation via on-line communication.

  5. The Influence of Age and Educational Qualification on Stakeholders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    info

    how stakeholders in education perceive the integration of mobile technology into basic ... decision for schools that cannot afford modern ICT facilities to ignore powerful .... traditional view of intelligence, which recognizes only verbal and.

  6. Earning empowerment from stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.T.

    1994-01-01

    If you want to be stopped in your tracks today through political action, litigation or both, then ignore the concerns of stakeholders who believe that they have been or will be adversely impacted by what you want to do. The frustrated attempts by the United States to permanently dispose of its high level radioactive waste confirm this reality. Unless and until fundamental changes are made in the decision making process, the gridlock of litigation and political maneuvering precipitated by efforts to perfect a permanent repository will remain and likely intensify

  7. Nuclear Energy Stakeholders in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadano, Julian

    2017-01-01

    Mr Gadano, Undersecretary for Nuclear Energy, Argentina spoke from the perspective of a country looking forward to becoming a member of the NEA. He reviewed the place of nuclear energy in his country's energy mix and called attention to its role in positively addressing the global challenges of climate change and energy security. Mr Gadano also described the federal system which governs Argentina. Drawing on his expertise as a lawmaker and nuclear regulator but also as an academic sociologist, he stressed that reaching agreement on siting initiatives for example requires a sustainable relation with stakeholders, including regional governments. This is important because in the end, 'the best project is the one you can finish'

  8. Potential role of power authorities in offshore wind power development in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhanju, Amardeep; Firestone, Jeremy; Kempton, Willett

    2011-01-01

    This article examines how power authorities could facilitate and manage offshore wind power development in US coastal waters. The power authority structure is an American 20th century institution for managing energy resources-a form of a public authority or public corporation dedicated to creating, operating and maintaining electric generation and transmission infrastructure. Offshore wind power is characterized by high capital costs but no fuel costs and thus low operating costs. Therefore a power authority, by virtue of its access to low-cost capital and managerial flexibility, could facilitate offshore wind power development by reducing financial risk of developing and lowering debt payments, thus improving the risk profile and lowering the cost of electricity production. Additionally, power authorities can be made up of multiple states, thus opening the possibility for joint action by neighboring coastal states. Using primary and secondary data, we undertake an in-depth analysis of the potential benefits and shortcomings of a power authority approach. - Highlights: → Proposes an institutional solution in the form of power authority for offshore wind power. → Power authority structure can significantly lower the cost of capital. → Tax-free bond financing available to power authority can significantly reduce the cost of energy. → It can enhance regional collaboration among coastal states to harness the offshore wind potential.

  9. The role of nuclear power in sustainable energy strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, B.A.; Bennett, L.L.; Bertel, E.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of future demand outlooks for energy, electricity and nuclear power, as a background for discussion of the design and operation aspects of advanced nuclear power systems. The paper does not attempt to forecast the actual outcomes of nuclear power programmes, since this will depend upon many factors that cannot be predicted with certainty. Rather, the paper outlines the size of the opportunity for nuclear power, in terms of the expected growth in energy and electricity demands, the need to diversify energy supply options and substitute depletable fossil fuels by other energy sources, and the need to mitigate health and environmental impacts including in particular those arising from the the atmospheric emissions from burning of fossil fuels. 7 refs

  10. The mediation of environmental assessment's influence: What role for power?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashmore, Matthew; Axelsson, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Considerable empirical research has been conducted on why policy tools such as environmental assessment (EA) often appear to have ‘little effect’ (after Weiss) on policy decisions. This article revisits this debate but looks at a mediating factor that has received limited attention to-date in the context of EA — political power. Using a tripartite analytical framework, a comparative analysis of the influence and significance of power in mediating environmental policy integration is undertaken. Power is analysed, albeit partially, through an exploration of institutions that underpin social order. Empirically, the research examines the case of a new approach to policy-level EA (essentially a form of Strategic Environmental Assessment) developed by the World Bank and its trial application to urban environmental governance and planning in Dhaka mega-city, Bangladesh. The research results demonstrate that power was intimately involved in mediating the influence of the policy EA approach, in both positive (enabling) and negative (constraining) ways. It is suggested that the policy EA approach was ultimately a manifestation of a corporate strategy to maintain the powerful position of the World Bank as a leading authority on international development which focuses on knowledge generation. Furthermore, as constitutive of an institution and reflecting the worldviews of its proponents, the development of a new approach to EA also represents a significant power play. This leads us to, firstly, emphasise the concepts of strategy and intentionality in theorising how and why EA tools are employed, succeed and fail; and secondly, reflect on the reasons why power has received such limited attention to-date in EA scholarship. - Highlights: ► Conducts empirical research on the neglected issue of power. ► Employs an interpretation of power in which it is viewed as a productive phenomenon. ► Analyses the influence of power in the trial application of a new approach to

  11. Indian power industry: role of private sector in future progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dua, T.R.

    1997-01-01

    This document discusses about the current scenario of power sectors in the country. It deals with the present power policy to encourage the private sector investment. Recommendations of the long-term pricing policy are laid down to meet the financial resources and energy demands. In general the reforms should be guided by the objective of introducing competition wherever possible, so as to minimise the cost to the consumer and improve the quality and services

  12. On the present situation and future role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    The engaged public debate about the need for, and responsibility of, the continued use of nuclear power goes on unabated between the political parties and other groups of social relevance in the Federal Republic of Germany. And yet, some tentative changes seem to appear in the spectrum of opinions. In this situation, the German public utility companies operating nuclear power plants felt it necessary to express once more in a position paper their attitude with respect to nuclear power for the benefit of those bearing political responsibility at Federal and State Government level and the political parties. Their statements are guided by the responsibility the public utilities have for a reliable, sufficient, environmentally clean, and economic provision of electricity. They are convinced that nuclear power should remain a major constituent part of a comprehensive supply concept also in the future. This supply concept, which is based on the efficient use of power, relies on nuclear energy, run-of-river power, and lignite for the base load and on domestic hard coal for the medium load range; renewable energy sources are included. It underscores the social responsibility of the public utilities in ensuring electricity supply in a way which helps to conserve resources and is compatible with the environment. (orig.) [de

  13. Europe's Constitutional Court : The Role of the European Court of Justice in the Intertwined Separation of Powers and Division of Powers in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knook, A.D.L.

    2009-01-01

    This book examines the Role of the European Court of Justice in the Intertwined Separation of Powers and Division of Powers of the European Union. This constitutional role is examined from five different angles. Chapters II and III examine the role of the Court of Justice in the Separation of Powers

  14. Stakeholder Relations Office

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Scientists, politicians, the public, school children, our neighbours, you. All of these groups of people have a stake in CERN, and all are important to us.   The list of stakeholders in an organisation as large and complex as CERN is a long and ever lengthening one. Each group has its own specific interests and needs in terms of what kind of information it requires from CERN and how we should engage. It’s important, therefore, for us to ensure that we’re communicating optimally with everyone we care about and who cares about us. This is something that CERN has always taken seriously. The CERN Courier, for example, was first published in 1959 and we had a pro-active public information office right from the start. Today, our stakeholder relations are spread between several groups and teams, reflecting the nature of CERN today. But while we’re already doing a good job, I think we can do better by exploiting the synergies between these teams, and that’s wh...

  15. Stakeholder involvement in the management of effluent discharges from nuclear installations in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, T.; Gadbois, S.; Heriard Dubreuil, G.; Oudiz, A.

    2004-01-01

    The involvement of local stakeholders in the decision-making process regarding health, safety and environmental issues is developing in many countries. As far as the management of effluent discharges from nuclear installations in France is concerned, members of Local Commission of Information, including elected people and NGOs, are playing an increasing role in that respect. To deepen the understanding of these risk governance processes, a working group of experts from different institutions was set up in 2000 by the Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN). The aim of this working group was to 1) analyse the stakeholder involvement processes already in place in France around nuclear and non-nuclear installations; 2) perform case studies of few national and international experiences around nuclear installations (notably concerning the revision of creation authorisation decree of COGEMA La Hague reprocessing plant, the environmental policy of BNFL Sellafield reprocessing plant, the discharges surveillance of EDF Fessenheim nuclear power plant); 3) study the evolution of the regulatory context for the stakeholder involvement. Four main elements, contributing to the social trust emerge from this analysis: 1) the social dynamics of the consultation process, notably with the emergence of 'new' stakeholders such as elected people and NGOs; 2) the readability of the plant follow-up from the point of view of local stakeholders and their involvement in the decision process (the relay role of these 'new' stakeholders); 3) the contribution of the institutional and pluralist expertise to the social trust (broadening of the range of values taken into account); 4) the issue of the local justification of the plant in the prospect of the sustainable development (no risk being acceptable without counter-parts). This paper will address these different issues on the basis of the case studies in the perspective of examining the radiological risk governance process

  16. The role of power sources in the European electricity mix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonin Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing debate in Europe about energy transition enhances the necessity to evaluate the performance of the envisaged mix of power sources, in terms of production cost, CO2 emissions and security of supply. In this study, we use MIXOPTIM, a Monte-Carlo simulator of the behavior of a mix of power sources on a territory, to evaluate the performance of the present EU power mix. After a validation on the French mix, we applied it to the whole EU territory and made variational calculations around the present mix to evaluate the performance impacts induced by small changes in installed renewable power and nuclear power. According to the analyzed criteria, the study shows that a plausible way to keep an affordable MWh in Europe with minimal amount of CO2 emissions and acceptable security of supply could be to extend the life of existing Gen II nuclear reactors. All other options lead to the degradation of the mix performance, on at least one of the three criteria listed above.

  17. Combating the greenhouse effect: no role for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, J.K.; Kelly, P.M.

    1990-01-01

    Many governments, including the United Kingdom government, now recognise the need for an immediate policy response to the dangerous build up of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. One immediate goal must be to cut substantially the amount of energy we use. British Nuclear Fuels have recently begun an advertising campaign to promote the expansion of nuclear power as a solution to the greenhouse effect, and government ministers have also advanced this concept in recent statements. In this report we argue that governments must not seek to involve nuclear power in combating global warming for the following reasons: seeking to replace all (or a part) of coal-fired power output with nuclear addresses only 10% (or less) of the greenhouse problem, it is many times cheaper to save a unit of energy than to generate an additional unit, to throw funds at enlarging the nuclear programme at the expense of investment in energy efficiency measures would in fact be to add to the greenhouse threat, the scope for the introduction of energy efficiency is enormous, nuclear power is not a viable option for third World countries, energy-efficiency measures can be introduced far more quickly than can nuclear power stations and energy efficiency technology is proven technology. (author)

  18. The influence of stakeholder groups in operation and maintenance services of offshore wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahsan, Dewan; Pedersen, Søren

    2018-01-01

    One of the prime challenges in offshore wind is to manage and coordinate with the various stakeholders involved in the operation and maintenance (O&M) phase. Therefore the aims of this paper are: i) to map the stakeholder groups involved in O&M of Offshore Wind Farm (OWF), ii) to assess...... the identified stakeholder group's interest and power to influence O&M, iii) to evaluate the relationship between different stakeholder groups and iv) to highlight potential strategies to manage the stakeholder groups. In this article, the stakeholder analysis approach is used. The results reveal that eleven key...

  19. Stakeholder analysis methodologies resource book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babiuch, W.M.; Farhar, B.C.

    1994-03-01

    Stakeholder analysis allows analysts to identify how parties might be affected by government projects. This process involves identifying the likely impacts of a proposed action and stakeholder groups affected by that action. Additionally, the process involves assessing how these groups might be affected and suggesting measures to mitigate any adverse effects. Evidence suggests that the efficiency and effectiveness of government actions can be increased and adverse social impacts mitigated when officials understand how a proposed action might affect stakeholders. This report discusses how to conduct useful stakeholder analyses for government officials making decisions on energy-efficiency and renewable-energy technologies and their commercialization. It discusses methodological issues that may affect the validity and reliability of findings, including sampling, generalizability, validity, ``uncooperative`` stakeholder groups, using social indicators, and the effect of government regulations. The Appendix contains resource directories and a list of specialists in stakeholder analysis and involvement.

  20. Partnering with stakeholders in radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore, C.; Vari, A.

    2009-01-01

    Site selection for radioactive waste management (RWM) facilities draws considerable attention from implementers, government bodies, local communities and the public at large. Facility siting processes have generally tended to be marred by conflicts, disagreements and delays. In response, efforts have been made to shift from a more traditional 'decide, announce and defend' model to one of 'engage, interact and co-operate'. The essence of the new approach is co-operation or partnership between the implementer and the affected communities, involving dialogue between experts and citizens, mutual learning and public participation in the decision-making process. National ministries and authorities have also been called to and do play a more visible role. The intensity and degree of partnering can vary from country to country and in different phases of project development. Important changes have taken place in citizen participation in radioactive waste management over the past decade. These changes can be summarised as follows: - shift from information and consultation towards partnership, i.e. from token involvement to citizen influence and power; - shift from a passive to an active role of local communities: from resigned acceptance to collaboration, volunteering and veto; - development of a great variety of administrative formats for collaboration; - recognition of the need for, and legitimacy of, community empowerment measures and socio-economic benefits; - emergence of new ideals and bases for collaboration including mutual learning, adding values to the host community/region and sustainable development. Involving local actors in the design of the facility and community benefits are likely to result in solutions that will add value to the host region. In all cases, social capital is augmented as local stakeholders develop new skills and increase their knowledge about the interests and ideals of their community. Implementers and other institutional players also

  1. Stakeholder Salience in ERP Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Salhotra, Eashan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine stakeholder involvement in an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) System project that involves implementation and improvement of the implemented system. The study targets stakeholders, their classification, and their degree of importance during different phases of an ERP project life cycle, i.e. planning, implementation, stabilisation and improvement. The study shows that stakeholder involvement and their salience vary along the ERP project life cycle a...

  2. The Role of Nuclear Power in Europe (Executive Summary)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    World Energy Council

    2007-01-01

    Energy is and will remain one of the major global concerns of the 21st century and Europe is no exception. With global energy demand expected to grow strongly in the coming years, burning questions are now being raised over the future of energy supplies, the economic competitiveness of different energy sources and the associated environmental impacts. The European policy makers and the energy industry currently face three major challenges: ensuring security of energy supply, stabilizing or reducing greenhouse gas emissions and maintaining economic competitiveness by keeping energy prices at an affordable level. The final costs of kWh depend on local legislation and taxes, which impact the discount rate, given that nuclear plants are highly capital intensive. As nuclear power generation does not produce greenhouse gases and emissions, the key sources in creating global climate change and air pollution, it would undoubtedly help tackle growing environmental concerns. The actual amount of spent nuclear fuel produced globally every year is relatively small. Given nuclear power's excellent operational safety record in Europe during past five decades, public concern in many countries today is shifting from operational risks to nuclear waste management. The future contribution of nuclear power to society will depend on innovation, such as development of new reactor and fuel cycle technologies

  3. Role of nuclear power in energy policy of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Toyoaki

    1984-01-01

    About 62 % of the energy supply in Japan depends on petroleum, and about 65 % of oil import comes from Persian Gulf. It is very important to ensure the supply of oil for the energy policy of Japan. For the purpose, the conversation between oil producing countries and oil consuming countries is necessary, but all the conversation carried out so far failed. The oil consumption in the world continued to decline, and the situation of oil market changed. The future situation of oil market largely depends on the development of substitute energy resources for oil. In order to ensure the supply of oil, the buyer's market must continue, therefore, effort must be continued to expand substitute energy and to promote energy saving. As the energy policy hereafter, various energy resources should be most effectively used in combination. In this compound energy age, the importance of nuclear power increases. The stable supply and economical efficiency of energy must be taken in consideration with the same weight. The only method to reduce the dependence on import is nuclear power, and this feature should be evaluated high. Nuclear power generation must be expanded hereafter. (Kako, I.)

  4. Integrating Environmental and Stakeholder Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2001-01-01

    Regulation has been an important instrument in pushing the business community towards im-proved environmental performance. However, there has also been increasing pressure from a growing number of stakeholders, including employees, customers, neighbours and NGOs, etc. In order to improve corporate...... relationships with various stakeholders, companies need to be able to identify these stakeholders and assess their influence. The first part of this paper will discuss the relevant theory and introduce a model to analyse and identify the most significant stakeholder groups and their influence on corporate...

  5. Sincerity in corporate philanthropy, stakeholder perceptions and firm value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuypers, Ilya R. P.; Koh, Ping-Sheng; Wang, Heli

    2016-01-01

    This study extends the literature on symbolic management by incorporating the role of stakeholder perceptions into the context of corporate philanthropy. In particular, we differentiate between the quantitative (generous giving) and qualitative (innovative giving) aspects of giving. We argue that

  6. What role can nuclear power play in mitigating global warming?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasztor, J.

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to look at nuclear fission, as one of the available options, and evaluate qualitatively the extent to which it can play a role in greenhouse gas reduction strategies during the next three decades. No attempt will be made here to make a quantitative comparison with alternative energy supplies, or with energy efficiency measures

  7. The Responsible Stakeholder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duncan, Russell

    2017-01-01

    Compares the changing world order with the rise of Chinese leadership and the relative decline of US power under the blustering fulminations of Donald Trump......Compares the changing world order with the rise of Chinese leadership and the relative decline of US power under the blustering fulminations of Donald Trump...

  8. The future role of nuclear power in the global energy balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, B.A.; Guthrie, D.; Tatsuta, Y.

    1991-01-01

    A sound judgement on the role of nuclear power in the global energy balance within the time span of the next 30 years should logically be based on the consideration of at least a number of factors such as global trends in energy and electricity demand, practically available or estimated sources of supply, major requirements that these energy sources should meet, nuclear power's own potential, a realistic assessment of nuclear power's present status, and problems related to nuclear power. The conclusion of such an analysis is that nuclear power will retain, and may even enhance, its position as an important element in the world's energy supply mix

  9. Soft Power, Hard Aspirations: the Shifting Role of Power in Brazilian Foreign Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo M. Valença

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Journalists and policy analysts have highlighted the emergence of Brazil as a regional power. However, little attention has been paid to its foreign policy strategies. Brazil's rise to prominence in world politics represents the historical culmination of a foreign policy featuring two main strategies – persuasion and consensus building – both of which emphasise the use of soft power. We analyse four current foreign policy initiatives: the campaign for a permanent seat on the UNSC; the development of a nuclear submarine; Brazil's leadership of the UN peacekeeping mission in Haiti; and government support for Brazilian multinationals. We suggest a growing tension between these initiatives and the two strategies identified above. These initiatives reflect the view current among some policymakers that if Brazil is to rise as a global power it must play by the rules of great power politics.

  10. The role of wind energy in the programme of power supply of northern Russia territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezroukikh, P.

    1995-01-01

    In this article examined technical, management and economic problems has been arising during working out of above mentioned Power Supply Programm based on the renewable energy sources usage and proved the leading role of wind energy in this Programm. (author)

  11. The role of wind energy in the programme of power supply of northern Russia territories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezroukikh, P [Ministry for Fuel and Energy, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    In this article examined technical, management and economic problems has been arising during working out of above mentioned Power Supply Programm based on the renewable energy sources usage and proved the leading role of wind energy in this Programm. (author)

  12. The role of wind energy in the programme of power supply of northern Russia territories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezroukikh, P. [Ministry for Fuel and Energy, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    In this article examined technical, management and economic problems has been arising during working out of above mentioned Power Supply Programm based on the renewable energy sources usage and proved the leading role of wind energy in this Programm. (author)

  13. The Municipal Electrical Utilities' role in buying and selling power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, D.I.

    1999-01-01

    Ontario's Municipal Electrical Utilities (MEUs) are the front-line providers of electricity services for most of the consumers in Ontario. MEUs serve 2.8 million customers (about 70 per cent of all power sold in Ontario). The new regulatory regime resulting from Ontario's Energy Competition Act (1998) will significantly impact MEUs. The changes aim to consolidate and rationalize the point of sale provision of power to Ontario customers and increase the efficiency of the sector. The Energy Competition Act (1998) creates a competitive electricity marketplace and provides mechanisms for its operation, but it is the MEUs which will bear the risk of market failures. Some of the changes which will be most important to MEUs are: (1) incorporation, (2) default supplier, and (3) oversight by the OEB. It is the author's view that the move towards open markets in electricity is unlikely to enlarge the decision making power of MEUs. On the contrary, the legislative scheme creates a complex regulatory environment wherein the distribution corporation must strictly comply with the OEB's requirements and public policy concerns in exercising its functions. As the MEUs essentially serve as a buffer in the newly opened retail markets, they must find ways to minimize their risk of market failures or spread the cost so as to remain viable commercial entities. They must also devise new information systems prior to the opening of the new market to deal with customer and default consumer pricing, billing and transfer of customers to and from retailers. Municipal utilities will also have to consider restructuring of their own operations, including determining which businesses should be pursued through competitive affiliates

  14. Role and position of Nuclear Power Plants Research Institute in nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metke, E.

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Plants Research Institute carries out applied and experimental research of the operating states of nuclear power plants, of new methods of surveillance and diagnosis of technical equipment, it prepares training of personnel, carries out tests, engineering and technical consultancy and the research of automated control systems. The main research programme of the Institute is the rationalization of raising the safety and operating reliability of WWER nuclear power plants. The Institute is also concerned with quality assurance of selected equipment of nuclear power plants and assembly works, with radioactive waste disposal and the decommissioning of nuclear power plants as well as with the preparation and implementation of the nuclear power plant start-up. The Research Institute is developing various types of equipment, such as equipment for the decontamination of the primary part of the steam generator, a continuous analyzer of chloride levels in water, a gas monitoring instrument, etc. The prospects are listed of the Research Institute and its cooperation with other CMEA member countries. (M.D.)

  15. Role of conceptual models in nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.D.; Moran, T.P.; Brown, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    A crucial objective in plant operation (and perhaps licensing) ought to be to explicitly train operators to develop, perhaps with computer aids, robust conceptual models of the plants they control. The question is whether we are actually able to develop robust conceptual models and validate their robustness. Cognitive science is just beginning to come to grips with this problem. This paper describes some of the evolving technology for building conceptual models of physical mechanisms and some of the implications of such models in the context of nuclear power plant operation

  16. The role of nuclear power in the new competitive era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pryor, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    As power generators around the world grapple with the challenges of deregulation and competition, there are those who suggest that ownership of an operating nuclear power plant may prove to be a liability. This is not the case for most plants. On the contrary, nuclear facilities that perform well will be important assets in competitive markets, whether as sources of competitively priced electricity, or as strategic factors in mergers and acquisitions. And, as the world focuses renewed attention on global climate change and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, nuclear power's significant environmental benefits further enhances its continued viability. The emergence of competitive markets will create a period of tremendous opportunity and enhanced value for nuclear plants. Nuclear plants, large coal plants, and hydro are the only types that can produce power at the bus bar with production costs close to one cent per kilowatt-hour. The challenge for all nuclear plants is to reduce costs and improve performance in order to improve their net earnings stream. Prospects for dramatic reductions are very high. In recent years, average nuclear plant performance figures worldwide have improved rapidly and substantially, and average costs are dropping. How will nuclear plants compare with alternative energy sources in an era of heightened competition? To evaluate nuclear plants in a competitive environment, this paper will look at three key areas: capital costs; operation and maintenance costs; and fuel costs, including spent fuel issues. The paper will examine innovative strategies to deal with capital or 'sunk costs' such as write-downs through securitization and regional operating companies, and will also focus on best practices in O and M and fuel where all nuclear plants have the potential to move to 'best in class'. The lessons that every nuclear plant can learn from other plants can contribute significantly to the performance improvement process. What has been

  17. University's role in research on superconducting power transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, E.B.

    1974-01-01

    Power transmission by superconducting cables appears to have enormous potential for the utility industry. It has still to be demonstrated that it will become a viable and economically competitive technology, however, development aimed at this goal by major research establishments has already exposed numerous research problems suitable for investigation by well qualified university departments without requiring large expenditures for equipment. What is missing in an organizational structure to relate work to the primary goals, monitor progress and influence the funding decisions of the major agencies. This does not seem difficult to set up, but continued success will require a long-term commitment from the participants

  18. University role in nuclear power program in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notea, A.

    1977-01-01

    The academic education in nuclear engineering should be considered as a subsystem within the general nuclear program of the country as well as within the educational structure of the university. The academic trained personnel are of major importance as future participants in decisional and planning steps of the program. Hence, the ''production'' of academic manpower in this field should be started at the earliest steps. The nuclear engineering curriculum should be planned in accordance with the objectives stated by the power program and the challenges foreseen. Obviously, the objectives in a developing country are considerably different from those of developed countries highly advanced in the nuclear power field. The paper analyzes possible objectives in a developing country which intends to implement nuclear power program. In view of these objectives curricula planning for the undergraduate and graduate levels are presented and explained. The courses for undergraduates intend to provide basic information to relatively large numbers of students from various faculties, as they are expected to join the program at various constructional stages. Major emphasise is given to graduates as they will act in the cadre of senior engineers and officials of the country. The research works for theses in developed countries may be highly technical, dealing with crumbs of huge development project carried out on national or international level. Such research works are hardly justified in countries not involved in the project. In developing countries the problems to be confronted with are mainly licensing and siting and to much less extent nuclear power technology. Hence the choice of subjects for theses should be coherent with these directions. Obviously, the subjects are bound to the department manpower and budgetary limitations. As a demonstration two fields were analysed under our local constraints and objectives. Subjects suitable for theses are pointed out. The fields dealt

  19. Environmental constraints and opportunities. The role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, T.; Bennett, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    Generation of electricity by any energy source usually entails emissions and disposal of waste products to air, water and land, potentially giving rise to short or long term impacts. However, all the major fuel cycles, when fitted to state of the art technology, are able to deliver electricity at relatively low risks to health and the environment. An exception is CO 2 emissions from fossil fuels. Nuclear power is a proven technology and is the most likely non-fossil source which can be deployed on a much larger scale and with costs competitive with fossil fuels for base load generation. 1 ref., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  20. The role of nuclear energy in electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, G.; Marothy, L.; Tallosy, J.

    1980-01-01

    The brief history of nuclear power production is given, with special regard to the energy demand in Hungary. The design and operation of the Paks Nuclear Power Station are described. The first four units will be WWER-440 type pressurized water reactors. The main components of the nuclear steam-producing apparatus and the process of fuel handling are presented. The secondary circuit and the main electric systems are shortly described. The safety of the plant is analysed. The safeguard engineering systems are discussed. The operation of the reactor control system, the emergency cooling and the pressure supression systems are analysed for the case of a design base accident (DBA). The DBA consists in an internal fracture of the main primary cooling pipeline. Based on the stations safety report and the Basmussen report the environmental risk of the station is estimated. It is concluded that even in the case of the DBA, the radiation burden of the population is under the permissable limits. (R.J.)

  1. The Role of Nuclear Power in Hungary, a Regional Comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cserhati, A.

    2016-01-01

    The presentation and paper are giving the broad picture on the country's nuclear competence and the atomic electricity production in international appraisal. The Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) region nuclear statistics were compiled by the author and appear in compact, easily understandable graphical form: Worldwide and regional figures of nuclear share for electricity generation. Types of operating nuclear power plant units. Age and performance (cumulative load factors) of units. Power uprate history of affected units. Status of the long term operation (or by earlier name: lifetime extension) projects. The cycle length expansion is a transition from 12 to 15 month fuel cycle, as a pioneering initiative of Paks NPP for efficiency increase of VVER-440 type. New build trends will be outlined in general for the world, Europe and the CEE region. The last topic is the Hungarian path to Paks-5 and Paks-6 completion. Preparatory projects (Teller and Levai), establishment of the Paks II company. Potential suppliers and types for the new build (AREVA EPR, ATMEA Atmea1, KEPCO/KHNP APR1400, Rosatom AES-2006, Toshiba-Westinghouse AP1000). Intergovernmental agreement with Russian Federation for building of two 1200 MW units. Financing of 80 percent of the investment by Russian loan with moderate interest rates. Planned schedule of the new build. EC infringement procedures. Public acceptance. (author).

  2. Multi-stakeholder perspectives in defining health-services quality in cataract care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolk-Vos, Aline C; van de Klundert, Joris J; Maijers, Niels; Zijlmans, Bart L M; Busschbach, Jan J V

    2017-08-01

    To develop a method to define a multi-stakeholder perspective on health-service quality that enables the expression of differences in systematically identified stakeholders' perspectives, and to pilot the approach for cataract care. Mixed-method study between 2014 and 2015. Cataract care in the Netherlands. Stakeholder representatives. We first identified and classified stakeholders using stakeholder theory. Participants established a multi-stakeholder perspective on quality of cataract care using concept mapping, this yielded a cluster map based on multivariate statistical analyses. Consensus-based quality dimensions were subsequently defined in a plenary stakeholder session. Stakeholders and multi-stakeholder perspective on health-service quality. Our analysis identified seven definitive stakeholders, as follows: the Dutch Ophthalmology Society, ophthalmologists, general practitioners, optometrists, health insurers, hospitals and private clinics. Patients, as dependent stakeholders, were considered to lack power by other stakeholders; hence, they were not classified as definitive stakeholders. Overall, 18 stakeholders representing ophthalmologists, general practitioners, optometrists, health insurers, hospitals, private clinics, patients, patient federations and the Dutch Healthcare Institute sorted 125 systematically collected indicators into the seven following clusters: patient centeredness and accessibility, interpersonal conduct and expectations, experienced outcome, clinical outcome, process and structure, medical technical acting and safety. Importance scores from stakeholders directly involved in the cataract service delivery process correlated strongly, as did scores from stakeholders not directly involved in this process. Using a case study on cataract care, the proposed methods enable different views among stakeholders concerning quality dimensions to be systematically revealed, and the stakeholders jointly agreed on these dimensions. The methods

  3. Sex Ratios, Economic Power, and Women's Roles: A Theoretical Extension and Empirical Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Scott J.

    1988-01-01

    Tested hypotheses concerning sex ratios, women's roles, and economic power with data from 111 countries. Found undersupply of women positively associated with proportion of women who marry and fertility rate; inversely associated with women's average age at marriage, literacy rate, and divorce rate. Suggests women's economic power may counteract…

  4. When dispositional and role power fit: implications for self-expression and self-other congruence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Serena; Langner, Carrie A; Mendoza-Denton, Rodolfo

    2009-03-01

    Integrating and extending the literatures on social power and person-environment fit, 4 studies tested the hypothesis that when people's dispositional beliefs about their capacity to influence others fit their assigned role power, they are more likely to engage in self-expression-that is, behave in line with their states and traits-thereby increasing their likelihood of being perceived by others in a manner congruent with their own self-judgments (i.e., self-other congruence). In Studies 1-3, dispositionally high- and low-power participants were randomly assigned to play a high- or low-power role in an interaction with a confederate. When participants' dispositional and role power fit (vs. conflicted), they reported greater self-expression (Study 1). Furthermore, under dispositional-role power fit conditions, the confederate's ratings of participants' emotional experiences (Study 2) and personality traits (Study 3) were more congruent with participants' self-reported emotions and traits. Study 4's results replicated Study 3's results using an implicit manipulation of power and outside observers' (rather than a confederate's) ratings of participants. Implications for research on power and person perception are discussed.

  5. Introductory statement to the 2nd scientific forum on sustainable development: A role for nuclear power?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    In his Introductory Statement to the 2nd Scientific Forum on 'Sustainable Development - A Role for Nuclear Power?' (Vienna, 28 September 1999), the Director General of the IAEA focussed on the the main aspects concerning the development of nuclear power: safety, competitiveness, and public support

  6. On Younger Stakeholders and Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyszkiewicz, Bogumila; Labor, Bea

    2009-08-01

    In modern democratic countries, information sharing and effective and open communication concerning dismantling and decommissioning of of nuclear facilities as well as the management of nuclear waste are essential for the task to build the confidence required for any further development of nuclear energy. At the same time, it is often perceived that all decision making processes about nuclear energy policies are probably increasingly influenced by public opinion. Nuclear and radiation safety Authorities have a clear role in this regard to provide unbiased information on any health and safety related issues. In order to meet this need, it is necessary for Authorities and others to understand the values and opinions of the citizens, and especially the younger ones. They hold the key to the future at the same time as their perspective on these issues is the least understood. The need of greater public participation in decision making is becoming increasingly recognised the scientific as well as the political community. Many activities are carried out in order to stimulate to higher levels of public involvement in decision making in this active research area. Younger citizens is a stakeholder group that is often excluded in decision- making processes. The existence of large gaps between the involvement of older and younger stakeholders in decision making processes needs to be addressed, since such imbalances might otherwise lead to unequal opportunities between generations and limit the future consumption level of the coming generations. Another demanding task for the present generation is to assure that appropriate financial resources are injected into the Swedish Nuclear Waste Fund. It will thereby be possible for coming generations to undertake efficient measures in the decommissioning and dismantling of older nuclear facilities. To undertake such measures in line with the environmental and health codex is essential. An appropriate balance in this regard must be

  7. Collaborative Stakeholder Engagement. Special Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Matt; Chrislip, David; Workman, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Stakeholder engagement and collaboration are essential to the development of an effective state plan. Engaging a diverse group of stakeholders tasked with working together to create education policies that will have a positive, lasting impact on students is not as easy as it sounds. Experts in the field argue that the traditional stakeholder…

  8. Stakeholder relations and financial performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, B.; Zhou, Y.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze how shareholder performance can be associated with stakeholder relations. As such, we try to find out whether there is an association between financial performance and stakeholder relations with respect to different theoretical notions about the firm. Financial performance is

  9. Stakeholder orientation vs. shareholder value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Caspar

    2003-01-01

    management in listed firms and other traditional remedies. The theoretical insightsare applied on a case from the Danish Supreme Court (Louis Poulsen A/S) where theinterests of the stakeholders were decisive. However, it is shown that the verdict mayinstead harm the relevant stakeholders illustrating how...

  10. The role of automation and humans in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    The document is the result of a series of advisory and consultants meetings held within the framework of the International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation in 1989-1990. It provides a basis for assigning functions to men and machines and for achieving a desirable balance. It should be particularly useful to designers of of new systems, where a large number of assignment decisions will have to be identified, taken and documented. In addition, the methodology can be used by utilities for plant modifications and upgrades. The document may also be employed for examining existing assignments in a system since the principles on which the document is based are generally applicable. The document may be useful to those who develop requirement specifications for automation, to technology designers who design automated machines, and to researchers who intend to further refine the function assignment methodology. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. The regulator's stake in a multi-stakeholder process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Mikael; Larsson, Carl-Magnus; Norrby, Soeren; Westerlind, Magnus

    1999-01-01

    The siting of a repository for spent nuclear fuel poses a number of challenges to a broad range of stakeholders, e.g. implementers, regulators, potential host municipalities, environmental groups, political decision-makers on different levels and the public. This paper presents some regulatory challenges as experienced and approached by the Swedish regulators most involved in nuclear waste management (the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute, SSI, and the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, SKI). First the regulatory framework is outlined with emphasis on decision-making processes and environmental impact assessment. Then a short background is given to the current status of the ongoing programme for repository siting. The main part of the paper discusses some conclusions from the so-called RISCOM pilot project, which was concluded in 1998. The paper also contains some findings from other projects as well as some experiences from the ongoing siting process. It is important to have independent regulators, with the capacity to review the safety assessment of the implementer. The regulators also have the challenging task to be people's experts in stretching the implementer. At the same time they should expose themselves to the being stretched by other stakeholders and the public at large. Experience also shows that regulators should engage early in the pre-licensing phase, e.g. in EIA and siting, and that this can be done without compromising the independence and integrity needed in the licensing phase. The regulator must be present at all levels, and observant of the participants' different needs and roles played on the national, regional and local level. A well structured, but flexible, EIA appear to be an efficient 'vehicle' for public participation. However, it is believed that the EIA should be complemented with hearings, in both the pre-licensing and licensing phases, since this is believed to increase the transparency of the decision making process. Such

  12. Open Innovation and Stakeholder Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Wayne Gould

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paradox of open innovation lies in the conflict between the practical desire to reap the benefits of open innovation and concern over the risk that others will misappropriate those benefits. Stakeholder theory and recent developments in value creation through stakeholder engagement can assist with reconciliation of this inherent structural risk. The limitations of existing open innovation typologies are identified, and a process-based model of open innovation is proposed. The model is then expanded to include stakeholder engagement. When integrated with stakeholder engagement, open innovation processes can be understood to generate benefits beyond the acquisition of specific information sought from external experts. The addition of stakeholder engagement to the open innovation model allows for greater understanding and easier acceptance of the risks inherent in the open innovation process.

  13. Stakeholder Thinking in Sustainability Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Hove Henriksen, Morten; Frier, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The objective of the paper is to describe and discuss how the biotech company Novozymes integrates stakeholder thinking into everyday sustainability practices. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on first-hand experiences as well as secondary information from Novozymes' sta...... to make sense of stakeholder thinking. Originality/value – The contribution of this paper is to provide a detailed analysis of how various stakeholder relations management methods can be used in practice to integrate sustainability in an organisation.......' stakeholder-oriented sustainability activities. Findings – The paper illustrates how a company is striving to transform the general stakeholder principles into concrete, manageable actions. Moreover, the paper describes some of the needs, challenges, and paradoxes experienced by an organisation that is trying...

  14. Online Company-stakeholder Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Rikke Augustinus; Morsing, Mette

    Based on a systematic data collection we study one of the first pioneering company-stakeholder communication campaigns in social media: the case of energy company Vattenfall A/S’s pan-European campaign ‘The Climate Manifesto’. Our findings challenge the general assumption, that stakeholder...... lacked between the company and stakeholders. Vattenfall was accused of green-washing, resulting in a communications crisis. Negative stakeholder reactions consisted of prejudiced and non-negotiable argumentation indicating that social media imposes new managerial challenges since communication processes...... technologies and we question to what extent social media serve the enhancement of improved understandings across corporate and civil society on CSR issues. This paper suggests that managers face a risk of the “double-edge of stakeholder communication” when incorporating social media into their CSR strategies...

  15. Forum on stakeholder confidence: Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vari, A.; Pescatore, C.

    2006-01-01

    The FSC workshop in Spain provided an important opportunity to carry out an in-depth examination of decision-making processes undertaken in an NEA member country, and to reflect on the evolution that has taken place over time. It offered a well-rounded perspective on the inclusion of stakeholders in decision making, and the atmosphere of the meetings was conducive to an honest and open exchange of ideas. The workshop started with the introduction of two case studies: the earlier attempt in Spain to locate a potential site for a high-level waste (HLW) disposal facility, and the dismantling of the Vandellos-I nuclear power plant. This was followed by two days of presentations and round-table discussions based on the recent COWAM Spain initiative (stemming from the EU-wide project on Community Waste Management), which aims at developing recommendations for institutional arrangements and decision-making processes concerning the siting of waste management facilities in Spain. This article provides a brief summary of the case studies and the COWAM Spain initiative, followed by some of the lessons learnt from an international perspective. (authors)

  16. Loneliness among University Students: Predictive Power of Sex Roles and Attachment Styles on Loneliness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Tahsin

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the predictive power of sex roles and attachment styles on loneliness. A total of 188 undergraduate students (114 female, and 74 male) from Gazi University completed the Bem Sex Role Inventory, UCLA Loneliness Scale, and Relationship Scales Questionnaire. Hierarchic Multiple Regression analysis and t-test were used to test…

  17. Understanding dyadic promoter-stakeholder relations in complex projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janita Vos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose a Bilateral Double Motive framework of stakeholder cooperation in complex projects. The framework analyses and explains dyadic promoter-stakeholder relationships at a micro level by acknowledging both transactional and relational motives. We demonstrate the framework’s usefulness by illustrating its explanatory power in two instances of cooperation and two of non-cooperation within two health information technology projects. The study contributes to project management theory through its combined focus on transactional and relational motives. Further, the study contributes to practice by providing a tool for planning and evaluating cooperation in health Information Technology projects and similar complex multi-stakeholder environments.

  18. Potential role of nuclear power in developing and transitional economies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganiage, D.; Dierstein, Ph.

    1996-01-01

    In some developing countries, such as Asia, the growth of electricity consumption is high, and a nuclear programme based on the construction of several standardised plants could be implemented and economically justified. In transitional economies, such as in Central and Eastern Europe countries, electricity authorities were forced to stop the construction of several nuclear plants, mainly because of financial problems. Nuclear power can provide the developing and transition economies with several advantages, such as energy independence and fuel supply security, minimal environmental pollution, support to local industry and employment. On the other hand, nuclear energy also means the support of national authorities and the development of a suitable infrastructure in order to check the enforcement of legal procedures, plants safety and waste management. Local population must understand and accept this commitment linked hand to hand with the choice of nuclear energy. Finally, nuclear industry is very capital-intensive. Therefore, financial resources are to be found by the local electricity authorities, along with the development of a suitable legal framework and the implementation of new tariff policies which must reflect the real costs of electricity. (R.P.)

  19. Learning Large Lessons: The Evolving Roles of Ground Power and Air Power in the Post-Cold War Era. Executive Summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, David E

    2007-01-01

    U.S. post-Cold War military operations have witnessed a shift in the relative roles of ground power and air power in war fighting, but the joint war fighting potential of this shift is not being fully realized...

  20. Ownership dynamics in local multi-stakeholder initiatives

    OpenAIRE

    Biekart, Kees; Fowler, Alan

    2018-01-01

    textabstractThe nature and dynamics of ownership are often neglected features of multi-stakeholder initiatives (MSIs). Seventeen cases in four countries illustrate characteristics of narrow government or broad societal ownership and forces for change over time. Refinements to the application of Gaventa’s Power Cube are used to analyse such shifts from the perspective of invited and closed spaces for participation. Observations about ways in which stakeholder groups can create a more enabling ...

  1. Talent development: linking the stakeholders to the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankhurst, Anne; Collins, Dave; Macnamara, Áine

    2013-01-01

    The three stakeholders (coaches, parents and the National Governing Body) in Talent Identification and Development (TID) are important factors in athlete development. How each of them perceive the key constructs of Talent Identification and Development (i.e. sport specialisation and selection, practice, athlete development, junior and adult success, and the role of the stakeholders), and the coherence of that understanding is not well understood. This study focuses on junior performance tennis and investigates the perceptions of coaches, parents and sports organisations (a National Governing Body) of the five key constructs of Talent Identification and Development. We were interested in examining (a) the extent to which stakeholder perceptions relate to research, (b) the coherence of each stakeholder's perceptions and (c) the extent to which there is coherence between what stakeholders understand each other thinks. Seventy-five coaches, parents, and National Governing Body staff completed a questionnaire that asked participants to rate their degree of agreement/disagreement with researched 'principles' of Talent Identification and Development. The results suggest that stakeholders do not strongly agree with the research supporting principles of Talent Identification and Development. Furthermore, a significant lack of coherence of stakeholder perceptions was evident. This lack of coherence was also evident in each group's understanding of what the other stakeholders believed. The impact of these results on the Talent Identification and Development process is discussed.

  2. The role of persuasion power on the consensus formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüç, Semra; Eryiğit, Recep

    2015-05-01

    An opinion dynamics model which is based on a version of two dimensional Sznajd model is introduced. According to this model the dynamics is governed by the interactions between four agents which live on the corners of a plaquette and their neighbors. The distinctive feature of the model is that each individual is identified by two parameters, namely, opinion and persuasion ability. The united group may persuade the individuals living at the neighboring sites according to both the number and their persuasion ability. This form of the model is used to discuss opinion dynamics processes in societies where a campaign is conducted by the principle being united and putting forward arguments which are commonly accepted by the members of the society. It is seen that persuasion parameter plays the major role in the societies where a minority opinion gains ground to be the major opinion of the society. The model has been applied to the Scottish referendum opinion poles data since 2011. The model in its simplicity, predicts that the arguments of the minority opinion ("YES" votes) are more appealing despite the observed win of the "NO" votes. This result may be due to the abundance of the "NO" opinion supporters at the beginning of the campaign.

  3. On Younger Stakeholders and Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyszkiewicz, Bogumila; Labor, Bea

    2009-08-15

    In modern democratic countries, information sharing and effective and open communication concerning dismantling and decommissioning of of nuclear facilities as well as the management of nuclear waste are essential for the task to build the confidence required for any further development of nuclear energy. At the same time, it is often perceived that all decision making processes about nuclear energy policies are probably increasingly influenced by public opinion. Nuclear and radiation safety Authorities have a clear role in this regard to provide unbiased information on any health and safety related issues. In order to meet this need, it is necessary for Authorities and others to understand the values and opinions of the citizens, and especially the younger ones. They hold the key to the future at the same time as their perspective on these issues is the least understood. The need of greater public participation in decision making is becoming increasingly recognised the scientific as well as the political community. Many activities are carried out in order to stimulate to higher levels of public involvement in decision making in this active research area. Younger citizens is a stakeholder group that is often excluded in decision- making processes. The existence of large gaps between the involvement of older and younger stakeholders in decision making processes needs to be addressed, since such imbalances might otherwise lead to unequal opportunities between generations and limit the future consumption level of the coming generations. Another demanding task for the present generation is to assure that appropriate financial resources are injected into the Swedish Nuclear Waste Fund. It will thereby be possible for coming generations to undertake efficient measures in the decommissioning and dismantling of older nuclear facilities. To undertake such measures in line with the environmental and health codex is essential. An appropriate balance in this regard must be

  4. The changing role of chemistry in the power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caris, N.B.

    2006-01-01

    Corrosion costs the U.S. electricity industry between five and ten billion dollars a year. In steam generating plants it is estimated that over half the forced outages are caused by corrosion, and in the U.S. industry, corrosion increases the cost of electricity more than it increases the cost of any other product, adding over 10% to its price. The total cost of corrosion to U.S. industry is in excess of dollar 276 billion annually, of which more than 30% could be prevented through the use of optimum corrosion management practices. In order to effectively deal with these issues it will require a coordinated approach throughout the industry, in which chemistry has a major role to play. Chemistry has effectively moved from being a problem to being a solution for materials and corrosion issues, and judging by the current advances and initiatives, will continue to do so. The window of opportunity to positively influence the entire industry is here. This will be especially challenging for us as chemists in Eskom, with an ageing fleet and lack of excess generating capacity. The spin-off of taking up this challenge to 'get our chemistry right' and take a quantum step forward would be a significant positive effect on the unit capability factor (UCF) and the forced loss rate (UCLF) for the Generation Division. This could, in turn, influence issues as far reaching as the cost of electricity for the South African consumer and when the construction of new generating plant is scheduled. (orig.)

  5. The role of government in a competitive power market : strategic behaviors and regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, N.Y. [Korea Energy Economics Institute, Euiwang (Korea)

    2001-12-01

    Restructuring in the Korean power industry has fundamentally changed the role of government. The role of government in a new environment may include : (1) promoting competition (2) prohibiting collusion or unfair trade practices (3) securing uninterrupted power supply (4) providing universal services to consumers (5) implementing appropriate price regulation. Focusing on the first two issues, this report has analyzed anti-competitive strategic behaviors and an impact of market power and tried to provide regulatory guidelines. This report surveyed three types of theoretical models analyzing a bidding behavior in an electric power market. The Cournot model is applied to the Korean electricity market. The following policy implications are derived. (1) The Cournot-Nash equilibrium price can be regarded as a threshold in market surveillance. (2) Had the fossil stations been divided among six instead of five companies, then market power would have been weakened in a reasonable degree. This finding also renders some implications with respect to business permission, divestiture, and merger. Among those, it is argued that a large new entrant rather than small IPPs contributes to increasing competition and lowering market power. (3) Increase in responsiveness of final demand to wholesale price fluctuation is an important factor to lower the Cournot equilibrium price and so market power. Therefore, appropriate regulatory system should be arranged to make power demand more elastic. (4) Activating contract markets such as CfD and introducing the capacity credit market can greatly help to lower market power. (author). 36 refs., 26 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Stakeholder expectation and satisfaction in road maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hietbrink, M.; Hartmann, Andreas; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the process of stakeholder satisfaction is a prerequisite for successful stakeholder management. The expectancy disconfirmation model describes the process of stakeholder satisfaction by relating customers’ satisfaction with a product or service to discrepancy between the perceived

  7. Linking environmental and stakeholder management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    1999-01-01

    is to discuss how the influence from an increasing number of stakeholders may influence the companies to adopt a more proactive attitude towards environmentally related initiatives. The first part of the paper will discuss the relevant theory and introduce a model to analyse and identify the most relevant......Regulation has been an important instrument in pushing the business community towards a more sustainable way of conduct. But recently an increasing pressure from a growing number of stakeholders including employees, customers, neighbours, NGO's etc has been observed. The purpose of this paper...... stakeholder groups and their influence. Based on a recent survey among Danish companies the second part of the paper will report on the actual perceived influence from a variety of stakeholders to force companies to introduce environmentally-related initiatives. The results will then be discussed in light...

  8. Port Stakeholder Summit - April 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's National Port Stakeholders Summit, Advancing More Sustainable Ports, focused on actions to protect air quality while reducing climate risk and supporting economic growth, making ports more environmentally sustainable.

  9. A successful effort to involve stakeholders in a facility siting decision using LIPS with stakeholder involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkhofer, L.; Conway, R.; Anderson, B.

    1995-01-01

    Local public opposition to federal bureaucratic decisions has resulted in public agencies rethinking the role of stakeholders in decision making. Efforts to include stakeholders directly in the decision-making process are on the increase. Unfortunately, many attempts to involve members of the public in decisions involving complex technical issues have failed. A key problem has been defining a meaningful role for the public in the process of arriving at a technical decision. This paper describes a successful effort by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in New Mexico to involve stakeholders in an important technical decision associated with its Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The decision was where to locate a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU), a facility intended to consolidate and store wastes generated from the cleanup of hazardous waste sites. A formal priority setting process known as the Laboratory Integration Prioritization System (LIPS) was adapted to provide an approach for involving the public. Although rarely applied to stakeholder participation, the LIPS process proved surprisingly effective. It produced a consensus over a selected site and enhanced public trust and understanding of Project activities

  10. Stakeholder conflicts and dividend policy

    OpenAIRE

    Bøhren, Øyvind; Josefsen, Morten G.; Steen, Pål E.

    2012-01-01

    This is the authors’ final, accepted and refereed manuscript to the article This paper compares the dividend policy of owner-controlled firms with that of firms where the owners are a minority relative to non-owner employees, customers, and community citizens. We find that regardless of whether owners or non-owners control the firm, the strong stakeholder uses the dividend payout decision to mitigate rather than to intensify the conflict of interest with the weak stakeholder. H...

  11. Why nuclear power generation must be developed? A many-faceted verification of its irreplaceable role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Yuichi; Oda, Toshiyuki

    1998-01-01

    Given the poor public acceptance right now, the future of nuclear power development is not necessarily bright. Yet, from the energy security aspect, the role of nuclear power, already responsible for about 30% of Japan's generated output, is never negligible. Also, Japan could hardly meet the GHG reduction target under the Kyoto Protocol without carbon-free nuclear power generation. While Japan is required to deal with both energy security and global warming from now on, to satisfy the two concurrently without nuclear power development is nearly impossible in practical terms. We have to consider calmly how nuclear power generation should be understood and treated in our effort to ensure energy supply and mitigate global warming. With this study, the need for nuclear power development was verified anew by reevaluating nuclear power generation from many facets, which are energy (electricity) supply and demand, environmental measures, energy security, and cost. Verification results showed: On supply and demand, the absence of nuclear power causes an electricity shortage during peak hours; On environment, no GHG-free power sources but nuclear currently have a sufficient supply capacity; On energy security, nuclear fuel procurement sources are diverse and located in relatively stable areas; On cost, the strong yen and cheap oil favors fossil fuels, and the weak yen and dear oil does nuclear power, though depending on unpredictable elements to send their cost up, typically waste disposal cost incurred in nuclear power, and CO 2 reduction cost in fossil fuels. With all these factors taken into consideration, the best mix of power sources should be figured out. From the verification results, we can conclude that nuclear power is one of irreplaceable energy sources for Japan. To prepare for growing electricity demand and care the environment better, Japan has few choices but to increase the installed capacity of nuclear power generation in the years to come. (author)

  12. The role of Denmark in the Nordic power market; Danmarks rolle i det nordiske kraftmarkedet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-07

    This report discusses whether Danish power producers are subject to any technological, political or economic restrictions which may influence their power trade with the other Nordic countries. Since Danish environmental accounts are corrected for foreign power trade, there are at present no limitations on the exchange of power. But the possibility of a more restrictive environmental policy may cause the producers to adapt their activities to the aims of the authorities. To illustrate the significance of possible restrictions on power trade between Denmark and the other Nordic countries, two alternative model calculations have been done. In the first, it is assumed that Danish producers may export freely. In the second, it is assumed that they are subject to neutral energy exchange. For free exploitation of Danish surplus capacity, the power consumption is estimated to 10 TWh more than for neutral energy exchange. The Swedish consumption will rise. The flexibility of the Danish system has been analysed. Certain technical properties of the Danish system may sometimes restrict import from Norway. Due to high costs of shutdowns and start-ups of thermal power plants, the speed with which Danish producers can adjust their schedule is limited. Power export from Norway and Sweden beyond top load periods must therefore be expected to last before Danish agents will replace local production with hydro electric power. The calculations demonstrate very clearly the crucial role of Denmark in the development of the Nordic power market. 10 refs., 22 figs.

  13. Corporate communications and stakeholder management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Mira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporate communications represent a modern communications discipline used by businesses across the globe to communicate with key stakeholders. Chief executive officers and executive management teams strive to create, protect and advance corporate reputation through corporate communications. Further, by communicating with key stakeholders the company adequately prepares for good news and future problems. With the benefit of technology and greater transparency, corporations of the future will continue to use corporate communications approaches to advance their business. Company's reputation derives from the way stakeholders perceive the organization, how they think, feel or act towards it. It is therefore vital that organizations interested in developing and building their reputational capital; pay careful attention to the way they are perceived and that they manage the relationships with their various stakeholders like a strategic resource. Stakeholders represent both opportunity and threat for the organizations. For instance, if an institution has a good reputation with stakeholders they may provide the organization more latitude to operate. On the other hand a poor reputation may result in creating the legislative that can make it more difficult for an institution to operate.

  14. Who has a stake? How stakeholder processes influence partnership sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Ellen Boyle

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available As universities attempt to expand their relevance by engaging with local and regional societal challenges, various kinds of partnerships are emerging. A broad range of stakeholders, from both the university and the community, are typically engaged in and influence the development, implementation and perpetuation of these partnerships. This paper juxtaposes analysis of three community-university partnerships in Worcester, Massachusetts, USA, paying particular attention to the partnerships’ stakeholders, and to their relative importance. This research builds upon current understandings of critical factors in partnership sustainability, as these three partnerships have different goals, involve different university and community stakeholders, and are at different points in their organisational history. The fact that they share the same context – the same city – offers a unique opportunity for comparative case study analysis. The theory of stakeholder salience is used to explain findings about partnership sustainability and to make suggestions for strengthening existing partnerships. Specifically, we argue that stakeholder power and legitimacy, along with stakeholder urgency, are key factors in sustaining community-university partnerships. Keywords Community-university partnerships; economic development; community development; stakeholder salience

  15. The feature of high flux engineering test reactor and its role in nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Guangquan

    1987-01-01

    The High Flux Engineering Test Reactor (HFETR) designed and built by Chinese own efforts reached to its initial criticality on Dec. 27, 1979, and then achieved high power operation on Dec. 16, 1980. Until Nov. 11. 1986, the reactor had been operated for thirteen cycles. The paper presents briefly main feature of HFETR and its utilization during past years. The paper also deals with its role in nuclear power development. Finally, author gives his opinion on comprehensive utilization of HFETR. (author)

  16. Supranational institutions as central stakeholders during eurozone debt crisis in 2008-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viljar Veebel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The financial crisis in the Eurozone is combining several new interdisciplinary debates. Has the financial crisis been caused by the decisions of the political actors or rather by complicated economic dilemmas? In what way have the different social stakeholders acted during the years of the crisis and which of the groups have had biggest influence in different stages of the crisis? Why and how national political elites have lost their dominant position in crisis management and which were the cornerstones of this power transition process and what role have the supranational institutions like the European Commission and the European Central Bank played during the crisis? Accordingly, the main goal of the article is to define crucial events and stakeholders in Eurozone crisis solution process by using empirical process tracking and narrative analysis as research methods. This article will also look on the possible interests and future actions of the Eurozone stakeholders based on the last four years´ experience. It will also be inquired into how and why national political elites and citizens delegated their democratic competences and powers to non-electable institutions during Eurozone crisis.

  17. Stakeholder analysis: theAndalusian Agency For Healthcare Quality case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Alcázar, Víctor; Casas-Delgado, Marta; Herrera-Usagre, Manuel; Torres-Olivera, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the different groups that can affect or be affected by an agency charged with the promoting and guaranteeing of health care quality in Andalusian region (Spain) and to provide a framework with the stakeholders included in different categories. The study adopted a cross-sectional research design. A case study with structured interviews among Andalusian Agency for Healthcare Quality Steering Committee members was carried out in 2010 to define stakeholders' categories and map the interest groups using 5 attributes: influence, importance, legitimacy, power, and urgency. After identification and categorization, stakeholders were weighted qualitatively according to the attributes of importance and influence using 4 possible levels. A matrix was made with the collected data relating both attributes. Furthermore, 8 different types of stakeholders were identified according to attributes power, legitimacy, and urgency. The study concludes that identifying and classifying stakeholders are fundamental to ensuring the success of an organization that must respond to needs and expectations, especially those of its clients. Moreover, knowing stakeholder linkages can contribute to increase organizational worth. This is essential for organizations basically directed to the provision of services in the scope of health care.

  18. Public-Private Leadership Forum; 21st Century Power Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-05-14

    The PPLF convenes stakeholders from across the power sector, spanning electricity supply, delivery, and end-use, and plays a key role in guiding the strategic direction of the Power Partnership. In addition, PPLF members support the implementation of activities set out in the Power Partnership Program of Work. Taken together, the activities of the PPLF span the dynamic landscape of power challenges and opportunities, with a focus on business models, ?nancial tools, and regulatory frameworks.

  19. Strengthening safety compliance in nuclear power operations: a role-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Córcoles, Mario; Gracia, Francisco J; Tomás, Inés; Peiró, José M

    2014-07-01

    Safety compliance is of paramount importance in guaranteeing the safe running of nuclear power plants. However, it depends mostly on procedures that do not always involve the safest outcomes. This article introduces an empirical model based on the organizational role theory to analyze the influence of legitimate sources of expectations (procedures formalization and leadership) on workers' compliance behaviors. The sample was composed of 495 employees from two Spanish nuclear power plants. Structural equation analysis showed that, in spite of some problematic effects of proceduralization (such as role conflict and role ambiguity), procedure formalization along with an empowering leadership style lead to safety compliance by clarifying a worker's role in safety. Implications of these findings for safety research are outlined, as well as their practical implications. © 2014 Society for Risk Analysis.

  20. The role of nuclear power in the reassessment of Czechoslovakia's energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cibula, M.

    1991-01-01

    The role of nuclear industry in an effective solution of Czechoslovakia's economic, energy and ecological problems is discussed. It is concluded that the impacts of slowing-down of the construction of nuclear power plants can only be overcome by extending the operation of the ecologically unfavorable coal-fired power plants; orientation either to the construction of natural gas-fired power plants with combined steam-gas cycles associated with the use of heat, or to electricity imports does not offer a fundamental solution to the above problem. (Z.M.). 5 refs

  1. Environmental Assessments and Stakeholder Involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesolowski, Cassandra

    2006-01-01

    Directives and legislation on EIA and SEA need to provide more guidance on how and when public participation should be used. There are now several examples of how well public participation can be performed and the methods are becoming more proactive and innovative. By increasing the role of public participation within the Environmental Assessment process, plans, programmes and projects will become more publicly acceptable. There does need to be a balance as to where public participation is performed in the system, as too much can be a stress on resources and time, as well as producing ineffective results. Key stages such as scoping, preparing the environmental statement or report and decision-making need to be highlighted for the benefits public participation can have. The Aarhus Convention is certainly making a difference in the UK; however it is difficult to judge exactly how much difference yet. It was only fully implemented in the UK in 2005 although some Authorities were applying the three pillars prior to implementation. It is not clear how aware the general public are of the Convention and their rights. Empowering communities in the UK. will communities for decision-making in Environmental Assessments? Providing the public with resources to enable them to fully engage in the process will improve the participation and increase their confidence, but how will this increase their influence within the decision-making process? Ultimately, should the stakeholders and public just influence the incremental decisions made in Environmental Assessments or have more responsibility within the major decisions taken? It will be interesting to see how these issues are addressed over the coming years

  2. Environmental Assessments and Stakeholder Involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesolowski, Cassandra [Univ. of Manchester, School of Environment and Development (United Kingdom). Planning and Landscape

    2006-09-15

    Directives and legislation on EIA and SEA need to provide more guidance on how and when public participation should be used. There are now several examples of how well public participation can be performed and the methods are becoming more proactive and innovative. By increasing the role of public participation within the Environmental Assessment process, plans, programmes and projects will become more publicly acceptable. There does need to be a balance as to where public participation is performed in the system, as too much can be a stress on resources and time, as well as producing ineffective results. Key stages such as scoping, preparing the environmental statement or report and decision-making need to be highlighted for the benefits public participation can have. The Aarhus Convention is certainly making a difference in the UK; however it is difficult to judge exactly how much difference yet. It was only fully implemented in the UK in 2005 although some Authorities were applying the three pillars prior to implementation. It is not clear how aware the general public are of the Convention and their rights. Empowering communities in the UK. will communities for decision-making in Environmental Assessments? Providing the public with resources to enable them to fully engage in the process will improve the participation and increase their confidence, but how will this increase their influence within the decision-making process? Ultimately, should the stakeholders and public just influence the incremental decisions made in Environmental Assessments or have more responsibility within the major decisions taken? It will be interesting to see how these issues are addressed over the coming years.

  3. Ontario Energy Board 2005 survey of stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    A survey was conducted among members of the Ontario Energy Board's (OEB) various stakeholder groups in order to measure the Board's performance and to help the Board identify areas for improvement in the way it operates. The survey included telephone interviews with consumer groups, advocacy groups, the energy sector, electricity and gas distributors, financial organizations as well as other stakeholders. The topics addressed in the survey were key energy issues and priority issues; the perceived role of the OEB; the OEB strengths and weaknesses; the importance of various OEB functions; the overall performance of the OEB; an evaluation of OEB communication with industry and consumers; an evaluation of service quality; and, awareness and participation in regulatory policy initiatives. Respondents used a 10-point scale in their evaluation. This report presented the main findings and their interpretations. Major stakeholders identified electricity supply issues and the price of electricity as being the most important energy issues facing Ontario. This report also presented the detailed findings for questions regarding the lack of generator capacity, policy stability, the coal phase out program, electricity blackouts, conservation, electricity restructuring and investment. The major finding of the survey was an overall increase in satisfaction with the OEB's performance. It was suggested that the OEB can improve in timeliness and providing consumer information. The major areas of strength were found to be its professionalism in conducting hearings and the fairness of the Board's decisions and regulations. tabs

  4. The role of fusion power in energy scenarios. Proposed method and review of existing scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lako, P; Ybema, J.R.; Seebregts, A.J.

    1998-04-01

    The European Commission wishes more insight in the potential role of fusion energy in the second half of the 21st century. Therefore, several scenario studies are carried out in the so-called macro-task Long Term Scenarios to investigate the potential role of fusion power in the energy system. The main contribution of ECN to the macro-task is to perform a long term energy scenario study for Western Europe with special focus on the role of fusion power. This interim report gives some methodological considerations for such an analysis. A discussion is given on the problems related to the long time horizon of the scenario study such as the forecast of technological innovations, the selection of appropriate discount rates and the links with climate change. Key parameters which are expected to have large effects on the role and cost-effectiveness are discussed in general terms. The key parameters to be varied include level and structure of energy demand, availability and prices of fossil energy, CO2 reduction policy, discount rates, cost and potential of renewable energy sources, availability of fission power and CO2 capture and disposal and the cost and the maximum rate of market growth of fusion power. The scenario calculations are to be performed later in the project with the help of an existing cost minimisation model of the Western European energy system. This MARKAL model is briefly introduced. The results of the model calculations are expected to make clear under which combinations of scenario parameters fusion power is needed and how large the expected financial benefits will be. The present interim report also gives an evaluation of existing energy scenarios with respect to the role of fusion power. 18 refs

  5. Conflict resolution efforts through stakeholder mapping in Labanan Research Forest, Berau, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiati, C. B.; Indriyanti, S. Y.; Maharani, R.; Subarudi

    2018-04-01

    Conflict resolution in Labanan Research Forest (LRF) by the Dipterocarps Forest Ecosystem Research and Development Center (Balai Besar Penelitian dan Pengembangan Ekosistem Hutan Dipterokarpa – B2P2EHD) needs support from other parties that are also interested in such forest management. This paper aimed to presented conflict resolution in LRF through stakeholder mapping for its engagement. This research was conducted for seven months (June to December 2015) with interviews and literature study as its data collection. Collected data were analysed by a stakeholder analysis and matrix based on their interest and power levels. Two important findings were: (1) There are 19 parties having interests in the existence of LRF should be engaged; (2) Conflict resolution of LRF can be achieved: (a) ensuring key stakeholders which have high interest and high power level has same perception in existence and management of LRF, (b) establishing a partnership with primary stakeholders which have high interest and high power levels; (c) building partnerships between primary stakeholders which have high interest but low power levels, (d) building partnerships between key and secondary stakeholders which have low interest but high power levels and (e) gaining support from primary and secondary stakeholders which have low interest and low power levels. Stakeholder mapping is an important tool for tenure conflict resolution through mapping the power and interest of the conflicted parties and finding the proper parties to be approached.

  6. Stakeholder Involvement Throughout the Life Cycle of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This report demonstrates the importance of stakeholder involvement throughout the life cycle of all nuclear facilities; including operating reactors, temporary spent fuel storage facilities and final radioactive waste repositories and follows what is defined in the IAEA Safety Standards GS-R-3 where the stakeholders' expectations (identified as 'interested parties' in GS-R-3) shall be taken into consideration 'in the activities and interactions in the processes of the management system, with the aim of enhancing the satisfaction of interested parties while at the same time ensuring that safety is not compromised'. This report explains how involving stakeholders in decision making processes, even for those stakeholder groups that do not have a direct role in making those decisions, can enhance public confidence in the application of nuclear science and technology. In addition, this report presents general guidance on stakeholder involvement. It does not provide detailed procedures for developing and implementing stakeholder involvement programmes, and specifics regarding stakeholder involvement for particular types of nuclear facilities. However, this publication references reports that provide such details. This publication provides assistance to those responsible for planning, designing, constructing, operating or decommissioning a nuclear facility. In addition, regulatory organizations and other authorities overseeing nuclear activities or managing nuclear facility licensing processes are often seen as the main source of independent information for the general public; therefore, stakeholder involvement can demonstrate capability and trustworthiness of regulatory organizations as well. The role of stakeholder involvement at different stages of a facility's life cycle is discussed, with suggestions on developing the components of a comprehensive stakeholder involvement plan. Included is guidance on focusing communication with certain stakeholders, applying various

  7. Stakeholder involvement - a japanese perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, S.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional societal and cultural background of Japanese in general indicates the intrinsic difficulty in involving the public as stakeholders in the process of any type of decision making in policy matters. It is characterized by the long-taught virtue of harmonization and obedience to others. In addition, characteristic system of Japanese traditional industrial society, such as lifetime employment, seniority-based wage system, and enterprise-based labour union, encourages the loyalty to the employer/company, but not to the public. The public or ordinary citizens would seldom come out as stakeholders and express their true feelings or real opinions, even though younger generation is notably getting out from such a trend. On the other hand, it is a common practice in Japanese society for any business or administrative transactions to try to obtain 'consensus' among relevant parties concerned (stakeholders) by negotiations behind the curtain prior to the formal discussion. In this sense, 'stakeholders involvement' is accepted and practised as a matter of course, but mostly for actions between parties of equivalently influential status levels or between 'directly relevant' parties such as those between the different government agencies, between regulators and industries. The concept of 'Involving the public in decision making as stakeholders' is not yet fully understood nor accepted in Japan both by regulators and by the public so far as the issue of radiation protection is concerned. These situations are explained with some examples. (author)

  8. Implications for reconstruction of the relationship between nuclear industry and siting areas in Japan. Lessons learnt from the cases of Site Stakeholder Groups in United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Shin-etsu

    2014-01-01

    After the Fukushima nuclear accident, the Japanese nuclear community began to recognize the need for establishing local stakeholder meetings in nuclear siting areas for information sharing and communication in reference to the experiences in European countries. This report shows the patterns of institutional design and the management style of stakeholder meetings in UK based on the interview survey, including SSGs (Site Stakeholder Groups) around the NDA (Nuclear Decommissioning Authority) sites and LCLCs (Local Community Liaison Councils) around the nuclear power stations in operation. SSGs have developed a local-oriented management style under the leadership of independent chairs elected from local stakeholders, in contrast to LCLCs where the operator of nuclear energy facilities has the initiative of management. SSGs play critical roles in improving quality of decision-making and enhancing its legitimacy through providing forums for local stakeholder engagement in the process of NDA's consultations and BPEO (Best Practicable Environmental Option) implementation. Based on these insights from UK's cases, the author suggests the following remedies for the relationship between the nuclear industry and siting areas in Japan: (1) introducing evaluation systems of stakeholder engagement linked to the insurance rates of nuclear energy liability, and (2) modifying the nuclear safety agreements into risk management principles. (author)

  9. Performance satisfaction, shareholder and stakeholder orientations: Managers´ perceptions in three countries across continents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Angelopoulos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Managers working in South Africa, Peru and the United States were classified as stakeholder- and/or shareholder-oriented along the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility (PRESOR scale. The relationship between stakeholder/shareholder orientation and perceptions of organisational performance was further explored. In South Africa and overall, respondents with both high stakeholder and low shareholder orientations reported the greatest performance satisfaction. In Peru, managers with a high stakeholder orientation reported the greatest satisfaction with organisational performance. A significant link between stakeholder or shareholder orientation and performance satisfaction was not found in the United States, however. Directions for future research are outlined.

  10. A Newcomer Gains Power: An Analysis of the Role of Rhetorical Expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Susan M.

    1998-01-01

    Offers a case study describing how the rhetorical expertise of a young woman (at the lowest professional level in a male-dominated bureaucratic organization) gave her the power to revise the processes by which her organization did its work, to rewrite the job descriptions of the managers within the organization, and to create a unique role for…

  11. Organizational Culture's Role in the Relationship between Power Bases and Job Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkutlu, Hakan; Chafra, Jamel; Bumin, Birol

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the moderating role of organizational culture in the relationship between leader's power bases and subordinate's job stress. Totally 622 lecturers and their superiors (deans) from 13 state universities chosen by random method in Ankara, Istanbul, Izmir, Antalya, Samsun, Erzurum and Gaziantep in 2008-2009…

  12. Changing gender roles, shifting power balance and long-distance migration of couples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, J.; Mulder, C.H.; Hooimeijer, P.

    2003-01-01

    Long-distance migration of couples requires joint decision-making within the household. The uneven power balance between men and women and traditional gender roles have given rise to the concepts of 'tied stayer' (usually the male partner) and 'tied mover' (usually the female). Since these concepts

  13. Changing Gender Roles, Shifting Power Balance and Long-distance Migration of Couples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, J.P.J.M.; Mulder, C.H.; Hooimeijer, P.

    2003-01-01

    Long-distance migration of couples requires joint decision-making within the household. The uneven power balance between men and women and traditional gender roles have given rise to the concepts of ‘tied stayer’ (usually the male partner) and ‘tied mover’ (usually the female). Since these

  14. Call for NDT leadership role in assuring safety of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, W.A.; Simpson, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    Nondestructive Testing and its potential role in assuring the safety of nuclear power were given emphasis at a conference on Nondestructive Testing in the Nuclear Industry sponsored by the American Society for Metals Dec. 1--3 in Denver, Colo. Excerpts from two major addresses challenging the NDT community to assume leadership in solving nuclear safety problems are presented

  15. The role of hydropower in electric power integration of Asian countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Lev; Savelyev, Vladimir; Chudinova, Lyudmila

    2018-01-01

    The possible role of hydropower plants in formation and operation of interstate power pools is described based on the generalization of the world experience. Peculiarities of the influence of hydropower on development of interstate electric ties in this part of the world and potential effects are showed on the example of Central and Northeast Asia.

  16. The Role of Soft Power in China’s Foreign Policy in the 21th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beston Husen Arif

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The concept of soft power has recently become more integrated in China’s diplomatic strategy and foreign policy. China’s utilization of hard power only is insufficient if it wishes to be an active player on the international stage. It also needs to employ soft power to stimulate its influences and leadership in world politics. This study focuses on the argument that soft power can play a significant role in shaping China’s charm image among other countries. It also discusses that China’s aspiration to be a more powerful state in the region depends on its ability to put more efforts into its soft power tactics. To this end, China has employed various tools of soft power’s sources including Chinese culture, language, arts, aids, trades and investments to promote its influences abroad. China’s interest in using soft power comes from its demanding national interests. These national interests include trying to secure a peaceful environment for its economic growth, to accommodate for its increasing energy needs, and also to minimise the influence of other powers, particularly the United States.

  17. 78 FR 20119 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2012-0042] Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY... concerning the Broad Stakeholder Survey. DHS previously published this ICR in the Federal Register on August... across the Nation. The Broad Stakeholder Survey is designed to gather stakeholder feedback on the...

  18. Transformational Leadership and Stakeholder Management in Library Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Sucozhañay

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyse the role of library managers as change agent when implementing Library 2.0, using transformational leadership and stakeholder management approaches. To do so, a case study in a Latin American academic library was performed. The experiences acquired for a period of six years were analysed, during which three library managers were involved in managing change. Qualitative data from documents, interviews, and observations were collected, and qualitative analysis methods were used to obtain in-depth understanding of the change process. Results show that lack of transformational leadership and stakeholder management contribute to delayed implementation and limited adoption of innovations. Although library managers recognized the importance of different stakeholders to implement changes, they did not apply systematic and proactive strategies to define and manage them. All in all, library managers should be trained as change agents, with emphasis on transformational leadership and stakeholder management skills.

  19. The role of nuclear power and nuclear propulsion in the peaceful exploration of space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-09-01

    This publication has been produced within the framework of the IAEA's innovative reactor and fuel cycle technology development activities. It elucidates the role that peaceful space related nuclear power research and development could play in terrestrial innovative reactor and fuel cycle technology development initiatives. This review is a contribution to the Inter-Agency Meeting on Outer Space Activities, and reflects the stepped up efforts of the Scientific and Technical Subcommittee of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space to further strengthen cooperation between international organizations in space related activities. Apart from fostering information exchange within the United Nations organizations, this publication aims at finding new potential fields for innovative reactor and fuel cycle technology development. In assessing the status and reviewing the role of nuclear power in the peaceful exploration of space, it also aims to initiate a discussion on the potential benefits of space related nuclear power technology research and development to the development of innovative terrestrial nuclear systems

  20. The role of probabilistic safety assessment and probabilistic safety criteria in nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this Safety Report is to provide guidelines on the role of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) and a range of associated reference points, collectively referred to as probabilistic safety criteria (PSC), in nuclear safety. The application of this Safety Report and the supporting Safety Practice publication should help to ensure that PSA methodology is used appropriately to assess and enhance the safety of nuclear power plants. The guidelines are intended for use by nuclear power plant designers, operators and regulators. While these guidelines have been prepared with nuclear power plants in mind, the principles involved have wide application to other nuclear and non-nuclear facilities. In Section 2 of this Safety Report guidelines are established on the role PSA can play as part of an overall safety assurance programme. Section 3 summarizes guidelines for the conduct of PSAs, and in Section 4 a PSC framework is recommended and guidance is provided for the establishment of PSC values

  1. Nuclear Power : The roles, functions and opportunities for research institutes - An overview and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheriffah Noor Khamseah Al-Idid Syed Ahmad Idid

    2010-01-01

    Shifting nuclear power from being the Last Option to a new energy mix for Malaysia has significant implications and requires specific actions, responses and support from critical stake holders including Government, Utility, Education Sectors and Research Institutes. This paper aims to briefly outline the roles and functions of these stake holders, but spotlighting on that of research institute. Presently the role of research and development (R and D) within a nuclear power programme is a controversial subject. Opinions range from assigning a continuing priority role in this area, to considering it a somewhat questionable effort at the present state of development of proven reactor types, in particular for countries which have not yet started or are at the earlier stages of the nuclear power programmes. As such Nuclear Malaysia may be facing a similar challenge in its quest to identify the most effective role and function for the agency to undertake for the 1st NPP. Thus it is within this context that his paper aims offer an overview of the activities and work scope required to support a Nuclear Power Programme (NPP) with the view that this will enable management and the scientific and research community to formulate strategies and work plan, in particular in terms of HRD and R and D plans, to further enhance its readiness to support Malaysia's first Nuclear Power programme, earmarked by the Government for the year 2020. Additionally it is hoped that this would contribute to the identification of an effective role, function and opportunities for Nuclear Malaysia in supporting Malaysia's first NPP. (author)

  2. The role of the dorsoanterior striatum in implicit motivation: The case of the need for power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver C Schultheiss

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Implicit motives like the need for power (nPower scale affective responses to need-specific rewards or punishments and thereby influence activity in motivational-brain structures. In this paper, we review evidence specifically supporting a role of the striatum in nPower. Individual differences in nPower predict (a enhanced implicit learning accuracy, but not speed, on serial-response tasks that are reinforced by power-related incentives (e.g., winning or losing a contest; dominant or submissive emotional expressions in behavioral studies and (b activation of the anterior caudate in response to dominant emotional expressions in brain imaging research. We interpret these findings on the basis of Hikosaka, Nakamura, Sakai, and Nakahara's (2002; Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 12(2, 217-222 model of central mechanisms of motor skill learning. The model assigns a critical role to the dorsoanterior striatum in dopamine-driven learning of spatial stimulus sequences. Based on this model, we suggest that the dorsoanterior striatum is the locus of nPower-dependent reinforcement. However, given the centrality of this structure in a wide range of motivational pursuits, we also propose that activity in the dorsoanterior striatum may not only reflect individual differences in nPower, but also in other implicit motives, like the need for achievement or the need for affiliation, provided that the proper incentives for these motives are present during reinforcement learning. We discuss evidence in support of such a general role of the dorsoanterior striatum in implicit motivation.

  3. Business resiliency and stakeholder management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Noel; Perry, Tony

    2014-01-01

    The authors facilitated separate round table discussions at the City and Financial Conference in London on 29th January, 2014. The theme of these discussions was business resiliency and stakeholder management. This topic attracted the largest group of all the breakout sessions, as the issue continues to generate much interest across the business resilience community. In this paper, the authors summarise the discussions held at the event and add their own insights into the subject of who are stakeholders, and the different means and messages to communicate to them.

  4. Stakeholder Engagement Through Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etter, Michael; Castello, Itziar

    competing logics of stakeholder engagement: the current (influence logic) and the new logic underlying social media (logic of community). With a longitudinal study of 26 months we observe how engagements failed since managers were not able to integrate certain symbolic and substantive elements of the new......The introduction of new information and communication technologies such social media platforms in organizations results in a new emerging logic of stakeholder engagement around sustainable development issues. We investigate how middle managers of a pharmaceutical corporation navigate between two...... introduced by social media....

  5. One Health stakeholder and institutional analysis in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimani, Tabitha; Ngigi, Margaret; Schelling, Esther; Randolph, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Introduction One Health (OH) can be considered a complex emerging policy to resolve health issues at the animal–human and environmental interface. It is expected to drive system changes in terms of new formal and informal institutional and organisational arrangements. This study, using Rift Valley fever (RVF) as a zoonotic problem requiring an OH approach, sought to understand the institutionalisation process at national and subnational levels in an early adopting country, Kenya. Materials and methods Social network analysis methodologies were used. Stakeholder roles and relational data were collected at national and subnational levels in 2012. Key informants from stakeholder organisations were interviewed, guided by a checklist. Public sector animal and public health organisations were interviewed first to identify other stakeholders with whom they had financial, information sharing and joint cooperation relationships. Visualisation of the OH social network and relationships were shown in sociograms and mathematical (degree and centrality) characteristics of the network summarised. Results and discussion Thirty-two and 20 stakeholders relevant to OH were identified at national and subnational levels, respectively. Their roles spanned wildlife, livestock, and public health sectors as well as weather prediction. About 50% of national-level stakeholders had made significant progress on OH institutionalisation to an extent that formal coordination structures (zoonoses disease unit and a technical working group) had been created. However, the process had not trickled down to subnational levels although cross-sectoral and sectoral collaborations were identified. The overall binary social network density for the stakeholders showed that 35 and 21% of the possible ties between the RVF and OH stakeholders existed at national and subnational levels, respectively, while public health actors’ collaborations were identified at community/grassroots level. We recommend

  6. The Positive Effect of Authoritarian Leadership on Employee Performance: The Moderating Role of Power Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Honglei; Guan, Bichen

    2018-01-01

    Based on goal setting theory, this study explores the positive effect and influencing process of authoritarian leadership on employee performance, as well as the moderating role of individual power distance in this process. Data from 211 supervisor-subordinate dyads in Chinese organizations indicates that authoritarian leadership is positively associated with employee performance, and learning goal orientation mediates this relationship. Furthermore, power distance moderates the effect of authoritarian leadership on learning goal orientation, such that the effect was stronger when individual power distance was higher. The indirect effect of authoritarian leadership on employee performance via learning goal orientation is also moderated by power distance. Theoretical and managerial implications and future directions are also discussed. PMID:29628902

  7. The Positive Effect of Authoritarian Leadership on Employee Performance: The Moderating Role of Power Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Honglei; Guan, Bichen

    2018-01-01

    Based on goal setting theory, this study explores the positive effect and influencing process of authoritarian leadership on employee performance, as well as the moderating role of individual power distance in this process. Data from 211 supervisor-subordinate dyads in Chinese organizations indicates that authoritarian leadership is positively associated with employee performance, and learning goal orientation mediates this relationship. Furthermore, power distance moderates the effect of authoritarian leadership on learning goal orientation, such that the effect was stronger when individual power distance was higher. The indirect effect of authoritarian leadership on employee performance via learning goal orientation is also moderated by power distance. Theoretical and managerial implications and future directions are also discussed.

  8. Survey and studies on the roles of nuclear power development in economy and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The development and utilization of nuclear energy is principally for security of energy supplies but, on the other hand, is contributing largely to the economic activities and technology developments in Japan. In order to clarify the economic and the technological roles played by the nuclear energy development and utilization, Atomic Energy Commission has made survey and studies on the present state of nuclear power industry and of nuclear power technology and the respective effects in other areas. The nuclear power industry, through its high growth, is now a substantial portion, and so has significant influence, in Japan's whole economic activities. Then, the nuclear power technology, started with its introduction, is now on the world's leading level. Its effects in other areas include quality control, system technology, etc. (Mori, K.)

  9. The role of nuclear power generation in aspects of the foreign currency outflow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Su; Lee, Man Ki

    2005-01-01

    Korea has little domestic energy resources and so imported almost all of the primary energy consumed from the foreign countries, with the foreign energy dependency being about more than 97% in recent years. In the meantime, the import amount of energy together with the rapid economic growth has increased continuously during the past 30 years to be 49.6 billion dollar in 2004 while the Current Account Balance was 27.6 billion dollar in the same year. Especially, the growth rate of electric consumption greatly surpassed ones in GDP and primary energy over the past 20 years. Nuclear power generation has played an important role in Korean society by supporting the industrial development as well as stabilizing downward the electricity price. The steady progress in the localization of nuclear construction has decreased the amount of foreign currency outflow by the nuclear power plant construction. In addition, nuclear fuel cost is the most competitive among those of the other fossil fuel power sources, so that this situation resulted in the large decrease of foreign currency outflow in power sector. In this thesis, we focused on the savings effect in foreign currency outflow by nuclear power generation using the scenario method. We tried to evaluate what amount of foreign currency has been saved by the introduction of nuclear power plant instead of the other fossil fuel power plants

  10. GC Side Event: Africa's Energy Needs and the Potential Role of Nuclear Power. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Energy is central to development, and energy availability, accessibility and affordability are central challenges for most African countries. Due to rapidly growing energy demand, the need for socioeconomic development, persistent concerns over climate change and environmental impacts and dependence on imported supplies of fossil fuels, African Member States are looking into possible options to secure sustainable energy supplies, including nuclear energy. The IAEA assists those countries in assessing the nuclear power option and building the necessary infrastructure for a safe, secure and sustainable nuclear power programme. This year, the IAEA is conducting Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review (INIR) missions to three African countries (Nigeria, Kenya and Morocco) considering introducing nuclear power. The side event presents recent updates from Africa on the potential role of nuclear power, including the IAEA Third Regional Conference on Energy and Nuclear Power in Africa, held in Mombasa, Kenya, in April 2015, an initiative to launch a new African network for enhancing nuclear power programme development, and others. The event reports on recent developments in several African Member States considering, embarking on, or expanding national nuclear power programmes.

  11. Planning that works: Empowerment through stakeholder focused interactive planning (SFIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, J.E.; Ison, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a powerful planning tool that can enable government, private industries, and public interest organizations to actualize their visions through sound decision making. The stakeholder focused interactive planning model is designed to integrate and ultimately gain stakeholder investment in the success of attainment of their vision. The only concessions required of the planning organization using this process is the acceptance of the premise that sustained vision success requires the support of both internal and external stakeholders and that each step in the process must be used as a validation of the previous step and essential to the completion of the next step. What is stakeholder/public involvement? It is the process in which the stakeholders (both internal and external) values, interests and expectations are included in decision-making processes. The primary goal of public involvement efforts is to include all those who have a stake in the decision, whether or not they have already been identified. Stakeholders are individuals, contractors, clients, suppliers, public organizations, state and local governments, Indian tribes, federal agencies, and other parties affected by decisions

  12. Green Power Partner Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA Green Power Partners can access tools and resources to help promote their green power commitments. Partners use these tools to communicate the benefits of their green power use to their customers, stakeholders, and the general public.

  13. Stakeholders and Radiation Protection in Today's World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rick Jones, C.; Lochard, J.; Lazo, T.

    2006-01-01

    In looking forward the C.R.P.P.H.(Nea 's Committee on radiation protection and public health) identified three influences that will condition the way we address emerging issues, and will alter how we address ongoing issues. These are the involvement of stakeholders in decision making processes, the evolution of radiological protection science and its changing place in risk assessment and management, and the experience gained in implementing the current system of radiological protection. First among there is the growing importance of stakeholder involvement in radiation protection decision making. This has affected the way that the principles of justification, optimization and limitation are viewed, the way the role of the radiation protection professional in risk assessment and management is viewed, and the relative importance of case specific circumstances in relation to harmonized, internationally accepted criteria. In the wake of this change, the international system of radiological protection is being updated by the ICRP, and discussions of the most appropriate direction to take are nearing their end. Second, radiological protection science continues to identify specific aspects that do not fit the conventional linear non threshold model, and which us to consider that, at the very least, the risks from different exposures and exposure situations may not be as simply and universally comparable assumed. This will affect the way that risks are managed, and all relevant stakeholder involvement processes. In addition, decisions relating to public, worker and environmental health and safety are increasingly seen as judgement social choices. Although such choices must be guided by an understanding of state-of-the-art scientific and its uncertainties, the final, choice will generally be made by society, not scientists. Third, since the issuance of ICRP Publication 60 in 1990, and the International Basic Safety Standards in 1996, extensive experience has been amassed in

  14. STAKEHOLDER LINKAGES FOR SUSTAINABLE LAND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    Key words: Stakeholders; farmer-expert linkages; resource management; Ethiopia. Introduction ... decentralized democratic decision making processes and thus ..... district offices within the given time limits. They were often .... -less willing and less ready to hearing weaker performance reports (expect more success with ...

  15. Managing resources through stakeholder networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogada, Job Ochieng; Krhoda, George Okoye; Veen, Van Der Anne; Marani, Martin; Oel, van Pieter Richards

    2017-01-01

    Stakeholder analysis and social network analysis were used to analyze stakeholders’ social and structural characteristics based on their interests, influence and interactions in Lake Naivasha basin, Kenya. Even though the Kenyan government and its agencies seem to command higher influence and

  16. Corporate responses to stakeholder activism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldam, Julie; Krause Hansen, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Corporations are increasingly expected to act responsibly. The purpose of this paper is to examine two types of corporate responses to these expectations: overt and covert responses. Specifically, it examines oil companies’ involvement in multi-stakeholder initiatives and sponsorships (overt...

  17. Engaging Stakeholders in Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jo Nell

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the importance of parent and community engagement in curriculum development, along with curriculum leadership, engaging stakeholders, and the importance of curriculum. Parent and community member engagement is examined in light of curriculum committee participation as reported by Missouri superintendents. Survey responses…

  18. Turkey's role as a regional and global player and its power capacity: Turkey's engagement with other emerging states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Gürzel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Turkey's role as a regional power has increased since Justice and Development Party (AKP came to power. AKP leadership not only aspired to become a regional power but also a global player. Turkey has, therefore, assumed different roles: the "natural leader" of the region; a historical "big brother;" and the "protector" of the Muslim minorities. Turkey has also assumed a "mediator" and a "facilitator" role by trying to negotiate a deal with an emerging power such as Brazil in order to attempt to resolve the controversial Iranian nuclear issue. By making use of recent developments, Turkey tried to solidify its long desired role as a "rising power" by increasing its influence in its neighborhood and engaging with other emerging powers. The concept "regional power" is a context-based notion. In other words, the location and geography are contesting and disputed approaches. Notwithstanding the fact that concepts such as "region" and "power" are social constructed reality, this paper analyzes the notion of 'regional power' as a subcategory of 'power'. In this context, this paper will make use of Stefan Schim's criteria while analyzing Turkey's power capacity in the region. Schim posits that the "regional power" needs to have a "role definition," and it should possess material power (hard power. It should also have economic as well as diplomatic and organizational capacity. Its power whether it is 'soft power' (attraction of ones idea's and or the ability to set the political agenda in a way that shapes the preferences of other actors or 'hard power' (material power that can be measured-economic and military power needs to be acknowledged by other actors in the region. It should also be accepted by great powers and emerging powers that are determinant in the international system. dditionally, the regional power (and/ or global power needs to have leverage, thus its power projection needs to yield results. Kalevi Holsti's role theory will be used as

  19. Evolving Role of the Power Sector Regulator: A Clean Energy Regulators Initiative Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinaman, O.; Miller, M.; Bazilian, M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper seeks to briefly characterize the evolving role of power sector regulation. Given current global dynamics, regulation of the power sector is undergoing dramatic changes. This transformation is being driven by various factors including technological advances and cost reductions in renewable energy, energy efficiency, and demand management; increasing air pollution and climate change concerns; and persistent pressure for ensuring sustainable economic development and increased access to energy services by the poor. These issues add to the already complex task of power sector regulation, of which the fundamental remit remains to objectively and transparently ensure least-cost service delivery at high quality. While no single regulatory task is trivial to undertake, it is the prioritization and harmonization of a multitude of objectives that exemplifies the essential challenge of power sector regulation. Evolving regulatory roles can be understood through the concept of existing objectives and an additional layer of emerging objectives. Following this categorization, we describe seven existing objectives of power sector regulators and nine emerging objectives, highlighting key challenges and outlining interdependencies. This essay serves as a preliminary installment in the Clean Energy Regulatory Initiative (CERI) series, and aims to lay the groundwork for subsequent reports and case studies that will explore these topics in more depth.

  20. The future of nuclear power worldwide and the role of the global nuclear energy partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurgeon, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation is entitled, 'The Future of Nuclear Power Worldwide and the Role of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership', and the core message in one sentence is: When we look at the challenges of meeting our growing energy demands, providing for energy security and reducing greenhouse gas emissions, we must conclude that nuclear power has to play a significant and growing role in meeting these challenges. Similarly, the mission of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership is to foster the safe and secure worldwide expansion of nuclear energy. GNEP comes at a crucial time in the burgeoning expansion of nuclear power. It is the only comprehensive proposal to close the nuclear fuel cycle in the United States, and engage the international community to minimize proliferation risks as well as provide and benefit from cooperation in policy formation, technical support, and technology and infrastructure development. Nuclear power's poised renaissance is encouraging, but it will require public support, expanded R and D activities and facilities, and increases in human capital needed for wide-scale construction and operation of new nuclear plants. Despite recent political currents, Germany can, too, become a part of this renaissance and become a full partner in the global partnership that shares a common vision for nuclear power's expansion. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear power in developing countries: Its potential role and strategies for its deployment. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The demand for energy, especially electricity, in developing countries is expected to grow rapidly in the coming decades as these countries seek to improve the living standards of their growing populations. Substantial growth in developing country energy demand plus a continued heavy reliance of the power sector on fossil fuels is likely to result in an increased dependence of these countries on energy imports and thus to potential deterioration of their terms-of-trade, reduced energy security and, in the absence of costly mitigation measures, severe degradation of the environment and public health, and will also lead to increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. If supply security, health and environmental protection and climate change become pressing policy issues, nuclear power is, in the short to medium term, the only viable non-fossil base load electricity generating alternative (other than hydro where growth potential is limited) that is already meeting 17% of global electricity needs and contributing more than 30% of electricity supplies in 14 countries. It is in the above context that the International Atomic Energy Agency organized this seminar to explore the role of nuclear power in meeting the growing demand for electricity in the developing world, and to identify and discuss suitable ways and means for proper implementation of nuclear power programmes in these countries. Several issues were discussed, in particular, the need and role of nuclear power; economic and financial aspects; technology transfer and national participation; safety, regulation and safeguards; and public acceptance

  2. Nuclear power in developing countries: Its potential role and strategies for its deployment. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-08-01

    The demand for energy, especially electricity, in developing countries is expected to grow rapidly in the coming decades as these countries seek to improve the living standards of their growing populations. Substantial growth in developing country energy demand plus a continued heavy reliance of the power sector on fossil fuels is likely to result in an increased dependence of these countries on energy imports and thus to potential deterioration of their terms-of-trade, reduced energy security and, in the absence of costly mitigation measures, severe degradation of the environment and public health, and will also lead to increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. If supply security, health and environmental protection and climate change become pressing policy issues, nuclear power is, in the short to medium term, the only viable non-fossil base load electricity generating alternative (other than hydro where growth potential is limited) that is already meeting 17% of global electricity needs and contributing more than 30% of electricity supplies in 14 countries. It is in the above context that the International Atomic Energy Agency organized this seminar to explore the role of nuclear power in meeting the growing demand for electricity in the developing world, and to identify and discuss suitable ways and means for proper implementation of nuclear power programmes in these countries. Several issues were discussed, in particular, the need and role of nuclear power; economic and financial aspects; technology transfer and national participation; safety, regulation and safeguards; and public acceptance.

  3. A new taxonomy for stakeholder engagement in patient-centered outcomes research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, Thomas W; Meissner, Paul; Grunbaum, Jo Anne; McElwee, Newell; Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Santa, John; Conway, Patrick H; Daudelin, Denise; Morrato, Elaine H; Leslie, Laurel K

    2012-08-01

    Despite widespread agreement that stakeholder engagement is needed in patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR), no taxonomy exists to guide researchers and policy makers on how to address this need. We followed an iterative process, including several stages of stakeholder review, to address three questions: (1) Who are the stakeholders in PCOR? (2) What roles and responsibilities can stakeholders have in PCOR? (3) How can researchers start engaging stakeholders? We introduce a flexible taxonomy called the 7Ps of Stakeholder Engagement and Six Stages of Research for identifying stakeholders and developing engagement strategies across the full spectrum of research activities. The path toward engagement will not be uniform across every research program, but this taxonomy offers a common starting point and a flexible approach.

  4. Stakeholder challenges in purchasing medical devices for patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Saba; Dickerson, Terry; Clarkson, John

    2013-03-01

    This study identifies the stakeholders who have a role in medical device purchasing within the wider system of health-care delivery and reports on their particular challenges to promote patient safety during purchasing decisions. Data was collected through observational work, participatory workshops, and semi-structured qualitative interviews, which were analyzed and coded. The study takes a systems-based and engineering design approach to the study. Five hospitals took part in this study, and the participants included maintenance, training, clinical end-users, finance, and risk departments. The main stakeholders for purchasing were identified to be staff from clinical engineering (Maintenance), device users (Clinical), device trainers (Training), and clinical governance for analyzing incidents involving devices (Risk). These stakeholders display varied characteristics in terms of interpretation of their own roles, competencies for selecting devices, awareness and use of resources for purchasing devices, and attitudes toward the purchasing process. The role of "clinical engineering" is seen by these stakeholders to be critical in mediating between training, technical, and financial stakeholders but not always recognized in practice. The findings show that many device purchasing decisions are tackled in isolation, which is not optimal for decisions requiring knowledge that is currently distributed among different people within different departments. The challenges expressed relate to the wider system of care and equipment management, calling for a more systemic view of purchasing for medical devices.

  5. The role of communications in achieving sound energy policy and excellence in nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper highlights the renewed emphasis on excellence throughout the U.S. nuclear power industry. The author discusses the role of the industry's national communications programs in helping achieve excellence, and in helping maintain the viability of nuclear power as a major source of energy in America. The author discusses an industry report which emphasized that quality operational performance of all U.S. nuclear utilities is absolutely essential for public and regulatory trust. To achieve that trust, the public must know about operational excellence. According to the author, delivering that message is one of the industry's major assignments

  6. Using social network and stakeholder analysis to help evaluate infectious waste management: a step towards a holistic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniato, Marco; Vaccari, Mentore; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan; Zurbrügg, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Assessing the strengths and weaknesses of a solid waste management scheme requires an accurate analysis and integration of several determining features. In addition to the technical aspects, any such system shows a complex interaction of actors with varying stakes, decision-making power and influence, as well as a favourable or disabling environment. When capitalizing on the knowledge and experience from a specific case, it is also crucial that experts do not "forget" or underestimate the importance of such social determinants and that they are familiar with the methods and tools to assess them. Social network analysis (SNA) and stakeholder analysis (SA) methods can be successfully applied to better understand actors' role and actions, analyse driving forces and existing coordination among stakeholders, as well as identify bottlenecks in communication which affect daily operations or strategic planning for the future way forward. SNA and SA, appropriately adjusted for a certain system, can provide a useful integration to methods by assessing other aspects to ensure a comprehensive picture of the situation. This paper describes how to integrate SNA and SA in order to survey a solid waste management system. This paper presents the results of an analysis of On-Nuch infectious waste incinerator in Bangkok, Thailand. Stakeholders were interviewed and asked to prioritize characteristics and relationships which they consider particularly important for system development and success of the scheme. In such a way, a large quantity of information about organization, communication between stakeholders and their perception about operation, environmental and health impact, and potential alternatives for the system was collected in a systematic way. The survey results suggest that stakeholders are generally satisfied with the system operation, though communication should be improved. Moreover, stakeholders should be strategically more involved in system development planning

  7. Stakeholders' Perceptions of Effective EFL Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwangsawad, Thooptong

    2017-01-01

    Teacher preparation is important as the component of teachers' ongoing learning and development. Well-designed teacher preparation can also be a powerful vehicle for preparing the next generation of teachers to implement new curriculum and innovative teaching methods. The rationale for this quantitative study was to explore stakeholders'…

  8. Stakeholder Management in IOS projects : Lessons from a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, Albert

    2006-01-01

    Implementing an effective inter-organizational system (IOS) requires significant organizational as well as technical changes. These will affect stakeholders with varying degrees of power and with varying degrees of interest in the system – yet promoters depend on them if the project is to succeed.

  9. Using social network and stakeholder analysis to help evaluate infectious waste management: A step towards a holistic assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caniato, Marco; Vaccari, Mentore; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan; Zurbrügg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Assessment of infectious waste management in Bangkok, in particular incineration. • Integration of social network and stakeholder analysis assessment methods. • Assessment of stakeholder characteristics, role, interaction and communication. • Interviewees self-evaluate their own characteristics and the system. • Non-technical aspects are important for system acceptability, and sustainability. - Abstract: Assessing the strengths and weaknesses of a solid waste management scheme requires an accurate analysis and integration of several determining features. In addition to the technical aspects, any such system shows a complex interaction of actors with varying stakes, decision-making power and influence, as well as a favourable or disabling environment. When capitalizing on the knowledge and experience from a specific case, it is also crucial that experts do not “forget” or underestimate the importance of such social determinants and that they are familiar with the methods and tools to assess them. Social network analysis (SNA) and stakeholder analysis (SA) methods can be successfully applied to better understand actors’ role and actions, analyse driving forces and existing coordination among stakeholders, as well as identify bottlenecks in communication which affect daily operations or strategic planning for the future way forward. SNA and SA, appropriately adjusted for a certain system, can provide a useful integration to methods by assessing other aspects to ensure a comprehensive picture of the situation. This paper describes how to integrate SNA and SA in order to survey a solid waste management system. This paper presents the results of an analysis of On-Nuch infectious waste incinerator in Bangkok, Thailand. Stakeholders were interviewed and asked to prioritize characteristics and relationships which they consider particularly important for system development and success of the scheme. In such a way, a large quantity of information

  10. Using social network and stakeholder analysis to help evaluate infectious waste management: A step towards a holistic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caniato, Marco, E-mail: marcocaniato@gmail.com [University of Brescia, Research Centre on Appropriate Technologies for Environmental Management in Developing Countries (CeTAmb), Via Branze, 43, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Vaccari, Mentore, E-mail: mentore.vaccari@unibs.it [University of Brescia, Research Centre on Appropriate Technologies for Environmental Management in Developing Countries (CeTAmb), Via Branze, 43, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Visvanathan, Chettiyappan, E-mail: visu@ait.ac.th [Asian Institute of Technology (AIT), School of Environment, Resources and Development (SERD), P.O. Box 4, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Zurbrügg, Christian, E-mail: zurbrugg@eawag.ch [University of Brescia, Research Centre on Appropriate Technologies for Environmental Management in Developing Countries (CeTAmb), Via Branze, 43, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries (Sandec), Ueberlandstrasse 133, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Assessment of infectious waste management in Bangkok, in particular incineration. • Integration of social network and stakeholder analysis assessment methods. • Assessment of stakeholder characteristics, role, interaction and communication. • Interviewees self-evaluate their own characteristics and the system. • Non-technical aspects are important for system acceptability, and sustainability. - Abstract: Assessing the strengths and weaknesses of a solid waste management scheme requires an accurate analysis and integration of several determining features. In addition to the technical aspects, any such system shows a complex interaction of actors with varying stakes, decision-making power and influence, as well as a favourable or disabling environment. When capitalizing on the knowledge and experience from a specific case, it is also crucial that experts do not “forget” or underestimate the importance of such social determinants and that they are familiar with the methods and tools to assess them. Social network analysis (SNA) and stakeholder analysis (SA) methods can be successfully applied to better understand actors’ role and actions, analyse driving forces and existing coordination among stakeholders, as well as identify bottlenecks in communication which affect daily operations or strategic planning for the future way forward. SNA and SA, appropriately adjusted for a certain system, can provide a useful integration to methods by assessing other aspects to ensure a comprehensive picture of the situation. This paper describes how to integrate SNA and SA in order to survey a solid waste management system. This paper presents the results of an analysis of On-Nuch infectious waste incinerator in Bangkok, Thailand. Stakeholders were interviewed and asked to prioritize characteristics and relationships which they consider particularly important for system development and success of the scheme. In such a way, a large quantity of information

  11. The International Finance Facility for Immunisation: stakeholders' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker-Buque, Tim; Mounier-Jack, Sandra

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate stakeholders' understanding and opinions of the International Finance Facility for Immunisation (IFFIm); to identify factors affecting funding levels; and to explore the future use of IFFIm. Between July and September 2015, we interviewed 33 individuals from 25 organizations identified as stakeholders in IFFIm. In total 22.5 hours of semi-structured interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using a framework method. Stakeholders' understanding of IFFIm's financing mechanism and its outcomes varied and many stakeholders wanted more information. Participants highlighted that the change in the macro-economic environment following the 2008 financial crisis affected national policy in donor countries and subsequently the number of new commitments IFFIm received. Since Gavi is now seen as a successful and mature organization, participants stated that donors prefer to donate directly to Gavi. The pharmaceutical industry valued IFFIm for providing funding stability and flexibility. Other stakeholders valued IFFIm's ability to access funds early and enable Gavi to increase vaccine coverage. Overall, stakeholders thought IFFIm was successful, but they had divergent views about IFFIm's on-going role. Participants listed two issues where bond financing mechanisms may be suitable: emergency preparedness and outcome-based time-limited interventions. The benefit of pledging funds through IFFIm needs to be re-evaluated. There are potential uses for bond financing to raise funds for other global health issues, but these must be carefully considered against criteria to establish effectiveness, with quantifiable pre-defined outcome indicators to evaluate performance.

  12. DEVISING STRATEGIES FOR RECLAMATION OF DERELICT SITES DUE TO MINING OF RESIDUAL SOIL (“SAIBRO” AT UBATUBA, NORTH COAST OF SÃO PAULO STATE, BRAZIL: THE VIEWS AND ROLES OF THE STAKEHOLDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio José Ferreira

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Between the late 60's and early 90's intensive exploitation of residual soil for civil construction took place in the municipality of Ubatuba, North Coast of São Paulo State. Tropical climatic conditions associated with a hilly landscape bordered by the Atlantic Ocean gave rise to thick (10-30m weathering profiles derived from Precambrian granitic-gneissic rocks. Exploitation of large volumes of this material required only very simple technology, which on the other hand has caused highly adverse environmental impacts, such asdeforestation, soil erosion, land instability hazards, scenic eterioration, pollution and disturbance of local water flow regime. This paper deals with the devising of strategies thus identifying stakeholders and describing their roles both on the dereliction and reclamation processes related with residual soil exploitation. The evaluation approach focused on the analysis of the regulatory framework and its practical implications and issues in terms of licensing for mining operations, commercialization of construction materials, and the relations of such mining activities with regional and urban planning. A survey of stakeholderviewpoints was successfully achieved through a two-day workshop. The attendance included decision-makers, officials and representatives of governmental and regulatory bodies (Federal, State and Municipal, environmental research institutions, private miners (entrepreneurs and consultants, public attorney, and NGOs. The outcomes have ndicated that State and local authorities properly managed to stop illegal exploitation of residual soil in the early 90´s. However no land reclamation was undertaken until present. One of the main problems would be related with the procedures for mining and environmental licensing that were considered to be too complex and long (usually involving up to seven decisional instances and 2,5 years in average. Other key issues and needs identified included: aorganization of a

  13. Leader power and leader self-serving behavior : The role of effective leadership beliefs and performance information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rus, Diana; van Knippenberg, Daan; Wisse, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    In this research we investigated the role played by leader power in determining leader self-serving behavior. Based on an integration of insights from research on the determinants of leader behavior and the power-approach theory, we hypothesized that with higher leader power leader self-serving

  14. The role of the nuclear programme in the development of the Romanian power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobos, I.; Popescu, A.; Popovici, D.

    2000-01-01

    The power system, major component of the Romanian development, is strictly related to the social-economic and technological policy and to the external factors influencing this development. Taking into consideration the future evolution of the electricity demand in Romania over the period 2000-2020, it is necessary to devise an optimized strategy for electricity generation in order to ensure the economic development of the country and to achieve a high standard of living. For these reasons presented are the role of the nuclear programme for different patterns of electricity consumption evolution, taking into account the present situation of Romanian power system, the evolution of the domestic primary energy resources, the fuel prices evolution, the technologies of the electric and thermal power generation and the environmental requirements. The analysis is achieved in the context of the new political and economic trends facing European countries, related to the Joint Agreement with European Community and to the requirements of the single energy market. (author)

  15. A systematic review of stakeholder engagement in comparative effectiveness and patient-centered outcomes research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, Thomas W; Fuster, Melissa; Saunders, Tully; Patel, Kamal; Wong, John B; Leslie, Laurel K; Lau, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    We conducted a review of the peer-reviewed literature since 2003 to catalogue reported methods of stakeholder engagement in comparative effectiveness research and patient-centered outcomes research. We worked with stakeholders before, during and after the review was conducted to: define the primary and key research questions; conduct the literature search; screen titles, abstracts and articles; abstract data from the articles; and analyze the data. The literature search yielded 2,062 abstracts. The review was conducted on 70 articles that reported on stakeholder engagement in individual research projects or programs. Reports of stakeholder engagement are highly variable in content and quality. We found frequent engagement with patients, modestly frequent engagement with clinicians, and infrequent engagement with stakeholders in other key decision-making groups across the healthcare system. Stakeholder engagement was more common in earlier (prioritization) than in later (implementation and dissemination) stages of research. The roles and activities of stakeholders were highly variable across research and program reports. To improve on the quality and content of reporting, we developed a 7-Item Stakeholder Engagement Reporting Questionnaire. We recommend three directions for future research: 1) descriptive research on stakeholder-engagement in research; 2) evaluative research on the impact of stakeholder engagement on the relevance, transparency and adoption of research; and 3) development and validation of tools that can be used to support stakeholder engagement in future work.

  16. Stakeholder analysis of the Programme for Improving Mental health carE (PRIME): baseline findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makan, Amit; Fekadu, Abebaw; Murhar, Vaibhav; Luitel, Nagendra; Kathree, Tasneem; Ssebunya, Joshua; Lund, Crick

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge generated from evidence-based interventions in mental health systems research is seldom translated into policy and practice in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). Stakeholder analysis is a potentially useful tool in health policy and systems research to improve understanding of policy stakeholders and increase the likelihood of knowledge translation into policy and practice. The aim of this study was to conduct stakeholder analyses in the five countries participating in the Programme for Improving Mental health carE (PRIME); evaluate a template used for cross-country comparison of stakeholder analyses; and assess the utility of stakeholder analysis for future use in mental health policy and systems research in LMIC. Using an adapted stakeholder analysis instrument, PRIME country teams in Ethiopia, India, Nepal, South Africa and Uganda identified and characterised stakeholders in relation to the proposed action: scaling-up mental health services. Qualitative content analysis was conducted for stakeholder groups across countries, and a force field analysis was applied to the data. Stakeholder analysis of PRIME has identified policy makers (WHO, Ministries of Health, non-health sector Ministries and Parliament), donors (DFID UK, DFID country offices and other donor agencies), mental health specialists, the media (national and district) and universities as the most powerful, and most supportive actors for scaling up mental health care in the respective PRIME countries. Force field analysis provided a means of evaluating cross-country stakeholder power and positions, particularly for prioritising potential stakeholder engagement in the programme. Stakeholder analysis has been helpful as a research uptake management tool to identify targeted and acceptable strategies for stimulating the demand for research amongst knowledge users, including policymakers and practitioners. Implementing these strategies amongst stakeholders at a country level will

  17. Historical perspectives - The role of the NASA Lewis Research Center in the national space nuclear power programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, H. S.; Sovie, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    The history of the NASA Lewis Research Center's role in space nuclear power programs is reviewed. Lewis has provided leadership in research, development, and the advancement of space power and propulsion systems. Lewis' pioneering efforts in nuclear reactor technology, shielding, high temperature materials, fluid dynamics, heat transfer, mechanical and direct energy conversion, high-energy propellants, electric propulsion and high performance rocket fuels and nozzles have led to significant technical and management roles in many natural space nuclear power and propulsion programs.

  18. Historical perspectives: The role of the NASA Lewis Research Center in the national space nuclear power programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, H. S.; Sovie, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    The history of the NASA Lewis Research Center's role in space nuclear power programs is reviewed. Lewis has provided leadership in research, development, and the advancement of space power and propulsion systems. Lewis' pioneering efforts in nuclear reactor technology, shielding, high temperature materials, fluid dynamics, heat transfer, mechanical and direct energy conversion, high-energy propellants, electric propulsion and high performance rocket fuels and nozzles have led to significant technical and management roles in many national space nuclear power and propulsion programs.

  19. Role of Dividend of Power to Buy Shares in Companies in Indonesia Stock Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskandar Muda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the role of the Purchasing Power Shares on manufacturing companies in Indonesia Stock Exchange Period 2014-2015. The variables used in this study as an Independent Variable Dividend and Purchasing Power Shares as Dependent Variables. Power Buy Stocks in this study was measured by the volume of stock sales every year. This research was conducted in Manufacturing company listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange. The population of this study were 144 companies with purposive sampling as many as 19 of the Company's Manufacturing Company listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange with the study of the 2014-2015 period in order to obtain 38 units of analysis. Data of this research are secondary data from the financial statements of 19 companies published in the Indonesia Stock Exchange. This research data processing method using the Test Statistics Deskribtif, Classical Assumption Test, Test Linear Regression using SPSS. The results of this study demonstrate that the role of the Dividend has significant influence on the Purchasing Power Shares in Manufacturing Company in Indonesia Stock Exchange (BEI.

  20. A Global Civilian Power? The Future Role of the European Union in International Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedrudin Brljavac

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Questions about the future of the European Union as an international actor continue to puzzle students of international relations and particularly students of EU foreign policy. What kind of predictions can we make about the future role of the EU in international politics? While the question is often framed in terms of military versus normative and/or global civilian power Europe, there are indications that ambitions in both directions may very well coincide. However, despite the EU’s development towards deepened defense integration since the 1990s, such developments are by far outweighed by developments pointing in the direction of the EU consolidating its role as a global civilian power. In this article, we analyze the union’s civilian policies and contrast the findings of our analysis with developments in the field of Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP. Based on our analysis of EU enlargement policy, external aid, global environmental policy and the union’s commitment to multilateralism, our conclusion is that the EU’s international role in the next decades will continue to be best described in terms of a global civilian power.

  1. IAEA activities in support of rising expectation to the role of nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Paris Conference N uclear energy for the 21st Century , which was held in March 2005 organized by the IAEA, is a strong indication of the interest in the role of nuclear power. At this conference, rising expectations were indicated as representatives from many countries expressed recognition of the potential of nuclear energy to meet their energy needs in a sustainable manner. A similar indication was recognized by the June 2004 Conference held by the IAEA in Obninsk, Russia, to celebrate 50 years of nuclear electricity production. Many developing countries that currently do not operate a nuclear power plant are expressing their view that nuclear power is an important option in their energy planning in order to alleviate energy price instability, to secure long-term energy supply and to achieve an energy mix that assures sustainability. India, China and other developing countries in Asia have ambitious nuclear power deployment programmes in order to support growing energy demand and per capita energy consumption. The IAEA has a mandate to secure the benefit of the peaceful use of nuclear technology for sustainability while working against the misuse of nuclear material. Under this mandate, many guidance documents have been prepared and various technical cooperation projects are carried out to support energy planning and infrastructure building to prepare for and to sustain nuclear power operation. Basically, the IAEA can provide support by four types of activities; a) helping the process in various stages, b) helping informed decision-making through providing analytical tools and publishing technical documents, and c) reducing institutional impediments through regional cooperation, multi-national arrangement and others; and d) supporting collaborative assessments and research toward development of nuclear plants and their applications. The paper describes the observed rising expectation and the IAEA's activities in response to the rising expectation of the role

  2. Integrating Genetic Studies of Nicotine Addiction into Public Health Practice: Stakeholder Views on Challenges, Barriers and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingel, M.J.; Hicks, A.D.; Robinson, M.E.; Koenig, B.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Will emerging genetic research strengthen tobacco control programs? In this empirical study, we interview stakeholders in tobacco control to illuminate debates about the role of genomics in public health. Methods: The authors performed open-ended interviews with 86 stakeholders from 5 areas of tobacco control: basic scientists, clinicians, tobacco prevention specialists, health payers, and pharmaceutical industry employees. Interviews were qualitatively analyzed using standard techniques. Results: The central tension is between the hope that an expanding genomic knowledge base will improve prevention and smoking cessation therapies and the fear that genetic research might siphon resources away from traditional and proven public health programs. While showing strong support for traditional public health approaches to tobacco control, stakeholders recognize weaknesses, specifically the difficulty of countering the powerful voice of the tobacco industry when mounting public campaigns and the problem of individuals who are resistant to treatment and continue smoking. Conclusions: In order for genetic research to be effectively translated into efforts to minimize the harm of smoking-related disease, the views of key stakeholders must be voiced and disagreements reconciled. Effective translation requires honest evaluation of both the strengths and limitations of genetic approaches. PMID:21757875

  3. Public goods and private interests: The role of voluntary green power demand in achieving environmental improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiser, Ryan Hayes

    This dissertation explores the role of consumer purchasing behavior in providing public, environmental goods. It does so by empirically evaluating one market---voluntary demand for renewable energy. The dissertation addresses the following five research questions: (1) What does early experience with green power marketing tell us about the prospects for this market to deliver environmental benefits? (2) What product design and marketing approaches might be used to increase voluntary demand? (3) What motivates non-residential customers to voluntarily purchase green power? (4) What role might public policy play in the creation of the green power market? (5) What preferences do individuals hold on the most appropriate forms of support for renewable energy? By helping to answer these questions, this dissertation seeks to better understand the gap between widespread positive attitudes for the environment and an often-anemic response to green product offerings. It contributes to not only the public goods and environmental marketing literatures, but also to contingent valuation methodology and to an emerging literature on the motivations of firms to contribute to environmental causes. The analysis performed is diverse, and includes: a literature review, a mail survey of green power marketers, a mail survey of non-residential green power customers, and contingent valuation and opinion surveys of U.S. residents. Detailed statistical analysis is performed on the data collected from the residential and non-residential surveys. The analysis reveals that customer participation in green power programs to date has been weak. The possibility that the traditional economic concept of "free riding" may explain this low response is raised, and the dissertation identifies a number of marketing approaches that might be used to partially combat this problem. Analysis of survey data shows that non-residential green power purchases have been motivated principally by altruistic concerns

  4. Stakeholder management in IOS projects : analysis of an attempt to implement an electronic patient file

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, A.; Bell, S.; Boddy, D.

    Implementing an inter-organizational system (IOS) requires significant organizational as well as technical changes. These will affect stakeholders (upon whom promoters depend) with varying degrees of power and with varying degrees of interest in the system. Identifying stakeholders and understanding

  5. A decision Enhancement Service for Stakeholder Analysis to Achieve Transformations in the Public Sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, Arjan; Janssen, Marijn; Sol, H G

    2015-01-01

    Sourcing has become a popular practice for public sector managers aiming for transformations to save costs and improve service delivery. Nevertheless, public sector sourcing often fails due to stakeholder resistance and power struggles, stressing the need for stakeholder analysis. This paper

  6. Stakeholder involvement in developing brochures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, M.; Garing, K.; Waldrop, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management involved stakeholders (i.e., people who perceive themselves to be affected by the DOE's activities) in a pre-decisional draft of a DOE public document-a practice that the public has called for if the DOE is to begin real public participation. Early and ongoing public input is key to realizing Environmental Management's goal of increasing public participation. The stakeholder review process employed in the development of this document, a brochure outlining public participation information, demonstrates that Environmental Management is open-quotes practicing what it preachesclose quotes about institutionalizing public participation in its program. environmental Management's objective for the brochure is to create a document that uses plain, direct language that encourages citizens to become involved in its decision making process. The information in the brochure provides the public with the information they need to become involved stakeholders. The breadth and volume of comments received assisted in the development of a brochure that includes many viewpoints

  7. The role of NOSA five-star management system for occupational management of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qin

    2011-01-01

    The occupational safety management of nuclear power plant is developed towards integrated management, risk management, process management, all-round and full staff participation. Appropriate management method integrated with nuclear power plant safety, health and environmental protection could be organically combined with the nuclear safety operation management system, and could jointly lay a solid foundation for building up good nuclear safety culture. NOSA five-star management system is such a kind of risk management based on safety, health and environmental management system, with an aim to protect the personal safety. The concepts of NOSA management and nuclear safety culture are coincident, with strong workability, and meeting the need of nuclear power plant occupational safety management. Adopting NOSA five-star management system and keeping continuous improvement is one of the effective ways to improve the level of occupational safety management of nuclear power plant. It can be organically combined with nuclear safety operation management system and continuously improved safety culture to play an important role in improving the safety and economics of nuclear power plant. (author)

  8. Ethics and incentives: an evaluation and development of stakeholder theory in the health care industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elms, Heather; Berman, Shawn; Wicks, Andrew C

    2002-10-01

    This paper utilizes a qualitative case study of the health care industry and a recent legal case to demonstrate that stakeholder theory's focus on ethics, without recognition of the effects of incentives, severely limits the theory's ability to provide managerial direction and explain managerial behavior. While ethics provide a basis for stakeholder prioritization, incentives influence whether managerial action is consistent with that prioritization. Our health care examples highlight this and other limitations of stakeholder theory and demonstrate the explanatory and directive power added by the inclusion of the interactive effects of ethics and incentives in stakeholder ordering.

  9. How We Engage Our Pesticide Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    The success of EPA's pesticide program is directly connected to our efforts to engage all stakeholders. In addition to meetings on pesticide-specific actions, we sponsor advisory committees that include diverse, independent stakeholders.

  10. Powering Africa's sustainable development: The potential role of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessides, Ioannis N.

    2014-01-01

    The electricity deficit is one of the most serious contemporary issues facing sub-Saharan Africa. Many countries in the region have insufficient generation capacity to meet rapidly rising demand. Electricity shortages have become a binding and powerful constraint on the continent's sustainable development. Their resolution will require coordinated effort to improve the effectiveness and governance of the region's utilities and to significantly scale-up generation capacity. A broad portfolio of low carbon (low-C) technologies needs to be deployed in order to address the electricity deficit in a cost-effective way and not be disruptive to economic growth. Since nuclear power can deliver low-C electricity in bulk, reliably and without intermittency, it could make a significant contribution towards resolving Africa's power crisis. However, the post-Fukushima safety concerns related to large nuclear plants with substantial radioactive inventories will be especially pronounced in Africa. Moreover, large scale reactors with huge upfront investment requirements are likely to be unsuitable for capital-constrained African countries with small electricity grids. One promising direction for nuclear development in Africa might be to downsize reactors from the gigawatt scale to less-complex smaller units (with substantially smaller radioactive inventory) that are more affordable. - Highlights: • We examine the potential role of nuclear power in Africa. • There is growing African interest in nuclear power. • Nuclear power in Africa will require grid strengthening. • Small modular reactors could enhance Africa's energy security. • There are concerns about Africa's safety culture for nuclear power

  11. Challenges of nuclear power for the sustainable role in Korean energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. E.

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to introduce the current role of nuclear power of Korea as the economic and low carbon emitter in the long term expansion planning and to improve the public acceptance of nuclear as the environmentally friendliness energy source. Nuclear and coal have been selected as the major electricity sources due to the insufficient domestic energy resources, and will provide more than 60% of total electricity generation in Korea for quite some time. National energy policy addressing environmental friendliness, stable supply and least cost has made it difficult to decide which energy resource is the best for the long term energy planning. Climate change regime will diminish the coal power plants in generation amount, the public still keeps nuclear at a distance and insists to replace nuclear by renewable and renewable doesn't any guarantee of stable supply although its economics is fast being improved. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the long-term power expansion planning in various points of view such as environmental friendliness, benefit of carbon reduction and system reliability as well as least cost operation. The objective and approach of this study are to analyze the proper role of nuclear power by comparing the different types of scenarios in terms of the system cost changes, CO 2 emission reduction and system reliability. The results from this analysis are useful for the Korean government in charge of long-term energy policy to go over what kinds of role can each electric resources play and what are the best way to solve the triangular dilemma as economics, environmental friendliness, stable supply of the electricity

  12. Stakeholder Governance, Competition and Firm Value

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Franklin; Carletti, Elena; Marquez, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In many countries, the legal system or social norms ensure that firms are stakeholder oriented. We analyze the advantages and disadvantages of stakeholder-oriented firms that are concerned with employees and suppliers compared to shareholder-oriented firms in a model of imperfect competition. Stakeholder firms are more (less) valuable than shareholder firms when marginal cost uncertainty is greater (less) than demand uncertainty. With globalization shareholder firms and stakeholder firms ofte...

  13. Key Challenges to the introduction of hydrogen - European stakeholder views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seymour, E. Hugo; Murray, Luke; Fernandes, Rei

    2008-01-01

    Recent hydrogen policy initiatives focus on fostering the market introduction of hydrogen technologies. These initiatives include hydrogen roadmapping projects. Stakeholder involvement in strategic planning is of key importance to the successful implementation of the strategy. Thus, the views of the stakeholder group involved in the European roadmapping project HyWays are pertinent to the introduction of hydrogen in Europe. A qualitative assessment using the Key Changes and Actor Mapping (KCAM) methodology showed that on average stakeholders expect hydrogen systems to begin to be introduced over the next 15 years. Hydrogen production is expected to be based initially on steam methane reforming of natural gas and onsite electrolysis using wind power, and any hydrogen transport is likely to be by truck. The major challenges envisaged are to do with carbon capture and storage, high-temperature hydrogen production technologies and hydrogen pipeline development. (author)

  14. Intermediate Collaborative Adaptive Management Strategies Build Stakeholder Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha C. Monroe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to implement collaborative adaptive management (CAM often suffer from challenges, such as an unwillingness of managers to share power, unresolved conflicts between stakeholders, and lack of capacity among stakeholders. Some aspects considered essential to CAM, e.g., trust and stakeholder capacity, may be more usefully viewed as goals for intermediate strategies rather than a set of initial conditions. From this perspective, intermediate steps that focus on social learning and building experience could overcome commonly cited barriers to CAM. An exploration of Springs Basin Working Groups, organized around major clusters of freshwater springs in north Florida, provides a case study of how these intermediate steps enable participants to become more reasonable and engaged. This strategy may be easily implemented by agencies beginning a CAM process.

  15. Business-NGO interactions in a multi-stakeholder context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijstee, M.M. van; Glasbergen, P.

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to contribute to our understanding of the conditions under which Business– nongovernmental organization (NGO) interactions lead to improvements in corporate social responsibility (CSR), by assessing the role that the stakeholder context of the firm plays in the

  16. Understanding Processes of Multi-Stakeholder Brand-Interessement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Wallpach, Sylvia; Hemetsberger, Andrea; Kornum, Niels

    2013-01-01

    -oriented branding theory by investigating into discursive strategies multiple stakeholders use to engage in and mobilize brand networks on social media sites. An empirical investigation into two prominent online LEGO sites uncovers the role of social media sites as actors, and the interests and respective...

  17. Stakeholder Orientation in Cruise Lines’ Mission Statements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Penco

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Consistent with the extant management literature, mission statements are crucial for the sustainability and growth of any firms and have been considered to be a tool for the strategic management process. Despite the considerable attention awarded to this theme, the role of the mission statement in the strategic management of tourism firms has not been sufficiently highlighted. The present paper tries to bridge this literature gap and aims to (i analyze the content of mission statements; and (ii investigate the stakeholder orientation of cruise line mission statements. We apply a content analysis method to analyze the mission statements of 44 cruise lines, employing three different perspectives: (1 the inclusion of stakeholder groups; (2 mentions of specific “mission” components; (3 reference to four goals usually assigned to mission statements. The analysis was performed using the software package QDA-Miner. The results suggest that it is possible to identify four clusters of firms that present similar content in their mission statements, and that cruise companies tend to reserve a major attention to customers. This contribution presents some valuable research implications mainly useful for researchers and academics, but also maybe of benefit to professionals and investors.

  18. Sustaining the future: the role of nuclear power in meeting future world energy needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, R.; Sun, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A description is given of recently informed analyses showing the potential that nuclear power has in meeting global energy demands. For both the electricity and transportation sectors, we can quantify the beneficial effects on the environment, and we show how nuclear power deserves credit for its role in assisting future world energy, environmental and economic sustainability. The continuing expansion of the world's and Asia's energy needs, coupled with the need to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) and other emissions, will require new approaches for large scale energy production and use. This is particularly important for China and Asia with respect to meeting both the energy demand and sustainability challenges. We show and explore the role of nuclear power for large-scale energy applications, including electricity production and hydrogen for transportation. Advanced nuclear technologies, such as those like CANDU's next generation ACR, can meet future global energy market needs, avoid emissions, and mitigate the potential for global climate change. We use the latest IPCC Scenarios out to the year 2100 as a base case, but correct them to examine the sensitivity to large scale nuclear and hydrogen fuel penetration. We show a significant impact of nuclear energy on energy market penetration, and in reducing GHGs and other emissions in the coming century, particularly in the industrial developing world and in Asia. This is achieved without needing emissions credits, as are used or needed as economic support for other sources, or for subsidies via emissions trading schemes. Nuclear power offers the relatively emissions-free means, both to provide electricity for traditional applications and, by electrolytic production of hydrogen, to extend its use deep into the transportation sector. For the published IPCC Marker Scenarios for Asia we show the reduction in GHG emissions when electrolysis using electricity from nuclear power assists the introduction of hydrogen as a fuel

  19. The Role of Visual Feedback on Power Output During Intermittent Wingate Testing in Ice Hockey Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Stastny

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Visual feedback may help elicit peak performance during different types of strength and power testing, but its effect during the anaerobic Wingate test is unexplored. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of visual feedback on power output during a hockey-specific intermittent Wingate test (AnWT6x6 consisting of 6 stages of 6 s intervals with a 1:1 work-to-rest ratio. Methods: Thirty elite college-aged hockey players performed the AnWT6x6 with either constant (n = 15 visual feedback during all 6 stages (CVF or restricted (n = 15 visual feedback (RVF where feedback was shown only during the 2nd through 5th stages. Results: In the first stage, there were moderate-to-large effect sizes for absolute peak power (PP output and PP relative to body mass and PP relative to fat-free mass. However, the remaining stages (2–6 displayed small or negligible effects. Conclusions: These data indicate that visual feedback may play a role in optimizing power output in a non-fatigued state (1st stage, but likely does not play a role in the presence of extreme neuromuscular fatigue (6th stage during Wingate testing. To achieve the highest peak power, coaches and researchers could provide visual feedback during Wingate testing, as it may positively influence performance in the early stages of testing, but does not result in residual fatigue or negatively affect performance during subsequent stages.

  20. Info avond Go&Learn stakeholders

    OpenAIRE

    Brabant, Karen

    2014-01-01

    De infoavond licht de stakeholders in over de planning en invulling van de circuits en de praktische organisatie ervan. De stakeholders worden ingelicht over de huidige realisaties binnen het project, zowel op nationaal als internationaal niveau. Het geeft aan de stakeholders eveneens de kans om te netwerken.

  1. CSR Model Implementation from School Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Suzannah

    2006-01-01

    Despite comprehensive school reform (CSR) model developers' best intentions to make school stakeholders adhere strictly to the implementation of model components, school stakeholders implementing CSR models inevitably make adaptations to the CSR model. Adaptations are made to CSR models because school stakeholders internalize CSR model practices…

  2. 40 CFR 155.52 - Stakeholder engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stakeholder engagement. 155.52 Section... REGISTRATION STANDARDS AND REGISTRATION REVIEW Registration Review Procedures § 155.52 Stakeholder engagement... Agency may meet with stakeholders regarding a forthcoming or ongoing registration review. For example...

  3. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION... § 3430.607 Stakeholder input. CSREES shall seek and obtain stakeholder input through a variety of forums...

  4. 7 CFR 3430.15 - Stakeholder input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.15 Section 3430.15... Stakeholder input. Section 103(c)(2) of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998... RFAs for competitive programs. CSREES will provide instructions for submission of stakeholder input in...

  5. From micronutrient recommendations to policy: consumer and stakeholder involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timotijevic, L; Raats, M M; Barnett, J; Brown, K; Shepherd, R; Fernandez, L; Dömölki, L; Ruprich, J; Sonne, A-M; Hermoso, M; Koletzko, B; Frost-Andersen, L; Timmer, A

    2010-06-01

    To achieve the nutritional goals stipulated by micronutrient recommendations, greater attention must be paid to the behavioural routes to such nutritional outcomes. Coopting stakeholders and consumers into decisions regarding micronutrient recommendations is an important step towards achieving a greater link between micronutrient recommendations and behaviour. This study aims to examine the rationale and processes associated with consumer and stakeholder involvement in setting micronutrient recommendations across Europe. Using the contacts established through the Eurreca network of excellence (commissioned by the European Commission), the research involved in-depth desk research of key documents and communication channels linked to the process of setting micronutrient recommendations across seven countries: the United Kingdom, Norway, Denmark, Germany, Spain, the Czech Republic and Hungary. Stakeholder engagement is recognized by most countries as an important aspect of the process of setting micronutrient recommendations and their translation into policy, although there is notable variation in the extent to which this has been achieved across the seven countries and its effect on final decisions. Stakeholders were not involved at the outset of the process ('framing' of the problem) in any of the countries, and there was no evidence of consumer involvement and open public fora. Some of the key explanatory factors for diversity in the degree of involvement include historical sociopolitical context; the extent to which food and nutrition are key policy agenda; and the relative power of stakeholders in influencing food and nutrition policy.

  6. DPSIR and Stakeholder Analysis of the Use of Nanosilver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Baun, Anders

    2015-01-01

    First concerns about the use of nanosilver were raised almost a decade ago, but assessing the risks has been extremely challenging scientifically, and regulation to protect environmental and human health remains controversial. In order to understand the known risks and issues associated with the ......First concerns about the use of nanosilver were raised almost a decade ago, but assessing the risks has been extremely challenging scientifically, and regulation to protect environmental and human health remains controversial. In order to understand the known risks and issues associated......, we carried out a stakeholder analysis, in order to explore possibilities for reaching consensus amongst stakeholders. Through the stakeholder analysis, the interests, views, power and influence of the identified stakeholders were mapped. Overall, the policy options identified in the DPSIR analysis...... were deemed not to be implementable, as industry and NGOs seem to have fundamentally conflicting views and interests. The use of the combination of DPSIR and stakeholder analysis proved valuable for use in cases of complexity, as they compensate for each other’s limitations and open up for a discussion...

  7. Emissions and temperature benefits: The role of wind power in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Hongbo, E-mail: hbduan@ucas.ac.cn

    2017-01-15

    Background: As a non-fossil technology, wind power has an enormous advantage over coal because of its role in climate change mitigation. Therefore, it is important to investigate how substituting wind power for coal-fired electricity will affect emission reductions, changes in radiative forcing and rising temperatures, particularly in the context of emission limits. Methods: We developed an integrated methodology that includes two parts: an energy-economy-environmental (3E) integrated model and an emission-temperature response model. The former is used to simulate the dynamic relationships between economic output, wind energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; the latter is used to evaluate changes in radiative forcing and warming. Results: Under the present development projection, wind energy cannot serve as a major force in curbing emissions, even under the strictest space-restraining scenario. China's temperature contribution to global warming will be up to 21.76% if warming is limited to 2 degrees. With the wind-for-coal power substitution, the corresponding contribution to global radiative forcing increase and temperature rise will decrease by up to 10% and 6.57%, respectively. Conclusions: Substituting wind power for coal-fired electricity has positive effects on emission reductions and warming control. However, wind energy alone is insufficient for climate change mitigation. It forms an important component of the renewable energy portfolio used to combat global warming. - Highlights: • We assess the warming benefits associated with substitution of wind power for coal. • The effect of emission space limits on climate responses is deeply examined. • China is responsible for at most 21.76% of global warming given the 2-degree target. • Wind power alone may not be sufficient to face the challenge of climate change. • A fertile policy soil and an aggressive plan are necessary to boost renewables.

  8. Emissions and temperature benefits: The role of wind power in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    Background: As a non-fossil technology, wind power has an enormous advantage over coal because of its role in climate change mitigation. Therefore, it is important to investigate how substituting wind power for coal-fired electricity will affect emission reductions, changes in radiative forcing and rising temperatures, particularly in the context of emission limits. Methods: We developed an integrated methodology that includes two parts: an energy-economy-environmental (3E) integrated model and an emission-temperature response model. The former is used to simulate the dynamic relationships between economic output, wind energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; the latter is used to evaluate changes in radiative forcing and warming. Results: Under the present development projection, wind energy cannot serve as a major force in curbing emissions, even under the strictest space-restraining scenario. China's temperature contribution to global warming will be up to 21.76% if warming is limited to 2 degrees. With the wind-for-coal power substitution, the corresponding contribution to global radiative forcing increase and temperature rise will decrease by up to 10% and 6.57%, respectively. Conclusions: Substituting wind power for coal-fired electricity has positive effects on emission reductions and warming control. However, wind energy alone is insufficient for climate change mitigation. It forms an important component of the renewable energy portfolio used to combat global warming. - Highlights: • We assess the warming benefits associated with substitution of wind power for coal. • The effect of emission space limits on climate responses is deeply examined. • China is responsible for at most 21.76% of global warming given the 2-degree target. • Wind power alone may not be sufficient to face the challenge of climate change. • A fertile policy soil and an aggressive plan are necessary to boost renewables.

  9. The role of elastic energy in activities with high force and power requirements: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jacob M; Flanagan, Eamonn P

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide strength and conditioning practitioners with an understanding of the role of elastic energy in activities with high force and power requirements. Specifically, the article covers 1) the nature of elasticity and its application to human participants, 2) the role of elastic energy in activities requiring a stretch-shorten cycle such as the vertical jump, 3) the role of muscular stiffness in athletic performance, 4) the control of muscular stiffness through feedforward and feedback mechanisms, and 5) factors affecting muscular stiffness. Finally, practical applications are provided. In this section, it is suggested that the storage and reuse of elastic energy is optimized at relatively higher levels of stiffness. Because stiffness decreases as fatigue ensues as well as with stretching before an event, the article emphasizes the need for proper preparation phases in a periodized cycle and the avoidance of long static stretches before high-force activities. The importance of teaching athletes to transition from eccentric to concentric movements with minimal time delays is also proposed due to the finding that time delays appear to decrease the reuse of elastic energy. In addition to teaching within the criterion tasks, evidence is provided that minimizing transitions in plyometric training, a technique demonstrated to increase musculotendinous stiffness, can optimize power output in explosive movements. Finally, evidence is provided that training and teaching programs designed to optimize muscular stiffness may protect athletes against sports-related injuries.

  10. Stakeholders, responsabilidad social en ecuador Stakeholders, social responsibility in ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Morán

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available La importancia de la responsabilidad social empresarial (RSE radica en el involucramiento y el compromiso de la empresa hacia los diferentes grupos de interés que interactúan. Algunos grupos son afectados a causa de las actividades operacionales de las organizaciones, generando impactos en dimensiones sociales, económicas y ambientales. El enfoque central de la investigación es la determinación de la incidencia de la RSE en los patrones de vida de los grupos que intervienen en la cadena de valor ecuatoriana. En adelante estos son llamados stakeholders. Se precisa como antesala, los hechos y precedentes que marcaron la evolución y participación del modelo de negocio en los diferentes países de Latinoamérica. Sobre esta base, se realiza una revisión conceptual de la responsabilidad social en las empresas, la ISO 26000 y la posición de los stakeholders. El estudio se fundamenta en un análisis comparativo de países como: Chile, Colombia y Ecuador; identificando similitudes de su entorno, particularidades, fortalezas y debilidades en materia de RSE.

  11. The unique role of a public power agency in nuclear communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheele, L.A.; Dobken, J.C., E-mail: lascheele@energy-northwest.com, E-mail: jcdobken@energy-northwest.com [Energy Northwest, Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Public power utilities hold a special responsibility to communicate effectively with the public and to serve as both capacity-building and information resources for public utility district members. Energy Northwest was formed in 1957 as joint state operating agency, and today agency membership includes 27 public power utility districts comprising nearly every public power utility district in Washington state and several municipalities. Energy Northwest owns and operates a diverse portfolio of resources, including a wind project, a hydro project, a solar demonstration project, and the U.S. Pacific Northwest's only nuclear energy facility, the Columbia Generating Station in southeast Washington. Member utilities look to Energy Northwest to provide them with thorough and accurate information on all things nuclear, including the contributions of nuclear energy to the region's energy mix, radiation effects and nuclear accidents. The agency plays a diverse role in relationship building among nuclear entities within the region; providing decision makers with accurate and timely information; developing forums in which member public power utilities become well-versed in talking to their constituents about nuclear issues; and using diverse outlets, including social media, to communicate directly with ratepayers throughout the region. (author)

  12. Emissions and temperature benefits: The role of wind power in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    As a non-fossil technology, wind power has an enormous advantage over coal because of its role in climate change mitigation. Therefore, it is important to investigate how substituting wind power for coal-fired electricity will affect emission reductions, changes in radiative forcing and rising temperatures, particularly in the context of emission limits. We developed an integrated methodology that includes two parts: an energy-economy-environmental (3E) integrated model and an emission-temperature response model. The former is used to simulate the dynamic relationships between economic output, wind energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; the latter is used to evaluate changes in radiative forcing and warming. Under the present development projection, wind energy cannot serve as a major force in curbing emissions, even under the strictest space-restraining scenario. China's temperature contribution to global warming will be up to 21.76% if warming is limited to 2 degrees. With the wind-for-coal power substitution, the corresponding contribution to global radiative forcing increase and temperature rise will decrease by up to 10% and 6.57%, respectively. Substituting wind power for coal-fired electricity has positive effects on emission reductions and warming control. However, wind energy alone is insufficient for climate change mitigation. It forms an important component of the renewable energy portfolio used to combat global warming. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The European Commission: nuclear power has an important role to play

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    The European Commission (E.C.) thinks that nuclear power has an important role to play: first to reduce CO 2 emissions and secondly to reinforce energy self-reliance of the member states. The decision to introduce nuclear power in their energy mix belongs to every state but the E.C. has also highlighted that if adequate investment are quickly made 2 thirds of the electricity produced in the European Union in 2010 could by from low-carbon-emitting sources. Today with 148 reactors operating in 15 member countries nuclear power contributes to 1 third of the electricity produced. Another issue that is looming is the security of electricity supplying. A study has shown that the security level is worsening (particularly in winter) because of the greater part of wind energy in the energy mix as wind energy is not necessarily available when energy demand is peaking. The E.C. has proposed a new directive drawing a common standard frame for nuclear safety requirements concerning design, site selection, maintenance, operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Each member state will have the choice to implement stiffer regulations. The European Union must reduce its dependency on Russian gas by increasing its storing capacities, by easing gas exchanges between member states and by importing more liquefied natural gas. European member states will have to invert 1000*10 9 euros in gas and electrical power infrastructures in the next 25 years. (A.C.)

  14. The unique role of a public power agency in nuclear communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheele, L.A.; Dobken, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Public power utilities hold a special responsibility to communicate effectively with the public and to serve as both capacity-building and information resources for public utility district members. Energy Northwest was formed in 1957 as joint state operating agency, and today agency membership includes 27 public power utility districts comprising nearly every public power utility district in Washington state and several municipalities. Energy Northwest owns and operates a diverse portfolio of resources, including a wind project, a hydro project, a solar demonstration project, and the U.S. Pacific Northwest's only nuclear energy facility, the Columbia Generating Station in southeast Washington. Member utilities look to Energy Northwest to provide them with thorough and accurate information on all things nuclear, including the contributions of nuclear energy to the region's energy mix, radiation effects and nuclear accidents. The agency plays a diverse role in relationship building among nuclear entities within the region; providing decision makers with accurate and timely information; developing forums in which member public power utilities become well-versed in talking to their constituents about nuclear issues; and using diverse outlets, including social media, to communicate directly with ratepayers throughout the region. (author)

  15. The role of accelerated power generation technology development to carbon dioxide emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russ, P.

    2004-01-01

    The paper focuses on the role of advanced power generation technology in the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. In order to quantify the importance of these technologies a scenario approach is applied comparing a 'business as usual' scenario with technology cases which assume the accelerated development and earlier availability of certain advanced technologies. The simulations with the POLES world energy model demonstrate that the availability of advanced technology for power generation alone does not lead to emission reductions needed to stabilise carbon dioxide emissions in the atmosphere at a sustainable level. To achieve that additional policy measures are necessary. It is however shown, that the availability of advanced technology has a crucial impact on the cost to meet emission reduction targets. (Author)

  16. Lessons learnt from stakeholder engagement in the UK Environment Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, Steve

    2004-01-01

    The Environment Agency has many reasons and occasions for engaging with stakeholders and does so very frequently. Many of these are relatively formal, often statutory, consultations which are part of the determination of regulatory permits. Other consultations are part of the Agency's role as developer, for example in the construction of flood defence schemes. The Agency also consults nationally on its significant policies, such as the stocking of salmon fisheries. This paper gives some examples of lessons learnt from the Agency's own stakeholder engagements and also from our participation in those led by other organizations. In the next section it also describes the Agency's current approach to stakeholder consultation and engagement. (author)

  17. Scenarios of Quality Assurance of Stakeholder Relationships in Finnish Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyytinen, Anu; Kohtamäki, Vuokko; Kivistö, Jussi; Pekkola, Elias; Hölttä, Seppo

    2017-01-01

    Although the role and significance of the external stakeholders of higher education institutions has grown in recent years, quality assurance of stakeholder relationships remains a new phenomenon in the management practices of higher education institutions and in higher education research. Based on interviews and expert panel data, this article…

  18. Stakeholders' Perceptions of IELTS as an Entry Requirement for Higher Education in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, David

    2013-01-01

    This project explores stakeholders' perceptions of the role of the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) in the admissions processes of UK higher education (HE) institutions. The term "stakeholders" here refers to HE academic and administrative staff responsible for the acceptance of students whose first language is not…

  19. Identifying Key Stakeholders in Blended Tertiary Environments: Experts' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuapawa, Kimberley

    2017-01-01

    Although key stakeholders in blended tertiary environments (BTEs) fulfil an extraordinary role in higher education, significant gaps in knowledge about their identities may be impeding the provision of stakeholder support, limiting their ability to promote effective learning and teaching. As online growth intensifies, it is critical that tertiary…

  20. Multi-Stakeholder Process Strengthens Agricultural Innovations and Sustainable Livelihoods of Farmers in Southern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisseleua, D. H. B.; Idrissou, L.; Olurotimi, P.; Ogunniyi, A.; Mignouna, D.; Bamire, S. A.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: In this paper, we explore the strategic role of Multi-stakeholder processes (MSP) in agricultural innovations and how it has impacted livelihood assets' (LAs) capital dynamics of stakeholders in platforms in West Africa. Design/Methodology/Approach: We demonstrate how LA capitals and socio-economic dynamics induced by MSP can enhance…

  1. National stakeholder workshop summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This is a summary of the plenary sessions and small group discussion sessions from the fourth National Stakeholder Workshop sponsored by the DOE Office of Worker and Community Transition held in Atlanta, Georgia on March 13--15, 1996. Topics of the sessions included work force planning and restructuring, worker participation in health and safety, review of actions and commitments, lessons learned in collective bargaining agreements, work force restructuring guidance, work force planning, update on community transition activities. Also included are appendices listing the participants and DOE contacts.

  2. The Role of Cultural Power and Its Influence on Global Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Mortazavi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of the culture power in international politics is very complicated and difficult matter because it has been less explicitly used in the analyses and theorizing of cultural elements, hence the role of culture like political, security and economic factors, is not apparent in the theory of international relations. Many researchers have found that it is not possible to achieve the depth of the relations between nations only by relying on the pure political and economic factors. They prescribe to focus on cultural issues and special attention to the field of culture in order to achieve a realistic cognition of international relations. What doubles the importance of the issue, is the design of some new theories and new intellectual schools, and its effect on global politics. Including, the theory of the clash of civilizations, the dialogue of civilizations, cultural fluidity and postmodernist attitude towards the category of identity and culture, that each of them in some way recommends a particular action framework, according to its noetic framework. Hence, the fundamental question is that: What is the role of culture (soft power in foreign policy and what impact does it have on global changes and developments trend? In response to this, the hypothesis is raised in such a way (trying to produce, procure and persuade values, attitudes, and trends and common attitudes lead to achieve cultural power and, as a result, facilitate the achievement of the national goals and interests of the countries, and promote the foreign policy of the countries and, on the other hand, the use of cultural power, creates a culture of resistance in the field of global politics.

  3. Stakeholder Alignment and Changing Geospatial Information Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S.; Cutcher-Gershenfeld, J.; King, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Changing geospatial information capabilities can have major economic and social effects on activities such as drought monitoring, weather forecasts, agricultural productivity projections, water and air quality assessments, the effects of forestry practices and so on. Whose interests are served by such changes? Two common mistakes are assuming stability in the community of stakeholders and consistency in stakeholder behavior. Stakeholder communities can reconfigure dramatically as some leave the discussion, others enter, and circumstances shift — all resulting in dynamic points of alignment and misalignment . New stakeholders can bring new interests, and existing stakeholders can change their positions. Stakeholders and their interests need to be be considered as geospatial information capabilities change, but this is easier said than done. New ways of thinking about stakeholder alignment in light of changes in capability are presented.

  4. The role of nuclear technology beyond power generation deserves wider recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, John

    2016-01-01

    Building new nuclear power plants, extending the lifetimes of existing reactors or decommissioning plants are regular topics of debate surrounding the civil nuclear industry. Then there are the challenges faced in many countries that still await political leadership on solutions for the future safe long-term management of waste for the future. However, one aspect of the industry that impacts the everyday lives of the general public is often overlooked - and that is nuclear's role in protecting the global environment and public health.

  5. The role of passive and inherent safety properties in Siemens/KWU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gremm, O.

    1990-01-01

    In Siemens/KWU Nuclear Power Plants the applied safety concept consist of a well balanced combination of active, passive use well is inherent safety measures. In principle it is not possible to realise a safety concept exclusively with inherent and/or passive safety properties. The respective measures and arguments will be explained in detail in the presentation. In addition the Siemens/KWU safety concept with examples of the role of inherent and passive safety measures will be illustrated. (author). 9 refs, 9 figs

  6. The role of nuclear technology beyond power generation deserves wider recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, John [nuclear 24, Redditch (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    Building new nuclear power plants, extending the lifetimes of existing reactors or decommissioning plants are regular topics of debate surrounding the civil nuclear industry. Then there are the challenges faced in many countries that still await political leadership on solutions for the future safe long-term management of waste for the future. However, one aspect of the industry that impacts the everyday lives of the general public is often overlooked - and that is nuclear's role in protecting the global environment and public health.

  7. Balancing the roles of humans and machines in power plant control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipsett, J.J.

    1989-05-01

    A number of factors are leading to a re-examination of the balance between the roles of the operators and the machine in controlling nuclear power plants. Some of these factors are: the advent of new and advanced computer technologies; increased plant complexity, placing heavy workloads and stress on the control room operator; and increasing concerns about the role of human reliability in industrial mishaps. In light of the changing control aspects, we examine the meaning of automation, we discuss a proposed model of the control process, the concept of control within a few defined reactor states, a decision-making sequence; and we identify some possible problem areas in implementing new control technologies. Significant benefits should come from the new control methods and these opportunities should be exploited as soon as prudence allows, taking great care that the safety of the plants is improved

  8. The economics of nuclear power: four essays on the role of innovation and industrial organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthelemy, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This thesis studies the role of innovation and industrial structures in the nuclear power sector. The analysis of innovation is based on the use of patent data as a measure of innovation effort. On the one hand, we study the determinants of innovation and, on the other hand, its impact on operating and safety performance of existing nuclear reactors and on construction costs. We show that nuclear safety regulation can induce innovation and improve safety performance, but at the same time contributes to increases in construction costs. The analysis of the role of industrial structures allows us to study the impact of learning by doing opportunities both for construction and operation of reactors, as well as the effect of electricity market liberalization on operating performance. In particular, we show that the divestiture of electricity production and distribution activities induces a substantial improvement in the availability of nuclear reactors. (author)

  9. Ambivalent Sexism and Power-Related Gender-role Ideology in Marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhixia; Fiske, Susan T.; Lee, Tiane L.

    2013-01-01

    Glick-Fiske's (1996) Ambivalent Sexism Inventory(ASI) and a new Gender-Role Ideology in Marriage (GRIM) inventory examine ambivalent sexism toward women, predicting power-related, gender-role beliefs about mate selection and marriage norms. Mainland Chinese, 552, and 252 U.S. undergraduates participated. Results indicated that Chinese and men most endorsed hostile sexism; Chinese women more than U.S. women accepted benevolent sexism. Both Chinese genders prefer home-oriented mates (women especially seeking a provider and upholding him; men especially endorsing male-success/female-housework, male dominance, and possibly violence). Both U.S. genders prefer considerate mates (men especially seeking an attractive one). Despite gender and culture differences in means, ASI-GRIM correlations replicate across those subgroups: Benevolence predicts initial mate selection; hostility predicts subsequent marriage norms. PMID:24058258

  10. Orbits in elementary, power-law galaxy bars - 1. Occurrence and role of single loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, Curtis

    2018-05-01

    Orbits in galaxy bars are generally complex, but simple closed loop orbits play an important role in our conceptual understanding of bars. Such orbits are found in some well-studied potentials, provide a simple model of the bar in themselves, and may generate complex orbit families. The precessing, power ellipse (p-ellipse) orbit approximation provides accurate analytic orbit fits in symmetric galaxy potentials. It remains useful for finding and fitting simple loop orbits in the frame of a rotating bar with bar-like and symmetric power-law potentials. Second-order perturbation theory yields two or fewer simple loop solutions in these potentials. Numerical integrations in the parameter space neighbourhood of perturbation solutions reveal zero or one actual loops in a range of such potentials with rising rotation curves. These loops are embedded in a small parameter region of similar, but librating orbits, which have a subharmonic frequency superimposed on the basic loop. These loops and their librating companions support annular bars. Solid bars can be produced in more complex potentials, as shown by an example with power-law indices varying with radius. The power-law potentials can be viewed as the elementary constituents of more complex potentials. Numerical integrations also reveal interesting classes of orbits with multiple loops. In two-dimensional, self-gravitating bars, with power-law potentials, single-loop orbits are very rare. This result suggests that gas bars or oval distortions are unlikely to be long-lived, and that complex orbits or three-dimensional structure must support self-gravitating stellar bars.

  11. Developing a stakeholder engagement strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Shell Canada's social performance plan was outlined in this presentation. Stakeholder engagement is a key strategy in the company's response to the concerns and broader priorities of different groups and individuals affected by their operations. A review of the business and societal values of stakeholder engagement was presented. Key benefits include greater profitability; protection of the environment; effective resource management; community benefits; and the delivery of value to customers. It was suggested that a continuous engagement process helps companies to assess impacts and work on strategies to avoid and mitigate negative impacts. A framework for social performance management was presented. It was noted that accountability and transparency are key components of Shell's progress towards sustainable development, and their direct and indirect contributions to the communities and societies where they operate. The social impact of core business operations is now a focus of the company. Key concerns of the social performance plan include environmental and health impacts; land use and changes in local economies; cultural concerns; and infrastructure impacts. An outline of Shell's Listening and Responding Program was also provided. refs., tabs., figs

  12. Developing a stakeholder engagement strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nixon, J.A. [Shell Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Shell Canada's social performance plan was outlined in this presentation. Stakeholder engagement is a key strategy in the company's response to the concerns and broader priorities of different groups and individuals affected by their operations. A review of the business and societal values of stakeholder engagement was presented. Key benefits include greater profitability; protection of the environment; effective resource management; community benefits; and the delivery of value to customers. It was suggested that a continuous engagement process helps companies to assess impacts and work on strategies to avoid and mitigate negative impacts. A framework for social performance management was presented. It was noted that accountability and transparency are key components of Shell's progress towards sustainable development, and their direct and indirect contributions to the communities and societies where they operate. The social impact of core business operations is now a focus of the company. Key concerns of the social performance plan include environmental and health impacts; land use and changes in local economies; cultural concerns; and infrastructure impacts. An outline of Shell's Listening and Responding Program was also provided. refs., tabs., figs.

  13. Complementary role of critical integral experiment and power reactor start-up experiments for LMFBR neutronics data and method validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatores, M.

    1986-09-01

    Both critical experiments and power reactor results play at present a complementary role in reducing the uncertainties in Key design parameters for LMFBR, which can be relevant for the economic performances of this type of reactors

  14. Stakeholder Involvement in nuclear issues. INSAG-20. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Many of the world's nuclear power plants were constructed long ago without much public involvement in the associated decision making. It is anticipated, however, that a variety of stakeholders will seek participation in such decisions now as the nuclear option is being revisited in many places. Accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, among other places, have served to arouse public concern. The development of 'here-and-now' media capabilities has created an awareness that may not have previously existed. Improvements in educational systems and the development of the Internet have made technical information and expertise available to individuals and locations that were previously without them. In addition, consideration of the environmental impacts of various energy strategies has moved to the fore. INSAG has concluded that the expectations of stakeholders of a right to participate in energy decisions are something that the nuclear community must address. Decisions regarding such matters as the siting and construction of a nuclear power plant are no longer largely the domain of a closed community of technical experts and utility executives. Today, the concerns and expectations of all manner of persons and organizations - from the local farmer to the international financial institution - must be considered. This report is intended for use by all stakeholders in the nuclear community - national regulatory authorities, nuclear power plant designers and operators, public interest organizations and individuals, the media and, not to be forgotten, local and national populations. INSAG's fundamental conclusion is that all stakeholders with an interest in nuclear decisions should be provided with an opportunity for full and effective participation in them. With this right, however, come certain obligations on all sides for openness, candour and civility. INSAG is hopeful that this report will help define the interests and roles of the stakeholders

  15. The role of history in the acceptance of nuclear power in the U.S. and Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, E.

    1984-01-01

    The present article reviews the status of nuclear power in the United States and Canada, outlines the nuclear histories of these continental neighbors, suggests the role that contrasts in those histories may have played in bringing the two nations to somewhat different positions on the nuclear question, and discusses two other factors that may be even more decisive: the level of confidence in government and the perception of the potential role of nuclear power in regional and national energy economics

  16. Optimizing the roles of man and computer in nuclear power plant control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colley, R.W.; Seeman, S.E.

    1983-10-01

    We are presently participating in a program to optimize the functional man-machine interface for Liquid Metal-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactors. The overall objective of this program is to enhance operational safety; that is, to accommodate plant incidents through optimal integration of man and machine in performing the functions required to safely control a plant during both normal and off-normal conditions. Purpose of this talk is to describe an approach to determine the optimal roles of man and computer in the control of nuclear power plants. Purpose of this session was to get together people that are working in the areas of understanding of how operators control plants, and working on developing new aids for these operators. We were asked to explain how our modeling and approach we're taking will lead us to an optimization of the roles of the man and the computer in the control of nuclear power plants. Our emphasis was to be on the functions required for plant control, and how the attributes of the human operator and the attributes of the computer can be optimally used to enhance operational safety in performing these functions

  17. The role of price elastic demand in market power in the Nordic electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravn, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    The paper discusses the modelling and analysis of market power and price elastic demand in the Nordic electricity spot market, Nordpool. The modelling of market power in the electricity sector must take into account a number of features that are specific to the electricity sector. First, electricity cannot be stored, but must be produced simultaneously with consumption. This aspect is, however, modified by the possibility of using hydro reservoirs as an indirect electricity storage. Second, the electricity transmission network plays an important role by breaking the market into several geographically separate sub-markets with different prices. Moreover, the specific bottlenecks may differ from hour to hour, according to the balance between supply and demand in each sub-market. Third, the demand side is presently characterised by very limited experience with hour to-hour-changes in electricity prices and very limited experience with short time adjustments of electricity consumption in response to changes in the electricity price. In the present paper three basic models for supply side competition on the Nordpool spot market will be presented, viz., perfect competition, Cournot competition and Supply Function Equilibrium. The models represent price and quantity settlement, including determination of price areas (bottle necks), in accordance with the way the Nordpool market functions. The models will incorporate electricity demand which is responsive to the electricity price. The paper describes the role of demand response for the determination of the electricity prices in each of the three supply side competition models. (au)

  18. Meeting our need for electric energy: the role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    This report focuses on the projected long-term growth of electric demand and the resultant need for new electric generating capacity through the year 2010. It summarizes the results of several technical and economic analyses done over the past two years to present two alternative scenarios for the future growth of nuclear energy in the United States. The first of these scenarios is based on a reference assumption of continued economic recovery and growth, while the second assumes a more vigorous economic recovery. These alternative scenarios reflect both the role that electricity could play in assuring the future economic wellbeing of the United States and the role that nuclear power could play in meeting future electricity needs. The scenarios do not project an expected future; rather, they describe a future that can be achieved only if US industry is revitalized in several key areas and if current obstacles to construction and operation of nuclear power plants are removed. This report underscores the need for renewed domestic industrialization as well as the need for government and industry to take steps to allow nuclear energy to fulfill its original potential. Further, it suggests some specific actions that must be taken if these goals are to be met

  19. Effective stakeholder management for medical practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Zigiriadis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of organizational-stakeholder relationships is highlighted in most organizational studies literature. This article investigates the relationship between medical practices and their stakeholders and has been developed to provide guidance on stakeholder engagement and communication. It is intended to provide a useful reference point for all medical practices concerning stakeholder engagement activities. Direction is provided on how to identify and ultimately engage with stakeholders. It should hopefully further develop the effectiveness of engagement efforts that are undertaken between a medical practice and its stakeholders. The ability of a medical practice to cultivate and sustain strong relationships with its prominent stakeholder groups greatly enhances the likelihood that the relationship will endure. Medical practitioners in South Africa are generally in urgent need of pursuing new ways of delivering quality health care through developing new service models that have been developed with the help of relevant stakeholders. Since stakeholder relationship management is critical for corporate sustainability, medical practice management should seek strategic direction by investigating the relative competitive threat and relative supportive value of each stakeholder and then classify them accordingly.

  20. SPSP Phase III Recruiting, Selecting, and Developing Secure Power Systems Professionals: Behavioral Interview Guidelines by Job Roles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neil, Lori Ross [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Conway, T. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tobey, D. H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Greitzer, Frank L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dalton, Angela C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pusey, Portia K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Secure Power Systems Professional Phase III final report was released last year which an appendix of Behavioral Interview Guidelines by Job Roles. This new report is that appendix broken out as a standalone document to assist utilities in recruiting and developing Secure Power Systems Professionals at their site.

  1. Electric Power Research Institute's role in applying superconductivity to future utility systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinowitz, M.

    1975-01-01

    Economics has been the single most important factor in determining the future of any new commercial technology in the United States. This criterion is in need of serious examination in view of the projected sharply increasing consumption of energy in the next few decades, particularly in the form of electricity. In order to make a smooth and meaningful transition from conventional methods of generating and transmitting electricity, a coordinated effort between all segments of the private and public domains will be required. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) should play a vital role in planning for both the imminent short term, and long term national electrical energy needs; and in coordinating efforts to achieve these vital goals. If, as predicted, the U. S. power consumption increases by more than a factor of six in the next 30 years, it should be clear that it is necessary to develop high power density methods of producing and transmitting electricity. Superconductivity is the natural prime candidate for a new feasible technology that can take on this responsibility

  2. Global Public Goods and The Role of Emerging Power: Considering the Concept of Impure Public Goods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Rieshøj Yi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The existing analysis of global public goods over-emphasizes the significance of public. Great power as a main provider has played an active role in these strategic initiatives, which may be ignored. In fact, main power has thought about the possible free-riders when providing public goods and making its foreign strategic plan. China’s announcement to “welcome the neighbouring countries to be a free-rider and benefit from China’s rise” is a good example. It is necessary to think about the theory of public goods and take another look at the free-riding phenomenon. The concept of impure public goods may be useful and effective when we understand the reason why global public goods are being provided and are relatively efficient. As an emerging power, China should have a clear strategy on global public goods with a possible “marketing” viewpoint, including more initiatives and specific measures, so that the global public goods provision may be more diverse and well-planned.

  3. Efficiency improvement of nuclear power plant operation: the significant role of advanced nuclear fuel technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velde Van de, A.; Burtak, F.

    2001-01-01

    Due to the increased liberalisation of the power markets, nuclear power generation is being exposed to high cost reduction pressure. In this paper we highlight the role of advanced nuclear fuel technologies to reduce the fuel cycle costs and therefore increase the efficiency of nuclear power plant operation. The key factor is a more efficient utilisation of the fuel and present developments at Siemens are consequently directed at (i) further increase of batch average burnup, (ii) improvement of fuel reliability, (iii) enlargement of fuel operation margins and (iv) improvement of methods for fuel design and core analysis. As a result, the nuclear fuel cycle costs for a typical LWR have been reduced during the past decades by about US$ 35 million per year. The estimated impact of further burnup increases on the fuel cycle costs is expected to be an additional saving of US$10 - 15 million per year. Due to the fact that the fuel will operate closer to design limits, a careful approach is required when introducing advanced fuel features in reload quantities. Trust and co-operation between the fuel vendors and the utilities is a prerequisite for the common success. (authors)

  4. Reconsidering the role of power, punishment and discipline in South African schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Venter

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the role of discipline and punishment in South African schools and seeks to interrogate the underlying power relations that guide teaching and learning in South Africa. It deconstructs the pre-occupation with discipline, power and punishment in South African schools in terms of the theoretical framework provided by Michel Foucault in his work entitled “Surveiller et punir: naissance de la prison” (1975 which was translated as “Discipline and punish: the birth of the prison”(1977. It was Foucault who reminded us that the modern school is based on Prussian military ideals of punctuality, discipline, neatness and submissiveness to authority. Foucault tends to see schooling as one side of “corriger”, which is to punish or to teach. Education as “correction” is therefore regarded as the antipode of authoritarian punishment. Foucault draws attention to the subtle tactics and constraints beneath the surface of proclaimed bourgeois freedom. It was found that in South African schools the problem of authoritarian punishment is still rife. From the readings of Foucault’s works suggestions are made for changes to the system and to teachers’ mental attitude in order to move to a more constructive way of maintaining power and discipline.

  5. Roles of nuclear power system in the presence of uncertainties from global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiriyama, Eriko; Iwata, Shuichi

    2005-01-01

    Environmental 'bads' like carbon dioxide are not simply incorporated in the market system. The costs involved, however, do not really reflect the inherent value of the environment, or what it is worth to them. This study focuses on the uncertainty of CO 2 emission credits. Assigning economic values to environmental goods and services is complex, but it is an area that is receiving considerable attention from environmental economists. The purpose of this study is to analyze the value of an investment in power generation assets that do not emit CO 2 . To deal with the CO 2 emission credit, we built new models based on the real option model by Pindyck (2000). In the modern, market-based financial systems that dominate the global economy, the value of a resource is represented by the price that an individual or a group is willing to pay for it. Managing CO 2 emission limitations will be a critical aspect of power generation systems. And it will be increasingly so as the emphasis on global environmental issues continues to rise. In order to secure the effectiveness of measures against global warming, we should reconsider the role of nuclear power systems. (author)

  6. Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmholdt, Claus Westergård; Fogsgaard, Morten

    2016-01-01

    and creativity suggests that when managers give people the opportunity to gain power and explicate that there is reason to be more creative, people will show a boost in creative behaviour. Moreover, this process works best in unstable power hierarchies, which implies that power is treated as a negotiable....... It is thus a central point that power is not necessarily something that breaks down and represses. On the contrary, an explicit focus on the dynamics of power in relation to creativity can be productive for the organisation. Our main focus is to elaborate the implications of this for practice and theory...

  7. Power and Conflict in Adaptive Management: Analyzing the Discourse of Riparian Management on Public Lands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Arnold

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive collaborative management emphasizes stakeholder engagement as a crucial component of resilient social-ecological systems. Collaboration among diverse stakeholders is expected to enhance learning, build social legitimacy for decision making, and establish relationships that support learning and adaptation in the long term. However, simply bringing together diverse stakeholders does not guarantee productive engagement. Using critical discourse analysis, we examined how diverse stakeholders negotiated knowledge and power in a workshop designed to inform adaptive management of riparian livestock grazing on a National Forest in the southwestern USA. Publicly recognized as a successful component of a larger collaborative effort, we found that the workshop effectively brought together diverse participants, yet still restricted dialogue in important ways. Notably, workshop facilitators took on the additional roles of riparian experts and instructors. As they guided workshop participants toward a consensus view of riparian conditions and management recommendations, they used their status as riparian experts to emphasize commonalities with stakeholders supportive of riparian grazing and accentuate differences with stakeholders skeptical of riparian grazing, including some Forest Service staff with power to influence management decisions. Ultimately, the management plan published one year later did not fully adopt the consensus view from the workshop, but rather included and acknowledged a broader diversity of stakeholder perspectives. Our findings suggest that leaders and facilitators of adaptive collaborative management can more effectively manage for productive stakeholder engagement and, thus, social-ecological resilience if they are more tentative in their convictions, more critical of the role of expert knowledge, and more attentive to the knowledge, interests, and power of diverse stakeholders.

  8. Engaging Fringe Stakeholders in Business and Society Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarthy, Lauren; Muthuri, Judy N.

    2018-01-01

    Business and society (B&S) researchers, as well as practitioners, have been critiqued for ignoring those with less voice and power (e.g., women, nonliterate, or indigenous peoples) often referred to as “fringe stakeholders.” Existing methods used in B&S research often fail to address issues...... methods may be used by researchers to achieve more inclusive, and thus more credible, stakeholder research that can improve decision making within businesses. Furthermore, we argue that ingrained social and environmental problems tackled by B&S research and the unique context in which they occur may open...... of meaningful participation, voice and power, especially in developing countries. In this article, we stress the utility of visual participatory research (VPR) methods in B&S research to fill this gap. Through a case study on engaging Ghanaian cocoa farmers on gender inequality issues, we explore how VPR...

  9. The role of public policy in emerging green power markets: an analysis of marketer preferences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, R.H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-06-01

    Green power marketing has been heralded by some as a means to create a private market for renewable energy that is driven by customer demand for green products. This article challenges the premise - sometimes proffered in debates over green markets - that profitable, sizable, credible markets for green products will evolve naturally without supportive public policies. Relying primarily on surveys and interviews of US green power marketers, the article examines the role of specific regulatory and legislative policies in 'enabling' the green market, and searches for those policies that are believed by marketers to be the most conducive or detrimental to the expansion of the green market. We find that marketers: (1) believe that profitable green power markets will only develop if a solid foundation of supportive policies exists; (2) believe that establishing overall price competition and encouraging customer switching are the top priorities; (3) are somewhat leery of government-sponsored or mandated public information programs; and (4) oppose three specific renewable energy policies that are frequently advocated by renewable energy enthusiasts, but that may have negative impacts on the green marketers' profitability. The stated preferences of green marketers shed light on ways to foster renewables by means of the green market. Because the interests of marketers do not coincide perfectly with those of society, however, this study also recognizes other normative perspectives and highlights policy tensions at the heart of current debates related to green markets. By examining these conflicts, we identify three key policy questions that should direct future research: To what extent should price competition and customer switching be encouraged at the expense of cost shifting? What requirements should be imposed to ensure credibility in green products and marketing? How should the green power market and broader renewable energy policies interact? (author)

  10. The role of transvaginal power Doppler ultrasound in the differential diagnosis of benign intrauterine focal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogendez, Ebru; Eken, Meryem Kurek; Bakal, Nuray; Gun, Ismet; Kaygusuz, Ecmel Isik; Karateke, Ates

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the role of power Doppler imaging in the differential diagnosis of benign intrauterine focal lesions such as endometrial polyps and submucous myomas using the characteristics of power Doppler flow mapping. A total of 480 premenopausal patients with abnormal uterine bleeding were evaluated by transvaginal ultrasonography (TVS) searching for intrauterine pathology. Sixty-four patients with a suspicious focal endometrial lesion received saline infusion sonography (SIS) after TVS. Fifty-eight patients with focal endometrial lesions underwent power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS). Three different vascular flow patterns were defined: Single vessel pattern, multiple vessel pattern, and circular flow pattern. Finally, hysteroscopic resection was performed in all cases, and Doppler flow characteristics were then compared with the final histopathological findings. Histopathological results were as follows: endometrial polyp: 40 (69 %), submucous myoma: 18 (31 %). Of the cases with endometrial polyps, 80 % demonstrated a single vessel pattern, 7.5 % a multiple vessel pattern, and 0 % a circular pattern. Vascularization was not observed in 12.5 % of patients with polyps. Of the cases with submucousal myomas, 72.2 % demonstrated a circular flow pattern, 27.8 % a multiple vessel pattern, and none of them showed a single vessel pattern. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the single vessel pattern in diagnosing endometrial polyps were 80, 100, 100, and 69.2 %, respectively; and for the circular pattern in diagnosing submucous myoma, these were 72.2, 100, 100, and 88.9 %, respectively. Power Doppler blood flow mapping is a useful, practical, and noninvasive diagnostic method for the differential diagnosis of benign intrauterine focal lesions. Especially in cases of recurrent abnormal uterine bleeding, recurrent abortion, and infertility, PDUS can be preferred as a first-line diagnostic method.

  11. The role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor in the future of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollaway, W.R.; Lidsky, L.M.; Miller, M.M.

    1990-12-01

    A preliminary assessment is made of the potential role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) in the future of nuclear power. The development of a usable actinide burning strategy could be an important factor in the acceptance and implementation of a next generation of nuclear power. First, the need for nuclear generating capacity is established through the analysis of energy and electricity demand forecasting models which cover the spectrum of bias from anti-nuclear to pro-nuclear. The analyses take into account the issues of global warming and the potential for technological advances in energy efficiency. We conclude, as do many others, that there will almost certainly be a need for substantial nuclear power capacity in the 2000--2030 time frame. We point out also that any reprocessing scheme will open up proliferation-related questions which can only be assessed in very specific contexts. The focus of this report is on the fuel cycle impacts of actinide burning. Scenarios are developed for the deployment of future nuclear generating capacity which exploit the advantages of actinide partitioning and actinide burning. Three alternative reactor designs are utilized in these future scenarios: The Light Water Reactor (LWR); the Modular Gas-Cooled Reactor (MGR); and the Integral Fast Reactor (FR). Each of these alternative reactor designs is described in some detail, with specific emphasis on their spent fuel streams and the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Four separation and partitioning processes are utilized in building the future nuclear power scenarios: Thermal reactor spent fuel preprocessing to reduce the ceramic oxide spent fuel to metallic form, the conventional PUREX process, the TRUEX process, and pyrometallurgical reprocessing.

  12. The role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor in the future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollaway, W.R.; Lidsky, L.M.; Miller, M.M.

    1990-12-01

    A preliminary assessment is made of the potential role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) in the future of nuclear power. The development of a usable actinide burning strategy could be an important factor in the acceptance and implementation of a next generation of nuclear power. First, the need for nuclear generating capacity is established through the analysis of energy and electricity demand forecasting models which cover the spectrum of bias from anti-nuclear to pro-nuclear. The analyses take into account the issues of global warming and the potential for technological advances in energy efficiency. We conclude, as do many others, that there will almost certainly be a need for substantial nuclear power capacity in the 2000--2030 time frame. We point out also that any reprocessing scheme will open up proliferation-related questions which can only be assessed in very specific contexts. The focus of this report is on the fuel cycle impacts of actinide burning. Scenarios are developed for the deployment of future nuclear generating capacity which exploit the advantages of actinide partitioning and actinide burning. Three alternative reactor designs are utilized in these future scenarios: The Light Water Reactor (LWR); the Modular Gas-Cooled Reactor (MGR); and the Integral Fast Reactor (FR). Each of these alternative reactor designs is described in some detail, with specific emphasis on their spent fuel streams and the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Four separation and partitioning processes are utilized in building the future nuclear power scenarios: Thermal reactor spent fuel preprocessing to reduce the ceramic oxide spent fuel to metallic form, the conventional PUREX process, the TRUEX process, and pyrometallurgical reprocessing

  13. Defining the Stakeholder Concept for Political Marketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormrod, Robert

    The concept of a ‘stakeholder’ is often misused in the academic literature; stakeholders can range from the few actors with which the organisation has a direct interaction (Carroll 1993), to anything that can exert some form of influence over the organisation, including nature, the deceased...... and the unborn (Starik 1995). It is therefore necessary to provide a precise definition of the stakeholder concept to maintain academic rigour. However, a specification of the nature of the stakeholder concept is generally missing in political marketing literature. This paper addresses this issue by discussing...... how the stakeholder concept is understood, and then applies the stakeholder concept to the political marketing context, proposing a definition of the stakeholder concept for political marketing research....

  14. Stakeholders in the Political Marketing Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormrod, Robert

    Stakeholders influence the ability of organisations to achieve their aims, but little work has been carried out into understanding the stakeholder concept as applied to the political marketing context. This paper first discusses the contextual nature of stakeholders using normative...... occurs in. Finally, it is proposed that in the political marketing context, the stakeholder concept can be defined as ‘context-specific actors that directly or indirectly influence or are influenced by the political actor’......./strategic and broad/narrow dimensions. Building on the assumption that ‘political marketing is different’, the paper argues that stakeholders can be considered as direct or indirect depending on which of the three interaction marketplaces of the political exchange triad the political actor-stakeholder interaction...

  15. Determinants of stakeholders' attitudes towards biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Latifah; Hashim, Hasrizul; Mahadi, Zurina; Ibrahim, Maznah; Ismail, Khaidzir

    2017-01-01

    Concern about the inevitable depletion of global energy resources is rising and many countries are shifting their focus to renewable energy. Biodiesel is one promising energy source that has garnered much public attention in recent years. Many believe that this alternative source of energy will be able to sustain the need for increased energy security while at the same time being friendly to the environment. Public opinion, as well as proactive measures by key players in industry, may play a decisive role in steering the direction of biodiesel development throughout the world. Past studies have suggested that public acceptance of biofuels could be shaped by critical consideration of the risk-benefit perceptions of the product, in addition to the impact on the economy and environment. The purpose of this study was to identify the relevant factors influencing stakeholders' attitudes towards biodiesel derived from crops such as palm oil for vehicle use, as well as to analyse the interrelationships of these factors in an attitude model. A survey of 509 respondents, consisting of various stakeholder groups in the Klang Valley region of Malaysia, was undertaken. The results of the study have substantiated the premise that the most important direct predictor of attitude to biodiesel is the perceived benefits ( β  = 0.80, p  < 0.001). Attitude towards biodiesel also involves the interplay between other factors, such as engagement to biotechnology, trust of key players, attitude to technology, and perceived risk. Although perceived benefit has emerged as the main predictor of public support of biodiesel, the existence of other significant interactions among variables leads to the conclusion that public attitude towards biodiesel should be seen as a multi-faceted process and should be strongly considered prior to its commercialisation.

  16. Projected role of nuclear power in Egypt and problems encountered in implementing the first nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effat, K.E.A.; Sirry, H.; El-Sharkawy, E.

    1977-01-01

    The increasing rise in fossil-fuel prices has favourably affected the economics of nuclear power generation bringing down the economically competitive size of nuclear units closer to small sizes compatible with grid capacities in developing countries. This encouraged Egypt to turn to nuclear power to fulfil its future power needs. In implementing its first nuclear power plant, Egypt is facing various problems. The capacity of the national electric power system and its inherent characteristics pose certain restrictions on the size and design of the nuclear plant required. The availability of sufficient local qualified management, engineering and technical personnel to participate in both precontractual and construction phases of the plant is quite a major problem. Lack of local developed industry to back up the construction phase implies the dependence to a large extent on imported equipment, materials and technology. The paper reviews the present and projected power demands in Egypt and the factors behind the decision to introduce a nuclear power generation programme. Various problems encountered and anticipated in introducing the first nuclear power plant are also discussed. (author)

  17. Current collective engagement stakeholder strategies for South African labour relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popi C. Madlala

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Collective engagement stakeholder strategies are significant for the creation of harmony in the workplace. It is a known fact that the South African (SA labour environment has been dominated by industrial action before and after the 1994 democratic transition. To be precise, the statistics reveals that industrial action has increased and become more destructive post-1994. Purpose: The purpose of this article was to present the current collective engagement stakeholder strategies for South African labour relations. Motivation for the study: The SA mining sector has seen more violent strikes, with a higher number of deaths, injuries, criminal activities, arrests, dismissals and job losses in recent years. This article captures the current mining stakeholder strategies shaping the existing labour relations environment. Research approach, design and method: This is a theoretical article highlighting the recent literature on collective engagement in the mining sector in South Africa. Main findings: This article presents the current labour relations incidents, reflecting the need for more effective collective engagement and stakeholder management strategies. Practical and managerial implications: The current labour relations context has prompted key stakeholders at the National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC to look specifically at promoting employment, labour market stability, the right to strike, minimising violence through collective bargaining and highlighting the role of the state, reducing vulnerability through social protection and increasing the minimum wage. Contribution or value add: This article adds theoretically to the existing body of knowledge regarding collective engagement and stakeholder strategies in the SA mining sector.

  18. Stakeholder capitalism, corporate governance and firm value

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Franklin; Carletti, Elena; Marquez, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In countries such as Germany, the legal system is such that firms are necessarily stakeholder oriented. In others like Japan social convention achieves a similar effect. We analyze the advantages and disadvantages of stakeholder-oriented firms that are concerned with employees and suppliers compared to pure shareholder-oriented firms. We show that in a context of imperfect competition stakeholder firms have higher prices and lower output than shareholder-oriented firms. Surprisingly, we also ...

  19. Towards a Science of Community Stakeholder Engagement in Biomedical HIV Prevention Trials: An Embedded Four-Country Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Peter A; Rubincam, Clara; Slack, Catherine; Essack, Zaynab; Chakrapani, Venkatesan; Chuang, Deng-Min; Tepjan, Suchon; Shunmugam, Murali; Roungprakhon, Surachet; Logie, Carmen; Koen, Jennifer; Lindegger, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Broad international guidelines and studies in the context of individual clinical trials highlight the centrality of community stakeholder engagement in conducting ethically rigorous HIV prevention trials. We explored and identified challenges and facilitators for community stakeholder engagement in biomedical HIV prevention trials in diverse global settings. Our aim was to assess and deepen the empirical foundation for priorities included in the GPP guidelines and to highlight challenges in implementation that may merit further attention in subsequent GPP iterations. From 2008-2012 we conducted an embedded, multiple case study centered in Thailand, India, South Africa and Canada. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with respondents from different trial-related subsystems: civil society organization representatives, community advocates, service providers, clinical trialists/researchers, former trial participants, and key HIV risk populations. Interviews/focus groups were recorded, and coded using thematic content analysis. After intra-case analyses, we conducted cross-case analysis to contrast and synthesize themes and sub-themes across cases. Lastly, we applied the case study findings to explore and assess UNAIDS/AVAC GPP guidelines and the GPP Blueprint for Stakeholder Engagement. Across settings, we identified three cross-cutting themes as essential to community stakeholder engagement: trial literacy, including lexicon challenges and misconceptions that imperil sound communication; mistrust due to historical exploitation; and participatory processes: engaging early; considering the breadth of "community"; and, developing appropriate stakeholder roles. Site-specific challenges arose in resource-limited settings and settings where trials were halted. This multiple case study revealed common themes underlying community stakeholder engagement across four country settings that largely mirror GPP goals and the GPP Blueprint, as well as highlighting

  20. Towards a Science of Community Stakeholder Engagement in Biomedical HIV Prevention Trials: An Embedded Four-Country Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Peter A.; Rubincam, Clara; Slack, Catherine; Essack, Zaynab; Chakrapani, Venkatesan; Chuang, Deng-Min; Tepjan, Suchon; Shunmugam, Murali; Roungprakhon, Surachet; Logie, Carmen; Koen, Jennifer; Lindegger, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Broad international guidelines and studies in the context of individual clinical trials highlight the centrality of community stakeholder engagement in conducting ethically rigorous HIV prevention trials. We explored and identified challenges and facilitators for community stakeholder engagement in biomedical HIV prevention trials in diverse global settings. Our aim was to assess and deepen the empirical foundation for priorities included in the GPP guidelines and to highlight challenges in implementation that may merit further attention in subsequent GPP iterations. Methods From 2008–2012 we conducted an embedded, multiple case study centered in Thailand, India, South Africa and Canada. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with respondents from different trial-related subsystems: civil society organization representatives, community advocates, service providers, clinical trialists/researchers, former trial participants, and key HIV risk populations. Interviews/focus groups were recorded, and coded using thematic content analysis. After intra-case analyses, we conducted cross-case analysis to contrast and synthesize themes and sub-themes across cases. Lastly, we applied the case study findings to explore and assess UNAIDS/AVAC GPP guidelines and the GPP Blueprint for Stakeholder Engagement. Results Across settings, we identified three cross-cutting themes as essential to community stakeholder engagement: trial literacy, including lexicon challenges and misconceptions that imperil sound communication; mistrust due to historical exploitation; and participatory processes: engaging early; considering the breadth of “community”; and, developing appropriate stakeholder roles. Site-specific challenges arose in resource-limited settings and settings where trials were halted. Conclusions This multiple case study revealed common themes underlying community stakeholder engagement across four country settings that largely mirror GPP goals and the

  1. Towards a Science of Community Stakeholder Engagement in Biomedical HIV Prevention Trials: An Embedded Four-Country Case Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Newman

    Full Text Available Broad international guidelines and studies in the context of individual clinical trials highlight the centrality of community stakeholder engagement in conducting ethically rigorous HIV prevention trials. We explored and identified challenges and facilitators for community stakeholder engagement in biomedical HIV prevention trials in diverse global settings. Our aim was to assess and deepen the empirical foundation for priorities included in the GPP guidelines and to highlight challenges in implementation that may merit further attention in subsequent GPP iterations.From 2008-2012 we conducted an embedded, multiple case study centered in Thailand, India, South Africa and Canada. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with respondents from different trial-related subsystems: civil society organization representatives, community advocates, service providers, clinical trialists/researchers, former trial participants, and key HIV risk populations. Interviews/focus groups were recorded, and coded using thematic content analysis. After intra-case analyses, we conducted cross-case analysis to contrast and synthesize themes and sub-themes across cases. Lastly, we applied the case study findings to explore and assess UNAIDS/AVAC GPP guidelines and the GPP Blueprint for Stakeholder Engagement.Across settings, we identified three cross-cutting themes as essential to community stakeholder engagement: trial literacy, including lexicon challenges and misconceptions that imperil sound communication; mistrust due to historical exploitation; and participatory processes: engaging early; considering the breadth of "community"; and, developing appropriate stakeholder roles. Site-specific challenges arose in resource-limited settings and settings where trials were halted.This multiple case study revealed common themes underlying community stakeholder engagement across four country settings that largely mirror GPP goals and the GPP Blueprint, as well as

  2. Organising stakeholder workshops in research and innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Velsing; Bryndum, Nina; Bedsted, Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    This article addresses the theory and practice of creating responsiveness among actors through deliberative dialogue processes with stakeholders from diverse institutional settings. The EU’s decision to mainstream stakeholder deliberation in research and innovation, as part of its focus......, the article illustrates the challenges of applying theory to five European stakeholder workshops co-organised by the authors. The illustration highlights the difficult interaction between theory and practice. The article concludes that while theoretical perspectives can provide general guidance, practical...... experience is essential when dealing with the trade-offs that are an intrinsic part of organising stakeholder workshops....

  3. Perceptions of gender roles, gender power relationships, and sexuality in Thai women following diagnosis and treatment for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritcharoen, Sureeporn; Suwan, Kobkaew; Jirojwong, Sansnee

    2005-05-10

    To describe patients' and their partners' perceptions of gender roles, gender power relationships, and sexuality before diagnosis of and after treatment for cervical cancer. Descriptive. Southern Thailand. 97 women with cervical cancer who received cancer treatment, including radiotherapy, and their partners. Structured interview methods were used to gather information relating to gender roles, gender power relationships, and sexuality. Gender roles, gender power relationships, and sexuality. Fifty-two percent of the women (n = 50) were diagnosed with stage II cervical cancer. The percentage of women who undertook various activities specific to gender roles before their diagnoses was higher than the percentage who undertook the same activities after treatment. An increased percentage of partners undertook the women's gender-role-specific activities after the women received cancer treatment compared with the percentage who did so before diagnosis. Little change in gender power relationships was reported. A high percentage of the couples reported changes in various aspects of their sexuality after cancer treatment compared with before diagnosis. Gender roles, gender power relationships, and sexuality changed for women with cervical cancer and their partners after the women completed cancer treatment. Open discussions among women with cervical cancer, their partners, and oncology nurses are necessary to identify culturally sensitive and appropriate solutions.

  4. Growing electricity demand and role of nuclear power in Asia. WANO Tokyo Center summarizes Asian Nuclear Power Atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    Present status of the activities of World Association of Nuclear Operations (WANO) in Asia was briefly summarized here. The WANO Tokyo Center is the hub for WANO's activities having a member ship of 17 operators from six countries and territories. The center conducts a variety of activities designed to enhance the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants (NPPs) in Asia. Asian economy is expanding now in spite of the stagnation of recent world economy. The economic development has been paralleled by population growth in Asia and the 21st century may become the 'age of Asia'. Despite this remarkable economic growth, some parts of Asia are still at the developing stage in terms of electric power infrastructure. Demand for electric power is expected to increase dramatically from now on, making the development of electric power plants an urgent priority. Nuclear power has thus become the focus of increasing interest in Asia. At present, 17 operators in six countries of Asia operate 79 units at 32 power stations with a total capacity of approximately 60 GW, or equivalent to around 17% of the total capacity of all WANO members. China's massive NPP construction program and Indonesia's nuclear power program are expected to boost total capacity in future. (M.N.)

  5. CONTENT OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND THEIR INFORMATIVE VALENCES FOR STAKEHOLDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRON Vasile Cristian Ioachim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The qualitative characteristics of accounting information have a major importance in fundamenting stakeholders decisions in order to satisfy their interests. The financial statements, by their nature, provide synthetic information which shows the financial position and its modifications, the economic performance of the entity, the management of resources and other aspects that lead to rational decisions. Stakeholders interests are complex and sometimes divergent, that is why the content of the financial statements must be adapted in order to meet these interests. The present research analyzes how the information presented in the financial statements respond to the needs of the stakeholders. The analysis showed that there are some significant aspects for which the informational power of the financial statements is reduced. Also, using econometric processing, we have conceived a function that characterizes the correlation between the financial profitability of the entities activating in the energy sector and the profitability obtained in the stock exchange market. The conclusions of the research allowed us to propose some measures of improvement of the information from the financial statements, in order to create an adequate informational basis for the decisions of all the categories of stakeholders.

  6. The roles played by the Canadian General Electric Company's Atomic Power Department in Canada's nuclear power program: work, organization and success in APD, 1955-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantello, G.W.

    2003-01-01

    This thesis explores the roles played by the Canadian General Electric Company's Atomic Power Department (APD) in Canada's distinctive nuclear power program. From the establishment of APD in 1955 until the completion of the KANUPP project in Pakistan in 1972, the company's strategy encompassed the design, manufacture, and commissioning of entire nuclear power projects in Canada and abroad. APD then developed a specialized role in the design and supply of complete nuclear fuel handling systems, nuclear fuel bundles, and service work, that sustained a thriving workplace. Five key factors are identified as the reasons behind the long and successful history of the department: (1) Strong, capable and efficient management from the start, (2) Flexible organizational structure, (3) Extremely competent design group, (4) Excellent manufacturing, test, commissioning and service capabilities, (5) Correctly identifying, at the right time, the best fields in which to specialize. (author)

  7. Tackling wicked problems in infection prevention and control: a guideline for co-creation with stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne F. G. van Woezik

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection prevention and control can be seen as a wicked public health problem as there is no consensus regarding problem definition and solution, multiple stakeholders with different needs and values are involved, and there is no clear end-point of the problem-solving process. Co-creation with stakeholders has been proposed as a suitable strategy to tackle wicked problems, yet little information and no clear step-by-step guide exist on how to do this. The objectives of this study were to develop a guideline to assist developers in tackling wicked problems using co-creation with stakeholders, and to apply this guideline to practice with an example case in the field of infection prevention and control. Methods A mixed-method approach consisting of the integration of both quantitative and qualitative research was used. Relevant stakeholders from the veterinary, human health, and public health sectors were identified using a literature scan, expert recommendations, and snowball sampling. The stakeholder salience approach was used to select key stakeholders based on 3 attributes: power, legitimacy, and urgency. Key values of stakeholders (N = 20 were derived by qualitative semi-structured interviews and quantitatively weighted and prioritized using an online survey. Results Our method showed that stakeholder identification and analysis are prerequisites for understanding the complex stakeholder network that characterizes wicked problems. A total of 73 stakeholders were identified of which 36 were selected as potential key stakeholders, and only one was seen as a definite stakeholder. In addition, deriving key stakeholder values is a necessity to gain insights into different problem definitions, solutions and needs stakeholders have regarding the wicked problem. Based on the methods used, we developed a step-by-step guideline for co-creation with stakeholders when tackling wicked problems. Conclusions The mixed

  8. Tackling wicked problems in infection prevention and control: a guideline for co-creation with stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Woezik, Anne F G; Braakman-Jansen, Louise M A; Kulyk, Olga; Siemons, Liseth; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E W C

    2016-01-01

    Infection prevention and control can be seen as a wicked public health problem as there is no consensus regarding problem definition and solution, multiple stakeholders with different needs and values are involved, and there is no clear end-point of the problem-solving process. Co-creation with stakeholders has been proposed as a suitable strategy to tackle wicked problems, yet little information and no clear step-by-step guide exist on how to do this. The objectives of this study were to develop a guideline to assist developers in tackling wicked problems using co-creation with stakeholders, and to apply this guideline to practice with an example case in the field of infection prevention and control. A mixed-method approach consisting of the integration of both quantitative and qualitative research was used. Relevant stakeholders from the veterinary, human health, and public health sectors were identified using a literature scan, expert recommendations, and snowball sampling. The stakeholder salience approach was used to select key stakeholders based on 3 attributes: power, legitimacy, and urgency. Key values of stakeholders (N = 20) were derived by qualitative semi-structured interviews and quantitatively weighted and prioritized using an online survey. Our method showed that stakeholder identification and analysis are prerequisites for understanding the complex stakeholder network that characterizes wicked problems. A total of 73 stakeholders were identified of which 36 were selected as potential key stakeholders, and only one was seen as a definite stakeholder. In addition, deriving key stakeholder values is a necessity to gain insights into different problem definitions, solutions and needs stakeholders have regarding the wicked problem. Based on the methods used, we developed a step-by-step guideline for co-creation with stakeholders when tackling wicked problems. The mixed-methods guideline presented here provides a systematic, transparent method to

  9. The role of nuclear research centers for the introduction of a nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perovic, B.; Frlec, B.; Kundic, V.

    1977-01-01

    Full development of nuclear energy has imposed a new role on nuclear energy centers. Nuclear technology for different reactor concepts is also now in a phase of high development. Several reactor concepts have been developed for industrial use and electric power production. Development of fast reactors is still under way and needs further research efforts. Having in mind these two main guidelines, research programmes in nuclear energy centers should be geared to the development of the activities vital to the implementation of national nuclear energy programmes. In this respect, national nuclear centers should devote their attention to three major tasks. First, to establish a background for the introduction of nuclear energy into the national energy system and to support a national safety system. Second, to support the national programme by skilled manpower, to provide the basic training in nuclear technology for future staff of nuclear power stations and to assist the universities in establishing the necessary educational programme in nuclear energy. Third, to follow the development of nuclear energy technology for the fast breeder reactor concepts. This paper describes some experience in introducing a new programme to the national nuclear energy centers in Yugoslavia. Recently, Yugoslavia has started building its first nuclear power station. Further introduction of nuclear power stations in the national electric energy system is also planned. This implies the need to reconsider the current nuclear energy programme in the nuclear energy centers. It has been decided to evaluate past experience and further needs for research activities regarding the nuclear power programme. Yugoslavia has three main nuclear energy centers whose activities are devoted to the development of national manpower in the field of nuclear sciences. Besides these three organizations, there are several others whose activities are concentrated on specific tasks in nuclear technology. In the

  10. The strategic role of power grids in the implementation of a European energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlin, A.

    2010-01-01

    With the development of low carbon and renewable energies, the World is living a third energy revolution. In this new context, the European Union has adopted an ambitious energy policy with a triple objective: reducing the volume of carbon dioxide emissions in the atmosphere in order to fight against a possible disastrous climatic change, increasing the security of its energy supplies by limiting its fossil fuels dependence and by reinforcing the solidarity between member states in particular during crisis situation, and completing the building up of domestic electricity and gas markets by a better integration of these markets at the European scale and in relation with neighboring areas (Mediterranean region, Russia). This article explains the key of success of such a policy: a prominent part of electricity in the European energy mix, with a strategic role given to power grids

  11. Role of seismic PRA in seismic safety decisions of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindra, M.K.; Kennedy, R.P.; Sues, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper highlights the important roles that seismic probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) can play in the seismic safety decisions of nuclear power plants. If a seismic PRA has been performed for a plant, its results can be utilized to evaluate the seismic capability beyond the safe shutdown event (SSE). Seismic fragilities of key structures and equipment, fragilities of dominant plant damage states and the frequencies of occurrence of these plant damage states are reviewed to establish the seismic safety of the plant beyond the SSE level. Guidelines for seismic margin reviews and upgrading may be developed by first identifying the generic classes of structures and equipment that have been shown to be dominant risk contributors in the completed seismic PRAs, studying the underlying causes for their contribution and examining why certain other items (e.g., piping) have not proved to be high-risk-contributors

  12. Engaging stakeholders on complex, and potentially contested, science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, John; Atherton, Elizabeth; Tweed, Cherry

    2014-01-01

    is built at an interpersonal level between those involved in the process. - Honest brokers: Can play an important role, mediating between the people and organisations involved, and interpreting the science and its significance for decisions. - Stakeholders as 'scientists': Involving stakeholders in the generation and interpretation of scientific knowledge promotes ownership and helps ensure that it is socially robust. - Communicating about uncertainty: Establishing uncertainty as an inherent feature of science, and discussing uncertainties in a way which is helpful to stakeholders while remaining true to the science. - Protected spaces: Creating spaces in which productive dialogue can take place between scientists and stakeholders, where issues and questions can be explored in a process of honest enquiry. For RWMD the scientific uncertainties inherent in evaluating the performance of a geological disposal facility into the far future present a challenge of engaging productively with stakeholders on the science. The stakeholders who are fundamentally opposed to disposal will focus on remaining uncertainties as just cause for their position. Whatever the process of stakeholder engagement on science that is eventually developed, it will be important to build in evaluation and learning, together with the flexibility to adjust the process as experience is gained. Its development should also keep one eye on the planning and legal framework to ensure that synergies, rather than pitfalls, are built in. (authors)

  13. The role of nuclear power and other options in competitive electricity market study using message model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scorpio Sri Herdinie and Edi Sartono

    2003-01-01

    The electricity demand in Indonesia is very high due to the National Economic Development based on industrialization and supported by a strong agriculture base. It can be noted that in the last five years, the annual electricity growth rate has been reaching around 15% per annum. Though during the economic crisis the electricity demand have time to reduction. Start early 2000s the economic growth in Indonesia will gradually increase. As a consequence, the electricity growth rate also increase in the next coming decades. MESSAGE (Model for Energy Supply Strategy Alternatives and their General Environmental Impacts) is a model designed for the optimization of energy system(i.e. energy supplies and utilization). The goal of this study is to support the national planning and decision making process in the energy and electricity sector in Indonesia with regard to the economic, health, environmental and safety aspects. The objective of this study is to analyse the role of Nuclear Power Plant in the whole energy systems by introducing the new electricity regulation and structure in the market. Seen that Nuclear Power Plant will be enter the Java Bali system in the period between 2015-2020. and will dominate the addition of capacities by the end period of study (year 2020-2025). Nuclear energy has very important long term roles in the energy scenario and it is possible to do the market competitive when the Multi buyer Multi Seller (MBMS) will be done in the system electricity in Indonesia(the government has changed the target of MBMS realization into 2007). (author)

  14. Stakeholder engagement in dredged material management decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Zachary A; Bates, Matthew E; Wood, Matthew D; Linkov, Igor

    2014-10-15

    Dredging and disposal issues often become controversial with local stakeholders because of their competing interests. These interests tend to manifest themselves in stakeholders holding onto entrenched positions, and deadlock can result without a methodology to move the stakeholder group past the status quo. However, these situations can be represented as multi-stakeholder, multi-criteria decision problems. In this paper, we describe a case study in which multi-criteria decision analysis was implemented in a multi-stakeholder setting in order to generate recommendations on dredged material placement for Long Island Sound's Dredged Material Management Plan. A working-group of representatives from various stakeholder organizations was formed and consulted to help prioritize sediment placement sites for each dredging center in the region by collaboratively building a multi-criteria decision model. The resulting model framed the problem as several alternatives, criteria, sub-criteria, and metrics relevant to stakeholder interests in the Long Island Sound region. An elicitation of values, represented as criteria weights, was then conducted. Results show that in general, stakeholders tended to agree that all criteria were at least somewhat important, and on average there was strong agreement on the order of preferences among the diverse groups of stakeholders. By developing the decision model iteratively with stakeholders as a group and soliciting their preferences, the process sought to increase stakeholder involvement at the front-end of the prioritization process and lead to increased knowledge and consensus regarding the importance of site-specific criteria. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. CO2 and the world energy system: The role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulkerson, W.; Jones, J.E. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The greenhouse effect, and other transnational and global environment, health and safety issues, require energy system planning on an international scale. Consideration of equity between nations and regions, particularly between the industrialized and developing countries, is an essential ingredient. For the immediate future, the next several decades at least, fossil fuels will remain the predominant energy sources. More efficient use of energy seems to be the only feasible strategy for the near to mid-term to provide growing energy services for the world economy while moderating the increasing demand for fossil fuels. In the longer term, nonfossil sources are essential for a sustainable world energy system, and nuclear power can play an important, if not dominant, role. The challenge is to design and implement a safe and economic nuclear power world enterprise which is socially acceptable and is complimentary to other nonfossil sources. The elements of such an enterprise seem clear and include: much safer reactors, preferably passively safe, which can be developed at various scales; development of economic resource extension technologies; effective and permanent waste management strategies; and strengthened safeguards against diversion of nuclear materials to weapons. All of these elements can best be developed as cooperative international efforts. In the process, institutional improvements are equally as important as technological improvements; the two must proceed hand-in-hand. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. TRENDS IN STRUCTURING POWER AND ITS ROLE IN SOCIAL SELF-REGULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona O. NICOLESCU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is trying to prove how social normality should start from a prescriptive, judicial reflection of democratic rationality in social-economic relations instead of starting from the generalization of exceptions under the form of normativity.From the point of view of realistic systemic knowledge, “real levels” and “necessary levels”, as well as the rational interaction between them can be determined sufficiently accurate for all social sub-systems, based on present knowledge. The necessary and sufficient condition is that self-regulatory decisions are independent of the speculative groups of the society (i.e. of politics and oligopolies. There are numberless approaches for separating governance from politics but the social power which supports these approaches is still incomparably smaller than the power of those who do not want social normality. Therefore, the study of economy (different economic methods proposed by economists is relevant for understanding social self-regulation and the role of “social power” in this self-regulation.

  17. The role of nuclear research centres in the introduction of a nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afgan, N.; Anastasijevic, P.; Kolar, D.; Strohal, P.

    1977-01-01

    Full development of nuclear energy has imposed a new role on nuclear energy centres. Nuclear technology for different reactor concepts is also now in a phase of high development. Several reactor concepts have been developed for industrial use and electric power production. Development of fast reactors is still under way and needs further research efforts. Having in mind these two main guidelines, research programmes in nuclear energy centres should be geared to the development of the activities vital to the implementation of national nuclear energy programmes. In this respect, national nuclear centres should devote their attention to three major tasks. First, to establish a background for the introduction of nuclear energy into the national energy system and to support a national safety system. Secondly, to support the national programme by skilled manpower, to provide the basic training in nuclear technology for future staff of nuclear power stations and to assist the universities in establishing the necessary educational programme in nuclear energy. Thirdly, to follow the development of nuclear energy technology for fast breeder reactor concepts. (author)

  18. The role of governmental authorities in the surveillance activities for quality assurance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutsky, J.; Hrdlicka, Z.; Beranek, J.; Becvar, J.

    1982-01-01

    The paper deals with the legal and organizational aspects as well as with the principles and procedures of the quality assurance (QA) system for particular equipment of nuclear power plants in Czechoslovakia, and the role of governmental authorities in surveillance activities. The basic governmental document is the Decree No.5 (1979) of the Czechoslovak Atomic Energy Commission (CzAEC) on the QA of particular equipment in nuclear power plants with regard to nuclear safety. It is divided into ten sections: opening provisions; classification of the particular equipment; QA programmes; procedures of final elaboration of QA programme documentation; QA principles; QA during design; QA during manufacture, procurement, installation and commissioning; in-service inspection; QA during repair and modifications; and concluding provisions. Governmental surveillance is based on Governmental Resolution No.195 (1977). According to this resolution, inspection must be carried out by an organization which is independent of the manufacturing and operating organizations. This inspection is performed by the Czechoslovak Atomic Energy Commission (for nuclear safety) and by the Czech Safety Work Office and the Slovak Safety Work Office (for technical safety), together with subordinated regional divisions. The activities of these authorities are discussed. (author)

  19. Canada's global health role: supporting equity and global citizenship as a middle power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Stephanie A; Lee, Kelley; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Blanchard, James; Haddad, Slim; Hoffman, Steven J; Tugwell, Peter

    2018-02-22

    Canada's history of nation building, combined with its status as a so-called middle power in international affairs, has been translated into an approach to global health that is focused on equity and global citizenship. Canada has often aspired to be a socially progressive force abroad, using alliance building and collective action to exert influence beyond that expected from a country with moderate financial and military resources. Conversely, when Canada has primarily used economic self-interest to define its global role, the country's perceived leadership in global health has diminished. Current Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal federal government has signalled a return to progressive values, driven by appreciation for diversity, equality, and Canada's responsibility to be a good global citizen. However, poor coordination of efforts, limited funding, and the unaddressed legacy of Canada's colonisation of Indigenous peoples weaken the potential for Canadians to make meaningful contributions to improvement of global health equity. Amid increased nationalism and uncertainty towards multilateral commitments by some major powers in the world, the Canadian federal government has a clear opportunity to convert its commitments to equity and global citizenship into stronger leadership on the global stage. Such leadership will require the translation of aspirational messages about health equity and inclusion into concrete action at home and internationally. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. CO2 and the world energy system: the role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulkerson, W.; Jones, J.E. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The greenhouse effect, and other transnational and global environment, health and safety issues, require energy system planning on an international scale. Consideration of equity between nations and regions, particularly between the industrialized and developing countries, is an essential ingredient. For the immediate future, the next several decades at least, fossil fuels will remain the predominant energy sources. More efficient use of energy seems to be the only feasible strategy for the near to mid-term to provide growing energy services for the world economy while moderating the increasing demand for fossil fuels. In the longer term, nonfossil sources are essential for a sustainable world energy system, and nuclear power can play an important, if not dominant, role. The challenge is to design and implement a safe and economic nuclear power world enterprise which is socially acceptable and is complimentary to other nonfossil sources. The elements of such an enterprise seem clear and include: much safer reactors, preferably passively safe, which can be deployed at various scales; development of economic resource extension technologies; effective and permanent waste management strategies; and strengthened safeguards against diversion of nuclear materials to weapons. All of these elements can best be developed as cooperative international efforts. In the process, institutional improvements are equally as important as technological improvements; the two must proceed hand-in-hand. (orig.)

  1. The potential role of nuclear power in controlling CO2 emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulkerson, W.; Jones, J.E.; Delene, J.G.; Perry, A.M.; Cantor, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear power currently reduces CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel burning worldwide by about 8% (0.4 Gt(C)/yr). It can continue to play an important role only if it can grow substantially in the next 50 years. For such growth to occur public confidence will need to improve throughout the world. That might happen if (a) other non-fossil alternatives are inadequate to meet electricity demand growth, (b) the risks to society from global warming are perceived to be very high, (c) nuclear technology improves substantially, and (d) an international institutional setting is devised to manage the nuclear enterprise so that the technology is available to all nations while catastrophic accidents and proliferation of nuclear weapon capabilities are avoided. It seems feasible that the necessary technological and institutional advances can be devised and tested over the next 20 years. It is also plausible that the direct costs of electricity produced by the system would be in the range of 50-100 mills/kWhr (1990 dollars) delivered to the grid. In other words, the direct costs of nuclear power should not be greater than they are today. Achieving such an outcome will require aggressive technical and institutional RD ampersand D performed in a cooperative international setting. If rapid growth of nuclear power can begin again in 15-20 years it could supply 30-50% of world electricity in 50 years and cut CO 2 emission rates by up to 2.5 Gt(C)/yr. This would be a substantial contribution to controlling greenhouse gases, but it is not sufficient. Improved efficiency and various renewable energy sources must also grow rapidly if CO 2 emission rates from electricity generation are to be reduced from the current value of about 2 Gt(C)/yr. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  2. The potential role of nuclear power in controlling CO sub 2 emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulkerson, W.; Jones, J.E.; Delene, J.G.; Perry, A.M.; Cantor, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear power currently reduces CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel burning worldwide by about 8% (0.4 Gt(C)/yr). It can continue to play an important role only if it can grow substantially in the next 50 years. For such growth to occur public confidence will need to improve throughout the world. That might happen if (a) other non-fossil alternatives are inadequate to meet electricity demand growth, (b) the risks to society from global warming are perceived to be very high, (c) nuclear technology improves substantially, and (d) an international institutional setting is devised to manage the nuclear enterprise so that the technology is available to all nations while catastrophic accidents and proliferation of nuclear weapon capabilities are avoided. It seems feasible that the necessary technological and institutional advances can be devised and tested over the next 20 years. It is also plausible that the direct costs of electricity produced by the system would be in the range of 50-100 mills/kWhr (1990 dollars) delivered to the grid. In other words, the direct costs of nuclear power should not be greater than they are today. Achieving such an outcome will require aggressive technical and institutional RD D performed in a cooperative international setting. If rapid growth of nuclear power can begin again in 15-20 years it could supply 30-50% of world electricity in 50 years and cut CO{sub 2} emission rates by up to 2.5 Gt(C)/yr. This would be a substantial contribution to controlling greenhouse gases, but it is not sufficient. Improved efficiency and various renewable energy sources must also grow rapidly if CO{sub 2} emission rates from electricity generation are to be reduced from the current value of about 2 Gt(C)/yr. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. The role of bureaucratic expertise in nuclear waste policy: Agency power and policy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henkels, M.

    1989-01-01

    The role of agency expertise in the nuclear waste policy process is explored during three periods: (1) 1957-1959 when nuclear wastes entered the public agenda, (2) 1970-1972 when the Atomic Energy Commission attempted to establish a waste repository in Kansas, and (3) 1984-1986 during the Department of Energy's implementation of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The study evaluated whether the preconditions for dependence on or deference to agency expertise have become less favorable, weakening agency control of the policy process. Five factors of expertise power are evaluated, beginning with the agency's role in the nuclear-energy and radioactive-waste information system. Perspectives on nuclear energy generally and of waste issues specifically are examined next; both indicate attitudes on the tractability of the problem and the likelihood of policy success. References to agency behavior and policies are used to evaluate views of agency competency. Finally, views of agency trustworthiness are examined through the comparison of portrayals of agency priorities and motivations. Agency expertise is evaluated in four contexts: (1) Congressional hearings, (2) nationally prominent newspapers, (3) journals of the scientific community, and (4) state and local papers of affected areas. State and tribal officials involved in the 1980s' nuclear waste policy process were surveyed also

  4. Stakeholder Value Matrix - Die VErbindung zwischen Shareholder Value und Stakeholder Value

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Figge

    2004-01-01

    Die Studie zeigt, was unter Stakeholder Value verstanden werden kann, wie Shareholder Value und Stakeholder Value gemessen werden können und welche Verbindung zwischen beiden Konzepten besteht. In dieser Studie wird erstmals die Wertbeitragsanalyse von Stakeholderbeziehungen vorgestellt. Anhand der Stakeholder Value Matrix lässt sich zeigen, welche Stakeholdergruppen zusammen positiv zum Unternehmenswert beitragen.

  5. Projected role of nuclear power in Egypt and problems encountered in implementing the first nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effat, K.E.A.; Sirry, H.; El-Fouly, M.F.; El-Sharkawy, E.; El-Saiedi, A.F.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews the present and projected power demands in Egypt and the factors behind the decision to introduce a nuclear power generation program. Different problems encountered and anticipated in introducing the first nuclear power plant are also discussed

  6. Innovations in PHWR design, integration of nuclear power stations into power systems and role of small size nuclear power plants in a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, S.K.; Kakodkar, A.; Balakrishnan, M.R.; Ray, R.N.; Murthy, L.G.K.; Chamany, B.F.; Kati, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    PHWR concept of thermal reactors has been considered with a view to exploiting the limited resources of natural uranium and keeping in mind the projected nuclear power programme covering fast breeder reactors. Experience in engineering of current PHWR units in India, gradual build up of necessary infrastructure and operational experience with one unit, have helped in building up design and technological capability in the country. The R and D facilities have been so planned that additional data required for the design of bigger reactor units (i.e.500/600 MWe) could be generated with minimal augmentation. Satisfactory operation of a nuclear power station demands certain prerequisites from the connected power system. The grid should have load patterns suitable for base load operation of these stations, should be stiff so far as voltage and frequency fluctuations are concerned and should have high reliability. A typical power grid in this country is characterised by heavy loads during peak hours and very light loads during night. Regional grids are of small size and the few interconnections existing between the regional grids consist of weak tie lines. Amongst all types of the power stations, it is the nuclear system which undergoes maximum strain and economic penalty while operating when connected to such a power system. Consistent with the above, phase installation of small-size power reactor units of about 200 MWe capacity may facilitate setting up of larger unit sizes at a later date. The effect of any possible reduction in the capital cost of a larger unit power station will enable the power station to partially meet the demand of the more productive types of loads. This paper deals with some of the major design changes that are being incorporated in the PHWR type power reactors currently being set up and the research and development back-up required for the purpose. Since the unit sizes of the power reactors presently contemplated are small compared to nuclear

  7. Stakeholder initiatives in flood risk management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelenbos, Jurian; Buuren, Van Arwin; Roth, Dik; Winnubst, Madelinde

    2017-01-01

    In recent years stakeholder participation has become a popular topic in flood management. Little is known about how and under which circumstances local stakeholders initiate and develop successful flood management strategies and how governmental actors respond to them. Drawing on theories of

  8. Perceptions of European stakeholders of pulse fishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, M.L.; Trapman, B.K.; Rasenberg, M.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    This research project examines the concerns and questions of European stakeholders about pulse fishing, in order to assess to what extent the knowledge agenda on pulse fishing covers these issues. To get a first impression of the concerns about pulse fishing, and to get an idea of the stakeholders

  9. Accountability in Community Colleges Using Stakeholder Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Paula R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to analyze stakeholder theory and its applicability to community college accountability. Community colleges have been using strategic planning as a management approach that includes the process of strategic action, and many organizations claim that they collaborate with their stakeholders during this process.…

  10. Stakeholder integration : Building Mutually Enforcing Relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P.M.A.R. Heugens (Pursey); F.A.J. van den Bosch (Frans); C.B.M. van Riel (Cees)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis study examines the central contention ofinstrumental stakeholder theory— namely, that firms that breed trust-based, cooperative ties with their stakeholders will have a competitive advantage over firms that do not.Acase study of the introduction ofgenetically modified food products

  11. DG CONNECT’s stakeholder engagement strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheyden, M.; Glidden, J.; Shahin, J.

    2013-01-01

    How do we ensure that public policy represents the interests of all, rather than a select few? How will we ensure it draws upon the best insights and talents of key stakeholders? The European Commission’s DG CONNECT recently announced the results of its Stakeholder Engagement Survey, which is

  12. Stakeholders' Perceptions of School Counselling in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Poi Kee

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study that set out to understand stakeholders' perception of the school counselling service in Singapore. Using semi-structured interviews, this study explored the perceptions of three main stakeholder groups, namely teachers and counsellors working within the schools and those working in the communities.…

  13. 77 FR 50144 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2012-0042] Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY... Information Collection Request: 1670-NEW. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National... (Pub. L. 104-13, 44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). NPPD is soliciting comments concerning the Broad Stakeholder...

  14. 76 FR 34087 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2011-0027] Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY... Information Collection Request: 1670-NEW. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National... (Pub. L. 104-13, 44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). NPPD is soliciting comments concerning the Broad Stakeholder...

  15. Corporate Reputation Management: Reaching Out to Financial Stakeholders

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yijing

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCorporate reputation is important for firms’ long-term performance and competitive advantages. This dissertation sets out to understand the relationship between corporate reputation and a company’s attractiveness to financial stakeholders from different angles. Specifically, I examine the role of corporate reputation in the context of the agency problem to explain the causal chain through which the uncertainties and risks are mitigated for investors. This dissertation contributes ...

  16. Enforcing a security pattern in stakeholder goal models

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Yijun; Kaiya, Haruhiko; Washizaki, Hironori; Xiong, Yingfei; Hu, Zhenjiang; Yoshioka, Nobukazu

    2008-01-01

    Patterns are useful knowledge about recurring problems and solutions. Detecting a security problem using patterns in requirements models may lead to its early solution. In order to facilitate early detection and resolution of security problems, in this paper, we formally describe a role-based access control (RBAC) as a pattern that may occur in stakeholder requirements models. We also implemented in our goal-oriented modeling tool the formally described pattern using model-driven queries and ...

  17. Stakeholder views of superfund sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Nearly ten years have passed since the enactment of the federal Comprehensive Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), usually referred to as open-quotes Superfundclose quotes. Nearly four years have passed since CERCLA's major overhaul through the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). Although much still remains to be done under Superfund, there is now enough experience to assess how effectively it is working. A study being undertaken by the University of Tennessee's Waste Management Research and Education Institute will supply a portion of that assessment. The study was completed in the fall of 1990. Our study examines two related issues: the resources that will be needed in the coming years to fulfill the mandate of Superfund and other hazardous waste remediation programs, and the site-level experience to date in implementing CERCLA and SARA. This chapter discusses only the open-quotes site-level experienceclose quotes effort, and only its methodological approach. The purpose of the open-quotes site-level experienceclose quotes effort is to explore what counts as a open-quotes successfulclose quotes site in the eyes of different stakeholders in a Superfund cleanup - e.g., the affected community, the potentially responsible parties (PRPs), state and local officials, and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

  18. Identification and Classification of Stakeholders in a Brazilian Professional Soccer Club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Lara de Siqueira

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Whereas an initial step in the management of stakeholders is the identification and classification of these actors, this study sought to answer the research question: how managers of Brazilian professional soccer clubs identify and classify their stakeholders? The theoretical framework used was the Stakeholder Theory, developed by Freeman (1984 and other researchers. The method used was proposed by Almeida et al. (2000, which assesses the saliency through the concepts power, legitimacy and urgency, that were proposed in the study of Mitchell et al. (1997. There were two propositions concerning the context of Brazilian soccer clubs: first, that the urgency perceived by managers in the demands of a stakeholder is high when his legitimacy is high and other one is that the most salient stakeholders for the managers are those with high degrees of legitimacy. Stakeholders were surveyed as perceived by the managers of Sociedade Esportiva Palmeiras. Three types of stakeholders were classified as demanding (sponsors, partners and the partner for the construction of the new stadium and three as dependents (members, athletes of professional soccer team and the media. Other stakeholders identified were classified as irrelevant, including the fans and and the organized groups of fans. It can be said that in the specific case of these managers of this particular football club, the trend was the acceptance of both propositions. 

  19. Environmental management initiatives and stakeholder influences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    1999-01-01

    in Danish industrial companies. These findings are discussed in the light of similar reported results and case studies of companies which are reportedly pioneers in the introduction of environmental initiatives from a number of EU countries. Implications for theory, practice and training are addressed...... of change, from the point of view of stakeholder theory, from a merely reactive attitude in industry, where companies only tend to respond to stakeholder pressure which cannot be ignored (e.g. ex post responses to one or two stakeholders, such as regulators and customers), towards an increasingly proactive...... attitude characterised by ex ante responses to several strategic groups of stakeholders (including NGOs, employees, neighbours, etc.). The present situation is illustrated by the findings in two recent surveys concerning perceived stakeholder influence in relation to environmental management initiatives...

  20. How can stakeholder involvement be improved?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-12-01

    Radioactive waste management is embedded in broader societal issues such as environment, risk management, sustainability, energy and health policy. In all these fields, there is an increasing demand for public involvement, participation or engagement. Guidance for public authorities also generally encourages greater involvement of the public. Involvement may take different forms at different phases and can include sharing information, consulting, dialoguing or deliberating on decisions with relevant stakeholders. Stakeholder involvement should be seen as a meaningful part of formulating and implementing public policy. There is no single technique for organising engagement. Initiatives should respond to their context and to stakeholders' particular needs. As the number of stakeholder involvement approaches and publications describing them continues to grow, new opportunities are opening up through social media, which has become an important tool for stakeholder involvement in recent years

  1. Using Participatory Learning & Action (PLA) research techniques for inter-stakeholder dialogue in primary healthcare: an analysis of stakeholders' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brún, T; O'Reilly-de Brún, M; Van Weel-Baumgarten, E; Burns, N; Dowrick, C; Lionis, C; O'Donnell, C; Mair, F S; Papadakaki, M; Saridaki, A; Spiegel, W; Van Weel, C; Van den Muijsenbergh, M; MacFarlane, A

    2017-01-01

    It is important for health care workers to know the needs and expectations of their patients. Therefore, service users have to be involved in research. To achieve a meaningful dialogue between service users, healthcare workers and researchers, participatory methods are needed. This paper describes how the application of a specific participatory methodology, Participatory Learning and Action (PLA) can lead to such a meaningful dialogue. In PLA all stakeholders are regarded as equal partners and collaborators in research.During 2011-2015, a European project called RESTORE used PLA in Austria, Greece, Ireland, The Netherlands and the UK to investigate how communication between primary health care workers and their migrant patients could be improved.Seventy eight migrants, interpreters, doctors, nurses and other key stakeholders (see Table 2) participated in 62 PLA sessions. These dialogues (involving discussions, activities, PLA techniques and evaluations) were generally 2-3 h long and were recorded and analysed by the researchers.Participants reported many positive experiences about their dialogues with other stakeholders. There was a positive, trusting atmosphere in which all stakeholders could express their views despite differences in social power. This made for better understanding within and across stakeholder groups. For instance a doctor changed her view on the use of interpreters after a migrant explained why this was important. Negative experiences were rare: some doctors and healthcare workers thought the PLA sessions took a lot of time; and despite the good dialogue, there was disappointment that very few migrants used the new interpreting service. Background In order to be effective, primary healthcare must understand the health needs, values and expectations of the population it serves. Recent research has shown that the involvement of service users and other stakeholders and gathering information on their perspectives can contribute positively to many

  2. Comparison research on stakeholders analysis of disposition of medical dispute between China and abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We learn about the methods, process, effects of each stakeholder and the principles of the disposition of medical dispute home and abroad through stakeholder analysis. Methods: We investigate the methods, process and the principles of the disposition of medical dispute home and abroad by literature retrieval, key informant interview and depth interview. Results: The stakeholders of medical disputes mainly include patients and families, medical staff and hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, governments, laws, non-government organizations and media. They play different roles in medical disputes and have different effects. Over all, patients and families, medical staff and hospitals have the greatest effect and then laws, media, government, non-government organizations and pharmaceutical companies. Conclusion: Different stakeholders affect the disposition of medical disputes differently. It is crucial to establish harmonious relationship between patients and doctors and to build harmonious society by untangling the responsibility between all the stakeholders and dispose medical disputes quickly and effectively.

  3. Clinical imaging guidelines part 4: challenges in identifying, engaging and collaborating with stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettmann, Michael A; Oikarinen, Helja; Rehani, Madan; Holmberg, Ola; del Rosario Perez, Maria; Naidoo, Anusha; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Dreyer, Keith; Ebdon-Jackson, Steve

    2015-04-01

    The effective development and use of clinical imaging guidelines requires an understanding of who the stakeholders are, what their interests in the process are, and what roles they should play. If the appropriate stakeholders are not engaged in the right roles, it is unlikely that clinical imaging guidelines will be successfully developed, relied on, and actually used. Some stakeholders are obvious: for the development of clinical imaging guidelines, both imagers and those who request examinations, such as general practitioners, internists, and medical specialists, must be involved. To gain acceptance, other relevant groups are stakeholders, including medical societies, other health care professionals, insurers, health IT experts and vendors, and patients. The role of stakeholders must be dictated by their specific interest. For some, involvement in the creation of guidelines is the right role. For others, such as regulators or insurers, reviews or invitations to comment are required, and for others, such as medical educators, it is probably sufficient to provide information and create awareness. Only through a careful consideration of who the stakeholders are and what are their interests are the successful development, acceptance, and use of clinical imaging guidelines likely to occur. Future efforts must focus on collaboration, particularly among groups that create clinical imaging guidelines and those that can support their use, and on regulatory roles and mandates. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Market role, profitability and competitive features of thermal power plants in the Swedish future electricity market with high renewable integration

    OpenAIRE

    Llovera Bonmatí, Albert

    2017-01-01

    The Swedish energy market is currently undergoing a transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources, including a potential phase-out of nuclear power. The combination of a phase-out with expansion of intermittent renewable energy leads to the issue of increased fluctuations in electricity production. Energy-related organizations and institutions are projecting future Swedish energy scenarios with different possible transition pathways. In this study the market role of thermal power p...

  5. Involving stakeholders and developing a policy for stakeholder involvement in the European network for Health Technology Assessment, EUnetHTA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmhøj Nielsen, Camilla; Wadmann, Sarah; Børlum Kristensen, Finn

    2009-01-01

    in national/regional policy making. A stakeholder Web site, analyses of stakeholder opinions on HTA and EUnetHTA in a discussion topic catalog, and a draft stakeholder policy resulted from the work. Conclusions: Stakeholder involvement in EUnetHTA is necessary to ensure the legitimacy and prospects...... be continued. Our experience shows the challenge of obtaining balanced stakeholder representation across the identified stakeholder groups. Continued attention should be given to achieving balanced stakeholder representation....

  6. Quality partnerships: The community stakeholders' view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vhonani Netshandama

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Since 1997 universities in South Africa have been encouraged to be responsive to the needs of communities, to encourage broader participation and to address issues of access in higher education (Department of Education 1997. This transformative agenda was found to be especially compelling in the case of rural-based South African universities, which often serve historically disadvantaged black populations in areas that are both under-resourced and underdeveloped (Nkomo & Sehoole 2007, pp. 235–36. In 2006 the traditional leadership of a local community approached the University of Venda to propose a partnership. This prompted the researcher to conduct a qualitative study, which sought to explore and describe community members’ views of what they understood to be a quality partnership. Thirty-seven community representatives were engaged in individual as well as focus group interviews. These representatives were identified first through a stakeholder analysis procedure that sought to determine who in the community would have valuable input for the university-community partnership. As a point of departure, the following two questions were asked consecutively: What are your needs and expectations of a partnership with the university and what would you regard as a quality partnership between the HEI and the community? The sample selection was purposive, utilising the snowball technique. Data was transcribed and analysed using Tesch’s eight-step method (Tesch 1990, in Creswell 1994, p. 155. Interview data and field notes were co-coded, crosschecked and triangulated. Feedback workshops were conducted with the community to confirm the findings. A consensus was reached that four main requirements emerged from the data: —Balance the partnership objectives of both parties —Ensure an unexploitative partnership —Share power and control in the partnership —Maintain and monitor the partnership. This article provides a brief overview of the national

  7. The Role of Nuclear Power in Achieving the World We Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, M. J.

    1970-01-01

    Supports the development of nuclear power plants and considers some problems and possible solutions: future power needs, power costs, thermal pollution, radionuclide discharge. Describes advantages and applications of dual purpose power plants for purifying water, producing phosphorus and ammonia, and serving as fast breeder reactors for Pu 239.…

  8. Sustainable development - a role for nuclear power? 2nd scientific forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-03-01

    economically in deep geologic formations. However, the necessary political decisions to select sites for repositories need public support and understanding about what the industry is doing and what can be done. As to nuclear weapons proliferation, the existing safeguards system must be fully maintained and strengthened and inherently proliferation-resistant fuel cycles should be explored. Overviews of the future global energy demand and of the prospects for nuclear power in various economic regions of the world indicate that, in the case of the OECD countries, the dominant issue is economics in an increasingly free market system for electricity. For the so-called transition economies, countries of the Former Soviet Union and Central and Eastern Europe, the issue is one of managing nuclear power plant operations safely. In the case of developing countries, the dominant concern is effective management of technology, in addition to economics and finance. The prospects for nuclear power depend on the resolution of two cardinal issues. The first is economic competitiveness, and in particular, reduced capital cost. The second is public confidence in the ability of the industry to manage plant operations and its high level waste safely. There is a continuing need for dialogue and communication with all sectors of the public: economists, investors, social scientists, politicians, regulators, unions, and environmentalists. Of help in this dialogue would be nuclear power's relevance to and comparative advantages in addressing environmental issues, such as global climate change, local air quality, and regional acidification. Suggestions have been made for a globalized approach to critical nuclear power issues, such as waste management, innovative and proliferation-resistant reactors and fuel cycles, and international standards for new generation nuclear reactor designs.The conclusion seems to be that there is a role for nuclear energy in sustainable development, especially if greenhouse

  9. Institutional reforms of nuclear emergency preparedness in Japan and its challenges. Case studies on stakeholder involvement in establishing nuclear emergency preparedness in France and its implications for Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Shin-etsu

    2013-01-01

    Based upon the experiences with the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, Japan is now making a comprehensive review of nuclear emergency preparedness. The Nuclear Regulation Authority of Japan has changed drastically its basic concept of nuclear emergency arrangements from their dependence on the prediction methods to advance planning-oriented arrangements. In order to implement such changes in an effective enough manner, this report examines how to improve stakeholder involvement focusing on the French cases, where the Local Information Commissions (CLI) plays a critical role, and thereby derives concrete lessons for Japan. Case studies on CLI's involvement in French nuclear emergency preparedness revealed the following implications for Japan; 1. Improving continuously the disaster prevention plans of local governments and of nuclear utilities thorough recursive cycles of disaster-preparedness drill and its evaluation for the benefits of local inhabitants, 2. Setting appropriate ranges wherein local stakeholders involve constantly in establishing nuclear emergency preparedness without alienating completely other stakeholders, 3. Utilizing the prediction systems not as a means to support decision-making in emergency situations but as a tool for facilitating stakeholder involvement in the phase of advance planning, and 4. Integrating nuclear emergency preparedness into other disaster preventions for reducing complex and unrecognized risks. (author)

  10. Governance of environmental risk: new approaches to managing stakeholder involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Suzanne; Dunphy, Dexter; Martin, Andrew

    2009-04-01

    Disputes concerning industrial legacies such as the disposal of toxic wastes illustrate changing pressures on corporations and governments. Business and governments are now confronted with managing the expectations of a society increasingly aware of the social and environmental impacts and risks associated with economic development and demanding more equitable distribution and democratic management of such risks. The closed managerialist decision-making of the powerful bureaucracies and corporations of the industrial era is informed by traditional management theory which cannot provide a framework for the adequate governance of these risks. Recent socio-political theories have conceptualised some key themes that must be addressed in a more fitting approach to governance. We identify more recent management and governance theory which addresses these themes and develop a process-based approach to governance of environmental disputes that allows for the evolving nature of stakeholder relations in a highly complex multiple stakeholder arena.

  11. The role of tacit knowledge and the challenges in transferring it in the nuclear power plant context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyttinen, L.; Helminen, N.

    2004-01-01

    Explicit knowledge and implementation of proper IT systems have been of concern of many organizations which recognize the importance of managing knowledge for safety operation and sustainable competitive advantage. Data and document management systems have been implemented to capture, store and distribute explicit knowledge. However, recently also awareness of the existence of tacit knowledge in organizations has arisen. What kind of role this undocumented knowledge, which the employees have acquired through their careers, plays in nuclear power plant context? This paper explores the role of tacit knowledge and the challenges related to its transfer at the two Finnish nuclear power plants. (author)

  12. The role of nuclear power in the option zero emission technologies for fossil fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corak, Z.

    2006-01-01

    The energy sector is one of the main sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions particularly carbon dioxide (CO2) increasing concerns due to their potential risk to induce global warming and climate change. The Parties having signed the Kyoto Protocol in December 1997, committed to decrease their GHG emissions. The Protocol states that countries shall undertake promotion, research, development and increased use of new and renewable forms of energy, of carbon dioxide sequestration technologies and of advanced and innovative environmentally sound technologies. The one significant option that is not specifically mentioned is nuclear energy which is essentially carbon-free. There are a number of technical options that could help reducing, or at least slowing the increase of, GHG emissions from the energy sector. The list of options includes: improving the efficiency of energy conversion and end-use processes; shifting to less carbon intensive energy sources (e.g. shifting from coal to natural gas); developing carbon-free or low-carbon energy sources; and carbon sequestration (e.g. planting forests or capturing and storing carbon dioxide). It must be pointed out that nuclear power is one of the few options that are currently available on the market, competitive in a number of countries, especially if global costs to society of alternative options are considered; practically carbon-free; and sustainable at large-scale deployment. The nuclear power could play significant role in alleviating the risk of global climate change. The main objective of the article is to present sequestration options, their cost evaluation as well as comparation with alternative possibilities of nuclear energy production. (author)

  13. Communication and collaboration among return-to-work stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Elizabeth; Kosny, Agnieszka

    2018-05-17

    Workers who are injured or become ill on the job are best able to return-to-work when stakeholders involved in their case collaborate and communicate. This study examined health care providers' and case managers' engagement in rehabilitation and return-to-work following workplace injury or illness. In-depth interviews were conducted with 97 health care providers and 34 case managers in four Canadian provinces about their experiences facilitating rehabilitation and return-to-work, and interacting with system stakeholders. A qualitative thematic content analysis demonstrated two key findings. Firstly, stakeholders were challenged to collaborate as a result of: barriers to interdisciplinary and cross-professional communication; philosophical differences about the timing and appropriateness of return-to-work; and confusion among health care providers about the workers' compensation system. Secondly, these challenges adversely affected the co-ordination of patient care, and consequentially, injured workers often became information conduits, and effective and timely treatment and return-to-work was sometimes negatively impacted. Communication challenges between health care providers and case managers may negatively impact patient care and alienate treating health care providers. Discussion about role clarification, the appropriateness of early return-to-work, how paperwork shapes health care providers' role expectations, and strengthened inter-professional communication are considered. Implications for Rehabilitation Administrative and conceptual barriers in workers' compensation systems challenge collaboration and communication between health care providers and case managers. Injured workers may become conduits of incorrect information, resulting in adversarial relationships, overturned health care providers' recommendations, and their disengagement from rehabilitation and return-to-work. Stakeholders should clarify the role of health care providers during

  14. Stakeholder participation in comparative effectiveness research: defining a framework for effective engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deverka, Patricia A; Lavallee, Danielle C; Desai, Priyanka J; Esmail, Laura C; Ramsey, Scott D; Veenstra, David L; Tunis, Sean R

    2012-03-01

    AIMS: Stakeholder engagement is fundamental to comparative effectiveness research (CER), but lacks consistent terminology. This paper aims to define stakeholder engagement and present a conceptual model for involving stakeholders in CER. MATERIALS #ENTITYSTARTX00026; METHODS: The definitions and model were developed from a literature search, expert input and experience with the Center for Comparative Effectiveness Research in Cancer Genomics, a proof-of-concept platform for stakeholder involvement in priority setting and CER study design. RESULTS: Definitions for stakeholder and stakeholder engagement reflect the target constituencies and their role in CER. The 'analytic-deliberative' conceptual model for stakeholder engagement illustrates the inputs, methods and outputs relevant to CER. The model differentiates methods at each stage of the project; depicts the relationship between components; and identifies outcome measures for evaluation of the process. CONCLUSION: While the definitions and model require testing before being broadly adopted, they are an important foundational step and will be useful for investigators, funders and stakeholder groups interested in contributing to CER.

  15. Interactions of selected policy-stakeholder groups implementing middle school science standards-based systemic reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydston, Theodore Lewis, III

    1999-12-01

    how divided stakeholders are about what role attitudes and beliefs should play in professional development. The system operates within a context of administrative flux creating instability that, when combined with a chaotic work environment, undermines collegial interactions and the decision-making process. Resolving these differences will require new skills and understandings about the role that assumptions, attitudes, values, and beliefs play in our interactions to allow both decisions and actions to support the reform initiative.

  16. Ecosystem Services Flows: Why Stakeholders’ Power Relationships Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipe-Lucia, María R.; Martín-López, Berta; Lavorel, Sandra; Berraquero-Díaz, Luis; Escalera-Reyes, Javier; Comín, Francisco A.

    2015-01-01

    The ecosystem services framework has enabled the broader public to acknowledge the benefits nature provides to different stakeholders. However, not all stakeholders benefit equally from these services. Rather, power relationships are a key factor influencing the access of individuals or groups to ecosystem services. In this paper, we propose an adaptation of the “cascade” framework for ecosystem services to integrate the analysis of ecological interactions among ecosystem services and stakeholders’ interactions, reflecting power relationships that mediate ecosystem services flows. We illustrate its application using the floodplain of the River Piedra (Spain) as a case study. First, we used structural equation modelling (SEM) to model the dependence relationships among ecosystem services. Second, we performed semi-structured interviews to identify formal power relationships among stakeholders. Third, we depicted ecosystem services according to stakeholders’ ability to use, manage or impair ecosystem services in order to expose how power relationships mediate access to ecosystem services. Our results revealed that the strongest power was held by those stakeholders who managed (although did not use) those keystone ecosystem properties and services that determine the provision of other services (i.e., intermediate regulating and final services). In contrast, non-empowered stakeholders were only able to access the remaining non-excludable and non-rival ecosystem services (i.e., some of the cultural services, freshwater supply, water quality, and biological control). In addition, land stewardship, access rights, and governance appeared as critical factors determining the status of ecosystem services. Finally, we stress the need to analyse the role of stakeholders and their relationships to foster equal access to ecosystem services. PMID:26201000

  17. Stakeholder Involvement in Brazil. Appendix IX.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    In response to public concerns about mining projects, mechanisms for stakeholder involvement in decisions concerning the licensing process of mining operations have been established. The most popular ones are the public hearings. The environmental regulatory body, Brazilian Institute of the Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (Instituto Brasileiro do Meio Ambiente e dos Recursos Naturais Renováveis, IBAMA), makes use of these events to inform the local community about impacts on the economic, physical and social issues caused by the operation of a mining project. However, by legislation, a uranium mining and processing plant is not regulated solely by the environmental regulator at the state and federal level. The Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear, CNEN) plays the key role as the nuclear regulatory body, and in many situations, it is perceived by local communities, where uranium mining projects are developed, as the main responsible party responding to regulatory issues regarding this type of operation. The situation gets even more complicated when it is seen that uranium mining and processing operations are state owned activities and the independency of the regulatory body (mainly the nuclear regulatory authority) is questioned, or at least put under scrutiny. It is not common for an ‘independent’ organization to be requested to provide regulatory oversight and this undermines the trust the communities may have on the regulatory process carried on regarding that specific operation

  18. Building trust : corporations and their stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, R.I.

    1998-01-01

    The issue of corporate responsibility in terms of societal, economic and environmental matters within the petrochemical sector and the role played in this area by the Council on Economic Priorities (CEP) was discussed. CEP is a non-profit research organization whose mission is to analyse the social and environmental records of corporations in an effort to influence corporate behaviour. CEP campaigns for more communication, more social disclosure and environmentally cleaner corporations. The campaign for cleaner corporations, (C-3), began in 1992 as a public awareness campaign to list the worst environmental performers in the U.S. In the C-3 process, CEP provides recommendations to listed companies and de-lists those which have improved their environmental and social performance. The focus in 1997 was on the petrochemical industry. The overall ranking of 15 major petrochemical companies was provided, along with two case histories illustrating the C-3 process from 'listing' to 'delisting'. Measures used in determining environmental performance for a company include their environmental management policy, environmental impact, environmental reporting and communications, product stewardship and stakeholder relations

  19. Assessing the potential role of concentrated solar power (CSP) for the northeast power system of Brazil using a detailed power system model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fichter, Tobias; Soria, Rafael; Szklo, Alexandre; Schaeffer, Roberto; Lucena, Andre F.P.

    2017-01-01

    One of the technologies that stand out as an alternative to provide additional flexibility to power systems with large penetration of variable renewable energy (VRE), especially for regions with high direct normal irradiation (DNI), is concentrated solar power (CSP) plants coupled to thermal energy storage (TES) and back-up (BUS) systems. Brazil can develop this technology domestically, especially in its Northeast region, where most of VRE capacity is being deployed and where lies most of the CSP potential of the country. This work applies the Capacity Expansion Model REMix-CEM, which allows considering dispatch constraints of thermal power plants in long-term capacity expansion optimization. REMix-CEM calculates the optimal CSP plant configuration and its dispatch strategy from a central planning perspective. Results showed that the hybridization of CSP plants with jurema-preta biomass (CSP-BIO) becomes a least-cost option for Brazil by 2040. CSP-BIO contributes to the Northeast power system by regularizing the energy imbalance that results from the large-scale VRE expansion along with conventional inflexible power plants. CSP-BIO plants are able to increase frequency response and operational reserve services and can provide the required additional flexibility that the Northeast power system of Brazil will require into the future. - Highlights: • Concentrating solar power (CSP) plants provide flexibility to power systems. • CSP configuration is optimized endogenously during capacity expansion optimization. • CSP hybridized with biomass supports grid-integration of variable renewable energy. • CSP become the least-cost option for the Northeast power system of Brazil by 2040.

  20. Stakeholder approach for evaluating organizational change projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltokorpi, Antti; Alho, Antti; Kujala, Jaakko; Aitamurto, Johanna; Parvinen, Petri

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to create a model for evaluating organizational change initiatives from a stakeholder resistance viewpoint. The paper presents a model to evaluate change projects and their expected benefits. Factors affecting the challenge to implement change were defined based on stakeholder theory literature. The authors test the model's practical validity for screening change initiatives to improve operating room productivity. Change initiatives can be evaluated using six factors: the effect of the planned intervention on stakeholders' actions and position; stakeholders' capability to influence the project's implementation; motivation to participate; capability to change; change complexity; and management capability. The presented model's generalizability should be explored by filtering presented factors through a larger number of historical cases operating in different healthcare contexts. The link between stakeholders, the change challenge and the outcomes of change projects needs to be empirically tested. The proposed model can be used to prioritize change projects, manage stakeholder resistance and establish a better organizational and professional competence for managing healthcare organization change projects. New insights into existing stakeholder-related understanding of change project successes are provided.