WorldWideScience

Sample records for stakeholder organizations faculty

  1. Adjunct Faculty as Key Stakeholders in Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, Alison; Ritt, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Institutions of higher learning are expanding their academic reach by offering distance education courses and degree programs. Student demand for distance education continues to grow and so does the need for qualified faculty. The literature presents numerous approaches and best practices regarding new faculty orientation and professional…

  2. Incident Management Organization succession planning stakeholder feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne E. Black

    2013-01-01

    This report presents complete results of a 2011 stakeholder feedback effort conducted for the National Wildfire Coordination Group (NWCG) Executive Board concerning how best to organize and manage national wildland fire Incident Management Teams in the future to meet the needs of the public, agencies, fire service and Team members. Feedback was collected from 858...

  3. Influencing Organizations to Promote Health: Applying Stakeholder Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Gerjo; Gurabardhi, Zamira; Gottlieb, Nell H.; Zijlstra, Fred R. H.

    2015-01-01

    Stakeholder theory may help health promoters to make changes at the organizational and policy level to promote health. A stakeholder is any individual, group, or organization that can influence an organization. The organization that is the focus for influence attempts is called the focal organization. The more salient a stakeholder is and the more…

  4. Stakeholders responses on health maintenance organizations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    National Health Insurance Scheme uses the services of Health Maintenance Organizations to run the scheme. This model of administering a national health insurance scheme is different from how so many other national health insurance programs are run in other parts of the world. The designing of the NHIS to include the ...

  5. Building stakeholder relations online: How nonprofit organizations use dialogic and relational maintenance strategies on Facebook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wissen, N.; Wonneberger, A.

    2017-01-01

    Although Facebook provides organizations with the opportunity to easily engage with stakeholders online, very little is known about the effectiveness of organizational communication strategies. This study examines how nonprofit organizations (NPOs) use Facebook to engage with stakeholders through

  6. Governing for Stakeholders : How Organizations May Create or Destroy Value for their Stakeholders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Vishwanathan (Pushpika)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThis PhD thesis lies at the intersection of stakeholder theory and corporate governance research. Stakeholder theory proposes that firms are best understood as a set of relationships among groups that have a stake in the activities of the firm. Corporate governance research, on the

  7. Key NLRB Decision Opens a Wide Door for Faculty Organizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambash, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    In its stunning and far-reaching decision in the "Pacific Lutheran University" case (12/16/14), the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) opened the door to union organizing among faculty at thousands of private-sector institutions, both secular and religious. The question before the NLRB was whether a local of the Service Employees…

  8. Nurse practitioner faculty research: Results from the 2012 National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Susan Weber; Bloch, Joan Rosen; Westrin, David; Fogg, Louis

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the research capacity and productivity of nurse practitioner (NP) faculty, a study was conducted to describe the types of research that have been and are being completed by National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) members. A web-based survey was developed with input from members of the NONPF Research Special Interest Group and the NONPF Board. This 23-question survey included demographic, academic degree, NP population focus, and research-related questions. Three e-mails were sent to NONPF members over a 10-week period of time (late December 2012 to early February 2013). Respondents (N = 344) in the sample were Advanced Practice Registered Nurses with either a Masters, Doctor of Nursing Practice, DNS or PhD as their highest academic degree. Study results demonstrated that current NP faculty research includes a wide breadth of clinical areas studied, types of methodologies used, variety of funding mechanisms, and successful publication records. Because NP faculty conduct a wide array of research on clinically relevant topics, and demonstrate successful funding and publication track records, they are poised to continue to be leaders in healthcare research. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  9. DO STAKEHOLDERS MATTER IN STRATEGIC DECISION MAKING OF A SPORTS ORGANIZATION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Alexandra Marques Miragaia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify and prioritize the stakeholders involved in making decisions in a sports organization. A multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the influence of the attributes of power, legitimacy and urgency on the salience of the various stakeholders. The results showed a convergence of external and internal decision makers’ perceptions, concerning the three main stakeholder groups: top management, sponsors and member association. Pearson correlations identified four types of stakeholder: definitive, dangerous, demanding and non-stakeholders. A generalized differentiation was also found in stakeholder classification, regarding evaluation of attributes, between external and internal decision makers. In addition, the study suggests the success of organizations’ management will depend on correct identification of stakeholders and consequent assessment of their relevance, in order to highlight who should get priority, and how, in strategic decision making.

  10. Organizing the Global Geodetic Observing System - Structure, Services and Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutterer, Hansjoerg

    2017-04-01

    The Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) is an essential component of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG). It aims at advancing our understanding of the dynamic Earth system by quantifying our planet's changes in space and time. This is based on the mission of GGOS: (1) to provide the observations needed to monitor, map, and understand changes in the Earth's shape, rotation, and mass distribution, (2) to provide the global geodetic frame of reference that is the fundamental backbone for measuring and consistently interpreting key global change processes and for many other scientific and societal applications, and (3) to benefit science and society by providing the foundation upon which advances in Earth and planetary system science and applications are built. For this purpose GGOS works with the IAG components to provide the geodetic infrastructure which is necessary for monitoring the Earth system and for global change research. Obviously, this is a cross-cutting issue both of IAG regarding its commissions, services and inter-comission committees and of external stakeholders. Hence, the structure and the activities of GGOS have to deal with various facets of the establishment, maintenance, operation and further development geodetic observation and data infrastructure such as networks, hardware, standards and products. This presentation gives a general overview of the present state of GGOS. In particular, it focuses on the structure of GGOS which is optimized and streamlined regarding role and purpose of GGOS. Moreover, it outlines feasible results of GGOS for the benefit of IAG and of society.

  11. Balancing management ‘for’ and ‘of’ stakeholders in projects and in temporary organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Annabeth; Eskerod, Pernille; Huemann, Martina

    at links, similarities and dissimilarities is offered. Further, findings from an empirical study on how to combine the stakeholder approaches are presented. Through analysis of sustainability related projects within various industries (consultancy, forest, pollution prevention, railway, and universities......The global developments within society have an impact on all organizations and therefore also on temporary organizations, like projects. However, these temporary organizations are often managed differently than permanent organizations, as projects are more fluid and time restricted. Yet, they still...... need stakeholder resources, e.g. expertise and raw materials, and how this is managed appears to have an impact on the success of the project. This paper addressed the question on how sustainable development can be enhanced by building bridge between two fundamentally different management approaches...

  12. Identification and Categorization of the Stakeholders from an Organization of the Third Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Aparecida de Melo Heinzen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The current article aims at identifying which are the most relevant stakeholders that a NonGovernmental Organization understands as active on its connections net, as well as identifying the type of influence that these actors practice over the Organization. It is about a quantitative and descriptive research, where it has been used the case study strategy with focused interview. The data collection was carried on through a focused interview. The article presents a group of fifteen potential stakeholders of the organization, classifies each of these actors according to its influence over the organization and identifies the agents. The results show that all the stakeholders that are understood as influencers of the organizations inputs are also seen as influenced by their outputs, which characterizes a certain degree of Independence amongst its activities. The article yet shows four distinct types of actors’ categories: discretionary, demanding, irrelevant and dependent. It is verified a predominance of actors classified as discretionary, the ones that are characterized by the high level of their actions recognition, but do not show great meaningfulness on the level of power practiced over the actions.

  13. Understanding institutional stakeholders' perspectives on multidrug-resistant bacterial organism at the end of life: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckel, Maria; Herbst, Franziska A; Adelhardt, Thomas; Tiedtke, Johanna M; Sturm, Alexander; Stiel, Stephanie; Ostgathe, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Information lacks about institutional stakeholders' perspectives on management approaches of multidrug-resistant bacterial organism in end-of-life situations. The term "institutional stakeholder" includes persons in leading positions with responsibility in hospitals' multidrug-resistant bacterial organism management. They have great influence on how strategies on multidrug-resistant bacterial organism management approaches in institutions of the public health system are designed. This study targeted institutional stakeholders' individual perspectives on multidrug-resistant bacterial organism colonization or infection and isolation measures at the end of life. Between March and December 2014, institutional stakeholders of two study centers, a German palliative care unit and a geriatric ward, were queried in semistructured interviews. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed qualitatively with the aid of the software MAXQDA for qualitative data analysis using principles of Grounded Theory. In addition, two external stakeholders were interviewed to enrich data. Key issues addressed by institutional stakeholders (N=18) were the relevance of multidrug-resistant bacterial organism in palliative and geriatric care, contradictions between hygiene principles and patients' and family caregivers' needs and divergence from standards, frame conditions, and reflections on standardization of multidrug-resistant bacterial organism end-of-life care procedures. Results show that institutional stakeholders face a dilemma between their responsibility in protecting third persons and ensuring patients' quality of life. Until further empirical evidence establishes a clear multidrug-resistant bacterial organism management approach in end-of-life care, stakeholders suggest a case-based approach. The institutional stakeholders' perspectives and their suggestion of a case-based approach advance the development process of a patient-, family-, staff-, and institutional

  14. Stakeholder Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flak, Leif Skiftenes; Rose, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    The e-government field, like most young fields, lacks a strong body of well-developed theory. One strategy for coping with theoretical immaturity is to import and adapt theories from other, more mature fields. This study reviews Stakeholder Theory (ST) and investigates its potential in relation...... to e-Government. Originally a management theory, stakeholder theory advocates addressing the concerns of all stakeholders in a firm, as opposed to concentration on the interests of senior managers and stockholders. Apart from the original profit focus, there is no serious conceptual mismatch between...... stakeholder theory and government’s objective of providing policy and services for citizens and organizations – society’s stakeholders. Potential problems with adapting a management theory to a government setting are discussed. The paper further discusses how information technology impacts a stakeholder model...

  15. Multi-stakeholder Governance in Cooperative Organizations: Toward a New Framework for Research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Leviten-Reid

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing popularity of multi-stakeholder cooperatives, social-economy researchers largely predict that these organizations will fail. Using a “cost of decision-making” approach, these researchers conclude that the governance structure of multi-stakeholder cooperatives makes this organizational model fundamentally untenable. In this paper, we review the empirical evidence available on multi-stakeholder cooperatives, which suggests that different groups of actors are able to govern themselves successfully. Consequently, we argue that the literature that has focused on the management of common pool resources by self-organized groups may be an appropriate body of literature in which to root a research program on these social-economy organizations. / Malgré la popularité grandissante des coopératives à multiples intervenants, les chercheurs en économie sociale prédisent que ces organisations essuieront un échec. Grâce à une méthode des coûts pour la prise de décisions, ces chercheurs en viennent à la conclusion que la structure de gouvernance des coopératives à multiples intervenants, par sa nature, en fait un modèle organisationnel indéfendable. Dans cet article, nous examinons les éléments de preuve empiriques disponibles sur les coopératives à multiples intervenants, qui suggèrent que différents groups d’actants peuvent réussir à s’autogérer. Par conséquent, nous discutons du fait que la documentation qui porte sur la gestion des ressources communes par les groupes autogérés pourrait constituer un corpus approprié pour établir un programme de recherche sur ces organisations d’économie sociale.

  16. An Analysis of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR on Stakeholders Loyalty: Perceptions of Malaysian Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmi Mohd Isa, PhD (Hull, UK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR and stakeholder loyalty to the Malaysian organisations. Stakeholder satisfaction was used to measure the mediating effects between CSR and stakeholder loyalty. A developed CSR items were used to measure the CSR of an organisation The research was conducted using online survey to reach 377 organisations that have CSR’s initiatives. Results showed that Malaysian stakeholders were loyal with organisations that have CSR. Stakeholder satisfaction also found to fully mediate the relationship between CSR and stakeholder loyalty. Furthermore, a constructive CSR dimension(s would be better to measure the stakeholders’ relationship. Importantly, the study shows the importance of CSR towards stakeholder loyalty. Once the needs are more clearly identified and understood, organisation will be in a better position to also anticipate stakeholders’ satisfaction in order to gain loyalty from the stakeholders.

  17. THE DESIGN OF PERFORMANCE MONITORING SYSTEMS IN HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATIONS: A STAKEHOLDER PERSPECTIVE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhana, Rima E; Van Caillie, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring hospitals performance is evolving over time in search of more efficiency by integrating additional levels of care, reducing costs and keeping staff up-to-date. To fulfill these three potentially divergent aspects and to monitor performance, healthcare administrators are using dissimilar management control tools. To explain why, we suggest to go beyond traditional contingent factors to assess the role of the different stakeholders that are at the heart of any healthcare organization. We rely first on seminal studies to appraise the role of the main healthcare players and their influence on some organizational attributes. We then consider the managerial awareness and the perception of a suitable management system to promote a strategy-focused organization. Our methodology is based on a qualitative approach of twenty-two case studies, led in two heterogeneous environments (Belgium and Lebanon), comparing the managerial choice of a management system within three different healthcare organizational structures. Our findings allow us to illustrate, for each healthcare player, his positioning within the healthcare systems. Thus, we define how his role, perception and responsiveness manipulate the organization's internal climate and shape the design of the performance monitoring systems. In particular, we highlight the managerial role and influence on the choice of an adequate management system.

  18. The Impact of a National Faculty Development Program Embedded Within an Academic Professional Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Constance D; Gusic, Maryellen E; Chandran, Latha

    2017-08-01

    A sizeable literature describes the effectiveness of institution-based faculty development programs in nurturing faculty educators as scholars, but national programs are less common and seldom evaluated. To fill this role, the Educational Scholars Program (ESP) was created within the Academic Pediatric Association (APA) in 2006. It is a national, three-year, cohort-based certification program focused on fostering educational scholarship. This article describes the development and outcomes of an innovative program embedded within the framework of a national professional organization, and offers a model for potential adaptation by similar organizations to enhance their support of educators.After 10 years, 171 scholars have enrolled in the ESP, and 50 faculty have participated. Scholars are assigned a faculty advisor and participate in three full-day sessions at a national meeting; online, interactive learning modules; and a mentored, scholarly project. The program receives support from the APA in four organizational frames: structural, human resource, political, and symbolic. The self-perceived scholarly proficiency of the scholars in Cohort 1 increased significantly over time, and their productivity and collaborations increased during and after the program. Scholars wrote enthusiastically about their experience in yearly and postprogram evaluations. In interviews, eight past APA presidents explained that the ESP strengthened the APA's mission, created new leaders, and provided a new model for other APA programs. Outcomes of the ESP suggest that a longitudinal faculty development program embedded within a national professional organization can create a social enterprise not only within the organization but also within the broader national community of educator-scholars.

  19. Legitimating New Forms of Organizing and New International Activities in the Eyes of Multiple Stakeholders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    by its multiple stakeholders; and (2) what legitimation strategies it developed and adopted to legitimate itself in the eyes of its multiple stakeholders. Theoretically, the paper is grounded within legitimation theory. The empirical context is defined by a new, international NGO entering an established...

  20. Aviation Technology Life Cycle Management: Importance for Aviation Companies, Aerospace Industry Organizations and Relevant Stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Szabo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper in the introductory part underlines some aspects concerning the importance of Aviation Technology Life Cycle Management and informs on basic international standards for the processes and stages of life cycle. The second part is focused on definition and main objectives of system life cycle management. The authors subsequently inform on system life cycle stages (in general and system life cycle processes according to ISO/IEC/IEEE 15288:2015 standard. Following the fact, that life cycle cost (LCC is inseparable part and has direct connection to the life cycle management, the paper contains brief information regarding to LCC (cost categories, cost breakdown structure, cost estimation a.o.. Recently was issued the first part of Aviation Technology Life Cycle Management monograph (in Slovak: ”Manažment životného cyklu leteckej techniky I”, written by I.Koblen and S.Szabo. Following this fact and direct relation to the topic of article it is a part of article briefly introduced the content of two parts of this monograph (the 2nd part of monograph it has been prepared for the print. The last part of article is focused on issue concerning main assumptions and conditions for successful application of aviation technology life cycle management in aviation companies, aerospace industry organizations as well as from the relevant stakeholders side.

  1. Knowledge and Attitudes of the Faculty of Theology Students on Organ Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürdil Yilmaz, Seher; Opak Yücel, Burcu; Çuhadar, Döndü

    2017-06-01

    The objective in this study is to determine the knowledge and attitudes of the Faculty of Theology students on organ transplantation. The study that was planned as a descriptive study took place between March-May 2014 with the participation of 119 students enrolled at the Faculty of Theology. It was determined as a result of the study that the students see lack of knowledge (49.6%) as the top obstacle for organ transplantation followed by religion (21%), that 52.1% accept that organ transplantation is not forbidden in Islam; that 27.7% agree with the thought that considers it disturbing and unnerving to carry an organ or tissue from another body; that 80.7% agree with the idea stating that organ transplantation should be carried out even if it provides only a possibility for treatment or for prolonging one's life and that 82.4% agree with the opinion that statements in favor of organ transplantation to be declared by the Directorate of Religious Affairs will increase organ transplantation. Clergymen play an important role in affecting the behavior and attitudes of large public masses, and thus it is important that the positive ideas of these individuals with regard to organ donation will thus have indirect but positive effects on the attitudes of the public with regard to organ transplantation. Hence, it is thought that determining the attitudes of clergymen candidates who will educate the public both at schools and at places of prayer and increasing their awareness in this subject will contribute to increasing the awareness of the public with regard to organ donation.

  2. Building a Foundation for Knowledge Co-Creation in Collaborative Water Governance: Dimensions of Stakeholder Networks Facilitated through Bridging Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wietske Medema

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The sustainable governance of water resources relies on processes of multi-stakeholder collaborations and interactions that facilitate the sharing and integration of diverse sources and types of knowledge. In this context, it is essential to fully recognize the importance of fostering and enhancing critical connections within and between networks of relationships between different government and non-government agencies, as well as the dynamics that are in support of the development of new knowledge and practices. In Quebec, a network of watershed organizations (WOs has been put in place to serve as bridging organizations (BOs for stakeholder groups in their watershed territories. Using the WOs as a case study, this research aims to contribute to a greater understanding of how stakeholder groups can be effectively connected to support knowledge co-creation through networked relationships facilitated by BOs. In line with this overall research aim, the following research objectives are proposed: (1 to assess the quality of the knowledge that is developed and shared through the WOs and their stakeholder networks; (2 to determine the characteristics of stakeholders participating in the WOs’ networks that either hinder or support collaborations and knowledge co-creation; (3 to describe the collaborative processes and mechanisms through which the WOs facilitate stakeholder interactions and knowledge co-creation; and (4 to assess the quality of the relationships and interactions between stakeholders participating in the WOs’ collaborative networks. A comprehensive literature review is provided of collaborative network dimensions that are in support of knowledge co-creation that forms the foundation of a research framework to assess knowledge co-creation processes that are facilitated through BOs and their collaborative networks. Documented experiences have been gathered through face-to-face semi-structured interviews, as well as a Quebec-wide survey

  3. STAKEHOLDER DISTRUST - Implications of Distrust Research for Stakeholder Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Laude, Daniel; Weibel, Antoinette; Sachs, Sybille; Schafheitle, Simon Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Stakeholder theory has addressed the role of trust in organization-stakeholder relationships in depth. Although it is similarly relevant, distrust as a distinct construct from (low) trust has received relatively little consideration by stakeholder theorists. Thus, this article focuses on stakeholder distrust and reflects on the findings of distrust research in organizational studies and the implications for stakeholder theory. For this purpose, we conduct a systematic literature review of org...

  4. Determination of the Support Level of Local Organizations in a Model Forest Initiative: Do Local Stakeholders Have Willingness to Be Involved in the Model Forest Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tolunay

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary cooperation and the support of stakeholders carry a major importance in the development of Model Forests. The identification of the support level of local organizations as stakeholders in the Bucak Model Forest initiative, located in the Mediterranean region of Turkey, constitutes the theme of this study. Within this scope, the views of the stakeholders comprising local government units (LGUs, non-governmental organizations (NGOs, village councils (VCs, professional organizations (POs and forest products enterprises (FPEs located in the district of Bucak were collected by utilizing a survey technique. The data were analysed by using non-parametric statistical analyses due to the absence of a normal distribution. The results show that the information provided about the Model Forest concept to the stakeholders located in the district on the Bucak Model Forest initiative was identified as a factor impacting the support level. Moreover, it was also observed that the stakeholders were more willing to provide advisory support rather than financial support. NGOs and VCs were identified as stakeholders who could not provide financial support due to their restricted budgets. We discuss the benefits for a Model Forest initiative of establishing international cooperation to strengthen the local and regional sustainable development process.

  5. Faculty Collaboration: How a Wiki Enhanced Communication, Organization, Accessibility, and Management of Writing a Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Vivian H.; Burnham, Joy J.; Hooper, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Faculty members have collaborated on research studies, manuscripts, books, teaching pedagogies, and ideas for years. From exchanging marked-up paper copies to exchanging email attachments, as technology has progressed so have the techniques and methods of collaborating. However, often, faculty adhere to traditional methods of sharing work and thus…

  6. Assessing stakeholder's experience and sensitivity on key issues for the economic growth of organic aquaculture production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lembo, Giuseppe; Jokumsen, Alfred; Spedicato, Maria Teresa

    2018-01-01

    Participatory management is widely recognised as a working method of paramount importance, based on the principles of knowledge sharing, accountability and legitimacy. Hence, it is broadly considered suitable for addressing issues related to the sustainable development of the seafood industry...... expressed by the participants revealed both competence and awareness, despite the complexity of the subject. Several ideas and useful suggestions emerged regarding unresolved technical issues. In addition, the need for a targeted communication strategy on the quality of organic aquaculture products...... and the necessity of fostering European/national programs to support the production and marketing of organic aquaculture products were highlighted...

  7. E-HRM effectiveness in a public sector organization: a multi-stakeholder perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bondarouk, Tatiana; Ruel, Hubertus Johannes Maria; van der Heijden, Beatrice

    2009-01-01

    Electronic HRM is increasingly gaining importance within working organizations and many of its adherents assume and express its advantages. Scientific support, however, is scarce and there is a lack of clarity regarding the contribution of e-HRM to HRM effectiveness. This article presents results

  8. Audit stakeholder media market: the need for and characteristics of the organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Bardash

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Active Ukraine media market development and its integration into the global market space cause a number of problems faced by scientists and practitioners in the fild of audit organizing of firms that saturate this market sector. The market research problems and organizing business parameters audit in this market are segmental in nature as the vast majority of work media market, accounting of its financial performance and its audit are dealt with separately, thus leaving aside the causal link between the trends of the industry and the specifics of audit of its subjects who in their turn represent different legal forms. The article deals with domestic and foreign experience of media market development for using it as marketing communications tools. The study takes the media companies organizational form as the basis for organizing and holding internal and external audits. The article summarizes the list of domestic audit challenges that accompany media market globalization. Therefore, the system that would efficiently respond to these challenges and, thereby, ensure effective company operation has great significance for the subjects of the media market taking into account their legal status and type of business.

  9. Perspectives on multidrug-resistant organisms at the end of life : A focus group study of staff members and institutional stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Franziska A; Heckel, Maria; Tiedtke, Johanna M; Adelhardt, Thomas; Sturm, Alexander; Stiel, Stephanie; Ostgathe, Christoph

    2018-03-16

    There is a lack of research into how hospital staff and institutional stakeholders (i. e. institutional representatives from public health authorities, hospital hygiene, and the departments of microbiology, palliative care, and geriatrics) engage with patients who are carriers of multidrug-resistant organisms and receiving end-of-life care. Knowledge of their experiences, workload, and needs should be considered in dealing with hospitalized carriers of multidrug-resistant organisms as well as staff education. This study explored and compared staff members' and stakeholders' perspectives on multidrug-resistant organisms and on provision of end-of-life care to carrier patients. In this study four focus groups consisting of hospital staff members and institutional stakeholders were formed within a mixed-methods parent study in a palliative care unit at a university clinic and a geriatric ward of a Catholic and academic teaching hospital. Participants discussed results from staff and stakeholder interviews from a former study phase. Data were analyzed according to Grounded Theory and perspectives of staff members and institutional stakeholders were compared and contrasted. Key issues debated by staff members (N = 19) and institutional stakeholders (N = 10) were 1) the additional workload, 2) reasons for uncertainty about handling carrier patients, 3) the format of continuing education, and 4) the preferred management approach for dealing with multidrug-resistant organism carrier patients. Although similar barriers (e. g. colleagues' ambiguous opinions) were identified, both groups drew different conclusions concerning the management of these barriers. While institutional stakeholders recommended making decisions on hygiene measures under consideration of the specific patient situation, staff members preferred the use of standardized hygiene measures which should be applied uniformly to all patients. Staff members and institutional stakeholders

  10. Northeast Under/graduate Organization for Neuroscience, A Regional Neuroscience Meeting for Undergraduates, Graduate Students, and Faculty

    OpenAIRE

    Frye, Cheryl A.; Edinger, Kassandra L.

    2004-01-01

    The Northeast Under/graduate Organization for Neuroscience (N.E.U.R.O.N.) was established in 1996 to provide a forum for undergraduate and graduate students and faculty in neuroscience to interact with each other. N.E.U.R.O.N. organizes a yearly one-day conference in the Northeast. While scientific meetings exist that serve the purpose of enhancing undergraduate research or neuroscience research, N.E.U.R.O.N. is unique in that it is a small, local conference, aimed specifically at undergradua...

  11. Attitudes and behaviours of students from the faculty of theology regarding organ donation: a study from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naçar, M; Cetinkaya, F; Baykan, Z; Poyrazoğlu, S

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the knowledge and attitude of students from the Faculty of Theology of Erciyes University regarding organ donation. This study comprising all students (n = 264) showed that 51.6% of subjects to the kidney is an organ that may be donated; other organs were less known. 16.5% of the students thought that organ donation is not in accord with Islamic beliefs; 22.0% thought that it is permitted in Islam for Muslims to donate to non-Muslims, and 23.6% were willing to accept organs from non-Muslims. 23.6% of the students were willing to donate their organs, whereas 57.3% were undecided. None of the students had an organ donation card. Among students who did not consider donation or were undecided, 16.5% stated that it was "religiously inappropriate" and 13.3% stated that they did not "approve the loss of body integrity." Students declared that they had little knowledge regarding organ/tissue donation: 67.9% about the religious aspect, 78.9% about the legal aspect, and 80.5% about the scientific aspect. Only 24.6% of the group noted school education as their source of information, with 51.2% stating that they had been questioned about organ donation by society. With this study, we concluded that the student's knowledge regarding organ donation was not sufficient.

  12. Accounting Faculty Internships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Christopher

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Accounting professionals, business college accrediting bodies, and even accounting academics themselves acknowledge that there is a disconnect between academe and the rigors and requirements of the accounting profession. Among the suggestions proposed in the literature to reduce this gap is the faculty internship, where accounting faculty members work within the field as accountants. Heretofore, individual case studies report benefits of such internships that accrue to a variety of stakeholder groups beyond just the faculty intern and include the academic institution, students, and accounting profession through faculty internships. This research seeks wider support for these benefits. This descriptive study involved surveying a sample of accounting faculty members to get their opinions about the benefits and drawbacks of faculty internships, and to determine the level of use of faculty internships in accounting. In all, 128 usable responses were obtained, representing a 14.6% response rate. The results of this study reveal that although most faculty members acknowledge the benefits cited in the literature, too few take advantage of faculty internships.

  13. The structural relationships between organizational commitment, global job satisfaction, developmental experiences, work values, organizational support, and person-organization fit among nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Antonio P; Candela, Lori L; Carver, Lara

    2012-07-01

    GUTIERAIM: The aim of this correlational study was to examine the relations between organizational commitment, perceived organizational support, work values, person-organization fit, developmental experiences, and global job satisfaction among nursing faculty. The global nursing shortage is well documented. At least 57 countries have reported critical shortages. The lack of faculty is finally being recognized as a major issue directly influencing the ability to admit and graduate adequate numbers of nurses. As efforts increase to both recruit and retain faculty, the concept of organizational commitment and what it means to them is important to consider. A cross-sectional correlational design was used. The present study investigated the underlying structure of various organizational factors using structural equation modelling. Data were collected from a stratified random sample of nurse faculty during the academic year 2006-2007. The final model demonstrated that perceived organizational support, developmental experiences, person-organization fit, and global job satisfaction positively predicted nurse faculty's organizational commitment to the academic organization. Cross-validation results indicated that the final full SEM is valid and reliable. Nursing faculty administrators able to use mentoring skills are well equipped to build positive relationships with nursing faculty, which in turn, can lead to increased organizational commitment, productivity, job satisfaction, and perceived organizational support, among others. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Students′ Perception of Organization Culture at a Faculty of Science and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ujhelyi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The current study uses an adapted version of Cameron and Quinn’s OCAI questionnaire to test the organisational culture of the Faculty of Science and Technology at the University of Debrecen, Hungary, as it is perceived by its students, and also to discover what type of organisational culture the same students think would be ideal for them. An additional objective of this paper is to identify possible gaps between the perceived and the ideal cultures expressed by the students. Our sample includes 128 questionnaires completed by bachelor students from 6 different majors at the faculty. According to our results, the respondents perceive to a significant degree that the faculty’s organisational culture is at an average level of clan, market and hierarchy cultures, while it also exhibits a relatively low level of the adhocracy culture. Their ideal faculty culture would be one with average adhocracy, average hierarchy, high clan and low market features. Significant gaps are identified between the perceived and ideal cultures in all the four types: students would prefer an increase in clan and adhocracy cultures, and a decrease in the other two cultures.

  15. A Tool to Assess and Compare Knowledge Mobilization Efforts of Faculties of Education, Research Brokering Organizations, Ministries of Education, and School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    There are few tools that exist to measure knowledge mobilization (KMb), the process of connecting research to policy and practice across diverse organizations and sectors. This article reports on a comparison of KMb efforts of 105 educational organizations: faculties of education (N = 21), research brokering organizations (N = 44), school…

  16. Engaging stakeholder networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svendsen, A. [CoreRelation Consulting Inc., Delta, BC (Canada)]|[Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada); Laberge, M. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Management philosophies concerning stakeholder engagement were reviewed. This presentation provided guidelines for managers working from a sustainability value creation framework who wish to develop more effective ways to engage with stakeholders and high stakes issues that cross political, social and organizational boundaries. It was suggested that conflicts over resources, the demand for participation and the increasing power of Non-Governmental Organizations have all contributed to the increased need for stakeholder engagement. A review of different types of stakeholders was provided. Earlier strategies of managing stakeholders were examined, in which externalities such as environmental cost were not accounted for. By contrast, the emerging management philosophy presented here stressed a recognition that long term survival relied on the good health of external and internal environments. Core business strategies were discussed with reference to core values. It was suggested that a longer term focus, inclusiveness, and integration were beneficial to businesses as a whole. A case study of Clayoquot Sound was presented. The concept of social capital was examined. Individual and collective learning were evaluated. A model for engaging stakeholder networks was presented as well as a step by step procedural guide, which included the creation of a solid foundation; organizational alignment; strategy; the importance of asking questions; trust building; evaluation; and renewal. Challenges to stakeholder engagement included finding resources; ensuring consistency; patience; a tendency in business to measure success in short term payoffs; and maintaining a stakeholder perspective. It was concluded that the benefits of a sustainability value creation framework for businesses far outweighed any initial disadvantages. refs., tabs., figs.

  17. Faculty of Dentistry, Kuwait University, designated as a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Primary Oral Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbehani, J M

    2014-01-01

    The Faculty of Dentistry, Kuwait University, was designated as a World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Primary Oral Health Care (POHC) in 2011. This article aimed to describe the following: (1) the background for this nomination, (2) the WHO Collaborating Centre for POHC, its terms of reference and 5 activities, (3) the primary health care concept as it was established in Alma-Ata, (4) the oral health situation in Kuwait and in the Middle-East region and, finally, (5) how POHC policy should be implemented in Kuwait and this region. It can be concluded that, because the caries experience is very high in Kuwait and in the other countries of the Eastern Mediterranean region, good POHC programmes should be designed and implemented in this region. The Faculty of Dentistry will strengthen its research tradition and as a WHO Collaborating Centre for POHC will try to collect information and experience from POHC in this region and exchange ideas between POHC experts in this region on how these programmes could be further developed. This will happen according to the terms of reference and activity plans of the WHO Collaborating Centre for POHC approved by the WHO Global Oral Health Programme. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Faculty of Dentistry, Kuwait University, Designated as a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Primary Oral Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbehani, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The Faculty of Dentistry, Kuwait University, was designated as a World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Primary Oral Health Care (POHC) in 2011. This article aimed to describe the following: (1) the background for this nomination, (2) the WHO Collaborating Centre for POHC, its terms of reference and 5 activities, (3) the primary health care concept as it was established in Alma-Ata, (4) the oral health situation in Kuwait and in the Middle-East region and, finally, (5) how POHC policy should be implemented in Kuwait and this region. It can be concluded that, because the caries experience is very high in Kuwait and in the other countries of the Eastern Mediterranean region, good POHC programmes should be designed and implemented in this region. The Faculty of Dentistry will strengthen its research tradition and as a WHO Collaborating Centre for POHC will try to collect information and experience from POHC in this region and exchange ideas between POHC experts in this region on how these programmes could be further developed. This will happen according to the terms of reference and activity plans of the WHO Collaborating Centre for POHC approved by the WHO Global Oral Health Programme. PMID:24504110

  19. Stakeholders' perception on the organization of chronic care: a SWOT analysis to draft avenues for health care reforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Durme, Thérèse; Macq, Jean; Anthierens, Sibyl; Symons, Linda; Schmitz, Olivier; Paulus, Dominique; Van den Heede, Koen; Remmen, Roy

    2014-04-18

    Adequate care for individuals living with chronic illnesses calls for a healthcare system redesign, moving from acute, disease-centered to patient-centered models. The aim of this study was to identify Belgian stakeholders' perceptions on the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the healthcare system for people with chronic diseases in Belgium. Four focus groups were held with stakeholders from the micro and meso level, in addition to two interviews with stakeholders who could not attend the focus group sessions. Data collection and the discussion were based on the Chronic Care model. Thematic analysis of the transcripts allowed for the identification of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the current health care system with focus on chronic care. Informants stressed the overall good quality of the acute health care system and the level of reimbursement of care as an important strength of the current system. In contrast, the lack of integration of care was identified as one of the biggest weaknesses of today's health care system, along with the unclear definitions of the roles and functions of health professionals involved in care processes. Patient education to support self-management exists for patients with diabetes and/or terminal kidney failure but not for those living with other or multiple chronic conditions. The current overall fee-for-service system is a barrier to integrated care, as are the lack of incentives for integrated care. Attending multidisciplinary meetings, for example, is underfinanced to date. Finally, clinical information systems lack interoperability, which further impedes the information flow across settings and disciplines. Our study's methods allowed for the identification of problematic domains in the health system for people living with chronic conditions. These findings provided useful insights surrounding perceived priorities. This methodology may inspire other countries faced with the challenge of

  20. Stakeholder Dissonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauesen, Linne Marie

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to investigate the question of whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) can be used as a link of trust between business and society, and which role CSR plays in recovering distrust in businesses. It uses a mixed methods study of processes of moving businesses...... within the Danish water sector from a general trust-breakdown to trust recovery from 2003 to 2013. Trust recovery is found to depend on stakeholders’ mutual engagement with each other and their willingness to share knowledge and learn from each other’s professional and institutional cultures....... This chapter suggests a theoretical extension of Bogenschneider and Corbett’s (2010) Community Dissonance Theory to embrace multiple stakeholders each having their own complex and unique culture and communication modus based on their institutional, professional or individual comprehensive language universes...

  1. Qualitative Assessment of a 3D Simulation Program: Faculty, Students, and Bio-Organic Reaction Animations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günersel, Adalet B.; Fleming, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that computer-based simulations and animations are especially helpful in fields such as chemistry where concepts are abstract and cannot be directly observed. Bio-Organic Reaction Animations (BioORA) is a freely available 3D visualization software program developed to help students understand the chemistry of biomolecular events.…

  2. Organs-on-Chips in Drug Development: The Importance of Involving Stakeholders in Early Health Technology Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelkamp, Heleen H.T.; van der Meer, Andries Dirk; Hummel, J. Marjan; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Mummery, Christine Lindsay; Passier, Petrus Christianus Johannes Josephus; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    2016-01-01

    Organs-on-chips are three-dimensional, microfluidic cell culture systems that simulate the function of tissues and organ subunits. Organ-on-chip systems are expected to contribute to drug candidate screening and the reduction of animal tests in preclinical drug development and may increase

  3. Faculty Internships for Hospitality Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Christine; Hales, Jonathan A; Wiener, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Internships can help hospitality faculty build industry relationships while also ensuring the best and most current training for their students. Many hospitality organizations have structured faculty internships available or are willing to work with faculty to provide individualized internship opportunities. Career and technical educators in…

  4. Corporate communications and stakeholder management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Mira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporate communications represent a modern communications discipline used by businesses across the globe to communicate with key stakeholders. Chief executive officers and executive management teams strive to create, protect and advance corporate reputation through corporate communications. Further, by communicating with key stakeholders the company adequately prepares for good news and future problems. With the benefit of technology and greater transparency, corporations of the future will continue to use corporate communications approaches to advance their business. Company's reputation derives from the way stakeholders perceive the organization, how they think, feel or act towards it. It is therefore vital that organizations interested in developing and building their reputational capital; pay careful attention to the way they are perceived and that they manage the relationships with their various stakeholders like a strategic resource. Stakeholders represent both opportunity and threat for the organizations. For instance, if an institution has a good reputation with stakeholders they may provide the organization more latitude to operate. On the other hand a poor reputation may result in creating the legislative that can make it more difficult for an institution to operate.

  5. Addressing issues raised by stakeholders: impacts on process, content and behaviour in the case of the Canadian nuclear waste management organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaver, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight how stakeholder input has shaped the work of the Canadian Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) in both process and content. In 2002, NWMO was mandated by the Government of Canada to undertake a study of different approaches for the long-term management of used nuclear fuel, and to recommend an approach to the Government by November 15, 2005. Public consultations are an important part of this legislated mandate. In inviting broad dialogue and feedback from the public at large, experts, and other communities of interest, NWMO intends that its processes, the study and its recommendations will reflect the values and perspectives of Canadian society. The organization has adopted a reflective study approach, through which it deliberately seeks public input at each stage of study. A continuum of engagement activities provides for dynamic interaction between the engagement processes and the research and analysis. The insights gained from engagement are integrated into the NWMO's study, to continuously enrich the iterative learning process. NWMO has received a wide range of comments, insights and questions from face-to-face discussions, workshops, round-tables, written submissions and public opinion research. The sections that follow illustrate how this stakeholder input has helped to shape the organisation's public engagement plans, work-plan and the focus of the assessment that is now in progress. Going forward, issues and comments provided by different communities of interest will assist the assessment of the management approaches and help design NWMO's recommendation to the Government of Canada. (author)

  6. Outcomes-Based Funding and Stakeholder Engagement. Lumina Issue Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlec, Alison; Shelton, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the key aspects of stakeholder engagement that can strengthen the design, implementation and sustainability of outcomes-based funding policies. We seek to help policymakers understand the prevailing starting-point attitudes of institutional stakeholders, primarily college and university administrators, faculty and staff, and…

  7. The Service Learning Projects: Stakeholder Benefits and Potential Class Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutti, Raina M.; LaBonte, Joanne; Helms, Marilyn Michelle; Hervani, Aref Agahei; Sarkarat, Sy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to summarize the benefits of including a service learning project in college classes and focusses on benefits to all stakeholders, including students, community, and faculty. Design/methodology/approach: Using a snowball approach in academic databases as well as a nominal group technique to poll faculty, key…

  8. Evaluating stakeholder management performance using a stakeholder report card: the next step in theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvey, Donna; Fottler, Myron D; Slovensky, Donna J

    2002-01-01

    In the highly competitive health care environment, the survival of an organization may depend on how well powerful stakeholders are managed. Yet, the existing strategic stakeholder management process does not include evaluation of stakeholder management performance. To address this critical gap, this paper proposes a systematic method for evaluation using a stakeholder report card. An example of a physician report card based on this methodology is presented.

  9. Gender Incongruence of Childhood: Clinical Utility and Stakeholder Agreement with the World Health Organization's Proposed ICD-11 Criteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titia F Beek

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO is revising the tenth version of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10. This includes a reconceptualization of the definition and positioning of Gender Incongruence of Childhood (GIC. This study aimed to: 1 collect the views of transgender individuals and professionals regarding the retention of the diagnosis; 2 see if the proposed GIC criteria were acceptable to transgender individuals and health care providers; 3 compare results between two countries with two different healthcare systems to see if these differences influence opinions regarding the GIC diagnosis; and 4 determine whether healthcare providers from high-income countries feel that the proposed criteria are clinically useful and easy to use. A total of 628 participants were included in the study: 284 from the Netherlands (NL; 45.2%, 8 from Flanders (Belgium; 1.3%, and 336 (53.5% from the United Kingdom (UK. Most participants were transgender people (or their partners/relatives; TG (n = 522, 89 participants were healthcare providers (HCPs and 17 were both HCP and TG individuals. Participants completed an online survey developed for this study. Overall, the majority response from transgender participants (42.9% was that if the diagnosis would be removed from the mental health chapter it should also be removed from the ICD-11 completely, while 33.6% thought it should remain in the ICD-11. Participants were generally satisfied with other aspects of the proposed ICD-11 GIC diagnosis: most TG participants (58.4% thought the term Gender Identity Disorder should change, and most thought Gender Incongruence was an improvement (63.0%. Furthermore, most participants (76.1% did not consider GIC to be a psychiatric disorder and placement in a separate chapter dealing with Gender and Sexual Health (the majority response in the NL and selected by 37.5% of the TG participants overall or as a Z-code (the majority response

  10. Anti-Racist Pedagogy: From Faculty's Self-Reflection to Organizing within and beyond the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Kyoko

    2018-01-01

    This article is a synthesis of my own work as well as a critical reading of the key literature in anti-racist pedagogy. Its purpose is to define anti-racist pedagogy and what applying this to courses and the fullness of our professional lives entails. I argue that faculty need to be aware of their social position, but more importantly, to begin…

  11. Salisbury State College Faculty Handbook. 1974-1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury State Coll., MD.

    The Salisbury State College's faculty handbook details the college's history and organization; personnel, academic and administrative policies and procedures; and the college services available to the faculty. (JMF)

  12. Project stakeholder management

    CERN Document Server

    Eskerod, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    Carrying out a project as planned is not a guarantee for success. Projects may fail because project management does not take the requirements, wishes and concerns of stakeholders sufficiently into account. Projects can only be successful though contributions from stakeholders. And in the end, it is the stakeholders that evaluate whether they find that the project is a success. To manage stakeholders effectively, you need to know your stakeholders, their behaviours and attitudes towards the project. In Project Stakeholder Management, the authors give guidance on how to adopt an analytical and s

  13. Restoring Faculty Vitality in Academic Medicine When Burnout Threatens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Darshana T; Williams, Valerie N; Thorndyke, Luanne E; Marsh, E Eugene; Sonnino, Roberta E; Block, Steven M; Viggiano, Thomas R

    2017-11-21

    Increasing rates of burnout-with accompanying stress and lack of engagement-among faculty, residents, students, and practicing physicians have caused alarm in academic medicine. Central to the debate among academic medicine's stakeholders are oft-competing issues of social accountability; cost containment; effectiveness of academic medicine's institutions; faculty recruitment, retention, and satisfaction; increasing expectations for faculty; and mission-based productivity.The authors propose that understanding and fostering what contributes to faculty and institutional vitality is central to preventing burnout during times of change. They first look at faculty vitality and how it is threatened by burnout, to provide a framework for a greater understanding of faculty well-being. Then they draw on higher education literature to determine how vitality is defined in academic settings and what factors affect faculty vitality within the context of academic medicine. Next, they propose a model to explain and examine faculty vitality in academic medicine, followed by a discussion of the need for a greater understanding of faculty vitality. Finally, the authors offer conclusions and propose future directions to promote faculty vitality.The authors encourage institutional decision makers and other stakeholders to focus particular attention on the evolving expectations for faculty, the risk of extensive faculty burnout, and the opportunity to reduce burnout by improving the vitality and resilience of these talented and crucial contributors. Faculty vitality, as defined by the institution, has a critical role in ensuring future institutional successes and the capacity for faculty to thrive in a complex health care economy.

  14. COMMUNICATION STRATEGY ABOUT BUSINESS MODELS: STAKEHOLDERS PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojoagă Alexandru

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Organizations inform stakeholders about their current and future activities, processes, created value, strategic intentions, and other information that may influence the established relationships. Organizations choose to communicate with stakeholders by different means and in varied ways. The annual report represents a way of communicating between companies and their stakeholders, and it is offering comprehensive information about how companies operates and creates value. The business model is an emerging concept in management literature and practice. The concept describes the logic by which a organization creates, maintains and delivers value for its stakeholders. Through annual reports organisations can communicate to stakeholders information about their business models.We investigated how information about business models is explicitly communicated through annual reports, and how this information is reffering to stakeholders. Our paper aims to reveal which stakeholders are more often mentioned when organizations are communicating about business models through annual reports. This approach shows the attention degree given by organizations to stakeholders. We perceived this from a strategic point of view, as a strategic signal. Thus, we considered if the stakeholder is mentioned more frequent in the communicated message it has a greater role in communication strategy about business model. We conducted an exploratory research and have realized a content analysis.The analysed data consist in over a thousand annual reports from 96 organizations. We analysed the informations transmitted by organizations through annual reports. The annual reports were for a time period of 12 years. Most of the selected companies are multi-business, and are operating in different industries. The results show the stakeholder’s hierarchy based on how often they were mentioned in the communicated messages about business models through annual reports. Based on our

  15. A Study of Crisis Management Based on Stakeholders Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qingchun, Yue

    2017-11-01

    From the view of stakeholder theory, not only the enterprises should provide services to shareholders, but also take care of the demands of stakeholders. Stakeholders for the enterprise crisis are the organizations and individuals, which cause crisis, respond to the crisis and affected by the enterprise crisis. In this paper, first of all, to comb the development of stakeholder theory systematically; secondly, with the help of the enterprise crisis stakeholder analysis model, analyze the concept of stakeholders for the enterprise crisis and membership, and with the example of Shuanghui Group for further analysis; finally, we put forward relevant proposals for the enterprise crisis from the view of stakeholders.

  16. Managing Diverse Stakeholders

    OpenAIRE

    Pipkin, Erin; Porter, Sean; Clark, Rickie

    2017-01-01

    For every public project, there is a diverse group of stakeholders who need and want information. During this session we outline important stakeholders, how and when to involve them in the planning process, and how targeted messaging might be the key to your project’s success. We also discuss how to identify and manage stakeholders who oppose your project.

  17. Stakeholder Engagement Through Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etter, Michael; Castello, Itziar

    The introduction of new information and communication technologies such social media platforms in organizations results in a new emerging logic of stakeholder engagement around sustainable development issues. We investigate how middle managers of a pharmaceutical corporation navigate between two...... competing logics of stakeholder engagement: the current (influence logic) and the new logic underlying social media (logic of community). With a longitudinal study of 26 months we observe how engagements failed since managers were not able to integrate certain symbolic and substantive elements of the new...... introduced by social media....

  18. Stakeholder Risk Management in Ethical Decision Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauesen, Linne Marie

    Stakeholder management has for the last three decades been concerned either with strategic business management or business ethics, values and quality. Many models have been developed, but recently the literature asks for more dynamic models instead of the staticism that characterizes some models....... This paper offers an ‘Organic Stakeholder Model’ based on decision making theory, risk assessment and adaption to a rapidly changing world combined with appropriate stakeholder theory for ethical purposes in decision making processes in businesses. The ‘Organic Stakeholder Model’ is based on empirical...... evidence from hybrid organizations as Publicly Owned Enterprises (POEs) mixed of private corporations and political administration. The model offers a new way of combining risk management with ethical decisionmaking processes by the inclusion of multiple stakeholders. Not only does the model apply...

  19. Mapeamento de stakeholders sob a perspectiva da sustentabilidade: uma desk research com organizações gaúchas/ Mapping stakeholders from the sustainability perspective: a desk research with organizations in Rio Grande do Sul - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minelle Enéas da Silva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A sustentabilidade tem recebido destaque nas discussões empresariais a partir do conceito do Triple Bottom Line (social, ambiental e econômico. Com esta perspectiva e a necessidade de compreender os envolvidos (em projetos ou na cadeia de suprimentos, por exemplo para que seja possível a inserção desta temática entre as formas de gestão, o objetivo do estudo é mapear os stakeholders envolvidos com sustentabilidade em relação à cadeia de suprimentos de duas organizações, Mercur S/A e Ecocitrus. O método baseou-se na pesquisa documental, com a finalidade de buscar os atores mais representativos para as organizações selecionadas. A partir da grande quantidade de interações, o levantamento demonstrou que as organizações possuem boas relações voltadas para sua atuação no mercado, as quais em sua maioria foram analisadas a partir da ótica da sustentabilidade. Dentre os resultados, pode-se ratificar que a integração entre os elos torna facilitada a disseminação e prática da sustentabilidade entre os atores de cada cadeia de suprimentos. Com isso, o mapeamento nas duas organizações focais fornece uma importante base para que estudos posteriores possam ser elaborados, por suas contribuições à adoção de práticas sustentáveis em toda a cadeia de suprimentos. Palavras-Chave: Cadeia de suprimentos; Stakeholders; Sustentabilidade; Mercur; Ecocitrus.

  20. Accountability in Community Colleges Using Stakeholder Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Paula R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to analyze stakeholder theory and its applicability to community college accountability. Community colleges have been using strategic planning as a management approach that includes the process of strategic action, and many organizations claim that they collaborate with their stakeholders during this process.…

  1. Overcoming Faculty Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaff, Jerry G.

    1978-01-01

    Teaching improvement and institutional renewal efforts often face pessimism about change, if not suspicion and resistance, but faculty teams can overcome these problems through an action-oriented but low-profile "organic" approach. The need for personal invitations by colleagues is shown. (Author/LBH)

  2. Mid-career faculty development in academic medicine: How does it impact faculty and institutional vitality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, MaryAnn W; Bhasin, Robina M; Beaudette, Donald J; Shann, Mary H; Benjamin, Emelia J

    2016-09-01

    Faculty vitality is integral to the advancement of higher education. Strengthening vitality is particularly important for mid-career faculty, who represent the largest and most dissatisfied segment. The demands of academic medicine appear to be another factor that may put faculty at risk of attrition. To address these issues, we initiated a ten-month mid-career faculty development program. A mixed-methods quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the program's impact on faculty and institutional vitality. Pre/post surveys compared participants with a matched reference group. Quantitative data were augmented by interviews and focus groups with multiple stakeholders. At the program's conclusion, participants showed statistically significant gains in knowledge, skills, attitudes, and connectivity when compared to the referents. Given that mid-career faculty development in academic medicine has not been extensively studied, our evaluation provides a useful perspective to guide future initiatives aimed at enhancing the vitality and leadership capacity of mid-career faculty.

  3. Combining Human Resource and Stakeholder Management Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravazzani, Silvia; Mormino, Sara

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores collaborative learning activities involving HR and external stakeholders that organizations decide to plan and implement in order to obtain benefits in terms of knowledge sharing, stakeholder understanding and value creation. The increasing uncertainty and multiplicity...... of competitive pressures and stakeholder demands (Harrison, St. John, 1996) require organizations, and in particular HR, to take on a more strategic role aimed to build new capability and support the overarching business strategy (Ulrich, Beatty 2001). This study draws on Strategic Human Resource Management......, Strategic Human Resource Development and Stakeholder Management studies and, on this basis, investigates the case of an Italian bank to understand the nature and characteristics of collaborative learning activities towards external stakeholders. The investigation supports the proposition that HR development...

  4. Drake University Faculty Manual. Revised, Fall 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake Univ., Des Moines, IA.

    The current Drake University faculty handbook contains information on the organization and administration of the institution including the faculty, the institutional government, the academic staff, academic rank, and academic freedom. Faculty responsibilities and relationships listed include the academic responsibilities and student-teacher…

  5. Stakeholder Relationships in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Juha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a stakeholder map to describe the most important stakeholders and the process of stakeholder relationships in higher education. According to the perspective of the balanced scorecard, the classification of stakeholders integrates stakeholders into strategic management. Stakeholder maps are essential in…

  6. Corporate Stakeholding and Globalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauesen, Linne Marie

    2016-01-01

    , the global warming, the disasters of global consumerism in terms of the collapse of the Rana Plaza factory in the fashion industry, are examples of how the stakeholder concept cannot continue to be defined as narrow as corporations usually does. The butterfly effect of globalism has shown to be – yes, global...... how to revise the stakeholder concept according to corporate responsibility, company stakeholding and globalism. It points to shortcomings in various global trade systems such as banking, fashion and IT markets, and through these it suggests and discusses a new way of defining the stakeholder concept...

  7. Stakeholder analysis: a useful tool for biobank planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjugn, Roger; Casati, Bettina

    2012-06-01

    Stakeholders are individuals, groups, or organizations that are affected by or can affect a particular action undertaken by others. Biobanks relate to a number of donors, researchers, research institutions, regulatory bodies, funders, and others. These stakeholders can potentially have a strong influence upon the organization and operation of a biobank. A sound strategy for stakeholder engagement is considered essential in project management and organization theory. In this article, we review relevant stakeholder theory and demonstrate how a stakeholder analysis was undertaken in the early stage of a planned research biobank at a public hospital in Norway.

  8. Building Communities of Practice through Faculty Mentorship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lari, Pooneh; Barton, Denise H.

    2017-01-01

    Building an effective mentoring program for community college faculty is a complex and multifaceted task. There are multiple layers of stakeholders and levels of involvement, which at times makes navigating the mentoring relationships challenging and complicates the decision of what types of information to provide to the faculty as part of their…

  9. Keterlibatan Event Stakeholders pada Keberhasilan Event Pr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidya Wati Evelina

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to determine how event organizers collaborate with stakeholders including the media, particular community, sponsors, participants, venue providers, accommodation providers, carteres, legal and finance personnel, production, local trade, transportation providers, government and associations for implementation Public Relations event. This paper discusses about the things that must be done for the cooperation and the benefits of cooperation undertaken. The method used in this paper is qualitative research method based on observations, literature and case studies. The results of this research note that the event organizers or companies can together with the stakeholders (the other party make an event as mutually beneficial Public Relations. This means that all parties can achieve through the event. At the conclusion of an event Public Relations, all stakeholders involved for their own purposes. Event organizer must ensure that all stakeholders work together effectively in accordance with the agreed schedule and budget. One important feature of the agreement is to maintain a good flow of communication according to the needs of its stakeholders. All information is documented to avoid misunderstandings. Collaboration between stakeholders continuously until the event is completed. Discussion of issues that arise during the event takes place between the committee with various stakeholders is an important thing for the evaluation and response to the events that occurred. 

  10. Evaluating the oil sands reclamation process: Assessing policy capacity and stakeholder access for government and non-governmental organizations operating in Alberta's oil sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Tyler

    By employing interpretive policy analysis this thesis aims to assess, measure, and explain policy capacity for government and non-government organizations involved in reclaiming Alberta's oil sands. Using this type of analysis to assess policy capacity is a novel approach for understanding reclamation policy; and therefore, this research will provide a unique contribution to the literature surrounding reclamation policy. The oil sands region in northeast Alberta, Canada is an area of interest for a few reasons; primarily because of the vast reserves of bitumen and the environmental cost associated with developing this resource. An increase in global oil demand has established incentive for industry to seek out and develop new reserves. Alberta's oil sands are one of the largest remaining reserves in the world, and there is significant interest in increasing production in this region. Furthermore, tensions in several oil exporting nations in the Middle East remain unresolved, and this has garnered additional support for a supply side solution to North American oil demands. This solution relies upon the development of reserves in both the United States and Canada. These compounding factors have contributed to the increased development in the oil sands of northeastern Alberta. Essentially, a rapid expansion of oil sands operations is ongoing, and is the source of significant disturbance across the region. This disturbance, and the promises of reclamation, is a source of contentious debates amongst stakeholders and continues to be highly visible in the media. If oil sands operations are to retain their social license to operate, it is critical that reclamation efforts be effective. One concern non-governmental organizations (NGOs) expressed criticizes the current monitoring and enforcement of regulatory programs in the oil sands. Alberta's NGOs have suggested the data made available to them originates from industrial sources, and is generally unchecked by government

  11. Stakeholder engagement in dredged material management decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Zachary A; Bates, Matthew E; Wood, Matthew D; Linkov, Igor

    2014-10-15

    Dredging and disposal issues often become controversial with local stakeholders because of their competing interests. These interests tend to manifest themselves in stakeholders holding onto entrenched positions, and deadlock can result without a methodology to move the stakeholder group past the status quo. However, these situations can be represented as multi-stakeholder, multi-criteria decision problems. In this paper, we describe a case study in which multi-criteria decision analysis was implemented in a multi-stakeholder setting in order to generate recommendations on dredged material placement for Long Island Sound's Dredged Material Management Plan. A working-group of representatives from various stakeholder organizations was formed and consulted to help prioritize sediment placement sites for each dredging center in the region by collaboratively building a multi-criteria decision model. The resulting model framed the problem as several alternatives, criteria, sub-criteria, and metrics relevant to stakeholder interests in the Long Island Sound region. An elicitation of values, represented as criteria weights, was then conducted. Results show that in general, stakeholders tended to agree that all criteria were at least somewhat important, and on average there was strong agreement on the order of preferences among the diverse groups of stakeholders. By developing the decision model iteratively with stakeholders as a group and soliciting their preferences, the process sought to increase stakeholder involvement at the front-end of the prioritization process and lead to increased knowledge and consensus regarding the importance of site-specific criteria. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. India: using stakeholder analysis to forecast success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Y; Chaudhury, N R; Vasudev, N

    1999-01-01

    This article presents the use of stakeholder analysis to examine the efficacy of health reform programs in India. Stakeholder analysis assists planners in identifying groups affected by proposed activities, their reactions to prospective changes, and the roles they might play in supporting or opposing them. Such information is then used to develop strategies involving national and local officials and communities in reform. Stakeholder analysis was used by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) for the proposed Women's and Children's Health (WACH) project. It involved interviews among major stakeholders regarding their views on the effectiveness of the current health system, the new roles that health care organizations and individuals would have after changes in service delivery under WACH, and their institutional capacity to handle new roles. In addition to stakeholder analysis, three other tools are available to policy managers and health sector reform teams to help them manage and influence the process of health sector reform: 1) institutional mapping, which involves identification and analysis of an organization's structure; 2) political mapping through graphic display of sources and degrees of political support and opposition; and 3) interest mapping, a combination of stakeholder analysis and political mapping. With the use of stakeholder analysis, USAID was provided with crucial information for the evaluation of community support and success capability of the WACH project.

  13. Combining Human Resource and Stakeholder Management Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravazzani, Silvia; Mormino, Sara

    2015-01-01

    of competitive pressures and stakeholder demands (Harrison, St. John, 1996) require organizations, and in particular HR, to take on a more strategic role aimed to build new capability and support the overarching business strategy (Ulrich, Beatty 2001). This study draws on Strategic Human Resource Management......, Strategic Human Resource Development and Stakeholder Management studies and, on this basis, investigates the case of an Italian bank to understand the nature and characteristics of collaborative learning activities towards external stakeholders. The investigation supports the proposition that HR development...... and corporate learning in a stakeholder-oriented perspective can play a strategic role in supporting business strategy, providing organizations the resources to meet internal and external needs (Wilson, 2005) and to interconnect with their value network....

  14. Stakeholder Attitudes EBM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) conducted a survey of fisheries stakeholders on the Gulf and East Coasts of the United States seeking their views on...

  15. Stakeholders: theory and practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedman, Andrew L; Miles, Samantha

    2006-01-01

    ... of the concept on practice and policy. However, as the concept has become more popular, the path has become tangled with the many different ways the concept has been used. For example, different practices have come to be called stakeholder activities, particularly by those seeking to use the label to legitimize their actions. Also, a range of different definitions as to what a stakeholder is has emerged. Concentrating on these issues encourages a view of a second future path of the stake...

  16. Universities as Inclusive Learning Organizations for Women?: Considering the Role of Women in Faculty and Leadership Roles in Academe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouthro, Patricia; Taber, Nancy; Brazil, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of the learning organization, first discussed by Senge (1990), to determine if it can work as a model in the higher education sector. Design/methodology/approach: Using a critical feminist framework, this paper assesses the possibilities and challenges of viewing universities as…

  17. Defining Campus Violence: A Phenomenological Analysis of Community Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Matthew J.; Caldwell, Rebecca J.; Goldman, Emily Grey

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to derive an empirically based understanding of campus violence. Grounded in a communication paradigm offered by sociolinguistic scholars, we adopted a phenomenological approach for conducting and analyzing 23 interviews from campus community stakeholders, including students, staff, faculty, administrators, and…

  18. Stakeholder approach for evaluating organizational change projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltokorpi, Antti; Alho, Antti; Kujala, Jaakko; Aitamurto, Johanna; Parvinen, Petri

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to create a model for evaluating organizational change initiatives from a stakeholder resistance viewpoint. The paper presents a model to evaluate change projects and their expected benefits. Factors affecting the challenge to implement change were defined based on stakeholder theory literature. The authors test the model's practical validity for screening change initiatives to improve operating room productivity. Change initiatives can be evaluated using six factors: the effect of the planned intervention on stakeholders' actions and position; stakeholders' capability to influence the project's implementation; motivation to participate; capability to change; change complexity; and management capability. The presented model's generalizability should be explored by filtering presented factors through a larger number of historical cases operating in different healthcare contexts. The link between stakeholders, the change challenge and the outcomes of change projects needs to be empirically tested. The proposed model can be used to prioritize change projects, manage stakeholder resistance and establish a better organizational and professional competence for managing healthcare organization change projects. New insights into existing stakeholder-related understanding of change project successes are provided.

  19. Involving stakeholders and developing a policy for stakeholder involvement in the European network for health technology assessment, EUnetHTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Camilla Palmhøj; Lauritsen, Sarah Wadmann; Kristensen, Finn Børlum; Bistrup, Marie Louise; Cecchetti, Americo; Turk, Eva

    2009-12-01

    This article explains how the issue of stakeholder involvement was addressed in the European network for Health Technology Assessment (EUnetHTA) Project and describes the structures of future stakeholder involvement in the EUnetHTA Collaboration. Initiatives led to a dialogue with stakeholders and exchanging views and expectations on health technology assessment (HTA) processes and the future development of EUnetHTA. The methods of involving different stakeholder groups in EUnetHTA included general information to stakeholders about EUnetHTA, targeted information on a Web site, analysis of stakeholder opinions on HTA and EUnetHTA, and development of a draft stakeholder policy. First steps were taken to organize processes to consolidate the legitimacy of EUnetHTA and its products and encourage the representation of interests, thus contributing to promoting the utilization of HTA in national/regional policy making. A stakeholder Web site, analyses of stakeholder opinions on HTA and EUnetHTA in a discussion topic catalog, and a draft stakeholder policy resulted from the work. Stakeholder involvement in EUnetHTA is necessary to ensure the legitimacy and prospects for utilization of EUnetHTA and its products. The described activities and results create the foundation for a continued dialogue with, and involvement of, stakeholders. The EUnetHTA stakeholder meeting can be considered as a successful experience of dialogue between EUnetHTA and stakeholders, which should be continued. Our experience shows the challenge of obtaining balanced stakeholder representation across the identified stakeholder groups. Continued attention should be given to achieving balanced stakeholder representation.

  20. Stakeholder Risk Management in Ethical Decision Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauesen, Linne Marie

    Stakeholder management has for the last three decades been concerned either with strategic business management or business ethics, values and quality. Many models have been developed, but recently the literature asks for more dynamic models instead of the staticism that characterizes some models....... management models does – for the sake of the wider social responsibilities of the businesses and its stakeholders.......Stakeholder management has for the last three decades been concerned either with strategic business management or business ethics, values and quality. Many models have been developed, but recently the literature asks for more dynamic models instead of the staticism that characterizes some models...... evidence from hybrid organizations as Publicly Owned Enterprises (POEs) mixed of private corporations and political administration. The model offers a new way of combining risk management with ethical decisionmaking processes by the inclusion of multiple stakeholders. Not only does the model apply...

  1. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Tunable hybrid plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report resents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning Tunable Hybrid Plasma (THP) derived from a three-year program of stake holder involvement. THP destroys volatile organic compounds by directing a moderate energy electron beam into a flow of air containing organic contaminants. This report is for technology developers and for those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders' perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of THP to the remediation problems the face. In addition, this report presents data requirements for the technology's field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on THP from stakeholders from four other sites throughout the western United States

  2. Stakeholder involvement in Swedish nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Section for Science and Technology Studies

    2006-09-15

    This report concerning Swedish nuclear waste management has been produced as part of a cross national research project: CARL - A Social Science Research Project into the Effects of Stakeholder involvement on Decision-Making in Radioactive Waste Management. Besides Sweden, the participating countries are Belgium, Canada, Finland, Slovenia and United Kingdom. A social science research team, working for three years, is in the first phase conducting research in their own countries in order to produce 6 country reports. During the next years the focus will shift to comparisons of stakeholder involvement practices in the participating countries. The report addresses current practices of Swedish nuclear waste management and their historical development. The main focus is on past, current and emerging patterns of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a deep repository for the final disposal of Sweden's spent nuclear fuel. The general questions attended to in the report are: Who are the main stakeholders, and how have they emerged and gained recognition as such? What are the issues currently subject to stakeholder involvement and how have these been decided upon? How is stakeholder involvement organized locally and nationally and how has this changed over time? How has stakeholder involvement gained acceptance as an activity of value in the siting of major waste facilities? The report have attempted to show the development of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a final repository for Sweden's spent nuclear fuel as resembling something other than a straightforward linear process of improvement and refinement. Stakeholder involvement has developed, over the past 15 years or so, into something more like a patchwork of different shapes and forms. Some of the forces that may well contribute to the further elaboration of the patchwork of stakeholder involvement have been pointed out, contingently modifying once more its overall colour and orientation. Questions

  3. Stakeholder involvement in Swedish nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran

    2006-09-01

    This report concerning Swedish nuclear waste management has been produced as part of a cross national research project: CARL - A Social Science Research Project into the Effects of Stakeholder involvement on Decision-Making in Radioactive Waste Management. Besides Sweden, the participating countries are Belgium, Canada, Finland, Slovenia and United Kingdom. A social science research team, working for three years, is in the first phase conducting research in their own countries in order to produce 6 country reports. During the next years the focus will shift to comparisons of stakeholder involvement practices in the participating countries. The report addresses current practices of Swedish nuclear waste management and their historical development. The main focus is on past, current and emerging patterns of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a deep repository for the final disposal of Sweden's spent nuclear fuel. The general questions attended to in the report are: Who are the main stakeholders, and how have they emerged and gained recognition as such? What are the issues currently subject to stakeholder involvement and how have these been decided upon? How is stakeholder involvement organized locally and nationally and how has this changed over time? How has stakeholder involvement gained acceptance as an activity of value in the siting of major waste facilities? The report have attempted to show the development of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a final repository for Sweden's spent nuclear fuel as resembling something other than a straightforward linear process of improvement and refinement. Stakeholder involvement has developed, over the past 15 years or so, into something more like a patchwork of different shapes and forms. Some of the forces that may well contribute to the further elaboration of the patchwork of stakeholder involvement have been pointed out, contingently modifying once more its overall colour and orientation. Questions have been

  4. Extending stakeholder theory to promote resource management initiatives to key stakeholders: a case study of water transfers in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafreniere, Katherine C; Deshpande, Sameer; Bjornlund, Henning; Hunter, M Gordon

    2013-11-15

    Many attempts to implement resource management initiatives in Canadian and international communities have been resisted by stakeholders despite inclusion of their representatives in the decision-making process. Managers' failure to understand stakeholders' perspectives when proposing initiatives is a potential cause of this resistance. Our study uses marketing thought to enhance stakeholder theory by bringing in an audience-centric perspective. We attempt to understand how stakeholders perceive their interests in an organization and consequently decide how to influence that organization. By doing so, we investigate whether a disconnect exists between the perceptions of managers and those of stakeholders. Natural resource managers can utilize this knowledge to garner stakeholder support for the organization and its activities. We support this claim with findings from a water transfer plebiscite held in the Canadian province of Alberta. Sixteen personal interviews employing narrative inquiry were conducted to document voters' (i.e., irrigators') interpretations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Extension Stakeholder Engagement: An Exploration of Two Cases Exemplifying 21st Century Adaptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles French

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 100 years, a number of societal trends have influenced how Cooperative Extension engages public audiences in its outreach and education efforts. These trends include rapid evolution in communication technology, greater specialization of Land-Grant University faculty, and diversification of funding sources. In response, Extension organizations have adapted their engagement approach, incorporated new technologies, modified their organizational structures, and even expanded the notion of public stakeholders to include funders, program nonparticipants, and others. This article explores the implications for future Extension efforts using two case studies—one which explores how a community visioning program incorporated new ways of engaging local audiences, and another which explores how an Extension business retention program used participatory action research and educational organizing approaches to strengthen participation in a research-based program.

  6. Stakeholder Analisys of Higher Education Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Maric

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, knowledge, the human capital, and learning organizations have become the key determinants of current global progress. Higher educational sector has been faced with globalization and strong competition. Therefore, the need has arisen for professional management structures and more entrepreneurial style of leadership. Organizations have been transformed to learning organizations by the life long learning concept, while the knowledge management has become the leading tool in building competitive advantages. High education organizations are being pushed forward by competitiveness. That pressure requires continuous improvement emphasizing the need for measuring outcomes and building excellence. The paradigm of stakeholder analysis, applied to specific determinations of the system of higher education institutions, could be a good way for comprehending and predicting interests, needs and requirements of all key players in the environment. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the possibility of understanding the connection between higher education institutions and its environment in context of stakeholder analysis. The paper uses literature as a basis in identifying critical parameters for stakeholder analysis and its implementation to higher education sector. The findings of the paper reveal that the concept of stakeholders is critical and difficult to implement everywhere and to everything. There is a clear attempt of all organizations, especially those that create and encourage knowledge, to understand the actions of all participants and predictions of interests and requirements of the changing environment.

  7. Involving stakeholders and developing a policy for stakeholder involvement in the European network for Health Technology Assessment, EUnetHTA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmhøj Nielsen, Camilla; Wadmann, Sarah; Børlum Kristensen, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This article explains how the issue of stakeholder involvement was addressed in the European network for Health Technology Assessment (EUnetHTA) Project and describes the structures of future stakeholder involvement in the EUnetHTA Collaboration. Methods: Initiatives led to a dialogue...... with stakeholders and exchanging views and expectations on health technology assessment (HTA) processes and the future development of EUnetHTA. The methods of involving different stakeholder groups in EUnetHTA included general information to stakeholders about EUnetHTA, targeted information on a Web site, analysis...... of stakeholder opinions on HTA and EUnetHTA, and development of a draft stakeholder policy. Results: First steps were taken to organize processes to consolidate the legitimacy of EUnetHTA and its products and encourage the representation of interests, thus contributing to promoting the utilization of HTA...

  8. Essential Skills for Project Stakeholders Identification: Sustainability Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mashiur Rahman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In every life cycle of the project there are numerous people or organizations involved either directly or indirectly. While these type of people and organizations involved are called stakeholders and these may include the project team, client or customer, community, environment, suppliers, government. Stakeholders contribute and share their experiences, knowledge, and insights to support the project throughout its life cycle and therefore it is crucial to capture their input. However, before initiation of the project, stakeholders need to be identified. Following the fact that there are strategies and processes for stakeholder identification, it is not clear what skills are needed to employ those strategies for stakeholder identification. These skills are exceedingly important to have because in today's corporate world, the project team must be flexible in every aspect of their job and be able to complement their skills for the success of stakeholder identification. Using literature review, this paper seeks to describe the skills of project leader needed to identify the project team and the external stakeholders. Inductive approach was followed in this study and data was collected qualitatively using secondary sources. There are two essential skills i.e. relationship building skills and communication skills for internal stakeholders and four major skills i.e. communication skills, people skills, intellectual skills and conceptual skills for external stakeholders are identified for the identification of project stakeholders through literature review considering the sustainability issues in the project management.

  9. Why Don’t More Farmers Go Organic? Using A Stakeholder-Informed Exploratory Agent-Based Model to Represent the Dynamics of Farming Practices in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Schmitt Olabisi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In spite of a growing interest in organic agriculture; there has been relatively little research on why farmers might choose to adopt organic methods, particularly in the developing world. To address this shortcoming, we developed an exploratory agent-based model depicting Philippine smallholder farmer decisions to implement organic techniques in rice paddy systems. Our modeling exercise was novel in its combination of three characteristics: first, agent rules were based on focus group data collected in the system of study. Second, a social network structure was built into the model. Third, we utilized variance-based sensitivity analysis to quantify model outcome variability, identify influential drivers, and suggest ways in which further modeling efforts could be focused and simplified. The model results indicated an upper limit on the number of farmers adopting organic methods. The speed of information spread through the social network; crop yields; and the size of a farmer’s plot were highly influential in determining agents’ adoption rates. The results of this stylized model indicate that rates of organic farming adoption are highly sensitive to the yield drop after switchover to organic techniques, and to the speed of information spread through existing social networks. Further research and model development should focus on these system characteristics.

  10. Cultivating adjunct faculty: strategies beyond orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santisteban, Lisette; Egues, Aida L

    2014-01-01

    Schools of nursing across the country are using adjunct faculty to meet clinical, didactic, and online instructional needs of their nursing programs. While adjunct faculty are vital to the alleviation of the nursing shortage and the shortage of nursing faculty, and to the preparation of the current and future nursing workforce, little is known about cultivating adjunct faculty as nurse educators. To investigate the cultivation of adjunct nursing faculty, the authors engaged in a comprehensive review of the extant literature of primary databases and reports from accredited nursing programs and professional nursing organizations. Scant literature exists that seeks to identify issues associated with developing adjunct nursing faculty as educators, including role transition needs, and useful approaches to orientation, mentorship, or retention. Working toward cultivation of adjunct faculty includes innovative support measures beyond simple orientation. Orientation should be comprehensive, and move to mentorship as a key component that helps establish a sustainable nurse educator career for adjunct nursing faculty. It is incumbent upon schools of nursing to cultivate their adjunct faculty, and this article includes creative approaches to doing so, with recommendations for nursing education, nursing practice, and nursing research settings. While adjunct faculty may successfully meet some of the challenges faced by nursing programs, they themselves face many challenges that may hinder their success as nurse educators. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Microfoundations for stakeholder theory: Managing stakeholders with heterogeneous motives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bridoux, F.; Stoelhorst, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Instrumental stakeholder theory proposes a positive relationship between fairness toward stakeholders and firm performance. Yet, some firms are successful with an arms-length approach to stakeholder management, based on bargaining power rather than fairness. We address this puzzle by relaxing the

  12. Public Participation Guide: Stakeholder Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interviews with stakeholders are one-to-one conversations about a specific topic or issue. The primary purpose of these interviews is to obtain project-relevant information and elicit stakeholder reactions and suggestions.

  13. STAKEHOLDER LINKAGES FOR SUSTAINABLE LAND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    This paper presents stakeholder types involved in sustainable land management (SLM), their interests and ... (DAs), and Rural Kebele Administration (RKA) offices were major stakeholders involved in SLM activities in the ... Key words: Stakeholders; farmer-expert linkages; resource management; Ethiopia. Introduction.

  14. Theory-Based Stakeholder Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Morten Balle; Vedung, Evert

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a new approach to program theory evaluation called theory-based stakeholder evaluation or the TSE model for short. Most theory-based approaches are program theory driven and some are stakeholder oriented as well. Practically, all of the latter fuse the program perceptions of the various stakeholder groups into one unitary…

  15. Strengthening stakeholder-engaged research and research on stakeholder engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Kristin N; Miller, Elizabeth

    2017-06-01

    Stakeholder engagement is an emerging field with little evidence to inform best practices. Guidelines are needed to improve the quality of research on stakeholder engagement through more intentional planning, evaluation and reporting. We developed a preliminary framework for planning, evaluating and reporting stakeholder engagement, informed by published conceptual models and recommendations and then refined through our own stakeholder engagement experience. Our proposed exploratory framework highlights contexts and processes to be addressed in planning stakeholder engagement, and potential immediate, intermediate and long-term outcomes that warrant evaluation. We use this framework to illustrate both the minimum information needed for reporting stakeholder-engaged research and the comprehensive detail needed for reporting research on stakeholder engagement.

  16. Shareholder, stakeholder-owner or broad stakeholder maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Niels

    2004-01-01

    including the shareholders of a company. Although it may be the ultimate goal for Corporate Social Responsibility to achieve this kind of maximization, broad stakeholder maximization is quite difficult to give a precise definition. There is no one-dimensional measure to add different stakeholder benefits...... by other stakeholders' interests. These constraints vary for dif-ferent stakeholder owners and new standards for Corporate Social Responsibility and more active political consumers will strengthen these constraints.......With reference to the discussion about shareholder versus stakeholder maximization it is argued that the normal type of maximization is in fact stakeholder-owner maxi-mization. This means maximization of the sum of the value of the shares and stake-holder benefits belonging to the dominating...

  17. Faculty Activity Assignment Versus Faculty Effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, D. R.; Peeples, T. O.

    The use of faculty activity data in higher education is discussed and the issue of whether the chairperson or the faculty member's estimates of how time was spent should determine resource expenditures is addressed. A historical review indicates that this type of data has been a concern of higher education for the past three decades. This…

  18. IFBRP Open House and Stakeholder Group Comment Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    In March 2017, Perkins + Will and the City of Duluth presented two high-level concept plans to the Irving-Fairmount Brownfields Plan stakeholders in a several different settings: an organized stakeholder meeting (open house), a small group meeting with businesses, a small group m...

  19. Communication in times of crisis: The stakeholder relationship under pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, T.G.L.A.; Verhoeven, P.; Beentjes, H.W.J.; Vliegenthart, R.

    This paper studies how stakeholder relationships change when an organization undergoes a crisis as compared to routine circumstances. During crises, the stakeholder relationships are under pressure, and therewith the organization’s reputation and the crisis intensity. This paper’s purpose is to

  20. Faculty Development at One Midwestern Dental School: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Smith, Deborah B; Overman, Pamela R; Bunce, Larry

    2015-10-01

    Most dental school faculty members arrive on campus with a wealth of clinical experience but little to no teacher training. For the past two decades, there has been a call for schools to educate their faculty on a wide variety of topics including educational methodology and cutting-edge educational techniques through faculty development programs. Drawing on theories of general program evaluation as well as evaluation specific to educational programming, the aim of this study was to investigate outcomes of the Faculty Development Program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Dentistry between 2007 and 2014. A mixed-methods research design gathered quantitative data via email survey sent to all eligible teaching faculty members; it received an overall response rate of 54% (N=51). Qualitative data came from open-ended survey questions and a focus group with seven volunteer faculty participants. The survey data suggested that the stated outcomes of faculty development were being met for all stakeholder groups with varying degrees of success. Focus group results indicated a need for a more formal new faculty orientation and better communication with all about the specific charge of faculty development within the school. Evaluation of faculty development activities in academic dental institutions is a necessary component of the ongoing improvement of dental education. Suggestions for future evaluations include the idea of collaborating with other dental schools to increase sample sizes, which would increase participants' perception of the level of confidentiality and make statistical analyses more robust.

  1. Faculty in the U.S. Community College: Corporate Labour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, John S.

    2005-01-01

    Community college faculty are a major labour force in the U.S. and constitute one-third of all postsecondary education faculty. As a labour force, community college faculty epitomize professional work in the new economy and the post-bureaucratic organization: they are predominantly temporary or part-time; the majority bargain collectively for a…

  2. Health Care Leadership: Managing Knowledge Bases as Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotarius, Timothy

    Communities are composed of many organizations. These organizations naturally form clusters based on common patterns of knowledge, skills, and abilities of the individual organizations. Each of these spontaneous clusters represents a distinct knowledge base. The health care knowledge base is shown to be the natural leader of any community. Using the Central Florida region's 5 knowledge bases as an example, each knowledge base is categorized as a distinct type of stakeholder, and then a specific stakeholder management strategy is discussed to facilitate managing both the cooperative potential and the threatening potential of each "knowledge base" stakeholder.

  3. Multi-stakeholder Virtual Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Niels; Mühlbacher, Hans

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces the special issue on multi-stakeholder virtual dialogue. Research as well as managerial practice in marketing has traditionally focused on single stakeholders and a one-way communication perspective. This special issue takes a novel approach by directing attention to the s......This article introduces the special issue on multi-stakeholder virtual dialogue. Research as well as managerial practice in marketing has traditionally focused on single stakeholders and a one-way communication perspective. This special issue takes a novel approach by directing attention...... success. While marketing literature increasingly recognizes that divers stakeholders have an impact on a company''s success, little is known about how virtual multi-stakeholder dialogue changes marketing research and management. This special issue provides insights on what roles stakeholders may play...

  4. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  5. Stakeholder Relations Office

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Scientists, politicians, the public, school children, our neighbours, you. All of these groups of people have a stake in CERN, and all are important to us.   The list of stakeholders in an organisation as large and complex as CERN is a long and ever lengthening one. Each group has its own specific interests and needs in terms of what kind of information it requires from CERN and how we should engage. It’s important, therefore, for us to ensure that we’re communicating optimally with everyone we care about and who cares about us. This is something that CERN has always taken seriously. The CERN Courier, for example, was first published in 1959 and we had a pro-active public information office right from the start. Today, our stakeholder relations are spread between several groups and teams, reflecting the nature of CERN today. But while we’re already doing a good job, I think we can do better by exploiting the synergies between these teams, and that’s wh...

  6. Development needs of faculty in foodservice management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, E S; Benes, B A

    1997-03-01

    To determine the development needs of foodservice management (FSM) faculty originally prepared in other fields. Application of qualitative research methodologies to description and comparison of the perspective of three groups: faculty themselves, leaders in foodservice industry, and educators in advanced-degree programs. Purposive sampling of organization directories was used to recruit faculty members for two surveys (142 and 62 respondents) and four focus groups; 15 representatives from industry, professional organizations, and education (through an advisory committee); and 11 foodservice administration advanced-degree programs (through survey and study of program catalogs). Faculty competencies needed were compared from the three perspectives. Descriptive statistics plus chi 2 determinations were used to make comparisons. All three sources identified needs that could be classified into one of three groups: acquisition of theory, mastery of applications, and personal qualities. Theoretical groundwork needed included food science/quantity food production, financial and personnel management, marketing, customer satisfaction, and use of computer and other technologies. Although only 44% of faculty respondents had advanced degrees in FSM, their graduate study in other areas was applicable in meeting many of the competencies. Almost all faculty had some FSM industry experience-a high priority from all perspectives. Most faculty were involved in development activities and reported success in acquiring knowledge and application competence. The faculty members' lack of identification with FSM and their feelings of isolation were more problematic.

  7. Questioning Stakeholder Legitimacy: A Philanthropic Accountability Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeger, Patsy; Robichau, Robbie

    2017-01-01

    Philanthropic organizations contribute to important work that solves complex problems to strengthen communities. Many of these organizations are moving toward engaging in public policy work, in addition to funding programs. This paper raises questions of legitimacy for foundations, as well as issues of transparency and accountability in a pluralistic democracy. Measures of civic health also inform how philanthropic organizations can be accountable to stakeholders. We propose a holistic model for philanthropic accountability that combines elements of transparency and performance accountability, as well as practices associated with the American pluralistic model for democratic accountability. We argue that philanthropic institutions should seek stakeholder and public input when shaping any public policy agenda. This paper suggests a new paradigm, called philanthropic accountability that can be used for legitimacy and democratic governance of private foundations engaged in policy work. The Philanthropic Accountability Model can be empirically tested and used as a governance tool.

  8. Towards an Engaged Campus: Measuring and Comparing Definitive Stakeholders' Perceptions of University Social Engagement in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Ha

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to measure and rigorously compare the perceptions of South Korean university social engagement between faculty and students, two definitive stakeholders identified by stakeholder theory--but considerably heterogeneous, to understand how South Korean campus embraces social engagement in practice. To that end, this study…

  9. Stakeholders and Apart Hotels: Multiple Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Kyoko Wada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Means of accommodation involve a wide range of social actors and agents, as well as different business models. Management strategies in this sector have been increasingly important for long-term sustainability and competitiveness of business organizations. This study aims to analyze the interactions between apart-hotels and their stakeholders to foster an improvement of services provided, aligning the interface of strategic management from the point of view of managers and their key stakeholders. It is an exploratory study, with qualitative chacter, along with multiple case studies of the following establishments: Travel Inn, Hotels Slaviero and Etoile george v. Brazilian enterprises, which manage lodging facilities with apart-hotel concepts, combining features that enable comparative analysis of the study. For conceptual understanding, this study was based on literature about stakeholders, taking the work of Freeman (1984 and Freeman et al (2010 as main references. The research was conducted through semi-structured interviews with managers of lodging facilities and their key stakeholders and through direct observation and documentation. We found that not all groups of influence are considered in the planning of service flats. However, the organizations surveyed indicated that the market has realized the importance of the groups that exert influence and are influenced by their goals, and are therefore increasingly alert for integration of such groups in their strategic planning.

  10. Assessing the Role of Business Faculty Values and Background in the Recognition of an Ethical Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Auken, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    The author sought to determine whether business faculty values and background can discriminate between a yes or no response to the introduction of an ethically challenged product. The results reveal that two competing views of the enterprise (stakeholder vs. stockholder) along with a faculty member's departmental membership do discriminate in the…

  11. Concepts on social services. The role of public administration authorities and other stakeholders in the organization and development of social services for people in difficult situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila PROCA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to social services, which are tackled as a form of social as¬sistance, as a result of the continuous objectives of National Program on creating the integrated social system for 2008- 2013, the strategy of social inclusion of persons with disabilities. As a result of the ratification of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities by Law nr. 166- XVIII of July 9, 2010, which has marked 5 years since its ratification, in the period from 5 to 10 July 2015, within the framework of International Scientific- practical conference on the topic ,,Five years after the ratification of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Practical and Judicial aspects’ analysis.’’ At this time, the creation and development of new community social services is a ceaseless process, alternative institutionalized social services (residential for children and adults, which are considered more efficient and less expensive for this system. They are meant to keep people or families in difficulty in an organizational propinquity to the community, having as a main objective the marginalization’s prevention, social ex¬clusion and facilitating the integration of beneficiaries in the family and community for improving their quality of life. The role of the organization, operation and development of social services reverts to: Ministry of Labor, Social Protection and Family and other Ministries, local public ad¬ministration authorities of level I and II, territorial structures of social assistance and their subdivisions with other social actors, associations, foundations, non-profit pri¬vate institutions, registered and accredited in accordance with the legislation in force, with the activity in the social sphere.

  12. Stakeholders in One Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazet, J A K; Uhart, M M; Keyyu, J D

    2014-08-01

    The stakeholders in One Health include the ultimate beneficiaries (i.e. animals, people and the environment) and the organisations that work to protect them (i.e. research institutes, government ministries, international organisations and professional bodies). However, identifying these stakeholders who will contribute to One Health activities and develop solutions to complex health problems can be difficult, as these problems often affect all sectors of society. In addition, evolving concepts about health and its dependence on environmental resilience necessitate the inclusion of ministries, organisations and disciplines that may not have been traditionally considered to be related to health. The multilateral organisations with greatest responsibilities in the global health arena have recognised that the best way to protect health security and promote overall global well-being is to work together across disciplinary and jurisdictional boundaries. Permanent regional networks and ad hoc networks created to tackle specific issues (both of which require donor investment) are also facilitating improved disease surveillance and collaborative approaches to synchronised interventions across country borders. These networks necessarily involve the key ministries for One Health, those of health, agriculture/livestock, and natural resources/environment. Ministries play a critical role in the formulation and implementation of policies for the promotion of health and disease control. They contribute to all stages of the One Heath process, as do universities, which engage by generating knowledge and capacity through teaching, research and extension services. Similarly, non-governmental organisations have a key role in stewardship; resource mobilisation; generation of knowledge; capacity development; intervention design; and implementation. Finally, communities, including rural and indigenous peoples, particularly those that are in close proximity to natural areas, are at the

  13. Stakeholder analysis methodologies resource book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babiuch, W.M.; Farhar, B.C.

    1994-03-01

    Stakeholder analysis allows analysts to identify how parties might be affected by government projects. This process involves identifying the likely impacts of a proposed action and stakeholder groups affected by that action. Additionally, the process involves assessing how these groups might be affected and suggesting measures to mitigate any adverse effects. Evidence suggests that the efficiency and effectiveness of government actions can be increased and adverse social impacts mitigated when officials understand how a proposed action might affect stakeholders. This report discusses how to conduct useful stakeholder analyses for government officials making decisions on energy-efficiency and renewable-energy technologies and their commercialization. It discusses methodological issues that may affect the validity and reliability of findings, including sampling, generalizability, validity, ``uncooperative`` stakeholder groups, using social indicators, and the effect of government regulations. The Appendix contains resource directories and a list of specialists in stakeholder analysis and involvement.

  14. Success of Student Internship in Engineering Industry: A Faculty Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, B. Vittaldasa; Kudva S., Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Student internship plays a major role in transforming the engineering interns to ready-to-use professionals. Learning at the workplace has become a challenge for the interns due to several issues. A knowledge gap analysis has been depicted considering all stakeholders of the internship, including the intern, faculty, institution and the industrial…

  15. Stakeholder Salience in ERP Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Salhotra, Eashan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine stakeholder involvement in an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) System project that involves implementation and improvement of the implemented system. The study targets stakeholders, their classification, and their degree of importance during different phases of an ERP project life cycle, i.e. planning, implementation, stabilisation and improvement. The study shows that stakeholder involvement and their salience vary along the ERP project life cycle a...

  16. Addressing issues raised by stakeholders: experiences of eight organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vari, Anna

    2004-01-01

    Demand for stakeholder involvement has become imperative in the field of radioactive waste management. Providing for fair and competent stakeholder involvement, however, raises several questions of practice, for example: How to address issues raised by stakeholders? How to take stakeholders' views into consideration if they are divergent or conflicting? This paper reviews eight case studies prepared for the Topical Session on Addressing Issues Raised by Stakeholders, aimed at analysing the impacts of stakeholder involvement on decisions in RWM organisations. The studies outline the experiences of the following organisations: Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC); Canadian Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO); Nuclear Waste Management Organisation of Japan (NUMO); Posiva, Finland; Radioactive Waste Repository Authority, Czech Republic (RAWRA); Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI); United Kingdom Environment Agency; United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Case study reports are included in the Annex of this volume. The paper outlines the main trends and lessons learned from the above case studies. The first section focuses on impacts of stakeholder involvement on specific RWM decisions regarding policy and process. Examples presented in the second section illustrate how stakeholders' concerns may influence general decision-making practices and organisational behaviour. In the third section various approaches to handling divergent stakeholder views are introduced. The paper concludes with recommendations extracted and derived from the eight reports. (author)

  17. Needs assessment and evaluation of a short course to improve faculties teaching skills at a former World Health Organization regional teacher training center

    Science.gov (United States)

    KOJURI, JAVAD; AMINI, MITRA; KARIMIAN, ZAHRA; DEHGHANI, MOHAMMAD REZA; SABER, MAHBOOBEH; BAZRAFCAN, LEILA; EBRAHIMI, SEDIGHEH; REZAEE, RITA

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the design of educational programs, much attention has been paid to teaching methods, needs assessment, an important part of the development of educational programs, generally is neglected. Another important aspect in educational program design is assessing effectiveness. The aims of this study were to design a formal needs assessment program to define the core contents of a faculty development program, and to determine whether participation in the faculty development program reinforced new teaching skills. Methods: A teacher-training program was designed at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences to help medical instructors boost their teaching skills. Needs assessment was done with nominal group technique followed by a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire. The program, imparted in workshop format, covered effective teaching methods, feedback, assessing knowledge and time management. Instruction was in the form of lectures, group discussions, case simulations, video presentations and role-plays. The program was evaluated in several phases using data triangulation and multi-item assessments of overall program quality in three major dimensions: Kirkpatrick program evaluation model, evaluation of the educational environment and qualitative analysis with open-ended questions. All participants in the study belonged to the academic staff of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (n=396). Results: Seven main categories were derived from nominal group techniques and questionnaires. After the program, participants rated the quality of the program highly. They felt that the educational intervention was appropriate and had a positive impact on their knowledge of effective teaching methods, feedback, knowledge assessment and time management. Assessment of the effectiveness of the program showed that participants reported significant improvements in their teaching abilities. Conclusions: Our faculty development program  have a significant positive effect on

  18. Needs assessment and evaluation of a short course to improve faculties teaching skills at a former World Health Organization regional teacher training center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAVAD KOJURI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the design of educational programs, much attention has been paid to teaching methods, needs assessment, an important part of the development of educational programs, generally is neglected. Another important aspect in educational program design is assessing effectiveness. The aims of this study were to design a formal needs assessment program to define the core contents of a faculty development program, and to determine whether participation in the faculty development program reinforced new teaching skills. Methods: A teacher-training program was designed at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences to help medical instructors boost their teaching skills. Needs assessment was done with nominal group technique followed by a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire. The program, imparted in workshop format, covered effective teaching methods, feedback, assessing knowledge and time management. Instruction was in the form of lectures, group discussions, case simulations, video presentations and role-plays. The program was evaluated in several phases using data triangulation and multi-item assessments of overall program quality in three major dimensions: Kirkpatrick program evaluation model, evaluation of the educational environment and qualitative analysis with open-ended questions. All participants in the study belonged to the academic staff of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (n=396. Results: Seven main categories were derived from nominal group techniques and questionnaires. After the program, participants rated the quality of the program highly. They felt that the educational intervention was appropriate and had a positive impact on their knowledge of effective teaching methods, feedback, knowledge assessment and time management. Assessment of the effectiveness of the program showed that participants reported significant improvements in their teaching abilities. Conclusion: Our faculty development program have a significant positive

  19. Needs assessment and evaluation of a short course to improve faculties teaching skills at a former World Health Organization regional teacher training center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojuri, Javad; Amini, Mitra; Karimian, Zahra; Dehghani, Mohammad Reza; Saber, Mahboobeh; Bazrafcan, Leila; Ebrahimi, Sedigheh; Rezaee, Rita

    2015-01-01

    In the design of educational programs, much attention has been paid to teaching methods, needs assessment, an important part of the development of educational programs, generally is neglected. Another important aspect in educational program design is assessing effectiveness. The aims of this study were to design a formal needs assessment program to define the core contents of a faculty development program, and to determine whether participation in the faculty development program reinforced new teaching skills. A teacher-training program was designed at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences to help medical instructors boost their teaching skills. Needs assessment was done with nominal group technique followed by a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire. The program, imparted in workshop format, covered effective teaching methods, feedback, assessing knowledge and time management. Instruction was in the form of lectures, group discussions, case simulations, video presentations and role-plays. The program was evaluated in several phases using data triangulation and multi-item assessments of overall program quality in three major dimensions: Kirkpatrick program evaluation model, evaluation of the educational environment and qualitative analysis with open-ended questions. All participants in the study belonged to the academic staff of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (n=396). Seven main categories were derived from nominal group techniques and questionnaires. After the program, participants rated the quality of the program highly. They felt that the educational intervention was appropriate and had a positive impact on their knowledge of effective teaching methods, feedback, knowledge assessment and time management. Assessment of the effectiveness of the program showed that participants reported significant improvements in their teaching abilities. Our faculty development program  have a significant positive effect on medical university teaching staff members

  20. Pharmacy faculty members' perspectives on the student/faculty relationship in online social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Anne H; Finley, Kristen N; Ulbrich, Timothy R; McAuley, James W

    2010-12-15

    To describe pharmacy faculty members' use of the online social network Facebook and compare the perspectives of faculty members with and without Facebook profiles regarding student/faculty relationships. An electronic survey instrument was sent to full-time faculty members (n = 183) at 4 colleges of pharmacy in Ohio seeking their opinions on student/faculty relationships on Facebook. If respondents answered "yes" to having a Facebook profile, they were asked 14 questions on aspects of being "friends" with students. If respondents answered "no," they were asked 4 questions. Of the 95 respondents (52%) to the survey instrument, 44 faculty members (46%) had a Facebook profile, while 51 faculty members (54%) did not. Those who had a profile had been faculty members for an average of 8.6 years, versus 11.4 years for those who did not have a Facebook profile. Seventy-nine percent of faculty members who used Facebook were not "friends" with their students. The majority of respondents reported that they would decline/ignore a "friend" request from a student, or decline until after the student graduated. Although a limited number of faculty members had used Facebook for online discussions, teaching purposes, or student organizations, the majority of universities did not have policies on the use of social networking sites. Online social network sites are used widely by students and faculty members, which may raise questions regarding professionalism and appropriate faculty/student relationships. Further research should address the student/preceptor relationship, other online social networking sites, and whether students are interested in using these sites within the classroom and/or professional organizations.

  1. Shareholder, stakeholder-owner or broad stakeholder maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Niels

    2004-01-01

    including the shareholders of a company. Although it may be the ultimate goal for Corporate Social Responsibility to achieve this kind of maximization, broad stakeholder maximization is quite difficult to give a precise definition. There is no one-dimensional measure to add different stakeholder benefits...

  2. Globalization, Internationalization and the Faculty: Culture and Perception of Full-Time Faculty at a Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Alison Izawa

    2012-01-01

    The processes of globalization have an impact on society in numerous ways. As a result, higher education institutions around the world attempt to adjust to these changes through internationalization efforts. Amongst the key stakeholders who play an important role in assuring that these efforts are successful is the faculty because it is this body…

  3. Sixth national stakeholder workshop summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    On June 17--18, 1998, the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Worker and Community Transition convened its sixth National Stakeholder Workshop at the Ramada Plaza Hotel Old Town in Alexandria, Virginia. Approximately 325 stakeholders attended representing DOE headquarters and field offices, contractors, labor organizations, state and local government, education and community interest groups. The meeting addressed the progress made on the issues and challenges identified at the last stakeholder`s meeting in Oakland, California on April 9--11, 1997. Also discussed were the full range of the Department`s work force issues and creative solutions to the inherent challenges of simultaneously implementing the Department`s post Cold-War mission, work force restructuring guidance, contract reform objectives, asset disposition, performance-based management requirements, and business process improvement policies. The format of the Workshop included several plenary sessions and a number of small group discussion sessions. The small group sessions focused on topics related to labor issues, work force restructuring, work force planning, community transition, and employee concerns. The sessions provided a wide range of views on worker and community transition issues. The plenary sessions of the Workshop included presentations on the following topics: welcome and introductions; opening remarks; building a better labor-management relationship; keynote speech from Secretary of Energy Federico Pena; meeting tomorrow`s challenges (early site closures); harnessing the contracting process to encourage local growth; and, the British experience in economic conversion.

  4. Stakeholder Analysis To Shape the Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughin, Keith; Derosa, Joseph

    An enterprise is a complex adaptive social system that should maximize stakeholder, not shareholder, value — value to employees, customers, shareholders and others. We expand upon Russell Ackoff s direction to distribute value among stakeholders, to propose a schema of rules that guide the interactions among autonomous agents in the transactional environment of an enterprise. We define an enterprise as an organization and its transactional environment interacting with and adapting to each other. Enterprise behavior can only be understood in the context of this transactional environment where everything depends on everything else and interactions cannot be controlled, but can be influenced if they are guided by an understanding of the internal rules of the autonomous agents. The schema has four complementary rules (control, autonomy, return and value) derived from the work of Russell Ackoff and Michael Porter. The basic rules are applied in combination to eight stakeholder types derived from Richard Hopeman and Raymond McLeod (Leaders, Competitors, Customers, Public, Workers, Collaborators, Suppliers and Regulators). An enterprise can use this schema and rules in a process of stakeholder analysis to develop and continually refine strategies to encourage behaviors that benefit the enterprise and discourage behaviors that harm the enterprise. These strategies are implemented in a relationship management program in support of enterprise strategic management to consciously and explicitly shape the environment to reduce risks and increase opportunities for success.

  5. Stakeholder relations and financial performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, B.; Zhou, Y.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze how shareholder performance can be associated with stakeholder relations. As such, we try to find out whether there is an association between financial performance and stakeholder relations with respect to different theoretical notions about the firm. Financial performance is

  6. Collaborative Stakeholder Engagement. Special Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Matt; Chrislip, David; Workman, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Stakeholder engagement and collaboration are essential to the development of an effective state plan. Engaging a diverse group of stakeholders tasked with working together to create education policies that will have a positive, lasting impact on students is not as easy as it sounds. Experts in the field argue that the traditional stakeholder…

  7. Online Company-stakeholder Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Rikke Augustinus; Morsing, Mette

    Based on a systematic data collection we study one of the first pioneering company-stakeholder communication campaigns in social media: the case of energy company Vattenfall A/S’s pan-European campaign ‘The Climate Manifesto’. Our findings challenge the general assumption, that stakeholder intera...

  8. Development of a comprehensive model for stakeholder management in mental healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bierbooms, J.J.P.A.; van Oers, J.A.M.; Bongers, I.M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Stakeholder management is not yet incorporated into the standard practice of most healthcare providers. The purpose of this paper is to assess the applicability of a comprehensive model for stakeholder management in mental healthcare organization for more evidence-based (stakeholder)

  9. Integrating Environmental and Stakeholder Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2001-01-01

    relationships with various stakeholders, companies need to be able to identify these stakeholders and assess their influence. The first part of this paper will discuss the relevant theory and introduce a model to analyse and identify the most significant stakeholder groups and their influence on corporate...... behaviour. Based on a recent survey of Danish compa-nies, the second part of the paper will report on the success of a variety of stakeholders in forc-ing companies to introduce environment-related initiatives. The results will then be discussed in light of the theory and other reported results. The paper......Regulation has been an important instrument in pushing the business community towards im-proved environmental performance. However, there has also been increasing pressure from a growing number of stakeholders, including employees, customers, neighbours and NGOs, etc. In order to improve corporate...

  10. Stakeholder engagement : Schiphol airport case : managing engagement with stakeholders when the interests are conflicting

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolova, Elizaveta

    2016-01-01

    Stakeholder engagement is the process by which an organization involves people who may be affected by the decisions it makes or can influence the implementation of its decisions. They may support or oppose the decisions, be influential in the organization or within the community in which it operates, hold relevant official positions or be affected in the long-term. Companies are becoming more aware of the environment they operate in, and acknowledge the need to care about susta...

  11. A critical review of current nursing faculty practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, M J; Alexander, I M; Gordon, L; Juszczak, L J; Gilliss, C

    2000-12-01

    To critically examine the current literature on nursing faculty practice, using the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) Guidelines for Evaluation of Faculty Practice, and to examine faculty practice models' strengths, weaknesses, and barriers. Thirty-five articles describing models of faculty practice were identified through an exhaustive search on CINAHL and Medline. Two NONPF monographs on nursing faculty practice were used as guidelines for the critical review. Faculty practice has become an integral component of faculty-role expectations at many schools of nursing. Workload, especially without adequate compensation, remains a hindrance to practice. The value of faculty practice time and expertise has not been sufficiently demonstrated. Integration of practitioner, educator and researcher roles remains extremely difficult and sometimes elusive. Faculty practice offers many advantages to schools of nursing, including educational and research opportunities for faculty and students, as well as practice sites and affordable community healthcare. Providing health care in the community presents an opportunity for independent and collaborative practice. To fully utilize the great research opportunities provided by faculty practice, more emphasis must be placed on gathering and analyzing descriptive data.

  12. The global nursing faculty shortage: status and solutions for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Deena A; Gyurko, Charlene C

    2013-09-01

    In addition to a global shortage of nurses, there is also a shortage of academically qualified faculty available to teach in schools of nursing. A systematic review examined proposed solutions to the global shortage of nursing faculty. Metasynthesis was used to compare and critically appraise strategies offered for solving or ameliorating the global nursing faculty shortage by premier nursing organizations. 181 recommendations in 62 publications were categorized into eight major themed solutions, including centralizing data management, international collaboration in nursing research, and increased funding for full-time faculty positions in nursing programs. The nursing faculty shortage is due to a confluence of factors, including the global migration of nurses, a seeming persistent devaluation of faculty by academic programs, disincentives, and an overall reduction in full-time equivalent faculty positions. Results point to a needed change in direction and approach to solving the nursing faculty shortage. By designing new education models that fit global healthcare needs and pooling teaching resources, designing and using the same databases across organizations to track and project faculty needs, and collaborating between schools and businesses to create mutually beneficial agreements for services, nursing faculty capacity can be enhanced, and nursing's capacity to meet global healthcare needs can be expanded. The results of this systematic review can be used as a rubric for the design and development of strategies to end the nursing faculty shortage and expand global nursing capacity. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. Faculty Assignment Classification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatcom Community Coll., Ferndale, WA.

    This document outlines the point-based faculty assignment classification system in effect at Whatcom Community College (Washington). The purpose of the point system is to provide an equitable and flexible means of compensating faculty members based on a system of assigning quantitative values to tasks. Teaching, which includes classroom…

  14. Faculty Internationalization Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, John R., II; Zhu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The internationalization of higher education has been the subject of a substantial body of research. However, few studies have examined how faculty members, significant implementers of internationalization, think about internationalization priorities. This article presents the results of a questionnaire which was sent to faculty members at three…

  15. Faculty Retirement Transitions Revitalized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ummersen, Claire; Duranleau, Lauren; McLaughlin, Jean

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost ten years since the American Council on Education (ACE) began to raise awareness of the importance of workplace flexibility in faculty careers and to encourage colleges and universities to support faculty in better integrating their professional and personal lives. With the generous support of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, ACE…

  16. Managing stakeholders in transformational government

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinwald, Anja Kaldahl; Kræmmergaard, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    ). This paper contributes to this literature by reporting the findings from a case study in a Danish local government who has reached the stage of transformational government. Using a grounded theory approach, information about the local government was initially collected and further analyzed within...... a stakeholder perspective. The paper reports how they succeeded in involving the most important stakeholders in the process of reaching transformational government. Finally the paper offers six lessons learned, based on the case study, about how to manage the involved stakeholders to reach transformational...

  17. Stakeholder Thinking in Sustainability Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Hove Henriksen, Morten; Frier, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The objective of the paper is to describe and discuss how the biotech company Novozymes integrates stakeholder thinking into everyday sustainability practices. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on first-hand experiences as well as secondary information from Novozymes...... to make sense of stakeholder thinking. Originality/value – The contribution of this paper is to provide a detailed analysis of how various stakeholder relations management methods can be used in practice to integrate sustainability in an organisation....

  18. Stakeholder research study : summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    The Canadian Energy Pipeline Association (CEPA) commissioned Ipsos-Reid to conduct a telephone survey to obtain an independent assessment of the level of knowledge and attitudes of four pipeline industry stakeholder groups in relation to Canada's pipeline industry and the individual member companies of CEPA. Included in the survey, which was conducted in the summer and fall of 2001, were 1000 people from the general population across Canada, 1,372 landowners who have CEPA member pipelines crossing their land, 400 adjacent landowners who own land within 2.5 km of a CEPA member pipeline, and 50 news media personnel. The survey revealed that there is a much higher level of knowledge than expected, and a positive attitude towards the energy pipeline industry. Results indicated that more than 80 per cent of landowners, adjacent landowners and the general public agree that Canadians can trust pipelines to safely transport oil and natural gas products across the country. A very strong percentage (88 to 97 per cent) of landowners agree that pipeline operators are generally good neighbours, that local pipeline companies are environmentally responsible and that the pipeline industry is necessary to transport energy products such as oil and natural gas across the country. 82 per cent of the adjacent landowners agree that pipeline companies make significant investments to maintain pipelines in Canada. As far as the general public is concerned, 95 per cent agree that the energy pipeline industry is important to the Canadian economy and 92 per cent believe pipeline incidents occur rarely or occasionally. 96 per cent of media also believe the economic impact of the pipeline industry is important to Canada and to local regions. CEPA's strategy is to raise awareness about pipeline safety, environmental performance and community involvement of the industry. The topics that survey respondents wanted to learn more about were: the economic impact of the energy pipeline industry

  19. Empowering the Faculty through Faculty Mentoring Needs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the mentoring assessment needs of faculties of the University of Education, Winneba, UEW; a public university in Ghana. The study was exploratory, and used survey, focus groups and semi-structured interviews in collecting data from 102 participants. The survey consisted of a 13-item 5-point ...

  20. Stakeholder acceptance analysis ResonantSonic drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning ResonantSonic Drilling (Sonic Drilling), derived from a three-year program of stakeholder involvement. Sonic Drilling is an innovative method to reach contamination in soil and groundwater. The resonant sonic drill rig uses counter-rotating weights to generate energy, which causes the drill pipe to vibrate elastically along its entire length. In the resonant condition, forces of up to 200,000 pounds are transmitted to the drill bit face to create a cutting action. The resonant energy causes subsurface materials to move back into the adjacent formation, permitting the drill pipe to advance. This report is for technology developers and those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders' perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment to make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of sonic drilling to the remediation problems they face

  1. Stakeholder Communication : Chapter 7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. J. T. van der Linden; I. Wilmont; M. E. Iacob; Stijn Hoppenbrouwers; C. Amrit; W. van Stokkum

    2012-01-01

    Onbekend.Economies around the globe have evolved into being largely service-oriented economies. Consumers no longer just want a printer or a car, they rather ask for a printing service or a mobility service. In addition, service-oriented organizations increasingly exploit new devices, technologies

  2. Stakeholder expectation and satisfaction in road maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hietbrink, M.; Hartmann, Andreas; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the process of stakeholder satisfaction is a prerequisite for successful stakeholder management. The expectancy disconfirmation model describes the process of stakeholder satisfaction by relating customers’ satisfaction with a product or service to discrepancy between the perceived

  3. Volkswagen Emission Crisis : Managing Stakeholder Relations on the Web

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Boyang; Veijalainen, Jari; Kotkov, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Organizations establish their own profiles at social media sites to publish pertinent information to customers and other stakeholders. During a long and severe crisis, multiple issues may emerge in media interaction. Positive responses and prompt interaction from the official account of e.g. a car manufacturer creates clarity and reduces anxiety among stakeholders. This research targets the Volkswagen 2015 emission scandal that became public on Sept. 18, 2015. We report its main p...

  4. Value Perspective of Project Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekic, Z.; Surlan, N.; Kosic, T.

    2017-11-01

    When starting a construction project, one assumes, mostly through experience, what is the value the project will bring to investors, consultants, contractors and other stakeholders. However, the value of the project greatly depends on the perspective of the observer and which stakeholder is considering it. So, how is value perceived on the construction project? The purpose of this research is to obtain construction project value parameters utilizing the Delphi technique.

  5. Community Engagement Studios: A Structured Approach to Obtaining Meaningful Input From Stakeholders to Inform Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Yvonne A; Israel, Tiffany L; Williams, Neely A; Boone, Leslie R; Schlundt, David G; Mouton, Charles P; Dittus, Robert S; Bernard, Gordon R; Wilkins, Consuelo H

    2015-12-01

    Engaging communities in research increases its relevance and may speed the translation of discoveries into improved health outcomes. Many researchers lack training to effectively engage stakeholders, whereas academic institutions lack infrastructure to support community engagement. In 2009, the Meharry-Vanderbilt Community-Engaged Research Core began testing new approaches for community engagement, which led to the development of the Community Engagement Studio (CE Studio). This structured program facilitates project-specific input from community and patient stakeholders to enhance research design, implementation, and dissemination. Developers used a team approach to recruit and train stakeholders, prepare researchers to engage with stakeholders, and facilitate an in-person meeting with both. The research core has implemented 28 CE Studios that engaged 152 community stakeholders. Participating researchers, representing a broad range of faculty ranks and disciplines, reported that input from stakeholders was valuable and that the CE Studio helped determine project feasibility and enhanced research design and implementation. Stakeholders found the CE Studio to be an acceptable method of engagement and reported a better understanding of research in general. A tool kit was developed to replicate this model and to disseminate this approach. The research core will collect data to better understand the impact of CE Studios on research proposal submissions, funding, research outcomes, patient and stakeholder engagement in projects, and dissemination of results. They will also collect data to determine whether CE Studios increase patient-centered approaches in research and whether stakeholders who participate have more trust and willingness to participate in research.

  6. Can Tablet Computers Enhance Faculty Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Aditee P; Whicker, Shari A; Benjamin, Robert W; Hawley, Jeffrey; McGann, Kathleen A

    2015-06-01

    Learner benefits of tablet computer use have been demonstrated, yet there is little evidence regarding faculty tablet use for teaching. Our study sought to determine if supplying faculty with tablet computers and peer mentoring provided benefits to learners and faculty beyond that of non-tablet-based teaching modalities. We provided faculty with tablet computers and three 2-hour peer-mentoring workshops on tablet-based teaching. Faculty used tablets to teach, in addition to their current, non-tablet-based methods. Presurveys, postsurveys, and monthly faculty surveys assessed feasibility, utilization, and comparisons to current modalities. Learner surveys assessed perceived effectiveness and comparisons to current modalities. All feedback received from open-ended questions was reviewed by the authors and organized into categories. Of 15 eligible faculty, 14 participated. Each participant attended at least 2 of the 3 workshops, with 10 to 12 participants at each workshop. All participants found the workshops useful, and reported that the new tablet-based teaching modality added value beyond that of current teaching methods. Respondents developed the following tablet-based outputs: presentations, photo galleries, evaluation tools, and online modules. Of the outputs, 60% were used in the ambulatory clinics, 33% in intensive care unit bedside teaching rounds, and 7% in inpatient medical unit bedside teaching rounds. Learners reported that common benefits of tablet computers were: improved access/convenience (41%), improved interactive learning (38%), and improved bedside teaching and patient care (13%). A common barrier faculty identified was inconsistent wireless access (14%), while no barriers were identified by the majority of learners. Providing faculty with tablet computers and having peer-mentoring workshops to discuss their use was feasible and added value.

  7. Planning that works: Empowerment through stakeholder focused interactive planning (SFIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, J.E.; Ison, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a powerful planning tool that can enable government, private industries, and public interest organizations to actualize their visions through sound decision making. The stakeholder focused interactive planning model is designed to integrate and ultimately gain stakeholder investment in the success of attainment of their vision. The only concessions required of the planning organization using this process is the acceptance of the premise that sustained vision success requires the support of both internal and external stakeholders and that each step in the process must be used as a validation of the previous step and essential to the completion of the next step. What is stakeholder/public involvement? It is the process in which the stakeholders (both internal and external) values, interests and expectations are included in decision-making processes. The primary goal of public involvement efforts is to include all those who have a stake in the decision, whether or not they have already been identified. Stakeholders are individuals, contractors, clients, suppliers, public organizations, state and local governments, Indian tribes, federal agencies, and other parties affected by decisions

  8. Indústria de Tabaco vs. Organização Mundial de Saúde: um confronto histórico entre redes sociais de stakeholders,p>Tobacco Industry vs. the World Health Organization: a historical confrontation between social networks of stakeholders

    OpenAIRE

    Sérgio Boeira; Paula Johns

    2007-01-01

    PortuguesO objetivo deste artigo é apresentar uma introdução à história da indústria de tabaco e do confronto entre sua rede social de stakeholders e a rede liderada pela Organização Mundial da Saúde, enfatizando-se a situação brasileira e o papel da Aliança de Controle do Tabagismo (ACT) como articuladora de uma multiplicidade de stakeholders contrários às estratégias da indústria no Brasil. O artigo busca delinear a problemática correlação entre produção, exportação e combate ao consumo de ...

  9. Faculty-led faculty development: evaluation and reflections on a distributed educational leadership model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzubeir, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This report describes and explores the impact of a series of faculty-led faculty development programs underpinned by principles of distributed educational leadership. We aimed to prepare faculty for their roles as facilitators and assessors in a newly implemented problem-based (PBL) graduate entry medical program. We asked participants attending a series of faculty development programs to evaluate workshops attended using an in-house designed survey. Overall descriptive statistics for all workshops and qualitative feedback for PBL workshops alone were examined. It was concluded that clinical faculty who are not specialized in medical education can offer high-quality, well-accepted training for their peers. Faculty development, underpinned by a distributed leadership approach which supports learning organization tenets, imaginative, flexible and democratic approaches to developing and nurturing expertise at all levels of the organization, is likely to lead to improvements in medical education. Despite the limitations of the survey approach to evaluation of faculty development programs, the information provided is useful both as a basis for decision making and program improvement.

  10. Fifth national stakeholder workshop summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    On April 9--11, 1997, the Department of Energy`s Office of Worker and Community Transition convened its fifth National Stakeholder Workshop. The workshop addressed a wide range of work force restructuring and community transition issues critical to the future success of the Department. Two important elements of the meeting were: (1) reviewing progress made on the challenges identified during the March 1996f stakeholder`s meeting in Atlanta, Georgia; and (2) identifying areas that needed priority attention during the early months of the second Clinton Administration. The format of the Workshop included several plenary sessions and a number of small group discussion sessions. The small group sessions focused on topics related to labor issues, work force restructuring, work force planning, community transition, and employee concerns. The sessions provided a wide range of views on worker and community transition issues. The workshop included presentations on the following topics: Welcome and introductions; Opening remarks; Community reuse organizations: recent accomplishments; Privatization: policy, practice and potential pitfalls; Department of Energy`s integrated training initiatives; Congressional perspective on work force restructuring; and, Privatization and the Ten Year Plan.

  11. Ontario Energy Board 2005 survey of stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    A survey was conducted among members of the Ontario Energy Board's (OEB) various stakeholder groups in order to measure the Board's performance and to help the Board identify areas for improvement in the way it operates. The survey included telephone interviews with consumer groups, advocacy groups, the energy sector, electricity and gas distributors, financial organizations as well as other stakeholders. The topics addressed in the survey were key energy issues and priority issues; the perceived role of the OEB; the OEB strengths and weaknesses; the importance of various OEB functions; the overall performance of the OEB; an evaluation of OEB communication with industry and consumers; an evaluation of service quality; and, awareness and participation in regulatory policy initiatives. Respondents used a 10-point scale in their evaluation. This report presented the main findings and their interpretations. Major stakeholders identified electricity supply issues and the price of electricity as being the most important energy issues facing Ontario. This report also presented the detailed findings for questions regarding the lack of generator capacity, policy stability, the coal phase out program, electricity blackouts, conservation, electricity restructuring and investment. The major finding of the survey was an overall increase in satisfaction with the OEB's performance. It was suggested that the OEB can improve in timeliness and providing consumer information. The major areas of strength were found to be its professionalism in conducting hearings and the fairness of the Board's decisions and regulations. tabs

  12. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Passive soil vapor extraction using borehole flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.S.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) derived from a three-year program of stakeholder involvement. PSVE takes advantage of the naturally occurring tendency of soil vapor to leave the subsurface during periods of low barometric pressure. PSVE seeks to expedite the release of volatile contaminants through the use of boreholes and technological enhancements. This report is for technology developers and those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders' perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment to make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of PSVE to the remediation problems they face. The report provides: stakeholders' final evaluation of the acceptability of PSVE in light of the technology's field test; stakeholders' principal comments concerning PSVE; requirements that stakeholders have of any remediation technology. Technology decision makers should take these conclusions into account in evaluating the effectiveness and acceptability of any remedial method proposed for their site. In addition, the report presents data requirements for the technology's field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on PSVE from stakeholders from Sandia National Laboratory, Rocky Flats, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory

  13. Stakeholder Involvement Throughout the Life Cycle of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This report demonstrates the importance of stakeholder involvement throughout the life cycle of all nuclear facilities; including operating reactors, temporary spent fuel storage facilities and final radioactive waste repositories and follows what is defined in the IAEA Safety Standards GS-R-3 where the stakeholders' expectations (identified as 'interested parties' in GS-R-3) shall be taken into consideration 'in the activities and interactions in the processes of the management system, with the aim of enhancing the satisfaction of interested parties while at the same time ensuring that safety is not compromised'. This report explains how involving stakeholders in decision making processes, even for those stakeholder groups that do not have a direct role in making those decisions, can enhance public confidence in the application of nuclear science and technology. In addition, this report presents general guidance on stakeholder involvement. It does not provide detailed procedures for developing and implementing stakeholder involvement programmes, and specifics regarding stakeholder involvement for particular types of nuclear facilities. However, this publication references reports that provide such details. This publication provides assistance to those responsible for planning, designing, constructing, operating or decommissioning a nuclear facility. In addition, regulatory organizations and other authorities overseeing nuclear activities or managing nuclear facility licensing processes are often seen as the main source of independent information for the general public; therefore, stakeholder involvement can demonstrate capability and trustworthiness of regulatory organizations as well. The role of stakeholder involvement at different stages of a facility's life cycle is discussed, with suggestions on developing the components of a comprehensive stakeholder involvement plan. Included is guidance on focusing communication with certain stakeholders, applying various

  14. Stakeholder involvement - a japanese perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, S.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional societal and cultural background of Japanese in general indicates the intrinsic difficulty in involving the public as stakeholders in the process of any type of decision making in policy matters. It is characterized by the long-taught virtue of harmonization and obedience to others. In addition, characteristic system of Japanese traditional industrial society, such as lifetime employment, seniority-based wage system, and enterprise-based labour union, encourages the loyalty to the employer/company, but not to the public. The public or ordinary citizens would seldom come out as stakeholders and express their true feelings or real opinions, even though younger generation is notably getting out from such a trend. On the other hand, it is a common practice in Japanese society for any business or administrative transactions to try to obtain 'consensus' among relevant parties concerned (stakeholders) by negotiations behind the curtain prior to the formal discussion. In this sense, 'stakeholders involvement' is accepted and practised as a matter of course, but mostly for actions between parties of equivalently influential status levels or between 'directly relevant' parties such as those between the different government agencies, between regulators and industries. The concept of 'Involving the public in decision making as stakeholders' is not yet fully understood nor accepted in Japan both by regulators and by the public so far as the issue of radiation protection is concerned. These situations are explained with some examples. (author)

  15. The International Finance Facility for Immunisation: stakeholders' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker-Buque, Tim; Mounier-Jack, Sandra

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate stakeholders' understanding and opinions of the International Finance Facility for Immunisation (IFFIm); to identify factors affecting funding levels; and to explore the future use of IFFIm. Between July and September 2015, we interviewed 33 individuals from 25 organizations identified as stakeholders in IFFIm. In total 22.5 hours of semi-structured interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using a framework method. Stakeholders' understanding of IFFIm's financing mechanism and its outcomes varied and many stakeholders wanted more information. Participants highlighted that the change in the macro-economic environment following the 2008 financial crisis affected national policy in donor countries and subsequently the number of new commitments IFFIm received. Since Gavi is now seen as a successful and mature organization, participants stated that donors prefer to donate directly to Gavi. The pharmaceutical industry valued IFFIm for providing funding stability and flexibility. Other stakeholders valued IFFIm's ability to access funds early and enable Gavi to increase vaccine coverage. Overall, stakeholders thought IFFIm was successful, but they had divergent views about IFFIm's on-going role. Participants listed two issues where bond financing mechanisms may be suitable: emergency preparedness and outcome-based time-limited interventions. The benefit of pledging funds through IFFIm needs to be re-evaluated. There are potential uses for bond financing to raise funds for other global health issues, but these must be carefully considered against criteria to establish effectiveness, with quantifiable pre-defined outcome indicators to evaluate performance.

  16. Stakeholder theory and reporting information The case of performance prism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartłomiej Nita

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to explain the stakeholder theory in the context of performance measurement in integrated reporting. Main research methods used in the article include logical reasoning, critical analysis of academic literature, and observation. The principal result of the discussion is included in the statement that the stakeholder theory in the field of accounting is reflected in the so-called integrated reporting. Moreover, among the large variety of performance measurement methods, such as balanced scorecard and others, the concept of performance prism can be considered as the only method that fully takes into account the wide range of stakeholders. The analysis performed leads to the conclusion that development in accounting research takes into account the objectives of an organization in the context of the so-called corporate social responsibility as well as performance reporting oriented towards the communication of the company with its environment and the various stakeholder groups.

  17. Effective stakeholder management for medical practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    E Zigiriadis; A Nicolaides

    2014-01-01

    The importance of organizational-stakeholder relationships is highlighted in most organizational studies literature. This article investigates the relationship between medical practices and their stakeholders and has been developed to provide guidance on stakeholder engagement and communication. It is intended to provide a useful reference point for all medical practices concerning stakeholder engagement activities. Direction is provided on how to identify and ul...

  18. ESMD Space Grant Faculty Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiang; Whitmore, Stephen; Radcliff, Roger; Misra, Prabhakar; Prasad, Nadipuram; Conrad, James; Lackey, Ellen; Selby, Gregory; Wersinger, Jean-Marie; Lambright, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    The strength of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate ESMD Faculty Project lies in its ability to meet National Aeronautics Space Administration NASA's Strategic Educational Outcome 1 by developing a sustainable and long-term integration of student involvement at academic institutions with all NASA Centers. This outcome is achieved by a three-fold approach: 1) by collecting Senior Design projects pertaining to Constellation work performed at each of the ten NASA Centers, 2) by engaging students at Minority Serving Institutions in the art of systems engineering and systems design of technologies required for space exploration, and 3) by identifying potential internships at each Center relative to exploration that provide students who are supported by their institutional Space Grant to engage in on-going mission-level and explorative systems designs. The objectives of the ESMD Faculty Project are to: 1. Aid the Centers (both Education Offices and associated technical organizations) in providing relevant opportunities for the ESMD Space Grant Program to support student and faculty in Senior Design projects 2. Enable better matches between the ESMD work required and what the Space Grant Consortia can do to effectively contribute to NASA programs 3. Provide the Space Grant Consortia an opportunity to strengthen relations with the NASA Centers 4. Develop better collective understanding of the U.S. Space Exploration Policy by the Center, Space Grant, faculty, Education Office, and students 5. Enable Space Grant institution faculty to better prepare their students to meet current and future NASA needs 6. Enable the Center Education Offices to strengthen their ties to their technical organizations and Space Grant Consortia 7. Aid KSC in gaining a greater and more detailed understanding of each of the Center activities Senior Design projects are intended to stimulate undergraduate students on current NASA activities related to lunar, Mars, and other planetary missions

  19. Survey of generational aspects of nurse faculty organizational commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Lara; Candela, Lori; Gutierrez, Antonio P

    2011-01-01

    To describe organizational commitment and generational differences in nursing faculty. The study provides new knowledge on generational differences in organizational commitment among nursing faculty with regard to work values, perceived organizational support, perceived person-organization fit, developmental experiences, and global job satisfaction. A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used with random stratified sampling procedures. Surveys measuring organizational commitment and related constructs were sent electronically to 4886 faculty, yielding a 30% response rate. Significant differences were noted between generations of faculty regarding organizational commitment and related measures. Include specific strategies for fostering commitment from each generation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Modelling with stakeholders - Next generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinov, Alexey; Kolagani, Nagesh; McCall, Michael K; Glynn, Pierre D.; Kragt, Marit E; Ostermann, Frank O; Pierce, Suzanne A; Ramu, Palaniappan

    2016-01-01

    This paper updates and builds on ‘Modelling with Stakeholders’ Voinov and Bousquet, 2010 which demonstrated the importance of, and demand for, stakeholder participation in resource and environmental modelling. This position paper returns to the concepts of that publication and reviews the progress made since 2010. A new development is the wide introduction and acceptance of social media and web applications, which dramatically changes the context and scale of stakeholder interactions and participation. Technology advances make it easier to incorporate information in interactive formats via visualization and games to augment participatory experiences. Citizens as stakeholders are increasingly demanding to be engaged in planning decisions that affect them and their communities, at scales from local to global. How people interact with and access models and data is rapidly evolving. In turn, this requires changes in how models are built, packaged, and disseminated: citizens are less in awe of experts and external authorities, and they are increasingly aware of their own capabilities to provide inputs to planning processes, including models. The continued acceleration of environmental degradation and natural resource depletion accompanies these societal changes, even as there is a growing acceptance of the need to transition to alternative, possibly very different, life styles. Substantive transitions cannot occur without significant changes in human behaviour and perceptions. The important and diverse roles that models can play in guiding human behaviour, and in disseminating and increasing societal knowledge, are a feature of stakeholder processes today.

  1. Linking environmental and stakeholder management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    1999-01-01

    Regulation has been an important instrument in pushing the business community towards a more sustainable way of conduct. But recently an increasing pressure from a growing number of stakeholders including employees, customers, neighbours, NGO's etc has been observed. The purpose of this paper...

  2. Corporate responses to stakeholder activism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldam, Julie; Krause Hansen, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Corporations are increasingly expected to act responsibly. The purpose of this paper is to examine two types of corporate responses to these expectations: overt and covert responses. Specifically, it examines oil companies’ involvement in multi-stakeholder initiatives and sponsorships (overt...... responses) and their monitoring of critics, including non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and activist organisations (covert responses)....

  3. Involving stakeholders in evaluating environmental restoration technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, G.H.; Serie, P.J.

    1993-02-01

    Involving citizens, interest groups, and regulators in environmental restoration and waste management programs is a challenge for government agencies and the organizations that support them. To be effective, such involvement activities must identify all individuals and groups who have a stake in the cleanup. Their participation must be early, substantive, and meaningful. Stockholders must be able to see how their input was considered and used, and feel that a good- faith effort was made to reconcile conflicting objectives. The Integrated Demonstration for Cleanup of Volatile Organic Compounds at Arid Sites (VOC-Arid ID) is a Department of Energy Office of Technology Development project located at Hanford. Along with technical evaluation of innovative cleanup technologies, the program is conducting an institutional assessment of regulatory and public acceptance of new technologies. Through a series of interviews and workshops, and use of a computerized information management tool, stakeholders are having a voice in the evaluation. Public and regulatory reaction has been positive

  4. Stakeholder participation in health impact assessment: A multicultural approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negev, Maya; Davidovitch, Nadav; Garb, Yaakov; Tal, Alon

    2013-01-01

    The literature on impact assessment (HIA) registers the importance of stakeholder participation in the assessment process, but still lacks a model for engaging stakeholders of diverse ethnic, professional and sectorial backgrounds. This paper suggests that the multicultural approach can contribute to HIA through a revision of the generic 5-step HIA model, and its implementation in a metropolitan plan in Southern Israel. The health issue scoped by the stakeholders in the HIA is related to land uses in the vicinity of the national hazardous industry and hazardous waste site. The stakeholders were representatives of the diverse populations at stake, including rural Bedouins and Jewish city dwellers, as well as representatives from the public sector, private sector, non-governmental organizations and academia. The case study revealed that a multicultural stakeholder participation process helps to uncover health issues known to the community which were not addressed in the original plan, and provides local knowledge regarding health conditions that is especially valuable when scientific data is uncertain or absent. It enables diverse stakeholders to prioritize the health issues that will be assessed. The case study also reveals ways in which the model needs revisions and improvements such as in recruitment of diverse participants. This paper presents a multicultural model of HIA and discusses some of the challenges that are faced when HIA is implemented in the context of current decision-making culture. -- Highlights: • We revised the generic HIA model in light of the multicultural approach. • We tested the model in a case study of zoning a hazardous industry site. • Multicultural stakeholder participation uncovers health issues known to communities. • It enables community prioritization of health issues. • We present a model for multicultural stakeholder participation in HIA

  5. Stakeholder engagement in policy development: challenges and opportunities for human genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Amy A.; Harris-Wai, Julie N.

    2015-01-01

    Along with rapid advances in human genomics, policies governing genomic data and clinical technologies have proliferated. Stakeholder engagement is widely lauded as an important methodology for improving clinical, scientific, and public health policy decision making. The purpose of this paper is to examine how stakeholder engagement is used to develop policies in genomics research and public health areas, as well as to identify future priorities for conducting evidence-based stakeholder engagements. We focus on exemplars in biobanking and newborn screening to illustrate a variety of current stakeholder engagement in policy-making efforts. Each setting provides an important context for examining the methods of obtaining and integrating informed stakeholder voices into the policy-making process. While many organizations have an interest in engaging stakeholders with regard to genomic policy issues, there is broad divergence with respect to the stakeholders involved, the purpose of engagements, when stakeholders are engaged during policy development, methods of engagement, and the outcomes reported. Stakeholder engagement in genomics policy development is still at a nascent stage. Several challenges of using stakeholder engagement as a tool for genomics policy development remain, and little evidence regarding how to best incorporate stakeholder feedback into policy-making processes is currently available. PMID:25764215

  6. Stakeholder engagement in policy development: challenges and opportunities for human genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Amy A; Harris-Wai, Julie N

    2015-12-01

    Along with rapid advances in human genomics, policies governing genomic data and clinical technologies have proliferated. Stakeholder engagement is widely lauded as an important methodology for improving clinical, scientific, and public health policy decision making. The purpose of this paper is to examine how stakeholder engagement is used to develop policies in genomics research and public health areas, as well as to identify future priorities for conducting evidence-based stakeholder engagements. We focus on exemplars in biobanking and newborn screening to illustrate a variety of current stakeholder engagement in policy-making efforts. Each setting provides an important context for examining the methods of obtaining and integrating informed stakeholder voices into the policy-making process. While many organizations have an interest in engaging stakeholders with regard to genomic policy issues, there is broad divergence with respect to the stakeholders involved, the purpose of engagements, when stakeholders are engaged during policy development, methods of engagement, and the outcomes reported. Stakeholder engagement in genomics policy development is still at a nascent stage. Several challenges of using stakeholder engagement as a tool for genomics policy development remain, and little evidence regarding how to best incorporate stakeholder feedback into policy-making processes is currently available.

  7. Faculty Development Proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kelsey A.

    An integrative approach to departmental design proposed for the Department of Criminal Justice at the University of the District of Columbia is described. The proposed curriculum classification framework for faculty assignment consists of three matrices: social behavior and humanities courses, technical courses, and philosophical courses. For the…

  8. Architecture faculty, Prague

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnídková, Vendula

    -, č. 40 (2011), s. 30-31 ISSN 1573-3815 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80330511 Keywords : Czech contemporary architecture * Alena Šrámková * Architecture faculty, Prague Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture , Cultural Heritage

  9. Evaluation of a Workplace Disability Prevention Intervention in Canada: Examining Differing Perceptions of Stakeholders

    OpenAIRE

    Maiwald, Karin; de Rijk, Angelique; Guzman, Jaime; Schonstein, Eva; Yassi, Annalee

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Workplace disability prevention is important, but stakeholders can differ in their appreciation of such interventions. We present a responsive evaluation of a workplace disability prevention intervention in a Canadian healthcare organization. Three groups of stakeholders were included: designers of the intervention, deliverers, and workers. The aim was to examine the appreciation of this intervention by analyzing the discrepancies with respect to what these various stakeholders s...

  10. Managing stakeholder ambiguity in the international mining sector: the case of Goldcorp Inc. in Guatemala

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieson, Travis Sinclair

    2015-01-01

    Canadian mining companies operating in the developing world face a complex business environment where substantial stakeholder ambiguity must be managed. Stakeholder ambiguity occurs when stakeholders interpret company actions or information they receive in different ways depending on their individual goals, demands, and opinions. Through interviews with company managers and leaders of civil-society organizations, this study endeavours to determine how Canadian-based senior mining company G...

  11. Use of shared faculty in U.S. and Canadian dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Darryl T; Farrar, Suzanne K; Caplan, Daniel J; Lanphier, Terrence F; Panza, Jeanne C; Ritter, André V

    2013-03-01

    Dental schools are facing substantial financial challenges and a shortage of faculty members. One solution to address these issues has been to hire "shared" faculty members, i.e., faculty members whose primary appointment is at one institution who are hired by another institution to teach a course or part of a course. This is a controversial concept. A survey of academic deans at U.S. and Canadian dental schools was conducted for this study; thirty-nine (54 percent) of the seventy-two academic deans completed the online survey. This survey found that the use of shared faculty members is not rare amongst U.S. and Canadian dental schools and that the opinions of the academic deans about the use of shared faculty members ranged widely-from strong support to strong disapproval. Using shared faculty members has advantages and disadvantages for students, the shared faculty members, and both institutions. Many of the disadvantages could be potentially minimized by stakeholders' working together to develop collaborative arrangements. Networks could be developed in which institutions coordinate hiring of shared faculty members based on what expertise is needed. Financial challenges and shortages of faculty members are unlikely to be resolved in the near future, but use of shared faculty members is one promising approach to begin to meet these challenges.

  12. Connecting to the Professor: Impact of the Student-Faculty Relationship in a Highly Challenging Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micari, Marina; Pazos, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    While many factors play into college student success, interaction with faculty has been identified as a key component. In highly challenging and anxiety-provoking courses, the student-faculty relationship may be all the more important. This study uses organic chemistry as a case example to investigate the role of the student-faculty relationship…

  13. Stakeholder orientation vs. shareholder value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Caspar

    2003-01-01

    Abstract: This article analyzes the conflict of interests between shareholders andother stakeholders, including when such conflicts of interests may arise. It is arguedthat shareholder value cannot be justified simply by referring to any prerogativeproperty rights of the shareholders. Instead, sh...... cautious the legal systemshould use a doctrine based on the `company's interests'. In addition, the notion of afirm's social responsibility is critically evaluated together with the associated pitfallsof accepting this concept....

  14. Business-NGO interactions in a multi-stakeholder context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijstee, M.M. van; Glasbergen, P.

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to contribute to our understanding of the conditions under which Business– nongovernmental organization (NGO) interactions lead to improvements in corporate social responsibility (CSR), by assessing the role that the stakeholder context of the firm plays in the

  15. The role of Stakeholders on implementing Universal Services in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do Manh, Thai; Falch, Morten; Williams, Idongesit

    2015-01-01

    in performing the policy. The authors are to examine the stakeholders such as the national government, international organizations, policy intermediaries, companies, and customers/citizens via applying the qualitative method to gather data and analyse the secondary document. The qualitative approach...

  16. A stakeholder dialogue on European vulnerability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vega-Leinert, de la A.C.; Schröter, D.; Leemans, R.; Fritsch, U.; Pluimers, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    A stakeholder dialogue was embedded in the ATEAM project to facilitate the development and dissemination of its European-wide vulnerability assessment of global change impacts. Participating stakeholders were primarily ecosystem managers and policy advisers interested in potential impacts on

  17. How We Engage Our Pesticide Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    The success of EPA's pesticide program is directly connected to our efforts to engage all stakeholders. In addition to meetings on pesticide-specific actions, we sponsor advisory committees that include diverse, independent stakeholders.

  18. EU health stakeholders and patient safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisette Tiddens-Engwirda

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The Standing Committee of European Doctors (CPME has been actively promoting patient safety for a long time, well before the issue was given a firm place on the European and international agendas. Among its efforts to help raise the profile of patient safety, CPME organised a conference on the 4th and 5th April 2005 together with a group of EU health stakeholders that covered the whole spectrum of healthcare delivery.

    The European Conference ‘Patient Safety – Making it happen!’ took place in Luxembourg under the auspices of the Luxembourg EU presidency and EU Commissioner Kyprianou and resulted in the “Luxembourg Declaration on Patient Safety”.

    This Declaration contains recommendations to the EU, national authorities and healthcare organizations. It underlines the added value of the EU and recommends joining forces with the WHO Alliance for Patient Safety.

    A culture of transparency, trust and safety is being sought for through the suggested use of e-health, flows of health information, patient involvement and reporting systems. CPME saw perseverance and commitment pay off as patient safety is now seen as a priority by all health stakeholders and EU institutional bodies (European Commission, presidencies and Council. However all parties realise full well that the Luxembourg Declaration on Patient Safety is only the first step. All efforts are now focussed on follow up and implementation.

  19. Mentoring and Pretenure Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Alan A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The University of British Columbia (Canada) Dental School uses teaching and research mentors for new faculty, together with a structured semiannual review process, to clearly identify faculty expectations for tenure. Pretenure faculty have appreciated the clear and regular input concerning their progress, and mentors enjoy the interaction with…

  20. Faculty Awareness of Textbook Prices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Robert; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports that variation in textbook prices is not correlated with textbook quality as judged by instructors and that university faculty are less price conscious when selecting textbooks than are community college faculty. States that, if faculty had greater access to price information, textbook prices would decrease. Makes recommendations for…

  1. Business analysis of opportunities stakeholders management in achieving positive synergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Nuzhdin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main purposes of processing organizations development is business-activity realization ensuring value-added increase in terms of constantly changing vector and the level of external environment factors influence. In such conditions stakeholder management should be oriented (directed to the use of methodology realizing the advantages of divergent (variative and process- and cost approaches providing creative character of development strategy. The most expedient thing here is the use of a wide range of business-analysis methodical tools as a subprocess of stakeholder management revealing the opportunities of the specific situation (development of unforeseen circumstances to ensure the alternativeness of the same strategy purpose achievement and to manage the development of integration organization forms as flexible module organization systems (FMOS. In the framework of business-analysis procedures the parameters of interrelations with the key (main stakeholders are considered as strategic ones in realizing stakeholder management processes. The structure of FMOS developed on the principle of technological business-cycle and formed under the influence of additive effect of positive synergy allows implementation of the new format of business relationship with strategic stakeholders. This format differs from the traditional one in the intraspecific exchange not associated with an increase in transaction costs. The quantity reduction of the specific transaction costs and the unification of several businesses potentials for strategic purpose achievement corresponding to their business interests leads to the positive synergetic effect that according to the process-cost approach in stakeholder management results in added value increase as well.

  2. CSR Model Implementation from School Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Suzannah

    2006-01-01

    Despite comprehensive school reform (CSR) model developers' best intentions to make school stakeholders adhere strictly to the implementation of model components, school stakeholders implementing CSR models inevitably make adaptations to the CSR model. Adaptations are made to CSR models because school stakeholders internalize CSR model practices…

  3. 40 CFR 155.52 - Stakeholder engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stakeholder engagement. 155.52 Section... REGISTRATION STANDARDS AND REGISTRATION REVIEW Registration Review Procedures § 155.52 Stakeholder engagement... Agency may meet with stakeholders regarding a forthcoming or ongoing registration review. For example...

  4. Info avond Go&Learn stakeholders

    OpenAIRE

    Brabant, Karen

    2014-01-01

    De infoavond licht de stakeholders in over de planning en invulling van de circuits en de praktische organisatie ervan. De stakeholders worden ingelicht over de huidige realisaties binnen het project, zowel op nationaal als internationaal niveau. Het geeft aan de stakeholders eveneens de kans om te netwerken.

  5. A Desire for Growth: Online Full-Time Faculty's Perceptions of Evaluation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith DeCosta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available College and universities evaluate the teaching performance of faculty members in a variety of ways. Benefits to effective faculty evaluation include advancing the scholarship of teaching and learning, as well as improving the functionality and innovation of courses, curriculum, departments, and ultimately the broader community (Boyer, 1990; Glassick, Huber, & Maeroff, 1997. While there is ample research related to the evaluation of faculty in traditional settings, there have been fewer studies examining online faculty members’ perceptions of evaluation processes. Further, due to the growth of online education, the existing evaluation scales, including those used in traditional settings, have been called into question (Berk, 2013; Hathorn & Hathorn, 2010; Rothman, Romeo, Brennan, & Mitchell, 2011. This qualitative study examines one university’s online full-time faculty and their perceptions of the tools and processes used to evaluate their teaching. Through a systematic qualitative content analysis of survey data, findings indicate that online faculty members have a desire to grow as instructors, focusing little on modality or task-oriented expectations as a means for growth. Participants expressed an interest in holistic, descriptive evaluation feedback by a range of stakeholders, particularly those with content knowledge. Study findings have implications for administrators and other stakeholders related to online full-time faculty, including the processes and documents through which they are evaluated.

  6. Stakeholders, responsabilidad social en ecuador Stakeholders, social responsibility in ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Morán

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available La importancia de la responsabilidad social empresarial (RSE radica en el involucramiento y el compromiso de la empresa hacia los diferentes grupos de interés que interactúan. Algunos grupos son afectados a causa de las actividades operacionales de las organizaciones, generando impactos en dimensiones sociales, económicas y ambientales. El enfoque central de la investigación es la determinación de la incidencia de la RSE en los patrones de vida de los grupos que intervienen en la cadena de valor ecuatoriana. En adelante estos son llamados stakeholders. Se precisa como antesala, los hechos y precedentes que marcaron la evolución y participación del modelo de negocio en los diferentes países de Latinoamérica. Sobre esta base, se realiza una revisión conceptual de la responsabilidad social en las empresas, la ISO 26000 y la posición de los stakeholders. El estudio se fundamenta en un análisis comparativo de países como: Chile, Colombia y Ecuador; identificando similitudes de su entorno, particularidades, fortalezas y debilidades en materia de RSE.

  7. Reviewing the Role of Stakeholders in Operational Research: Opportunities for Group Model Building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooyert, V. de; Rouwette, E.A.J.A.; Kranenburg, H.L. van

    2013-01-01

    Stakeholders have always received much attention in system dynamics, especially in the group model building tradition, which emphasizes the deep involvement of a client group in building a system dynamics model. In organizations, stakeholders are gaining more and more attention by managers who try

  8. Lessons learnt from stakeholder engagement in the UK Environment Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, Steve

    2004-01-01

    The Environment Agency has many reasons and occasions for engaging with stakeholders and does so very frequently. Many of these are relatively formal, often statutory, consultations which are part of the determination of regulatory permits. Other consultations are part of the Agency's role as developer, for example in the construction of flood defence schemes. The Agency also consults nationally on its significant policies, such as the stocking of salmon fisheries. This paper gives some examples of lessons learnt from the Agency's own stakeholder engagements and also from our participation in those led by other organizations. In the next section it also describes the Agency's current approach to stakeholder consultation and engagement. (author)

  9. Intermediate Collaborative Adaptive Management Strategies Build Stakeholder Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha C. Monroe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to implement collaborative adaptive management (CAM often suffer from challenges, such as an unwillingness of managers to share power, unresolved conflicts between stakeholders, and lack of capacity among stakeholders. Some aspects considered essential to CAM, e.g., trust and stakeholder capacity, may be more usefully viewed as goals for intermediate strategies rather than a set of initial conditions. From this perspective, intermediate steps that focus on social learning and building experience could overcome commonly cited barriers to CAM. An exploration of Springs Basin Working Groups, organized around major clusters of freshwater springs in north Florida, provides a case study of how these intermediate steps enable participants to become more reasonable and engaged. This strategy may be easily implemented by agencies beginning a CAM process.

  10. The municipality as a stakeholder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmqvist, Roland

    2006-01-01

    The author explains how local politicians look upon the dialogue regarding nuclear installations in their municipalities. As seen from the map of European reactors there is a lot of local districts affected by nuclear operations. What has a mayor from such a community to say about the shut-down phase of such operations and especially about the need for communication between stakeholders when closing and decommissioning a nuclear power reactor? To answer this question the author has structured his presentation into 4 parts as follows: 1. The European municipalities ? some characteristics; 2. The siting of NPPs (nuclear power plants) in Europe; 3. The shutdown, decommissioning and the dismantling phases; 4. Lessons learnt

  11. National stakeholder workshop summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This is a summary of the plenary sessions and small group discussion sessions from the fourth National Stakeholder Workshop sponsored by the DOE Office of Worker and Community Transition held in Atlanta, Georgia on March 13--15, 1996. Topics of the sessions included work force planning and restructuring, worker participation in health and safety, review of actions and commitments, lessons learned in collective bargaining agreements, work force restructuring guidance, work force planning, update on community transition activities. Also included are appendices listing the participants and DOE contacts.

  12. Stakeholders involvement by HTA Organisations: why is so different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazza, Marianna; Jommi, Claudio

    2012-05-01

    To investigate stakeholder involvement by Health Technology Assessment Organisations (HTAOs) in France, Spain, England and Wales, Germany, Sweden, and The Netherlands and to examine whether this involvement depends on (i) the administrative tradition and the relevant conception of the relationship between state and society (contractarian and corporative vs. organic), (ii) the general structure of the healthcare system (HCS) (Bismarckian vs. Beveridgian system), and (iii) the role of Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and HTAOs in the HCS. Given the exploratory nature of the study, we considered interviews based on semi-structured questionnaires the most appropriate data-gathering technique. The interviews were administered to 16 key personnel in the HTAOs concerned. We have also carried out a literature review on HTAOs and stakeholders (1999-2011) using PubMed, Ebsco, JSTOR and Wiley Science. In contractarian and (to a lesser extent) Bismarckian models, stakeholders are more involved. The administrative tradition and the HCS appear less important when the HTA is binding and used for regulatory purposes. In such situations, stakeholders are more intensively involved because their participation provides an opportunity for HTAOs to achieve consensus and legitimacy in advance. Despite the limitations of the research (we did not conduct multiple interviews for each HTAO, and key informants were not always available) and its exploratory nature, we can conclude that models of stakeholders involvement cannot easily be transferred from one country to another due to the importance of national administrative traditions and the characteristics of HCSs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Stakeholders Analysis: A new field of research in tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Fabiano Amâncio Vieira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to make a bibliography on works about the stakeholder analysis and identify possible research topics in tourism. The survey was conducted in January 2010, using the base of science web of references, organized according to their impact factor of publication, focusing on the theme stakeholder analysis, which found 1,296 articles from 200 of these were selected most relevant (by impact factor, which was made a preliminary analysis of its contents and addressed effectively separated those theoretical aspects of stakeholder analysis, making a list of 51 articles. In relation to its central theme, rose: Environment (13 Social Networking (8, Decision Making, (9 Public Policy (6, Project Management (4 and Literature Review (11. Predominates in these articles the qualitative approach with 42 (82%. There is growing interest on the use of thematic analysis of stakeholders, from 2005 the frequency of publication of these articles have been stepped up (39 articles, demonstrating the potential and maturity of the theory. He also noted that there are different theoretical approaches to stakeholder analysis that can be exploited in research on tourism, and found five articles addressing the topic.

  14. Stakeholder involvement in CSR strategy-making?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Leila

    2014-01-01

    listening to others in the strategy-making process rather than directly involving others in decision-making. Also, because non-stakeholders, such as paid-for consultants, are found to be note-worthy influencers in the CSR strategy-making process, it is concluded that the process is not only a stakeholder......A given characteristic of successful corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs is that they reflect stakeholder expectations and preferences for corporate behavior. This study examines the process by which this alignment is sought by CSR managers in the CSR strategy-making process. Through...... reliance on stakeholder management theories, and with a particular focus on how and why managers communicate with stakeholders, the extent to which the company-stakeholder alignment process in CSR strategy-making reflects modern, enlightened approaches to stakeholder relations is assessed. This assessment...

  15. Towards a More Holistic Stakeholder Analysis Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedereviciute, Kristina; Valentini, Chiara

    2011-01-01

    are identified based on the dimensions of connectivity and the content shared. Accordingly, the study introduces four groups of important actors from social media: unconcerned lurkers, unconcerned influencers, concerned lurkers and concerned influencers and integrates them into the existing Stakeholder Salience...... in finding stakeholders on new environments (social media), where connectivity and relationships play a key role. The argument stems from the need to assess stakeholder presence beyond the dyadic ties. Consequently, the combination of the Stakeholder Salience Model (SSM) and social network analysis (SNA......) is proposed as a more holistic solution for stakeholder identification including those from social media. A process of finding “unknown” but important stakeholders from social media was identified incorporating the content search and the principles of SNA. Consequently, stakeholders from social media...

  16. Student and Faculty Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty: A Qualitative Single-Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, Kristina R.

    2012-01-01

    Educators are concerned that academic dishonesty is increasing among students, particularly in higher education. There is not a single definition of academic dishonesty accepted by all stakeholders in the field of education. Most studies of academic dishonesty do not include both student and faculty perceptions of academic dishonesty. An in-depth…

  17. Leadership Competencies: Do They Differ for Women and Under-Represented Minority Faculty Members?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarupski, Kimberly A.; Levine, Rachel B.; Yang, Wan Rou; González-Fernández, Marlís; Bodurtha, Joann; Barone, Michael A.; Fivush, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    The literature on leadership competencies does not include an understanding of how stakeholders perceive competencies for women and under-represented minority faculty members. We surveyed three groups of leaders (N = 113) to determine their perceptions of the importance of 23 leadership competencies. All three groups endorsed the same five…

  18. Developing a stakeholder engagement strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Shell Canada's social performance plan was outlined in this presentation. Stakeholder engagement is a key strategy in the company's response to the concerns and broader priorities of different groups and individuals affected by their operations. A review of the business and societal values of stakeholder engagement was presented. Key benefits include greater profitability; protection of the environment; effective resource management; community benefits; and the delivery of value to customers. It was suggested that a continuous engagement process helps companies to assess impacts and work on strategies to avoid and mitigate negative impacts. A framework for social performance management was presented. It was noted that accountability and transparency are key components of Shell's progress towards sustainable development, and their direct and indirect contributions to the communities and societies where they operate. The social impact of core business operations is now a focus of the company. Key concerns of the social performance plan include environmental and health impacts; land use and changes in local economies; cultural concerns; and infrastructure impacts. An outline of Shell's Listening and Responding Program was also provided. refs., tabs., figs

  19. Motivating the Stakeholders, a Feature of SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Raluca ROBU

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Motivation, in a narrow meaning, based on a classical vision on the organisation and management, aims only at the employees or staff of the organization. This optics still predominates both in theory and in the worldwide managerial practice. Motivation, in a broad meaning, contoured in recent years, based on a modern vision on the organization and management is centred on the stakeholders, namely on those people, categories of staff and organisms who have major interests in developing the activity and performances of the organisation. In order to understand motivation, the managers must first understand the reasons why the individuals behave in a certain way and for which they have certain reactions under threatening situations or by which influencing is attempted. Motivation is an internal process, not an imperative one which can be compelled from the outside. Managers must understand the motivation strategies, the way in which they succeed or fail on the grounds of the way in which they succeed in influencing the inner motivations of the employees.

  20. Results from the Wisdom stakeholder workshop on restoration management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisbet, A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A Workshop to extend the Involvement of Stakeholders in Decisions On restoration Management (WISDOM) will be held in Oxford in September 2003. The aim of the workshop is to promote awareness and interest in the wider application of stakeholder involvement in the formulation of strategies for the management of contaminated agricultural land and produce following a nuclear accident. A network of stakeholder groups has already been set up under the auspices of the European Communities 5th Framework Programme (FP5). The network, given the acronym FARMING, involves more than 100 stakeholders in UK, Finland, Belgium, Greece and France. Membership tends to be at a senior level and comprises a wide range of Government and non-government organizations, including the farming sector, the food, milk and water industries, consumers and green groups. The stakeholder groups have met regularly since 2001 and have advanced contingency planning and emergency response, both nationally and on a European basis. A compendium of countermeasure options produced by another FP5 project, STRATEGY, has helped provide stakeholders with a common focus for discussion and evaluation. The 2 1/2 day workshop comprises a mixture of invited and proffered papers as well as facilitated group discussions and plenary sessions that will address the following issues: lessons learnt from stakeholder engagement; influence of regional characteristics on countermeasure selection; practical aspects of countermeasure implementation; crisis management; maintaining consumer confidence; acceptability of intervention limits; social, ethical and economic consequences; future prospects for stakeholder networks. More than 30 FARMING stakeholders and facilitators have expressed an interest in attending the WISDOM workshop. GOs and NGOs will both be represented. There will also be representatives from the STRATEGY project and the European Commission. Invitations have been issued to representatives of a further

  1. Effective stakeholder management for medical practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Zigiriadis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of organizational-stakeholder relationships is highlighted in most organizational studies literature. This article investigates the relationship between medical practices and their stakeholders and has been developed to provide guidance on stakeholder engagement and communication. It is intended to provide a useful reference point for all medical practices concerning stakeholder engagement activities. Direction is provided on how to identify and ultimately engage with stakeholders. It should hopefully further develop the effectiveness of engagement efforts that are undertaken between a medical practice and its stakeholders. The ability of a medical practice to cultivate and sustain strong relationships with its prominent stakeholder groups greatly enhances the likelihood that the relationship will endure. Medical practitioners in South Africa are generally in urgent need of pursuing new ways of delivering quality health care through developing new service models that have been developed with the help of relevant stakeholders. Since stakeholder relationship management is critical for corporate sustainability, medical practice management should seek strategic direction by investigating the relative competitive threat and relative supportive value of each stakeholder and then classify them accordingly.

  2. Helping faculty enhance scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawranik, Pamela; Thorpe, Karran M

    2008-04-01

    Nurse educators face a myriad of challenges (e.g., changing student populations, increased demand for the use of technology, faculty shortages, and facilitating the development of self-confidence and competence in students) as they endeavor to enhance scholarship and quality in nursing education. Scholarship encompasses four separate but integrated elements (i.e., discovery, integration, application, and teaching) that need to be instilled in nursing students to prepare them for diverse roles in the profession of nursing. Implications for nurse educators relate to creating curricula that support scholarship, technological and interprofessional opportunities, and strategies for socializing students into scholarship.

  3. Comparison research on stakeholders analysis of disposition of medical dispute between China and abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We learn about the methods, process, effects of each stakeholder and the principles of the disposition of medical dispute home and abroad through stakeholder analysis. Methods: We investigate the methods, process and the principles of the disposition of medical dispute home and abroad by literature retrieval, key informant interview and depth interview. Results: The stakeholders of medical disputes mainly include patients and families, medical staff and hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, governments, laws, non-government organizations and media. They play different roles in medical disputes and have different effects. Over all, patients and families, medical staff and hospitals have the greatest effect and then laws, media, government, non-government organizations and pharmaceutical companies. Conclusion: Different stakeholders affect the disposition of medical disputes differently. It is crucial to establish harmonious relationship between patients and doctors and to build harmonious society by untangling the responsibility between all the stakeholders and dispose medical disputes quickly and effectively.

  4. Management of sustainable tourism destination through stakeholder cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božena Krce Miočić

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Destination presents a set of different organizations and individuals who can work towards realising the same objectives or their objectives can be diametrically opposed. Harmonisation of such objectives in a unique strategic development of the entire destination is usually taken over by destination management organization (DMO established to accomplish the mentioned objective. The opposed interests in such a system as complex as tourism result in the degradation of space and society in which tourism takes place. Therefore sustainable development in tourism represents a primary concept of development today. Tourism is a fast growing phenomenon and its sustainable development represents a necessity. Besides the positive economic outputs of tourism, we should also mention its negative impact on the particular destination, the environmental degradation to some extent, as well as socio-economic elements of local community. Accordingly, multi-stakeholder concept in destination management should include all interest and influential groups in tourism development planning. Such integrated destination management connects all stakeholders independent from influence or interest powers to participate directly or indirectly in creating and implementing the quality tourism development. This concept’s basic function is connecting and coordinating stakeholders with different interests within a tourism destination, in order to create quality product and a recognizable destination image, and to achieve a long-term sustainable competitiveness on the market. However, based on the stakeholder approach, the most emphasized issue in sustainable tourism development concept is the government that holds a key role in socio-economic development. In this paper, we analysed current involvement of stakeholders in Zadar County tourism development and examined their interest in future involvement in sustainable destination development. Based on the analysis of focus group

  5. A quick needs assessment of key stakeholder groups on the role of family medicine in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Sanders

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Zambia is a nation of nine million people, and has too few physicians to meet the country’s health needs. Following the strategy of other sub-Saharan countries, Zambia has developed a training programme in family medicine to help improve the medical competencies of its physician workforce. A needs assessment was undertaken to better understand the landscape into which Zambian family medicine is being placed. Methods. In 2014, a nine-question survey in Likert-scale format was developed, validated, and then delivered to four stakeholder groups: (i practicing clinical physicians, (ii the general public, (iii the University of Zambia’s School of Medicine’s academic faculty and (iv medical students. The needs assessment was delivered through several different mechanisms: via web-based service, to respondents’ email addresses; in paper form, to population samples of convenience; and verbally, through face-to-face encounters. Results. The number of stakeholders from each group who responded to the needs assessment were: clinical physicians, 27; general public, 15; academic faculty, 14; and medical students, 31. Five of the nine survey statements achieved super-majority consensus, with >66% of stakeholders in each group agreeing. Two additional statements achieved a simple-majority consensus with >50% agreement within each stakeholder group. Conclusion. This survey suggests that there is a broad-based a priori understanding of family medicine in Zambia, and general agreement that its presence would be valuable to Zambia’s healthcare system.

  6. Nursing faculty shortage in 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Jennifer M

    2009-01-01

    As everyone is well aware, we are in the midst of a nursing shortage-one with no end in sight at the present time. But are you aware that we also have a shortage of nursing faculty? This article will briefly describe the current and predicted shortage of faculty, potential reasons for the shortage, current ways of coping, and the future for nursing faculty.

  7. Defining the Stakeholder Concept for Political Marketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormrod, Robert

    The concept of a ‘stakeholder’ is often misused in the academic literature; stakeholders can range from the few actors with which the organisation has a direct interaction (Carroll 1993), to anything that can exert some form of influence over the organisation, including nature, the deceased...... and the unborn (Starik 1995). It is therefore necessary to provide a precise definition of the stakeholder concept to maintain academic rigour. However, a specification of the nature of the stakeholder concept is generally missing in political marketing literature. This paper addresses this issue by discussing...... how the stakeholder concept is understood, and then applies the stakeholder concept to the political marketing context, proposing a definition of the stakeholder concept for political marketing research....

  8. Stakeholders in the Political Marketing Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormrod, Robert

    /strategic and broad/narrow dimensions. Building on the assumption that ‘political marketing is different’, the paper argues that stakeholders can be considered as direct or indirect depending on which of the three interaction marketplaces of the political exchange triad the political actor-stakeholder interaction......Stakeholders influence the ability of organisations to achieve their aims, but little work has been carried out into understanding the stakeholder concept as applied to the political marketing context. This paper first discusses the contextual nature of stakeholders using normative...... occurs in. Finally, it is proposed that in the political marketing context, the stakeholder concept can be defined as ‘context-specific actors that directly or indirectly influence or are influenced by the political actor’....

  9. Stakeholder confidence and radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Any significant decisions regarding geologic disposal of radioactive waste will need a comprehensive public review and a thorough involvement of all relevant stakeholders, such as waste generators, waste management agencies, regulatory authorities, local communities and elected officials. The participation of non-technical stakeholders will become increasingly important as more countries move towards siting and implementing geologic repositories. The decision-making process and avenues for stakeholder involvement differ from country to country. It is important to identify similarities and differences, understand the key concerns of the various stakeholders, and develop means to interact effectively. The Nuclear Energy Agency recently set up a Forum on Stakeholder Confidence charged with distilling the lessons that can be learnt from national and international experience. These proceedings of the Forums first workshop held in August 2000 provide an overview of OECD countries' experience in the field of stakeholder confidence and radioactive waste disposal. (author)

  10. Defining the Stakeholder Concept for Political Marketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormrod, Robert

    The concept of a ‘stakeholder’ is often misused in the academic literature; stakeholders can range from the few actors with which the organisation has a direct interaction (Carroll 1993), to anything that can exert some form of influence over the organisation, including nature, the deceased and t...... how the stakeholder concept is understood, and then applies the stakeholder concept to the political marketing context, proposing a definition of the stakeholder concept for political marketing research....... and the unborn (Starik 1995). It is therefore necessary to provide a precise definition of the stakeholder concept to maintain academic rigour. However, a specification of the nature of the stakeholder concept is generally missing in political marketing literature. This paper addresses this issue by discussing...

  11. Beyond the Relational View: Network Resources and Leadership in Multi-Stakeholder Collaborations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reypens, C.; Blazevic, V.; Lievens, A.

    2016-01-01

    The growing prominence of networks as organizational forms for innovation raises questions concerning how to organize and manage effective collaboration between multiple, diverse stakeholders. Building on the relational view, we study the determinants underlying superior network performance in a

  12. ESSA Stakeholder Engagement: Early Challenges and Promising Practices. Policy Update. Vol. 24, No. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Rachel; Hofmann, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requires state education agencies (SEAs) to collaborate with school districts, civil rights organizations, principals, teachers, "other school leaders," parents, and "stakeholders representing the interests of children with disabilities, English language learners, and other vulnerable…

  13. Facilitating scholarship among clinical faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E G; Van Ort, S

    2001-01-01

    This article describes an evolving model of clinical scholarship for clinical-track faculty. Contemporary literature regarding scholarship emphasizes broader definitions of scholarship among university faculty, usually with an implicit focus on university faculty with doctoral degrees. Discussions of clinical scholarship focus on scholarship projects with clear application to improved patient care. Clinical-track faculty in university settings serve as exemplars of professional nurse clinicians for their students and for community-based colleagues, and also participate in university life as full faculty. Furthermore, scholarship for clinical faculty is consistent with their participation as academic scholars and as clinical scholars. An important strategy for fostering scholarship among clinical faculty in one school was the creation of a position, Director of Clinical Scholarship, with responsibilities for strengthening organizational support for scholarship activities among clinical-track faculty. Examples of activities and resources designed to foster scholarship are presented, along with preliminary evaluation of scholarship activities of clinical-track faculty. J Prof Nurs 17:141-146, 2001. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company

  14. Stakeholder Management of Jakarta’s Light Rail Transit Using Stakeholder Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khrisna Yudi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Stakeholders involvement in infrastructure development c.q. Light Rail Transit (LRT has a significant role since they affect the success of infrastructure management. This paper is primarily aimed to identify key stakeholders and responses that need to be applied to them. On the initial stage, a list of stakeholders was developed using research strategies such as case study and literature review. Sources were then chosen with certain criteria. They were assigned to score each stakeholder on the list. A stakeholder analysis was conducted to obtain a list of key stakeholders that have a significant impact on Jakarta’s LRT.

  15. Stakeholder management from the business perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Krstić Nataša

    2014-01-01

    In an increasingly global and highly competitive business world of today, the business sector pays meticulous attention to stakeholders - groups or individuals, which affect or are affected by business decisions. The paper examines the methodology of identifying key stakeholders, demonstrates the process of their various mapping models, as well as the manner in which stakeholders, in cooperation with a corporation, create the opportunity to be engaged at an early stage of a project, activity ...

  16. Why Stakeholder Engagement will not be Tweeted

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castello, Itziar; Etter, Michael

    We analyze the role of power transforming stakeholder engagement practices under the conditions of the network society. We look at how Global Health (pseudonym) managers navigate between two competing logics of stakeholder engagement: the current (influence logic) and the new logic underlying...... social media (logic of community). With a longitudinal study of 26 months we find that managers are able to integrate symbolic and substantive elements of the new logic but elements of the conditions of authority and hierarchy remain unchanged constraining new forms of stakeholder engagement. We relate...... our results to the current conceptualization of stakeholder engagement as firm centered....

  17. Involving lay and professional stakeholders in the development of a research intervention for the DEPICTED study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, Lesley; Robling, Michael R; Bennert, Kristina; Crawley, Charlotte; Hambly, Helen; Hawthorne, Kamila; Gregory, John W

    2011-09-01

    AIM This paper focuses on stakeholders' active involvement at key stages of the research as members of a Stakeholder Action Group (SAG), particularly in the context of lay stakeholder involvement. Some challenges that can arise and wider issues (e.g. empowerment, the impact of user involvement) are identified and explored within the literature on service user involvement in health care research, reflecting on the implications for researchers. BACKGROUND In the DEPICTED study, lay and professional stakeholders were actively involved in developing a complex research intervention. Lay stakeholders comprised teenage and adult patients with diabetes, parents and patient organization representatives. Professional stakeholders were from a range of disciplines. METHODS Three 1-day research meetings were attended by 13-17 lay stakeholders and 10-11 professional stakeholders (plus researchers). The SAG was responsible for reviewing evidence, advising on developing ideas for the research intervention and guiding plans for evaluation of the intervention in a subsequent trial. Formal evaluations were completed by stakeholders following each SAG meeting. RESULTS  Throughout the first (developmental) stage of this two-stage study, lay and professional stakeholders participated or were actively involved in activities that provided data to inform the research intervention. Lay stakeholders identified the need for and contributed to the design of a patient-held tool, strongly influenced the detailed design and content of the research intervention and outcome questionnaire, thus making a major contribution to the trial design. CONCLUSION Stakeholders, including teenagers, can be actively involved in designing a research intervention and impact significantly on study outcomes. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. A framework for engaging stakeholders on the management of alien species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Ana; Shackleton, Ross; Canavan, Susan; Cybèle, Cathleen; Davies, Sarah J; Dehnen-Schmutz, Katharina; Fried, Jana; Gaertner, Mirijam; Geerts, Sjirk; Griffiths, Charles L; Kaplan, Haylee; Kumschick, Sabrina; Le Maitre, David C; Measey, G John; Nunes, Ana L; Richardson, David M; Robinson, Tamara B; Touza, Julia; Wilson, John R U

    2018-01-01

    Alien species can have major ecological and socioeconomic impacts in their novel ranges and so effective management actions are needed. However, management can be contentious and create conflicts, especially when stakeholders who benefit from alien species are different from those who incur costs. Such conflicts of interests mean that management strategies can often not be implemented. There is, therefore, increasing interest in engaging stakeholders affected by alien species or by their management. Through a facilitated workshop and consultation process including academics and managers working on a variety of organisms and in different areas (urban and rural) and ecosystems (terrestrial and aquatic), we developed a framework for engaging stakeholders in the management of alien species. The proposed framework for stakeholder engagement consists of 12 steps: (1) identify stakeholders; (2) select key stakeholders for engagement; (3) explore key stakeholders' perceptions and develop initial aims for management; (4) engage key stakeholders in the development of a draft management strategy; (5) re-explore key stakeholders' perceptions and revise the aims of the strategy; (6) co-design general aims, management objectives and time frames with key stakeholders; (7) co-design a management strategy; (8) facilitate stakeholders' ownership of the strategy and adapt as required; and (9) implement the strategy and monitor management actions to evaluate the need for additional or future actions. In case additional management is needed after these actions take place, some extra steps should be taken: (10) identify any new stakeholders, benefits, and costs; (11) monitor engagement; and (12) revise management strategy. Overall, we believe that our framework provides an effective approach to minimize the impact of conflicts created by alien species management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nurse faculty migration: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, D C; González-Jurado, M A; Beneit-Montesinos, J V

    2013-06-01

    To undertake a systematic review of English and Spanish literature relating to nurse faculty migration. A systematic review of both published literature, using CINAHL, EMBASE, ERIC and MEDLINE, and grey literature, using Google and Yahoo search engines, utilizing a defined search strategy with key terms, wild card strings and logical operators, was undertaken. An initial limitation of searching for material published in the last ten years was removed due to the poor yield of relevant papers. In total, 18 research-based studies were identified, retrieved and reviewed. Finally, the retrieved material was reviewed and augmented by a group of nurse faculty and migration experts, who offered comments and proposed additional grey literature. With increased globalization, the impact of mutual recognition agreements and associated modes of supply of services as well as those factors influencing clinical nurse migration was also considered. Studies on clinical nurse migration and general academic faculty provided some insights, but nursing faculty differ in a number of key ways and this needs to be considered when interpreting the results. Based on this systematic review, the paper concludes that nurse faculty migration is a neglected topic and one that warrants urgent investigation if health systems redesign and the associated scale-up of nurses are to be achieved. Particular gaps in knowledge relate to nurse faculty workforce planning, and understanding the dynamics and flows of faculty both across and within countries. It is unclear as to the extent to which our knowledge of push and pull factors relating to clinical nurse migration can be used in understanding nurse faculty migration. The current policy position of organizations such as the World Health Organization and individual governments to increase nursing numbers is incomplete without due consideration of faculty migration. © 2013 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2013 International Council of Nurses.

  20. Physiotherapy Research Priorities in Switzerland: Views of the Various Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nast, Irina; Tal, Amir; Schmid, Stefan; Schoeb, Veronika; Rau, Barbara; Barbero, Marco; Kool, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Research priorities, defined by multiple stakeholders, can proximally facilitate the coordination of research projects and national and international cooperation and distally further improve the quality of physiotherapy practice. The aim of this study was therefore to establish physiotherapy research priorities in Switzerland considering multiple stakeholders' opinions. A mixed methods design was chosen. For a qualitative identification of physiotherapy research topics, 18 focus group discussions and 23 semi-structured interviews/written commentaries were conducted. For the quantitative analysis, 420 participants prioritized research topics using a two-round Delphi questionnaire survey. The following stakeholder groups were surveyed in the German-speaking, French-speaking and Italian-speaking regions of Switzerland: physiotherapy researchers, practitioners and educators, representatives of patient organizations, public health organizations, health insurers, physicians, nurses, occupational therapists and other health professionals, as well as physical educators. The top five overall physiotherapy research priorities identified were as follows: physiotherapy treatment, physiotherapy assessment and diagnosis, prevention, physiotherapist-patient interaction and physiotherapy professional education at the bachelor level. With regard to diagnostic groups, the highest priorities were placed on musculoskeletal disorders, neurology, orthopaedics, geriatrics and ergonomics/occupational health. Consensus was moderate to high, and only few differences between stakeholder groups were revealed. Research directly related to physiotherapy treatment is of highest priority. It should focus on diagnostic groups related to chronicity in anticipation of demographic changes. Multidisciplinary networks for research and practice, alongside sound coordination of research projects, should increase the impact of physiotherapy research. An accurate dissemination of research priorities

  1. Promoting Interdisciplinary Research among Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Elena; Zhao, Weinan; Reiser, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    With the growing recognition of the importance of interdisciplinary research, many faculty have increased their efforts to form interdisciplinary research teams. Oftentimes, attempts to put together such teams are hampered because faculty have a limited picture of the research interests and expertise of their colleagues. This paper reports on…

  2. Stakeholders Involvement in Performance Management in Public General Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi Ploom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to increasing concerns with the legitimacy and efficiency of public spending, performance management as a part of world-wide public sector reform, called New Public Management (NPM has taken place. This is also the case of educational sector. In Estonian education system, legislation formally enables to design an integrated performance management system. But there is few research done to investigate how these policies and regulations ought to be put into force in order to gain the benefits considering the schools' and pupils' better performance. This study investigates how different stakeholders are involved into the performance management in Estonian general schools. The study is based on empirical survey data gathered from 303 schools providing secondary education in Estonia. The research findings have three main implications. Firstly, the paper contributes to the scarce knowledge about implementation of performance management issues in public schools. Our analysis revealed that compilation of school development plans in Estonian schools is rather a formal obligation. Therefore we propose that the analysis and discussion of the school development plans is needed to organize on regional level, involving all main stakeholders of a school. Secondly, we suggest that in the circumstances of a decentralised education system, like in Estonia, it is needed to implement, central practical performance assessment principles and guidance for the schools. Thirdly, it is highly necessary to improve schools’ cooperation with different stakeholder groups. Also the framework involving different stakeholder groups in the decentralized schools management system should be built up.

  3. Stakeholder views of superfund sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Nearly ten years have passed since the enactment of the federal Comprehensive Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), usually referred to as open-quotes Superfundclose quotes. Nearly four years have passed since CERCLA's major overhaul through the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). Although much still remains to be done under Superfund, there is now enough experience to assess how effectively it is working. A study being undertaken by the University of Tennessee's Waste Management Research and Education Institute will supply a portion of that assessment. The study was completed in the fall of 1990. Our study examines two related issues: the resources that will be needed in the coming years to fulfill the mandate of Superfund and other hazardous waste remediation programs, and the site-level experience to date in implementing CERCLA and SARA. This chapter discusses only the open-quotes site-level experienceclose quotes effort, and only its methodological approach. The purpose of the open-quotes site-level experienceclose quotes effort is to explore what counts as a open-quotes successfulclose quotes site in the eyes of different stakeholders in a Superfund cleanup - e.g., the affected community, the potentially responsible parties (PRPs), state and local officials, and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

  4. Grade Inflation: Faculty Lived-Experiences and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Nan

    2016-01-01

    The research area of this study is the phenomenon of grade inflation in higher educational organizations. Using a qualitative phenomenological research design, seven faculty members from a higher educational organization were purposefully selected to participate in a semi-structured, face-to-face interview. The participants were of various ages,…

  5. How Do Stakeholders Matter in Product Innovation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, P.H.; Hillebrand, B.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates how stakeholder orientation affects product innovation and takes the incorporation of green (ecological) issues as a specific context to study this question. The authors borrow insights from three streams of literature: (1) insights from stakeholder theory, combined with (2)

  6. Organising stakeholder workshops in research and innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Velsing; Bryndum, Nina; Bedsted, Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    , the article illustrates the challenges of applying theory to five European stakeholder workshops co-organised by the authors. The illustration highlights the difficult interaction between theory and practice. The article concludes that while theoretical perspectives can provide general guidance, practical...... experience is essential when dealing with the trade-offs that are an intrinsic part of organising stakeholder workshops....

  7. Improving Urban Freight Governance and Stakeholder Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Britta; Bech Godskesen Andersen, Christina; Figueroa, Maria J.

    2017-01-01

    Urban freight transport is a complex field characterised by many actors and stakeholders and thus many rationalities are at stake. This paper contributes to literature on urban freight governance by approaching the field with social system theory combined with the concepts of relationship platforms...... of value creation among stakeholders through this process is key to implementation of new urban freight solutions....

  8. DG CONNECT’s stakeholder engagement strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheyden, M.; Glidden, J.; Shahin, J.

    2013-01-01

    How do we ensure that public policy represents the interests of all, rather than a select few? How will we ensure it draws upon the best insights and talents of key stakeholders? The European Commission’s DG CONNECT recently announced the results of its Stakeholder Engagement Survey, which is

  9. STAKEHOLDER PERCEPTION OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Petra F.A. Dilling

    2011-01-01

    As corporate social responsibility receives increased attention by company stakeholders, researchers are also increasingly exploring corporate social responsibility, its causes and implications. However little is known about the perception of corporate social responsibility. This study explores the link between stakeholder perception of corporate social responsibility and its relationship with underlying factors. The findings suggest that age of the corporation, community involvement, and cul...

  10. Stakeholders' perceptions about recreational events within Marine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to achievelong-term conservation of marine resources. The promulgation of laws regarding MPAs in South Africa has triggered various responses from stakeholders affected by their declaration. This study focused on perceptions of stakeholders from recreational activity providers such as fishing and scuba diving within ...

  11. Perceptions of European stakeholders of pulse fishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, M.L.; Trapman, B.K.; Rasenberg, M.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    This research project examines the concerns and questions of European stakeholders about pulse fishing, in order to assess to what extent the knowledge agenda on pulse fishing covers these issues. To get a first impression of the concerns about pulse fishing, and to get an idea of the stakeholders

  12. Why Stakeholder Engagement will not be Tweeted

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castello, Itziar; Etter, Michael

    We analyze the role of power transforming stakeholder engagement practices under the conditions of the network society. We look at how Global Health (pseudonym) managers navigate between two competing logics of stakeholder engagement: the current (influence logic) and the new logic underlying...

  13. Smart Mobility Stakeholders - Curating Urban Data & Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperling, Joshua [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the curation of urban data and models through engaging SMART mobility stakeholders. SMART Mobility Urban Science Efforts are helping to expose key data sets, models, and roles for the U.S. Department of Energy in engaging across stakeholders to ensure useful insights. This will help to support other Urban Science and broader SMART initiatives.

  14. Stakeholders' Perceptions of School Counselling in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Poi Kee

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study that set out to understand stakeholders' perception of the school counselling service in Singapore. Using semi-structured interviews, this study explored the perceptions of three main stakeholder groups, namely teachers and counsellors working within the schools and those working in the communities.…

  15. Nursing faculty academic incivility: perceptions of nursing students and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muliira, Joshua K; Natarajan, Jansi; van der Colff, Jacoba

    2017-12-13

    Incivility in nursing education can adversely affect the academic environment, the learning outcomes, and safety. Nursing faculty (NF) and nursing students (NS) contribute to the academic incivility. Little is known about the extent of NF academic incivility in the Middle East region. This study aimed at exploring the perceptions and extent of NF academic incivility in an undergraduate nursing program of a public university in Oman. A cross sectional survey was used to collect data from 155 undergraduate NS and 40 NF about faculty academic incivility. Data was collected using the Incivility in Nursing Education Survey. The majority of NS and NF had similar perceptions about disruptive faculty behaviors. The incidence of faculty incivility was low (Mean = 1.5). The disruptive behaviors with the highest incidence were arriving late for scheduled activities, leaving schedule activities early, cancelling scheduled activities without warning, ineffective teaching styles and methods, and subjective grading. The most common uncivil faculty behaviors reported by participants were general taunts or disrespect to other NF, challenges to other faculty knowledge or credibility, and general taunts or disrespect to NS. The relatively low level of NF academic incivility could still affect the performance of some students, faculty, and program outcomes. Academic institutions need to ensure a policy of zero tolerance to all academic incivility, and regular monitoring and evaluation as part of the prevention strategies.

  16. Co-creating Stakeholder and Brand Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Wallpach, Sylvia; Voyer, Benjamin; Kastanakis, Minas

    2017-01-01

    important role in ongoing interactive identity development processes of stakeholders. The special section contributes to deepening the understanding of this reciprocal co-creation of stakeholder and brand identities, through a series of conceptual and empirical articles. The Introduction reviews four......This article introduces the special section on reciprocal co-creation of stakeholder and brand identities. Branding research and practice traditionally focus on the managerial creation and implementation of brand identity. Based on recent paradigmatic shifts from managerial to co-creative branding...... and from consumer to multi-stakeholder approaches in marketing, this special section develops a dynamic, process-oriented perspective on brand identity. Brand identity continuously emerges as a dynamic outcome of social processes of stakeholder interaction. Reciprocally, brand identity plays a potentially...

  17. The Influence of the Stakeholder`s Profile Variables on the Perceived Image of the West University of Timisoara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remus Ionut Naghi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false RO X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Due to the competitive intensity increase in the academic environment, but also to the desire to attract a higher number of students, the managers of Romanian higher education institutions were forced to adopt in a greater extent a marketing orientation in their activity. An important component of this orientation represents the necessity to build an identity and a unique and competitive image in the minds of all the stakeholders of such institutions. Despite the fact that the subject of institutional image in general, and the image of educational institutions in particular, benefits of a greater attention in the literature, we consider that in the Romanian universities practice there is an insufficient level of concern for this topic. To build such an image that would be correctly perceived by stakeholders, also assumes to be aware of the main factors which influence the way in which this image is perceived.This paper aims to achieve a review of the specialized literature, after which will identify the main factors which influence the stakeholder’s perception on the image of an organization in general, with particularity on the case of higher educational institutions. Then, using a quantitative research, we aim to highlight the way in which some of the stakeholder`s profile variables influence the perception of the image of the West University of Timişoara.

  18. From Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience: Encouraging Innovation in Undergraduate Neuroscience Education by Supporting Student Research and Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwick, Jean C.; Kerchner, Michael; Lom, Barbara; Ramirez, Julio J.; Wiertelak, Eric P.

    2006-01-01

    This article features the organization Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience. FUN was established by a group of neuroscientists dedicated to innovation and excellence in undergraduate neuroscience education and research. In the years since its inception, FUN has grown into a dynamic organization making a significant impact on the quality of…

  19. Patient and Stakeholder Engagement in the PCORI Pilot Projects: Description and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Laura P; Ellis, Lauren E; Edmundson, Lauren; Sabharwal, Raj; Rein, Alison; Konopka, Kristen; Frank, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Patients and healthcare stakeholders are increasingly becoming engaged in the planning and conduct of biomedical research. However, limited research characterizes this process or its impact. We aimed to characterize patient and stakeholder engagement in the 50 Pilot Projects funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), and identify early contributions and lessons learned. A self-report instrument was completed by researchers between 6 and 12 months following project initiation. Forty-seven principal investigators or their designees (94 % response rate) participated in the study. MAIN MEASURES Self-report of types of stakeholders engaged, stages and levels of engagement, facilitators and barriers to engagement, lessons learned, and contributions from engagement were measured. Most (83 %) reported engaging more than one stakeholder in their project. Among those, the most commonly reported groups were patients (90 %), clinicians (87 %), health system representatives (44 %), caregivers (41 %), and advocacy organizations (41 %). Stakeholders were commonly involved in topic solicitation, question development, study design, and data collection. Many projects engaged stakeholders in data analysis, results interpretation, and dissemination. Commonly reported contributions included changes to project methods, outcomes or goals; improvement of measurement tools; and interpretation of qualitative data. Investigators often identified communication and shared leadership strategies as "critically important" facilitators (53 and 44 % respectively); lack of stakeholder time was the most commonly reported challenge (46 %). Most challenges were only partially resolved. Early lessons learned included the importance of continuous and genuine partnerships, strategic selection of stakeholders, and accommodation of stakeholders' practical needs. PCORI Pilot Projects investigators report engaging a variety of stakeholders across many stages of research, with specific

  20. What's the ROI for resolving the nursing faculty shortage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Karren; Kelley, Brian M

    2013-01-01

    The nursing faculty shortage will have a fundamental impact on the ability to produce nurses. For most nursing schools and states, however, concerns about the relative merits of different solutions to the nursing faculty shortage are misplaced. Without significantly increased visibility and definition, accompanied by a clear public, private, and health care organization return on investment (ROI), proposing solutions to the nursing faculty shortage is at best premature and at worst irrelevant. There is simply too much competition for resources to expect that a vaguely defined and invisible problem with no rationale for increased investment will receive sufficient support from critical decision makers and constituencies. First must come problem definition, visibility, and ROI. Only then can the case be made for implementing solutions to the nursing faculty shortage.

  1. A framework for stakeholder identification in concept mapping and health research: a novel process and its application to older adult mobility and the built environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Claire; Winters, Meghan; Hanson, Heather M; Ashe, Maureen C

    2013-05-02

    Stakeholders, as originally defined in theory, are groups or individual who can affect or are affected by an issue. Stakeholders are an important source of information in health research, providing critical perspectives and new insights on the complex determinants of health. The intersection of built and social environments with older adult mobility is an area of research that is fundamentally interdisciplinary and would benefit from a better understanding of stakeholder perspectives. Although a rich body of literature surrounds stakeholder theory, a systematic process for identifying health stakeholders in practice does not exist. This paper presents a framework of stakeholders related to older adult mobility and the built environment, and further outlines a process for systematically identifying stakeholders that can be applied in other health contexts, with a particular emphasis on concept mapping research. Informed by gaps in the relevant literature we developed a framework for identifying and categorizing health stakeholders. The framework was created through a novel iterative process of stakeholder identification and categorization. The development entailed a literature search to identify stakeholder categories, representation of identified stakeholders in a visual chart, and correspondence with expert informants to obtain practice-based insight. The three-step, iterative creation process progressed from identifying stakeholder categories, to identifying specific stakeholder groups and soliciting feedback from expert informants. The result was a stakeholder framework comprised of seven categories with detailed sub-groups. The main categories of stakeholders were, (1) the Public, (2) Policy makers and governments, (3) Research community, (4) Practitioners and professionals, (5) Health and social service providers, (6) Civil society organizations, and (7) Private business. Stakeholders related to older adult mobility and the built environment span many

  2. Environmental Assessments and Stakeholder Involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesolowski, Cassandra

    2006-01-01

    Directives and legislation on EIA and SEA need to provide more guidance on how and when public participation should be used. There are now several examples of how well public participation can be performed and the methods are becoming more proactive and innovative. By increasing the role of public participation within the Environmental Assessment process, plans, programmes and projects will become more publicly acceptable. There does need to be a balance as to where public participation is performed in the system, as too much can be a stress on resources and time, as well as producing ineffective results. Key stages such as scoping, preparing the environmental statement or report and decision-making need to be highlighted for the benefits public participation can have. The Aarhus Convention is certainly making a difference in the UK; however it is difficult to judge exactly how much difference yet. It was only fully implemented in the UK in 2005 although some Authorities were applying the three pillars prior to implementation. It is not clear how aware the general public are of the Convention and their rights. Empowering communities in the UK. will communities for decision-making in Environmental Assessments? Providing the public with resources to enable them to fully engage in the process will improve the participation and increase their confidence, but how will this increase their influence within the decision-making process? Ultimately, should the stakeholders and public just influence the incremental decisions made in Environmental Assessments or have more responsibility within the major decisions taken? It will be interesting to see how these issues are addressed over the coming years

  3. Building trust : corporations and their stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, R.I.

    1998-01-01

    The issue of corporate responsibility in terms of societal, economic and environmental matters within the petrochemical sector and the role played in this area by the Council on Economic Priorities (CEP) was discussed. CEP is a non-profit research organization whose mission is to analyse the social and environmental records of corporations in an effort to influence corporate behaviour. CEP campaigns for more communication, more social disclosure and environmentally cleaner corporations. The campaign for cleaner corporations, (C-3), began in 1992 as a public awareness campaign to list the worst environmental performers in the U.S. In the C-3 process, CEP provides recommendations to listed companies and de-lists those which have improved their environmental and social performance. The focus in 1997 was on the petrochemical industry. The overall ranking of 15 major petrochemical companies was provided, along with two case histories illustrating the C-3 process from 'listing' to 'delisting'. Measures used in determining environmental performance for a company include their environmental management policy, environmental impact, environmental reporting and communications, product stewardship and stakeholder relations

  4. Identification and Classification of Stakeholders in a Brazilian Professional Soccer Club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Lara de Siqueira

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Whereas an initial step in the management of stakeholders is the identification and classification of these actors, this study sought to answer the research question: how managers of Brazilian professional soccer clubs identify and classify their stakeholders? The theoretical framework used was the Stakeholder Theory, developed by Freeman (1984 and other researchers. The method used was proposed by Almeida et al. (2000, which assesses the saliency through the concepts power, legitimacy and urgency, that were proposed in the study of Mitchell et al. (1997. There were two propositions concerning the context of Brazilian soccer clubs: first, that the urgency perceived by managers in the demands of a stakeholder is high when his legitimacy is high and other one is that the most salient stakeholders for the managers are those with high degrees of legitimacy. Stakeholders were surveyed as perceived by the managers of Sociedade Esportiva Palmeiras. Three types of stakeholders were classified as demanding (sponsors, partners and the partner for the construction of the new stadium and three as dependents (members, athletes of professional soccer team and the media. Other stakeholders identified were classified as irrelevant, including the fans and and the organized groups of fans. It can be said that in the specific case of these managers of this particular football club, the trend was the acceptance of both propositions. 

  5. A method to evaluate the role of stakeholder dynamics in IT based innovation adoption processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postema, Tim

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of new information technology in organizations seems to lead to mixed results in practice. Innovation adoption success is dependent on user commitment and absorption of the innovation in work processes. For that reason, much can be gained in insights in the role of stakeholders during innovation adoption. In this article we are presenting an evaluation method for stakeholder dynamics during the IT based innovation journey in relation to innovation adoption predictors. The method covers two evaluation elements of these stakeholder dynamics; (a) the changing nature of stakeholder salience and changing role involvements of stakeholders on the one hand, and (b) the changing nature of stakeholder-innovation interaction during the adoption processes on the other. It is argued that a stakeholder's capacity and intentions together determine his role involvement and influence on innovation adoption and thus its decision making unit membership. To further enhance usability of the described method, we propose the use of structured implementation activities and their effect during different phases of the innovation journey on the decision making unit as constructed through stakeholder analysis.

  6. Motivation of university and non-university stakeholders to change medical education in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruitenberg EJ

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both university and non-university stakeholders should be involved in the process of curriculum development in medical schools, because all are concerned with the competencies of the graduates. That may be difficult unless appropriate strategies are used to motivate each stakeholder. From 1999 to 2006, eight medical schools in Vietnam worked together to change the curriculum and teaching for general medical students to make it more community oriented. This paper describes the factors that motivated the different stakeholders to participate in curriculum change and teaching in Vietnamese medical schools and the activities to address those factors and have sustainable contributions from all relevant stakeholders. Methods Case study analysis of contributions to the change process, using reports, interviews, focus group discussions and surveys and based on Herzberg's Motivation Theory to analyze involvement of different stakeholders. Results Different stakeholders were motivated by selected activities, such as providing opportunities for non-university stakeholders to share their opinions, organizing interactions among university stakeholders, stimulating both bottom-up and top-down inputs, focusing on learning from each other, and emphasizing self-motivation factors. Conclusion The Herzberg Motivation theory helped to identify suitable approaches to ensure that teaching topics, materials and assessment methods more closely reflected the health care needs of the community. Other medical schools undertaking a reform process may learn from this experience.

  7. Defining the Perception and Experiences of Educational Service Stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleiman Ahmady

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The office of educational services at universities is a very important division and it is necessary for employees to strive towards providing suitable services to students. The quality of educational services has always been a major concern for higher education managers. Interviewing stakeholders and experts increases our understanding of different aspects of the subject in order to create a native model with high performance capability based on existing conditions and the cultural and political infrastructure of our country. Therefore, we aimed to define the perception and experiences of educational service stakeholders.Methods: In this qualitative thematic content analysis that adapted a deductive approach using Graneheim and Lundman’s method. Initially, purposeful sampling was done to identify and select the students (as first level stakeholders studying paramedical majors at one of the medical science universities of the country during the educational year 2015-2016. Altogether, 20 people were interviewed consisting of 6 students, 4 faculty members, 2 student affairs employees, 1 counselor, 2 education officers, and 2 education office managers.Data were analyzed and coded using MAXQDA software.Results: Of the 400 initial codes extracted through data analysis, 336 abstract codes, 48 sub-categories, 20 categories, and 7 themes were obtained. The level of abstraction was different in the categories. The extracted themes were as follows: information gap before and after entering university, the difference between expected and perceived services and factors contributing to expectations, the university’s approach in enhancing service quality, the student and management of educational problems, the system-student interaction in educational planning, and the professors’ responsibilities and performance in enhancing quality, and the role on the university management system in enhancing the quality of services

  8. Setting research priorities in tobacco control: a stakeholder engagement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindson, Nicola; Richards-Doran, Dan; Heath, Laura; Hartmann-Boyce, Jamie

    2017-12-01

    The Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group (TAG) conducts systematic reviews of the evidence for tobacco cessation and prevention interventions. In 2016 TAG conducted a priority-setting, stakeholder engagement project to identify where further research is needed in the areas of tobacco control and smoking cessation. The project comprised two surveys and a workshop. A range of stakeholders participated, including members of the public (smokers and ex-smokers), clinicians, researchers, research funders, health-care commissioners and public health organizations. The first survey phase identified unanswered research questions in the field of tobacco control. The second phase asked participants to rank these, with overall rankings calculated by combining scores across participants. The workshop allowed attendees to discuss prioritization of topics and questions in more depth. Workshop discussions were transcribed and analysed thematically, and a final voting activity at the close of the workshop allowed participants to choose topics to prioritize and to de-prioritize. A total of 304 stakeholders (researchers, health professionals, smokers and ex-smokers, guideline developers, research funders and policymakers, representing 28 countries) identified 183 unanswered research questions. These were categorized into 15 research categories. A total of 175 participants prioritized categories and questions in the second survey phase, with 'electronic cigarettes'; 'addressing inequalities'; and 'mental health and other substance abuse' prioritized as the top three categories. Forty-three stakeholders attended the workshop and discussed reasons for and against category prioritization. Prioritized research categories largely mirrored those in the survey stage, although 'treatment delivery' also emerged as a key category. Five cross-cutting themes emerged: efficacy; relative efficacy; cost effectiveness; addressing inequalities; and different types of evidence. There are many unanswered

  9. Defining program sustainability: differing views of stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Heather M; Salmoni, Alan W; Volpe, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Sustainability is a highly desired outcome of health promotion programs, yet it often eludes program planners looking to achieve it. This study aimed to uncover how the goal of program sustainability was interpreted by key stakeholders from three fall prevention program demonstration sites. Collected as part of a larger study on program sustainability that made use of a multiple case study methodology, semi-structured interviews were conducted with key informants involved in a wide range of program initiatives throughout the two-year funding period. Forty participants across the three sites provided definitions of sustainability. Most stakeholders reported that it was some version of the general fall prevention program that should be sustained. Fewer stakeholders reported that it was the successful elements or solutions to the program goals that should be sustained. The most common suggestions reported by stakeholders for how sustainability should be achieved were awareness raising and securing new funding sources. Although a number of key elements emerged, there were significant differences in stakeholders' definitions of sustainability, both within and between demonstration sites. This research provided insight into the unique meanings of sustainability held by different stakeholders during their involvement in a fall prevention program. The array of definitions held by stakeholders demonstrates how easily the efforts of those involved can become fragmented and, therefore, less effective in reaching the end goal of program sustainability when the project team is not working from the same definition of what that goal means.

  10. Stakeholders' analysis of the medical tourism industry: development strategies in Isfahan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Alireza; Ferdosi, Masoud; Keyvanara, Mahmoud; Agharahimi, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Policy makers and decision makers must identify the stakeholders in medical tourism, who will be affected by and/or affect this industry, and determine their status for partnership. The aim of this study was to identify the main stakeholders in Isfahan's medical tourism, analyze them, and provide strategies for developing this industry. A qualitative study was conducted in 2011. At first, the key stakeholders in medical tourism were identified in accordance with the experts' idea and literature review. Then we interviewed the key stakeholders. Data analysis was conducted using the stakeholders' analyses, which helped in developing strategies. The result showed that the key stakeholders were made up of nine groups. They included the provincial governance of Isfahan, the Cultural Heritage and Tourism Organization of Isfahan, the Chamber of Commerce, the Medical Council, the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, health service providers, tourism services providers, investors, and the Tosea Saderat Bank. The rate of knowledge of the Cultural Heritage and Tourism Organization of Isfahan, clinic and international relationship of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences from government policy about medical tourism were very much. Private Hospitals, the Medical Council, investors, and the University of Medical Sciences had great power. Private hospitals, clinics, the Cultural Heritage and Tourism Organization of Isfahan, and the University of Medical Sciences were in the supporter position. The effected strategies were the included strategies, focused on increasing power; increasing support, and on maintaining the position. There are different stakeholders in the medical tourism industry. Thus, policy makers can plan, make a policy and decision, and use effective strategies to develop medical tourism by designing a medical tourism stakeholders' network, a medical tourism provincial council, and clarify the roles and responsibilities of stakeholders.

  11. Collaborative learning framework for online stakeholder engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodyakov, Dmitry; Savitsky, Terrance D; Dalal, Siddhartha

    2016-08-01

    Public and stakeholder engagement can improve the quality of both research and policy decision making. However, such engagement poses significant methodological challenges in terms of collecting and analysing input from large, diverse groups. To explain how online approaches can facilitate iterative stakeholder engagement, to describe how input from large and diverse stakeholder groups can be analysed and to propose a collaborative learning framework (CLF) to interpret stakeholder engagement results. We use 'A National Conversation on Reducing the Burden of Suicide in the United States' as a case study of online stakeholder engagement and employ a Bayesian data modelling approach to develop a CLF. Our data modelling results identified six distinct stakeholder clusters that varied in the degree of individual articulation and group agreement and exhibited one of the three learning styles: learning towards consensus, learning by contrast and groupthink. Learning by contrast was the most common, or dominant, learning style in this study. Study results were used to develop a CLF, which helps explore multitude of stakeholder perspectives; identifies clusters of participants with similar shifts in beliefs; offers an empirically derived indicator of engagement quality; and helps determine the dominant learning style. The ability to detect learning by contrast helps illustrate differences in stakeholder perspectives, which may help policymakers, including Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, make better decisions by soliciting and incorporating input from patients, caregivers, health-care providers and researchers. Study results have important implications for soliciting and incorporating input from stakeholders with different interests and perspectives. © 2015 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Opinion of stakeholders on existing curriculum for postgraduate (MD) course in Pharmacology: A survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badyal, Dinesh K; Daniel, Sujit R

    2016-10-01

    To survey the opinion about various curricular components of Doctor of Medicine (MD) pharmacology curriculum in India by stakeholders, including faculty and students. An online survey was done to evaluate the various curricular components of MD pharmacology curriculum being used in India. A total of 393 respondents including faculty, MD students, and other stakeholders completed the survey. The survey was developed using SurveyMonkey platform and link to survey was E-mailed to stakeholders. The results were expressed as percentages. There was a balanced representation of respondents from various designations, teaching experience, regions, and age groups. Most of the respondents (83%) were aware of the MD pharmacology curriculum. However, they reported that it is more inclined to knowledge domain. About half of respondents (53%) said that animal experiments are being used. The most common teaching methods mentioned are seminars (98.5%), journal clubs (95%), and practical exercises by postgraduates (73%), but there is less use of newer methods (25%) in theory and less of clinical pharmacology exercise (39%) in practical classes. The log books are maintained but not assessed regularly. Internal assessment is sparingly used. The MD pharmacology curriculum needs to be made uniform at the national level and updated to include the newer methods in teaching-learning and assessment. There should be sharing of newer methods at a common platform implemented at the national level.

  13. Kantian Capitalism and the Stakeholder Model: the necessity of a corporate ethics of justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Francés Gómez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stakeholder theory is the main-stream way of conceiving organizations, especially for profit corporations. Corporations are described as a web of stakeholders before whom managers have a multi-fiduciary responsibility. Edward Freeman, the father of stakeholder theory, holds that a normative theory of stakeholder management would set those fiduciary responsibilities as truly moral duties, due to the fact that stakeholders possess intrinsic, as opposed to merely instrumental, value. This article criticizes the basis of Freeman’s defense of normative stakeholder theory. The crucial critical argument is that Freeman employs the very same normative foundation that the classic theory of the firm uses; while deriving a view of the corporation that is less precise than the classic one. As an alternative, it is proposed that the organization should be conceived as a realm for justice: a social context of interaction where all parties would find it rational to agree to criteria for distributing the benefits so that cooperation –as required to bring about those benefits– is secured. This approach founds obligations (among stakeholders without the need to resort to hypothesis as individual dignity or rights. However, the demands of justice might still be operationalized as rights of several kinds.

  14. Kantian Capitalism and the Stakeholder Model: the necessity of a corporate ethics of justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Francés Gómez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Stakeholder theory is the main-stream way of conceiving organizations, especially for profit corporations. Corporations are described as a web of stakeholders before whom managers have a multi-fiduciary responsibility. Edward Freeman, the father of stakeholder theory, holds that a normative theory of stakeholder management would set those fiduciary responsibilities as truly moral duties, due to the fact that stakeholders possess intrinsic, as opposed to merely instrumental, value. This article criticizes the basis of Freeman’s defense of normative stakeholder theory. The crucial critical argument is that Freeman employs the very same normative foundation that the classic theory of the firm uses; while deriving a view of the corporation that is less precise than the classic one. As an alternative, it is proposed that the organization should be conceived as a realm for justice: a social context of interaction where all parties would find it rational to agree to criteria for distributing the benefits so that cooperation –as required to bring about those benefits– is secured. This approach founds obligations (among stakeholders without the need to resort to hypothesis as individual dignity or rights. However, the demands of justice might still be operationalized as rights of several kinds.

  15. Engaging stakeholders in rehabilitation research: a scoping review of strategies used in partnerships and evaluation of impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camden, Chantal; Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Nguyen, Tram; Graham, Emma; Thomas, Aliki; Sprung, Jennifer; Morris, Christopher; Russell, Dianne J

    2015-01-01

    To describe how stakeholder engagement has been undertaken and evaluated in rehabilitation research. A scoping review of the scientific literature using five search strategies. Quantitative and qualitative analyses using extracted data. Interpretation of results was iteratively discussed within the team, which included a parent stakeholder. Searches identified 101 candidate papers; 28 were read in full to assess eligibility and 19 were included in the review. People with disabilities and their families were more frequently involved compared to other stakeholders. Stakeholders were often involved in planning and evaluating service delivery. A key issue was identifying stakeholders; strategies used to support their involvement included creating committees, organizing meetings, clarifying roles and offering training. Communication, power sharing and resources influenced how stakeholders could be engaged in the research. Perceived outcomes of stakeholder engagement included the creation of partnerships, facilitating the research process and the application of the results, and empowering stakeholders. Stakeholder engagement outcomes were rarely formally evaluated. There is a great interest in rehabilitation to engage stakeholders in the research process. However, further evidence is needed to identify effective strategies for meaningful stakeholder engagement that leads to more useful research that positively impacts practice. Implications for Rehabilitation Using several strategies to engage various stakeholders throughout the research process is thought to increase the quality of the research and the rehabilitation process by developing proposals and programs responding better to their needs. Engagement strategies need to be better reported and evaluated in the literature. Engagement facilitate uptake of research findings by increasing stakeholders' awareness of the evidence, the resources available and their own ability to act upon a situation. Factors influencing

  16. Neonatology faculty development using simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Heather M; Hales, Roberta L

    2016-11-01

    The goal of faculty development activities is to supply the public with knowledgeable, skilled, and competent physicians who are prepared for high performance in the dynamic and complex healthcare environment. Current faculty development programs lack evidence-based support and are not sufficient to meet the professional needs of practicing physicians. Simulation activities for faculty development offer an alternative to traditional, teacher-centric educational offerings. Grounded in adult learning theory, simulation is a learner-centric, interactive, efficient, and effective method to train busy professionals. Many of the faculty development needs of clinical neonatologists can be met by participating in simulation-based activities that focus on technical skills, teamwork, leadership, communication, and patient safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Burnout in Female Faculty Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy-Vu, Lisa; Beck, Keli; Moore, Justin B

    2017-04-01

    Despite approximately equal numbers of male and female medical school graduates, women are entering academic medicine at a lower rate than their male colleagues. Of those who do assume a faculty position, female faculty members report higher levels of burnout, often attributable to gender-specific difficulties in clinical expectations and maintenance of work-life balance. Many of these struggles are attributable to issues that are amenable to supportive policies, but these policies are inconsistent in their availability and practice. This commentary presents evidence for inconsistencies in the day-to-day experience of female faculty members, and proposes solutions for the mitigation of the challenges experienced more often by female faculty members with the goal of diversifying and strengthening academic medicine.

  18. Student evaluation of teaching enhances faculty professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty McDonald

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the role of Web 2.0 technologies in sourcing ongoing information from university students in an effort to assist faculty in their continuous professional development (PD, with the ultimate goal of incrementally improving teaching and learning. On a semester basis, students use an online program called CoursEvals to provide their opinions about the course and its instructor. The collected data are used to inform the content and delivery of faculty PD workshops. The interactive nature of CoursEvals, with Web features that facilitate information sharing and interoperatibility with Blackboard, a learning/course management system, make it ideal for impacting higher education. Students can complete student evaluation of teaching (SEOT online from any location (university, home, mobile, or overseas. This paper underscores the interactive nature of the feedback process that allows faculty, administration, policy makers, and other stakeholders to participate in the ongoing improvement of teaching and learning. We see how Web 2.0 technologies can impact the teaching/learning nexus in higher education, how online forums and Blackboard bulletin boards have helped popularize Web 2.0 technologies, how online social interactions have escalated through wikis, blogs, emails, instant messaging, and audio and video clips, and how faculty can retrieve their personal SEOT at any time and use the information to self- or peer-evaluate at their convenience. Faculty can compare their SEOT over time to determine stability and monitor their classroom effectiveness. They can also address reliability and validity issues and use the information judiciously without making unnecessary generalizations. Researchers will find useful information supporting the impact of Web 2.0 technologies in higher education.

  19. Understanding and Modeling Freight Stakeholder Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    This project developed a conceptual model of private-sector freight stakeholder decisions and interactions for : forecasting freight demands in response to key policy variables. Using East Central Wisconsin as a study area, empirical : models were de...

  20. Administrator and Faculty Perceptions of Institutional Support for Online Education in Florida's College System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Gerene M.

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 30% of Florida's college system (FCS) students are enrolled in distance learning courses (FLDOE, 2015). As FCS institutions continue to grow their online programs to meet demand, a lack of support from, and consensus among administrator and faculty stakeholders could undermine institutional efforts to sustain growth and quality…

  1. Building corporate reputation with stakeholders: exploring the role of message ambiguity for social marketers

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson-Delaporte, Sonia; Beverland, Michael B.; Lindgreen, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – Managing the corporate reputation of hybrid firms (organizations that act commercially to pursue social agendas) involves particular challenges because of competing stakeholder interests. With reference to the Trappist beer market, the paper seeks to identify the value of message ambiguity in reducing stakeholder tension, while simultaneously achieving a clear market positioning.\\ud \\ud Design/methodology/approach – In total, 25 in-depth interviews were conducted with brand marketer...

  2. Gender Differences in Business Faculty's Research Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yining; Zhao, Qin

    2013-01-01

    The authors use expectancy theory to evaluate gender differences in key factors that motivate faculty to conduct research. Using faculty survey data collected from 320 faculty members at 10 business schools, they found that faculty members, both men and women, who displayed higher motivation were more productive in research. Among them, pretenured…

  3. Stakeholder management from the business perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In an increasingly global and highly competitive business world of today, the business sector pays meticulous attention to stakeholders - groups or individuals, which affect or are affected by business decisions. The paper examines the methodology of identifying key stakeholders, demonstrates the process of their various mapping models, as well as the manner in which stakeholders, in cooperation with a corporation, create the opportunity to be engaged at an early stage of a project, activity or business decision, thus establishing a precedent according to which both sides benefit. By doing so, the business sector can ensure that its actions will receive 'a social licence to operate', whereas various groups of stakeholders will be offered a possibility to be included in business dealings for the sake of protecting their interests. The authors of the paper have analysed a two-way process of stakeholder management in establishing corporate reputation which is reflected in business performance and results. It was concluded that stakeholder engagement should foster innovation and lead to broader social prosperity, achieving the main goal of sustainability: business excellence according to the principles of the triple final result, by realizing synergy between the social community, environment and profit.

  4. IMPLICATIONS OF CSR ON CORPORATE STAKEHOLDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crisan Catalina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Companies’ strategies and values must be in accordance to stakeholders’ expectations and needs because their role and influences on companies’ activity are decisive for companies future development. Corporate Social Responsibility is a meaningful way through which companies can pursue sustainable development by having a coherent economical, social and environmental perspective on how the business should be managed. CSR must become an integral part of corporate management system, because it has a major role in distressing the relation between company and major stakeholders, both internally and externally. CSR is a global phenomenon, which draws the attention of a growing number of partisans, from public private and social sector. To demonstrate the applicability of the theoretical approaches deduced from the existing literature, the authors recourse to an empirical qualitative research, conducted through a questionnaire implemented to top managers, HR managers and heads of CSR departments within large companies that operate in Romania. The research is based on the analysis of a number of 87 questionnaires and aims to highlight major stakeholders and finding how companies’ responsible activities can influence stakeholders. This study is designed to highlight how prioritization of stakeholders influences CSR initiatives within large companies that operate in Romania, and to present a perspective of company’s approach towards shared value influence major stakeholders. The conclusions drawn have a greater relevance both theoretically and especially practically because provides insights on how large companies perceive CSR and how stakeholders influence responsible initiatives in emergent country like Romania where stereotypes are difficult to manage.

  5. Stakeholder Perceptions of Risk in Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dong; McCoy, Andrew P; Kleiner, Brian M; Mills, Thomas H; Lingard, Helen

    2016-02-01

    Safety management in construction is an integral effort and its success requires inputs from all stakeholders across design and construction phases. Effective risk mitigation relies on the concordance of all stakeholders' risk perceptions. Many researchers have noticed the discordance of risk perceptions among critical stakeholders in safe construction work, however few have provided quantifiable evidence describing them. In an effort to fill this perception gap, this research performs an experiment that investigates stakeholder perceptions of risk in construction. Data analysis confirms the existence of such discordance, and indicates a trend in risk likelihood estimation. With risk perceptions from low to high, the stakeholders are architects, contractors/safety professionals, and engineers. Including prior studies, results also suggest that designers have improved their knowledge in building construction safety, but compared to builders they present more difficultly in reaching a consensus of perception. Findings of this research are intended to be used by risk management and decision makers to reassess stakeholders' varying judgments when considering injury prevention and hazard assessment.

  6. THE DIALOGUE WITH STAKEHOLDERS IN TEORY AND IN PRACTICE: ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AN INDUSTRIAL SECTOR PUBLIC COMPANY AND ITS STAKEHOLDERS TO CREATE A SOCIAL REPONSIBILITY POLICY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gracinda Carvalho Teixeira

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to study the relationship between a public company of the industrial sector and its stakeholders showing the place they occupy in the construction of the company social responsibility policy (CSR. The meaning of the term stakeholder in theory and in the organization’s practice is a challenge in the delineation of interest groups formed along the historical trajectory of the organization. The premises of the corporate social responsibility policy, assume the company's attendance at economic and legal requirements related to their productive activities, in addition to the social and environmental impacts, in order to prevent, mitigate or compensate for the damages resulting from their activities. To adapt to this new reality organizations should incorporate new corporate values that promote the restructuring of their productive activities and the dialogue with stakeholders. The research results suggest that the environmental issues involving the company have spurred the intention to create of CSR and that the notion of stakeholder incorporated by the organization guides in delimitation of the participants in the company’s dialogue with their stakeholders to build a social responsibility policy.

  7. Use of Stakeholder Focus Groups to Define the Mission and Scope of a new Department of Population Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, William M

    2018-04-09

    The focus and funding of US healthcare is evolving from volume to value-based, and healthcare leaders, managers, payers, and researchers are increasingly focusing on managing populations of patients. Simultaneously, there is increasing interest in getting "upstream" from disease management to promote health and prevent disease. Hence, the term "population health" has both clinical and community-based connotations relevant to the tripartite mission of US medical schools. To seek broad input for the strategic development of the Department of Population Health in a new medical school at a tier 1 research university. Focus groups with facilitated consensus development. Eighty-one persons representing the Dell Medical School and other schools at the University of Texas at Austin, city/county government, community nonprofit organizations, and faculty from other local university schools along with selected national academic leaders. Focus groups with subsequent consensus development of emphases identified premeeting by participants by e-mail exchanges. The resulting departmental strategic plan included scope of work, desired characteristics of leaders, and early impact activities in seven areas of interest: community engagement and health equity, primary care and value-based health, occupational and environment medicine, medical education, health services and community-based research, health informatics and data analysis, and global health. Medical schools should have a primary focus in population, most effectively at the departmental level. Engaging relevant academic and community stakeholders is an effective model for developing this emerging discipline in US medical schools.

  8. Stakeholder approach, Stakeholders mental model: A visualization test with cognitive mapping technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garoui Nassreddine

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The idea of this paper is to determine the mental models of actors in the firm with respect to the stakeholder approach of corporate governance. The use of the cognitive map to view these diagrams to show the ways of thinking and conceptualization of the stakeholder approach. The paper takes a corporate governance perspective, discusses stakeholder model. It takes also a cognitive mapping technique.

  9. University of Wisconsin IAIMS planning: organizational challenges within a faculty governance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, K; Brennan, P F; DeMets, D; Dahlen, K; Buchanan, J

    2000-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison Health Sciences Schools are currently in the planning stage of developing an Integrated Advanced Information Management System (IAIMS). The planning phase of this project attends to the unique opportunities that are found at the flagship campus of a large state university system. Statewide teaching and research initiatives and accelerated campus-level capital development challenge the planners to create an IAIMS plan that anticipates an emerging health science environment. Additionally, UW-Madison has an organizational culture with a strong tradition of faculty governance, which provides a very desirable and flexible decision-making environment for a cross-discipline collaborative information management initiative. Development of a shared IAIMS vision conflicts with a governance model that most directly supports intradepartmental decision-making. The challenge presented here for an IAIMS initiative has less to do with hard wiring a technical infrastructure and more to do with increased stakeholder cooperation in a highly decentralized organization with autonomous information systems.

  10. A Study of Faculty Governance Leaders' Perceptions of Online and Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciabocchi, Elizabeth; Ginsberg, Amy; Picciano, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a study on the perceptions of faculty governance leaders to online and blended learning. For the purposes of this study, faculty governance was defined as formally established bodies in colleges and universities such as senates, councils, and collective bargaining organizations that are affiliated with the…

  11. Love and Hate in University Technology Transfer: Examining Faculty and Staff Conflicts and Ethical Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Clovia; Schumann, David

    2016-01-01

    With respect to university technology transfer, the purpose of this paper is to examine the literature focused on the relationship between university research faculty and technology transfer office staff. We attempt to provide greater understanding of how research faculty's personal values and research universities' organization values may differ…

  12. Toward Multi-Stakeholder Value: Virtual Human Resource Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Yue Suen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Some large organizations have used online virtual worlds (e.g., Second Life in human resources (HR in recent years, but few studies have explored how the values are generated by this technology and what factors have an impact on the performance of this technology. In this article we identify the delivery of HR functions in virtual worlds as virtual human resource management (v-HRM. In principle, v-HRM is an integrated HR strategy that enhances the management of human capital and increases the visibility of human capital to worldwide stakeholders through the establishment of an online virtual world. By introducing the features of v-HRM and summarizing the initiatives of v-HRM based on IBM experiences, we propose a model that examines the multi-stakeholder value of v-HRM. A qualitative study was employed to explore the impact of v-HRM on four types of stakeholder values through the insights from social shaping of technology approach. The case analysis results also show four types of v-HRM value facilitators. This model acknowledges how and what to implement with respect to v-HRM, and thus can be used to guide future research on v-HRM.

  13. The Role of Private Stakeholders in Disaster and Humanitarian Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharcisio Cotta Fontainha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of private stakeholders in disaster operations goes far beyond the delivery of profits to its shareholders. Disasters and humanitarian operations literature acknowledges the importance of private sector in disaster lifecycle; however, it lacks an analysis of the risks and benefits of each different form of their engagement in such operations (contractual relationships, one-off relationships and CSR - Corporate Social Responsibility partnerships. To address this research gap, a literature review was conducted on papers covering the perspective of private stakeholders when engaging in disaster and humanitarian operations with stakeholders from public and social groups. The results revealed that some challenges are specific from one approach and others are common for all of them. Moreover, despite the increasing of reputation capital and organizational learning being used to motivate CSR approach, they are mentioned as benefits in approaches with lower engagement - contractual and one-off relationship approaches. Thus, the benefits and risks of each approach need to be carefully addressed by scholars and field professionals in order to seek better results from the engagement of private organizations.

  14. Mapping the Views of Adolescent Health Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewan, Lindsay A; McLinden, Daniel; Biro, Frank; DeJonckheere, Melissa; Vaughn, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Health research that includes youth and family stakeholders increases the contextual relevance of findings, which can benefit both the researchers and stakeholders involved. The goal of this study was to identify youth and family adolescent health priorities and to explore strategies to address these concerns. Stakeholders identified important adolescent health concerns, perceptions of which were then explored using concept mapping. Concept mapping is a mixed-method participatory research approach that invites input from various stakeholders. In response to prompts, stakeholders suggested ways to address the identified health conditions. Adolescent participants then sorted the statements into groups based on content similarity and rated the statements for importance and feasibility. Multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis were then applied to create the concept maps. Stakeholders identified sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and obesity as the health conditions they considered most important. The concept map for STIs identified 7 clusters: General sex education, support and empowerment, testing and treatment, community involvement and awareness, prevention and protection, parental involvement in sex education, and media. The obesity concept map portrayed 8 clusters: Healthy food choices, obesity education, support systems, clinical and community involvement, community support for exercise, physical activity, nutrition support, and nutrition education. Ratings were generally higher for importance than for feasibility. The concept maps demonstrate stakeholder-driven ideas about approaches to target STIs and obesity in this context. Strategies at multiple social ecological levels were emphasized. The concept maps can be used to generate discussion regarding these topics and to identify interventions. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  16. Organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a…

  17. Structure, Features, and Faculty Content in ARL Member Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Holly; Koenig, Jay; McGeachin, Robert B.; Tucker, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    Questions about the optimal way to present repository content to authors, submitters, and end-users, prompted this study. The authors examined, through an observation and a survey, the institutional repositories of peer institutions in the ARL for good practices related to the presentation and organization of faculty-authored institutional…

  18. Faculty Development and Quality Assurance in the EU ERAMIS Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Merceron

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the ERAMIS project is to create a
    network of Masters degrees “Informatics as a Second
    Competence” in nine beneficiary universities of Kazakhstan,
    Kyrgyzstan and Russia. This contribution presents how
    faculty development is organized and quality assurance
    implemented inside this project.

  19. Perceptions of Education Faculty Students on Teaching Methods and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmer, Elif; Güven, Gülçin; Aydin, Oktay; Özden, Bülent; Efe, Kadriye; Sener, Nurcan

    2016-01-01

    Individual differences have an influence on a wide range of education fields. These differences can range from organizing teaching environments to the techniques and strategies that the teacher uses. This study focused on individual differences of pre-service teachers and aimed to investigate the perceptions of Education Faculty students on…

  20. A national study on the attitudes of Irish dental faculty members to faculty development.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, E M

    2010-02-01

    International studies suggest that dental faculty are resistant to the concept and practice of faculty development. This paper analyses the demographic and educational profile of Irish Dental Faculty, exploring their attitudes to educational initiatives.

  1. An Examination of Not-For-Profit Stakeholder Networks for Relationship Management: A Small-Scale Analysis on Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jamie; Kitchens, Brent; Kozary, Ben; Zaki, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Using a small-scale descriptive network analysis approach, this study highlights the importance of stakeholder networks for identifying valuable stakeholders and the management of existing stakeholders in the context of mental health not-for-profit services. We extract network data from the social media brand pages of three health service organizations from the U.S., U.K., and Australia, to visually map networks of 579 social media brand pages (represented by nodes), connected by 5,600 edges. This network data is analyzed using a collection of popular graph analysis techniques to assess the differences in the way each of the service organizations manage stakeholder networks. We also compare node meta-information against basic topology measures to emphasize the importance of effectively managing relationships with stakeholders who have large external audiences. Implications and future research directions are also discussed. PMID:27711236

  2. An Examination of Not-For-Profit Stakeholder Networks for Relationship Management: A Small-Scale Analysis on Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyllie, Jessica; Lucas, Benjamin; Carlson, Jamie; Kitchens, Brent; Kozary, Ben; Zaki, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Using a small-scale descriptive network analysis approach, this study highlights the importance of stakeholder networks for identifying valuable stakeholders and the management of existing stakeholders in the context of mental health not-for-profit services. We extract network data from the social media brand pages of three health service organizations from the U.S., U.K., and Australia, to visually map networks of 579 social media brand pages (represented by nodes), connected by 5,600 edges. This network data is analyzed using a collection of popular graph analysis techniques to assess the differences in the way each of the service organizations manage stakeholder networks. We also compare node meta-information against basic topology measures to emphasize the importance of effectively managing relationships with stakeholders who have large external audiences. Implications and future research directions are also discussed.

  3. An Examination of Not-For-Profit Stakeholder Networks for Relationship Management: A Small-Scale Analysis on Social Media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Wyllie

    Full Text Available Using a small-scale descriptive network analysis approach, this study highlights the importance of stakeholder networks for identifying valuable stakeholders and the management of existing stakeholders in the context of mental health not-for-profit services. We extract network data from the social media brand pages of three health service organizations from the U.S., U.K., and Australia, to visually map networks of 579 social media brand pages (represented by nodes, connected by 5,600 edges. This network data is analyzed using a collection of popular graph analysis techniques to assess the differences in the way each of the service organizations manage stakeholder networks. We also compare node meta-information against basic topology measures to emphasize the importance of effectively managing relationships with stakeholders who have large external audiences. Implications and future research directions are also discussed.

  4. Student narratives of faculty incivility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasiter, Sue; Marchiondo, Lisa; Marchiondo, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Academic incivility remains a problem on college campuses. Nursing research has refocused from student impropriety to aberrant faculty behaviors. Our original study using the Nursing Education Environment Survey showed that 133 of 152 student participants experienced uncivil treatment. Latent, inductive content analysis was undertaken to analyze narratives about their "worst experience" of negative faculty behavior. Four categories were identified: "In front of someone," "Talked to others about me," "Made me feel stupid," and "I felt belittled." Incivility had a profound effect on students and is problematic because it increases already significant academic pressure; it interferes with learning and safe clinical performance; it is contrary to caring, a central nursing concept; and it decreases program satisfaction and retention. Few nursing schools have civility policies for faculty behavior. Formal procedures that promote professional interaction should be crafted and implemented. Equally important is creating ways for nursing students to document incivility without fear of retaliation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. PARTISIPASI STAKEHOLDERS ISLAM DALAM UPAYA MEREFORMASI PERATURAN DAERAH TENTANG USAHA TEMPAT HIBURAN DI KOTA PROBOLINGGO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Sucahyo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The nightlife scene is inevitable. Through Perda Kota Probolinggo Number 9 of 2010 it is regulated. However, in its development, it has little impact on society; Covert prostitution, the circulation of liquor, disputes between visitors, and moral decadence, made the Islamic stakeholders critical of guarding the local regulation, until finally the new law was born. This paper seeks to see how the participation of stakeholders labeled Islam ultimately succeeded in reforming this policy. The method in this research is descriptive qualitative with focus on three Islamic stakeholders, which are in the policy arena, outside policy but formal and outside but informal. Data is taken through observation, interview and documentation. Methods of data analysis using interactive analysis model Miles and Huberman. The results concluded; 1 Partisiapasi of Islamic stakeholders in the policy area conducted by the PKB and PPP factions joined in Commission X. Through the legislative authority of this group proposed Raperda after previously hearing and cooperating with LPPMUB. Supervision authority is carried out by recommendation. 2 The participation of Islamic stakeholders outside the policies incorporated in the main formal organization comes from NU circles. The group is pro actively guarding every phenomenon as a result of the enactment of local regulations, starting letters of recommendation, joining in the hearing, giving moral support to the Police, and so on. 3 The participation of Islamic stakeholders outside the policy sphere and not directly incorporated in formal organizations is used as the last ammunition through demonstration media.

  6. PERAN STAKEHOLDER PADA ASPEK KONSERVASI DALAM PENGELOLAAN TAMAN NASIONAL LAUT KEPULAUAN SERIBU (TNKpS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Dana Prabowo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The TNKpS area was marine consist of 110 small land with 108 land outside management authority of TNKpS and five of which are settlement land which occupied by 14,061 people. Beside the area condition, management complexities were actualization of protection, preservation, and utilization of natural resources in TNKpS. To overcome the management complexities, collaboration with other stkakeholders were needed so that the goals of management could be achieved. The purpose of this research is to identify the main role of stakeholder in conservation aspects. Research was done on the all of TNKpS’ SPTN at the islands where the stakeholder standby, using a closed-ended questionnaire method to 77 indicator in 11 criteria, and analyzed as descriptive. Stakeholders consist of government institutions, private sectors, NGOs, and the communities organization. Positive roles were the dominant to conservation activities. The stakeholder role focused on certain indicator that appropriate with organization main function and goals along with collaboration agreement. The role that less only the management of abration and intrution, utilization, and carrying capacity has not been done by all of the stakeholders.  Keyword: collaboration, management complexities, role, stakeholders, TNKpS 

  7. Ethical theory and stakeholder-related decisions: The role of stakeholder culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M. Jones; W.A. Felps (William); G. Bigley

    2007-01-01

    textabstractWe use convergent elements of major ethical theories to create a typology of corporate stakeholder cultures—the aspects of organizational culture consisting of the beliefs, values, and practices that have evolved for solving problems and otherwise managing stakeholder relationships. We

  8. Reviewing the role of stakeholders in Operational Research; A stakeholder theory perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooyert, V. de; Rouwette, E.A.J.A.; Kranenburg, H.L. van; Freeman, R.E.

    2017-01-01

    The role of stakeholders in organizational decision-making is gaining more and more attention. Managers find that in order to create value sustainably and ethically, it is necessary to balance the interests of various stakeholders. This trend is reflected in the management literature, where much

  9. Stakeholder Valuing: A Process for Identifying the Interrelationships between Firm and Stakeholder Attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. Carlon

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As firms are creating and recreating themselves as stakeholder corporations, tensions mount between a firm’s fiduciary duties to its shareholders and the broader responsibilities inherent in a stakeholder focus. Firms have employed several techniques to help resolve this tension with limited success. We suggest that the next step in reducing this tension is formally accounting for stakeholder value through changes in financial reporting. We contend that stakeholders have a financial value to the firm that can and should be accounted for through the firm’s financial reporting system. We propose a three-step process we call stakeholder valuing (SV to begin a conversation regarding how such a method can be created. SV begins with codifying the firm’s identity as a stakeholder entity, moves to assessing stakeholder value that’s consistent with that identity, and concludes with accounting for and reporting that value. What we are suggesting will be seen by some as a radical change in accounting practices but we believe it is necessary as we move toward a consistent, reliable, verifiable, transparent, and comparable means of accounting for the true value of a stakeholder corporation.

  10. Analysing stakeholder power dynamics in multi-stakeholder processes : insights of practice from Africa and Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, J.H.; Hiemstra, W.; Vugt, van S.M.; Walters, H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines different practical methods for stakeholders to analyse power dynamics in multi-stakeholders processes (MSPs), taking into account the ambiguous and uncertain nature of complex adaptive systems. It reflects on an action learning programme which focused on 12 cases in Africa and

  11. Stakeholder Management Capability and Performance in Brazilian Cooperatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeda Maria Pereira Pavão

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – The aim of this paper is to relate Stakeholder Management Capability (SMC to economic-financial and social-environmental performance. Design/methodology/approach – Data collection occurred in 26 states and the Federal District of Brazil. There was validation of 171 questionnaires answered at the strategic and tactical levels in the context of cooperatives in 13 sectors of Brazil’s economy. Structural equation modeling was used as an application to verify the data with the use of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Findings – The results made it possible to verify the relationship between SMC and the social and environmental performance. The coefficient found for the relationship between SMC and economicfinancial performance also had a positive effect. Practical implications – The research results provide evidence that SMC is directly related to the economic-financial and socialenvironmental performance of cooperative organizations. SMC may also contribute to the analytical process of organizations from the statistical dimension and an applied empirical structure. Originality/value – The model reached support in both relationships with significant values, demonstrating that the dimensions and scales used to measure it were satisfactory, validating the proposed model. This finding demonstrates that these organizations have the skills to meet the requirements of and manage stakeholders, even if one person plays different roles, i.e. the cooperative member, which is basically the owner, supplier, consumer and customer.

  12. STAKEHOLDER THEORY DAN KARYA KESELAMATAN SCHINDLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Nicodemus Lontah

    2015-04-01

    Donaldson and Peterson studies have shown that stakeholder theory has a more solid foundation than the epistemology of shareholder theory to analyze the performance of business ethics and moral duty of a company. This article discussed the business activities of Oskar Schindler, an industrialist war-profiteer during World War II. Schindler's business which was originally run by the government under the Nazi regime, eventually opposed the mission of economic and legal liability imposed by the regime. Schindler's transformation of vision and business mission in this article demonstrate the characteristics and connection of layers in descriptive, instrumental and normative stakeholder theory in the concept of "normative, instrumental and descriptive stakeholder theory" according to Donaldson and Peterson.

  13. Community stakeholder responses to advocacy advertising

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, B.; Sinclair, J. [Elon University, Elon, NC (United States). School Community

    2009-07-01

    Focus group research was used to examine how community stakeholders, a group with local industry experience, responded to coal industry advocacy messages. The stakeholders expressed beliefs about both the advertiser and the coal industry, and while their knowledge led to critical consideration of the industry campaign, they also expressed a desire to identify with positive messages about their community. Applying a postpositivist research perspective, a new model is introduced to integrate these beliefs in terms of advertiser trust and industry accountability under the existing theoretical framework of persuasion knowledge. Agent and topic knowledge are combined in this model based on responses to the industry advocacy campaign. In doing so, this study integrates a priori theory within a new context, extending the current theoretical framework to include an understanding of how community stakeholders - a common target for marketplace advocacy - interpret industry messages.

  14. Organizational Responsibility for Age-Friendly Social Participation: Views of Australian Rural Community Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterton, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study critically explores the barriers experienced by diverse rural community stakeholders in facilitating environments that enable age-friendly social participation. Twenty-six semi-structured interviews were conducted across two rural Australian communities with stakeholders from local government, health, social care, and community organizations. Findings identify that rural community stakeholders face significant difficulties in securing resources for groups and activities catering to older adults, which subsequently impacts their capacity to undertake outreach to older adults. However, in discussing these issues, questions were raised in relation to whose responsibility it is to provide resources for community groups and organizations providing social initiatives and whose responsibility it is to engage isolated seniors. These findings provide a much-needed critical perspective on current age-friendly research by acknowledging the responsibilities of various macro-level social structures-different community-level organizations, local government, and policy in fostering environments to enable participation of diverse rural older adults.

  15. Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo

    Most of us recognize that organizations are everywhere. You meet them on every street corner in the form of families and shops, study in them, work for them, buy from them, pay taxes to them. But have you given much thought to where they came from, what they are today, and what they might become...... and considers many more. Mary Jo Hatch introduces the concept of organizations by presenting definitions and ideas drawn from the a variety of subject areas including the physical sciences, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, literature, and the visual and performing arts. Drawing on examples from...... prehistory and everyday life, from the animal kingdom as well as from business, government, and other formal organizations, Hatch provides a lively and thought provoking introduction to the process of organization....

  16. Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo

    and considers many more. Mary Jo Hatch introduces the concept of organizations by presenting definitions and ideas drawn from the a variety of subject areas including the physical sciences, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, literature, and the visual and performing arts. Drawing on examples from......Most of us recognize that organizations are everywhere. You meet them on every street corner in the form of families and shops, study in them, work for them, buy from them, pay taxes to them. But have you given much thought to where they came from, what they are today, and what they might become...... prehistory and everyday life, from the animal kingdom as well as from business, government, and other formal organizations, Hatch provides a lively and thought provoking introduction to the process of organization....

  17. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: In-well vapor stripping, in-situ bioremediation, gas membrane separation system (membrane separation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This document provides stakeholder evaluations on innovative technologies to be used in the remediation of volatile organic compounds from soils and ground water. The technologies evaluated are; in-well vapor stripping, in-situ bioremediation, and gas membrane separation

  18. Introducing legal method when teaching stakeholder theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Governments are particularly salient stakeholders for business ethics. They act on societal needs and social expectations, and have the political and legal powers to restrict or expand the economic freedoms of business as well as the legitimacy and often urgency to do so. We draw on two examples......: the Business & Human Rights regime from a UN Global Compact perspective; and mandatory CSR reporting. Supplying integrated teaching notes and generalising on the examples, we explain how legal method may help students of business ethics, organisation and management – future managers – in their analysis...... to the business ethics literature by explaining how legal method complements stakeholder theory for organisational practice....

  19. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration stakeholder involvement model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaupanger, R.M.; Kostelnik, K.M.; Milam, L.M.

    1994-04-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. Stakeholder participation in the DOE Environmental Management decision-making process is critical to remediation efforts. Appropriate mechanisms for communication with the public, private sector, regulators, elected officials, and others are being aggressively pursued by BWID to permit informed participation. This document summarizes public outreach efforts during FY-93 and presents a strategy for expanded stakeholder involvement during FY-94

  20. Students and Libraries: The Perspectives of Faculty in a Pakistani University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kashif

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore student library use from the perspective of the faculty. An already developed instrument was used to collect data from full-time faculty members working in a private university located in the province of Punjab, Pakistan. The faculty strongly supported the idea of library based learning, student library use, assigning library-based tasks, and the crucial role of librarians in promoting a library culture. The respondents were not satisfied with the students’ library use skills, availability of relevant and current data or the promotion of library use by the institution’s top management. The current research is first of its kind in Pakistan and is based on data collected from a single university. Future research might be extended to other universities in the Pakistani or South Asian higher education sector. The study could be helpful to higher education policy to design customerdriven marketing strategies while marketing libraries to stakeholders.

  1. Work, work environments and other factors influencing nurse faculty intention to remain employed: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourangeau, Ann; Saari, Margaret; Patterson, Erin; Ferron, Era Mae; Thomson, Heather; Widger, Kimberley; MacMillan, Kathleen

    2014-06-01

    Given the role nurse faculty have in educating nurses, little is known about what influences their intention to remain employed (ITR) in academic settings. Findings from a nurse faculty survey administered to test a conceptual model of factors hypothesized as influencing nurse faculty ITR are reported. A cross-sectional survey design was employed. We included colleges and universities in Ontario, Canada. The population of Ontario nurse faculty who reported being employed as nurse faculty with the College of Nurses of Ontario (Canada) was included. Of the 1328 nurse faculty who were surveyed, 650 participated. Participants completed a questionnaire with measures of work, work environment, job satisfaction, burnout and ITR. Regression analyses were conducted to test the model. Ten of 26 independent variables explained 25.4% of variance in nurse faculty ITR for five years. These variables included: proximity to retirement, quality of relationships with colleagues, being employed full time, having dependents, satisfaction with work-life balance, quality of education, satisfaction with job status, access to financial support for education from organization, access to required human resources and being unionized. Although not all influencing factors are modifiable, academic leadership should develop strategies that encourage nurse faculty ITR. Strategies that support collegial relationships among faculty, increase the number of full time positions, promote work-life balance, engage faculty in assessing and strengthening education quality, support faculty choice between full-time and part-time work, and ensure adequate human resources required to teach effectively will lead to heightened nurse faculty ITR. © 2013.

  2. Driving Success over the Past 50 Years-The Faculty in Academic Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Daryl D

    2015-01-01

    The faculty at member schools and colleges of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) are critical for continued progress in veterinary medicine. The success of those faculty members over the past 50 years has positioned veterinary medicine to engage an ever-widening array of opportunities, responsibilities, and societal needs. Yet the array of skills and accomplishments of faculty in academic veterinary medicine are not always visible to the public, or even within our profession. The quality and the wide range of their scholarship are reflected, in part, through the according of national and international awards and honors from organizations relevant to their particular areas of expertise. The goal of this study was to illustrate the breadth of expertise and the quality of the faculty at 34 schools/colleges of veterinary medicine by examining the diversity of organizations that have recognized excellence in faculty achievements through a variety of awards.

  3. The Politics of Stakeholder Influence in Corporate Environmental Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, Lise

    2006-01-01

    I contribute in this article to descriptive stakeholder engagement theory by conceptualising a number of new internal influence strategies that engaged secondary stakeholders can use in their new face-to-face interactions with the corporations. These internal stakeholder influence strategies should...... be seen as adding to the list of external stakeholder influence strategies (e.g. Frooman, 1999) that secondary stakeholders can use in their traditional role of operating from the outside....

  4. Corporate Citizenship and Stakeholder Engagement : Maintaining an Equitable Power Balance

    OpenAIRE

    Ihugba, Bethel Uzoma; Osuji, Onyeka K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an engagement oriented corporation-stakeholder relationship in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programmes. It is a proposition which poses the two connected questions of how to move from solely public relation driven stakeholder management to social development oriented stakeholder participation (engagement) and how Stakeholder Engagement can be measured. On the backdrop of Arnstein’s (1969) citizenship participation model and reasons for Stakeholder Engagement frame...

  5. Faculty Desegregation and Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jimy M.

    1984-01-01

    In the largest district initially placed under court-ordered faculty desegregation. The influences of teacher turnover, experience, and racial isolation on elementary school student achievement in predominantly minority schools were examined. Findings suggest that poorly planned desegregation policies can have undesirable consequences, especially…

  6. Faculty Rights to Scholarly Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Molly

    2017-01-01

    This chapter provides a history of the scholarly publishing system, and explains how it has evolved to benefit corporate publishers to the detriment of faculty, universities, and the public. It offers the open access movement as a potential remedy for the publishing crisis, and the policy environment surrounding these new forms of communication.

  7. Faculty Consulting: Responsibility or Promiscuity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Carol M; Lewis, Darrell R.

    1984-01-01

    The potential benefits--to the individual, the institution, and society--and the potential costs of faculty consulting are examined. A review of the relevant literature and data precedes a presentation of new findings and a taxonomy for developing institutional guidelines. (Author/MLW)

  8. Faculty Development through Cognitive Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Mary Antony

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a faculty development project in which 12 teacher educators used the Cognitive Coaching model to engage in critical reflections about their teaching. Each identified an aspect of their teaching they wanted to improve and a colleague to serve as coach. Participants engaged in Cognitive Coaching cycles, consisting of planning…

  9. Searching for Educational Technology Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2003-01-01

    Identifies the types of positions available at domestic four-year institutions of higher education for faculty whose specialty is educational technology. Analyzes educational job postings listed in the "Chronicle of Higher Education" from August, 2000, through July, 2001. (Author/SOE)

  10. Embedded Neoliberalism within Faculty Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, John S.; Aliyeva, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Although there are claims that neoliberalism has not only commandeered the agenda and actions of universities and colleges but also become identified with the work of academic professionals, there is little empirical evidence to show that neoliberalism has infiltrated the work of faculty. This qualitative field work investigation of three…

  11. Cross-Race Faculty Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Christine A.; Lincoln, Yvonna S.

    2005-01-01

    There are many synonyms for the word "mentor": coach, guide, role model, peer advisor, and sponsor, among others. The plethora of terms would suggest that we know something about this role, but most of the research on mentoring has been conducted in business and industry rather than in education. In fact, junior and senior faculty and…

  12. Summary of stakeholder engagement session of WPDD topical session on stakeholder involvement in decommissioning projects - November 14, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, Steve

    2006-01-01

    as important as technical rigour in these documents. The Italian presentation mentioned setting up a bilateral agreement on monitoring with local authorities. This seems like a step in the right direction, but the FSC would recommend far more than that to build public confidence. Today the public expects to be directly involved in decision making on major issues that affect them, not just via elected representatives. As I mentioned in my presentation on the situation in the UK, it is also important not to raise unrealistic expectations of how much the public can influence our decisions. In much UK legislation, decisions can only be made on a strictly technical basis and the opportunity for public influence is very limited. The presentation by EDF highlighted another vital requirement for successful stakeholder engagement. That is a disciplined, project based approach within the leading organizations. If stakeholder engagement is not meticulously planned it will flat on its face, as people will be given different messages at different times. So it is very important that this disciplined approach includes both local and national players to ensure consistency. Finally, the presentation from Germany mentioned the stepwise approach to decision making. This is very much in line with FSC recommendations. It is important that stakeholders are involved right from the start of the process, and not just in the final site selection stage. The steps involved in reaching a decision must be transparent and the opportunity for stakeholder involvement in each one needs to be clear. If the legal and procedural framework incorporate this stepwise approach explicitly it is a great help for stakeholder participation

  13. New faculty orientation in North American medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Sheila W; Anderson, William; Mylona, Elza; Greenberg, Ruth; Yang, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about common elements or "best practices" of new faculty orientation (NFO) programs in medical schools. The objective was to examine school-wide NFO programs in North American medical schools. We reviewed the literature and conducted a web-based survey. Analyses included descriptive statistics and content analysis. We found little evidence of "best practices." Of the 106 responding schools (106/148=71.62%), 72 (67.9%) reported some type of school-wide NFO program. The typical program was organized by an Office of Faculty Affairs or Faculty Development, targeted broad goals, 4 to 8 hour long, offered early in the academic year, and used 2 or more presentation formats (e.g., oral, print). Based on the literature, this study appears to be the first comprehensive description of NFO programs in medical schools. Multiple types of NFO are needed to accommodate the diversity of faculty and faculty responsibilities. School-wide programs may serve best to develop institutional affiliation and collegiality.

  14. Faculty ratings of retention strategies for minority nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Barbara H

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate a) the types of retention strategies used by undergraduate nursing programs for the purpose of retaining minority students, b) the rated effectiveness of the strategies, as identified by faculty in those programs, and c) whether there is a relationship between strategies rated as effective and the type of nursing program, baccalaureate (BSN) or associate (AD) degree. Administrator-selected faculty from randomly sampled BSN and AD nursing programs within a 16-state area of the southeastern United States were asked to respond to an online survey regarding the use and effectiveness of retention strategies selected from the literature. Descriptive statistics and chi-square tests for association were used to analyze the data. Of the 14 strategies included in this analysis, faculty availability and timely feedback on tests and clinical performances were used by all undergraduate programs. Organized study groups and peer mentoring were the least used strategies. Faculty from both BSN and AD programs reported using many of the strategies and rated their use as effective overall for minority nursing student retention. The highest rated strategies were those that involved direct interaction of nurse faculty and students.

  15. Faculty attitudes about interprofessional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary L. Beck Dallaghan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interprofessional education (IPE is an important component to training health care professionals. Research is limited in exploring the attitudes that faculty hold regarding IPE and what barriers they perceive to participating in IPE. The purpose of this study was to identify faculty attitudes about IPE and to identify barriers to participating in campus-wide IPE activities. Methods: A locally used questionnaire called the Nebraska Interprofessional Education Attitudes Scale (NIPEAS was used to assess attitudes related to interprofessional collaboration. Questions regarding perceived barriers were included at the end of the questionnaire. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were used to analyze the results in aggregate as well as by college. In addition, open-ended questions were analyzed using an immersion/crystallization framework to identify themes. Results: The results showed that faculty had positive attitudes of IPE, indicating that is not a barrier to participating in IPE activities. Most common barriers to participation were scheduling conflicts (x24,285=19.17, p=0.001, lack of department support (4,285=10.09, p=0.039, and lack of awareness of events (x24,285=26.38, p=0.000. Narrative comments corroborated that scheduling conflicts are an issue because of other priorities. Those who commented also added to the list of barriers, including relevance of the activities, location, and prior negative experiences. Discussion: With faculty attitudes being positive, the exploration of faculty's perceived barriers to IPE was considered even more important. Identifying these barriers will allow us to modify our IPE activities from large, campus-wide events to smaller activities that are longitudinal in nature, embedded within current curriculum and involving more authentic experiences.

  16. Enduring Contestations: Stakeholder Strategic Action in Water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enduring Contestations: Stakeholder Strategic Action in Water Resource Management in the Save Catchment Area, Eastern Zimbabwe. ... The data presented in this article was collected in the Save Catchment Council area in the eastern part of Zimbabwe between August 2001 and April 2002. Eastern Africa Social Science ...

  17. Listed Firm's Level of Stakeholder Transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Caspar

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes how Danish listed firms comply with the Danish Corporate Governance Code's recommendations regarding the categories: Role of shareholders, role of stakeholders and transparency. It is shown that the number of recommendations can be explained by six different underlying facto...

  18. Towards Empowered Stakeholder Participation in Water Resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper considers why stakeholder institutions mandated to manage water resources in Zimbabwe in a participatory manner, have failed to perform according to expectations. A central argument of the paper is that this failure is because of the absence of a clear development agenda, which can facilitate effective ...

  19. Management of the Stakeholder Driven Company

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolffsen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    Ideen er at vise at en virksomhed, som samtidigt skal tilgode ledelsen og forbrugerne, må have en monopollignende stilling på markedet og benytte en bizar prisdiskriminering, hvilket vises men en Nash forhandlingsligevægt. Desuden inddrages en ekstensiv diskussion af stakeholder-begrebet....

  20. Safety Outreach and Incident Response Stakeholder Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosewater, David Martin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Conover, David [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this document is to set out a strategy to reach all stakeholders that can impact the timely deployment of safe stationary energy storage systems in the built environment with information on ESS technology and safety that is relevant to their role in deployment of the technology.

  1. Discrepant Stakeholder Perspectives on Graduate Employability Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinash, Shelley; Crane, Linda; Judd, Madelaine-Marie; Knight, Cecily

    2016-01-01

    A literature review identified 12 strategies that have been empirically linked to improvements in graduate employability. A survey methodology was used to investigate self-reported use and/or perspectives on these strategies among four stakeholder groups. The following questions were asked: to students--What strategies are you using to improve…

  2. 18 CFR 50.4 - Stakeholder participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stakeholder participation. 50.4 Section 50.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... county throughout the project area, either in paper or electronic format; and (ii) Complete copies of all...

  3. Evaluating Outcomes from Stakeholders' Perception: Evidence from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-02

    Oct 2, 2016 ... The need for the appreciation of values and knowledge diversity has contributed to the increasing ... Outcome Perception Index (OPI) was developed to assess stakeholders' perception of the extent to which the ..... Consumer Price Index of Bryan and Cecchetti (1993); the Economic Security Index designed ...

  4. Evaluating outcomes from stakeholders' perception: evidence from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The need for the appreciation of values and knowledge diversity has contributed to the increasing relevance of stakeholder participation in the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of development projects. Using mixed methods research design and indicators, this paper assesses the outcomes of the participatory monitoring ...

  5. Software Architecture : Framing Stakeholders' Concerns introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lago, Patricia; Avgeriou, Paris; Hilliard, Rich

    2010-01-01

    As noted earlier, some stakeholder concerns are well-served today by available architecture viewpoints, frameworks, or ADLs, while others aren't expressible with available, off-the-shelf approaches. Hence the theme of this special issue: exploring the space of architecting in the face of multiple

  6. Introducing legal method when teaching stakeholder theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    2015-01-01

    : the Business & Human Rights regime from a UN Global Compact perspective; and mandatory CSR reporting. Supplying integrated teaching notes and generalising on the examples, we explain how legal method may help students of business ethics, organisation and management – future managers – in their analysis...... to the business ethics literature by explaining how legal method complements stakeholder theory for organisational practice....

  7. Stakeholders and quality assurance in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leisyte, Liudvika; Westerheijden, Donald F.; Eggins, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The various changes in post-bureaucratic organising, which are moving towards network approaches, coupled with the managerial agenda of corporate governance, have redefined the roles of various internal and external stakeholders in the governance of higher education institutions (Leisyte and Dee,

  8. looking for convergence: stakeholders' perceptions of cocoa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    ABSTRACT. This study was undertaken with the objective of evaluating the extent of convergence on the part of key stakeholders in the cocoa sector on the problems of cocoa extension and how to address it. The study was carried out in the Atwima Mponua and Amansie West districts of the Ashanti re- gion in 2008 ...

  9. Looking for convergence: Stakeholders' perceptions of cocoa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was undertaken with the objective of evaluating the extent of convergence on the part of key stakeholders in the cocoa sector on the problems of cocoa extension and how to address it. The study was carried out in the Atwima Mponua and Amansie West districts of the Ashanti region in 2008 although some of the ...

  10. Assessing Stakeholder Input in a Large System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmyn, Zenon J.; Collet, Leverne S.

    The intent of this paper is to illustrate the use of stakeholder information in evaluating a school program. The material presented is part of a comprehensive formative evaluation of a crisis intervention program operated by a suburban school district situated near a large industrial city in the Midwest. The crisis intervention program provided…

  11. Sustainable food and agriculture: stakeholder's frames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gorp, B.; van der Goot, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite its importance, the notion of sustainability is open for discursive struggle. This article's primary objective is to acquire insight into the manner in which the principal stakeholders strategically use frames in their public communication about sustainable food and agriculture. A framing

  12. Stakeholders Perception of Transparency and Accountability in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main concern of the stakeholders is the problem of who to hold accountable for fund disbursement and execution of educational programs. The second concern is the degree of transparency in financial dealings with a view to check irregularity and ultimately enhances efficiency. Using the 'Perception Survey' method, ...

  13. Stakeholder Support for School Food Policy Expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Simone; Pescud, Melanie; Donovan, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which parents and school-based stakeholders (principals, teachers, canteen managers and Parents & Citizen Committee presidents) are supportive of potential expansions to a new school food policy. Eight additional policy components elicited in preliminary focus groups with parents and 19 additional…

  14. Report On Stakeholders Analysis Fast-Trac Phase Iii Deliverables, #5 One Set Of Stakeholder Readings, #6. Final Version Of The Stakeholders? Questionnaire, #7. Stakeholders? Analysis Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-10

    THIS STUDY WAS UNDERTAKEN TO IDENTIFY AND EVALUATE CRITERIA BY WHICH THE PUBLIC, AND CERTAIN STAKEHOLDER GROUPS WITHIN THE PUBLIC, WILL JUDGE THE MERITS OF THE FAST-TRAC SYSTEM. OVER A PERIOD OF TWO YEARS, THREE SURVEYS WERE CONDUCTED TO OBTAIN SPECI...

  15. Stakeholders' Perceptions of Parcelization in Wisconsin's Northwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark G. Rickenbach; Paul H. Gobster

    2003-01-01

    Parcelization, the process by which relatively large forest ownerships become subdivided into smaller ones, is often related to changes in ownership and can bring changes to the use of the land. Landowners, resource professionals, and others interested in Wisconsin's Northwoods were asked their views on parcelization in a series of stakeholder forums. We analyzed...

  16. Stakeholder Participation in REDD+ Readiness Activities for Three Collaborative Projects in Lao PDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saykham Boutthavong

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A key challenge for reducing emission from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD in developing countries is to balance the power of various stakeholders in decision making. This study explores the forms of stakeholder participation in the implementation of three pilot projects in Laos, with a focus on who actually makes decisions on project activities. We found that stakeholder roles in making decisions were imbalanced. The central government and development partner organizations were the ones who actually fulfill the roles of decision-makers in most project activities. Although local communities were not the key stakeholders in decision making in most activities, their roles seem to have increased in the activities where participatory approaches were applied. Participation of the private sector, non-governmental organizations, academic and research institutes and mass organizations was limited. Opportunities to reach decision-makers regarding project activities came through service contract agreements. Our findings suggest that an understanding of who fulfills the key roles will support a decentralization of decision making by balancing power and redistributing the roles from dominant to weaker stakeholders. In addition, the private sector’s participation may enhance opportunities to harmonize their investments for supporting REDD+ development and reduce the negative impacts on the forests and the environment.

  17. Extrinsic versus Intrinsic Motivation in Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, E. Dendy

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the motivation of faculty for effective teaching. Describes five stages in faculty growth and development. Suggests some implications of career phases and motivational studies. Lists 22 references. (YP)

  18. A Corporate Approach to Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Diana

    1988-01-01

    Presents a corporate model for faculty development programs. Reviews corporate training programs, including planning, implementation, and motivations. Discusses the application of these corporate concepts to professional development, instructional development, personal development, and new staff orientation for faculty. (CH)

  19. Teaching of nuclear medicine at medical faculties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienstbier, Z.

    1987-01-01

    The teaching of nuclear medicine at medical faculties in the CSSR is analyzed. It is shown that the teaching conditions are different at the individual faculties of medicine and the respective conditions are exemplified. (author). 4 tabs

  20. Investigating IT Faculty Resistance to Learning Management System Adoption Using Latent Variables in an Acceptance Technology Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousbahi, Fatiha; Alrazgan, Muna Saleh

    2015-01-01

    To enhance instruction in higher education, many universities in the Middle East have chosen to introduce learning management systems (LMS) to their institutions. However, this new educational technology is not being used at its full potential and faces resistance from faculty members. To investigate this phenomenon, we conducted an empirical research study to uncover factors influencing faculty members' acceptance of LMS. Thus, in the Fall semester of 2014, Information Technology faculty members were surveyed to better understand their perceptions of the incorporation of LMS into their courses. The results showed that personal factors such as motivation, load anxiety, and organizational support play important roles in the perception of the usefulness of LMS among IT faculty members. These findings suggest adding these constructs in order to extend the Technology acceptance model (TAM) for LMS acceptance, which can help stakeholders of the university to implement the use of this system. This may assist in planning and evaluating the use of e-learning.

  1. Climate Change Education for General Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbay, G.; Fox-Lykens, R.; Fuoco, M. J.; Phalen, L.; Harcourt, P.; Veron, D. E.; Rogers, M.; Merrill, J.

    2016-12-01

    As MADE-CLEAR scientists, our ultimate goal is to inform the public about climate change through education. Education will provide citizens with important tools for adapting and coping against climate change through the understanding of the cause and effects of climate change, and the role they play in counteracting these effects. MADE-CLEAR is connecting educators with resources such as lesson plans and hands-on activities so they can easily incorporate climate change into their curriculum. This past year Delaware State University held workshops for Chemistry and Math faculty to provide information and resources to help integrate climate change education into their classes. We presented them with information on climate change and demonstrated several laboratory activities that would be applicable to their classes. Such activities included a sea level rise graphing exercise, ocean acidification pH demonstration, ocean acidification's effect on organism's demonstration, carbon dioxide variability and heat trapping gas simulation. The goals of the workshops are to implement a multidisciplinary approach in climate change education. Workshops are prepared hands-on heavy followed by the lectures and video resources. Pre- and post-workshop assessment questions on the workshop contents are provided to monitor faculty understanding of the climate change content. In doing so, we aim to improve climate literacy in our higher education students.

  2. Stakeholder Involvement in Swedish Nuclear Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran

    2006-01-01

    The focus in this paper is on past, current and emerging patterns of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a deep repository for final disposal of Sweden's spent nuclear fuel. In particular, we concentrate on how the two municipalities of Oskarshamn and Oesthammar have acted as engaged stakeholders, and have gained recognition as such, in the siting process. In general: How has stakeholder involvement gained acceptance as an activity of value in the siting of major waste facilities? What are the issues currently subject to stakeholder involvement and how have these been decided upon? An effect of the history of nuclear activity in Oskarshamn and Oesthammar is that stakeholder involvement over a final repository can be divided into social and technical issues. Both municipalities have out of tradition, as part of their social acceptance of a new repository, been prepared to surrender extended involvement in key safety issues. They have been prepared to do this because they also see themselves being able to delegate these safety issues to the government authorities SSI and SKI. These two authorities have been acceptable to the two municipalities as their legitimate 'technological guardians'. As physical geology re-enters the siting process for a deep repository, Oskarshamn appear more prepared to break with tradition than Oesthammar. Oskarshamn are currently demanding transparency from SKB in relation to the exact technical and geological criteria they will use to choose between them and Oesthammar as a repository site. In contrast to Oesthammar, Oskarshamn are preparing with the expected help of SKI and SSI to dispute their geology and its relation to nuclear safety with SKB if they consider it necessary. If Oskarshamn act to draw safety issues in relation to alternative methods and sitings into the EIA process where might this lead? As environmental groups now enter the process (three groups were granted funding in the first round - 2005) the character of site

  3. Stakeholder involvement in the decommissioning of Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrisson, Norman; LOVE, June; Murray, Marc

    2006-01-01

    The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) was established in the 1950's to pioneer the development of nuclear energy within the UK. Today its primary mission is to decommission UK's former nuclear research sites and restore its environment in a way that is safe and secure, environmentally friendly, value for money and publicly Acceptable. UKAEA Dounreay celebrated its 50 birthday in 2005, having pioneered the development of fast reactor technology since 1955. Today the site is now leading the way in decommissioning. The Dounreay nuclear site licence covers an area of approximately 140 acres and includes 3 reactors: the Dounreay Material Test Reactor (DMTR), the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR), and the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR). In addition there are 180 facilities on site which have supported the fast reactor programme, including a fuel reprocessing capability, laboratories and administration buildings. The reactors are now all in advanced stages of decommissioning. In October 2000 the Dounreay Site Restoration Plan (DSRP) was published to provide a framework for the site's restoration. The plan's objective was to reduce the site's hazards progressively by decontaminating and dismantling the plant, equipment and facilities, remediating contaminated ground and treating and packaging waste so it is suitable for long term storage or disposal. Whilst hailed as the most detailed plan integrating some 1500 activities and spanning 60 years it was criticised for having no stakeholder involvement. In response to this criticism, UKAEA developed a process for public participation over the following 2 years and launched its stakeholder engagement programme in October 2002. In order to provide a larger platform for the engagement process an advertisement was placed in the Scottish media inviting people to register as stakeholders in the Dounreay Site Restoration Plan. The stakeholder list now total over 1000. In October 2002 UKAEA launched their commitment to public

  4. Viewls - Stakeholder views on biofuels. WP1 final report about the results of the stakeholder questionnaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-03-15

    For the VIEWLS project an internet-based questionnaire on biofuels was distributed among a large group of stakeholders in the European Union, Accession Countries and the Americas in the second half of 2003. The purpose of the questionnaire was to collect information on stakeholders' opinion on biofuel related topics including the future potential of biofuels and drivers and barriers for the market introduction. Here the main results are presented. The results should only be regarded as indicative because no detailed statistical analysis was performed due to the difference in representation from different countries and stakeholder groups. (au)

  5. Stakeholder views on biofuels. WP1 Final report about the results of the stakeholder questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    For the VIEWLS project an internet-based questionnaire on biofuels was distributed among a large group of stakeholders in the European Union, Accession Countries and the Americas in the second half of 2003. The purpose of the questionnaire was to collect information on stakeholders' opinion on biofuel related topics including the future potential of biofuels and drivers and barriers for the market introduction. Here the main results are presented. The results should only be regarded as indicative because no detailed statistical analysis was performed due to the difference in representation from different countries and stakeholder groups

  6. Relationships between teaching faculty and teaching librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Linda S

    2014-01-01

    Every librarian who teaches in an academic library setting understands the complexities involved in partnering with teaching faculty. Relationships Between Teaching Faculty and Teaching Librarians recounts the efforts of librarians and faculty working together in disciplines across the board to create and sustain connections crucial to the success of library instruction. This unique collection of essays examines various types of partnerships between librarians and faculty (networking, coordination, and collaboration) and addresses the big issues involved, including teaching within an academic

  7. Relationships among Faculty Training, Faculty Degree, Faculty Longevity, and Student Satisfaction in Online Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Robert Todd; Shaw, Melanie; Pang, Sangho; Salley, Witt; Snider, J. Blake

    2015-01-01

    With the ever-increasing availability of online education opportunities, understanding the factors that influence online student satisfaction and success is vital to enable administrators to engage and retain this important stakeholder group. The purpose of this ex-post-facto, nonexperimental quantitative study was to investigate the impact of…

  8. Faculty and Technology: Implications for Faculty Training and Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Kidd, Terry; Kyei-Blankson, Lydia

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factors affecting ICT adoption process and the implications for faculty training and technology leadership. Respondents represented a wide range of academic and professional positions. They identified themselves as Assistant, Associate, and Professor as well as Instructional Designer, Director of Technology, Information Manager, eLearning Manager, Assistant Department Chair, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs and Consultant. The respondents identified Organizational Support, Leadership, Training and Development, and Resources as the predominate themes affecting Information and Communication Technology (ICT) adoption process in higher education. Evidence from this study offers insights on how higher education administrators and technology leaders could help their faculty and staff to implement appropriate ICT tools and practices to improve student learning.

  9. Perceptions of Faculty Status among Academic Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Quinn; Garrison, Melissa; Hales, Whitney

    2016-01-01

    This study measures the opinions of ARL librarians concerning the benefits and disadvantages of faculty status in academic librarianship. Average responses from faculty and nonfaculty librarians, as well as from tenured and tenure-track librarians, are analyzed to determine the general perceptions of each group. Overall, faculty librarians…

  10. Faculty Desegregation and Student Achievement. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jimy M.

    The priority attached to inner-city student desegregation has often become diminished with the onset of mandatory faculty desegregation. Consequently, students tend to be substantially more segregated than teachers in urban schools. Faculties in predominantly minority schools typically have higher turnover and less experience than faculties in…

  11. Faculty Recruitment in an Era of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Marilyn; Schimpf, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Faculty recruitment is a challenge for administration and departments, especially in an era of change in the academy. This article builds on information from an interactive conference panel session that focused on faculty recruitment best practices. The article addresses faculty recruitment strategies that focus on the optimization of search…

  12. Faculty Experiences in a Research Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Courtney M.; Kozlowski, Kelly A.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines the experiences of faculty in a research learning community developed to support new faculty in increasing scholarly productivity. A phenomenological, qualitative inquiry was used to portray the lived experiences of faculty within a learning community. Several themes were found including: accountability, belonging,…

  13. Interculturalising the Curriculum: Faculty Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garson, Kyra; Bourassa, Emma; Odgers, Todd

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes faculty perceptions of the impacts of a professional development (PD) programme for faculty called Interculturalising the curriculum. Over 70 faculty members have participated since 2008. Participants in the study represented four cohorts from 2008, 2011, 2012, 2013, from a broad range of academic disciplines. We begin with a…

  14. Faculty Development--An Ounce of Prevention...?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Robert F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses areas of concern for faculty development in the sciences, including: (1) knowledge of computers, (2) subject matter knowledge; (3) correlation of the delivery of faculty development programs with individual needs, (4) responsibility for science faculty development in terms of available supports. (CS)

  15. Community engagement in the CTSA program: stakeholder responses from a national Delphi process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Elmer; Seifer, Sarena D; Stupak, Matthew; Martinez, Linda Sprague

    2014-06-01

    In response to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee's December 2012 public request for stakeholder input on the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program, two nonprofit organizations, the Center for Community Health Education Research and Service, Inc. (CCHERS) and Community-Campus Partnerships for Health (CCPH), solicited feedback from CTSA stakeholders using the Delphi method. Academic and community stakeholders were invited to participate in the Delphi, which is an exploratory method used for group consensus building. Six questions posed by the IOM Committee to an invited panel on community engagement were electronically sent to stakeholders. In Round 1 stakeholder responses were coded thematically and then tallied. Round 2 asked stakeholders to state their level of agreement with each of the themes using a Likert scale. Finally, in Round 3 the group was asked to rank the Round 2 based on potential impact for the CTSA program and implementation feasibility. The benefits of community engagement in clinical and translational research as well as the need to integrate community engagement across all components of the CTSA program were common themes. Respondents expressed skepticism as to the feasibility of strengthening CTSA community engagement. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Stakeholder Models for Social and Mobile Media CSR Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    now have the ability to engage with knowledge resources related to CSR made available through innovative uses of smartphone and social media technology. In these cases of consumer initiated sustainability-on-the go—the Good Guide, CarrotMob and Colalife— organizations founded by activist individuals......This paper is intended to demonstrate current uses of smartphone and social media technology by consumers. The three cases discussed show ways in which consumers have built communities through social and mobile media for a range of purposes—1) to organize their purchasing activities to get...... to engage with business about Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). Second, it discusses how this technology calls for an expansion of our understanding of how to interact with stakeholders. This includes moving from a communication-focused perspective to an engagement perspective, meaning that consumers...

  17. Perspektif Shareholding Versus Stakeholding di Dalam Memahami Fenomena Corporate Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niki Lukviarman

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper challenges the notion of “universalist” or “one-size-fits-all” approach to corporate govern¬ance. It considers different perspective of understanding organization (corporations which in turn generate alter¬nate paradigms concerning the issue of corporate governance and the way one could govern the corporation. It looks more closely of various assumptions and theoretical frameworks underpinning the governance concepts. The main proposition of this paper is that different perspectives in theory and paradigms result in different diagno¬ses of and the solutions to the problems of corporate governance in practice. Hence, it might be argued that there should be varies model of governance that should be considered based on specific characteristics of organization -and of different context- in order for such model to be effective.Keywords: shareholding, stakeholding, corporate governance, shareholder rights, corporate efficiency

  18. FINANCIAL POSITION AND ITS RELEVANCE TO STAKEHOLDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRON VASILE-CRISTIAN-IOACHIM

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The financial position of an economic entity is a concept that can have different meanings, depending on the stakeholder category that make its analysis. In energy sector, which is considered of high importance in the national economy, we consider that the most important category of stakeholder is the state (government, because ensuring the functionality of this sector is an crucial condition for development of others sectors from national economy. For this reason, we can look at the informational needs of other stakeholder categories trough the state’s “sine qua non” condition to ensure the optimal functionality of this sector, which manifests itself like this: the functioning of the sector involves the attraction of investors, the functioning of the sector involves the existence of human resources, the functioning of the sector cannot be ensured without the existence of commercial relations that involves suppliers and clients and for insuring the functioning of the sector it is often require various financing sources. All those aspects are giving raise to some categories of stakeholder interested over the parameters in which the energy sector entities are functioning, one of the interest domain being the financial position of the companies activating in its field. Over the present study we had in view to highlight the main present approaches regarding the concept of financial position, but also the main issues fallowed by the main stakeholder categories in their attempt to appreciate the financial position of the entities activating in energy sector which are listed to Bucharest Stock Exchange. The results of this study have showed that there is some base requirements regarding the informational needs of stakeholder regarding the financial position of the companies activating in energy sector, and those are related to the concepts of going concern, overall solvency ratio, general liquidity ratio and indebtedness degree. After this study

  19. Understanding Processes of Multi-Stakeholder Brand-Interessement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Wallpach, Sylvia; Hemetsberger, Andrea; Kornum, Niels

    2013-01-01

    The new “stakeholder-focus brand era” (Merz, He, & Vargo 2009, p.337) puts stakeholders and their role in brand co-creation center stage. Yet, insights into the dynamics of multi-stakeholder brand co-creation are still sparse. Applying a network theory approach, this article advances stakeholder......-oriented branding theory by investigating into discursive strategies multiple stakeholders use to engage in and mobilize brand networks on social media sites. An empirical investigation into two prominent online LEGO sites uncovers the role of social media sites as actors, and the interests and respective...... discursive strategies of stakeholders involved in co-creating the brand LEGO....

  20. Perspectives on the role of stakeholders in knowledge translation in health policy development in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabyonga Orem, Juliet; Marchal, Bruno; Mafigiri, DavidKaawa; Ssengooba, Freddie; Macq, Jean; Da Silveira, Valeria Campos; Criel, Bart

    2013-08-19

    Stakeholder roles in the application of evidence are influenced by context, the nature of the evidence, the policy development process, and stakeholder interactions. Past research has highlighted the role of stakeholders in knowledge translation (KT) without paying adequate attention to the peculiarities of low-income countries. Here we identify the roles, relations, and interactions among the key stakeholders involved in KT in Uganda and the challenges that they face. This study employed qualitative approaches to examine the roles of and links among various stakeholders in KT. In-depth interviews were conducted with 21 key informants and focused on the key actors in KT, their perceived roles, and challenges. Major stakeholders included civil society organizations with perceived roles of advocacy, community mobilization, and implementation. These stakeholders may ignore unconvincing evidence. The community's role was perceived as advocacy and participation in setting research priorities. The key role of the media was perceived as knowledge dissemination, but respondents noted that the media may misrepresent evidence if it is received in a poorly packaged form. The perceived roles of policy makers were evidence uptake, establishing platforms for KT and stewardship; negative roles included ignoring or even misrepresenting evidence that is not in their favor. The roles of parliamentarians were perceived as advocacy and community mobilization, but they were noted to pursue objectives that may not be supported by the evidence. The researchers' main role was defined as evidence generation, but focusing disproportionately on academic interests was cited as a concern. The donors' main role was defined as funding research and KT, but respondents were concerned about the local relevance of donor-supported research. Respondents reported that links among stakeholders were weak due to the absence of institutionalized, inclusive platforms. Challenges facing the stakeholders in

  1. The Impact of Stakeholders' Roles within the Livestock Industry on Their Attitudes to Livestock Welfare in Southeast and East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Michelle; Zito, Sarah; Phillips, Clive J C

    2017-01-25

    Stakeholders in the livestock industry are in a position to make critical choices that directly impact on animal welfare during slaughter and transport. Understanding the attitudes of stakeholders in livestock-importing countries, including factors that motivate the stakeholders to improve animal welfare, can lead to improved trade relations with exporting developed countries and improved animal welfare initiatives in the importing countries. Improving stakeholder attitudes to livestock welfare may help to facilitate the better welfare that is increasingly demanded by the public for livestock. Knowledge of the existing attitudes towards the welfare of livestock during transport and slaughter provides a starting point that may help to target efforts. This study aimed to investigate the animal welfare attitudes of livestock stakeholders (farmers, team leaders, veterinarians, business owners, business managers, and those working directly with animals) in selected countries in E and SE Asia (China, Thailand, Viet Nam, and Malaysia). The factors that motivated them to improve animal welfare (in particular their religion, knowledge levels, monetary gain, the availability of tools and resources, more pressing community issues, and the approval of their supervisor and peers) were assessed for their relationships to stakeholder role and ranked according to their importance. Stakeholder roles influenced attitudes to animal welfare during livestock transport and slaughter. Farmers were more motivated by their peers compared to other stakeholders. Business owners reported higher levels of motivation from monetary gain, while business managers were mainly motivated by what was prescribed by the company for which they worked. Veterinarians reported the highest levels of perceived approval for improving animal welfare, and all stakeholder groups were least likely to be encouraged to change by a 'western' international organization. This study demonstrates the differences in

  2. Stakeholders' perceptions of rehabilitation services for individuals living with disability: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darzi, Andrea J; Officer, Alana; Abualghaib, Ola; Akl, Elie A

    2016-01-08

    The World Health Organization (WHO) was tasked with developing health system guidelines for the implementation of rehabilitation services. Stakeholders' perceptions are an essential factor to take into account in the guideline development process. The aim of this study was to assess stakeholders' perceived feasibility and acceptability of eighteen rehabilitation services and the values they attach to ten rehabilitation outcomes. We disseminated an online self-administered questionnaire through a number of international and regional organizations from the different WHO regions. Eligible individuals included persons with disability, caregivers of persons with disability, health professionals, administrators and policy makers. The answer options consisted of a 9-point Likert scale. Two hundred fifty three stakeholders participated. The majority of participants were health professional (64 %). In terms of outcomes, 'Increasing access' and 'Optimizing utilization' were the top service outcomes rated as critical (i.e., 7, 8 or 9 on the Likert scale) by >70 % of respondents. 'Fewer hospital admissions', 'Decreased burden of care' and 'Increasing longevity' were the services rated as least critical (57 %, 63 % and 58 % respectively). In terms of services, 'Community based rehabilitation' and 'Home based rehabilitation' were found to be both definitely feasible and acceptable (75 % and 74 % respectively). 'Integrated and decentralized rehabilitation services' was found to be less feasible than acceptable according to stakeholders (61 % and 71 % respectively). As for 'Task shifting', most stakeholders did not appear to find task shifting as either definitely feasible or definitely acceptable (63 % and 64 % respectively). The majority of stakeholder's perceived 'Increasing access' and 'Optimizing utilization' as most critical amongst rehabilitation outcomes. The feasibility of the 'Integrated and decentralized rehabilitation services' was perceived to be less than their

  3. Medical faculty opinions of peer tutoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudland, Joy R; Rennie, Sarah C

    2014-01-01

    Peer tutoring is a well-researched and established method of learning defined as 'a medical student facilitating the learning of another medical student'. While it has been adopted in many medical schools, other schools may be reluctant to embrace this approach. The attitude of the teaching staff, responsible for organizing and or teaching students in an undergraduate medical course to formal peer teaching will affect how it is introduced and operationalized. This study elicits faculty opinions on how best to introduce peer tutoring for medical students. Structured telephone interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis. The interviews were with medically qualified staff responsible for organizing or teaching undergraduate medical students at a New Zealand medical school. Six questions were posed regarding perceived advantages and disadvantages of peer tutoring and how the school and staff could support a peer-tutoring scheme if one was introduced. Staff generally supported the peer tutoring concept, offering a safe environment for learning with its teachers being so close in career stage to the learners. They also say disadvantages when the student-teachers imparted wrong information and when schools used peer tutoring to justify a reduction in teaching staff. Subjects felt that faculty would be more accepting of peer tutoring if efforts were made to build staff 'buy in' and empowerment, train peer tutors and introduce a solid evaluation process. Staff of our school expressed some concerns about peer tutoring that are not supported in the literature, signaling a need for better communication about the benefits and disadvantages of peer tutoring.

  4. Assessing Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care: Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Gaglio, Bridget; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Alexander, Gwen L.; Stark, Azadeh; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Walsh, Kathleen; Boggs, Jennifer; Lemay, Celeste A.; Firneno, Cassandra; Biggins, Colleen; Blosky, Mary Ann; Arora, Neeraj K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Patient-centered communication is critical to quality cancer care. Effective communication can help patients and family members cope with cancer, make informed decisions, and effectively manage their care; suboptimal communication can contribute to care breakdowns and undermine clinician-patient relationships. The study purpose was to explore stakeholders' views on the feasibility and acceptability of collecting self-reported patient and family perceptions of communication experiences while receiving cancer care. The results were intended to inform the design, development, and implementation of a structured and generalizable patient-level reporting system. Methods: This was a formative, qualitative study that used semistructured interviews with cancer patients, family members, clinicians, and leaders of health care organizations. The constant comparative method was used to identify major themes in the interview transcripts. Results: A total of 106 stakeholders were interviewed. Thematic saturation was achieved. All stakeholders recognized the importance of communication and endorsed efforts to improve communication during cancer care. Patients, clinicians, and leaders expressed concerns about the potential consequences of reports of suboptimal communication experiences, such as damage to the clinician-patient relationship, and the need for effective improvement strategies. Patients and family members would report good communication experiences in order to encourage such practices. Practical and logistic issues were identified. Conclusion: Patient reports of their communication experiences during cancer care could increase understanding of the communication process, stimulate improvements, inform interventions, and provide a basis for evaluating changes in communication practices. This qualitative study provides a foundation for the design and pilot testing of such a patient reporting system. PMID:23943884

  5. Shared mental models of integrated care: aligning multiple stakeholder perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jenna M; Baker, G Ross

    2012-01-01

    Health service organizations and professionals are under increasing pressure to work together to deliver integrated patient care. A common understanding of integration strategies may facilitate the delivery of integrated care across inter-organizational and inter-professional boundaries. This paper aims to build a framework for exploring and potentially aligning multiple stakeholder perspectives of systems integration. The authors draw from the literature on shared mental models, strategic management and change, framing, stakeholder management, and systems theory to develop a new construct, Mental Models of Integrated Care (MMIC), which consists of three types of mental models, i.e. integration-task, system-role, and integration-belief. The MMIC construct encompasses many of the known barriers and enablers to integrating care while also providing a comprehensive, theory-based framework of psychological factors that may influence inter-organizational and inter-professional relations. While the existing literature on integration focuses on optimizing structures and processes, the MMIC construct emphasizes the convergence and divergence of stakeholders' knowledge and beliefs, and how these underlying cognitions influence interactions (or lack thereof) across the continuum of care. MMIC may help to: explain what differentiates effective from ineffective integration initiatives; determine system readiness to integrate; diagnose integration problems; and develop interventions for enhancing integrative processes and ultimately the delivery of integrated care. Global interest and ongoing challenges in integrating care underline the need for research on the mental models that characterize the behaviors of actors within health systems; the proposed framework offers a starting point for applying a cognitive perspective to health systems integration.

  6. Social media and suicide prevention: findings from a stakeholder survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jo; Rodrigues, Maria; Fisher, Steve; Bailey, Eleanor; Herrman, Helen

    2015-02-25

    Suicide is a leading cause of death, particularly among young adults. The rapid growth of social media and its heavy use by young adults presents new challenges and opportunities for suicide prevention. Social media sites are commonly used for communicating about suicide-related behavior with others, which raises the possibility of using social media to help prevent suicide. However, the use of social media varies widely between different suicide prevention advocates. The role this type of intervention should play in a community's overall suicide prevention strategy remains a matter of debate. Explore the ways in which stakeholders use social media for suicide prevention and assess their views about the potential utility of social media as a suicide prevention tool. A 12-week stakeholder consultation that involved the online administration and completion of surveys by 10 individuals who conduct research about suicide and social media, 13 organizations that use social media for suicide prevention purposes, and 64 users of social media. Social media was seen as a useful means of delivering a range of suicide prevention activities. Respondents reported that the key benefits of social media were the opportunity to obtain emotional support from others, to express one's feelings, to talk to others with similar problems, and to provide help to others. The social media site believed to hold most potential for delivering suicide prevention activities was Facebook. There were concerns about potential risks of social media, but respondents felt the potential benefits outweighed the risks. Social media was recognized by different types of stakeholders as holding potential for delivering suicide prevention activities. More research is required to establish the efficacy and safety of potential social media-based interventions and ethical standards and protocols to ensure that such interventions are delivered safely need to be developed and implemented.

  7. What it Takes to Successfully Implement Technology for Aging in Place: Focus Groups With Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Sebastiaan Theodorus Michaël; Wouters, Eveline J M; Luijkx, Katrien G; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M

    2016-05-03

    There is a growing interest in empowering older adults to age in place by deploying various types of technology (ie, eHealth, ambient assisted living technology, smart home technology, and gerontechnology). However, initiatives aimed at implementing these technologies are complicated by the fact that multiple stakeholder groups are involved. Goals and motives of stakeholders may not always be transparent or aligned, yet research on convergent and divergent positions of stakeholders is scarce. To provide insight into the positions of stakeholder groups involved in the implementation of technology for aging in place by answering the following questions: What kind of technology do stakeholders see as relevant? What do stakeholders aim to achieve by implementing technology? What is needed to achieve successful implementations? Mono-disciplinary focus groups were conducted with participants (n=29) representing five groups of stakeholders: older adults (6/29, 21%), care professionals (7/29, 24%), managers within home care or social work organizations (5/29, 17%), technology designers and suppliers (6/29, 21%), and policy makers (5/29, 17%). Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. Stakeholders considered 26 different types of technologies to be relevant for enabling independent living. Only 6 out of 26 (23%) types of technology were mentioned by all stakeholder groups. Care professionals mentioned fewer different types of technology than other groups. All stakeholder groups felt that the implementation of technology for aging in place can be considered a success when (1) older adults' needs and wishes are prioritized during development and deployment of the technology, (2) the technology is accepted by older adults, (3) the technology provides benefits to older adults, and (4) favorable prerequisites for the use of technology by older adults exist. While stakeholders seemed to have identical aims, several underlying differences emerged, for example, with regard

  8. Faculty development: a 'field of dreams'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Yvonne; McLeod, Peter J; Boillat, Miriam; Meterissian, Sarkis; Elizov, Michelle; Macdonald, Mary Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Participants in faculty development workshops often comment that 'those who need faculty development the most attend the least'. The goals of this study were to explore the reasons why some clinical teachers do not participate in centralised faculty development activities and to learn how we can make faculty development programmes more relevant to teachers' needs. In 2006, we conducted focus groups with 16 clinical teachers, who had not participated in faculty development activities, to ascertain their perceptions of faculty development, reasons for non-participation and perceived barriers to involvement. Content analysis and team consensus guided the data interpretation. Focus group participants were aware of faculty development offerings and valued the goals of these activities. Important reasons for non-participation emerged: clinical reality, which included volume of work and lack of (protected) time; logistical issues, such as timing and the central location of organised activities; a perceived lack of financial reward and recognition for teaching, and a perceived lack of direction from, and connection to, the university. Clinical reality and logistical issues appeared to be greater deterrents to participation than faculty development goals, content or strategies. Moreover, when asked to discuss faculty development, teachers referred to their development as faculty members in the broadest sense, which included personal and career development. They also expressed the desire for clear guidance from the university, financial rewards and recognition for teaching, and a sense of 'belonging'. Faculty development programmes should try to address these organisational issues as well as teachers' personal and professional needs.

  9. Finding First-Year Success in Extension: Navigating Stakeholders Needs and Institutional Expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald A. Llewellyn

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Functioning within a defined administrative framework and meeting the needs of the stakeholders are essential in an Extension appointment. The first day of employment starts the promotion and tenure clock. It is the responsibility of the new Extension professional to take immediate steps to move forward with development of programming and application of the skill set that they bring to the job. Finding success in the first year of an Extension appointment revolves around understanding the expectations of the institution and the needs of the stakeholders. Once the institutional expectations and programming needs are understood, formulating a strategy that includes plans of work and logic models, measurement of outcomes and impacts, team building, professional development, peer mentoring, grant writing, and scholarship will provide a foundation for first year success in Extension. A willingness to follow a timely and systematic approach to meeting the expectations of the institution and stakeholders will provide for an efficient transition and relieve many of the stressors associated with a new appointment. This paper is based primarily on the author’s first year experience as an Extension faculty member and summarizes several best practices.

  10. Exploring Nurse Faculty Incivility and Resonant Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Katherine R

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to explore the relationship between the frequency of interfaculty incivility among nurses in academia and observed levels of resonant leadership of immediate supervisors. Despite mandates to address incivility in health care, nurse faculty report high levels of horizontal incivility among their peers. No known quantitative research has measured the relationship between nurse faculty-to-faculty incivility and resonant leadership traits of leaders. Nursing faculty from 17 universities (n = 260) were emailed an anonymous link to answer survey questions about horizontal peer incivility and leaders' management styles. There was a significant inverse relationship (Pearson's r, -.560) between the frequency of experienced faculty-to-faculty incivility and the level of observed resonant leadership behaviors of participants' immediate supervisors. Resonant supervisory behaviors inversely correlated with nurse faculty peer incivility, with potential to impact satisfaction, recruitment, and retention.

  11. Making Sense of Stakeholder Brand Reputations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Wallpach, Sylvia; Koll, Oliver

    may show substantial overlap and divergence at the same time. When relating these stakeholders’ reputations to management-intended brand reputation, we find that some reputation elements have permeated to none, one or both groups, but also that the two stakeholder groups may agree about reputation...... elements which are not intended. We discuss how brand management can and why it should use such results in their brand-building efforts.......Marketing science and practice acknowledge that a brand’s reputation amongst consumers is essential for success. However, brand reputation may also affect other stakeholders’ exchange relationships with a brand. We discuss (1) the relevance of a multi-stakeholder approach to brand management, (2...

  12. Better economics: supporting adaptation with stakeholder analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambwera, Muyeye; Zou, Ye; Boughlala, Mohamed

    2011-11-15

    Across the developing world, decision makers understand the need to adapt to climate change — particularly in agriculture, which supports a large proportion of low-income groups who are especially vulnerable to impacts such as increasing water scarcity or more erratic weather. But policymakers are often less clear about what adaptation action to take. Cost-benefit analyses can provide information on the financial feasibility and economic efficiency of a given policy. But such methods fail to capture the non-monetary benefits of adaptation, which can be even more important than the monetary ones. Ongoing work in Morocco shows how combining cost-benefit analysis with a more participatory stakeholder analysis can support effective decision making by identifying cross-sector benefits, highlighting areas of mutual interest among different stakeholders and more effectively assessing impacts on adaptive capacity.

  13. Must Milton Friedman Embrace Stakeholder Theory?

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrero, I. (Ignacio); Hoffman, W. M. (W. Michael); McNulty, R. E. (Robert E.)

    2012-01-01

    Milton Friedman famously stated that the only social responsibility of business is to increase its profits, a position now known as the shareholder model of business. Subsequently, the stakeholder model, associated with Edward Freeman, has been widely seen as a heuristically stronger theory of the responsibilities of the firm to the society in which it is situated. Friedman's position, nevertheless, has retained currency among many business thinkers. In this paper we argue that Friedman's eco...

  14. Stakeholder engagement: A green business model indicator

    OpenAIRE

    Abuzeinab, Amal; Arif, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    PhD study This is an Open Access article and is freely available via the publisher's webpage. Follow the DOI link for full text. Green business models have the potential to deliver a much better performance compared to the conventional business models in this age of sustainability. Stakeholder engagement is considered one of the key elements to help facilitate an increased uptake of green business models. There is limited research available on principles and mechanisms to enhance stakeh...

  15. Change Management from a Stakeholder Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Isaksson, Raine; Hallencreutz, Jacob; Turner, Dawn-Marie; Garvare, Rickard

    2011-01-01

    With the ever increasing rate of change the pressure continues to rise on all types of organisations for quicker and more effective change. Companies of today face multiple requirements which have caused a shift from shareholder focus to a more balanced stakeholder focus. In the 80s and 90s the Japan originated quality movement with its focus on customers was by many seen as the solution for effective change. Change program focus has since shifted from Total Quality Management (TQM) and Busin...

  16. Cultivating stakeholder interaction in emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, W.J.; Brownell, L.F.

    1994-01-01

    The Secretary of Energy has defined the mission for the Department. Her vision for the Department of Energy (DOE) is to promote environmental excellence, economic growth, and leadership in science and technology. The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), which is responsible for implementing an emergency management system for EM facilities and the transport of non-weapons-related radioactive materials, has addressed this mission through the establishment of six goals. This paper specifically discusses efforts to accomplish the last goal: Develop a stronger partnership between the DOE and its stakeholders. EM's Emergency Management Program supports strong partnerships with all interested parties. The EM Emergency Management Program provides the capability for preparedness in the event of an operational emergency at EM facilities, and it gives DOE the capability for preparedness in the event of an operational emergency involving DOE shipments of non-weapons-related radioactive and hazardous materials in transit. The Program is committed to plan, train, and provide material resources for the protection and safety of DOE workers, the public, and the environment. A great deal of stakeholder interaction is associated with the transport of DOE radioactive materials. To assure a communication link to other DOE program areas and interested stakeholders outside the DOE, the Emergency Management Program has committed extensive resources within the transportation program to promote and support EM's commitment to stakeholder involvement. The Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) develops and enhances integrated emergency preparedness in the area of transportation. TEPP coordinates programs across the DOE complex and supplies a DOE-wide unified approach to the public

  17. Playing, sitting out, and observing the game: an investigation of faculty members' perspectives on political behavior in ethical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Kelsey E; Gibson, Carter; Mecca, Jensen T; Giorgini, Vincent; Connelly, Shane; Mumford, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Ethical dilemmas are inherently ambiguous, complex, and ill-defined. Additionally, these dilemmas involve multiple stakeholders. These characteristics may induce political behavior as a resolution tactic. Thus, the goal of the present effort was to investigate perspectives on politics among researchers in an ethical decision-making context. A qualitative analysis of interviews with university faculty members revealed that faculty members' perspectives on political behavior in an ethical decision-making context fall into a number of categories, including positive, negative, and realistic views of political activity. The implications of these varying perspectives on ethical decision making are discussed.

  18. Stakeholder analysis for coppice forestry in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IvayloVelichkov

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The study analyzes the state of coppice forestry in Bulgaria during last 18 years. Stakeholders and their interests and preferences in coppice forests are explored and assessed. Forests restitution process in Bulgaria started in 1997 and has not been finished yet. Nevertheless, significant further changes of the current ownershipdistribution are not expected. By the end of 2007, the state was the biggest coppice forest owner/stakeholder in Bulgaria with 71.3% of all coppice forests being state property. The other two important stakeholders are the municipalities (14.0% and private owners (12.0%. Currently, forest owners' number in Bulgaria exceeds 1million, the average holding area being smaller than 1 ha. Only 150 individual plots are larger than 50 ha. The majority of private owners aim at taking maximum and immediate profit from their recently restituted forest properties. In most cases that reflects in clearcuts. Coppice forests management has been one of the problematicissues of Bulgarian forestry for decades. Despite of forest authorities significant efforts, the area of coppice forests in Bulgaria (1.78 million ha in 2007 remained unchanged for a period of 50 years. The official forest policy is still aimed at conversionof coppice forests into seed ones through different silvicultural methods. That policy is applied to almost all coppice forests regardless of their ownership.

  19. Spaced education faculty development may not improve faculty teaching performance ratings in a surgery department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernar, Luise I M; Beleniski, Florencia; Rosen, Heather; Lipsitz, Stuart; Hafler, Janet; Breen, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of spaced education as a faculty development tool designed to improve teaching skills in a surgery department. Faculty members were randomized to receive either weekly spaced education e-mails with content designed to improve teaching skills (group A) or no e-mails (group B). Using qualitative and quantitative surveys, we assessed both medical students' perception of faculty members' teaching effectiveness and faculty members' perception of the usefulness of the spaced education e-mails. Academic medical center. Twenty-nine surgery faculty members with teaching responsibility for medical students in their Core Surgery Clerkship. All 41 medical students who rotated through the Core Surgery Clerkship rated the quality of teaching for each faculty members; 172 online rating surveys were completed. Overall, faculty members received high ratings on the teaching skills included on the surveys. Additionally, no significant differences were found between the perceived skill level of the faculty members who received the weekly e-mails and those who did not. Specifically, 53.8% and 54% (p = 0.47) of the faculty were felt to deliver feedback more than three times per week; 87.1% and 89.9% (p = 0.15) of faculty were felt to deliver useful feedback; 89.2% and 90.8% (p = 0.71) of faculty were perceived to encourage student autonomy; and 78.1% and 81.9% (p = 0.89) of faculty were felt to set clear learning expectations for students. Postprogram comments from faculty revealed they did not find the e-mails useful as a faculty development tool. Students perceived high levels of teaching skills among the clinical faculty. Faculty members who received e-mail-based spaced education-based faculty development were not rated to be more effective teachers on the student surveys. Electronically based faculty development does not satisfy faculty expectations. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  20. Tension Awareness of Stakeholders in Large Technology Projects : A Duality Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, Albert; van Offenbeek, Marjolein; Vos, Janita F.J.

    2017-01-01

    This article analyzes the tensions evolving from project management dilemmas and how they relate to stakeholders in large technology projects. The study addresses an organization-wide electronic health record implementation in a large hospital. It adopts a duality lens in exploring whether and how

  1. Network formation, learning and innovation in multi-stakeholder research projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flor, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Mounting pressure on research organizations to achieve sustainable development outcomes from research has pushed them to use multi-stakeholder approaches. Insights are missing however, on how these influence social, technical, and institutional change, as well as what outcomes emerge from these. The

  2. Participation of stakeholders in corporate governance: foundation ontological and methodological proposal [Participación de los stakeholders en la gobernanza corporativa: fundamentación ontológica y propuesta metodológica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leire San-Jose Ruiz De Aguirre

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The participation in the company is a longstanding issue in research on bu- siness organization, but usually is explained around workers and not around the highest levels of corporate governance. In the modern businesses, the value contribution of capital is dwindling, and the risk, in many situations, is shared by all of the stakeholders of the company. If the added value and the assumed risk are not unique to the shareholders, why should be the government right unique for shareholder? In this paper we reflect on the foundations of the participation of different stakeholders that group the company. We debate the problems associated with the manipulation of Stakeholder Theory, and the depletion deduction of it; moreover, we propose to take the ontological perspective and a practical approach of inductive character. The main contribution of work is to provide a methodological guide which summarizes the participation in organizations of stakeholders.

  3. Stakeholder Engagement/Capacity Building Pilot Opportunity FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about the pilot opportunity for stakeholder engagement/capacity building. EPA is offering an opportunity for community stakeholders and ports to participate in a pilot project to test and refine capacity building tools.

  4. Challenges in Recruiting, Retaining and Promoting Racially and Ethnically Diverse Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Samantha E; Gunn, Christine M; Kulukulualani, Anthony K; Raj, Anita; Freund, Karen M; Carr, Phyllis L

    2018-02-01

    Despite individual and institutional awareness of the inequity in retention, promotion and leadership of racially and ethnically underrepresented minority faculty in academic medicine, the number of such faculty remains unacceptably low. The authors explored challenges to the recruitment, retention and promotion of underrepresented faculty among a sample of leaders at academic medical centers. Semi-structured interviews were conducted from 2011 to 2012 with 44 senior faculty leaders, predominantly members of the Group on Diversity and Inclusion (GDI) and/or the Group on Women in Medical Sciences (GWIMS), at the 24 randomly selected medical schools of the National Faculty Survey of 1995. All institutions were in the continental United States and balanced across public/private status and geographic region. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed, and organized into content areas before conducting inductive thematic analysis. Themes expressed by multiple informants were studied for patterns of association. The climate for underrepresented minority faculty was described as neutral to positive. Three consistent themes were identified regarding the challenges to recruitment, retention and promotion of underrepresented faculty: 1) the continued lack of a critical mass of minority faculty; 2) the need for coordinated programmatic efforts and resources necessary to address retention and promotion; and 3) the need for a senior leader champion. Despite a generally positive climate, the lack of a critical mass remains a barrier to recruitment of racially and ethnically underrepresented faculty in medicine. Programs and resources committed to retention and promotion of minority faculty and institutional leadership are critical to building a diverse faculty. Copyright © 2018 National Medical Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Impacts of climate extremes on activity sectors stakeholders' perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundzewicz, Z. W.; Giannakopoulos, C.; Schwarb, M.; Stjernquist, I.; Schlyter, P.; Szwed, M.; Palutikof, J.

    2008-06-01

    Significant changes in the climatic system have been observed, which may be attributed to human-enhanced greenhouse effect. Even stronger changes are projected for the future, impacting in an increasing way on human activity sectors. The present contribution, prepared in the framework of the MICE (Modelling the Impact of Climate Extremes) Project of the European Union, reviews how climate change may impact on winter tourism in the Alpine region, intense precipitation and flood potential in central Europe, forest damage in Scandinavia and beach holidays in the Mediterranean coast. Impacts are likely to be serious and largely adverse. Due to a lack of adequate information and lack of broadly accepted and reliable mathematical models describing the impact of changes in climate extremes on these activity sectors, it has been found useful to use expert judgement based impact assessment. Accordingly, regional mini-workshops were organized serving as platforms for communication between scientists and stakeholders, vehicles for dissemination of the state-of-the-art of the scientific understanding and for learning stakeholders’ view on extreme events, their impacts and the preparedness system. Stakeholders had the opportunity to react to the scientific results and to reflect on their perception of the likely impacts of projected changes in extremes on relevant activity sectors and the potential to adapt and avert adverse consequences. The results reported in this paper present the stakeholders’ suggestions for essential information on different extreme event impacts and their needs from science.

  6. Stakeholders and Radiation Protection in Today's World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rick Jones, C.; Lochard, J.; Lazo, T.

    2006-01-01

    In looking forward the C.R.P.P.H.(Nea 's Committee on radiation protection and public health) identified three influences that will condition the way we address emerging issues, and will alter how we address ongoing issues. These are the involvement of stakeholders in decision making processes, the evolution of radiological protection science and its changing place in risk assessment and management, and the experience gained in implementing the current system of radiological protection. First among there is the growing importance of stakeholder involvement in radiation protection decision making. This has affected the way that the principles of justification, optimization and limitation are viewed, the way the role of the radiation protection professional in risk assessment and management is viewed, and the relative importance of case specific circumstances in relation to harmonized, internationally accepted criteria. In the wake of this change, the international system of radiological protection is being updated by the ICRP, and discussions of the most appropriate direction to take are nearing their end. Second, radiological protection science continues to identify specific aspects that do not fit the conventional linear non threshold model, and which us to consider that, at the very least, the risks from different exposures and exposure situations may not be as simply and universally comparable assumed. This will affect the way that risks are managed, and all relevant stakeholder involvement processes. In addition, decisions relating to public, worker and environmental health and safety are increasingly seen as judgement social choices. Although such choices must be guided by an understanding of state-of-the-art scientific and its uncertainties, the final, choice will generally be made by society, not scientists. Third, since the issuance of ICRP Publication 60 in 1990, and the International Basic Safety Standards in 1996, extensive experience has been amassed in

  7. What do faculty feel about teaching in this school? assessment of medical education environment by teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehnaz, Syed Ilyas; Arifulla, Mohamed; Sreedharan, Jayadevan; Gomathi, Kadayam Guruswami

    2017-01-01

    Faculty members are major stakeholders in curriculum delivery, and positive student learning outcomes can only be expected in an educational environment (EE) conducive to learning. EE experienced by teachers includes all conditions affecting teaching and learning activities. As the EE of teachers indirectly influences the EE of students, assessment of teachers' perceptions of EE can highlight issues affecting student learning. These perceptions can also serve as a valuable tool for identifying faculty development needs. In this study, we have used the Assessment of Medical Education Environment by Teachers (AMEET) inventory as a tool to assess medical teachers' perceptions of the EE. The AMEET inventory was used to assess perceptions regarding various domains of EE by teachers teaching undergraduate students at the College of Medicine, Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates. Median total, domain, and individual statement scores were compared between groups using Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Teaching-learning activities, learning atmosphere, collaborative atmosphere, and professional self-perceptions were identified as strengths of the EE while time allocated for various teaching-learning activities, preparedness of students, levels of student stress, learning atmosphere in hospital, and support system for stressed faculty members were areas necessitating improvement. The scores of faculty members teaching in basic medical sciences were found to be significantly higher than those in clinical sciences. The EE of this medical college was generally perceived as being positive by faculty although a few areas of concern were highlighted. Strengths and weaknesses of the EE from the teachers' point of view provide important feedback to curriculum planners, which can be used to improve the working environment of the faculty as well as facilitate a better direction and focus to faculty development programs being planned for the future.

  8. A dynamic perspective in Freeman’s stakeholder model

    OpenAIRE

    Y. FASSIN

    2011-01-01

    Stakeholder literature has acknowledged the need to complement the extant theory on stakeholder management by more dynamic perspectives. This article makes use of the recent terminology of stakewatcher and stakeseeker to illustrate the dynamic aspect of stakeholder theory transposed in the graphical representation of Freeman’s stakeholder model. Presenting a few selected case studies, it applies the scheme on the concept of value responsibility chain; it exemplifies the role of stakeseekers i...

  9. Stakeholder Management as an Effective Tool for Project Success

    OpenAIRE

    Książek, Martyna J.

    2014-01-01

    This theoretical paper will examine subject literature and will try to analyze how stakeholder management can increase the project success. The article provides background to the topic of stakeholders from the first usage of the term in 1963, supplemented by an analysis of project stakeholder management strategies. The article will provide the reader with insight to how one can increase the success factor of the project with the usage of appropriate stakeholder management to...

  10. Generation-specific incentives and disincentives for nurse faculty to remain employed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourangeau, Ann E; Wong, Matthew; Saari, Margaret; Patterson, Erin

    2015-05-01

    The aims of this paper are to: (1) describe work characteristics that nurse faculty report encourage them to remain in or leave their academic positions; and (2) determine if there are generational differences in work characteristics selected. Nurse faculty play key roles in preparing new nurses and graduate nurses. However, educational institutions are challenged to maintain full employment in faculty positions. A cross-sectional, descriptive survey design was employed. Ontario nurse faculty were asked to select, from a list, work characteristics that entice them to remain in or leave their faculty positions. Respondent data (n = 650) were collected using mailed surveys over four months in 2011. While preferred work characteristics differed across generations, the most frequently selected incentives enticing nurse faculty to stay were having: a supportive director/dean, reasonable workloads, supportive colleagues, adequate resources, manageable class sizes and work/life balance. The most frequently selected disincentives included: unmanageable workloads, unsupportive organizations, poor work environments, exposure to bullying, belittling and other types of incivility in the workplace and having an unsupportive director/dean. This research yields new and important knowledge about work characteristics that nurse faculty report shape their decisions to remain in or leave their current employment. Certain work characteristics were rated as important among all generations. Where similarities exist, broad strategies addressing work characteristics may effectively promote nurse faculty retention. However, where generational differences exist, retention-promoting strategies should target generation-specific preferences. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Defensive Stakeholder Management in European Universities: An Institutional Logics Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mampaey, Jelle; Huisman, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Earlier studies on stakeholder management in European universities focused on proactive strategies, that is, substantive organizational practices to establish and maintain mutually beneficial exchanges between universities and their stakeholders. We argue that the literature on stakeholder management has to be extended by theorizing defensive…

  12. МULTI-STAKEHOLDER MODEL OF EDUCATION PROJECT QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юлия Юрьевна ГУСЕВА

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of approaches to the definition of higher education projects’ stakeholders is conducted. A model of education project quality management with the influence of stakeholders is formed. A mechanism of recognition of new groups of project’s stakeholders on the basis of set theory is offered.

  13. Stakeholder Analysis of an Executable Achitecture Systems Engineering (EASE) Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    The FCR tables and stakeholder feedback are then used as the foundation of a Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats ( SWOT ) analysis . Finally...the SWOT analysis and stakeholder feedback arc translated into an EASE future development strategy; a series of recommendations regarding...and Threats ( SWOT ) analysis . Finally, the SWOT analysis and stakeholder feedback are translated into an EASE future development strategy; a series

  14. An integrative framework for managing project issues across stakeholder groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Offenbeek, Marjolein A.G.; Vos, Janita F.J.

    2016-01-01

    The stakeholders and the issues associated with a project are different concepts but closely interconnected. Despite this, the project stakeholder management literature falls short in analyzing the linkages between the stakeholders and the issues they bring. This paper develops a multilayered

  15. 78 FR 15680 - Information Sharing With Agency Stakeholders: Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Information Sharing With Agency Stakeholders: Public Meeting...) is soliciting feedback from our stakeholders regarding cross-Agency strategic priorities. We are also... restructuring, as well as to provide an opportunity for stakeholders to ask questions and share their...

  16. Higher Education Quality: Perception Differences among Internal and External Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Munirul

    2015-01-01

    Conceptually, education quality of higher education can be determined by evaluation of their stakeholders's satisfaction level. The purpose of this study is to describe how students as external stakeholder and lecturers as internal stakeholder, perceived their satisfaction of learning experience in the university. This study was conducted in…

  17. The research impact of school psychology faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Marley W; Chan-Park, Christina Y

    2015-06-01

    Hirsch's (2005) h index has become one of the most popular indicators of research productivity for higher education faculty. However, the h index varies across academic disciplines so empirically established norms for each discipline are necessary. To that end, the current study collected h index values from Scopus and Google Scholar databases for 401 tenure-track faculty members from 109 school psychology training programs. Male faculty tended to be more senior than female faculty and a greater proportion of the male faculty held professorial rank. However, female faculty members outnumbered males at the assistant and associate professor ranks. Although strongly correlated (rho=.84), h index values from Google Scholar were higher than those from Scopus. h index distributions were positively skewed with many faculty having low values and a few faculty having high values. Faculty in doctoral training programs exhibited significantly larger h index values than faculty in specialist training programs and there were univariate differences in h index values across academic rank and sex, but sex differences were not significant after taking seniority into account. It was recommended that the h index be integrated with peer review and diverse other indicators when considering individual merit. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Creating an Adaptive Ecosystem Management Network Among Stakeholders of the Lower Roanoke River, North Carolina, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan L. Manring

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive ecosystem management (AEM requires building and managing an interorganizational network of stakeholders to conserve ecosystem integrity while sustaining ecosystem services. This paper demonstrates the usefulness of applying the concepts of interorganizational networks and learning organizations to AEM. A case study of the lower Roanoke River in North Carolina illustrates how an AEM network can evolve to guide stakeholders in creating a shared framework for generative learning, consensus building through collaboration, and decision making. Environmental professionals can use this framework to guide institutional arrangements and to coordinate the systematic development of cohesive interorganizational AEM networks.

  19. Scenario-based stakeholder engagement: incorporating stakeholders preferences into coastal planning for climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Emma L; Few, Roger; Brown, Katrina

    2008-09-01

    Climate change poses many challenges for ecosystem and resource management. In particular, coastal planners are struggling to find ways to prepare for the potential impacts of future climate change while dealing with immediate pressures. Decisions on how to respond to future risks are complicated by the long time horizons and the uncertainty associated with the distribution of impacts. Existing coastal zone management approaches in the UK either do not adequately incorporate changing stakeholder preferences, or effectively ensure that stakeholders are aware of the trade-offs inherent in any coastal management decision. Using a novel method, scenario-based stakeholder engagement, which brings together stakeholder analysis, climate change management scenarios and deliberative techniques, the necessary trade-offs associated with long term coastal planning are explored. The method is applied to two case studies of coastal planning in Christchurch Bay on the south coast of England and the Orkney Islands off the north coast of Scotland. A range of conflicting preferences exist on the ideal governance structure to manage the coast under different climate change scenarios. In addition, the results show that public understanding of the trade-offs that have to be made is critical in gaining some degree of public support for long term coastal decision-making. We conclude that scenario-based stakeholder engagement is a useful tool to facilitate coastal management planning that takes into account the complexities and challenges of climate change, and could be used in conjunction with existing approaches such as the Shoreline Management Planning process.

  20. Organic poultry farming

    OpenAIRE

    Hermansen, John E.; Horsted, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    The development in organic livestock production can be attributed to an increased consumer inter-est in organic products while, at the same time, farmers are interested in converting to organic pro-duction methods – often stimulated by governmental support or subsidies. It is important that the organic production systems can fulfil the expectations of each of these stakeholders if the organic livestock production is to increase further. This is in particular important if the organic poultry p...

  1. Faculty development programs for medical teachers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANJAY ZODPEY

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: India has the highest number of medical colleges in the world and subsequently the higher number of medical teachers. There is a dire need of adopting a systematic approach to faculty development to enhance quality education to meet health challenges for 21st Century. This manuscript provides a landscape of faculty development programs in India, identifying gaps and opportunities for reforms in faculty development. Methods: Conventionally, FDPs are organized by medical colleges and universities through Basic Courses and Advanced Courses focusing on pedagogy. Medical Council of India is facilitating FDPs through 18 selected regional centers to enable medical teachers to avail modern education technology for teaching from July 2009. Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research has three Regional Institutes in India. Results: Recommendations include the need for formulating a national strategy for faculty development to not only enhance the quantity of medical teachers but also the quality of medical education; providing support for Departments of Medical Education/Regional Centers in terms of finance and staffing and incorporation of teaching skills in postgraduate training. Conclusion: Distance learning courses focusing on educational leadership and pedagogy for medical teachers can be an option to reach a wider audience. FDPs can be an asset in recruiting and retaining teachers as they offer valued professional development opportunities.

  2. Faculty research productivity and organizational structure in schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlenberg, E M

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between faculty research productivity and organizational structure in schools of nursing. The need for nursing research has been widely recognized by members of the nursing profession, yet comparatively few engage in conducting research. Although contextual variables have been investigated that facilitate or inhibit nursing research, the relationship between organizational structure and nursing research productivity has not been examined. This problem was examined within the context of the Entrepreneurial Theory of Formal Organizations. A survey methodology was used for data collection. Data on individual faculty research productivity and organizational structure in the school of nursing were obtained through the use of a questionnaire. A random sample of 300 faculty teaching in 60 master's and doctoral nursing schools in the United States was used. The instruments for data collection were Wakefield-Fisher's Adapted Scholarly Productivity Index and Hall's Organizational Inventory. The data were analyzed using Pearson Product-Moment Correlation Coefficients and multiple correlation/regression techniques. The overall relationship between faculty research productivity and organizational structure in schools of nursing was not significant at the .002 level of confidence. Although statistically significant relationships were not identified, scholarly research productivity and its subscale prepublication and research activities tended to vary positively with procedural specifications in a highly bureaucratic organizational structure. Further research may focus on identification of structural variables that support highly productive nurse researchers.

  3. An international comparison of stakeholder motivation to implement liver cancer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, John F P; Joy, Susan M; Blauvelt, Barri M; Yan, Weili; Marsteller, Jill A

    2015-06-01

    The World Health Organization offers clear guidance on the development of national cancer control programmes based on a country's level of resources, yet the motivation to implement such programmes may be driven by factors other than resources. To compare stakeholder motivation to implement a national liver cancer control programme and assess if variation in motivation was associated with stakeholder characteristics or with national indicators of need and resources. Relevant stakeholders were purposively selected from 13 countries (Australia, China, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Nigeria, South Korea, Spain, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey and USA) to participate in a structured survey on liver cancer control. Respondents included 12 individuals working in clinical, 5 in policy and 3 in advocacy roles from each country. Stakeholders' motivation was measured using a scale grounded in expectancy theory and knowledge gained during previous qualitative interviews. Comparisons across countries and respondent characteristics were conducted using hierarchical regression. Country level motivation scores, holding constant individual level covariates, were correlated with indicators of need and resources and tested using Pearson's correlation coefficients. In total, 260 stakeholders, equally drawn from the study countries, completed the survey (45% response rate). At the national level, motivation was highest in Nigeria, Thailand and China (P stakeholders working at the international level relative to the local level (P = 0.017). Motivation was positively associated with a country's relative burden of liver cancer (P = 0.015) and negatively associated with their level of resources (P = 0.018). This study provides the first empirical evidence on the motivation of stakeholders to implement national cancer control programmes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that motivation is more clearly associated with a country's cancer control needs rather than resources. Published by Oxford

  4. Engaging Stakeholders in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Regarding School-Based Sealant Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Donald L; Milgrom, Peter; Gillette, Jane

    2018-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to use qualitative methods to describe the key lessons learned during the stakeholder engagement stage of planning a randomized clinical trial comparing outcomes of silver diamine fluoride (SDF) as an alternative to pit-and-fissure sealants in a school-based delivery system. Methods: Eighteen caregivers and community-based stakeholders with involvement in the school-based sealant program Sealants for Smiles from the state of Montana, were recruited for this qualitative study. United States (U.S.) Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) methodology standards were used to develop two semi-structured interview guides consisting of 6 questions. One interview guide was used for telephone interviews with caregivers and the second was used for a stakeholder focus group. Content analytic methods were used to analyze the data. Results: All participants believed that a study comparing SDF and sealants was clinically relevant. Non-caregiver stakeholders agreed with the proposed primary outcome of the study (caries prevention) whereas caregivers also emphasized the importance of child-centered outcomes such as minimizing dental anxiety associated with dental care. Stakeholders described potential concerns associated with SDF such as staining and perceptions of safety and discussed ways to address these concerns through community engagement, appropriate framing of the study, proper consent procedures, and ongoing safety monitoring during the trial. Finally, stakeholders suggested dissemination strategies such as direct communication of findings through professional organizations and encouraging insurance plans to incentivize SDF use by reimbursing dental providers. Conclusions: Involving key stakeholders in early planning is essential in developing patient-centered research questions, outcomes measures, study protocols, and dissemination plans for oral health research involving a school-based delivery system. Copyright © 2018

  5. Analysis of stakeholders networks of infant and young child nutrition programmes in Sri Lanka, India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Shahadat; Mahmood, Hana; Senarath, Upul; Zahiruddin, Quazi; Karn, Sumit; Rasheed, Sabrina; Dibley, Michael

    2017-06-13

    Effective public policies are needed to support appropriate infant and young child feeding (IYCF) to ensure adequate child growth and development, especially in low and middle income countries. The aim of this study was to: (i) capture stakeholder networks in relation to funding and technical support for IYCF policy across five countries in South Asia (i.e. Sri Lanka, India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Pakistan); and (ii) understand how stakeholder networks differed between countries, and identify common actors and their patterns in network engagement across the region. The Net-Map method, which is an interview-based mapping technique to visualise and capture connections among different stakeholders that collaborate towards achieving a focused goal, has been used to map funding and technical support networks in all study sites. Our study was conducted at the national level in Bangladesh, India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka, as well as in selected states or provinces in India and Pakistan during 2013-2014. We analysed the network data using a social network analysis software (NodeXL). The number of stakeholders identified as providing technical support was higher than the number of stakeholders providing funding support, across all study sites. India (New Delhi site - national level) site had the highest number of influential stakeholders for both funding (43) and technical support (86) activities. Among all nine study sites, India (New Delhi - national level) and Sri Lanka had the highest number of participating government stakeholders (22) in their respective funding networks. Sri Lanka also had the highest number of participating government stakeholders for technical support (34) among all the study sites. Government stakeholders are more engaged in technical support activities compared with their involvement in funding activities. The United Nations Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO) were highly engaged stakeholders for both funding and

  6. Analysis of stakeholders networks of infant and young child nutrition programmes in Sri Lanka, India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahadat Uddin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective public policies are needed to support appropriate infant and young child feeding (IYCF to ensure adequate child growth and development, especially in low and middle income countries. The aim of this study was to: (i capture stakeholder networks in relation to funding and technical support for IYCF policy across five countries in South Asia (i.e. Sri Lanka, India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Pakistan; and (ii understand how stakeholder networks differed between countries, and identify common actors and their patterns in network engagement across the region. Methods The Net-Map method, which is an interview-based mapping technique to visualise and capture connections among different stakeholders that collaborate towards achieving a focused goal, has been used to map funding and technical support networks in all study sites. Our study was conducted at the national level in Bangladesh, India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka, as well as in selected states or provinces in India and Pakistan during 2013–2014. We analysed the network data using a social network analysis software (NodeXL. Results The number of stakeholders identified as providing technical support was higher than the number of stakeholders providing funding support, across all study sites. India (New Delhi site – national level site had the highest number of influential stakeholders for both funding (43 and technical support (86 activities. Among all nine study sites, India (New Delhi – national level and Sri Lanka had the highest number of participating government stakeholders (22 in their respective funding networks. Sri Lanka also had the highest number of participating government stakeholders for technical support (34 among all the study sites. Government stakeholders are more engaged in technical support activities compared with their involvement in funding activities. The United Nations Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF and the World Health Organization (WHO

  7. The Role of Transformational Leadership, Organizational Culture and Organizational Learning in Improving the Performance of Iranian Agricultural Faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Enayat; Zamani-Miandashti, Naser

    2013-01-01

    This empirical research was conducted to investigate the role of transformational leadership, organizational culture and organizational learning in improving the performance of Iranian agricultural faculties and leading them to become learning organizations. The research population consisted of all faculty members of public agricultural faculties…

  8. Personal-organisational value conflicts and job satisfaction of internal construction stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Panahi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the issue of value conflicts in construction organizations. This research was conducted in the Malaysian construction industry to fill the gap in the knowledge in areas of organizational behaviour in the construction industry in terms of the possible effects of conflicts on the job satisfaction of internal construction stakeholders. The conflicts considered are those rooted in differences between personal and organizational values. This research targeted professional project consultants identified as architects, engineers, and quantity surveyors as the internal construction stakeholders in Malaysia. The personal-organizational values and the level of job satisfaction of the stakeholders were assessed using a questionnaire survey. To achieve the research objective, comparative and hierarchical regression analyses were performed. The results generated by the analyses indicated a high level of value conflicts in the construction organizations which significantly and negatively affected job satisfaction of the internal stakeholders. Therefore this research, through investigating the potential effect of value conflicts on the stakeholders’ job satisfaction, reveals the importance of the interaction between personal and organizational values in construction organizations which contributes to the extant literature of organizational behaviour in construction.

  9. Increasing the Availability of Physical Activity Programs for Older Adults: Lessons Learned From Texercise Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Alan B; Thiel, Shannon B; Thorud, Jennifer L; Smith, Matthew Lee; Howell, Doris; Cargill, Jessica; Swierc, Suzanne M; Ory, Marcia G

    2016-01-01

    Many initiatives have been developed to facilitate older adults' engagement in physical activity (PA) and document its benefits. One example is Texercise, a 12-week program with a focus on increasing participants' self-efficacy. The goal of this paper is to augment the knowledgebase of PA program implementation and dissemination by elucidating the experience of Texercise implementation as perceived by multiple stakeholders. We conducted 28 semistructured stakeholder interviews and categorized the responses into four preset themes: (1) program delivery and advocacy; (2) value/merit of the program; (3) successes/challenges of offering and sustaining the program; and (4) recommendations for enhancing implementation and delivery. We identified emergent subthemes through further analysis. Many perceptions that are broadly applicable to community organizations emerged. Our findings highlight the importance of stakeholder support when embedding PA programs in communities. Furthermore, the findings are crucial to understanding underlying processes that support widespread program dissemination and sustainability.

  10. The value of adding regional to local stakeholder involvement in evaluating the acceptability of innovative technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G.; Niesen, K.; Serie, P.

    1995-02-01

    Technology is urgently needed to clean up contamination by volatile organic compounds at United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites. In many cases, however, existing technology is too slow, inefficient, or expensive. The record of technology development is, in some cases, similarly disappointing. Remediation technologies developed at great expense and evaluated piecemeal over long periods have not been deployed because, in the end, the public judged them ineffective or unacceptable. The need for successful methods of remediation is too great and resources too limited to continue with ineffective technology evaluation. In order to make good decisions about which technologies to deploy, remedial project managers need to know stakeholders' requirements for the performance of proposed technologies. Expanding stakeholder involvement regionally identifies the concerns of a broad range of stakeholders at and DOE sites throughout the West -- issues that must be taken into account if technologies are to be accepted for wide deployment

  11. Stakeholders' perceptions on forest biomass-based bioenergy development in the southern US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedi, Puneet; Alavalapati, Janaki R.R.

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzes perceptions of four stakeholder groups (non-governmental organizations [NGOs], government, industry, and academia) regarding forest biomass-based bioenergy development in the southern US (United States) by combining SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunities, and Threats) framework with AHP (Analytical Hierarchy Process). Results suggest that NGO representatives perceived rural development as an important opportunity. Government stakeholder group noted that less or no competition with food production and promotes energy security were major strength factors. Conversion technologies are still under trial was identified as a major weakness by industry representatives. Representatives of academia felt that the competition from other renewable energy sources could be a major threat. Overall, all stakeholder groups were in favor of forest biomass-based bioenergy development in the southern US.

  12. Stakeholder engagement for improved school policy: development and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The health and education departments of government share a responsibility for promoting the health of children through policies in the school setting. These policies can be enhanced through the involvement of such stakeholders as school personnel, students, parents or caregivers, health professionals, the non-profit sector and industry. Although there is little evidence-based literature on the roles of stakeholders in school policy development and implementation, stakeholder involvement appears to be critical throughout the policy process. This article discusses stakeholder involvement in the development and implementation of school policies that promote and support healthy eating and physical activity. Canadian examples illustrate stakeholder engagement in this context.

  13. DPSIR and Stakeholder Analysis of the Use of Nanosilver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Baun, Anders

    2015-01-01

    were deemed not to be implementable, as industry and NGOs seem to have fundamentally conflicting views and interests. The use of the combination of DPSIR and stakeholder analysis proved valuable for use in cases of complexity, as they compensate for each other’s limitations and open up for a discussion......, we carried out a stakeholder analysis, in order to explore possibilities for reaching consensus amongst stakeholders. Through the stakeholder analysis, the interests, views, power and influence of the identified stakeholders were mapped. Overall, the policy options identified in the DPSIR analysis...

  14. What Firms Leave Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Larsen, Mathias Lund; Gwozdz, Wencke

    This study analyzes which firms leave multi-stakeholder initiatives (MSIs) for corporate social responsibility. Based on an analysis of all active and delisted participants from the UN Global Compact between 2000 and 2015 (n= 15,853), we find that SMEs are more likely to be delisted than larger...... and publicly-listed firms; that early adopters face a higher risk of being delisted; and that the presence of a local network in a country reduces the likelihood of being delisted. We theorize that MSIs face a participant self-selection bias over time and that local networks enable legitimacy spillover effects...

  15. A watershed-based adaptive knowledge system for developing ecosystem stakeholder partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hebin; Thornton, Jeffrey A.; Shadrin, Nickolai

    2015-11-01

    This study proposes a Watershed-based Adaptive Knowledge System (WAKES) to consistently coordinate multiple stakeholders in developing sustainable partnerships for ecosystem management. WAKES is extended from the institutional mechanism of Payments for Improving Ecosystem Services at the Watershed-scale (PIES-W). PIES-W is designed relating to the governance of ecosystem services fl ows focused on a lake as a resource stock connecting its infl owing and outfl owing rivers within its watershed. It explicitly realizes the values of conservation services provided by private land managers and incorporates their activities into the public organizing framework for ecosystem management. It implicitly extends the "upstream-to-downstream" organizing perspective to a broader vision of viewing the ecosystems as comprised of both "watershed landscapes" and "marine landscapes". Extended from PIES-W, WAKES specifies two corresponding feedback: Framework I and II. Framework I is a relationship matrix comprised of three input-output structures of primary governance factors intersecting three subsystems of a watershed with regard to ecosystem services and human stakeholders. Framework II is the Stakeholder-and-Information structure channeling five types of information among four stakeholder groups in order to enable the feedbacks mechanism of Framework I. WAKES identifies the rationales behind three fundamental information transformations, illustrated with the Transboundary Diagnostic Analysis and the Strategic Action Program of the Bermejo River Binational Basin. These include (1) translating scientific knowledge into public information within the Function-and-Service structure corresponding to the ecological subsystem, (2) incorporating public perceptions into political will within the Service- and- Value structure corresponding to the economic subsystem, and (3) integrating scientific knowledge, public perceptions and political will into management options within the Value-and-Stakeholder

  16. Stakeholder involvement in nuclear issues. INSAG-20. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Many of the world's nuclear power plants were constructed long ago without much public involvement in the associated decision making. It is anticipated, however, that a variety of stakeholders will seek participation in such decisions now as the nuclear option is being revisited in many places. Accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, among other places, have served to arouse public concern. The development of 'here-and-now' media capabilities has created an awareness that may not have previously existed. Improvements in educational systems and the development of the Internet have made technical information and expertise available to individuals and locations that were previously without them. In addition, consideration of the environmental impacts of various energy strategies has moved to the fore. INSAG has concluded that the expectations of stakeholders of a right to participate in energy decisions are something that the nuclear community must address. Decisions regarding such matters as the siting and construction of a nuclear power plant are no longer largely the domain of a closed community of technical experts and utility executives. Today, the concerns and expectations of all manner of persons and organizations - from the local farmer to the international financial institution - must be considered. This report is intended for use by all stakeholders in the nuclear community - national regulatory authorities, nuclear power plant designers and operators, public interest organizations and individuals, the media and, not to be forgotten, local and national populations. INSAG's fundamental conclusion is that all stakeholders with an interest in nuclear decisions should be provided with an opportunity for full and effective participation in them. With this right, however, come certain obligations on all sides for openness, candour and civility. INSAG is hopeful that this report will help define the interests and roles of the stakeholders in the nuclear

  17. Research Productivity of Sports Medicine Fellowship Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Saltzman, Bryan M; Chalmers, Peter N; Frank, Rachel M; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R

    2016-12-01

    Research productivity is considered an important factor in academic advancement in sports medicine. No study to date has evaluated academic productivity and correlates of academic rank for sports medicine fellowship faculty. To describe the academic productivity of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) fellowship program faculty and to determine the association between academic productivity, fellowship characteristics, and academic rank. Descriptive epidemiology study. Characteristics of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs were obtained from the AOSSM and program websites. Metrics of academic productivity (Hirsch index [ h index], I-10 index, publications, citations, and number of publications in several journals) were obtained from Scopus. Statistical analyses were conducted to determine whether academic productivity differs with fellowship attributes and academic rank. A total of 90 AOSSM sports medicine fellowship programs with 610 associated faculty members were identified. Faculty were predominantly male (94%), at academic medical centers (74%), members of AOSSM (71%), and sports medicine-fellowship trained (84%). Faculty had a median of 18 (range, 0-684) publications overall, including a median of 3 (range, 0-161) publications since 2012. All measures of academic productivity were significantly higher among faculty employed at academic medical centers compared with those not employed at academic centers ( P Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy per faculty member ( P sports medicine fellowship faculty. Research productivity was higher among faculty employed at academic centers in the Northeast and Midwest regions and at programs with a larger number of fellows.

  18. Research Productivity of Sports Medicine Fellowship Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Chalmers, Peter N.; Frank, Rachel M.; Cole, Brian J.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research productivity is considered an important factor in academic advancement in sports medicine. No study to date has evaluated academic productivity and correlates of academic rank for sports medicine fellowship faculty. Purpose: To describe the academic productivity of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) fellowship program faculty and to determine the association between academic productivity, fellowship characteristics, and academic rank. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Characteristics of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs were obtained from the AOSSM and program websites. Metrics of academic productivity (Hirsch index [h index], I-10 index, publications, citations, and number of publications in several journals) were obtained from Scopus. Statistical analyses were conducted to determine whether academic productivity differs with fellowship attributes and academic rank. Results: A total of 90 AOSSM sports medicine fellowship programs with 610 associated faculty members were identified. Faculty were predominantly male (94%), at academic medical centers (74%), members of AOSSM (71%), and sports medicine–fellowship trained (84%). Faculty had a median of 18 (range, 0-684) publications overall, including a median of 3 (range, 0-161) publications since 2012. All measures of academic productivity were significantly higher among faculty employed at academic medical centers compared with those not employed at academic centers (P Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy per faculty member (P sports medicine fellowship faculty. Research productivity was higher among faculty employed at academic centers in the Northeast and Midwest regions and at programs with a larger number of fellows. PMID:28210650

  19. Faculty-Student Collaboration: Issues and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline L. Barretta-Herman

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory qualitative study of 11 social work faculty identified the benefits and risks of faculty-student collaboration. Benefits articulated include helping students learn to write for publication, learning the publication process, getting innovative student material published, and enriching the project through shared problem-solving. The benefits, however, must be weighed against the risks of exploitation of the student collaborator. Successful faculty-student collaboration in this dual relationship demands that faculty take responsibility for safeguarding boundaries, following the NASW Code of Ethics, and openly negotiating roles, tasks, workload, and order of authorship with the student.

  20. Radiologic sciences. Faculty needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Kevin J

    2005-01-01

    A total of 326 programs are represented in the data collected. Based on the average number of full- and part-time faculty members reported per program, this survey represents more than 1500 faculty positions. Based on the forecast of retirement and career change for all faculty members, there will be a turnover of 700 to 800 positions over the next 5 to 10 years. Part-time/adjunct faculty vacancies are expected to create the greatest number of opportunities for technologists to make the transition to education, with approximately one third of current part-time/adjunct educators planning on leaving radiologic sciences education within 5 years. To encourage retention of part-time/adjunct educators, annual evaluations should be modified to recognize the important educational role these instructors play. There is a need to create enthusiasm and interest in education as a career pathway for radiologic technologists. Resources are needed that help radiologic technologists make the transition to teaching. Finally, the retention of educators must be emphasized. Program applicant trends indicate radiologic technology students are older, have prior postsecondary education experience or are making a career change. This data emphasizes the need for educators, both full time and part time, to understand the characteristics and needs of the adult learner. Adult learners bring a wealth of education, experience and life skills that create both opportunities and challenges in the classroom and clinical setting. All categories of respondents indicated that their current salaries were greater than those of program graduates in their firstjob. Of interest is that 1 in 5 (20%) of part-time/adjunct educators indicated the opposite--that program graduates earn more in their firstjob than educators earn. When asked about salaries if working full time in clinical practice, the majority of all groups indicated their salary would be about the same or would decrease. Only 20% of program

  1. Contingent Faculty Perceptions of Organizational Support, Workplace Attitudes, and Teaching Evaluations at a Public Research University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Young Cha

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research examines contingent faculty’s perception of organizational support, workplace attitudes, and Student Ratings of Teaching (SRT in a large public research university to investigate their employee-organization relationship. According to t-tests and regression analyses for samples of 2,229 faculty and instructional staff who answered the survey and had SRT data (tenured and tenure-track faculty: 1,708, 76.6% of total; contingent faculty: 521, 23.4% of total, employment relationship of contingent faculty in this institution was closer to a combined economic and social exchange model than to a pure economic exchange model or underinvestment model. Contingent faculty’s satisfaction with work, satisfaction with coworkers, perception of being supported at work, and affective organizational commitment were higher than tenured and tenure-track faculty at a statistically significant level. In addition, contingent faculty had higher SRT mean results in all areas of SRT items in medium-size (10-30 classes and in ‘class presentation,’ ‘feedback,’ ‘deeper understanding,’ and ‘interest stimulated’ in large-size (30-50 classes than Tenured and Tenure-track Faculty. These results not only refute the misconception that contingent faculty have too little time to provide students with feedback but also support that they provide students with good teaching, at least in medium-size and large-size classes. Whereas these results might be partially attributable to the relatively stable status of contingent faculty in this study (who work for more than 50 percent FTE, they indicate that, as a collective, contingent faculty also represent a significant contributor to the university, who are satisfied with their work, enjoy the community they are in, and are committed to their institution.

  2. Does formal mentoring for faculty members matter? A survey of clinical faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylona, Elza; Brubaker, Linda; Williams, Valerie N; Novielli, Karen D; Lyness, Jeffrey M; Pollart, Susan M; Dandar, Valerie; Bunton, Sarah A

    2016-06-01

    Mentoring relationships, for all medical school faculty members, are an important component of lifelong development and education, yet an understanding of mentoring among medical school clinical faculty members is incomplete. This study examined associations between formal mentoring relationships and aspects of faculty members' engagement and satisfaction. It then explored the variability of these associations across subgroups of clinical faculty members to understand the status of mentoring and outcomes of mentoring relationships. The authors hypothesised that academic clinical faculty members currently in formal mentoring relationships experience enhanced employee engagement and satisfaction with their department and institution. Medical school faculty members at 26 self-selected USA institutions participated in the 2011-2014 Faculty Forward Engagement Survey. Responses from clinical faculty members were analysed for relationships between mentoring status and perceptions of engagement by faculty members. Of the 11 953 clinical faculty respondents, almost one-third reported having a formal mentoring relationship (30%; 3529). Most mentored faculty indicated the relationship was important (86%; n = 3027), and over three-fourths were satisfied with their mentoring experience (77%; n = 2722). Mentored faculty members across ranks reported significantly higher levels of satisfaction and more positive perceptions of their roles in the organisation. Faculty members who were not receiving mentoring reported significantly less satisfaction with their workplace environment and lower overall satisfaction. Mentored clinical faculty members have significantly greater satisfaction with their department and institution. This multi-institutional study provides evidence that fostering mentoring opportunities may facilitate faculty members' satisfaction and engagement, which, in turn, may help medical schools retain high-quality faculty staff committed to the multidimensional

  3. Stakeholder Orientation in Cruise Lines’ Mission Statements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Penco

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Consistent with the extant management literature, mission statements are crucial for the sustainability and growth of any firms and have been considered to be a tool for the strategic management process. Despite the considerable attention awarded to this theme, the role of the mission statement in the strategic management of tourism firms has not been sufficiently highlighted. The present paper tries to bridge this literature gap and aims to (i analyze the content of mission statements; and (ii investigate the stakeholder orientation of cruise line mission statements. We apply a content analysis method to analyze the mission statements of 44 cruise lines, employing three different perspectives: (1 the inclusion of stakeholder groups; (2 mentions of specific “mission” components; (3 reference to four goals usually assigned to mission statements. The analysis was performed using the software package QDA-Miner. The results suggest that it is possible to identify four clusters of firms that present similar content in their mission statements, and that cruise companies tend to reserve a major attention to customers. This contribution presents some valuable research implications mainly useful for researchers and academics, but also maybe of benefit to professionals and investors.

  4. MUTU SEKOLAH DAN BUDAYA PARTISIPASI STAKEHOLDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Kholis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Penelitian ini memotret dan mengeksplor pemaknaan konsep sekolah bermutu, pengembangan budaya partisipasi, dan budaya sekolah, serta peran-peran yang dilakukan aktor dalam melakukan rekayasa sosial sekolah ke arah tercapainya sekolah bermutu di lembaga konfesional MIN Tegalasri. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian kualitatif dengan pendekatan fenomenologi. Data dikumpulkan melalui wawancara mendalam, observasi, dan dokumentasi. Standar pengukuran keabsahan datanya adalah; derajat kepercayaan, keteralihan, kebergantungan dan kepastian. Ananlisis data dilakukan secara estafet mulai pengumpulan data, koleksi data, dan pemaknaan data. Penelitian ini menyimpulkan bahwa dua aspek mutu yang dicapai bidang akademik dan nonakademik; tingkat partisipasi mulai dari pimpinan, staf pendidik, staf kependidikan, peserta didik, komite sekolah, dan paguyuban kelas; budaya sekolah yang dikembangkan adalah konsolidasi internal-eksternal, mensinergikan potensi internal-eksternal, mendekatkan sekolah dengan masyarakat, bekerjasama dengan berbagai pihak, restrukturisasi dan revitalisasi komite sekolah dan paguyuban kelas, dan mengembangkan budaya bersih, indah dan nyaman; kepala sekolah merupakan aktor pengembangan budaya sekolah bermutu dan partisipasi stakeholders. Kata kunci: mutu sekolah, budaya partisipasi stakeholders

  5. Stakeholder Involvement in Japan. Appendix IX.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The Government of Japan, especially the Ministry of the Environment, is responsible for implementing the decontamination activities in the areas contaminated by radioactive materials discharged by the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant operated by the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO). To promptly reduce the impacts of the contamination on human health and the living environment, the Act on Special Measures Concerning the Handling of Environmental Pollution by Radioactive Materials Discharged by the Nuclear Power Station Accident Associated with the Tohoku District — Off the Pacific Ocean Earthquake that Occurred on March 11, 2011 (the Act) came into force on 1 January 201220. The Act clarifies the roles and responsibility of the national and local governments, TEPCO, relevant stakeholders (e.g. landowners) and the public as follows: (a) National government: Implement any necessary measures in considering its social responsibility associated with the promotion of nuclear energy; (b) Local governments: Carry out their roles depending on their natural and social conditions, in cooperation with the national government; (c) TEPCO: Implement any necessary measures in good faith, while assisting the national and local governments; (d) Relevant stakeholders (e.g. landowners) and the public: Cooperate with the national and local governments

  6. Stakeholder perceptions of misoprostol: a qualitative investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazzano AN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Alessandra N Bazzano,1 Lea Jones,1 Thoai D Ngo2 1Department of Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Team, Health System Department, Marie Stopes International, London, UK Abstract: The study aimed to explore perceptions of stakeholders regarding misoprostol use in Cambodia, a setting with high maternal mortality. Semi-structured expert interviews were conducted with 21 participants in the capital, Phnom Penh. The sample included participants involved in providing reproductive health services through international and local health agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. A theme of controversy over the role of misoprostol in the context of reproductive health services emerged, along with a need to reconcile legitimate viewpoints in order to understand the place of misoprostol in the Cambodian reproductive health setting. Understanding stakeholder perspectives on misoprostol can shed light on the drug's role in reproductive health programming where maternal mortality is high and health facilities are still improving. Keywords: maternal mortality, misoprostol, post-partum hemorrhage, medical abortion, unsafe abortion, Cambodia

  7. Providing guidance for genomics-based cancer treatment decisions: insights from stakeholder engagement for post-prostatectomy radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, James; Lobo, Jennifer M; Trifiletti, Daniel M; Showalter, Timothy N

    2017-08-24

    Despite the emergence of genomics-based risk prediction tools in oncology, there is not yet an established framework for communication of test results to cancer patients to support shared decision-making. We report findings from a stakeholder engagement program that aimed to develop a framework for using Markov models with individualized model inputs, including genomics-based estimates of cancer recurrence probability, to generate personalized decision aids for prostate cancer patients faced with radiation therapy treatment decisions after prostatectomy. We engaged a total of 22 stakeholders, including: prostate cancer patients, urological surgeons, radiation oncologists, genomic testing industry representatives, and biomedical informatics faculty. Slides were at each meeting to provide background information regarding the analytical framework. Participants were invited to provide feedback during the meeting, including revising the overall project aims. Stakeholder meeting content was reviewed and summarized by stakeholder group and by theme. The majority of stakeholder suggestions focused on aspects of decision aid design and formatting. Stakeholders were enthusiastic about the potential value of using decision analysis modeling with personalized model inputs for cancer recurrence risk, as well as competing risks from age and comorbidities, to generate a patient-centered tool to assist decision-making. Stakeholders did not view privacy considerations as a major barrier to the proposed decision aid program. A common theme was that decision aids should be portable across multiple platforms (electronic and paper), should allow for interaction by the user to adjust model inputs iteratively, and available to patients both before and during consult appointments. Emphasis was placed on the challenge of explaining the model's composite result of quality-adjusted life years. A range of stakeholders provided valuable insights regarding the design of a personalized decision

  8. Forum of stakeholder confidence - Phase II of program of work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bars, Yves

    2006-01-01

    The author welcomed the Forum for Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) participants and introduced the day's meetings that would investigate the possible contributions and conditions for RD and D to support stakeholder confidence. In his introductory remarks, Mr. Le Bars reviewed the intent of this topical discussion and its contribution to the Phase 2 Programme of Work for FSC. Observations were drawn from previous FSC work concerning the evolving requirements for stakeholder involvement that require a new culture within the organizations. It is recognized that each actor must respect certain values and abilities, and have the capacity to communicate, to learn from the public and to adapt. In particular, it was suggested that the role of the expert in the decision-making process has changed, and there is a need to restore credibility to the voice of experts to support the processes relating to radioactive waste management. Mr. Le Bars spoke about the changing role of the 'expert' and increasing demands from the public to be informed, active participants in decision-making processes. As societal expectations have evolved over the years, there is less willingness to give the expert the legitimacy to decide, or the expert working solely with the decision-maker. Rather, there are growing demands for public policies to be defined and implemented through decision-making processes that also invite stakeholder participation, as another important category of actors. Thus, the decision-making process can be viewed as now involving three parties: the public, the experts and decision-makers. Research must be positioned in this context. Research must be part of the process, structure, behaviour and debate. It is meant to be introduced in the process as contributor to the project definition, by providing scientific background. Further, it is best undertaken through an adaptive behaviour, carried out by institutions with a clearly defined and communicated role. In setting

  9. The Experiences of Vietnamese University Faculty in Relation to Their Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong, Tam T.; McLean, Gary N.

    2016-01-01

    As Vietnam higher education has explored ways to integrate into the international community, professional development of faculty is becoming a key element. However, there is a significant shortage of faculty development (FD) in Vietnam, resulting in a large gap in quality, quantity, and qualifications between Vietnamese faculty and their…

  10. Lodestar of the Faculty: The Increasingly Important Role of Dean of Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilian, Fred

    2012-01-01

    In the tight budget atmosphere of recent years, schools may have chosen to do without a dean of faculty or, at best, to double- hat another middle manager with this responsibility. This is a mistake. That all private schools do not have a dedicated dean of faculty suggests a lack of emphasis on the very component of the school--the faculty--that…

  11. Administrative Hierarchy and Faculty Work: Examining Faculty Satisfaction with Academic Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael T.; Mamiseishvili, Ketevan; Lee, Donghun

    2016-01-01

    Academic administrators at all levels have some impact on the performance of faculty members, yet each level of administration may interact differently with faculty. Literature has strongly supported the notion that department chairs, deans, and provosts can positively influence the performance and livelihood of faculty members. This study was…

  12. Mid-Career Faculty Development in Academic Medicine: How Does It Impact Faculty and Institutional Vitality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, MaryAnn W.; Bhasin, Robina M.; Beaudette, Donald J.; Shann, Mary H.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Faculty vitality is integral to the advancement of higher education. Strengthening vitality is particularly important for midcareer faculty, who represent the largest and most dissatisfied segment. The demands of academic medicine appear to be another factor that may put faculty at risk of attrition. To address these issues, we initiated…

  13. Faculty Perspectives on International Education: The Nested Realities of Faculty Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Joanne; Mitsunaga, Rikki

    2010-01-01

    Even though faculty are obviously vital to the work of internationalizing academia, "surprisingly little work has been published that addresses the roles, responsibilities, and problems faced by faculty on an operational level" (Dewey and Duff 2009, p. 491). This chapter examines the motivations, supports, and barriers faculty are facing…

  14. A successful effort to involve stakeholders in a facility siting decision using LIPS with stakeholder involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkhofer, L.; Conway, R.; Anderson, B.

    1995-01-01

    Local public opposition to federal bureaucratic decisions has resulted in public agencies rethinking the role of stakeholders in decision making. Efforts to include stakeholders directly in the decision-making process are on the increase. Unfortunately, many attempts to involve members of the public in decisions involving complex technical issues have failed. A key problem has been defining a meaningful role for the public in the process of arriving at a technical decision. This paper describes a successful effort by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in New Mexico to involve stakeholders in an important technical decision associated with its Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The decision was where to locate a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU), a facility intended to consolidate and store wastes generated from the cleanup of hazardous waste sites. A formal priority setting process known as the Laboratory Integration Prioritization System (LIPS) was adapted to provide an approach for involving the public. Although rarely applied to stakeholder participation, the LIPS process proved surprisingly effective. It produced a consensus over a selected site and enhanced public trust and understanding of Project activities

  15. Research Resources Survey: Radiology Junior Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Votaw, John R

    2015-07-01

    To assess resources available to junior faculty in US academic radiology departments for research mentorship and funding opportunities and to determine if certain resources are more common in successful programs. An anonymous survey covering scientific environment and research mentorship and was sent to vice-chairs of research of radiology departments. Results were evaluated to identify practices of research programs with respect to mentorship, resources, and opportunities. Academy of Radiology Research's 2012 National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants and awards list was used to determine if environment and practices correlate with funding. There was a 51% response rate. A greater fraction of clinical faculty gets promoted from assistant to associate professor than research faculty. Research faculty overall submits more funding applications. Most programs support start-up costs and K-awards. Over half of the departments have a vice-chair for faculty development, and most have formal mentorship programs. Faculty members are expected to teach, engage in service, publish, and apply for and get research funding within 3 years of hire. Top-tier programs as judged by NIH awards have a combination of MDs who devote >50% effort to research and PhD faculty. Key factors holding back both clinical and research junior faculty development were motivation, resources, and time, although programs reported high availability of resources and support at the department level. Better marketing of resources for junior faculty, effort devoted to mentoring clinical faculty in research, and explicit milestones/expectations for achievement could enhance junior faculty success, promote interest in the clinician–scientist career path for radiologists, and lead to greater research success.

  16. Influencing Academic Motivation: The Effects of Student-Faculty Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolian, Teniell L.; Jach, Elizabeth A.; Hanson, Jana M.; Pascarella, Ernest T.

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education, we examined the influence of student-faculty interactions on student academic motivation over 4 years of college. Results suggest that several forms of student-faculty interaction, such as quality of faculty contact, frequency of faculty contact, research with faculty, personal…

  17. Successful enculturation: strategies for retaining newly hired nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazza, Elizabeth A; Shellenbarger, Teresa

    2005-01-01

    Although the nursing faculty shortage negatively impacts student enrollment figures, it also facilitates career mobility of nursing faculty. To retain qualified faculty, nursing programs need to implement supportive programs that facilitate successful enculturation of the newly hired faculty member. The authors propose a series of supportive activities aimed at enculturation and subsequent retention of newly hired nursing faculty.

  18. Stakeholder integrated research (STIR): a new approach tested in climate change adaptation research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gramberger, M.; Zellmer, K.; Kok, K.; Metzger, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Ensuring active participation of stakeholders in scientific projects faces many challenges. These range from adequately selecting stakeholders, overcoming stakeholder fatigue, and dealing with the limited time available for stakeholder engagement, to interacting with, and integrating, the research

  19. Using the IRPA Guiding Principles on Stakeholder Engagement: putting theory into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C Rick

    2011-11-01

    The International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) published their Guiding Principles for Radiation Protection Professionals on Stakeholder Engagement in February 2009. The publication of this document is the culmination of four years of work by the Spanish Society for Radiological Protection, the French Society of Radioprotection, the United Kingdom Society of Radiological Protection, and the IRPA organization, with full participation by the Italian Associate Society and the Nuclear Energy Agency's Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health. The Guiding Principles provide field-tested and sound counsel to the radiation protection profession to aid it in successfully engaging with stakeholders in decision-making processes that result in mutually agreeable and sustainable decisions. Stakeholders in the radiation protection decision making process are now being recognized as a spectrum of individuals and organizations specific to the situation. It is also important to note that stakeholder engagement is not needed or advised in all decision making situations, although it has been shown to be a tool of first choice in dealing with such topics as intervention and chronic exposure situations, as well as situations that have reached an impasse using traditional approaches to decision-making. To enhance the contribution of the radiation protection profession, it is important for radiation protection professionals and their national professional societies to embrace and implement the IRPA Guiding Principles in a sustainable way by making them a cornerstone of their operations and an integral part of day-to-day activities.

  20. The keys to governance and stakeholder engagement: the southeast michigan beacon community case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Jardins, Terrisca R

    2014-01-01

    Community-based health information exchanges (HIEs) and efforts to consolidate and house data are growing, given the advent of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) under the Affordable Care Act and other similar population health focused initiatives. The Southeast Michigan Beacon Community (SEMBC) can be looked to as one case study that offers lessons learned, insights on challenges faced and accompanying workarounds related to governance and stakeholder engagement. The SEMBC case study employs an established Data Warehouse Governance Framework to identify and explain the necessary governance and stakeholder engagement components, particularly as they relate to community-wide data sharing and data warehouses or repositories. Perhaps the biggest lesson learned through the SEMBC experience is that community-based work is hard. It requires a great deal of community leadership, collaboration and resources. SEMBC found that organizational structure and guiding principles needed to be continually revisited and nurtured in order to build the relationships and trust needed among stakeholder organizations. SEMBC also found that risks and risk mitigation tactics presented challenges and opportunities at the outset and through the duration of the three year pilot period. Other communities across the country embarking on similar efforts need to consider realistic expectations about community data sharing infrastructures and the accompanying and necessary governance and stakeholder engagement fundamentals.

  1. How to Evaluate a Faculty Governance Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, John W.; Dunbar, David; Gingerich, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    During the 2010-11 academic year, Cabrini College began an evaluation of a faculty governance structure that had been implemented in fall 2007. The processes involved might serve as a roadmap for faculty members and administrators at other institutions who seek to understand the strengths and weaknesses of their governance model and improve shared…

  2. The Integration of Women into Law Faculties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashburn, Elizabeth A.; Cohen, Elena N.

    The integration of women into law school faculties was studied to determine the interrelationships among cultural, institutional, and individual influences. Currently available data on women's representation in law schools were analyzed, and data were collected from a national law faculty recruitment conference and through on-site visits to 10 law…

  3. Faculty ethics: ideal principles with practical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reybold, L Earle

    2009-01-01

    Ethics in higher education is the subject of intense public attention, with considerable focus on faculty roles and responsibilities. Media reports and scholarly research have documented egregious misconduct that includes plagiarism, falsification of data, illicit teacher-student relationships, and grading bias. These accounts of wrongdoing often portray faculty ethicality as only a legal issue of obeying rules and regulations, especially in the teaching and research roles. My discussion challenges this narrow perspective and argues that characterizations of faculty ethicality should take into account broader expectations for professionalism such as collegiality, respect, and freedom of inquiry. First, I review the general principles of faculty ethics developed by the American Association of University Professors, as well as professional codes of ethics in specific professional fields. Second, I juxtapose the experiences of women and minority faculty members in relation to these general codes of ethics. This section examines three issues that particularly affect women and minority faculty experiences of ethicality: "chilly and alienating" academic climates, "cultural taxation" of minority identity, and the snare of conventional reward systems. Third, I suggest practical strategies to reconcile faculty practice with codes of ethics. My challenge is to the faculty as a community of practice to engage professional ethics as social and political events, not just legal and moral failures.

  4. Racial and Gender Differences in Faculty Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Robert; And Others

    The overall study examined job satisfaction among tenured college faculty. This paper compares responses from minority (about 6%) and female (about 18%) faculty with the overall responses (N=1135). Overall, 91% reported being satisfied with their careers with 82% saying they would choose the career again. Race and gender were not related…

  5. Information-Seeking Habits of Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp-Serrano, Karen; Robbins, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the information-seeking behavior of academic education faculty from twenty large public research universities. The investigation includes an examination of how frequently education faculty seek or access information, how they stay up-to-date on current developments in the field and identify less recent journal literature, how…

  6. Paying Faculty Members What They Are Worth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Richard D.; Klagholz, Leo F.

    1980-01-01

    Faculty members at New Jersey's state colleges have begun working under a plan that provides salary increases for meritorious performance. Such merit compensation does not conflict with faculty promotion, nor is it intended to replace cost-of-living increases. However, it does replace government-style guaranteed automatic raises that encourage…

  7. Japan: Faculty and Curriculum Development Seminar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Joseph, Jr.; Hurst, G. Cameron, III; Coble, Parks; Ruder, Philip J.; Knippling, Alpana Sharma

    1998-01-01

    Describes the Association of American Colleges and Universities' Faculty and Curriculum Development Seminar, held in Japan and designed to open faculty minds to global issues. The year-long seminar involves three-person teams from eight institutions, competitively selected through proposals. Its three phases include preparatory reading and…

  8. Faculty Personality: A Factor of Student Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Cassandra S.; Wu, Xiaodong; Irwin, Kathleen C.; Patrizi, L. A. Chad

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between student retention and faculty personality as it was hypothesized that faculty personality has an effect on student retention. The methodology adopted for this study was quantitative and in two parts 1) using linear regression models to examine the impact or causality of faculty…

  9. Motivational Issues of Faculty in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Cader, Akram

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that faculty motivation influences profitability of academic programs. The problem researched in this mixed method study was the motivational factors that reduce faculty member effectiveness in improving the profitability of their universities' academic programs. Based on Maslow's theory of needs, the purpose of the…

  10. Innovation of University Teaching Faculty Management Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuzheng; Wang, Boyu

    2015-01-01

    With the deepening of university reform in China, the traditional teaching faculty management mode has been exposed more and more defects. To make innovation of the university teaching faculty management mode becomes the voice of the times. Universities should conduct careful research on this issue in the development. Starting from the…

  11. Regional Accreditation and the Evaluation of Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elman, Sandra E.

    1994-01-01

    Universities can effectively employ regional accreditation processes in striving to find legitimate means and credible mechanisms for more equitably evaluating faculty teaching and professional work. Examples from accreditation show how institutions can ensure compliance while establishing strong evaluation procedures for faculty service and…

  12. Faculty Development: An Imperative for the Nineties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nies, Joyce I.

    1990-01-01

    Budget constraints and changing enrollment patterns have expanded the concept of faculty development to include retraining. In home economics, retraining faculty for high demand areas such as hotel/restaurant management and fashion merchandising can be an efficient use of resources and an effective way to meet demand. (SK)

  13. Social Work Faculty and Undergraduate Research Mentorships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Pilar S.; Hughes, Anne K.; Vélez Ortiz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Social work faculty scholars lead the field as generators of knowledge that integrates investigative studies with practical social welfare outcomes. As such, the faculty potentially offers undergraduate researchers a different way of envisioning research that extends beyond traditional undergraduate research models. To date, however, no research…

  14. The Nursing Faculty Shortage: Is There Hope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeYoung, Sandra; Bliss, Julie; Tracy, Janet P.

    2002-01-01

    Recent solutions to the nursing faculty shortage (expanded certification programs, aggressive recruitment, delayed retirement) have had some success. New solutions might include fast-track bachelor-to-doctorate curricula, recruitment of advanced practice nurses, image enhancement, national certification, and linking of the faculty and nurse…

  15. AACSB Standards and Accounting Faculty's Intellectual Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. Brian; Quddus, Munir

    2008-01-01

    The authors performed a content analysis of intellectual contribution portfolios of accounting faculty at various business schools that Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International recently accredited. The results showed a significant divergence in faculty research (e.g., areas, topics) and their teaching assignments. This…

  16. Faculty Satisfaction Questionnaire: Development, Validity, and Reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Ana Gil

    This study sought to design and test a survey instrument which examined college faculty satisfaction with their roles of teaching, research, and service. A panel of experts reviewed the Spanish and English versions of the 39 item survey for quality of items and grammatical accuracy. Thirty randomly selected faculty members from a population of 234…

  17. The organisational aspect of faculty development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Gynnild, Vidar; Roxå, Torgny

    2004-01-01

    The article points out the faculty centres ought to be more conscious in their organisational strategies and get to managements support when working on pedagogical changes.......The article points out the faculty centres ought to be more conscious in their organisational strategies and get to managements support when working on pedagogical changes....

  18. Enhancing Sustainability Curricula through Faculty Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natkin, L. W.; Kolbe, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although the number of higher education institutions adopting sustainability-focused faculty learning communities (FLCs) has grown, very few of these programs have published evaluation research. This paper aims to report findings from an evaluation of the University of Vermont's (UVM's) sustainability faculty fellows (SFF) program. It…

  19. Bullying and Inappropriate Behaviour among Faculty Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriläinen, Matti; Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija; Puhakka, Helena; Käyhkö, Katinka

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the degree, nature and consequences of bullying or inappropriate behaviour among faculty personnel (n = 303) in a Finnish university. A total of 114 (38%) faculty members answered the email questionnaire. According to the results, 15% of the respondents had experienced bullying; in addition, 45% had experienced inappropriate…

  20. The Faculty Learning Outcome Assessment Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurney, Carol A.; Brantmeier, Edward J.; Good, Megan R.; Harrison, Douglas; Meixner, Cara

    2016-01-01

    Assessment is a cyclical process within which educators construct outcomes, implement programs, assess constructs such as learning, evaluate results, and utilize results to craft stronger programs and services. Within educational and faculty development, assessment measures program impact on faculty, students, and/or institutional culture.…

  1. Why Does the Faculty Resist Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagg, John

    2012-01-01

    Faculty members who led change initiatives often express frustration at the roadblocks created by other faculty members or groups. In 2009 George Kuh and Stanley Ikenberry undertook a survey of provosts for the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment to explore the state of student learning assessment. They found that "Gaining faculty…

  2. Nurse Faculty Practice: From Theory to Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Nancy Burk; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Because nursing is a practice profession and an applied science, it is a challenge for faculty members to maintain their clinical expertise and pursue scholarly activities. The Medical College of Georgia's School of Nursing's development of a faculty practice plan is reviewed. The political constraints are identified. (MLW)

  3. Nursing Faculty Perceptions on Teaching Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Doris A.

    2010-01-01

    The perceptions of nursing faculty teaching critical thinking (CT) affective attributes and cognitive skills are described in this quantitative, descriptive study. The study sample consisted of nurse educators from the National League of Nursing database. The purpose of the study was to gain nursing faculty perception of which teaching strategies…

  4. Study of Faculty and Information Technology, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Eden; Brooks, D. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    In this inaugural year of the faculty technology study, EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research (ECAR) partnered with 151 college/university sites yielding responses from 17,451 faculty respondents across 13 countries. The findings are exploratory in nature, as they cover new ground to help us tell a more comprehensive story about technology…

  5. E-Science and Astronomy Faculty: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, L. A.

    2010-10-01

    In 2003, the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) began to recognize the implications of large-scale science and distributed networks on 21st century libraries and librarianship. Its members became very aware of e-science. The National Science Foundation (NSF) had already studied developing a major focus on cyberinfrastructure. This was stimulated by the awareness of the oncoming data deluge that started with astronomical research. This paper gives an overview of the history in the United States behind the NSF and ARL push among their constituents regarding each organization's e-science concepts and goals. In the present, it describes a brief case study involving the expectations of the astronomy/astrophysics faculty at Brown University. The future role of the astronomy librarian for his/her faculty at an academic institution greatly depends on mandates, policies, and the librarian's skills of archiving and providing access.

  6. Are All Part-Time Faculty Underemployed? The Influence of Faculty Status Preference on Satisfaction and Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Douglas C.; Joseph, Todd Allen

    2008-01-01

    Utilizing a person-job fit perspective, we examined the job satisfaction and affective commitment of three groups of college faculty (N = 167): full-time faculty, part-time faculty preferring a part-time position (voluntary part-time), and part-time faculty preferring a full-time position (involuntary part-time). Involuntary part-time faculty were…

  7. Planning for Internationalization By Investing in Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K. Childress

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last half century, major world events have prompted higher education institutions to develop internationalization plans. In order engage faculty in internationalization, higher education scholars and practitioners have recommended that internationalization plans include allocated resources, such as budgets for academic exchanges, faculty development workshops, and international curricular development and research grants (Olson, Green, & Hill, 2006; Paige, 2005; Siaya & Hayward, 2003. Yet, a frequently cited obstacle to faculty engagement in internationalization plans is lack of funding (Backman, 1984; Bond, 2003; Ellingboe, 1998; Green & Olson, 2003; Steers & Ungsen, 1992; Woolston, 1983. A cross-case analysis reveals that differential investment leads to faculty engagement in internationalization plans. This article discusses how two institutions developed funds from a variety of sources and institutional levels to engage faculty in an institutional planning process. This study offers implications for institutional planning, resource dependency theory, and internationalization.

  8. Predictors of turnover intention in nurse faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Denise K; Kennerly, Susan

    2011-04-01

    Turnover of nurse faculty is an increasingly important issue in nursing as the available number of qualified faculty continues to decrease. Understanding the factors that contribute to turnover is important to academic administrators to retain and recruit qualified nursing faculty. The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of turnover intention in nurse faculty working in departments and schools of nursing in Carnegie Doctoral/Research Universities-Extensive, public and private, not-for-profit institutions. The multidimensional model of organizational commitment was used to frame this study. The predictor variables explored were organizational climate, organizational commitment, work role balance, role ambiguity, and role conflict. The work roles examined were research, teaching, and service. Logistical regression was performed to examine the predictors of turnover intention. Organizational climate intimacy and disengagement, affective and continuance organizational commitment, and role ambiguity were shown to predict turnover intention in nurse faculty. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Cognitive dissonance experienced by nurse practitioner faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Holly B; Hawkins, Joellen W; Weiss, Josie A

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explicate the concept of cognitive dissonance as experienced and reported by nurse practitioner (NP) faculty members. Responses from NP faculty members to an online survey about their experiences with cognitive dissonance. The respondents detailed their experiences with cognitive dissonance, citing differences between expectations for which they are rewarded and those for which they are paid. Expecting all faculty members to excel in practice, research, teaching, and service may create unrealistic workloads for NP faculty members. Examining expectations and considering creation of a clinical track for faculty who practice may be options administrators of NP programs might explore. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  10. Faculty Viewpoints on Teaching Quantway®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Howington

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantway is a quantitative reasoning-based pathway for developmental math that has been developed as an alternative to the traditional remedial algebra sequence. To explore the experiences of faculty involved with Quantway, we interviewed eight individuals who have taught the course in the past year to survey their attitudes and opinions about students in their classes, the materials and pedagogies in use, and the collegial interaction of networked faculty. Faculty were selected with the intention of gathering a broad set of opinions resulting from differences of location, experience, and other factors. In this paper, we summarize those interviews by identifying common themes reported by the faculty that highlight strengths and challenges of teaching Quantway. Themes include perceptions about changes in student engagement and attitudes as well as changes in their own mindset; the evolution of teaching strategies and materials used inside and outside the classroom; and the relevance of connections between faculty at different institutions involved in the project.

  11. Stakeholder Safety in Information Systems Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.H. Barbour

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Information Communication Technology (ICT researchers adapt and use tools from reference and cognate disciplines. This application of existing tools outside the context of their development has implications beyond the immediate problem context. ICT researchers have access to a wide variety of data sources including newer ones, such as the Internet, that may bring unexpected outcomes. ICT research can impact on researchers, their institutions and the researched in unexpected ways. People so affected are the stakeholders in ICT research activities. Reputations, welfare and property may be put at risk by unplanned events described in this paper. Legal aspects of ICT research are broadly identified and linked to the tort of negligence. The Social Research Association’s Code for researcher safety is described and its application extended to include the Internet as a potential data source. A common set of underlying ethical principles is identified suggesting that the ICT researcher can refine particular research protocols for specific social contexts.

  12. UAS-NAS Stakeholder Feedback Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Debra; Murphy, Jim; Grindle, Laurie

    2016-01-01

    The need to fly UAS in the NAS to perform missions of vital importance to national security and defense, emergency management, science, and to enable commercial applications has been continually increasing over the past few years. To address this need, the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) Integrated Aviation Systems Program (IASP) formulated and funded the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project (hereafter referred to as UAS-NAS Project) from 2011 to 2016. The UAS-NAS Project identified the following need statement: The UAS community needs routine access to the global airspace for all classes of UAS. The Project identified the following goal: To provide research findings to reduce technical barriers associated with integrating UAS into the NAS utilizing integrated system level tests in a relevant environment. This report provides a summary of the collaborations between the UAS-NAS Project and its primary stakeholders and how the Project applied and incorporated the feedback.

  13. Food allergy: Stakeholder perspectives on acceptable risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard; Crevel, René; Chan, Chun-Han

    2010-01-01

    We have reached a point where it is difficult to improve food allergy risk management without an agreement on levels of acceptable risk. This paper presents and discusses the perspectives of the different stakeholders (allergic consumers, health professionals, public authorities and the food...... industry) on acceptable risk in food allergy. Understanding where these perspectives diverge and even conflict may help develop an approach to define what is acceptable. Uncertainty about food allergy, its consequences and how to manage them is the common denominator of the stakeholders’ views. In patients...... to all patients despite the fact that the risk to each is not identical. Regulators and the food industry struggle with the fact that the lack of management thresholds forces them to make case-by-case decisions in an area of uncertainty with penalties for under- or over-prediction. As zero risk...

  14. Areva Resources Namibia. Report to Stakeholders 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This document is Areva Namibia's stakeholder report for 2015. After some turbulent years, the company has now settled into the routine of care and maintenance and expect it to continue until the over-supply of uranium on the world market is depleted and the market conditions improve sustainably. Until then the Care and Maintenance team will continue protecting the mine's infrastructure so that it can be commissioned without delay as soon as the economic conditions become more favourable. The company also maintains its focus on process development and optimisation, on safety, occupational health and protection of the environment. The care and maintenance phase is giving an opportunity to thoroughly research the alkaline heap leach process and make improvements to the uranium recovery methods. The third phase of metallurgical test work will explore some new options to further reduce the cost of production and enhance the economic viability of Trekkopje mine. Preliminary bench testing carried out in mid-2015 at the Process Development Laboratory in France delivered promising results. The on-site testing program started in October 2015 and will continue into 2016. Areva Namibia has been very active in the community. Thanks to the desalination plant NamWater has been able to meet the water demand of the other uranium mines when pumping from the Omaruru Delta (Omdel) aquifer had to be reduced. Negotiations about the sale of the plant are at an advanced stage. The company is supporting social projects in the areas of economic development, education, culture and sport in its neighbouring communities of Arandis and Swakopmund and in the wider Erongo region. This report presents some of the highlights of this active engagement with stakeholders at the local, regional and national level. Content: Health and Safety; People; Environment; Community; Care and Maintenance; Process Development; Sustainability Indicators

  15. Determinants of stakeholders' attitudes towards biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Latifah; Hashim, Hasrizul; Mahadi, Zurina; Ibrahim, Maznah; Ismail, Khaidzir

    2017-01-01

    Concern about the inevitable depletion of global energy resources is rising and many countries are shifting their focus to renewable energy. Biodiesel is one promising energy source that has garnered much public attention in recent years. Many believe that this alternative source of energy will be able to sustain the need for increased energy security while at the same time being friendly to the environment. Public opinion, as well as proactive measures by key players in industry, may play a decisive role in steering the direction of biodiesel development throughout the world. Past studies have suggested that public acceptance of biofuels could be shaped by critical consideration of the risk-benefit perceptions of the product, in addition to the impact on the economy and environment. The purpose of this study was to identify the relevant factors influencing stakeholders' attitudes towards biodiesel derived from crops such as palm oil for vehicle use, as well as to analyse the interrelationships of these factors in an attitude model. A survey of 509 respondents, consisting of various stakeholder groups in the Klang Valley region of Malaysia, was undertaken. The results of the study have substantiated the premise that the most important direct predictor of attitude to biodiesel is the perceived benefits ( β  = 0.80, p  < 0.001). Attitude towards biodiesel also involves the interplay between other factors, such as engagement to biotechnology, trust of key players, attitude to technology, and perceived risk. Although perceived benefit has emerged as the main predictor of public support of biodiesel, the existence of other significant interactions among variables leads to the conclusion that public attitude towards biodiesel should be seen as a multi-faceted process and should be strongly considered prior to its commercialisation.

  16. Dental Student and Faculty Perceptions of Uncivil Behavior by Faculty Members in Classroom and Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Richard W; Hagan, Joseph L; Fournier, Suzanne E; Townsend, Janice A; Ballard, Mary B; Armbruster, Paul C

    2018-02-01

    Uncivil behavior by a faculty member or student can threaten a classroom environment and make it less conducive to learning. The aim of this study was to explore faculty behaviors that dental faculty and students perceive to be uncivil when exhibited in the classroom and clinic. In 2015, all faculty, administrators, and students at a single academic dental institution were invited to participate in an electronic survey that used a five-point Likert scale for respondents to indicate their agreement that 33 faculty behaviors were uncivil. Response rates were 49% for faculty and 59% for students. Significant differences were found between student and faculty responses on 22 of the 33 behavioral items. None of the three category composite scores differed significantly for students compared to faculty respondents. The category composite scores were not significantly associated with gender, ethnicity, or age for faculty or students. Overall, this study found significant differences between students and faculty about perceived uncivil faculty behaviors, though not for categories of behaviors.

  17. What motivates occasional faculty developers to lead faculty development workshops? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Irby, David M

    2015-11-01

    The demand for faculty development is ongoing, and many medical schools will need to expand their pool of faculty developers to include physicians and scientists whose primary expertise is not education. Insight into what motivates occasional faculty developers can guide recruitment and retention strategies. This study was designed to understand the motivations of faculty developers who occasionally (one to three times each year) lead faculty development workshops. Qualitative data were collected in March and April 2012 from interviews with faculty developers who occasionally taught workshops from 2007 to 2012 in the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine's faculty development program. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. The authors thematically analyzed the transcripts using a general inductive approach and developed codes sensitized by motivation theories. The authors interviewed 29/30 (97%) occasional faculty developers and identified five themes: mastery (desire to learn and develop professionally), relatedness (enjoyment of working with and learning from others), duty (sense of obligation to give back and be a good academic citizen), purpose (commitment to improving local teaching and ultimately patient care), and satisfaction (fun and enjoyment). Four of the themes the authors found are well addressed in motivation theory literature: mastery, relatedness, duty, and purpose. Whereas these four are motivators for occasional faculty developers, it is the fifth theme-satisfaction-that the authors feel is foundational and links the others together. Armed with this understanding, individuals leading faculty development programs can develop strategies to recruit and retain occasional faculty developers.

  18. The Politics of Stakeholder Influence in Corporate Environmental Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, Lise

    2006-01-01

    I contribute in this article to descriptive stakeholder engagement theory by conceptualising a number of new internal influence strategies that engaged secondary stakeholders can use in their new face-to-face interactions with the corporations. These internal stakeholder influence strategies should...... environmental governance practices. The Shell top management is to this end appearing sincere in the way they monitor (Meyer and Rowan, 1977) the progress in giving secondary stakeholders (Clarkson, 1995) access to environmental information and to environmental decision-making in Shell. Based on the Shell case...... be seen as adding to the list of external stakeholder influence strategies (e.g. Frooman, 1999) that secondary stakeholders can use in their traditional role of operating from the outside....

  19. The Politics of Stakeholder Influence in Corporate Environmental Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, Lise

    I contribute in this article to descriptive stakeholder engagement theory by conceptualising a number of new internal influence strategies that engaged secondary stakeholders can use in their new face-to-face interactions with the corporations. These internal stakeholder influence strategies should...... environmental governance practices. The Shell top management is to this end appearing sincere in the way they monitor (Meyer and Rowan, 1977) the progress in giving secondary stakeholders (Clarkson, 1995) access to environmental information and to environmental decision-making in Shell. Based on the Shell case...... be seen as adding to the list of external stakeholder influence strategies (e.g. Frooman, 1999) that secondary stakeholders can use in their traditional role of operating from the outside....

  20. Multicriteria mapping of stakeholder preferences in regulating nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2010-01-01

    In order to facilitate stakeholder discussions on how to regulate nanotechnology, the opensource program multicriteria mapping (MCM) was used to structure 26 interviews with stakeholders in the USA. MCM offers a systematic part quantitative, part qualitative approach to clarify why some regulatory options (bans, moratoriums, voluntary measures, etc.) were deemed to be acceptable/unacceptable by various stakeholders and which criteria stakeholders used to evaluate the different regulatory options. Adopting an incremental approach and implementing a new regulatory framework was evaluated as the best options whereas a complete ban and no additional regulation of nanotechnology were found to be the least favorable. Criteria applied differed substantially among stakeholders and included social, ethical, regulatory, environmental, and health issues. Opinions on future regulation seem far less polarized than expected and it seems that stakeholders would welcome a combination of voluntary measures, an incremental approach and forming of a new regulatory framework.

  1. E-health stakeholders experiences with clinical modelling and standardizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gøeg, Kirstine Rosenbeck; Elberg, Pia Britt; Højen, Anne Randorff

    2015-01-01

    Stakeholders in e-health such as governance officials, health IT-implementers and vendors have to co-operate to achieve the goal of a future-proof interoperable e-health infrastructure. Co-operation requires knowledge on the responsibility and competences of stakeholder groups. To increase awareness on clinical modeling and standardization we conducted a workshop for Danish and a few Norwegian e-health stakeholders' and made them discuss their views on different aspects of clinical modeling using a theoretical model as a point of departure. Based on the model, we traced stakeholders' experiences. Our results showed there was a tendency that stakeholders were more familiar with e-health requirements than with design methods, clinical information models and clinical terminology as they are described in the scientific literature. The workshop made it possible for stakeholders to discuss their roles and expectations to each other.

  2. Strategic Planning Within Air Force Materiel Command: A Focus on External Stakeholders’ Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    solicit stakeholder input. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Strategic Planning, Stakeholders, Planning, 172 Management , Organizational Theory 16. PRICE...Constituency Theory ....... ............................... 24 Stakeholder Management ........................... 24 Balancing the Needs of Stakeholders...II and was based on a comprehensive review of literature on strategic planning, stakeholder management , and stakeholder involvement. Question two

  3. Part A: An Exploration of Stakeholder Engagement in Social Enterprise

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, Roopam

    2008-01-01

    This report sets out to explore stakeholder engagement as currently practised in social enterprises in Nottingham City. The literature displays confusion about many of the characteristics of social enterprise, but there is overwhelming consensus that social enterprises are built on stakeholder engagement. Given the debate about definitions of and this expectation of stakeholder involvement in Social Enterprise, this report addresses the following questions in the context of three social e...

  4. The Conceptual Scheme for Managing University Stakeholders'’ Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Schüller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A duplicate of this original article was erroneously published in issue six of this year. Please use this original for citation. Universities have to face many changes in the sector of higher education caused by the current dynamic development in this sector. With the decline in state support, increased competition and unfavourable demographic progress, universities are forced to establish and improve their relationships with new and existing stakeholders. Research on relationships among universities and stakeholders has historically focused on the different factors and their influence on improving stakeholder satisfaction with the quality of university services and on strengthening cooperation. Some studies are focused on stakeholders’ classification according to their importance for higher education institutions. However, there are fewer scientific studies which concentrate on the intricacies of managing stakeholder satisfaction according to key areas of Universities. This study aims to design a conceptual scheme for managing stakeholder satisfaction depending on the importance of stakeholders in the key fields of Universities. The research was done in three steps. As the first stage, university stakeholders were identified via interview. In the second stage, the following key fields relating to university activities were identified via focus group - education, science and research, premises and technology. In the third stage, the importance of the particular stakeholders was identified for the fields mentioned in the stage two. In order to gain the necessary information, a set interview method was chosen. Native students were identified as the most important stakeholder for the field - education, academic staff as the most important for the field - research and development and enterprises as the most important stakeholder for the field - premises and equipment. The results of the research conducted provided the authors with a convenient base

  5. [THE CANCELED FACULTY: ON THE ISSUE OF ESTABLISHMENT OF MEDICAL FACULTY OF THE PETROGRAD UNIVERSITY DURING THE FIRST WORLD WAR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostovtsev, E A; Sidortchuk, I V

    2015-01-01

    The article considers history of attempts to organize medicalfaculty in the Petrograd university on the eve and during the First World War The actuality of issue is in both insufficient investigation of this page of history of national medicine and medical education and history of development of national medicine in the period of the First World War which centenary is observed this year On the basis of large spectrum of published and archive sources the article considers the prerequisites of organization of medical faculty in St. Petersburg-Petrograd The discussions around its organization, positioning and augmentation of its supporters and opponents are called to mind The attempt is cited concerning organization offaculty in context of existed relationship between professional and teaching staff corporation of the Petrograd university and authorities. The separate attention is paid to the issue of corporative aspiration of professorate which determined model of their behavior and in spite of all social politic alterations provide no permission to compromise with authorities. The similar behavior model continued and after the February Revolution and this became the cause of giving up the idea of organization of medical faculty after overthrow of czarism.

  6. Designing a cultural competency curriculum: asking the stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaka, Martina L

    2010-06-01

    The design of a cultural competency curriculum can be challenging. The 2002 Institute of Medicine report, Unequal Treatment, challenged medical schools to integrate cross-cultural education into the training of all current and future health professionals. However, there is no current consensus on how to do this. The Department of Native Hawaiian Health at the John A. Burns School of Medicine formed a Cultural Competency Curriculum Development team that was charged with developing a curriculum for the medical school to address Native Hawaiian health disparities. By addressing cultural competency training of physicians, the team is hoping to help decrease the health disparities found in Native Hawaiians. Prior attempts to address culture at the time consisted of conferences sponsored by the Native Hawaiian Center of Excellence for faculty and clinicians and Problem Based Learning cases that have imbedded cultural issues. Gather ideas from focus groups of Native Hawaiian stake- holders. The stakeholders consisted of Native Hawaiian medical students, patients and physicians. Information from the focus groups would be incorporated into a medical school curriculum addressing Native Hawaiian health and cultural competency training. Focus groups were held with Native Hawaiian medical students, patients and physicians in the summer and fall of 2006. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained from the University of Hawaii as well as the Native Hawaiian Health Care Systems. Qualitative analysis of tape recorded data was performed by looking for recurrent themes. Primary themes and secondary themes were ascertained based on the number of participants mentioning the topic. Amongst all three groups, cultural sensitivity training was either a primary theme or secondary theme. Primary themes were mentioned by all students, by 80% of the physicians and were mentioned in all 4 patient groups. Secondary themes were mentioned by 75% of students, 50% of the physicians and by 75

  7. Stakeholder requirements for commercially successful wave energy converter farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babarit, Aurélien; Bull, Diana; Dykes, Katherine; Malins, Robert; Nielsen, Kim; Costello, Ronan; Roberts, Jesse; Bittencourt Ferreira, Claudio; Kennedy, Ben; Weber, Jochem

    2017-12-01

    In this study, systems engineering techniques are applied to wave energy to identify and specify stakeholders' requirements for a commercially successful wave energy farm. The focus is on the continental scale utility market. Lifecycle stages and stakeholders are identified. Stakeholders' needs across the whole lifecycle of the wave energy farm are analyzed. A list of 33 stakeholder requirements are identified and specified. This list of requirements should serve as components of a technology performance level metric that could be used by investors and funding agencies to make informed decisions when allocating resources. It is hoped that the technology performance level metric will accelerate wave energy conversion technology convergence.

  8. Stakeholder versus Shareholder Satisfaction in Corporate Risk Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Tom

    2006-01-01

    Inherent in corporate governance is the conflict between satisfying stakeholders in general versus satisfying shareholders in particular. This empirical study of Danish non-financial companies finds that companies which state that their aim is to satisfy stakeholders in general ("stakeholder...... be explained by company characteristics normally identified in the literature as being decisive for hedging behaviour such as firm size, leverage, and export ratio. Rather, the study finds a unique relationship between the managerial focus on stakeholders and a conservative risk management strategy...

  9. AN INSIGHT INTO STAKEHOLDER-LED CSR COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesia Mihai

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Although companies have always been engaged in communicating strategically with the main stakeholders, recent developments have shown that the corporate communication function has been redefined as a complex activity of communicating with both internal and external stakeholders. The authors use stakeholder theory to provide insight into CSR on-line communication by analyzing the content available to the general public of three major Romanian companies. The analysis shows that Romanian companies have adopted mainly the engagement rhetoric, one of the explanations being the fact that many domestic stakeholders still fail to understand the key role of CSR in developing corporate identity and reputation via on-line communication.

  10. Engaging stakeholders for adaptive management using structured decision analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Elise R.; Kathryn, D.; Kennedy, Mickett

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive management is different from other types of management in that it includes all stakeholders (versus only policy makers) in the process, uses resource optimization techniques to evaluate competing objectives, and recognizes and attempts to reduce uncertainty inherent in natural resource systems. Management actions are negotiated by stakeholders, monitored results are compared to predictions of how the system should respond, and management strategies are adjusted in a “monitor-compare-adjust” iterative routine. Many adaptive management projects fail because of the lack of stakeholder identification, engagement, and continued involvement. Primary reasons for this vary but are usually related to either stakeholders not having ownership (or representation) in decision processes or disenfranchisement of stakeholders after adaptive management begins. We present an example in which stakeholders participated fully in adaptive management of a southeastern regulated river. Structured decision analysis was used to define management objectives and stakeholder values and to determine initial flow prescriptions. The process was transparent, and the visual nature of the modeling software allowed stakeholders to see how their interests and values were represented in the decision process. The development of a stakeholder governance structure and communication mechanism has been critical to the success of the project.

  11. Innovation in Services and Stakeholder Interactions: Cases from Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia

    organisations and their stakeholders navigate and manage such unfolding to reach successful outcomes. Grounded in the literature and theories on innovation in services, this dissertation adopts a qualitative approach and emphasises the empirical context of facilities management services. Facilities management...... to maximise the potential of interactions. Moreover, service organisations should evaluate how each set of stakeholders should be involved in different types of innovation processes, and manage interactions through change and expectation management........ Within the service context, specifically, empirical evidence and existing research suggest that interactions between stakeholders are an important element of innovation processes. Therefore, when managing and studying innovation in the service context, interactions between stakeholders should be taken...

  12. Stakeholders in nursing education: their role and involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgolesi, M; Marchetti, A; Piredda, M; Pulimeno, A M L; Rocco, G; Stievano, A; De Marinis, M G

    2014-01-01

    In literature, there is evidence that all stakeholders need to be involved in the curricula building process to make sure that health professionals are "educated" to meet the stakeholders' "demands". In Italy, the involvement of stakeholders in the definition of university curricula is ratified by various regulations. To describe the major experiences of stakeholder involvement in nursing education, identify the main stakeholders for nursing education, and the processes in which they are involved. The search strategy included an electronic exploration of the relevant databases. The search terms were: Stakeholders, Curriculum, Nursing Education combined with Boolean operators. The references of the retrieved articles were hand searched for additional related studies. Most of the studies identified were from the United Kingdom, Australia, and the USA. In Italy, no relevant studies were found. The most frequently identified stakeholders were: students, clinicians, educators, nurse managers. They were mainly involved during profound changes in the curricula and the implementation of new educational approaches. Stakeholders are mostly involved in countries with a private funding system for universities. Such funding systems have probably developed in the academia a greater propensity to involve stakeholders, to provide recognition of success when starting new programs, and are perceived more as marketing research. This seems contrary to the spirit of the Italian and European regulatory interventions, which instead, provide a structured commitment to consolidating and expanding the collaboration among universities, users, and the world of labor. This latter collaboration should facilitate internship activities, lifelong learning, and employability of the newly-graduated professionals.

  13. A Qualitative Assessment and Analysis of Stakeholder Expectations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bullard, Steven

    2003-01-01

    A Department of Defense acquisition program is influenced by a large number of external stakeholders, including operational users, oversight authorities, contractors and suppliers, and interfacing program managers...

  14. Ethics workshops-are they effective in improving the competencies of faculty and postgraduates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Sudha; Bhuvaneswari, S; Sankaran, Ramalingam

    2014-07-01

    Responsible conduct of research requires a good knowledge about research ethics. With the recent changes in the clinical trial regulations and the proposed introduction of ethics in medical curriculum by the Medical Council of India, there is an urgent need to train the medical faculty and postgraduates in research ethics. We wanted to measure the effectiveness of a one day program which was organized using didactic lectures and case scenarios on the knowledge, attitude and skills on ethics among faculty and postgraduates. This was done using a retropre questionnaire. We performed a Kolmogorov Smirnov test to measure the normality, Mann Whitney U-test to test the difference in scores between faculty and postgraduates and a Wilcoxin signed rank test to measure the prepost scores. The faculty showed better scores in knowledge and attitude (pintroduction of ethics training during undergraduate course and also the fact that even a short training program in research ethics could be effective.

  15. Nursing directors' leadership styles and faculty members' job satisfaction in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiu-Chin; Baron, Mark

    2006-10-01

    Nursing leaders in Taiwan seldom receive the leadership training necessary to lead an academic organization. As a result, leaders may experience burn out, and dissatisfaction among faculty may increase. This study examined nursing faculty members' perceptions of nursing directors' leadership and their job satisfaction levels to understand how perceptions of leadership styles related to job satisfaction in Taiwan. This descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional study used self-administered questionnaires. Transformational leadership theory supported the research framework. Nine schools with nursing programs awarding diplomas to students participated in this study. A total of 175 questionnaires were returned (72% response rate). The findings indicated that Taiwan's nursing directors tend to display transformational leadership more frequently in their workplaces and that Taiwan's nursing faculty members are moderately satisfied in their jobs. In addition, nursing faculty in Taiwan are more satisfied with directors who practice the leadership style of attributed idealized influence.

  16. Evaluation of a workplace disability prevention intervention in Canada: examining differing perceptions of stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiwald, Karin; de Rijk, Angelique; Guzman, Jaime; Schonstein, Eva; Yassi, Annalee

    2011-06-01

    INTRODUCTION Workplace disability prevention is important, but stakeholders can differ in their appreciation of such interventions. We present a responsive evaluation of a workplace disability prevention intervention in a Canadian healthcare organization. Three groups of stakeholders were included: designers of the intervention, deliverers, and workers. The aim was to examine the appreciation of this intervention by analyzing the discrepancies with respect to what these various stakeholders see as the causes of work disability, what the intervention should aim at to address this problem, and to what extent the intervention works in practice. METHODS A qualitative research method was used, including data-triangulation: (a) documentary materials; (b) semi-structured interviews with the deliverers and workers (n = 14); (c) participatory observations of group meetings (n = 6); (d) member-checking meetings (n = 3); (e) focus-group meetings (n = 2). A grounded theory approach, including some ethnographic methodology, was used for the data-analysis. RESULTS Stakeholders' perceptions of causes for work disability differ, as do preferred strategies for prevention. Designers proposed work-directed measures to change the workplace and work organizations, and individual-directed measures to change workers' behaviour. Deliverers targeted individual-directed measures, however, workers were mostly seeking work-directed measures. To assess how the intervention was working, designers sought a wide range of outcome measures. Deliverers focused on measurable outcomes targeted at reducing work time-loss. Workers perceived that this intervention offered short-term benefits yet fell short in ensuring sustainable return-to-work. CONCLUSION This study provides understanding of where discrepancies between stakeholders' perceptions about interventions come from. Our findings have implications for workplace disability prevention intervention development, implementation and evaluation

  17. The value added of conducting regional versus local stakeholder involvement in evaluating technology acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, G.H.

    1995-06-01

    Battelle has conducted a three-year effort, funded by the U. S Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Technology Development, to involve stakeholders in evaluating innovative technologies to clean up volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination at arid sites. Stakeholders have been encouraged to participate in the demonstration of these innovative technologies in order to improve decisions made by DOE and its contractors about technology development, demonstration, and deployment. The basic approach is to identify people and organizations with a stake in the remediation process, and hence in the demonstration of innovative technologies. Stakeholders have included public interest group and environmental group representatives, regulators, technology users, Native Americans, Hispanic community members, and local elected officials. These people are invited to be involved and they are presented with substantive information about the technologies. Their input in terms of identifying issues and concerns, defining the kinds of information needed from the demonstrations, and assessing the acceptability of the technologies for deployment, will help ensure that only broadly promising technologies are carried forward. This approach is designed to increase the likelihood of successful deployment of the new technologies needed to accomplish environmental restoration throughout the DOE complex and at private facilities. The hypothesis in conducting this regional stakeholder involvement program is that there will be different data requirements for different sites due to geographical, institutional, programmatic, and cultural differences at the sites. Identifying the broadest set of data requirements, collecting this information during the technology demonstration, and providing the results of the demonstration to stakeholders will enhance the acceptance of the technology at these sites and, thereby, enhance the technology's deployability

  18. Relation between Romanian NGOs Acting in Nuclear Field and Other Stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrei, V.; Pantazi, D.; Radulescu, G.; Bucur, C.; Stanciu, L.; Apostol Minodora, M.

    2015-01-01

    In Romania, three main NGOs act in promoting peaceful use of nuclear energy. The organization with the longest road is the Romanian Association for Nuclear Energy (AREN), created by individual persons acting in nuclear field in 1990. In 2001, a number of Romanian and foreign legal entities having core competence or unfolding nuclear energy related industrial and research activities created the Romanian Industrial Forum (Romatom). Both AREN and Romatom are active parts of European nuclear world: AREN is European Nuclear Society member and Romatom is Foratom member. The 3rd NGO is Women in Nuclear Romania (WiNRo) which registered in 2011. However, the women acting in nuclear field have become earlier active independent voices particularly in public communication on nuclear field matters. The debut was in 1993 when the women group acting in AREN became members of WiN Global, the organization that they trust would become a real opportunity to share their professional competences and improve their communication knowledge and skills in the light of the mission they decided to embrace, namely, that of clear, transparent and trustful communication with stakeholders, particularly the general public on peaceful use of nuclear energy. Today, WiN Ro is also part of WiN Europe where common European desiderates aim to establish and achieve. Today, Romanian NGOs act to continue the trustful relations they have built with a large portfolio of stakeholders adapting their endeavors for answering to various stakeholders needs for transparency and effective communication on nuclear matters at national level. At international level, the Romanian NGOs aim to register benefic experience for their organizational works and opportunities for promotion of the national good approaches, from relations with stakeholders acting in the international arena of nuclear world. Relevant aspects on how the Romanian NGOs have approached relations with stakeholders will be presented. (author)

  19. Conducting research in risk communication that is both beneficial for stakeholders and scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrière, Marie; Bogaard, Thom; Junier, Sandra; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Mostert, Erik

    2015-04-01

    One of the key tasks for disaster risk reduction is raising awareness. On way to increase it is through risk communication, including visual risk communication. Previous research showed that visual risk communication linked to natural hazards is mostly evaluated in terms of user's requirements, ability to understand the content, or satisfaction with the diverse components of the tool(s): Its impact on risk awareness is not researched. Most of the risk communication evaluations are performed in a lab-type environments and thus their conclusions might not be fully valid in real life settings. Our approach differs in the sense that we decided to test a real communication effort. However, we did not use an existing one but designed our own. This process was conducted according to collaborative research principles, meaning that we created the communication effort in collaboration with the local stakeholders in order to respect the social environment of the case study. Moreover, our research activity should be beneficial and significant for the community in which we work as well as for science. This contribution will present the process that allowed us to design an exhibition in the Ubaye Valley (France) and the methodology that was developed to measure changes in risk awareness. During a 2-years project, we collaborated with local and regional stakeholders (politicians and technicians). Informal meetings with local stakeholders were organized to determine what they perceived as the needs in term of risk communication and to investigate the potential to develop activities that would benefit both them and us. We were offered the opportunity to design an exhibition for the local public library. We proposed the content and this was adjusted in interaction with the stakeholders. Later local technicians and inhabitants contributed to the content of the exhibition and regional stakeholders helped with the funding of the exhibition. Finally, employees of the public library took

  20. Environmental Policy Beliefs of Stakeholders in Protected Area Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovardas, Tasos; Poirazidis, Kostas

    2007-04-01

    Although the importance of understanding stakeholder beliefs regarding environmental policy has been noted by many authors, research focusing on the heterogeneity of stakeholder views is still very scarce and concentrated on a product-oriented definition of stakeholders. The aim of the present study is to address this gap by examining environmental policy beliefs of stakeholder groups engaged in protected area management. Questionnaires containing 73 five-point Likert scale items were administered to eight different stakeholder groups involved in the management of Greek protected areas. Items referred to core beliefs on environmental policy, namely, the value framework and sustainable development, and secondary beliefs, that is, beliefs on social consensus and ecotourism development. Our study used as a starting point respondent recruitment on the basis of a traditional product-centered approach. We investigated whether environmental policy beliefs can be used to effectively segregate stakeholders in well-defined segments, which override the product-oriented definition of stakeholders. Indeed, K-means clustering revealed an innovation-introduction and an implementation-charged sample segment. The instrument utilized in this research proved quite reliable and valid in measuring stakeholder environmental policy beliefs. Furthermore, the methodology implied that stakeholder groups differ in a significant number of belief-system elements. On the other hand, stakeholder groups were effectively distinguished on a small set of both core and secondary beliefs. Therefore, the instrument used can be an effective tool for determining and monitoring environmental policy beliefs of stakeholders in protected area management. This is of considerable importance in the Greek case, given the recent establishment of 27 administrative bodies of protected areas, all of which are required to incorporate public consultation into management practices.