WorldWideScience

Sample records for stakeholder involvement evaluation

  1. Involving stakeholders in evaluating environmental restoration technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, G.H.; Serie, P.J.

    1993-02-01

    Involving citizens, interest groups, and regulators in environmental restoration and waste management programs is a challenge for government agencies and the organizations that support them. To be effective, such involvement activities must identify all individuals and groups who have a stake in the cleanup. Their participation must be early, substantive, and meaningful. Stockholders must be able to see how their input was considered and used, and feel that a good- faith effort was made to reconcile conflicting objectives. The Integrated Demonstration for Cleanup of Volatile Organic Compounds at Arid Sites (VOC-Arid ID) is a Department of Energy Office of Technology Development project located at Hanford. Along with technical evaluation of innovative cleanup technologies, the program is conducting an institutional assessment of regulatory and public acceptance of new technologies. Through a series of interviews and workshops, and use of a computerized information management tool, stakeholders are having a voice in the evaluation. Public and regulatory reaction has been positive

  2. Stakeholder involvement in the evaluation of a multipurpose canister system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.R.; Kane, D.; Smith, T.B. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), began evaluating a multipurpose canister (MPC) concept in October of 1992. This followed recommendations by the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (NWTRB) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) that DOE develop a nuclear waste management system that achieves system integration, standardization, and reduced fuel-handling operations. Industry organizations such as Edison Electric Institute (EEI) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) had conducted earlier studies that concluded advantages to the nuclear waste management system may be offered by such a concept. The MPC concept involves a metal canister which would contain multiple spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The canister would be sealed at the nuclear power plant and would not be reopened. The MPC would then be placed inside separate casks or overpacks for storage, transportation, and disposal. An important factor in DOE's evaluation of the MPC concept was the involvement of external parties. This paper describes that involvement process for the OCRWM's MPC implementation program. External parties who have an interest or stake in the program are referred to as stakeholders

  3. Possible stakeholder concerns regarding volatile organic compound in arid soils integrated demonstration technologies not evaluated in the stakeholder involvement program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds in Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) supported the demonstration of a number of innovative technologies, not all of which were evaluated in the integrated demonstration's stakeholder involvement program. These technologies have been organized into two categories and the first category ranked in order of priority according to interest in the evaluation of the technology. The purpose of this report is to present issues stakeholders would likely raise concerning each of the technologies in light of commentary, insights, data requirements, concerns, and recommendations offered during the VOC-Arid ID's three-year stakeholder involvement, technology evaluation program. A secondary purpose is to provide a closeout status for each of the technologies associated with the VOC-Arid ID. This report concludes with a summary of concerns and requirements that stakeholders have for all innovative technologies

  4. The effects of stakeholder involvement on perceptions of an evaluation's credibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Miriam R; Azzam, Tarek

    2018-06-01

    This article presents a study of the effects of stakeholder involvement on perceptions of an evaluation's credibility. Crowdsourced members of the public and a group of educational administrators read a description of a hypothetical program and two evaluations of the program: one conducted by a researcher and one conducted by program staff (i.e. program stakeholders). Study participants were randomly assigned versions of the scenario with different levels of stakeholder credibility and types of findings. Results showed that both samples perceived the researcher's evaluation findings to be more credible than the program staff's, but that this difference was significantly reduced when the program staff were described to be highly credible. The article concludes with implications for theory and research on evaluation dissemination and stakeholder involvement. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Facilitating Evaluations of Innovative, Competence-Based Assessments: Creating Understanding and Involving Multiple Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulikers, Judith T. M.; Baartman, Liesbeth K. J.; Biemans, Harm J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Schools are held more responsible for evaluating, quality assuring and improving their student assessments. Teachers' lack of understanding of new, competence-based assessments as well as the lack of key stakeholders' involvement, hamper effective and efficient self-evaluations by teachers of innovative, competence-based assessments (CBAs). While…

  6. The value of adding regional to local stakeholder involvement in evaluating the acceptability of innovative technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G.; Niesen, K.; Serie, P.

    1995-02-01

    Technology is urgently needed to clean up contamination by volatile organic compounds at United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites. In many cases, however, existing technology is too slow, inefficient, or expensive. The record of technology development is, in some cases, similarly disappointing. Remediation technologies developed at great expense and evaluated piecemeal over long periods have not been deployed because, in the end, the public judged them ineffective or unacceptable. The need for successful methods of remediation is too great and resources too limited to continue with ineffective technology evaluation. In order to make good decisions about which technologies to deploy, remedial project managers need to know stakeholders' requirements for the performance of proposed technologies. Expanding stakeholder involvement regionally identifies the concerns of a broad range of stakeholders at and DOE sites throughout the West -- issues that must be taken into account if technologies are to be accepted for wide deployment

  7. Evaluation Use and Involvement of Internal Stakeholders: The Case of a New Non-Degree Online Program in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornachione, Edgard B., Jr.; Trombetta, Maria R.; Casa Nova, Silvia P. C.

    2010-01-01

    To what extent does the intense and direct involvement of internal stakeholders, such as program managers and staff members, play a significant role toward evaluation use? Stakeholder involvement is a key element in evaluation and evaluation use is considered within a broader sense that includes organizational knowledge, individual skills, and…

  8. The value added of conducting regional versus local stakeholder involvement in evaluating technology acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, G.H.

    1995-06-01

    Battelle has conducted a three-year effort, funded by the U. S Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Technology Development, to involve stakeholders in evaluating innovative technologies to clean up volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination at arid sites. Stakeholders have been encouraged to participate in the demonstration of these innovative technologies in order to improve decisions made by DOE and its contractors about technology development, demonstration, and deployment. The basic approach is to identify people and organizations with a stake in the remediation process, and hence in the demonstration of innovative technologies. Stakeholders have included public interest group and environmental group representatives, regulators, technology users, Native Americans, Hispanic community members, and local elected officials. These people are invited to be involved and they are presented with substantive information about the technologies. Their input in terms of identifying issues and concerns, defining the kinds of information needed from the demonstrations, and assessing the acceptability of the technologies for deployment, will help ensure that only broadly promising technologies are carried forward. This approach is designed to increase the likelihood of successful deployment of the new technologies needed to accomplish environmental restoration throughout the DOE complex and at private facilities. The hypothesis in conducting this regional stakeholder involvement program is that there will be different data requirements for different sites due to geographical, institutional, programmatic, and cultural differences at the sites. Identifying the broadest set of data requirements, collecting this information during the technology demonstration, and providing the results of the demonstration to stakeholders will enhance the acceptance of the technology at these sites and, thereby, enhance the technology's deployability

  9. Stakeholder involvement - a japanese perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, S.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional societal and cultural background of Japanese in general indicates the intrinsic difficulty in involving the public as stakeholders in the process of any type of decision making in policy matters. It is characterized by the long-taught virtue of harmonization and obedience to others. In addition, characteristic system of Japanese traditional industrial society, such as lifetime employment, seniority-based wage system, and enterprise-based labour union, encourages the loyalty to the employer/company, but not to the public. The public or ordinary citizens would seldom come out as stakeholders and express their true feelings or real opinions, even though younger generation is notably getting out from such a trend. On the other hand, it is a common practice in Japanese society for any business or administrative transactions to try to obtain 'consensus' among relevant parties concerned (stakeholders) by negotiations behind the curtain prior to the formal discussion. In this sense, 'stakeholders involvement' is accepted and practised as a matter of course, but mostly for actions between parties of equivalently influential status levels or between 'directly relevant' parties such as those between the different government agencies, between regulators and industries. The concept of 'Involving the public in decision making as stakeholders' is not yet fully understood nor accepted in Japan both by regulators and by the public so far as the issue of radiation protection is concerned. These situations are explained with some examples. (author)

  10. Stakeholder involvement in developing brochures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, M.; Garing, K.; Waldrop, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management involved stakeholders (i.e., people who perceive themselves to be affected by the DOE's activities) in a pre-decisional draft of a DOE public document-a practice that the public has called for if the DOE is to begin real public participation. Early and ongoing public input is key to realizing Environmental Management's goal of increasing public participation. The stakeholder review process employed in the development of this document, a brochure outlining public participation information, demonstrates that Environmental Management is open-quotes practicing what it preachesclose quotes about institutionalizing public participation in its program. environmental Management's objective for the brochure is to create a document that uses plain, direct language that encourages citizens to become involved in its decision making process. The information in the brochure provides the public with the information they need to become involved stakeholders. The breadth and volume of comments received assisted in the development of a brochure that includes many viewpoints

  11. Facilitating evaluations of innovative, competence-based assessment: Creating understanding and involving multiple stakeholders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulikers, J.T.M.; Baartman, L.K.J.; Biemans, H.

    2010-01-01

    Schools are held more responsible for evaluating, quality assuring and improving their student assessments. Teachers’ lack of understanding of new, competence-based assessments as well as the lack of key stakeholders’ involvement, hamper effective and efficient self-evaluations by teachers of

  12. Facilitating evaluations of innovative, competence-based assessments: creating understanding and involving multiple stakeholders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulikers, J.T.M.; Baartman, L.; Biemans, H.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Schools are held more responsible for evaluating, quality assuring and improving their student assessments. Teachers’ lack of understanding of new, competence-based assessments as well as the lack of key stakeholders’ involvement, hamper effective and efficient self-evaluations by teachers of

  13. Stakeholder involvement tools: criteria for choice and evaluation. Proceedings of a Topical Session at the 4. Meeting of the NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, Claire; Pescatore, Claudio; )

    2003-01-01

    The Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was created to facilitate the sharing of international experience in addressing the societal dimension of radioactive waste management. It explores means of ensuring an effective dialogue with the public, and considers ways to strengthen confidence in decision-making processes. This addressed a variety of topics ranging from stakeholder identity, evolutions in participatory democracy, and trust in the institutional framework, to the role of open dialogue in all aspects of radioactive waste management. The session was opened with an overview of theoretical, legal and substantive justifications for public participation in environmental governance, explaining that the typical physical characteristics of environmental issues (complexity, uncertainty, large temporal and spatial scales, and irreversibility) pose challenges to traditional decision making frameworks. The Danish example was then described, with the prominent role of the Danish Board of Technology, mandated to perform independent technology assessment and to support public debate by communicating assessment results to Parliament, other political decision makers and the Danish population. The RISCOM-II work on criteria for evaluating dialogue processes was then presented (clear aims and objectives will aid in planning a process, and can be used to evaluate it; the participants in a dialogue may have different views about its goals and so the planning and evaluation should involve these persons in order to come to a shared understanding). Then, a framework for evaluation at the level of government is outlined - a study on information, consultation and public participation in policy-making found that evaluation is often overlooked. As a conclusion, the topical presentations were analysed by placing them against a background of research on public participation. Choosing stakeholder involvement tools is part of a larger planning process in which not just methods, but

  14. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration stakeholder involvement model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaupanger, R.M.; Kostelnik, K.M.; Milam, L.M.

    1994-04-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. Stakeholder participation in the DOE Environmental Management decision-making process is critical to remediation efforts. Appropriate mechanisms for communication with the public, private sector, regulators, elected officials, and others are being aggressively pursued by BWID to permit informed participation. This document summarizes public outreach efforts during FY-93 and presents a strategy for expanded stakeholder involvement during FY-94

  15. The European climate change program. An evaluation of stakeholder involvement and policy achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxian Rusche, Tim

    2010-01-01

    In order to step up its efforts in reducing climate change, the European Commission (hereafter: the Commission) has launched in June 2000 its European climate change program (hereafter: ECCP). This wide-ranging stakeholder consultation aimed at identifying and developing all elements necessary for a European climate change strategy. The ECCP formally came to a close in April 2003. This paper analyses the inner workings of ECCP, and how ECCP has delivered with regard to its objectives. Special attention is paid to ECCP's Working Group 1, 'Flexible Mechanisms', which developed the foundations for the European emission trading scheme (hereafter: EU ETS). The paper draws on documents published on the Commission's ECCP web-site, on academic literature, on press releases from stakeholders and on interviews with four participants in the ECCP process. Using this method, the paper offers important insights as to how the consensus-building for establishing the world's biggest carbon-trading scheme has started long time before the formal legislative process. (author)

  16. How can stakeholder involvement be improved?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-12-01

    Radioactive waste management is embedded in broader societal issues such as environment, risk management, sustainability, energy and health policy. In all these fields, there is an increasing demand for public involvement, participation or engagement. Guidance for public authorities also generally encourages greater involvement of the public. Involvement may take different forms at different phases and can include sharing information, consulting, dialoguing or deliberating on decisions with relevant stakeholders. Stakeholder involvement should be seen as a meaningful part of formulating and implementing public policy. There is no single technique for organising engagement. Initiatives should respond to their context and to stakeholders' particular needs. As the number of stakeholder involvement approaches and publications describing them continues to grow, new opportunities are opening up through social media, which has become an important tool for stakeholder involvement in recent years

  17. Involving the public in epidemiological public health research: a qualitative study of public and stakeholder involvement in evaluation of a population-wide natural policy experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson de Cuevas, Rachel; Nylén, Lotta; Burström, Bo; Whitehead, Margaret

    2018-04-20

    Public involvement in research is considered good practice by European funders; however, evidence of its research impact is sparse, particularly in relation to large-scale epidemiological research. To explore what difference public and stakeholder involvement made to the interpretation of findings from an evaluation of a natural policy experiment to influence the wider social determinants of health: 'Flexicurity'. Stockholm County, Sweden. Members of the public from different occupational groups represented by blue-collar and white-collar trade union representatives. Also, members of three stakeholder groups: the Swedish national employment agency; an employers' association and politicians sitting on a national labour market committee. Total: 17 participants. Qualitative study of process and outcomes of public and stakeholder participation in four focused workshops on the interpretation of initial findings from the flexicurity evaluation. New insights from participants benefiting the interpretation of our research findings or conceptualisation of future research. Participants sensed more drastic and nuanced change in the Swedish welfare system over recent decades than was evident from our literature reviews and policy analysis. They also elaborated hidden developments in the Swedish labour market that were increasingly leading to 'insiders' and 'outsiders', with differing experiences and consequences for financial and job security. Their explanation of the differential effects of the various collective agreements for different occupational groups was new and raised further potential research questions. Their first-hand experience provided new insights into how changes to the social protection system were contributing to the increasing trends in poverty among unemployed people with limiting long-standing illness. The politicians provided further reasoning behind some of the policy changes and their intended and unintended consequences. These insights fed into

  18. The Data Party: Involving Stakeholders in Meaningful Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Nancy K.

    2013-01-01

    A hallmark of Extension includes the involvement of stakeholders in research and program needs assessment, design, implementation, evaluation, and reporting. A data party can be used to enhance this stakeholder involvement specifically in data analysis. This type of event can not only increase client participation in Extension programming and…

  19. Stakeholder involvement in Swedish nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran

    2006-09-01

    This report concerning Swedish nuclear waste management has been produced as part of a cross national research project: CARL - A Social Science Research Project into the Effects of Stakeholder involvement on Decision-Making in Radioactive Waste Management. Besides Sweden, the participating countries are Belgium, Canada, Finland, Slovenia and United Kingdom. A social science research team, working for three years, is in the first phase conducting research in their own countries in order to produce 6 country reports. During the next years the focus will shift to comparisons of stakeholder involvement practices in the participating countries. The report addresses current practices of Swedish nuclear waste management and their historical development. The main focus is on past, current and emerging patterns of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a deep repository for the final disposal of Sweden's spent nuclear fuel. The general questions attended to in the report are: Who are the main stakeholders, and how have they emerged and gained recognition as such? What are the issues currently subject to stakeholder involvement and how have these been decided upon? How is stakeholder involvement organized locally and nationally and how has this changed over time? How has stakeholder involvement gained acceptance as an activity of value in the siting of major waste facilities? The report have attempted to show the development of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a final repository for Sweden's spent nuclear fuel as resembling something other than a straightforward linear process of improvement and refinement. Stakeholder involvement has developed, over the past 15 years or so, into something more like a patchwork of different shapes and forms. Some of the forces that may well contribute to the further elaboration of the patchwork of stakeholder involvement have been pointed out, contingently modifying once more its overall colour and orientation. Questions have been

  20. Stakeholder involvement in Swedish nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Section for Science and Technology Studies

    2006-09-15

    This report concerning Swedish nuclear waste management has been produced as part of a cross national research project: CARL - A Social Science Research Project into the Effects of Stakeholder involvement on Decision-Making in Radioactive Waste Management. Besides Sweden, the participating countries are Belgium, Canada, Finland, Slovenia and United Kingdom. A social science research team, working for three years, is in the first phase conducting research in their own countries in order to produce 6 country reports. During the next years the focus will shift to comparisons of stakeholder involvement practices in the participating countries. The report addresses current practices of Swedish nuclear waste management and their historical development. The main focus is on past, current and emerging patterns of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a deep repository for the final disposal of Sweden's spent nuclear fuel. The general questions attended to in the report are: Who are the main stakeholders, and how have they emerged and gained recognition as such? What are the issues currently subject to stakeholder involvement and how have these been decided upon? How is stakeholder involvement organized locally and nationally and how has this changed over time? How has stakeholder involvement gained acceptance as an activity of value in the siting of major waste facilities? The report have attempted to show the development of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a final repository for Sweden's spent nuclear fuel as resembling something other than a straightforward linear process of improvement and refinement. Stakeholder involvement has developed, over the past 15 years or so, into something more like a patchwork of different shapes and forms. Some of the forces that may well contribute to the further elaboration of the patchwork of stakeholder involvement have been pointed out, contingently modifying once more its overall colour and orientation. Questions

  1. Environmental Assessments and Stakeholder Involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesolowski, Cassandra

    2006-01-01

    Directives and legislation on EIA and SEA need to provide more guidance on how and when public participation should be used. There are now several examples of how well public participation can be performed and the methods are becoming more proactive and innovative. By increasing the role of public participation within the Environmental Assessment process, plans, programmes and projects will become more publicly acceptable. There does need to be a balance as to where public participation is performed in the system, as too much can be a stress on resources and time, as well as producing ineffective results. Key stages such as scoping, preparing the environmental statement or report and decision-making need to be highlighted for the benefits public participation can have. The Aarhus Convention is certainly making a difference in the UK; however it is difficult to judge exactly how much difference yet. It was only fully implemented in the UK in 2005 although some Authorities were applying the three pillars prior to implementation. It is not clear how aware the general public are of the Convention and their rights. Empowering communities in the UK. will communities for decision-making in Environmental Assessments? Providing the public with resources to enable them to fully engage in the process will improve the participation and increase their confidence, but how will this increase their influence within the decision-making process? Ultimately, should the stakeholders and public just influence the incremental decisions made in Environmental Assessments or have more responsibility within the major decisions taken? It will be interesting to see how these issues are addressed over the coming years

  2. Environmental Assessments and Stakeholder Involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesolowski, Cassandra [Univ. of Manchester, School of Environment and Development (United Kingdom). Planning and Landscape

    2006-09-15

    Directives and legislation on EIA and SEA need to provide more guidance on how and when public participation should be used. There are now several examples of how well public participation can be performed and the methods are becoming more proactive and innovative. By increasing the role of public participation within the Environmental Assessment process, plans, programmes and projects will become more publicly acceptable. There does need to be a balance as to where public participation is performed in the system, as too much can be a stress on resources and time, as well as producing ineffective results. Key stages such as scoping, preparing the environmental statement or report and decision-making need to be highlighted for the benefits public participation can have. The Aarhus Convention is certainly making a difference in the UK; however it is difficult to judge exactly how much difference yet. It was only fully implemented in the UK in 2005 although some Authorities were applying the three pillars prior to implementation. It is not clear how aware the general public are of the Convention and their rights. Empowering communities in the UK. will communities for decision-making in Environmental Assessments? Providing the public with resources to enable them to fully engage in the process will improve the participation and increase their confidence, but how will this increase their influence within the decision-making process? Ultimately, should the stakeholders and public just influence the incremental decisions made in Environmental Assessments or have more responsibility within the major decisions taken? It will be interesting to see how these issues are addressed over the coming years.

  3. Theory-Based Stakeholder Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Morten Balle; Vedung, Evert

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a new approach to program theory evaluation called theory-based stakeholder evaluation or the TSE model for short. Most theory-based approaches are program theory driven and some are stakeholder oriented as well. Practically, all of the latter fuse the program perceptions of the various stakeholder groups into one unitary…

  4. Stakeholder involvement in CSR strategy-making?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Leila

    2014-01-01

    A given characteristic of successful corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs is that they reflect stakeholder expectations and preferences for corporate behavior. This study examines the process by which this alignment is sought by CSR managers in the CSR strategy-making process. Through...... listening to others in the strategy-making process rather than directly involving others in decision-making. Also, because non-stakeholders, such as paid-for consultants, are found to be note-worthy influencers in the CSR strategy-making process, it is concluded that the process is not only a stakeholder...

  5. Tribal and stakeholder involvement in systems analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, L.; Swartz, G.; Cooley, C.

    1997-01-01

    Beginning in early 1995, U.S. Department of Energy began an experiment to link tribal and stakeholder representatives into technology assessment activities related to an Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study. The INTS study moved outside the framework of after-the-fact public involvement by providing the opportunity for technical and non-technical stakeholders alike to work together in the early predecision stages of the criteria development and assessment of options for innovative mixed waste treatment. The stakeholders gained an appreciation of the intense level of effort required to complete such an analysis. The engineers and scientists conducting the systems analyses had the opportunity (some for the first time) to learn more about tribal and stakeholder issues and how they might apply to the technical tasks related to technology assessment and selection

  6. Stakeholder involvement in decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Significant numbers of nuclear facilities will need to be decommissioned in the coming decades. In this context, NEA member countries are placing increasing emphasis on the involvement of stakeholders in the associated decision procedures. This study reviews decommissioning experience with a view to identifying stakeholder concerns and best practice in addressing them. The lessons learnt about the end of the facility life cycle can also contribute to better foresight in siting and building new facilities. This report will be of interest to all major players in the field of decommissioning, in particular policy makers, implementers, regulators and representatives of local host communities

  7. Stakeholder Involvement in Swedish Nuclear Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran

    2006-01-01

    The focus in this paper is on past, current and emerging patterns of stakeholder involvement in the siting of a deep repository for final disposal of Sweden's spent nuclear fuel. In particular, we concentrate on how the two municipalities of Oskarshamn and Oesthammar have acted as engaged stakeholders, and have gained recognition as such, in the siting process. In general: How has stakeholder involvement gained acceptance as an activity of value in the siting of major waste facilities? What are the issues currently subject to stakeholder involvement and how have these been decided upon? An effect of the history of nuclear activity in Oskarshamn and Oesthammar is that stakeholder involvement over a final repository can be divided into social and technical issues. Both municipalities have out of tradition, as part of their social acceptance of a new repository, been prepared to surrender extended involvement in key safety issues. They have been prepared to do this because they also see themselves being able to delegate these safety issues to the government authorities SSI and SKI. These two authorities have been acceptable to the two municipalities as their legitimate 'technological guardians'. As physical geology re-enters the siting process for a deep repository, Oskarshamn appear more prepared to break with tradition than Oesthammar. Oskarshamn are currently demanding transparency from SKB in relation to the exact technical and geological criteria they will use to choose between them and Oesthammar as a repository site. In contrast to Oesthammar, Oskarshamn are preparing with the expected help of SKI and SSI to dispute their geology and its relation to nuclear safety with SKB if they consider it necessary. If Oskarshamn act to draw safety issues in relation to alternative methods and sitings into the EIA process where might this lead? As environmental groups now enter the process (three groups were granted funding in the first round - 2005) the character of site

  8. Stakeholder involvement in the decommissioning of Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrisson, Norman; LOVE, June; Murray, Marc

    2006-01-01

    The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) was established in the 1950's to pioneer the development of nuclear energy within the UK. Today its primary mission is to decommission UK's former nuclear research sites and restore its environment in a way that is safe and secure, environmentally friendly, value for money and publicly Acceptable. UKAEA Dounreay celebrated its 50 birthday in 2005, having pioneered the development of fast reactor technology since 1955. Today the site is now leading the way in decommissioning. The Dounreay nuclear site licence covers an area of approximately 140 acres and includes 3 reactors: the Dounreay Material Test Reactor (DMTR), the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR), and the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR). In addition there are 180 facilities on site which have supported the fast reactor programme, including a fuel reprocessing capability, laboratories and administration buildings. The reactors are now all in advanced stages of decommissioning. In October 2000 the Dounreay Site Restoration Plan (DSRP) was published to provide a framework for the site's restoration. The plan's objective was to reduce the site's hazards progressively by decontaminating and dismantling the plant, equipment and facilities, remediating contaminated ground and treating and packaging waste so it is suitable for long term storage or disposal. Whilst hailed as the most detailed plan integrating some 1500 activities and spanning 60 years it was criticised for having no stakeholder involvement. In response to this criticism, UKAEA developed a process for public participation over the following 2 years and launched its stakeholder engagement programme in October 2002. In order to provide a larger platform for the engagement process an advertisement was placed in the Scottish media inviting people to register as stakeholders in the Dounreay Site Restoration Plan. The stakeholder list now total over 1000. In October 2002 UKAEA launched their commitment to public

  9. Involving stakeholders and developing a policy for stakeholder involvement in the European network for Health Technology Assessment, EUnetHTA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmhøj Nielsen, Camilla; Wadmann, Sarah; Børlum Kristensen, Finn

    2009-01-01

    in national/regional policy making. A stakeholder Web site, analyses of stakeholder opinions on HTA and EUnetHTA in a discussion topic catalog, and a draft stakeholder policy resulted from the work. Conclusions: Stakeholder involvement in EUnetHTA is necessary to ensure the legitimacy and prospects...... be continued. Our experience shows the challenge of obtaining balanced stakeholder representation across the identified stakeholder groups. Continued attention should be given to achieving balanced stakeholder representation....

  10. A stakeholder involvement approach to evaluate and enhance technology acceptance: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Technology Development's Plume Focus Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, G.H.; Stein, S.L.; Serie, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) faces a major challenge in cleaning up its contaminated sites throughout the United States. One major area of concern is the plumes in soil and ground water which are contaminated with a myriad of different pollutants. DOE recently organized its plume-related problems into the Plume Focus Area. The mission of the Plume Focus Area is to enhance the deployment of innovative technologies for containing and cleaning up contaminant plumes in ground water and soil at all DOE sites. Environmental cleanup priorities for soil and ground water plumes are being defined and technology users have the challenge of matching current and innovative technologies to those priorities. By involving a range of stakeholders in the selection, demonstration, and evaluation of new technologies, the deployment of these technologies can be enhanced. If new plume cleanup technologies are to be deployable, they must improve on today's baseline technologies. The Sites' Coordination Team (SCT) of the Plume Focus Area develops and supports the implementation of methods for stakeholder involvement throughout the multiple steps that define focus area activities. Site-specific teams are being formed to carry out the strategy at each site, and the teams will work through Site Technology Coordination Groups (STCGs) at each location. The SCT is responsible for identifying the site-specific stakeholder involvement teams, training the team members, preparing needed national-level guidance and strategies, helping the teams tailor a strategy for their particular site that meets the overall needs of the focus area, and facilitating inter-site coordination. The results will be used to develop national technology acceptance reports on the innovative technologies being funded and evaluated under the Plume Focus Area

  11. A successful effort to involve stakeholders in a facility siting decision using LIPS with stakeholder involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkhofer, L.; Conway, R.; Anderson, B.

    1995-01-01

    Local public opposition to federal bureaucratic decisions has resulted in public agencies rethinking the role of stakeholders in decision making. Efforts to include stakeholders directly in the decision-making process are on the increase. Unfortunately, many attempts to involve members of the public in decisions involving complex technical issues have failed. A key problem has been defining a meaningful role for the public in the process of arriving at a technical decision. This paper describes a successful effort by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in New Mexico to involve stakeholders in an important technical decision associated with its Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The decision was where to locate a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU), a facility intended to consolidate and store wastes generated from the cleanup of hazardous waste sites. A formal priority setting process known as the Laboratory Integration Prioritization System (LIPS) was adapted to provide an approach for involving the public. Although rarely applied to stakeholder participation, the LIPS process proved surprisingly effective. It produced a consensus over a selected site and enhanced public trust and understanding of Project activities

  12. Stakeholder Involvement in Brazil. Appendix IX.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    In response to public concerns about mining projects, mechanisms for stakeholder involvement in decisions concerning the licensing process of mining operations have been established. The most popular ones are the public hearings. The environmental regulatory body, Brazilian Institute of the Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (Instituto Brasileiro do Meio Ambiente e dos Recursos Naturais Renováveis, IBAMA), makes use of these events to inform the local community about impacts on the economic, physical and social issues caused by the operation of a mining project. However, by legislation, a uranium mining and processing plant is not regulated solely by the environmental regulator at the state and federal level. The Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear, CNEN) plays the key role as the nuclear regulatory body, and in many situations, it is perceived by local communities, where uranium mining projects are developed, as the main responsible party responding to regulatory issues regarding this type of operation. The situation gets even more complicated when it is seen that uranium mining and processing operations are state owned activities and the independency of the regulatory body (mainly the nuclear regulatory authority) is questioned, or at least put under scrutiny. It is not common for an ‘independent’ organization to be requested to provide regulatory oversight and this undermines the trust the communities may have on the regulatory process carried on regarding that specific operation

  13. Stakeholders in nursing education: their role and involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgolesi, M; Marchetti, A; Piredda, M; Pulimeno, A M L; Rocco, G; Stievano, A; De Marinis, M G

    2014-01-01

    In literature, there is evidence that all stakeholders need to be involved in the curricula building process to make sure that health professionals are "educated" to meet the stakeholders' "demands". In Italy, the involvement of stakeholders in the definition of university curricula is ratified by various regulations. To describe the major experiences of stakeholder involvement in nursing education, identify the main stakeholders for nursing education, and the processes in which they are involved. The search strategy included an electronic exploration of the relevant databases. The search terms were: Stakeholders, Curriculum, Nursing Education combined with Boolean operators. The references of the retrieved articles were hand searched for additional related studies. Most of the studies identified were from the United Kingdom, Australia, and the USA. In Italy, no relevant studies were found. The most frequently identified stakeholders were: students, clinicians, educators, nurse managers. They were mainly involved during profound changes in the curricula and the implementation of new educational approaches. Stakeholders are mostly involved in countries with a private funding system for universities. Such funding systems have probably developed in the academia a greater propensity to involve stakeholders, to provide recognition of success when starting new programs, and are perceived more as marketing research. This seems contrary to the spirit of the Italian and European regulatory interventions, which instead, provide a structured commitment to consolidating and expanding the collaboration among universities, users, and the world of labor. This latter collaboration should facilitate internship activities, lifelong learning, and employability of the newly-graduated professionals.

  14. Stakeholder involvement techniques. A short guide and annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was created under a mandate from the Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) to facilitate the sharing of international experience in addressing the societal dimension of radioactive waste management. It explores means of ensuring an effective dialogue amongst all stakeholders, and considers ways to strengthen confidence in decision-making processes. FSC documents may be obtained online at www.nea.fr/html/rwrnifsc.html. OECD countries are increasingly implementing forms of participatory democracy that will require new or enhanced forms of dialogue amongst a broader range of concerned parties. The 4. regular FSC meeting held in Paris in May 2003 included a topical session on Stakeholder involvement tools: Criteria for choice and evaluation. The internal Minutes of the 4. meeting noted, in response to the discussions initiated by this topical session: 'Given that FSC members have one specific issue - radioactive waste management (RWM) - to deal with, a continuing relationship and dialogue among stakeholders seems important. What is desired is a well-informed citizen, because this is - in the end - an issue of democracy. Perhaps we have suffered in our field from a lack of recognition that RWM, like others, is an issue of democracy as well as a technical one'. At the close of the topical session, it was agreed that the FSC would prepare a short guide on stakeholder involvement techniques. The present guide approaches the topic from the point of view of radioactive waste management. However, because dialogue and deliberation techniques can be used in many fields, it will be of interest to a wide readership. It includes an annotated bibliography pointing to easily accessible handbooks and other resources. (author)

  15. Recording and accounting for stakeholder involvement in systematic reviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saan, M.; Boeije, H.; Sattoe, J.; Bal, M.; Missler, M.A.; van Wesel, F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The use of stakeholders in systematic reviews is increasingly valued, but their influence on the systematicity of the review is often unclear. The aim of this study was to describe some of the processes of involvement of stakeholders and to demonstrate a Tool for Recording and Accounting

  16. Lay and professional stakeholder involvement in scoping palliative care issues: Methods used in seven European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brereton, Louise; Ingleton, Christine; Gardiner, Clare; Goyder, Elizabeth; Mozygemba, Kati; Lysdahl, Kristin Bakke; Tummers, Marcia; Sacchini, Dario; Leppert, Wojciech; Blaževičienė, Aurelija; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Refolo, Pietro; De Nicola, Martina; Chilcott, James; Oortwijn, Wija

    2017-02-01

    Stakeholders are people with an interest in a topic. Internationally, stakeholder involvement in palliative care research and health technology assessment requires development. Stakeholder involvement adds value throughout research (from prioritising topics to disseminating findings). Philosophies and understandings about the best ways to involve stakeholders in research differ internationally. Stakeholder involvement took place in seven countries (England, Germany, Italy, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway and Poland). Findings informed a project that developed concepts and methods for health technology assessment and applied these to evaluate models of palliative care service delivery. To report on stakeholder involvement in the INTEGRATE-HTA project and how issues identified informed project development. Using stakeholder consultation or a qualitative research design, as appropriate locally, stakeholders in seven countries acted as 'advisors' to aid researchers' decision making. Thematic analysis was used to identify key issues across countries. A total of 132 stakeholders (82 professionals and 50 'lay' people) aged ⩾18 participated in individual face-to-face or telephone interviews, consultation meetings or focus groups. Different stakeholder involvement methods were used successfully to identify key issues in palliative care. A total of 23 issues common to three or more countries informed decisions about the intervention and comparator of interest, sub questions and specific assessments within the health technology assessment. Stakeholders, including patients and families undergoing palliative care, can inform project decision making using various involvement methods according to the local context. Researchers should consider local understandings about stakeholder involvement as views of appropriate and feasible methods vary. Methods for stakeholder involvement, especially consultation, need further development.

  17. Defining stakeholder involvement in participatory design processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, P.; Imada, A.S.; Zink, K.J.

    2008-01-01

    A participatory approach could be used to implement work place or organizational improvements. However, the question is which participants should be involved and how. In this paper the theoretical involvement in different steps of a linear stepwise approach is described and compared with the latest

  18. Stakeholder Involvement Throughout the Life Cycle of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This report demonstrates the importance of stakeholder involvement throughout the life cycle of all nuclear facilities; including operating reactors, temporary spent fuel storage facilities and final radioactive waste repositories and follows what is defined in the IAEA Safety Standards GS-R-3 where the stakeholders' expectations (identified as 'interested parties' in GS-R-3) shall be taken into consideration 'in the activities and interactions in the processes of the management system, with the aim of enhancing the satisfaction of interested parties while at the same time ensuring that safety is not compromised'. This report explains how involving stakeholders in decision making processes, even for those stakeholder groups that do not have a direct role in making those decisions, can enhance public confidence in the application of nuclear science and technology. In addition, this report presents general guidance on stakeholder involvement. It does not provide detailed procedures for developing and implementing stakeholder involvement programmes, and specifics regarding stakeholder involvement for particular types of nuclear facilities. However, this publication references reports that provide such details. This publication provides assistance to those responsible for planning, designing, constructing, operating or decommissioning a nuclear facility. In addition, regulatory organizations and other authorities overseeing nuclear activities or managing nuclear facility licensing processes are often seen as the main source of independent information for the general public; therefore, stakeholder involvement can demonstrate capability and trustworthiness of regulatory organizations as well. The role of stakeholder involvement at different stages of a facility's life cycle is discussed, with suggestions on developing the components of a comprehensive stakeholder involvement plan. Included is guidance on focusing communication with certain stakeholders, applying various

  19. Stakeholder involvement for management of the coastal zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oen, Amy Mp; Bouma, Geiske M; Botelho, Maria; Pereira, Patrícia; Haeger-Eugensson, Marie; Conides, Alexis; Przedrzymirska, Joanna; Isaksson, Ingela; Wolf, Christina; Breedveld, Gijs D; Slob, Adriaan

    2016-10-01

    The European Union (EU) has taken the lead to promote the management of coastal systems. Management strategies are implemented by the Water Framework Directive (WFD) and the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD), as well as the recent Maritime Spatial Planning (MSP) Directive. Most EU directives have a strong focus on public participation; however, a recent review found that the actual involvement of stakeholders was variable. The "Architecture and roadmap to manage multiple pressures on lagoons" (ARCH) research project has developed and implemented participative methodologies at different case study sites throughout Europe. These cases represent a broad range of coastal systems, and they highlight different legislative frameworks that are relevant for coastal zone management. Stakeholder participation processes were subsequently evaluated at 3 case study sites in order to assess the actual implementation of participation in the context of their respective legislative frameworks: 1) Byfjorden in Bergen, Norway, in the context of the WFD; 2) Amvrakikos Gulf, Greece, in the context of the MSFD; and 3) Nordre Älv Estuary, Sweden, in the context of the MSP Directive. An overall assessment of the evaluation criteria indicates that the ARCH workshop series methodology of focusing first on the current status of the lagoon or estuary, then on future challenges, and finally on identifying management solutions provided a platform that was conducive for stakeholder participation. Results suggest that key criteria for a good participatory process were present and above average at the 3 case study sites. The results also indicate that the active engagement that was initiated at the 3 case study sites has led to capacity building among the participants, which is an important intermediary outcome of public participation. A strong connection between participatory processes and policy can ensure the legacy of the intermediary outcomes, which is an important and necessary

  20. Consumer involvement in dietary guideline development: opinions from European stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kerry A; Hermoso, Maria; Timotijevic, Lada; Barnett, Julie; Lillegaard, Inger Therese L; Řehůřková, Irena; Larrañaga, Ainhoa; Lončarević-Srmić, Azra; Andersen, Lene Frost; Ruprich, Jiří; Fernández-Celemín, Laura; Raats, Monique M

    2013-05-01

    The involvement of consumers in the development of dietary guidelines has been promoted by national and international bodies. Yet, few best practice guidelines have been established to assist with such involvement. Qualitative semi-structured interviews explored stakeholders' beliefs about consumer involvement in dietary guideline development. Interviews were conducted in six European countries: the Czech Republic, Germany, Norway, Serbia, Spain and the UK. Seventy-seven stakeholders were interviewed. Stakeholders were grouped as government, scientific advisory body, professional and academic, industry or non-government organisations. Response rate ranged from 45 % to 95 %. Thematic analysis was conducted with the assistance of NVivo qualitative software. Analysis identified two main themes: (i) type of consumer involvement and (ii) pros and cons of consumer involvement. Direct consumer involvement (e.g. consumer organisations) in the decision-making process was discussed as a facilitator to guideline communication towards the end of the process. Indirect consumer involvement (e.g. consumer research data) was considered at both the beginning and the end of the process. Cons to consumer involvement included the effect of vested interests on objectivity; consumer disinterest; and complications in terms of time, finance and technical understanding. Pros related to increased credibility and trust in the process. Stakeholders acknowledged benefits to consumer involvement during the development of dietary guidelines, but remained unclear on the advantage of direct contributions to the scientific content of guidelines. In the absence of established best practice, clarity on the type and reasons for consumer involvement would benefit all actors.

  1. From micronutrient recommendations to policy: consumer and stakeholder involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timotijevic, L; Raats, M M; Barnett, J; Brown, K; Shepherd, R; Fernandez, L; Dömölki, L; Ruprich, J; Sonne, A-M; Hermoso, M; Koletzko, B; Frost-Andersen, L; Timmer, A

    2010-06-01

    To achieve the nutritional goals stipulated by micronutrient recommendations, greater attention must be paid to the behavioural routes to such nutritional outcomes. Coopting stakeholders and consumers into decisions regarding micronutrient recommendations is an important step towards achieving a greater link between micronutrient recommendations and behaviour. This study aims to examine the rationale and processes associated with consumer and stakeholder involvement in setting micronutrient recommendations across Europe. Using the contacts established through the Eurreca network of excellence (commissioned by the European Commission), the research involved in-depth desk research of key documents and communication channels linked to the process of setting micronutrient recommendations across seven countries: the United Kingdom, Norway, Denmark, Germany, Spain, the Czech Republic and Hungary. Stakeholder engagement is recognized by most countries as an important aspect of the process of setting micronutrient recommendations and their translation into policy, although there is notable variation in the extent to which this has been achieved across the seven countries and its effect on final decisions. Stakeholders were not involved at the outset of the process ('framing' of the problem) in any of the countries, and there was no evidence of consumer involvement and open public fora. Some of the key explanatory factors for diversity in the degree of involvement include historical sociopolitical context; the extent to which food and nutrition are key policy agenda; and the relative power of stakeholders in influencing food and nutrition policy.

  2. Stakeholder involvement in nuclear crisis management in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioannides, K.G.; Tzialla, C.E.; Papachristodoulou, C.A.; Papanikolaou, C.; Apostolopoulos, C.

    2005-01-01

    The setting up of the Greek Stakeholders Group in the framework of the EC Food and Agriculture Restoration Management Involving Networked Groups (FARMING) project is described. The Group included members from more than 20 governmental and non-governmental organisations, having interest and/or responsibilities in the management of a crisis following a nuclear accident. The stakeholders, during their meetings in 2002, discussed the agricultural countermeasures and rural waste disposal options which have been compiled by the EC Sustainable Restoration and Long-Term Management of Contaminated Rural, Urban and Industrial Ecosystems (STRATEGY) project. All stakeholders agreed that the most preferable were those options that ensure public acceptance, minimise environmental impact and maintain farming practices and acceptable living and working conditions. Their views are synoptically presented along with the major conclusions from the stakeholders meetings regarding nuclear crisis management

  3. Stakeholder approach for evaluating organizational change projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltokorpi, Antti; Alho, Antti; Kujala, Jaakko; Aitamurto, Johanna; Parvinen, Petri

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to create a model for evaluating organizational change initiatives from a stakeholder resistance viewpoint. The paper presents a model to evaluate change projects and their expected benefits. Factors affecting the challenge to implement change were defined based on stakeholder theory literature. The authors test the model's practical validity for screening change initiatives to improve operating room productivity. Change initiatives can be evaluated using six factors: the effect of the planned intervention on stakeholders' actions and position; stakeholders' capability to influence the project's implementation; motivation to participate; capability to change; change complexity; and management capability. The presented model's generalizability should be explored by filtering presented factors through a larger number of historical cases operating in different healthcare contexts. The link between stakeholders, the change challenge and the outcomes of change projects needs to be empirically tested. The proposed model can be used to prioritize change projects, manage stakeholder resistance and establish a better organizational and professional competence for managing healthcare organization change projects. New insights into existing stakeholder-related understanding of change project successes are provided.

  4. Stakeholders involvement in the decommissioning processes in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionisi, Mario

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the situation about stakeholders involvement in Italy in the framework of the decommissioning process of the Italian nuclear installations, and in particular the specific experience of the Italian Regulatory Body APAT. Specific aspects and APAT initiatives for building confidence of stakeholders in the process of the release of solid material from the regulatory control are presented. Content: Decommissioning activities in Italy, Decommissioning licensing procedures (Site and material release, APAT - ARPA Partnership approach in the clearance process)

  5. Decommissioning: guiding principles and best practices for involving local stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyes, D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: A wide range of nuclear facilities covering the entire nuclear fuel cycle have been constructed and operated for many years worldwide. For communities where the facilities are located, concerns about safety and environmental contamination are paramount. Working together with elected officials, local community leaders and the public at large during the earliest planning stages will help alleviate concerns about facility operation and ultimate disposition, and will result in better decisions about facility design, location, construction, operation and, ultimately, decommissioning. Such comprehensive community involvement has been the exception rather than the norm. Now that older facilities are being considered for decommissioning, efforts to involve local stakeholders and alleviate their concerns face major challenges. This is particularly true where some residual radioactive contamination will remain onsite and future use of the site may need to be restricted. Plans for stakeholder involvement at the decommissioning stage should be carefully designed and provide for honest, authentic and meaningful involvement of all stakeholders affected by decommissioning decisions. A set of principles and best practices is proposed to help guide the design and implementation of effective community involvement programs. The principles and best practices are drawn from the experiences of public involvement practitioners in a variety of environmental contamination applications. Successful community involvement is the result of a carefully crafted set of coordinated activities conducted over the long term. Ideally, facility decommissioning is simply the end stage of the involvement process, or the beginning of a site stewardship process in those cases where decommissioning does not produce an uncontaminated site. In either case, decommissioning will not be a new, unexpected event, and stakeholders could be involved just as they have been over the life of the facility. In

  6. Lay and professional stakeholder involvement in scoping palliative care issues: Methods used in seven European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brereton, L.; Ingleton, C.; Gardiner, C.; Goyder, E.; Mozygemba, K.; Lysdahl, K.B.; Tummers, M.J.; Sacchini, D.; Leppert, W.; Blazeviciene, A.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Refolo, P.; Nicola, M. De; Chilcott, J.; Oortwijn, W.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stakeholders are people with an interest in a topic. Internationally, stakeholder involvement in palliative care research and health technology assessment requires development. Stakeholder involvement adds value throughout research (from prioritising topics to disseminating findings).

  7. Stakeholders Involvement in Performance Management in Public General Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi Ploom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to increasing concerns with the legitimacy and efficiency of public spending, performance management as a part of world-wide public sector reform, called New Public Management (NPM has taken place. This is also the case of educational sector. In Estonian education system, legislation formally enables to design an integrated performance management system. But there is few research done to investigate how these policies and regulations ought to be put into force in order to gain the benefits considering the schools' and pupils' better performance. This study investigates how different stakeholders are involved into the performance management in Estonian general schools. The study is based on empirical survey data gathered from 303 schools providing secondary education in Estonia. The research findings have three main implications. Firstly, the paper contributes to the scarce knowledge about implementation of performance management issues in public schools. Our analysis revealed that compilation of school development plans in Estonian schools is rather a formal obligation. Therefore we propose that the analysis and discussion of the school development plans is needed to organize on regional level, involving all main stakeholders of a school. Secondly, we suggest that in the circumstances of a decentralised education system, like in Estonia, it is needed to implement, central practical performance assessment principles and guidance for the schools. Thirdly, it is highly necessary to improve schools’ cooperation with different stakeholder groups. Also the framework involving different stakeholder groups in the decentralized schools management system should be built up.

  8. Communication and Stakeholder Involvement in Environmental Remediation Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-05-15

    The way in which members of the public perceive a contamination situation and an approach to the remediation of contaminated land will influence the decision making process in a variety of ways. Through communication between experts, decision makers and members of stakeholder communities, participatory processes and negotiation between different interest groups can sometimes be used effectively as mechanisms for improving the overall decision making process. The intention is to ensure a technically sound and socially acceptable decision that meets norms of adequacy or satisfactory performance in relation to a whole range of different concerns. Good communication strategies will encourage cooperation and understanding between different interested parties in remediation projects. Involvement of affected or interested persons can prevent fear driven reactions, which potentially damage public response and create undue expectations or unnecessary anxiety. For all environmental remediation (ER) cases, there is a risk that the process will fail if it does not respect social, environmental, political and economic dimensions. This requires open, clear and mutually agreed lines of communication among stakeholders within a well defined legal framework. A general recommendation is to involve them from a very early point in the process. This publication presents ER in plain language in such a way that implementers and regulators can communicate the motives and objectives of remediation projects to a variety of stakeholder communities in order to improve mutual understanding and facilitate dialogue between interested parties. ER is considered from two perspectives: technical and non-technical. A section that gives general ideas on the strategies to deal with stakeholder involvement and which discusses different aspects of the communication approaches in ER is then included. It is recognized that social, cultural and political situations are very diverse in different countries in

  9. Communication and Stakeholder Involvement in Environmental Remediation Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The way in which members of the public perceive a contamination situation and an approach to the remediation of contaminated land will influence the decision making process in a variety of ways. Through communication between experts, decision makers and members of stakeholder communities, participatory processes and negotiation between different interest groups can sometimes be used effectively as mechanisms for improving the overall decision making process. The intention is to ensure a technically sound and socially acceptable decision that meets norms of adequacy or satisfactory performance in relation to a whole range of different concerns. Good communication strategies will encourage cooperation and understanding between different interested parties in remediation projects. Involvement of affected or interested persons can prevent fear driven reactions, which potentially damage public response and create undue expectations or unnecessary anxiety. For all environmental remediation (ER) cases, there is a risk that the process will fail if it does not respect social, environmental, political and economic dimensions. This requires open, clear and mutually agreed lines of communication among stakeholders within a well defined legal framework. A general recommendation is to involve them from a very early point in the process. This publication presents ER in plain language in such a way that implementers and regulators can communicate the motives and objectives of remediation projects to a variety of stakeholder communities in order to improve mutual understanding and facilitate dialogue between interested parties. ER is considered from two perspectives: technical and non-technical. A section that gives general ideas on the strategies to deal with stakeholder involvement and which discusses different aspects of the communication approaches in ER is then included. It is recognized that social, cultural and political situations are very diverse in different countries in

  10. Stakeholder involvement in international conventions governing civil nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmerechts, Sam

    2017-01-01

    Mr Emmerechts explained that international conventions have varying positions on stakeholders and their involvement depending upon the intent of the legislator and the field they cover, ranging from a narrow to a broad interpretation. He addressed stakeholder involvement in two other international conventions governing civil nuclear activities, namely the Convention on Nuclear Safety, and the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (the Joint Convention), both concluded under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). He noted that the Convention on Nuclear Safety remains a 'traditional' international legal instrument, focusing on governments and governmental bodies as the main stakeholders and limiting obligations regarding the involvement of the public and intergovernmental organisations to their receiving information and observing. Likewise, the Joint Convention limits obligations regarding public involvement to access to information, notably as to the siting of proposed facilities. However, he noted that in the European Union, the Directive on Nuclear Safety (2014/87/Euratom) and the Directive for the Safe Management of Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste (2011/70/Euratom) have more advanced public participation requirements in nuclear decision making. Mr Emmerechts explained that the substantial differences between nuclear legislation and the Aarhus and Espoo Conventions with regards to public involvement requirements could partly be explained by the technicality of nuclear information and by issues related to nuclear security

  11. Recording and accounting for stakeholder involvement in systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saan, Marieke C; Boeije, Hennie R; Sattoe, Jane N T; Bal, Marjolijn I; Missler, Marjolein; van Wesel, Floryt

    2015-06-01

    The use of stakeholders in systematic reviews is increasingly valued, but their influence on the systematicity of the review is often unclear. The aim of this study was to describe some of the processes of involvement of stakeholders and to demonstrate a Tool for Recording and Accounting for Stakeholder Involvement (TRASI). We demonstrate the TRASI in two worked examples. In one project, the reviewers collaborated with the end-user and an expert during the literature search. In the other project, experts were consulted to generate keywords before searching the literature. In the first project, disagreements about keywords to identify studies for the research topic were solved by informal discussion. In the second project, difficulties arose in reaching agreement between experts and reviewers about the core construct and the meaningful keywords associated with it. The TRASI aids researchers to systematically and transparently account for the decisions taken. The TRASI supports information specialists and librarians to shape the search strategy to match the objectives of the review. We propose the TRASI as a first step in resolving the challenges of detecting and reconstructing stakeholder influences. Potential new applications of the TRASI are discussed. © 2015 Health Libraries Group.

  12. Stakeholder involvement in systematic reviews: a protocol for a systematic review of methods, outcomes and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Alex; Campbell, Pauline; Struthers, Caroline; Synnot, Anneliese; Nunn, Jack; Hill, Sophie; Goodare, Heather; Watts, Chris; Morley, Richard

    2017-01-01

    evaluate methods of involving stakeholders in systematic reviews. Review findings will contribute to Cochrane training resources.

  13. STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT IN HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT AT NATIONAL LEVEL: A STUDY FROM IRAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdizadeh, Bahareh; Shahmoradi, Safoura; Majdzadeh, Reza; Doaee, Shila; Bazyar, Mohammad; Souresrafil, Aghdas; Olyaeemanesh, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the opinions of stakeholders on their roles in health technology assessment (HTA) in Iran and to determine the barriers and facilitators existing in the organizations to help increase their involvement in the HTA program. The study was conducted in two stages, semi-structured interviews, and "policy dialogue" with stakeholders. The data were analyzed through the framework approach. The interviews were held with ten stakeholder representatives from various organizations. In addition, Twenty-one representatives participated in the policy dialogue. Based on the findings, all the stakeholder organizations considered themselves as interest groups in all the stages of the HTA process; however, their tendencies and methods of involvement differed from one another. According to the participants, the most important issue to be considered in the context of HTA was that the structures, stages, and procedures of the HTA process must be made transparent. Stakeholder involvement in the HTA program cannot readily take place. Various stakeholders have different interests, responsibilities, infrastructures, and barriers. If a program does not meet these considerations, its chances of succeeding will substantially decrease. Therefore, to prevent overlooking the needs and expectations of stakeholders from the HTA process, it is essential to create opportunities in which their thoughts and ideas are taken into account.

  14. Evaluating outcomes from stakeholders' perception: evidence from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The need for the appreciation of values and knowledge diversity has contributed to the increasing relevance of stakeholder participation in the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of development projects. Using mixed methods research design and indicators, this paper assesses the outcomes of the participatory monitoring ...

  15. Exploring Stakeholder Values and Interests in Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Shannon K.

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges facing program evaluation education is how to bridge the need to train students in theoretical and methodological foundations, and also prepare them for the unpredictability and complex environment outside the classroom. This issue is particularly challenging in terms of understanding stakeholder values and interests. The…

  16. Stakeholder involvement report for the Cryocell reg-sign demonstration at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vick, J.D.; Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G.H.; Niesen, K.A.; Serie, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating frozen soil subsurface barriers as a way, to contain the spread of contamination. CRACKLE is one such technology being evaluated in terms of technical performance, operating requirements, and cost of deployment in and soils. The primary source of data for this evaluation will be a full-scale field demonstration to be conducted at an uncontaminated site at the Hanford Reservation during fiscal years 1994--1996. Experience has shown that not addressing stakeholder concerns early on in the process of technology development can lead to expending resources on remedial approaches that are ultimately not deployable. Therefore the CRACKLE project worked with stakeholders to help ensure that stakeholder issues and concerns, that if left unacknowledged could delay or block the deployment of the technology, were addressed during the technology's demonstration. The insights gained from stakeholder involvement in the CRACKLE demonstration project apply to other remediation technologies. Section IV and Appendix A of this report provide additional information about stakeholder comments. Understanding these insights will allow remedial project managers to anticipate issues of concern to stakeholders, to involve them effectively and to speed up technology development, deployment, and environmental cleanup

  17. Evaluating stakeholder management performance using a stakeholder report card: the next step in theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvey, Donna; Fottler, Myron D; Slovensky, Donna J

    2002-01-01

    In the highly competitive health care environment, the survival of an organization may depend on how well powerful stakeholders are managed. Yet, the existing strategic stakeholder management process does not include evaluation of stakeholder management performance. To address this critical gap, this paper proposes a systematic method for evaluation using a stakeholder report card. An example of a physician report card based on this methodology is presented.

  18. Tools for Stakeholder Involvement in Facility Management Service Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia; Scupola, Ada

    that are more in line with the stakeholder needs and expectations, and may thus result in increased customer satisfaction, better services and, at the very end, an increased competitive advantage for the organization. Background: The background of this study lies in user involvement in service design...... in the design process as well as FM service provision processes. Research limitations: The major limitation of the study consists of the relatively small amount of interviews conducted, which is the basis for finding the tools in FM service design processes....

  19. The role of stakeholder involvement in risk communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renn, O.

    2004-01-01

    Inviting stakeholders to be part of the decision making process in risk analysis and management improves the likelihood that the resulting decision will be accepted. Unfortunately, early public involvement may compromise, however, the objective of efficient and effective risk reduction or violate the principle of fairness. Another problem is that the public consists of many groups with different value structures and preferences. Without a systematic procedure to reach consensus on values and preferences, the public's position often appears as unclear. Participatory processes are thus needed that combine technical expertise, rational decision making, and public values and preferences. The recent report by the National Academy of Sciences encourages risk professionals to foster citizen participation and public involvement in risk management. The report emphasizes the need for a combination of assessment and dialogue which the authors have framed the 'analytic-deliberative' approach. The popularity associated with the concepts of two-way-communication, trust-building, and citizen participation, however, obscures the challenge of how to put these noble goals into practice and how to ensure that risk management reflects competence, efficiency, and fair burden sharing. This paper discusses the potential and requirements for stakeholder participation in the field of risk management and communication. (orig.)

  20. Stakeholder Evaluation for Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge: Completion Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Burkardt, Nina; Swann, Margaret Earlene; Stewart, Susan C.

    2009-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System, managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), is the largest system of public lands in the world dedicated to wildlife conservation. There are over 545 national wildlife refuges nationwide, encompassing 95 million acres. As part of the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, each refuge is developing 15-year comprehensive conservation plans (CCPs). Each CCP describes a vision and desired future condition for the refuge and outlines goals, objectives, and management strategies for each refuge's habitat and visitor service programs. The CCP process for Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) in Davis, West Virginia was initiated in 2006. This planning process provides a unique opportunity for public input and involvement. Public involvement is an important part of the CCP process. Participation by parties with a stake in the resource (stakeholders) has the potential to increase understanding and support and reduce conflicts. Additionally, meaningful public participation in a decision process may increase trust and provide satisfaction in terms of both process and outcome for management and the public. Public meetings are a common way to obtain input from community members, visitors, and potential visitors. An 'Issues Workbook' is another tool the FWS uses to obtain public input and participation early in the planning process. Sometimes, however, these traditional methods do not capture the full range of perspectives that exist. A stakeholder evaluation is a way to more fully understand community preferences and opinions related to key topics in refuge planning. It can also help refuge staff understand how changes in management affect individuals in terms of their preference for services and experiences. Secondarily, a process such as this can address 'social goals' such as fostering trust in regulating agencies and reducing conflict among stakeholders. As part of the CCP planning effort at Canaan

  1. Involving patients in health technology funding decisions: stakeholder perspectives on processes used in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Edilene; Street, Jackie; Carter, Drew; Merlin, Tracy

    2016-04-01

    Governments use a variety of processes to incorporate public perspectives into policymaking, but few studies have evaluated these processes from participants' point of view. The objective of this study was twofold: to understand the perspectives of selected stakeholders with regard to involvement processes used by Australian Advisory Committees to engage the public and patients; and to identify barriers and facilitators to participation. Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with representatives of different stakeholder groups involved in health technology funding decisions in Australia. Data were collected and analysed using a theoretical framework created by Rowe and Frewer, but adapted to more fully acknowledge issues of power and influence. Stakeholder groups disagreed as to what constitutes effective and inclusive patient involvement. Barriers reported by interviewees included poor communication, a lack of transparency, unworkable deadlines, and inadequate representativeness. Also described were problems associated with defining the task for patients and their advocates and with the timing of patient input in the decision-making process. Interviewees suggested that patient participation could be improved by increasing the number of patient organizations engaged in processes and including those organizations at different stages of decision making, especially earlier. The different evaluations made by stakeholder groups appear to be underpinned by contrasting conceptions of public involvement and its value, in line with Graham Martin's work which distinguishes between 'technocratic' and 'democratic' public involvement. Understanding stakeholders' perspectives and the contrasting conceptions of public involvement could foster future agreement on which processes should be used to involve the public in decision making. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Stakeholder involvement activities in Slovakia. NRA's Commitment to Transparent Regulatory Process. Stakeholder Involvement in the French Regulatory Process - From Public Information to Public Participation. Stakeholder involvement in nuclear decision making in the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziakova, Marta Chairperson; Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic; Nuclear Regulation Authority - NRA; Ferapontov, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Session 2 focused on the regulatory perspectives related to stakeholder involvement in the regulatory decision-making process. Presentations provided the audience with information regarding the international and national legal framework implemented in the Slovak Republic, in France, in Japan and in Russia. Examples of stakeholder involvement, as well as some tools used for this purpose, were presented and discussed. The value of consistency and complementarity between international and national requirements was highlighted. Presentations and discussion confirmed the very close tie between the way the stakeholder involvement process is conducted and the public confidence and perception of reliability the regulatory body may gain, or lose. The four presentations confirmed that stakeholder involvement is a key challenge for maintaining regulatory body credibility, independence and legitimacy. All countries confirmed their commitment to trying to make their stakeholder involvement processes as open, visible, transparent and comprehensive as possible. Involvement represents a long and permanent process which requires investment of time, human resources and money, as well as the ability to reach out, to listen, to share, and to take input into account, while keeping in view the goal of delivering decisions that are as rational and objective as possible. Involving stakeholders is more than informing or communicating. The earlier the stakeholders are involved in the decision-making process, the greater the chance of success. If losing credibility is easy, all regulatory bodies agreed on the long process needed to recover it

  3. Ideals, practices, and future prospects of stakeholder involvement in sustainability science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Jahel; Vermaßen, Hannah; Ellenbeck, Saskia

    2017-12-12

    This paper evaluates current stakeholder involvement (SI) practices in science through a web-based survey among scholars and researchers engaged in sustainability or transition research. It substantiates previous conceptual work with evidence from practice by building on four ideal types of SI in science. The results give an interesting overview of the varied landscape of SI in sustainability science, ranging from the kinds of topics scientists work on with stakeholders, over scientific trade-offs that arise in the field, to improvements scientists wish for. Furthermore, the authors describe a discrepancy between scientists' ideals and practices when working with stakeholders. On the conceptual level, the data reflect that the democratic type of SI is the predominant one concerning questions on the understanding of science, the main goal, the stage of involvement in the research process, and the science-policy interface. The fact that respondents expressed agreement to several types shows they are guided by multiple and partly conflicting ideals when working with stakeholders. We thus conclude that more conceptual exchange between practitioners, as well as more qualitative research on the concepts behind practices, is needed to better understand the stakeholder-scientist nexus. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  4. Regulatory and Stakeholder Involvement is Key to Successful Project Completion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, K. S.; Coleman, S. J.; Shoemake, J. M.; Olds, T. E.

    2006-01-01

    Public involvement participation is an integral and effective component of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) activities that ensures crucial decisions are made with the benefit and consideration of public perspectives. This component brings a broad range of diverse viewpoints and values into DOE's decision-making processes before end decision points are reached. Early involvement enables DOE to make more informed decisions, improve quality through collaborative efforts, and helps to build mutual understanding and trust between DOE and the public it serves. During the cold war, the production of thousands of nuclear warheads was an outstanding engineering achievement that created materials and technologies that were vital to national interest and security; however, it also created a legacy of perplexing toxic nuclear waste. The significant challenges presented by the liquid and solid nuclear wastes stored at the Hanford Site, were formally acknowledged by the U.S. Congress when it directed DOE to establish the Office of River Protection (ORP). The office was assigned the single, dedicated mission of retrieving, treating, and disposing of all waste contained in 177 huge underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington State. As part of this on-going mission of cleanup, the Office of River Protection must make sound decisions that uphold not only the Department of Energy's interests, but more importantly, the interests of the state of Washington. Public participation is an open, ongoing, two-way communication, both formal and informal, between DOE and its stakeholders, regulatory agencies and Tribal governments. Similarly, public information is a means to keep the public informed of progress or to status ongoing activities and/or issues. Another facet of this process is that various laws and regulations govern public participation and information when it comes to Hanford cleanup, including the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent

  5. Stakeholder-focused evaluation of an online course for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunet, Diane O; Reyes, Michele

    2006-01-01

    Different people who have a stake or interest in a training course (stakeholders) may have markedly different definitions of what constitutes "training success" and how they will use evaluation results. Stakeholders at multiple levels within and outside of the organization guided the development of an evaluation plan for a Web-based training course on hemochromatosis. Stakeholder interests and values were reflected in the type, level, and rigor of evaluation methods selected. Our mixed-method evaluation design emphasized small sample sizes and repeated measures. Limited resources for evaluation were leveraged by focusing on the data needs of key stakeholders, understanding how they wanted to use evaluation results, and collecting data needed for stakeholder decision making. Regular feedback to key stakeholders provided opportunities for updating the course evaluation plan to meet emerging needs for new or different information. Early and repeated involvement of stakeholders in the evaluation process also helped build support for the final product. Involving patient advocacy groups, managers, and representative course participants improved the course and enhanced product dissemination. For training courses, evaluation planning is an opportunity to tailor methods and data collection to meet the information needs of particular stakeholders. Rigorous evaluation research of every training course may be infeasible or unwarranted; however, course evaluations can be improved by good planning. A stakeholder-focused approach can build a picture of the results and impact of training while fostering the practical use of evaluation data.

  6. Dementia-friendly communities: challenges and strategies for achieving stakeholder involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heward, Michelle; Innes, Anthea; Cutler, Clare; Hambidge, Sarah

    2017-05-01

    Dementia-friendly communities (DFCs) are a UK policy initiative that aims to enable people with dementia to feel supported and included within their local community. Current approaches to DFC creation rely on stakeholder involvement, often requiring volunteer assistance. There is though a lack of evidence that examines the reality of achieving this. This paper critically assesses the challenges and strategies for achieving stakeholder involvement in DFCs. The evidence base is drawn from an inter-agency project funded by the National Health Service in the South of England where seven DFCs were developed by steering group partners and four part-time project workers (PWs). Data from the independent evaluation undertaken in the first year (2013-2014) of the project were analysed: 14 semi-structured interviews and a focus group examined PWs' experiences; while progress and key milestones are determined from monthly progress forms, good news stories, locality steering group minutes and press releases. Analysis was undertaken using a directed content analysis method, whereby data content for each locality was matched to the analytical framework that was drawn from Alzheimer's Society guidance. Challenges to achieving stakeholder involvement were identified as: establishing networks and including people representative of the local community; involving people affected by dementia; and gaining commitment from organisations. Strategies for achieving stakeholder involvement were recognised as: a sustainable approach; spreading the word; and sharing of ideas. By highlighting these challenges and the approaches that have been used within communities to overcome them, these findings form the foundation for the creation of DFC initiatives that will become embedded within communities. Stakeholder involvement is unpredictable and changeable; therefore, reliance on this approach questions the long-term sustainability of DFCs, and must be considered in future policies designed to

  7. Involving the stakeholders in the curriculum process: a recipe for success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Johannes J; Fourie, Willem J; Watson, Sheona; Gay, H

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Nursing and Health Studies at the Manukau Institute of Technology (MIT) in Auckland, New Zealand, decided to involve stakeholders from the health care sector in developing a new curriculum. After implementing the new curriculum, the process was evaluated using a content analysis as qualitative research design. Seven individual interviews and one Focus group interview were conducted with the stakeholders to determine their experiences during the process. Ethical permission was sought from the MIT ethical committee. The analyses of the collected data enabled the researchers to identify six main categories. The categories were: "Existing Programme", "The need to change", "The curriculum development process", "The stakeholders", "Personnel", and "Ethnic minorities". From the collected data, it was clear that a new curriculum was necessary to enable the graduates to meet the health care needs of the New Zealand population, especially after the primary health care policy was introduced in New Zealand. It was also clear that the curriculum development process could be a painful process for all concerned, but a strong leadership could cement a feeling of "collegiality" between stakeholders and teaching staff. The importance of considering the rights of ethnic minorities is clearly stated in the Treaty of Waitangi, safeguarding the rights of the Maori People, and therefore applied rigorously in the development process. In this project, the collaborative process was very successful, and the stakeholders actually expressed feelings of "Ownership" of the curriculum.

  8. STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT THROUGHOUT HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT: AN EXAMPLE FROM PALLIATIVE CARE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brereton, Louise; Wahlster, Philip; Mozygemba, Kati; Lysdahl, Kristin Bakke; Burns, Jake; Polus, Stephanie; Tummers, Marcia; Refolo, Pietro; Sacchini, Dario; Leppert, Wojciech; Chilcott, James; Ingleton, Christine; Gardiner, Clare; Goyder, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Internationally, funders require stakeholder involvement throughout health technology assessment (HTA). We report successes, challenges, and lessons learned from extensive stakeholder involvement throughout a palliative care case study that demonstrates new concepts and methods for HTA. A 5-step "INTEGRATE-HTA Model" developed within the INTEGRATE-HTA project guided the case study. Using convenience or purposive sampling or directly / indirectly identifying and approaching individuals / groups, stakeholders participated in qualitative research or consultation meetings. During scoping, 132 stakeholders, aged ≥ 18 years in seven countries (England, Italy, Germany, The Netherlands, Norway, Lithuania, and Poland), highlighted key issues in palliative care that assisted identification of the intervention and comparator. Subsequently stakeholders in four countries participated in face-face, telephone and / or video Skype meetings to inform evidence collection and / or review assessment results. An applicability assessment to identify contextual and implementation barriers and enablers for the case study findings involved twelve professionals in the three countries. Finally, thirteen stakeholders participated in a mock decision-making meeting in England. Views about the best methods of stakeholder involvement vary internationally. Stakeholders make valuable contributions in all stages of HTA; assisting decision making about interventions, comparators, research questions; providing evidence and insights into findings, gap analyses and applicability assessments. Key challenges exist regarding inclusivity, time, and resource use. Stakeholder involvement is feasible and worthwhile throughout HTA, sometimes providing unique insights. Various methods can be used to include stakeholders, although challenges exist. Recognition of stakeholder expertise and further guidance about stakeholder consultation methods is needed.

  9. The impact of stakeholder involvement in hospital policy decision-making: a study of the hospital's business processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfait, Simon; Van Hecke, Ann; Hellings, Johan; De Bodt, Griet; Eeckloo, Kristof

    2017-02-01

    In many health care systems, strategies are currently deployed to engage patients and other stakeholders in decisions affecting hospital services. In this paper, a model for stakeholder involvement is presented and evaluated in three Flemish hospitals. In the model, a stakeholder committee advises the hospital's board of directors on themes of strategic importance. To study the internal hospital's decision processes in order to identify the impact of a stakeholder involvement committee on strategic themes in the hospital decision processes. A retrospective analysis of the decision processes was conducted in three hospitals that implemented a stakeholder committee. The analysis consisted of process and outcome evaluation. Fifteen themes were discussed in the stakeholder committees, whereof 11 resulted in a considerable change. None of these were on a strategic level. The theoretical model was not applied as initially developed, but was altered by each hospital. Consequentially, the decision processes differed between the hospitals. Despite alternation of the model, the stakeholder committee showed a meaningful impact in all hospitals on the operational level. As a result of the differences in decision processes, three factors could be identified as facilitators for success: (1) a close interaction with the board of executives, (2) the inclusion of themes with a more practical and patient-oriented nature, and (3) the elaboration of decisions on lower echelons of the organization. To effectively influence the organization's public accountability, hospitals should involve stakeholders in the decision-making process of the organization. The model of a stakeholder committee was not applied as initially developed and did not affect the strategic decision-making processes in the involved hospitals. Results show only impact at the operational level in the participating hospitals. More research is needed connecting stakeholder involvement with hospital governance.

  10. Encouraging Stakeholder Engagement: A Case Study of Evaluator Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poth, Cheryl-Anne; Shulha, Lyn

    2008-01-01

    This chapter describes evaluator behaviors revealed by the case analysis of a participatory and developmental evaluation. The analysis revealed that the evaluator paid specific attention to individual stakeholder cues. These cues were related to three elements of the evaluation: negotiating the design, monitoring individual stakeholder needs, and…

  11. Stakeholder involvement for countermeasures in the food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carle, B.

    2005-01-01

    In the aftermath of a large scale radioactive contamination, the authorities will have to decide on protective measures for reducing the contamination of the food chain. The overall aim is to reduce the dose of the population to an acceptable level while still guaranteeing sufficient foodstuffs and feeding stuffs on the market and also to limit the social, environmental and economic impact of the countermeasures implemented. Many countermeasures have been developed over the years, but their large scale feasibility and especially their acceptability have hardly been studied. Within the context of a European research project called Farming (2000-2004). SCK-CEN has organised stakeholder meetings, leading to guidance to the authorities for improvements in the emergency organisation. To improve emergency countermeasure decisions related to the food chain, especially as regards feasibility and acceptability, taking into account stakeholder opinions. The stakeholders include scientists and representatives from both governmental and non-governmental organisations

  12. 77 FR 38306 - GFIRST Conference Stakeholder Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ...), National Cyber Security Division (NCSD), United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) will... of Homeland Security, National Protection and Programs Directorate, Office of Cybersecurity and... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2011-0116] GFIRST Conference Stakeholder...

  13. The Missing Stakeholder Group: Why Patients Should be Involved in Health Economic Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Voorn, George A K; Vemer, Pepijn; Hamerlijnck, Dominique; Ramos, Isaac Corro; Teunissen, Geertruida J; Al, Maiwenn; Feenstra, Talitha L

    2016-04-01

    Evaluations of healthcare interventions, e.g. new drugs or other new treatment strategies, commonly include a cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) that is based on the application of health economic (HE) models. As end users, patients are important stakeholders regarding the outcomes of CEAs, yet their knowledge of HE model development and application, or their involvement therein, is absent. This paper considers possible benefits and risks of patient involvement in HE model development and application for modellers and patients. An exploratory review of the literature has been performed on stakeholder-involved modelling in various disciplines. In addition, Dutch patient experts have been interviewed about their experience in, and opinion about, the application of HE models. Patients have little to no knowledge of HE models and are seldom involved in HE model development and application. Benefits of becoming involved would include a greater understanding and possible acceptance by patients of HE model application, improved model validation, and a more direct infusion of patient expertise. Risks would include patient bias and increased costs of modelling. Patient involvement in HE modelling seems to carry several benefits as well as risks. We claim that the benefits may outweigh the risks and that patients should become involved.

  14. Governance of environmental risk: new approaches to managing stakeholder involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Suzanne; Dunphy, Dexter; Martin, Andrew

    2009-04-01

    Disputes concerning industrial legacies such as the disposal of toxic wastes illustrate changing pressures on corporations and governments. Business and governments are now confronted with managing the expectations of a society increasingly aware of the social and environmental impacts and risks associated with economic development and demanding more equitable distribution and democratic management of such risks. The closed managerialist decision-making of the powerful bureaucracies and corporations of the industrial era is informed by traditional management theory which cannot provide a framework for the adequate governance of these risks. Recent socio-political theories have conceptualised some key themes that must be addressed in a more fitting approach to governance. We identify more recent management and governance theory which addresses these themes and develop a process-based approach to governance of environmental disputes that allows for the evolving nature of stakeholder relations in a highly complex multiple stakeholder arena.

  15. United Kingdom [Stakeholder involvement in decommissioning]. Annex I.G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This annex describes the policy and practice for Stakeholder engagement being developed by the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) in the UK. It is too early to report upon the success or otherwise of the approach so this is provided as 'work in progress' which can be further tracked via the NDA's website at www.nda.gov.uk. The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority is a non-departmental public body, set up in April 2005 under the Energy Act 2004 to take strategic responsibility for the UK's nuclear legacy. Its core objective is to ensure that the 20 civil public sector nuclear sites under our ownership are decommissioned and cleaned up safely, securely, cost effectively and in ways that protect the environment for this and future generations. It will lead the development of a unified and coherent decommissioning strategy, working in partnership with regulators and site licensees to achieve best value, optimum impact on local communities, and the highest environmental standards. The text in Annex I.Ga provides a brief background to the role of the NDA, then it considers NDA's policy towards stakeholder engagement. It then goes onto report upon how this policy is being implemented with active engagement of stakeholders

  16. Stakeholder involvement facilitates decision making for UK nuclear accident recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, C; Burt, R; Nisbet, A F

    2005-01-01

    The importance of major stakeholders participating in the formulation of strategies for maintaining food safety and agricultural production following a nuclear accident has been successfully demonstrated by the UK 'Agriculture and Food Countermeasures Working Group' (AFCWG). The organisation, membership and terms of reference of the group are described. Details are given of the achievements of the AFCWG and its sub-groups, which include agreeing management options that would be included in a recovery handbook for decision-makers in the UK and tackling the disposal of large volumes of contaminated milk, potentially resulting from a nuclear accident.

  17. Resolving a Prickly Situation: Involving Stakeholders in Invasive Cactus Management in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Ana; Kaplan, Haylee; Wilson, John R U; Richardson, David M

    2016-05-01

    The regulation and management of alien species can be contentious, particularly when the stakeholders who benefit from alien species are different from those who suffer the costs. We propose a consultative process involving relevant stakeholders in invasive species management decisions. The process involves (1) the identification of relevant stakeholders, (2) assessing their perceptions, (3) enhancing interaction between stakeholders, (4) assessing changes in stakeholders' perceptions following interactions with other stakeholders, and (5) developing management recommendations in collaboration with stakeholders. We demonstrate the application of the process using the family Cactaceae ('cacti') in South Africa. Many species of cacti have been introduced to the country over the past two centuries, mostly for horticulture, food and fodder, and hundreds of other species have been introduced in the past few decades (or are likely to be introduced soon) for horticulture. Using the proposed process enabled the negotiation and participation of all stakeholders in decision making and helped minimize contentious situations by clarifying stakeholder's beliefs and exploring consensus solutions. Consequently, management objectives were broadly supported by all stakeholders. These results will be included in a national cactus management strategy for South Africa.

  18. Involvement of stakeholders in determining health priorities of adolescents in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twine, Rhian; Kahn, Kathleen; Scholtz, Alexandra; Norris, Shane A

    2016-01-01

    When developing intervention research, it is important to explore issues from the community perspective. Interventions that promote adolescent health in South Africa are urgently needed, and Project Ntshembo ('hope') aims to improve the health of young women and their offspring in the Agincourt sub-district of rural northeast South Africa, actively using stakeholder involvement throughout the research process. This study aimed to determine adolescent health priorities according to key stakeholders, to align stakeholder and researcher priorities, and to form a stakeholder forum, which would be active throughout the intervention. Thirty-two stakeholders were purposefully identified as community members interested in the health of adolescents. An adapted Delphi incorporating face-to-face discussions, as well as participatory visualisation, was used in a series of three workshops. Consensus was determined through non-parametric analysis. Stakeholders and researchers agreed that peer pressure and lack of information, or having information but not acting on it, were the root causes of adolescent health problems. Pregnancy, HIV, school dropout, alcohol and drug abuse, not accessing health services, and unhealthy lifestyle (leading to obesity) were identified as priority adolescent health issues. A diagram was developed showing how these eight priorities relate to one another, which was useful in the development of the intervention. A stakeholder forum was founded, comprising 12 of the stakeholders involved in the stakeholder involvement process. The process brought researchers and stakeholders to consensus on the most important health issues facing adolescents, and a stakeholder forum was developed within which to address the issues. Stakeholder involvement as part of a research engagement strategy can be of mutual benefit to the researchers and the community in which the research is taking place.

  19. Strengthening stakeholder involvement in health workforce governance: why we need to talk about power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Ellen; Burau, Viola

    2018-01-01

    There is now widespread agreement on the benefits of an integrated, people-centred health workforce, but the implementation of new models is difficult. We argue that we need to think about stakeholders and power, if we want to ensure change in the health workforce. We discuss these issues from a governance perspective and suggest a critical approach to stakeholder involvement as an indicator of good governance. Three models of involving stakeholders in health workforce governance can be identified: corporatist professional involvement either in a continental European model of conservative corporatism or in a Nordic model of public corporatism; managerialist and market-centred involvement of professions as organizational agents; and a more inclusive, network-based involvement of plural professional experts at different levels of governance. The power relations embedded in these models of stakeholder involvement have different effects on capacity building for an integrated health workforce.

  20. Using the ecosystem services concept to analyse stakeholder involvement in wetland management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen-Shacham, E.; Dayan, T.; Groot, de R.S.; Beltrame, C.; Guillet, F.; Feitelson, E.

    2015-01-01

    Wetland management usually involves multiple stakeholders. This paper describes how the use of the ecosystem services (ES) concept can help to identify the main stakeholders associated with wetland conservation, using the Hula Wetland in the Sea of Galilee’s watershed as a case study. We conducted a

  1. Involvement of External Stakeholders in Local Health Policymaking Process: A Case Study from Odense Municipality, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Leena Eklund; Jakobsen, Mette Winge; Winblad, Malin; Aro, Arja R.

    2017-01-01

    Collaboration between research and policy is an essential element for knowledge-based public health. However, only half of the Danish municipalities have experience with collaborating with researchers or other stakeholders. Through content analysis of interviews and policy documents the study explores the involvement of external stakeholders in…

  2. Views from stakeholders regarding stakeholder involvement and their own role - Views from Operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baecker, Axel

    2006-01-01

    The German unification caused enormous economic and social impacts on the previous East German state. The nuclear power plant complex in Greifswald and the surrounding region was no exception. Energiewerke Nord GmbH (EWN) as owner of the NPP site in Greifswald must stop the operation of all fife operating 440 MW units with Russian type rectors and also all construction works on the other three NPP units and the decision was taken to decommission all plants, mainly due to a lack of political acceptance and secured financial basis. Thus, EWN was faced with a formidable task, virtually from one day to another, to close down and decommission a major nuclear site under the mentioned boundary conditions. Initially, difficulties were caused by massive personnel reductions (from around 4900 operational and 8000 construction staff to just 1200 employees), in combination with the introduction of a market economy and West German laws and procedures. In a closed co-operation with all stakeholders EWN has now reached an optimal size for its decommissioning tasks as well as for the future industrial use of the former NPP site

  3. Visualization of a City Sustainability Index (CSI: Towards Transdisciplinary Approaches Involving Multiple Stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Mori

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a visualized 3-D model of a City Sustainability Index (CSI based on our original concept of city sustainability in which a sustainable city is defined as one that maximizes socio-economic benefits while meeting constraint conditions of the environment and socio-economic equity on a permanent basis. The CSI is based on constraint and maximization indicators. Constraint indicators assess whether a city meets the necessary minimum conditions for city sustainability. Maximization indicators measure the benefits that a city generates in socio-economic aspects. When used in the policy-making process, the choice of constraint indicators should be implemented using a top-down approach. In contrast, a bottom-up approach is more suitable for defining maximization indicators because this technique involves multiple stakeholders (in a transdisciplinary approach. Using different materials of various colors, shapes, sizes, we designed and constructed the visualized physical model of the CSI to help people evaluate and compare the performance of different cities in terms of sustainability. The visualized model of the CSI can convey complicated information in a simple and straightforward manner to diverse stakeholders so that the sustainability analysis can be understood intuitively by ordinary citizens as well as experts. Thus, the CSI model helps stakeholders to develop critical thinking about city sustainability and enables policymakers to make informed decisions for sustainability through a transdisciplinary approach.

  4. Report on stakeholder evaluation of highland aquatic resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Søren

    This report gives an overview of completed research activities on the value ascribed by users, local communities and stakeholders to functions, goods and services (including non‐use values) derived from the aquatic resources in the study areas. The perceived impact of factors such as environmental...... degradation, changing demand for goods and services and modified highland aquatic resources management practices on these values has also been assessed. To help structure this analysis stakeholder Delphi studies have been undertaken in each country involving representatives from all stakeholder groups...

  5. The Dutch Consumer Quality Index: an example of stakeholder involvement in indicator development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rademakers Jany JDJM

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Like in several other Western countries, in the Dutch health care system regulated competition has been introduced. In order to make this work, comparable information is required about the performance of health care providers in terms of effectiveness, safety and patient experiences. Without further coordination, external actors will all try to force health care providers to be transparent. For health care providers this might result in a situation in which they have to deliver data for several sets of indicators, defined by different actors. Therefore, in the Netherlands an effort is made to define national sets of performance indicators and related measuring instruments. In this article, the following questions are addressed, using patient experiences as an example: - When and how are stakeholders involved in the development of indicators and instruments that measure the patients' experiences with health care providers? - Does this involvement lead to indicators and instruments that match stakeholders' information needs? Discussion The Dutch experiences show that it is possible to implement national indicator sets and to reach consensus about what needs to be measured. Preliminary evaluations show that for health care providers and health insurers the benefits of standardization outweigh the possible loss of tailor-made information. However, it has also become clear that particular attention should be given to the participation of patient/consumer organisations. Summary Stakeholder involvement is complex and time-consuming. However, it is the only way to balance the information needs of all the parties that ask for and benefit from transparency, without frustrating the health care system.

  6. Stakeholder involvement in development and implementation of appropriate emergency preparedness routines in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duranova, T.

    2009-01-01

    The presentation presents the process of stakeholder involvement in development and implementation of appropriate emergency preparedness routines in Slovakia in last five years. The presentation gives detailed information on used practices and real process taken place in Slovakia

  7. Summary of stakeholder engagement session of WPDD topical session on stakeholder involvement in decommissioning projects - November 14, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, Steve

    2006-01-01

    as important as technical rigour in these documents. The Italian presentation mentioned setting up a bilateral agreement on monitoring with local authorities. This seems like a step in the right direction, but the FSC would recommend far more than that to build public confidence. Today the public expects to be directly involved in decision making on major issues that affect them, not just via elected representatives. As I mentioned in my presentation on the situation in the UK, it is also important not to raise unrealistic expectations of how much the public can influence our decisions. In much UK legislation, decisions can only be made on a strictly technical basis and the opportunity for public influence is very limited. The presentation by EDF highlighted another vital requirement for successful stakeholder engagement. That is a disciplined, project based approach within the leading organizations. If stakeholder engagement is not meticulously planned it will flat on its face, as people will be given different messages at different times. So it is very important that this disciplined approach includes both local and national players to ensure consistency. Finally, the presentation from Germany mentioned the stepwise approach to decision making. This is very much in line with FSC recommendations. It is important that stakeholders are involved right from the start of the process, and not just in the final site selection stage. The steps involved in reaching a decision must be transparent and the opportunity for stakeholder involvement in each one needs to be clear. If the legal and procedural framework incorporate this stepwise approach explicitly it is a great help for stakeholder participation

  8. Stakeholder involvement in development and design of appropriate emergency preparedness routines in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duranova, T.; Kusovska, Z.; Metke, E.; Sladek, V.; Sokolikova, A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents the process of stakeholder involvement in development and implementation of appropriate emergency preparedness routines in Slovakia in last five years. The paper presents the discussion of good practices, which made the work undertaken valuable and effective. The paper reflects the lessons learned during the course representing five years of stakeholder involvement effort. The paper gives detailed information on used practices and real process taken place in Slovakia. (authors)

  9. A decision analysis framework for stakeholder involvement and learning in groundwater management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, T. P.; Rossi, P. M.; Ala-aho, P.; Eskelinen, R.; Reinikainen, K.; Kløve, B.; Pulido-Velazquez, M.; Yang, H.

    2013-12-01

    Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) methods are increasingly used to facilitate both rigorous analysis and stakeholder involvement in natural and water resource planning. Decision-making in that context is often complex and multi-faceted with numerous trade-offs between social, environmental and economic impacts. However, practical applications of decision-support methods are often too technically oriented and hard to use, understand or interpret for all participants. The learning of participants in these processes is seldom examined, even though successful deliberation depends on learning. This paper analyzes the potential of an interactive MCDA framework, the decision analysis interview (DAI) approach, for facilitating stakeholder involvement and learning in groundwater management. It evaluates the results of the MCDA process in assessing land-use management alternatives in a Finnish esker aquifer area where conflicting land uses affect the groundwater body and dependent ecosystems. In the assessment process, emphasis was placed on the interactive role of the MCDA tool in facilitating stakeholder participation and learning. The results confirmed that the structured decision analysis framework can foster learning and collaboration in a process where disputes and diverse interests are represented. Computer-aided interviews helped the participants to see how their preferences affected the desirability and ranking of alternatives. During the process, the participants' knowledge and preferences evolved as they assessed their initial knowledge with the help of fresh scientific information. The decision analysis process led to the opening of a dialogue, showing the overall picture of the problem context and the critical issues for the further process.

  10. Forum on Stakeholder Confidence: A Platform to build and share Knowledge about Stakeholder Confidence in Radioactive Waste Management. Reflections on Stakeholder Involvement. How do we ensure engagement for a project running over decades - Case study Sweden. Case Study Switzerland: stakeholder involvement in the Swiss site selection procedure; View of the Implementer on the Swiss Site Selection Procedure. Stakeholder Engagement on Radioactive Waste: Australia's Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuenzi, Pascale Jana; Shaver, Kathryn; Gerhardsson, Ansi; Toernqvist, Johanna Yngve; Bjoerklund, Sara

    2017-01-01

    social media to enhance stakeholder involvement included: creating polls to evaluate feedback and establishing more concrete metrics on public support, connecting with youth through popular applications such as Facebook and Twitter, establishing more open public dialogue, and building trust by providing a more accessible form of communication to enhance conversation. Another key message highlighted during the presentations focused on the information void for the public and key stakeholders regarding the subject of radioactive waste management. Ms Smith's presentation on Australia's experience with stakeholder engagement of radioactive waste highlighted the importance of not only providing the public with information, but also engaging the public on the subject matter in order to bridge an existing gap between intolerance and tolerance regarding radioactive waste management. One aspect that was evident in all of the presentations on radioactive waste management was an acknowledgement that the process of implementation has taken much longer than originally planned, and that it is challenging to gain trust and support from the local communities where deep geological repositories are being sited or built. All of the speakers recognised a similar dilemma regarding the acknowledgement of both technical and social components of radioactive waste management, both of which are necessary and should be established at the same time to ensure no void in decision making and realisation. Successful decision making is open, transparent and broadly participatory

  11. Stakeholders and public involvement in river management: heterogeneous acceptance of participatory processes among Swiss institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buletti, Nora; Utz, Stephan; Ejderyan, Olivier; Graefe, Olivier; Lane, Stuart; Reynard, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    This research explores participatory processes in the domain of river management in Switzerland. The main objective is to better understand how participatory processes are incorporated into river management practice. Switzerland being a federal state, river management is a cantonal (regional) responsibility, under the supervision (and co-funding) of the State (a Confederation). The federal funding includes the opportunity to fund additional participatory activities to aid river management, not least because the federal authorities consider the involvement of wider stakeholders and the public in decision-making as a means of aiding the progression of projects. This is a particularly important goal in a Swiss setting where direct democracy (the possibility of calling the decision of any level of government into question through a popular vote) means that a reasonable level of project acceptance is a necessary element of project progression. River management in Switzerland now includes both flood protection and river restoration objectives, which has served to increase its controversy: river corridors contain competing interests with different objectives (e.g. ecological enhancement, protection of agricultural land, flood risk reduction). We were asked by the Confederation to evaluate participatory processes it sponsored and one element of this evaluation aimed to develop a typology of stakeholder participation. We conducted interviews with the 26 cantonal officers in charge of river management. These interviews were based upon thematically structured open ended questions, with the responses analyzed qualitatively. We have identified significant divergence in the implementation of participatory processes between the cantons. These appear to be related to two factors: (1) the canton's historical experience of river management; and (2) the methods used to select stakeholders for inclusion in the decisional process. Cantons that refer to guidelines or pre

  12. May Stakeholders be Involved in Design Without Informed Consent? The Case of Hidden Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pols, A J K

    2017-06-01

    Stakeholder involvement in design is desirable from both a practical and an ethical point of view. It is difficult to do well, however, and some problems recur again and again, both of a practical nature, e.g. stakeholders acting strategically rather than openly, and of an ethical nature, e.g. power imbalances unduly affecting the outcome of the process. Hidden Design has been proposed as a method to deal with the practical problems of stakeholder involvement. It aims to do so by taking the observation of stakeholder actions, rather than the outcomes of a deliberative process, as its input. Furthermore, it hides from stakeholders the fact that a design process is taking place so that they will not behave differently than they otherwise would. Both aspects of Hidden Design have raised ethical worries. In this paper I make an ethical analysis of what it means for a design process to leave participants uninformed or deceived rather than acquiring their informed consent beforehand, and to use observation of actions rather than deliberation as input for design, using Hidden Design as a case study. This analysis is based on two sets of normative guidelines: the ethical guidelines for psychological research involving deception or uninformed participants from two professional psychological organisations, and Habermasian norms for a fair and just (deliberative) process. It supports the conclusion that stakeholder involvement in design organised in this way can be ethically acceptable, though under a number of conditions and constraints.

  13. Stakeholder Involvement in Nuclear Decision Making, NEA Workshop, 17-19 January 2017. Workshop wrap-up and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maclachlan, Ann

    2017-01-01

    . Involvement is taken to mean two-way dialogue and some degree of power-sharing. Actors need to learn to match the appropriate degree and format of involvement to the decision context. Evaluation can help to improve subsequent initiatives. The decision authority must demonstrate that stakeholder views were given consideration and explain why they were or were not retained for the ultimate decision. While stakeholder involvement is resource intensive, many have found that it is time and money well spent in terms of the quality of decisions, optimised implementation and improved relationships. Involvement is best started very early in the decision-making sequence. As a major lesson, face-to-face interaction and effective listening are very important. Large town hall-type meetings on the contrary tend to be polarising. When involving the general public, the views and opinions of the 'silent majority' must be represented. It is wise to take into account and respect local knowledge. Local people may be recruited who are experts in their own places and traditions and who can talk directly with the public concerned. Stakeholder involvement is not static. The world is evolving, and innovation is needed to adapt and improve (e.g. adjusting international methods to home country contexts or learning to apply new tools like social media). Organisations need to build up their use of social media to develop competence, credibility and an audience. This will be an important basis to rely on in times of crisis. Education and training today must prepare youth to take over the responsibilities related to the future management of all aspects of nuclear power. There is a need to reach out now to younger generations to familiarise them with the issues and benefits associated with nuclear energy, as well as the science, and encourage them to be active participants in decision making when they reach adulthood

  14. Development of the Neptune Deepwater Port: The Importance of Key Stakeholder Involvement and Benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, Marc

    2010-09-15

    In 2005, a subsidiary of GDF SUEZ began developing the Neptune LNG Deepwater Port off the coast of Massachusetts. The project met with minimal opposition and maintained a very aggressive timeline. The reasons? Productive involvement with key stakeholders and well-defined benefits. This paper outlines the systematic approach to stakeholder outreach and mitigation planning that Neptune LNG LLC took to garner project acceptance. Details of the pre-planning phase, the stakeholder outreach phase, and the project mitigation phase are all discussed. The result was a major energy project that took less than 3.5 years to permit and 1.5 years to build.

  15. Integrating multicriteria evaluation and stakeholders analysis for assessing hydropower projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosso, M.; Bottero, M.; Pomarico, S.; La Ferlita, S.; Comino, E.

    2014-01-01

    The use of hydroelectric potential and the protection of the river ecosystem are two contrasting aspects that arise in the management of the same resource, generating conflicts between different stakeholders. The purpose of the paper is to develop a multi-level decision-making tool, able to support energy planning, with specific reference to the construction of hydropower plants in mountain areas. Starting from a real-world problem concerning the basin of the Sesia Valley (Italy), an evaluation framework based on the combined use of Multicriteria Evaluation and Stakeholders Analysis is proposed in the study. The results of the work show that the methodology is able to grant participated decisions through a multi-stakeholders traceable and transparent assessment process, to highlight the important elements of the decision problem and to support the definition of future design guidelines. - Highlights: • The paper concerns a multi-level decision-making tool able to support energy planning. • The evaluation framework is based on the use of AHP and Stakeholders Analysis. • Hydropower projects in the Sesia Valley (Italy) are evaluated and ranked in the study. • Environmental, economic, technical and sociopolitical criteria have been considered. • 42 stakeholder groups have been included in the evaluation

  16. Understanding Stakeholder Interests and Perspectives in Evaluations of Health IT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lisa; Sheikh, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Appropriately identifying and representing stakeholders' interests and viewpoints in evaluations of health information technology (health IT) is a critical part of ensuring continued progress and innovation in eHealth. This contribution therefore seeks to clarify the principles of stakeholder analysis in an eHealth context. We describe this with reference to a mixed methods national evaluation of ePrescribing systems in English hospitals. We use this evaluation to exemplify the engagement and analytical tools required to ensure a detailed understanding of the issues, challenges and lessons learnt across stakeholder groups. We conclude that this type of approach may support the robustness of evaluations of health IT as well as their longer term impact on innovation in the field.

  17. Stakeholder Involvement in Decision Making: A Short Guide to Issues, Approaches and Resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive waste management is embedded in broader societal issues such as the environment, risk management, energy, health policy and sustainability. In all these fields, there is an increasing demand for public involvement and engagement. This 2015 update of Stakeholder Involvement Techniques: Short Guide and Annotated Bibliography, assists practitioners and non-specialists by outlining the steps and issues associated with stakeholder involvement in decision making and by facilitating access to useful online resources (handbooks, toolboxes and case studies). The updated guide has been considerably enriched with experiences since 2004 and includes extensive references to the literature. It is published alongside the release of an online annotated bibliography that will be updated regularly. (authors)

  18. Engaging stakeholders in rehabilitation research: a scoping review of strategies used in partnerships and evaluation of impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camden, Chantal; Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Nguyen, Tram; Graham, Emma; Thomas, Aliki; Sprung, Jennifer; Morris, Christopher; Russell, Dianne J

    2015-01-01

    To describe how stakeholder engagement has been undertaken and evaluated in rehabilitation research. A scoping review of the scientific literature using five search strategies. Quantitative and qualitative analyses using extracted data. Interpretation of results was iteratively discussed within the team, which included a parent stakeholder. Searches identified 101 candidate papers; 28 were read in full to assess eligibility and 19 were included in the review. People with disabilities and their families were more frequently involved compared to other stakeholders. Stakeholders were often involved in planning and evaluating service delivery. A key issue was identifying stakeholders; strategies used to support their involvement included creating committees, organizing meetings, clarifying roles and offering training. Communication, power sharing and resources influenced how stakeholders could be engaged in the research. Perceived outcomes of stakeholder engagement included the creation of partnerships, facilitating the research process and the application of the results, and empowering stakeholders. Stakeholder engagement outcomes were rarely formally evaluated. There is a great interest in rehabilitation to engage stakeholders in the research process. However, further evidence is needed to identify effective strategies for meaningful stakeholder engagement that leads to more useful research that positively impacts practice. Implications for Rehabilitation Using several strategies to engage various stakeholders throughout the research process is thought to increase the quality of the research and the rehabilitation process by developing proposals and programs responding better to their needs. Engagement strategies need to be better reported and evaluated in the literature. Engagement facilitate uptake of research findings by increasing stakeholders' awareness of the evidence, the resources available and their own ability to act upon a situation. Factors influencing

  19. Stakeholder involvement in strategic HRD aligning: the impact on HRD effectiveness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wognum, Ida; Lam, J.F.

    2000-01-01

    The study reported here focusses on the question to what extent stakeholder involvement in HRD policymaking (here referred to as strategic HRD aligning) predicts effective HRD programmes. The study involved 44 large companies in the industrial, financial and commercial services sectors. The findings

  20. The Influence of Stakeholder Involvement on The Effectiveness of Place Branding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E-H. Klijn (Erik-Hans); J. Eshuis (Jasper); E. Braun (Erik)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe assumption in the governance literature is that stakeholder involvement enhances the chances of success of governance processes. Place branding has a strong governance character in that it involves many different actors and the government is one of the parties in the branding

  1. STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT IN THE HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN LATIN AMERICA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichon-Riviere, Andres; Soto, Natalie; Augustovski, Federico; Sampietro-Colom, Laura

    2018-06-11

    Latin American countries are taking important steps to expand and strengthen universal health coverage, and health technology assessment (HTA) has an increasingly prominent role in this process. Participation of all relevant stakeholders has become a priority in this effort. Key issues in this area were discussed during the 2017 Latin American Health Technology Assessment International (HTAi) Policy Forum. The Forum included forty-one participants from Latin American HTA agencies; public, social security, and private insurance sectors; and the pharmaceutical and medical device industry. A background paper and presentations by invited experts and Forum members supported discussions. This study presents a summary of these discussions. Stakeholder involvement in HTA remains inconsistently implemented in the region and few countries have established formal processes. Participants agreed that stakeholder involvement is key to improve the HTA process, but the form and timing of such improvements must be adapted to local contexts. The legitimization of both HTA and decision-making processes was identified as one of the main reasons to promote stakeholder involvement; but to be successful, the entire system of assessment and decision making must be properly staffed and organized, and certain basic conditions must be met, including transparency in the HTA process and a clear link between HTA and decision making. Participants suggested a need for establishing clear rules of participation in HTA that would protect HTA producers and decision makers from potentially distorting external influences. Such rules and mechanisms could help foster trust and credibility among stakeholders, supporting actual involvement in HTA processes.

  2. The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk through Stakeholder Involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    William T. Hartwell

    2007-01-01

    The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration's Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Integration of a near real-time communications system, a public web site, training workshops for involved stakeholders, and educational programs all help to alleviate public perception of risk of health effects from past activities conducted at the NTS

  3. Collaborative Evaluation within a Framework of Stakeholder-Oriented Evaluation Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Rita G.

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative Evaluation systematically invites and engages stakeholders in program evaluation planning and implementation. Unlike "distanced" evaluation approaches, which reject stakeholder participation as evaluation team members, Collaborative Evaluation assumes that active, on-going engagement between evaluators and program staff,…

  4. Stakeholder involvement in other sectors. High Voltage Electricity Transmission. Case study: CO_2 capture and storage. Common misconceptions on stakeholder involvement - Reviewing deployment of RES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolsink, Maarten; Komendantova, Nadejda; Kalaydjian, Francois

    2017-01-01

    Session 7 featured several speakers with expertise outside of the nuclear field. High-voltage electricity transmission and carbon capture and storage projects were presented by experts who study and advise on stakeholder involvement in such activities. The session chair provided an overview of stakeholder involvement fundamentals as applied to renewable energy projects. Though the presentations were on non-nuclear projects, the principles presented and discussed were clearly applicable in nuclear contexts as well. Mr Wolsink of University of Amsterdam re-framed the topic of the power supply system as a 'socio-technical system'. He identified three types or levels of societal acceptance for energy innovation: socio-political acceptance, market acceptance and community acceptance. This distinction highlights the different nature of questions, issues, set of actors and challenges that arise at different points or forums around energy infrastructure projects and why general favorability towards a technology does not translate into support of its local implementation. Societal acceptance probably cannot be acquired without meaningful involvement. Arnstein's 'ladder of citizen participation' was referenced by two session speakers. Mr Wolsink explained that inexperienced organisations may target 'consultation', thinking that this is real participation. However, consultation is a relatively low level of involvement which consists of gathering information or views, without promoting two-way dialogue (engagement) or committing to actual influence and indeed some degree of citizen power. He advised that simple consultation should be avoided unless the organisation finds that such stakeholder or public input is essential to the decision and intends to give it due account. The Barendrecht case on carbon capture and storage, as presented by Mr Kalaydjian of IFP Energies Nouvelles, illustrates the danger in overly restricting or compartmentalising stakeholder involvement. Ms

  5. Why social science matters in river management: involvement of local stakeholders in monitoring the effects of room for the river measures in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugge, Laura; van den Born, Riyan

    2015-04-01

    The Netherlands is a densely populated delta region with a long tradition in flood protection and river management. In response to climate change, adaptive measures are implemented to create more room for the river (and thus increasing water discharge capacity) while at the same time maintaining the multifunctional use of the river system. These functions include for example navigation, water supply, housing and spatial quality, nature development and recreation. The incorporation of social aspects in water management is vital for the development and implementation of sustainable solutions in environmental planning. Active stakeholder involvement has major benefits in terms of trust, public support, social learning and creative decision making. In practice, however, stakeholder involvement is often confined to one-way communication (e.g. information on websites and public hearings) instead of establishing a dialogue with the relevant local stakeholders. Moreover, stakeholders are often involved too late. Our study focusses on stakeholder perceptions and the opportunities for stakeholder participation and collaboration in river management. One way to actively involve stakeholders and invest in a dialogue is through participatory monitoring, i.e. to involve local stakeholders in collecting, analyzing and evaluating monitoring data. Currently, a pilot engineering intervention (2013-2015) is carried out in the Waal river, i.e. the main Rhine branch in The Netherlands. This intervention comprises the substitution of traditional groynes by a 10 km longitudinal dam and will change the appearance of the fluvial landscape dramatically. An interdisciplinary team of scientists, government representatives and other public and private parties is involved in monitoring the hydrological, ecological and socio-economic effects of the longitudinal dam with the aim to develop and improve models, guidelines and tools for integrative river management. This also provides unique

  6. Practices and Experience in Stakeholder Involvement for Post-nuclear Emergency Management - Summary of the workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of post-accident consequence management is the involvement of stakeholders: in the planning, preparation and execution as well as in sustaining efforts over the long term. Having recognised the significance of stakeholder participation in several International Nuclear Emergency Exercises (INEX), the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) decided to organise the Practices and Experience in Stakeholder Involvement for Post-nuclear Emergency Management Workshop to explore these issues. This summary highlights the key issues discussed during the workshop, which brought together 75 emergency management and communication specialists from 16 countries. In light of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the experience shared during this workshop will be central to further improving national emergency management arrangements

  7. Stakeholder involvement in the management of effluent discharges from nuclear installations in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, T.; Gadbois, S.; Heriard Dubreuil, G.; Oudiz, A.

    2004-01-01

    The involvement of local stakeholders in the decision-making process regarding health, safety and environmental issues is developing in many countries. As far as the management of effluent discharges from nuclear installations in France is concerned, members of Local Commission of Information, including elected people and NGOs, are playing an increasing role in that respect. To deepen the understanding of these risk governance processes, a working group of experts from different institutions was set up in 2000 by the Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN). The aim of this working group was to 1) analyse the stakeholder involvement processes already in place in France around nuclear and non-nuclear installations; 2) perform case studies of few national and international experiences around nuclear installations (notably concerning the revision of creation authorisation decree of COGEMA La Hague reprocessing plant, the environmental policy of BNFL Sellafield reprocessing plant, the discharges surveillance of EDF Fessenheim nuclear power plant); 3) study the evolution of the regulatory context for the stakeholder involvement. Four main elements, contributing to the social trust emerge from this analysis: 1) the social dynamics of the consultation process, notably with the emergence of 'new' stakeholders such as elected people and NGOs; 2) the readability of the plant follow-up from the point of view of local stakeholders and their involvement in the decision process (the relay role of these 'new' stakeholders); 3) the contribution of the institutional and pluralist expertise to the social trust (broadening of the range of values taken into account); 4) the issue of the local justification of the plant in the prospect of the sustainable development (no risk being acceptable without counter-parts). This paper will address these different issues on the basis of the case studies in the perspective of examining the radiological risk governance process

  8. Stakeholder involvement in the management of rural areas following a nuclear accident: the farming network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercer, J.; Nisbet, A.F.

    2002-01-01

    The importance of the participation of stakeholders in the formulation of strategies for maintaining agricultural production and food safety following a nuclear accident, has been successfully demonstrated by the Agriculture and Food Countermeasures Working Group (AFCWG). This group was set up in the UK by the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) and the then Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food in 1997 (Nisbet and Mondon, 2001). Before this time stakeholder organisations had not collectively considered the implications of contamination of the foodchain in the event of an accidental release of radioactivity. With funding from the European Commission (EC) the UK approach to stakeholder engagement is being taken forward on a European basis during the period 2000-2004 through a project given the acronym FARMING (Food and Agriculture Restoration Management Involving Networked Groups). The overall objective of this project is to create a network of stakeholder working groups in 5 member states (UK, Belgium, Finland, France and Greece) to assist in the development of robust and practicable strategies for restoring and managing contaminated agricultural land and food products in a sustainable way. The initial intention was to involve at least 50 individual stakeholders

  9. Potential scenarios for broadening stakeholder involvement in the implementing geological disposal technology platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martell, Meritxell [Merience Strategic Thinking, Barcelona (Spain); Bergmans, Anne [University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2013-07-01

    This paper analyses the potential for the involvement of different types of stakeholders in the Implementing Geological Disposal Technology Platform (IGD-TP). This analysis was conducted as part of the InSOTEC project, a three-year (2011- 2014) collaborative research project funded under the 7. Euratom Framework Programme (Grant Agreement nr. 269906). In our analysis, we consider the extent to which the IGDTP's practice as regards to stakeholder involvement matches its discourse, and what potential for improvement exists given its structural organisation as a European Technology Platform (ETPs). Technology Platforms (TPs) can be understood as knowledge networks, deliberately set up to influence (research) policy in a specific domain. We therefore use knowledge networks as a conceptual approach and look at the IGD-TP as a complex network which includes actors, knowledge and practices across different countries, focusing on a very specific topic (i.e. implementing geological disposal). We compare the way different stakeholders are involved in the IGD-TP to the practice of other ETPs, and explore how the IGD-TP is viewed by its members and by outsiders to the platform Applying Callon's framework of knowledge co-production (1999) we come to define different degrees of interaction between science, society and policy in view of defining research and development (R and D) priorities [1]. Subsequently we describe how these interactions could be conceptualised and interpreted for the IGD-TP. The current approach of the IGDTP can be mainly understood as classical model involving mainly expert stakeholders and scientists. Where there seems to be a good representation among IGD-TP members of industry, research institutes, and some members of the academic community this is not the case for other types of stakeholders, such as public authorities or civil society. At this stage, the overall approach of the IGD-TP would seem to restrict the scope of stakeholder

  10. Potential scenarios for broadening stakeholder involvement in the implementing geological disposal technology platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martell, Meritxell; Bergmans, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the potential for the involvement of different types of stakeholders in the Implementing Geological Disposal Technology Platform (IGD-TP). This analysis was conducted as part of the InSOTEC project, a three-year (2011- 2014) collaborative research project funded under the 7. Euratom Framework Programme (Grant Agreement nr. 269906). In our analysis, we consider the extent to which the IGDTP's practice as regards to stakeholder involvement matches its discourse, and what potential for improvement exists given its structural organisation as a European Technology Platform (ETPs). Technology Platforms (TPs) can be understood as knowledge networks, deliberately set up to influence (research) policy in a specific domain. We therefore use knowledge networks as a conceptual approach and look at the IGD-TP as a complex network which includes actors, knowledge and practices across different countries, focusing on a very specific topic (i.e. implementing geological disposal). We compare the way different stakeholders are involved in the IGD-TP to the practice of other ETPs, and explore how the IGD-TP is viewed by its members and by outsiders to the platform Applying Callon's framework of knowledge co-production (1999) we come to define different degrees of interaction between science, society and policy in view of defining research and development (R and D) priorities [1]. Subsequently we describe how these interactions could be conceptualised and interpreted for the IGD-TP. The current approach of the IGDTP can be mainly understood as classical model involving mainly expert stakeholders and scientists. Where there seems to be a good representation among IGD-TP members of industry, research institutes, and some members of the academic community this is not the case for other types of stakeholders, such as public authorities or civil society. At this stage, the overall approach of the IGD-TP would seem to restrict the scope of stakeholder

  11. Stakeholder involvement and decommissioning. Some lessons derived from papers presented at WPDD (2000 - 2004)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore, Claudio

    2006-01-01

    Decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) are the last elements of the life cycle of both nuclear and non-nuclear facilities. The problems of this phase are partly the same and partly different from those of the preceding phases (planning, construction and operation). Public concerns about safety, for instance, are present in every phase. In the course of construction and operation important challenges include meeting public expectations of a higher quality of life, accommodation of an increasing population, mitigation of construction nuisances and assurance of the safe operation of the facility. In the decommissioning and dismantling phase public concerns include decrease in employment, the reduction of revenues for the municipality, the future use of the affected land, and other negative social impacts (e.g. emigration of part of the skilled population) [d'Abadal, Castellnou]. This phase too is characterised - as earlier phases - by the heterogeneity of stakeholder interests and values, and the difficulties to achieve consensus or compromise. The difficulties arise in connection with the harmonisation of energy production, environmental protection and sustainable socio-economic development considerations. Issues of interaction between local and regional decisions are also characteristic. From the point of view of conflict management the building of trust amongst stakeholders is very important in the decommissioning and dismantling phase. Consequently, social lessons learned from the siting and development of nuclear facilities are widely applicable in the field of D and D. This paper summarises some lessons learned from papers on stakeholder involvement presented at WPDD meetings mainly between 2000 and 2004. In conclusion, community/stakeholder participation and economic development involve the identification of all relevant stakeholders and the community needs. There must be an early discussion of plans with all stakeholders. A continuous dialogue with the

  12. Introducing CARL - Studying Stakeholder Involvement in Decision-Making on RWM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmans, Anne

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides some background on the four following papers, drawing on the research conducted within the CARL research project. CARL is a cross-national 'social sciences research project into the effects of stakeholder involvement on decision-making in radioactive waste management'. The paper introduces the project, its aims, activities and describes the common framework used to look at each individual country

  13. ORGANIC RESEARCH AND STAKEHOLDERS INVOLVEMENT: THE IFOAM EU REGIONAL GROUP CONTRIBUTION

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalvez, Mr V; Schlueter, Mr M; Slabe, Ms A; Schmid, Mr O

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents the concepts, criteria, procedures and some methodologies to increase stakeholders involvement and participatioin in organic research Projects in the European Union, based on the experiencie and practise of the IFOAM EU Regional Group (IFOAM-EURG), in transnational Organic research Projects, enfatising in achivements, dificulties and trends for the future

  14. Software Quality Perceptions of Stakeholders Involved in the Software Development Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Priya

    2013-01-01

    Software quality is one of the primary determinants of project management success. Stakeholders involved in software development widely agree that quality is important (Barney and Wohlin 2009). However, they may differ on what constitutes software quality, and which of its attributes are more important than others. Although, software quality…

  15. Involving Stakeholders in Programme Theory Specification: Discussion of a Systematic, Consensus-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Urk, Felix; Grant, Sean; Bonell, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The use of explicit programme theory to guide evaluation is widely recommended. However, practitioners and other partnering stakeholders often initiate programmes based on implicit theories, leaving researchers to explicate them before commencing evaluation. The current study aimed to apply a systematic method to undertake this process. We…

  16. Proceedings of the topical session on stakeholder involvement in decommissioning projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, Juan Luis; Chandler, Steve; Metcalfe, Doug; Le Bars, Yves

    2006-01-01

    Set up by the Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC), the WPDD brings together senior representatives of national organisations who have a broad overview of Decommissioning and Dismantling (D and D) issues through their work as regulators, implementers, R and D experts or policy makers. These include representatives from regulatory authorities, industrial decommissioners from the NEA Co-operative Programme on Exchange of Scientific and Technical Information on Nuclear Installation Decommissioning Projects (CPD), and cross-representation from the other NEA Committees. The EC is a member of the WPDD and the IAEA is participating as an observer. This broad participation provides good possibilities for the co-ordination efforts amongst activities in the international programmes. At its sixth meeting, in Paris, 14-16 November 2005, the WPDD held a topical session on the 'Stakeholder Involvement in Decommissioning Projects'. The topical session was jointly planned and run with members of the NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC). This report documents the topical session. The main text summarises the lessons learnt and includes the rapporteurs reports. Appendix 1 and 2 provide the agenda of the topical session and all contributed papers respectively. The Topical session also provided a stimuli to review all the contributions in the area of stakeholder involvement that the WPDD has received since its inception. A list of references is provided in Appendix 3. The topical session was meant to provide an exchange of information and experience on the following issues: - Views from Stakeholders Regarding Stakeholder Involvement and Their Own Role. - Case Studies on Stakeholders Confidence. At the end of each session time was allotted for a plenary discussion. The Rapporteur reviewed the main points and the lessons learnt at the end of the whole Topical Session. (authors)

  17. Stakeholder involvement in stages of a participatory process illustrated in interior design cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vink, Peter; van Rhijn, Gu; Seim, Rikke

    2008-01-01

    In a previous study (Vink et al., 2008) an overview was made of the involvement of different stakeholders in a participatory design process. In this paper this overview was used to describe four participatory design cases focused on improvising productivity, health, and comfort by interior design....... It appeared that this overview is useful to describe the involvement in participatory interior design projects. However, it can only serve as an initial benchmark as much is dependent on the specific case at hand....

  18. Energy Justice and the Stakeholders Involved: A Case Study of Solar Power in Rural Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romulus, Elijah Rey Asse

    This paper explores and analyzes energy justice and the stakeholders involved. Energy insecurity, specifically the lack of access to electricity effects over 1.3 billion people worldwide and energy justice is a way to address it. This paper is supported by a case study with data collected in the southern rural regions of Haiti regarding energy justice communities. Three cities were studied: Les Cayes, Anse-a-Veau, and Les Anglais. It examines how solar businesses can aid energy justice communities seeking access to electricity. Stakeholders such as the communities themselves, solar businesses, and nonprofits in the region are studied and analyzed. The paper concludes solar businesses are helping said communities but needs participation from other stakeholders to be successful. Finally, there are five recommendations to build capacity, develop infrastructure in the region, explore the possibility of solar cooperatives, strengthen the solar economy in Haiti, and demand reparations.

  19. Stakeholder Involvement in Tourism Destination Development: A Case of Dunga Beach and Wetland, Kisumu County, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Otieno Wanga

    2014-09-01

    In Kenya, Tourism is the second largest source of foreign exchange revenue following agriculture; it however, faces numerous challenges sustainability due the complex nature of tourism destinations. Tourism destinations are complex and dynamic systems that involve various stakeholders each with different understanding of same tourism system. These different perceptions can be tapped to develop a common tourism model that helps achieve the overall sustainable tourism development objective of a given destination. This paper describes participatory systems approach to develop a shared understanding amongst stakeholders of the tourism system in Dunga Beach and Wetland, in Kisumu County, Kenya. The process includes the development of a systems model that represents a holistic understanding of the interconnectedness and relationships between the various components that impact on sustainable development of tourism in Dunga. The model is intended for use as a framework for enhancing ecotourism experiences by stakeholders who are ecotourism experience providers in Dunga for the satisfaction of tourists in Dunga beach and wetland.

  20. Participatory Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation of Multi-Stakeholder Platforms in Integrated Landscape Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusters, Koen; Buck, Louise; de Graaf, Maartje; Minang, Peter; van Oosten, Cora; Zagt, Roderick

    2017-03-21

    Integrated landscape initiatives typically aim to strengthen landscape governance by developing and facilitating multi-stakeholder platforms. These are institutional coordination mechanisms that enable discussions, negotiations, and joint planning between stakeholders from various sectors in a given landscape. Multi-stakeholder platforms tend to involve complex processes with diverse actors, whose objectives and focus may be subjected to periodic re-evaluation, revision or reform. In this article we propose a participatory method to aid planning, monitoring, and evaluation of such platforms, and we report on experiences from piloting the method in Ghana and Indonesia. The method is comprised of three components. The first can be used to look ahead, identifying priorities for future multi-stakeholder collaboration in the landscape. It is based on the identification of four aspirations that are common across multi-stakeholder platforms in integrated landscape initiatives. The second can be used to look inward. It focuses on the processes within an existing multi-stakeholder platform in order to identify areas for possible improvement. The third can be used to look back, identifying the main outcomes of an existing platform and comparing them to the original objectives. The three components can be implemented together or separately. They can be used to inform planning and adaptive management of the platform, as well as to demonstrate performance and inform the design of new interventions.

  1. Stake-holder involvement in the management of rural areas after an accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisbet, A.F.

    2001-01-01

    Widespread contamination of the food chain following a nuclear accident could have considerable consequences for European farming and food industries. For the purposes of contingency planning it is important to bring together the many and diverse stakeholders who would be involved in intervention so that strategies can be developed for maintaining agricultural production and food safety. This type of approach has been successfully implemented in the UK through the setting up of the Agriculture and Food Countermeasures Working Group. Building on this initiative, the European Commission under the auspices of its 5. Framework Programme is funding a thematic network in which similar stakeholder groups are being established in four other Member States. These national groups contain individuals involved in making policy decisions within government departments and agencies, regulatory authorities, the water, milk and farming industries, the retail trade and consumer groups, as well as individuals with specialist expertise. The stakeholder network will provide a European focus for tackling future nuclear accidents and assist in the harmonization of policies and strategies between Member States. This paper gives an overview of the approaches being adopted and discusses the achievements and expected benefits of stakeholder engagement. (author)

  2. The Missing Stakeholder Group : Why Patients Should be Involved in Health Economic Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Voorn, George A K; Vemer, Pepijn; Hamerlijnck, Dominique; Ramos, Isaac Corro; Teunissen, Geertruida J; Al, Maiwenn; Feenstra, Talitha L

    Evaluations of healthcare interventions, e.g. new drugs or other new treatment strategies, commonly include a cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) that is based on the application of health economic (HE) models. As end users, patients are important stakeholders regarding the outcomes of CEAs, yet their

  3. Judgement and Knowledge in Fisheries Involving Stakeholders. JAKFISH D1.5 Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastoors, Martin; Ulrich, Clara; Wilson, Douglas Clyde

    . In four different case studies, the JAKFISH project invited fisheries stakeholders to participate in the process of framing the management problem, and to give input and evaluate the scientific models that are used to provide fisheries management advice. JAKFISH investigated various tools to assess...

  4. Who, when, and how? Marine planning stakeholder involvement preferences--a case study of the Solent, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Bernadine; Potts, Jonathan; Fletcher, Stephen

    2011-11-01

    The introduction of a marine planning system throughout English territorial waters over the next decade provides an opportunity for stakeholder input to the management of the marine environment. Stakeholder involvement has been identified as an important component of successful development and subsequent implementation of marine planning but it has to be recognised that the views and interest of stakeholders can vary greatly, thus the desire for involvement with the process is unlikely to be uniform. This paper presents the views of stakeholders within the Solent, United Kingdom on their potential involvement with the marine planning process. Interestingly, it highlights a strong variability of views within and across sectors. Assuming the situation in the Solent is typical of groups of stakeholders throughout the country, the lack of uniformity in the potential involvement from different stakeholders may present a challenge in achieving a representative and truly collaborative marine planning process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Stakeholder involvement in nuclear issues. INSAG-20. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Many of the world's nuclear power plants were constructed long ago without much public involvement in the associated decision making. It is anticipated, however, that a variety of stakeholders will seek participation in such decisions now as the nuclear option is being revisited in many places. Accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, among other places, have served to arouse public concern. The development of 'here-and-now' media capabilities has created an awareness that may not have previously existed. Improvements in educational systems and the development of the Internet have made technical information and expertise available to individuals and locations that were previously without them. In addition, consideration of the environmental impacts of various energy strategies has moved to the fore. INSAG has concluded that the expectations of stakeholders of a right to participate in energy decisions are something that the nuclear community must address. Decisions regarding such matters as the siting and construction of a nuclear power plant are no longer largely the domain of a closed community of technical experts and utility executives. Today, the concerns and expectations of all manner of persons and organizations - from the local farmer to the international financial institution - must be considered. This report is intended for use by all stakeholders in the nuclear community - national regulatory authorities, nuclear power plant designers and operators, public interest organizations and individuals, the media and, not to be forgotten, local and national populations. INSAG's fundamental conclusion is that all stakeholders with an interest in nuclear decisions should be provided with an opportunity for full and effective participation in them. With this right, however, come certain obligations on all sides for openness, candour and civility. INSAG is hopeful that this report will help define the interests and roles of the stakeholders in the nuclear

  6. Facilitating comparative effectiveness research in cancer genomics: evaluating stakeholder perceptions of the engagement process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deverka, Patricia A; Lavallee, Danielle C; Desai, Priyanka J; Armstrong, Joanne; Gorman, Mark; Hole-Curry, Leah; O'Leary, James; Ruffner, B W; Watkins, John; Veenstra, David L; Baker, Laurence H; Unger, Joseph M; Ramsey, Scott D

    2012-07-01

    The Center for Comparative Effectiveness Research in Cancer Genomics completed a 2-year stakeholder-guided process for the prioritization of genomic tests for comparative effectiveness research studies. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of engagement procedures in achieving project goals and to identify opportunities for future improvements. The evaluation included an online questionnaire, one-on-one telephone interviews and facilitated discussion. Responses to the online questionnaire were tabulated for descriptive purposes, while transcripts from key informant interviews were analyzed using a directed content analysis approach. A total of 11 out of 13 stakeholders completed both the online questionnaire and interview process, while nine participated in the facilitated discussion. Eighty-nine percent of questionnaire items received overall ratings of agree or strongly agree; 11% of responses were rated as neutral with the exception of a single rating of disagreement with an item regarding the clarity of how stakeholder input was incorporated into project decisions. Recommendations for future improvement included developing standard recruitment practices, role descriptions and processes for improved communication with clinical and comparative effectiveness research investigators. Evaluation of the stakeholder engagement process provided constructive feedback for future improvements and should be routinely conducted to ensure maximal effectiveness of stakeholder involvement.

  7. Risk Perception of Plastic Pollution: Importance of Stakeholder Involvement and Citizen Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syberg, Kristian; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Christensen, Thomas Budde

    2017-01-01

    , the public, and policy makers and elaborate on how the eight risk drivers have influenced this process. Plastic pollution has several of the characteristics that can enhance people’s perception of the risk as being important and which has generated great awareness of the problem. The chapter finally...... discusses how risk perception can be improved by greater stakeholder involvement and utilization of citizen science and thereby improve the foundation for timely and efficient societal measures....

  8. Corporate Leadership and Governance for Increasing Stakeholder Involvement and Developing Stronger Connections

    OpenAIRE

    Coulson-Thomas, Colin

    2018-01-01

    Many organisations and their supply chains are networks of relationships, but greater connectivity, additional connections and more intimate relationships can involve costs and risks as well as confer benefits, while inappropriate relationships can be harmful. Aspects of company law and regulation and contemporary corporate leadership and governance codes, priorities and practices favour some stakeholders over others and can hinder rather than help the building of relationships with a wider r...

  9. Theory-Based Stakeholder Evaluation – applied. Competing Stakeholder Theories in the Quality Management of Primary Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Balle; Heilesen, J. B.

    In the broader context of evaluation design, this paper examines and compares pros and cons of a theory-based approach to evaluation (TBE) with the Theory-Based Stakeholder evaluation (TSE) model, introduced by Morten Balle Hansen and Evert Vedung (Hansen and Vedung 2010). While most approaches...... to TBE construct one unitary theory of the program (Coryn et al. 2011), the TSE-model emphasizes the importance of keeping theories of diverse stakeholders apart. This paper applies the TSE-model to an evaluation study conducted by the Danish Evaluation Institute (EVA) of the Danish system of quality......-model, as an alternative to traditional program theory evaluation....

  10. Measuring stakeholder participation in evaluation: an empirical validation of the Participatory Evaluation Measurement Instrument (PEMI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigneault, Pierre-Marc; Jacob, Steve; Tremblay, Joël

    2012-08-01

    Stakeholder participation is an important trend in the field of program evaluation. Although a few measurement instruments have been proposed, they either have not been empirically validated or do not cover the full content of the concept. This study consists of a first empirical validation of a measurement instrument that fully covers the content of participation, namely the Participatory Evaluation Measurement Instrument (PEMI). It specifically examines (1) the intercoder reliability of scores derived by two research assistants on published evaluation cases; (2) the convergence between the scores of coders and those of key respondents (i.e., authors); and (3) the convergence between the authors' scores on the PEMI and the Evaluation Involvement Scale (EIS). A purposive sample of 40 cases drawn from the evaluation literature was used to assess reliability. One author per case in this sample was then invited to participate in a survey; 25 fully usable questionnaires were received. Stakeholder participation was measured on nominal and ordinal scales. Cohen's κ, the intraclass correlation coefficient, and Spearman's ρ were used to assess reliability and convergence. Reliability results ranged from fair to excellent. Convergence between coders' and authors' scores ranged from poor to good. Scores derived from the PEMI and the EIS were moderately associated. Evidence from this study is strong in the case of intercoder reliability and ranges from weak to strong in the case of convergent validation. Globally, this suggests that the PEMI can produce scores that are both reliable and valid.

  11. WS1 evaluation of methodology, protocols and case studies, with stakeholder recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bugter, R.J.F.

    2014-01-01

    The BESAFE project organized its first stakeholder meeting at INBO in Brussels on 23 and 24 May 2013. Committed stakeholder involvement is central to BESAFE’s success, and the intention of this first workshop was to get initial feedback as well as to involve stakeholders in a brainstorm about the

  12. Management of industrial sites contaminated with radionuclides and stake-holders involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudiz, A.; Cessac, B.; Brenot, J.; Maigne, J.P.; Santucci, P.

    2001-01-01

    The method to be used for the assessment and management of the radiation risks associated with sites contaminated with radionuclides was recently developed in France at the request of the authorities. The aim is to provide all the stakeholders (administrations, elected representatives, engineering companies, operators, residents' associations and environmental protection organizations) with a guide describing how to proceed. There are six stages: the removal of doubt, the pre-diagnosis, the initial diagnosis, the simplified risk study, the detailed risk study and the assistance in the selection of the remediation strategy. Each stage of risk assessment involves the stakeholders to a greater or lesser degree depending on the complexity of the site in question. The guide outlines the criteria which enable the assessment sequence to be interrupted and the appropriate decisions to be taken. For example, one can stop at the stage of the simplified risk study when the site is small and if it is relatively easy to remove and store the contaminated soil. However, in many cases a detailed risk study will be needed. The selection of the appropriate strategy presupposes the identification of several alternate strategies which must be characterized in terms of reduction of dosimetric impact, reduction of contamination, costs and associated nuisances. The choice of strategy requires the involvement of the stakeholders. The degree of involvement depends of the sites specific context. The radiological aspect is generally only one of the elements of the choice, and the conditions have to be created to enable the stakeholders to discuss all the relevant aspects in the site's specific context. (authors)

  13. Evaluating the Interests of Different Stakeholders in Beijing Wastewater Reuse Systems for Sustainable Urban Water Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Liang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Whether water systems can be operated successfully and sustainably is influenced by the attitudes and willingness of stakeholders involved in the management of such systems. This study quantitatively evaluates the interests of different stakeholders in wastewater reuse systems in Beijing. Such interests comprise economic, environmental, and social effects induced by the wastewater reuse systems. The study considers four main stakeholders in Beijing, namely the Municipal Administration Committee (MAC, Municipal Environmental Protection Bureau (MEPB, plant managers, and users. Cost benefit analysis is conducted to determine the aforementioned interests separately from the perspectives of the various stakeholders. The results reveal that not all stakeholders’ interests in the wastewater reuse systems in Beijing are satisfied. From the perspectives of both the MAC and MEPB, the evaluation results indicate that both decentralized and centralized wastewater reuse systems are economically feasible. However, from the viewpoints of plant managers and users, the results reveal that only the centralized wastewater reuse systems are economically feasible, whereas the decentralized systems are not. The failure to satisfy the interests of plant managers and users may be a major reason for the interrupted operation of the decentralized systems in Beijing. The study demonstrates that successful and sustainable development of a new water project necessitates satisfying the interests of all stakeholders.

  14. Improved Emergency Preparedness For Management Of The Food chain Via Stakeholder Involvement: Belgian and European Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardeman, Frank; Carle, Benny [SCK.CEN, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Turcanu, Catrinel [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Av. F. Roosevelt 50, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Vandecasteele, Christian [FANC, Federal Agency for Nuclear Control, Ravensteinstraat 36, 1000 Brussels (Belgium)

    2006-07-01

    Initiatives involving stakeholder engagement have gained increasing importance in sustainable decision making for many risk-related issues. This paper describes a Belgian experience within a European context related to food management options in the event of a radioactive contamination of the food chain. Under the auspices of the European Commission's 5. Framework Programme, the F.A.R.M.I.N.G. (F.A.R.M.I.N.G. 2000) project (co-ordinated by H.P.A.) a stakeholder network was established in a number of European countries, following a successful approach originally adopted in the UK. In a comparable approach, national working groups were thus established in Belgium, Finland, France and Greece in order to organise stakeholder panels and to discuss the outcomes of scientific and technical research related to management options for the food chain. The results of these panels were exchanged between participating Member States and on a wider international basis at the W.I.S.D.O.M.2. workshop in 2003. The F.A.R.M.I.N.G. project had many achievements and there were also several important lessons learned for Belgium (Vandecasteele et al., 2005): Firstly, many stakeholders showed a real interest in tackling problems relating to food chain contamination; Secondly, the Belgian agricultural system is very intensive and technically and economically optimised, making many of the options envisaged difficult to implement; thirdly, the applicability of management options is also limited by political and legal issues (e.g. competencies, environmental legislation), operational constraints (e.g. waste treatment, supplies of materials), societal and ethical aspects (e.g. milk disposal to sea, animal welfare), and economics (e.g. who pays the intervention cost?); fourthly, there is a now a greater awareness of these problems in both the food production sector and among the experts involved in emergency management; Fifthly, increased attention is now given in Belgium to the medium and

  15. Improved Emergency Preparedness For Management Of The Food chain Via Stakeholder Involvement: Belgian and European Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardeman, Frank; Carle, Benny; Turcanu, Catrinel; Vandecasteele, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Initiatives involving stakeholder engagement have gained increasing importance in sustainable decision making for many risk-related issues. This paper describes a Belgian experience within a European context related to food management options in the event of a radioactive contamination of the food chain. Under the auspices of the European Commission's 5. Framework Programme, the F.A.R.M.I.N.G. (F.A.R.M.I.N.G. 2000) project (co-ordinated by H.P.A.) a stakeholder network was established in a number of European countries, following a successful approach originally adopted in the UK. In a comparable approach, national working groups were thus established in Belgium, Finland, France and Greece in order to organise stakeholder panels and to discuss the outcomes of scientific and technical research related to management options for the food chain. The results of these panels were exchanged between participating Member States and on a wider international basis at the W.I.S.D.O.M.2. workshop in 2003. The F.A.R.M.I.N.G. project had many achievements and there were also several important lessons learned for Belgium (Vandecasteele et al., 2005): Firstly, many stakeholders showed a real interest in tackling problems relating to food chain contamination; Secondly, the Belgian agricultural system is very intensive and technically and economically optimised, making many of the options envisaged difficult to implement; thirdly, the applicability of management options is also limited by political and legal issues (e.g. competencies, environmental legislation), operational constraints (e.g. waste treatment, supplies of materials), societal and ethical aspects (e.g. milk disposal to sea, animal welfare), and economics (e.g. who pays the intervention cost?); fourthly, there is a now a greater awareness of these problems in both the food production sector and among the experts involved in emergency management; Fifthly, increased attention is now given in Belgium to the medium and long

  16. Can the BestGrid Process Improve Stakeholder Involvement in Electricity Transmission Projects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadejda Komendantova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The European Union has set ambitious targets for deployment of renewable energy sources to reach goals of climate change mitigation and energy security policies. However, the current state of electricity transmission infrastructure is a major bottleneck for further scaling up of renewable energy in the EU. Several thousands of kilometers of new lines have to be constructed and upgraded to accommodate growing volumes of intermittent renewable electricity. In many countries, construction of electricity transmission projects has been delayed for several years due to concerns of local stakeholders. The innovative BESTGRID approach, reported here, brings together transmission system operators (TSOs and non-governmental organizations (NGOs to discuss and understand the nature of stakeholder concerns. This paper has three objectives: (1 to understand stakeholder concerns about the deployment of electricity transmission grids in four pilot projects according to five guiding principles: need, transparency, engagement, environment, and impacts on human health as well as benefits; (2 to understand how these principles can be addressed to provide a basis for better decision-making outcomes; and (3 to evaluate the BESTGRID process based on feedback received from stakeholders and the level of participation achieved according to the ladder of Arnstein. This paper goes beyond a discussion of “measures to mitigate opposition” to understand how dialogue between TSOs and the public—represented mainly by NGOs and policy-makers—might lead to a better decision-making process and more sustainable electricity transmission infrastructure deployment.

  17. User and stakeholder involvement for relevant, reliable and robust local-scale climate projections in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neby, Simon; Sobolowski, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    How can users and stakeholders be actively involved with providing input to and using output from local-scale climate projections? How can the scientific community better understand the needs of local actors? And how should communication and cooperation efforts be organized? These are critical questions we aim to answer in a climate services project funded by the Norwegian Research Council (R3: Relevant, Reliable and Robust local-scale climate projections for Norway). The project takes into consideration not only the scientific issues in establishing useful local-scale climate projections, but also addresses the "usability gap" between climate information and decision-making. The lack of effective communication between scientists and user communities often result in outputs and products that are not matched with decision-relevant climate information. In the R3 project, the scientific participants actively engage with a range of users that have quite different information needs: municipalities, infrastructure developers, agriculture, energy producers, insurance companies, and more. In this particular presentation, we present our experiences concerning three specific issues that relate to the stakeholder-science interface: 1) Preferences are not clear-cut and pre-defined. In practice, this means that stakeholders often do not have precise information about their needs, nor precise information about how, where and whether their needs can be voiced. Similarly, science communities tend to presuppose that stakeholders are interested and have well-articulated needs, which is hardly the case. Collectively, that means that there is a need for an approach that guides the articulation and prioritization of preferences in a manner that integrates both scientific and stakeholder perspectives and takes the integrity of both perspectives seriously. 2) Technologies are unclear. Although information may be produced and used, past experiences, trial and error processes and pragmatic

  18. Placing the topical session on stakeholder involvement tools perspective: Rapporteur's analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vari, Anna

    2003-01-01

    The topical session discussed the following questions: - How to decide which of the various dialogue tools fits a waste management process, decision phase, and desired outcomes? - How to evaluate whether the dialogue process has been successful or not? - What can be expected, what should practitioners watch out for when applying some of the more commonly-used tools? This report summarises the responses given to the above questions by session contributors, and compares them with some general findings in public participation research. It was argued by most that although public participation will not guarantee an automatic success of the waste management programme, without it decision makers likely will be heading for tremendous difficulties. The public will not be contented by information only, but demands to be involved in the decision making process. Very strong motivation is needed to participate in a complex deliberation process that includes learning about or analysing a wide range of technical and non-technical issues, as well as gradually working out solutions or plans that are acceptable to all parties. Accomplishing such participation is an even more significant effort when it is a 'spare time', unpaid occupation. Under these conditions, the persons who attend all consultation meetings tend to be the ones who feel strongly against the project and who may not be open to the type of dialogue that decision makers would like to engage with them. As in other risk management and political situations, it is the very definition of 'what is at risk', and 'what should be done about it' that is brought to the fore. All these facts were recognised as significant challenges to the participation process. According to session participants, however, there are no alternatives or shortcuts to public involvement as a tool to make the decision making process in RWM transparent and acceptable. Most agreed that efforts should be allocated to using

  19. Acceptability and Perceived Benefits and Risks of Public and Patient Involvement in Health Care Policy: A Delphi Survey in Belgian Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleemput, Irina; Christiaens, Wendy; Kohn, Laurence; Léonard, Christian; Daue, François; Denis, Alain

    2015-06-01

    In systems with public health insurance, coverage decisions should reflect social values. Deliberation among stakeholders could achieve this goal, but rarely involves patients and citizens directly. This study aimed at evaluating the acceptability, and the perceived benefits and risks, of public and patient involvement (PPI) in coverage decision making to Belgian stakeholders. A two-round Delphi survey was conducted among all stakeholder groups. The survey was constructed on the basis of interviews with 10 key stakeholders and a review of the literature on participation models. Consensus was defined as 65% or more of the respondents agreeing with a statement and less than 15% disagreeing. Eighty stakeholders participated in both rounds. They were defined as the Delphi panel. Belgian stakeholders are open toward PPI in coverage decision processes. Benefits are expected to exceed risks. The preferred model for involvement is to consult citizens or patients, within the existing decision-making structures and at specific milestones in the process. Consulting citizens and patients is a higher level of involvement than merely informing them and a lower level than letting them participate actively. Consultation involves asking nonbinding advice on (parts of) the decision problem. According to the Delphi panel, the benefits of PPI could be increasing awareness among members of the general public and patients about the challenges and costs of health care, and enriched decision processes with expertise by experience from patients. Potential risks include subjectivity, insufficient resources to participate and weigh on the process, difficulties in finding effective ways to express a collective opinion, the risk of manipulation, and lobbying or power games of other stakeholders. PPI in coverage decision-making processes is acceptable to Belgian stakeholders, be it in different ways for different types of decisions. Benefits are expected to outweigh risks. Copyright © 2015

  20. Stakeholder involvement in redefining Hanford's Double-Shell Tank Waste Disposal Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triplett, M.B.; Hunter, V.L.

    1992-01-01

    Hanford's Double-Shell Tank (DST) waste disposal strategy, outlined in the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington calls for using B-Plant to separate the low-level and high-level portions of the DST waste. This separations step would provide feed to the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), viewed by many as the cornerstone to Site cleanup. The State of Washington strongly opposed using the 47-year old B-Plant because it was not built to comply with current environmental regulations. Because of this and other challenges to Hanford's tank waste disposal strategy, the Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Field Office (RL) initiated efforts to redefine the strategy. To support this effort, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company, (WHC) and sought input from outside stakeholder (stakeholders are those interest groups that are affected by the outcome of the decision and have a strong desire to ensure that their concerns are addressed) groups through a formal stakeholder involvement and multiattribute utility (MAU) analysis process

  1. The importance of stakeholder involvement in a successful waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goidell, L.C.; Hagen, T.D.; Thompson, T.; Sattler, J.

    1998-01-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project has been transporting legacy low-level radioactive waste to the Nevada Test Site for disposal since 1985. Additionally, several records of decision have been issued regarding Fernald Environmental Management Project remediation waste disposal on-site, at the Nevada Test Site, or at a permitted commercial disposal facility. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended, once of the criteria that must be evaluated prior to issuance of a record of decision is public acceptance. The Fernald Environmental Management Project has made a concerted effort to gain stakeholder support both locally and in Nevada for these records of decision. The Fernald Environmental Management Project's approach towards stakeholder interaction can provide a valuable framework for other sites that need to dispose of operations or remediation waste at remote, off-site locations. This approach has also been invaluable in allowing the public to understand the actual effects of waste management incidents

  2. Safeguarding Cultural Heritage against Climate Change and Natural Hazards through Stakeholder Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Rosmarie; Zuvela-Aloise, Maja; Hollosi, Brigitta; Anders, Ivonne; Höfler, Angelika; Boi, Silvia; Resta, Vanni; Patrikakis, Charalampos

    2017-04-01

    Europe's cultural heritage is among the richest in the world, and draws millions of visitors to archeological sites, museums, monuments, castles, and other sites each year. The protection and conservation of European heritage is of utmost importance for our society, not only in order to preserve the European cultural identity, but also because cultural heritage is a wealth creator bringing tourism-related business opportunities on which many communities depend. However, Europe's heritage assets are extremely exposed to climate change and natural hazards, which threatens their integrity and may compromise their value. The goal of the STORM (Safeguarding Cultural Heritage through Technical and Organisational Management) project is to provide critical decision-making tools to European cultural heritage stakeholders affected by climate change and natural hazards. Here, the STORM project will be presented with a focus on climate change and natural hazard risk communication to the involved stakeholders. However, climate change communication is not a one-way process, and discussions with stakeholders are necessary to identify their specific needs. Hence, the STORM concept is tested through pilot site studies in five different countries: the Diocletian Baths in Rome, Italy; the Mellor Heritage site, Manchester, UK; the Roman Ruins of Tróia, Portugal; the Historical Centre of Rethymno on Crete, Greece and Ephesus, Izmir, Turkey. Furthermore, the past and future climatic conditions at the project's pilot sites are analysed in terms of mean state and extreme events (for example temperature and precipitation changes evident from observations and climate scenarios), which will be discussed with regard to their relevance for the local cultural heritage protection based on discussions with the stakeholders.

  3. Involvement of stakeholders in the work of Technical Support Organisation: a strategy to learn together a new way of working

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollinger, Francois; Petitfrere, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Society's concerns have led to changes in the legal framework towards a greater requirement for public information and participation in decision-making processes. International organisations such as the OECD/NEA and the IAEA have also made similar changes. Moving towards expertise sharing is a development that demands a real change of culture on the part of all players, putting technical issues as part of a broader process of evaluation and decision-making. Which evolutions are necessary to the way Technical Support Organisations work to introduce a fourth player the population representatives in controlling radiological and nuclear risk? Developing experimental expert assessment processes involving parts of civil society that both sides can learn from one another is the core of IRSN's strategy for opening its expertise to civil society. In this perspective a dedicated team is responsible for carrying out actions in consultation with stakeholders from civil society. Two pluralistic assessment groups have been set up on radiological protection issues, and their innovative method of operation is worth highlighting. Another participative action is the development jointly with the Local Committees in the Loire Valley of methods of collecting environmental monitoring data. An internal network dedicated to stakeholder involvement has also been set up to accompany and promote this new approach internally. IRSN is currently elaborating a charter which will make public its commitments to the society related to stakeholder's involvement. Finally IRSN also intends to take advantage of existing experiences elsewhere and has been working for three years with four other assessments agencies in France in the frame of health and environmental risks about this new challenge: involving civil society in the assessments preceding the decision-making. (author)

  4. Trusting telemedicine: A discussion on risks, safety, legal implications and liability of involved stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parimbelli, E; Bottalico, B; Losiouk, E; Tomasi, M; Santosuosso, A; Lanzola, G; Quaglini, S; Bellazzi, R

    2018-04-01

    The main purpose of the article is to raise awareness among all the involved stakeholders about the risks and legal implications connected to the development and use of modern telemedicine systems. Particular focus is given to the class of "active" telemedicine systems, that imply a real-world, non-mediated, interaction with the final user. A secondary objective is to give an overview of the European legal framework that applies to these systems, in the effort to avoid defensive medicine practices and fears, which might be a barrier to their broader adoption. We leverage on the experience gained during two international telemedicine projects, namely MobiGuide (pilot studies conducted in Spain and Italy) and AP@home (clinical trials enrolled patients in Italy, France, the Netherlands, United Kingdom, Austria and Germany), whose development our group has significantly contributed to in the last 4 years, to create a map of the potential criticalities of active telemedicine systems and comment upon the legal framework that applies to them. Two workshops have been organized in December 2015 and March 2016 where the topic has been discussed in round tables with system developers, researchers, physicians, nurses, legal experts, healthcare economists and administrators. We identified 8 features that generate relevant risks from our example use cases. These features generalize to a broad set of telemedicine applications, and suggest insights on possible risk mitigation strategies. We also discuss the relevant European legal framework that regulate this class of systems, providing pointers to specific norms and highlighting possible liability profiles for involved stakeholders. Patients are more and more willing to adopt telemedicine systems to improve home care and day-by-day self-management. An essential step towards a broader adoption of these systems consists in increasing their compliance with existing regulations and better defining responsibilities for all the

  5. 75 FR 49930 - Stakeholder Meeting Regarding Re-Evaluation of Currently Approved Total Coliform Analytical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9190-2] Stakeholder Meeting Regarding Re-Evaluation of... conferences during which the Agency will have a technical dialogue with stakeholders regarding re-evaluation of currently approved Total Coliform Rule (TCR) analytical methods. At these meetings, stakeholders...

  6. Summary of case studies presented at the WPDD topical session on stakeholder involvement in decommissioning projects - november 14, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, Doug

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Two case studies were presented on experiences with stakeholder involvement in decommissioning projects. The first paper described the development of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority's (UKAEA) stakeholder involvement activities for the Dounreay Nuclear Reactor Test Establishment. The second paper presented the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory process for decommissioning that includes opportunities for public involvement. The presentation contrasted the stakeholder involvement for two commercial US nuclear power plants (NPPs) that completed decommissioning in 2005, the Trojan NPP and the Maine Yankee NPP. The two case studies highlighted the importance of involving stakeholders in decommissioning projects, and provide important lessons learned. The Dounreay case study demonstrated the UKAEA's determination and commitment to continuously improve its stakeholder engagement program. In 2002, the UKAEA set out to broaden its stakeholder program by improving both public understanding and participation. With regard to public understanding, the UKAEA committed to keep the public informed on decommissioning developments, and ensure that communication was in an understandable form. To improve participation, the UKAEA actively worked to identify and engage stakeholders. The UKAEA then made efforts to involve stakeholders in decision-making activities, including the use of stakeholder panels to discuss and consider options for specific aspects of the Dounreay decommissioning and site restoration plan. In 2004, the UKAEA commissioned an independent review of its stakeholder involvement program to assess the program's effectiveness and benchmark it against best practices. The program was found to be useful, and positive feedback was provided on the use of stakeholder panels and the UKAEA's determination to deliver a broad based and effective stakeholder strategy. Recommendations to UKAEA included involving stakeholders

  7. Stakeholder involvement in establishing a milk quality sub-index in dairy cow breeding goals: a Delphi approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchion, M; McCarthy, M; Resconi, V C; Berry, D P; McParland, S

    2016-05-01

    The relative weighting on traits within breeding goals are generally determined by bio-economic models or profit functions. While such methods have generally delivered profitability gains to producers, and are being expanded to consider non-market values, current approaches generally do not consider the numerous and diverse stakeholders that affect, or are affected, by such tools. Based on principles of respondent anonymity, iteration, controlled feedback and statistical aggregation of feedback, a Delphi study was undertaken to gauge stakeholder opinion of the importance of detailed milk quality traits within an overall dairy breeding goal for profit, with the aim of assessing its suitability as a complementary, participatory approach to defining breeding goals. The questionnaires used over two survey rounds asked stakeholders: (a) their opinion on incorporating an explicit sub-index for milk quality into a national breeding goal; (b) the importance they would assign to a pre-determined list of milk quality traits and (c) the (relative) weighting they would give such a milk quality sub-index. Results from the survey highlighted a good degree of consensus among stakeholders on the issues raised. Similarly, revelation of the underlying assumptions and knowledge used by stakeholders to make their judgements illustrated their ability to consider a range of perspectives when evaluating traits, and to reconsider their answers based on the responses and rationales given by others, which demonstrated social learning. Finally, while the relative importance assigned by stakeholders in the Delphi survey (4% to 10%) and the results of calculations based on selection index theory of the relative emphasis that should be placed on milk quality to halt any deterioration (16%) are broadly in line, the difference indicates the benefit of considering more than one approach to determining breeding goals. This study thus illustrates the role of the Delphi technique, as a complementary

  8. Local stakeholder involvement in the perspective of nuclear waste management: lessons form the Cowam network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heriard Dubreuil, G.; Gadbois, S.

    2004-01-01

    The management of high level radioactive waste is nowadays recognised as a complex decision-making process entailing technical, environmental, ethical, social, political and economic dimensions where no solution can be reached solely on the basis of technical considerations. While this issue is acknowledged as a problem for the community as a whole, waste management remains a global problem looking for a local solution. Starting from this view, COWAM network (Community Waste Management), developed under the Fifth Framework Programme of the European Commission, addressed the following objectives: 1) To empower local actors through a networking process; 2) To gather and discuss the available experiences of decision-making processes at the local level within their national context in Europe; 3) To set up an arena for balanced exchanges between local actors, NGOs, regulators and implementers; 4) To promote new approaches to decision-making in national contexts in Europe. COWAM network comprises 230 delegates from 10 European countries, involving in priority local communities and NGOs. The emphasis put on the local participation enabled members of COWAM network to overcome distrust and to build common lessons and views beyond usual stakeholder positions. Through the analysis of case studies different issues were identified, among them two relate more specifically to: 1) Expertise what is the purpose of expertise on environmental impact in the decision-making process? How is this expertise linked with other scientific and non scientific issues? What is the role of stakeholders in expertise? 2) Environmental quality in the long term and sustainable development how is the impact of radioactive waste management facilities on the environment in the long term taken into account? how is this associated with the sustainable development of the hosting community? How are local stakeholders involved in these issues and what is the expected benefit from their participation? (author)

  9. What makes for robust decisions and the involvement of all of the stakeholders in the debate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bars, Yves

    2006-01-01

    So that decisions will be robust and proof against conflicts of interest and changes of administrators and policy-makers, it is essential that they are reached through a process that involves stakeholders and allows time for debate. The first point to note is that in the culture of many countries the concept of public policy, in the sense of defining a policy agenda, is not that straightforward. Secondly, drawing on the work of the 'Forum on Stakeholder Confidence' (FSC/NEA), the author looks at what goes into the mix, based on a number of different examples: processes, actor structures and behaviour. Lastly, he gives a few rules for conducting public debates. In conclusion, each national situation is specific to the given country: any transfer of experience out of that context must be handled with extreme caution. This said, would it not be possible to keep some generic rules? For example on difficulties with process definition, the necessary clarity of the structure and respective role of the actors, particularly when they are public actors, the behaviour of experts and technicians involved which becomes an increasingly sensitive point the closer they are to process leadership. We can expect significant progress from comparing our experience - and managing dismantling is no exception to that rule. In France, a 1999 decree authorises the implementation of a Local Information and Monitoring Committee to be chaired by the Prefect of Department where an underground research laboratory (URL) project is implemented

  10. Pharmacy clients' attitudes to expanded pharmacist prescribing and the role of agency theory on involved stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoti, Kreshnik; Hughes, Jeffery; Sunderland, Bruce

    2011-02-01

    To examine the views of regular pharmacy clients on pharmacist prescribing and employ agency theory in considering the relationship between the stakeholders involved. Computer assisted telephone interviews were conducted with 400 pharmacy clients recruited around Australia. Potential respondents were identified using a random number generation function in Microsoft Excel. Data were analysed with SPSS version 17 using one-way analysis of variance, principal component analysis and linear regression. The relationships between the main stakeholders involved were explored using agency theory. A total of 1153 answered calls recruited 400 consenting pharmacy clients. Most respondents (71%) trusted pharmacists adopting an expanded role in prescribing, however the majority (66%) supported this only after a diagnosis had been made by a doctor. Those who accepted pharmacist diagnosing and prescribing preferred that this was limited to pain management and antibiotics. Most respondents (64%) considered that expanded pharmacist prescribing would improve their access to prescription medicines, although those over 65 years of age were less supportive than younger respondents. Factors which contributed positively to clients' perception of trust in an expanded prescribing role for pharmacists were identified, and improved access to medicines was found to be the strongest predictor (P Agency theory would conceptualize the introduction of pharmacist prescribers, as disrupting the principal (patient) agent (doctor) relationship. Its introduction would best be facilitated by careful change management. © 2011 The Authors. IJPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  11. What we heard within WPDD on stakeholder involvement in decommissioning, 2001-2004. A Compilation of Papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    At its sixth meeting, the WPDD held a topical session on Stakeholder Involvement in Decommissioning Projects. The topical session was jointly planned and run with members of the NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC). The Topical Session provided a stimulus to review the contributions in the area of stakeholder involvement that the WPDD have received since its inception. This report contains a compilation of all papers regarding stakeholder involvement in decommissioning given at WPDD meetings and workshops between 2001 and the end of 2004. The compilation, together with other relevant material collected by FSC, will serve as background material for a review, focusing on lessons to be learnt and including examples of key statements by representatives from different NEA member states involved in or affected by decommissioning projects. The review is intended to be published during 2006 in a NEA brochure

  12. The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk Through Stakeholder Involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Hartwell

    2007-01-01

    Between 1951 and 1992, 928 nuclear tests were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), including 100 atmospheric and 828 underground tests. Initial public reaction to the tests was largely supportive, but by the late 1950s this began to change, largely as a result of fear of the potential for adverse health effects to be caused by exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from the tests. The nuclear power plant accident at Three Mile Island in 1979 served to heighten these fears, as well as foster a general distrust of the federal agencies involved and low public confidence in monitoring results. Modeled after a similar program that involved the public in monitoring activities around the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant, the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the NTS since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah, and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Since assuming administration of the program in 2000, DRI has accomplished significant enhancements to the network's data collection and transmission capabilities. A robust datalogging and communications system allows for the near real-time transmission of data to a platform maintained by DRI's Western Regional Climate Center, where the data are uploaded and displayed on a publicly accessible web site (http://cemp.dri.edu/). Additionally, the CEMP can serve as part of an emergency response network in the event of an unplanned radiological release from the NTS, and also provides an excellent platform for testing new environmental sensor technologies

  13. 75 FR 57763 - ILP Effectiveness Evaluation 2010; Supplemental Notice of Multi-Stakeholder Technical Conference...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... Effectiveness Evaluation 2010; Supplemental Notice of Multi- Stakeholder Technical Conference on the Integrated..., Teleconferences, Regional Workshops and Multi-Stakeholder Technical Conference on the Integrated Licensing Process... opportunity for industry, state and Federal agencies, tribes, and other stakeholders to express their views...

  14. The science of stakeholder engagement in research: classification, implementation, and evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Melody S.; Sanders Thompson, Vetta L.

    2017-01-01

    In this commentary, we discuss the science of stakeholder engagement in research. We propose a classification system with definitions to determine where projects lie on the stakeholder engagement continuum. We discuss the key elements of implementation and evaluation of stakeholder engagement in research posing key questions to consider when doing this work. We commend and critique the work of Hamilton et al. in their multilevel stakeholder engagement in a VA implementation trial of evidence-...

  15. Networking as an efficient, modern way of favouring stakeholders' involvement in implementing good radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, Ch.; Janssens, A.; Mrabit, K.; Ahier, B.

    2006-01-01

    Since the publication of ICRP 22 and ICRP 26 in 1973 and 1977 respectively, the understanding and practical implementation of the concept of Optimisation of Radiation Protection known as ALARA ('as low as reasonably achievable') has developed considerably globally and particularly in Europe. In the 1990 ICRP 60 publication, ALARA was re-emphasised as the cornerstone of the radiological protection system. This is also an explicit requirement of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (International BSS) and EC Directive laying down the Basic Safety Standards for radiological protection (EURATOM Directive 96/29), as well as of most of the national regulations. Throughout the 1980's and early 1990's ALARA was integrated into many organisations' radiation protection programmes, particularly in the nuclear industry and mainly for managing occupational exposure. One of the main lessons identified from that period was that it was not possible to implement good radiological protection by relying only on technical rules and procedures summarised in the three words: 'Time-Distance-Shielding'. A fourth word, 'Commitment', was to be added as no radiological protection programme would be successful without the commitment of all concerned stakeholders: regulatory bodies, managers, workers, etc. The scope of this presentation is, through different international feedback experiences, to demonstrate how networking is an efficient, modern way of fostering stakeholders involvement in implementing good radiological protection. (authors)

  16. Involving Research Stakeholders in Developing Policy on Sharing Public Health Research Data in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Irene; Kombe, Francis; Mwalukore, Salim; Bull, Susan; Parker, Michael; Kamuya, Dorcas; Molyneux, Sassy

    2015-01-01

    Increased global sharing of public health research data has potential to advance scientific progress but may present challenges to the interests of research stakeholders, particularly in low-to-middle income countries. Policies for data sharing should be responsive to public views, but there is little evidence of the systematic study of these from low-income countries. This qualitative study explored views on fair data-sharing processes among 60 stakeholders in Kenya with varying research experience, using a deliberative approach. Stakeholders’ attitudes were informed by perceptions of benefit and concerns for research data sharing, including risks of stigmatization, loss of privacy, and undermining scientific careers and validity, reported in detail elsewhere. In this article, we discuss institutional trust-building processes seen as central to perceptions of fairness in sharing research data in this setting, including forms of community involvement, individual prior awareness and agreement to data sharing, independence and accountability of governance mechanisms, and operating under a national framework. PMID:26297748

  17. Stakeholder involvement in the decommissioning of Trojan and Maine Yankee nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, Bruce A.; Orlando, Dominick A.

    2006-01-01

    a longer than anticipated period to obtain NRC approval of the Maine Yankee License Termination Plan (LTP). While both licensees provided final status survey reports (FSSRs) for NRC approval, the Trojan approach to decommissioning and data management allowed NRC to review FSS records and supporting documentation more efficiently. This paper describes the stakeholder and regulatory impacts of the differing approaches to decommissioning, development of licensee required plans, decommissioning operations and records, and the differences in licensing processes. In conclusion: From an NRC perspective, there is no significant difference in the two licensing approaches at the completion of decommissioning. The NRC License Termination Rule mandates the opportunity for stakeholder involvement. Individual States may vary in their role in the decommissioning process. Stakeholder interest can vary and must be addressed. High quality decommissioning submittals from the licensee to the NRC are critical

  18. The community environmental monitoring program: a model for stakeholder involvement in environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwell, William T.; Shafer, David S.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1981, the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has involved stakeholders directly in its daily operation and data collection, as well as in dissemination of information on radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the primary location where the United States (US) conducted nuclear testing until 1992. The CEMP is funded by the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, and is administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. The CEMP provides training workshops for stakeholders involved in the program, and educational outreach to address public concerns about health risk and environmental impacts from past and ongoing NTS activities. The network includes 29 monitoring stations located across an approximately 160,000 km 2 area of Nevada, Utah and California in the southwestern US. The principal radiological instruments are pressurized ion chambers for measuring gamma radiation, and particulate air samplers, primarily for alpha/beta detection. Stations also employ a full suite of meteorological instruments, allowing for improved interpretation of the effects of meteorological events on background radiation levels. Station sensors are wired to state-of-the-art data-loggers that are capable of several weeks of on-site data storage, and that work in tandem with a communications system that integrates DSL and wireless internet, land line and cellular phone, and satellite technologies for data transfer. Data are managed through a platform maintained by the Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC) that DRI operates for the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The WRCC platform allows for near real-time upload and display of current monitoring information in tabular and graphical formats on a public web site. Archival data for each station are also available on-line, providing the ability to perform trending analyses or calculate site

  19. Evaluating stakeholder participation in water management: intermediary outcomes as potential indicators for future resource management outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Gemma; Bloeschl, Guenter; Loucks, Daniel Pete

    2013-04-01

    Evaluation of participation programmes, projects and activities is essential to identify whether stakeholder involvement has been successful in achieving its aims. Aims may include an improvement in water resource management such as enhanced ecological functioning, an improvement in human wellbeing and economic conditions, or overcoming a conflict between interest groups. Evaluating against "interest-based" resource management criteria requires that a desirable outcome can be identified, agreed upon and be measured at the time of evaluation. In many water management situations where collaborative approaches are applied, multiple interests and objectives are present, or stakeholders have not yet identified their own positions and priorities. Even if a resource management objective has been identified and strategy agreed upon, resource management changes tend to emerge over longer timescales and evaluation frequently takes place before they can be recognised. Evaluating against resource management criteria may lead evaluators to conclude that a programme has failed because it has not achieved a resource management objective at the time of evaluation. This presents a critical challenge to researchers assessing the effectiveness of stakeholder participation programmes. One strategy to overcome this is to conduct "goal-free" evaluation to identify what the programme is actually achieving. An evaluation framework that includes intermediary outcomes that are both tangible achievements such as innovation, creation of new organisations, and shared information and knowledge, as well as intangible achievements such as trust and network development can be applied to more broadly assess a programme's success. Analysis of case-studies in the published literature for which a resource management outcome has been achieved shows that intermediary outcomes frequently precede resource management outcomes. They seem to emerge over shorter timescales than resource management outcomes

  20. The science of stakeholder engagement in research: classification, implementation, and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Melody S; Sanders Thompson, Vetta L

    2017-09-01

    In this commentary, we discuss the science of stakeholder engagement in research. We propose a classification system with definitions to determine where projects lie on the stakeholder engagement continuum. We discuss the key elements of implementation and evaluation of stakeholder engagement in research posing key questions to consider when doing this work. We commend and critique the work of Hamilton et al. in their multilevel stakeholder engagement in a VA implementation trial of evidence-based quality improvement in women's health primary care. We also discuss the need for more work in this area to enhance the science of stakeholder engagement in research.

  1. When the user is not the chooser: learning from stakeholder involvement in technology adoption decisions in infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, R; Kyratsis, Y; Holmes, A

    2012-07-01

    Health systems need efficient and effective innovation decisions to provide maximum benefit to patients, particularly in a climate of financial constraints. Although evidence-based innovations exist for helping to address healthcare-associated infections, the uptake and implementation of these is highly variable and in some cases very slow. To investigate innovation adoption decisions and implementation processes from an organizational perspective, focusing on the implications of stakeholder involvement during the innovation process. Thirty-eight technology adoption decisions and implementation processes were examined through 121 qualitative interviews in 12 National Health Service healthcare organizations across England. Stakeholder involvement varied across organizations with decisions highly exclusive to the infection prevention and control (IPC) team, to highly inclusive of wider organizational members. The context, including organizational culture, previous experience, and logistical factors influenced the level of stakeholder engagement. The timing of stakeholder involvement in the process impacted on: (i) the range of innovations considered; (ii) the technologies selected, and (iii) the success of technology implementation. Cases of non-adoption, discontinued adoption, and of successful implementation are presented to share learning. The potential benefits of stakeholder involvement for 'successful' innovation adoption are presented including a goal-oriented framework for involvement. Key stakeholder involvement can lead to innovation adoption and implementation compatible with structural and cultural contexts, particularly when involvement crosses the phases of initiation, decision-making and implementation. Involving members of the wider healthcare organization can raise the profile of IPC and reinforce efforts to make IPC everybody's business. Copyright © 2012 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Facing the challenge of stakeholders involvement: the Argentine nuclear regulatory case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta, Gabriela M.; Arnaud, Marta I.; Cesario, Pablo A.

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina (ARN) is an autonomous body reporting to the Presidency of Argentina, empowered to regulate and control the nuclear activity with regards to radiation and nuclear safety, physical protection and nuclear non-proliferation issues. Under the executive decree 1172/2003, which makes reference to the accessibility of public information to increase transparency of government actions and specially to promote public involvement, ARN has the legal obligation to inform of its activities in an accurate, comprehensive and understandable manner. The re-launching of the nuclear plan in 2006 and the repercussions this provoked on society highlighted the need to reinforce the legitimacy of the regulatory role and the promotion of confidence on its works to ensure the safety of the people. Therefore it was considered necessary to involve the society further in this programme by achieving greater public understanding and awareness of the nuclear regulatory activities. The more the public is conscious of the role of the regulator, conceiving it as a trustworthy and autonomous authority, the easier it is for the regulator to fulfil its obligations. As ARN has a strong commitment with society and considering that communication with the general public, as an external stakeholder, is a means to establishing and maintaining public trust and confidence, the implementation of a new communication programme became a key issue. In this scenario, ARN faced a challenge it was not prepared to handle and thus created a Division to deal with institutional communication and allow and ease the interaction with society. Within this Division, one of the methods chosen to achieve a better interaction with society was the use of a technological tool to attend possible inquiries, increasing and facilitating a greater involvement of the stakeholders. With this in mind a 'Mail-Info' was established because it allows a fast, accessible, easy and informal way of

  3. Facing the challenge of stakeholders involvement: the Argentine nuclear regulatory case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, Gabriela M.; Arnaud, Marta I.; Cesario, Pablo A. [Nuclear Affairs and Institutional Communication Department, Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. del Libertador 8250, C1429BNP (Argentina)

    2010-07-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina (ARN) is an autonomous body reporting to the Presidency of Argentina, empowered to regulate and control the nuclear activity with regards to radiation and nuclear safety, physical protection and nuclear non-proliferation issues. Under the executive decree 1172/2003, which makes reference to the accessibility of public information to increase transparency of government actions and specially to promote public involvement, ARN has the legal obligation to inform of its activities in an accurate, comprehensive and understandable manner. The re-launching of the nuclear plan in 2006 and the repercussions this provoked on society highlighted the need to reinforce the legitimacy of the regulatory role and the promotion of confidence on its works to ensure the safety of the people. Therefore it was considered necessary to involve the society further in this programme by achieving greater public understanding and awareness of the nuclear regulatory activities. The more the public is conscious of the role of the regulator, conceiving it as a trustworthy and autonomous authority, the easier it is for the regulator to fulfil its obligations. As ARN has a strong commitment with society and considering that communication with the general public, as an external stakeholder, is a means to establishing and maintaining public trust and confidence, the implementation of a new communication programme became a key issue. In this scenario, ARN faced a challenge it was not prepared to handle and thus created a Division to deal with institutional communication and allow and ease the interaction with society. Within this Division, one of the methods chosen to achieve a better interaction with society was the use of a technological tool to attend possible inquiries, increasing and facilitating a greater involvement of the stakeholders. With this in mind a 'Mail-Info' was established because it allows a fast, accessible, easy and informal

  4. Institutional reforms of nuclear emergency preparedness in Japan and its challenges. Case studies on stakeholder involvement in establishing nuclear emergency preparedness in France and its implications for Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Shin-etsu

    2013-01-01

    Based upon the experiences with the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, Japan is now making a comprehensive review of nuclear emergency preparedness. The Nuclear Regulation Authority of Japan has changed drastically its basic concept of nuclear emergency arrangements from their dependence on the prediction methods to advance planning-oriented arrangements. In order to implement such changes in an effective enough manner, this report examines how to improve stakeholder involvement focusing on the French cases, where the Local Information Commissions (CLI) plays a critical role, and thereby derives concrete lessons for Japan. Case studies on CLI's involvement in French nuclear emergency preparedness revealed the following implications for Japan; 1. Improving continuously the disaster prevention plans of local governments and of nuclear utilities thorough recursive cycles of disaster-preparedness drill and its evaluation for the benefits of local inhabitants, 2. Setting appropriate ranges wherein local stakeholders involve constantly in establishing nuclear emergency preparedness without alienating completely other stakeholders, 3. Utilizing the prediction systems not as a means to support decision-making in emergency situations but as a tool for facilitating stakeholder involvement in the phase of advance planning, and 4. Integrating nuclear emergency preparedness into other disaster preventions for reducing complex and unrecognized risks. (author)

  5. From public participation to stakeholder involvement: The rocky road to more inclusiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peelle, E.

    1995-07-01

    Surviving always at the edge of extinction, public participation in environmental decision making has an uncertain and problematic history. From its emergence from the urban planning and delivery system efforts of the 1960s to many siting and non-siting uses today, it remains a battleground, with few successes and many failures. While some compelling structural, organizational and cultural explanations for this state of affairs exist, the author offers a further one--a too-limited definition and vision of public participation. One then can argue for a more inclusive process such as stakeholder involvement (SI) to enable a more viable approach to decision making. One can argue that the narrow conceptualization offered in the term public participation (PP) is partly responsible for the meager results of decades of efforts by earnest practitioners. Because of the limited, unique, and self-selected publics that respond to the major PP mechanisms such as public hearings, PP has become largely the province of organized activist groups and is largely accepted as such by most parties, including PP professionals. The author reviews the roles of Congress, federal agencies/proponents, local governments, activist groups and PP professionals in creating the current limited PP processes. She discusses trends and prospects for moving to broader based, more inclusive SI approaches. The emerging SI approach presents major methodological and organizational challenges, but offers the promise of outcomes more likely to be legitimated and potentially more lasting.

  6. Stakeholder involvement in building and maintaining national and international radiation safety infrastructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, K.

    2004-01-01

    Society's expectations with regard to policy towards risky technologies have changed significantly over the past 50 years, and perhaps most dramatically, over the past decade. Arrangements for the development and implementation of such policy may well fit with traditional theories from the disciplines of law, political science and engineering regarding democratic legitimacy, the delegation of power and the role of the expert. They may, however, no longer fit with a policy environment that is considerably more complex than those theories allow. The stakes are high for the radiation protection community as it seeks to recognize and accommodate these changed and changing expectations.For many years, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and its Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has an active work programme on details and implications of stakeholder involvement in radiological protection decision making processes. The series of workshops in Villigen, Switzerland (in 1998 and 2002) and related follow-up work, offer assistance to the international radiological protection community on how to better integrate radiological protection into modern society. The lessons that have been learned in this area carry implications on national policy and on the governmental infrastructures necessary to carry it out

  7. Evaluation of a Workplace Disability Prevention Intervention in Canada: Examining Differing Perceptions of Stakeholders

    OpenAIRE

    Maiwald, Karin; de Rijk, Angelique; Guzman, Jaime; Schonstein, Eva; Yassi, Annalee

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Workplace disability prevention is important, but stakeholders can differ in their appreciation of such interventions. We present a responsive evaluation of a workplace disability prevention intervention in a Canadian healthcare organization. Three groups of stakeholders were included: designers of the intervention, deliverers, and workers. The aim was to examine the appreciation of this intervention by analyzing the discrepancies with respect to what these various stakeholders s...

  8. The Safe and Effective Use of Shared Data Underpinned by Stakeholder Engagement and Evaluation Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Andrew; Magrabi, Farah; Hypponen, Hannele; Wong, Zoie Shui-Yee; Nykänen, Pirkko; Scott, Philip J; Ammenwerth, Elske; Rigby, Michael

    2018-04-22

     The paper draws attention to: i) key considerations involving the confidentiality, privacy, and security of shared data; and ii) the requirements needed to build collaborative arrangements encompassing all stakeholders with the goal of ensuring safe, secure, and quality use of shared data.  A narrative review of existing research and policy approaches along with expert perspectives drawn from the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) Working Group on Technology Assessment and Quality Development in Health Care and the European Federation for Medical Informatics (EFMI) Working Group for Assessment of Health Information Systems.  The technological ability to merge, link, re-use, and exchange data has outpaced the establishment of policies, procedures, and processes to monitor the ethics and legality of shared use of data. Questions remain about how to guarantee the security of shared data, and how to establish and maintain public trust across large-scale shared data enterprises. This paper identifies the importance of data governance frameworks (incorporating engagement with all stakeholders) to underpin the management of the ethics and legality of shared data use. The paper also provides some key considerations for the establishment of national approaches and measures to monitor compliance with best practice. Data sharing endeavours can help to underpin new collaborative models of health care which provide shared information, engagement, and accountability amongst all stakeholders. We believe that commitment to rigorous evaluation and stakeholder engagement will be critical to delivering health data benefits and the establishment of collaborative models of health care into the future. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.

  9. Developing a Stakeholder-Driven Anticipated Timeline of Impact for Evaluation of Social Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Sanjeev; Campbell, Bernadette; Zinzow, Heidi

    2006-01-01

    The authors present a stakeholder-driven method, the earliest anticipated timeline of impact, which is designed to assess stakeholder expectations for the earliest time frame in which social programs are likely to affect outcomes. The utility of the anticipated timeline of impact is illustrated using an example from an evaluation of a…

  10. 75 FR 66752 - ILP Effectiveness Evaluation 2010; Additional Notice of Multi-Stakeholder Technical Conference on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. AD10-7-000] ILP Effectiveness Evaluation 2010; Additional Notice of Multi- Stakeholder Technical Conference on the Integrated..., Teleconferences, Regional Workshops And Multi-Stakeholder Technical Conference On The Integrated Licensing Process...

  11. Flood Induced Disasters and Stakeholder Involvement to Implement Integrated Food Management in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, N. P.

    2016-12-01

    Nepal, a landlocked country in South Asia covers an area of 147, 181 square kilometers. Its elevation ranges from 61m as the lowest to 8848m, the highest peak Everest in the world. More than 80% of the annual rainfall occurs in the monsoon season from June to September. Thus, due to the intense rainfall that occurs within a short period, monsoon acts as the biggest cause for the occurrence of different disastrous events including flood. Beyond it, Nepal lies at the center and southern edge of Hindu-Kush Himalayan (HKH) region, which is the youngest geological formation in the world. Hence, floods and landslides are common in this region. In Nepal, from the records of 1971-2010, floods and landslides are the second biggest cause for casualties after epidemics. Hawaii based Center of Excellence in disaster management and humanitarian assistance in 2015 has declared Nepal as 30th vulnerable country from the aspect of floods. According to WMO definition, integrated flood management (IFM) is a process of promoting an integrated rather than a fragmented approach to flood management, integrating land and water resource development in a river basin within the context of integrated water resources management (IWRM), with the aim of maximizing the net benefits from flood plains while minimizing loss of life from flooding. That is the reason why the IFM is one of the important countermeasures to be implemented in Nepal to reduce the adverse effects of floods. This study emphasizes on the existing conditions along with the challenges of IFM with respect to stakeholder involvement in the context of Nepal. It can be assured that all the highlighted issues coming out from this study will be highly valuable to policy makers, implementing agencies along with scientific and local communities to enhance IFM works in the nation for the benefits of societies.

  12. Improving the active involvement of stakeholders and the public in flood risk management – tools of an involvement strategy and case study results from Austria, Germany and Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Vitale

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The EU Flood Risk Management Directive 2007/60/EC aims at an active involvement of interested parties in the setting up of flood risk management plans and thus calls for more governance-related decision-making. This requirement has two perspectives. On the one hand, there is (1 the question of how decision-makers can improve the quality of their governance process. On the other hand, there is (2 the question of how the public shall be appropriately informed and involved. These questions were the centre of the ERA-Net CRUE-funded project IMRA (integrative flood risk governance approach for improvement of risk awareness that aimed at an optimisation of the flood risk management process by increasing procedural efficiency with an explicit involvement strategy. To reach this goal, the IMRA project partners developed two new approaches that were implemented in three case study areas for the first time in flood risk management: 1. risk governance assessment tool: An indicator-based benchmarking and monitoring tool was used to evaluate the performance of a flood risk management system in regard to ideal risk governance principles; 2. social milieu approach: The concept of social milieus was used to gain a picture of the people living in the case study regions to learn more about their lifestyles, attitudes and values and to use this knowledge to plan custom-made information and participation activities for the broad public. This paper presents basic elements and the application of two innovative approaches as a part of an "involvement strategy" that aims at the active involvement of all interested parties (stakeholders for assessing, reviewing and updating flood risk management plans, as formulated in the EU Flood Risk Management Directive 2007/60/EC.

  13. Strategic planning model for achieving stakeholder involvement in environmental at DOE weapons complex sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, G.

    1994-01-01

    Within today's reality a public manager often needs to develop cooperative relationships among a number of individual, program, and organizational stakeholders to accomplish particular projects, programs, or policies. A DOE site manager charged with accomplishing environmental restoration and conversion at former weapons production sites is no exception. Important reasons for this include the technical and political complexity of the clean-up problem; limits on the funding, authority, and other resources available to DOE; authority, responsibilities, and interests of other stakeholders; and the ever present potential for conflict among stakeholders, and power of any one to hinder, if not halt, the clean-up process if conflicts aren't managed and cooperative relationships established and maintained

  14. A multi-stakeholder evaluation of the Baltimore City virtual supermarket program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Lagisetty

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing access to healthy foods and beverages in disadvantaged communities is a public health priority due to alarmingly high rates of obesity. The Virtual Supermarket Program (VSP is a Baltimore City Health Department program that uses online grocery ordering to deliver food to low-income neighborhoods. This study evaluates stakeholder preferences and barriers of program implementation. Methods This study assessed the feasibility, sustainability and efficacy of the VSP by surveying 93 customers and interviewing 14 programmatic stakeholders who had recently used the VSP or been involved with program design and implementation. Results We identified the following themes: The VSP addressed transportation barriers and food availability. The VSP impacted customers and the city by including improving food purchasing behavior, creating a food justice “brand for the city”, and fostering a sense of community. Customers appreciated using Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP benefits to pay for groceries, but policy changes are needed allow online processing of SNAP benefits. Conclusions This evaluation summarizes lessons learned and serves as a guide to other public health leaders interested in developing similar programs. Provisions in the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA Farm Bill 2014 allow for select grocers to pilot online transactions with SNAP benefits. If these pilots are efficacious, the VSP model could be easily disseminated.

  15. A multi-stakeholder evaluation of the Baltimore City virtual supermarket program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagisetty, Pooja; Flamm, Laura; Rak, Summer; Landgraf, Jessica; Heisler, Michele; Forman, Jane

    2017-10-23

    Increasing access to healthy foods and beverages in disadvantaged communities is a public health priority due to alarmingly high rates of obesity. The Virtual Supermarket Program (VSP) is a Baltimore City Health Department program that uses online grocery ordering to deliver food to low-income neighborhoods. This study evaluates stakeholder preferences and barriers of program implementation. This study assessed the feasibility, sustainability and efficacy of the VSP by surveying 93 customers and interviewing 14 programmatic stakeholders who had recently used the VSP or been involved with program design and implementation. We identified the following themes: The VSP addressed transportation barriers and food availability. The VSP impacted customers and the city by including improving food purchasing behavior, creating a food justice "brand for the city", and fostering a sense of community. Customers appreciated using Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits to pay for groceries, but policy changes are needed allow online processing of SNAP benefits. This evaluation summarizes lessons learned and serves as a guide to other public health leaders interested in developing similar programs. Provisions in the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Bill 2014 allow for select grocers to pilot online transactions with SNAP benefits. If these pilots are efficacious, the VSP model could be easily disseminated.

  16. Attitudes towards evaluation of psychiatric disability claims: a survey of Swiss stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schandelmaier, Stefan; Leibold, Andrea; Fischer, Katrin; Mager, Ralph; Hoffmann-Richter, Ulrike; Bachmann, Monica Susanne; Kedzia, Sarah; Busse, Jason Walter; Guyatt, Gordon Henry; Jeger, Joerg; Marelli, Renato; De Boer, Wout Ernst Lodewijk; Kunz, Regina

    2015-01-01

    In Switzerland, evaluation of work capacity in individuals with mental disorders has come under criticism. We surveyed stakeholders about their concerns and expectations of the current claim process. We conducted a nationwide online survey among five stakeholder groups. We asked 37 questions addressing the claim process and the evaluation of work capacity, the maximum acceptable disagreement in judgments on work capacity, and its documentation. Response rate among 704 stakeholders (95 plaintiff lawyers, 285 treating psychiatrists, 129 expert psychiatrists evaluating work capacity, 64 social judges, 131 insurers) varied between 71% and 29%. Of the lawyers, 92% were dissatisfied with the current claim process, as were psychiatrists (73%) and experts (64%), whereas the majority of judges (72%) and insurers (81%) were satisfied. Stakeholders agreed in their concerns, such as the lack of a transparent relationship between the experts' findings and their conclusions regarding work capacity, medical evaluations inappropriately addressing legal issues, and the experts' delay in finalising the report. Findings mirror the characteristics that stakeholders consider important for an optimal work capacity evaluation. For a scenario where two experts evaluate the same claimant, stakeholders considered an inter-rater difference of 10%‒20% in work capacity at maximum acceptable. Plaintiff lawyers, treating psychiatrists and experts perceive major problems in work capacity evaluation of psychiatric claims whereas judges and insurers see the process more positively. Efforts to improve the process should include clarifying the basis on which judgments are made, restricting judgments to areas of expertise, and ensuring prompt submission of evaluations.

  17. Effective Stakeholder involvement at the Base of the Pyramid: The case of Rabobank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, V.; Sjauw-Koen-Fa, A.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, we explore the role of Rabobank in dealing with the wicked problem of food security in general and of smallholder inclusion into food value chains in particular. In the first part of the essay, we focus on the (social) expectations of stakeholders with regard to Rabobank’s role in BoP

  18. Involving stakeholders in the commissioning and implementation of fishery science projects: experiences from the U.K. Fisheries Science Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, M J; Payne, A I L; Deas, B; Catchpole, T L

    2013-10-01

    Following from similar initiatives worldwide, the U.K.'s Fisheries Science Partnership (FSP) was established in 2003 to provide the fishing industry with opportunities to propose and participate in scientific studies in collaboration with fishery scientists. Key concepts were that most of the available funding would support industry participation, that industry, not scientists, would come up with the ideas for projects, and that commercial fishing vessels and fishing methods would be used to address specific concerns of the fishing industry in a scientifically controlled manner. Nearly 100 projects had been commissioned by March 2012, covering annual time-series surveys of stocks subject to traditional assessment, and ad hoc projects on, e.g. gear selectivity, discard survival, tagging and migration and fishery development. The extent to which the results of the projects have been used by stakeholders, fishery scientists and fishery managers at a national and E.U. level is evaluated, along with the degree of industry interest and involvement, and reasons are identified for successes or failures in the uptake of the results into management and policy. Finally, the question is posed whether the programme has been successful in improving the engagement of the fishing community in the science-management process and in fostering communication and greater trust between fishers, scientists and managers. © 2013 Crown Copyright. © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  19. Setting health research priorities using the CHNRI method: III. Involving stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiyo Yoshida

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Setting health research priorities is a complex and value–driven process. The introduction of the Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative (CHNRI method has made the process of setting research priorities more transparent and inclusive, but much of the process remains in the hands of funders and researchers, as described in the previous two papers in this series. However, the value systems of numerous other important stakeholders, particularly those on the receiving end of health research products, are very rarely addressed in any process of priority setting. Inclusion of a larger and more diverse group of stakeholders in the process would result in a better reflection of the system of values of the broader community, resulting in recommendations that are more legitimate and acceptable.

  20. Stakeholder Involvement in Radioactive Waste Management in Belgium: the Past, the Present and Challenges for the Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmans, Anne; Steenberge, Annelies Van [Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium)

    2006-09-15

    At present stakeholder involvement in RWM in Belgium focuses solely on siting a LILW-repository, engaging primarily local citizen-stakeholders. If accepting the value of participation in this programme, which NIRAS/ONDRAF explicitly states, the biggest future challenge for the agency will be to match the efforts in its LILWprogramme with similar efforts for the whole of its management operations, both short-term and long-term; and both site specific as well as on a general policy level. The local partnerships (in particular STORA and MONA) today have become NIRAS/ONDRAF's most important stakeholders. Their insisting on opening up a HLW-debate (but without the intention of turning it into a site selection process) might therefore be just the leverage needed to move from a declaration of intent to the setting up of an active participatory programme. Although some might regret it, the introduction of the partnership approach has opened up a Pandora's box, creating self-awareness and self-identification among a particular group of stakeholders who clearly are not prepared to be backing out of their new role in the immediate future.

  1. Stakeholder Involvement in Radioactive Waste Management in Belgium: the Past, the Present and Challenges for the Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmans, Anne; Steenberge, Annelies Van

    2006-01-01

    At present stakeholder involvement in RWM in Belgium focuses solely on siting a LILW-repository, engaging primarily local citizen-stakeholders. If accepting the value of participation in this programme, which NIRAS/ONDRAF explicitly states, the biggest future challenge for the agency will be to match the efforts in its LILWprogramme with similar efforts for the whole of its management operations, both short-term and long-term; and both site specific as well as on a general policy level. The local partnerships (in particular STORA and MONA) today have become NIRAS/ONDRAF's most important stakeholders. Their insisting on opening up a HLW-debate (but without the intention of turning it into a site selection process) might therefore be just the leverage needed to move from a declaration of intent to the setting up of an active participatory programme. Although some might regret it, the introduction of the partnership approach has opened up a Pandora's box, creating self-awareness and self-identification among a particular group of stakeholders who clearly are not prepared to be backing out of their new role in the immediate future

  2. Public Values and Stakeholder Involvement - A new framework for Performance Assessment? The European Project RISCOM-II. Work Package 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Kjell [Karinta-Konsult, Taeby (Sweden); Chataignier, Stephane [Electricite de France (France); Drottz-Sjoeberg, Britt-Marie [BMD Research (Sweden)] [and others

    2002-11-01

    RISCOM-II is a project within the fifth framework programme of the European Commission. It is based on a widely recognised need for more transparent decision processes in nuclear waste management. The objective of the RISCOM-II project is to share the knowledge of the context of radioactive waste management in various European countries and to see to what extent it is possible to apply more widely the RISCOM Model in order to improve the acceptability of radioactive waste management. Thus, the project aims to promote the development of processes involving transparency, as well as means involving greater participation of the public. Key topics studied in the RISCOM-II Project are issues in risk assessment to better understand how factual elements relate to value-laden issues and how stakeholder concerns can be addressed, as well as organizational issues affecting transparency in Europe. A range of public participation processes are analysed, some will be selected for testing and hearings are evaluated with respect to transparency. There are five participating countries: Sweden, the United Kingdom, Finland, the Czech Republic, and France, which are represented by various organizations: safety or radiation protection authorities, operators involved in nuclear wastes and the production of nuclear power, research institutes or organizations, and consultants. Work Package No 1(WP-1), Public values and performance assessment, emphasises the importance of value-laden issues involved in nuclear waste management. The expert dominance in the field has so far tended to avoid values or deal with them in seemingly factual frameworks. The objectives of (WP-1) are thus: 1. to identify value-laden issues raised by performance assessment, trying to understand how factual and technical elements relate to value-laden issues 2. to find value judgements of stakeholders, and explore if and how they could be addressed in performance assessment 3. to initiate open debate about risk and

  3. Public Values and Stakeholder Involvement - A new framework for Performance Assessment? The European Project RISCOM-II. Work Package 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Kjell; Chataignier, Stephane; Drottz-Sjoeberg, Britt-Marie

    2002-11-01

    RISCOM-II is a project within the fifth framework programme of the European Commission. It is based on a widely recognised need for more transparent decision processes in nuclear waste management. The objective of the RISCOM-II project is to share the knowledge of the context of radioactive waste management in various European countries and to see to what extent it is possible to apply more widely the RISCOM Model in order to improve the acceptability of radioactive waste management. Thus, the project aims to promote the development of processes involving transparency, as well as means involving greater participation of the public. Key topics studied in the RISCOM-II Project are issues in risk assessment to better understand how factual elements relate to value-laden issues and how stakeholder concerns can be addressed, as well as organizational issues affecting transparency in Europe. A range of public participation processes are analysed, some will be selected for testing and hearings are evaluated with respect to transparency. There are five participating countries: Sweden, the United Kingdom, Finland, the Czech Republic, and France, which are represented by various organizations: safety or radiation protection authorities, operators involved in nuclear wastes and the production of nuclear power, research institutes or organizations, and consultants. Work Package No 1(WP-1), Public values and performance assessment, emphasises the importance of value-laden issues involved in nuclear waste management. The expert dominance in the field has so far tended to avoid values or deal with them in seemingly factual frameworks. The objectives of (WP-1) are thus: 1. to identify value-laden issues raised by performance assessment, trying to understand how factual and technical elements relate to value-laden issues 2. to find value judgements of stakeholders, and explore if and how they could be addressed in performance assessment 3. to initiate open debate about risk and

  4. Fair processes and fair outcomes: involving local stakeholders in RWM decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vari, A.

    2004-01-01

    There is a general agreement on the requirements to be met by radioactive waste management strategies. One of the requirements is that both the outcomes of any decisions and the decision-making processes must be seen to be fair. However, there exist multiple legitimate views on fairness and there is no meta-theory that could help decide which of the competing views should be considered valid in a concrete case. Referring to the plurality of views on fairness, Linnerooth-Bayer (forthcoming) argues that the impasse in facility siting processes can be attributed to the failure to take adequate account of the diverse views held by the various stakeholders on fair processes and outcomes. Three fundamental ethical principles have been derived from three basic ethical theories: well-being which is the central concept of utilitarian ethics, justice which is a key notion in egalitarian ethics, and dignity which is central to deontology (Bay and Oughton, 2003). According to utilitarian ethics fairness means that public welfare is maximized even at the cost of stakeholders' individual rights. Costs and benefits can be legitimately distributed in any way; only their overall balance has to be enhanced. In contrary, egalitarian ethics aims for a fair distribution of benefits and costs among stakeholders, while deontology acknowledges universal values of actions, e.g. the respect for individual rights, apart from their consequences. According to the latter ethics, fairness means that stakeholders themselves have the opportunity to learn about the benefits and costs of various options, and having considered them, decide on their position to accept them. How do diverse views on fair decisions materialize in RWM debates? (author)

  5. A research perspective on stakeholder involvement in radioactive waste management State of the art and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaston Meskens; Erik Laes; Gilbert Eggermont

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Our modern society is increasingly faced with challenges and problems that cannot be solved by a purely technical, political or social approach. Radioactive waste disposal site selection and management can be characterised as one of these challenges that require a trans-disciplinary approach, integrating social, philosophical and ethical aspects in a 'technical' practice. Along the spirit of this trans-disciplinary approach, and in order to ensure the necessary public support for a policy decision regarding this practice, stakeholder involvement is more and more seen as a necessary policy element in the decision making process. The aim is to achieve the broad involvement of individuals from civil society, with significant representation from local communities, elected representatives and NGO's, as well as scientists from outside radioactive waste management organisations, together with established players in the field, such as the implementers of radioactive waste management, public authorities, experts and waste producers. Several initiatives regarding stakeholder involvement in radioactive waste management have been taken already in Europe, as well in the research era as in 'the real world'. The presentation will give a state of the art by examining some representative examples on both national and European level. The focus will be on the main social, philosophical and ethical aspects of the problem at stake, seen through a trans-disciplinary research lens. The presentation will conclude with some ideas that could inspire as well theoretical researchers as stakeholders-in-the-field. (authors)

  6. A Research Perspective on Stakeholder Involvement in Radioactive Waste Management - State of the Art and Future Prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meskens, Gaston; Laes, Erik; Eggermont, Gilbert

    2006-01-01

    Our modern society is increasingly faced with challenges and problems that cannot be solved by a purely technical, political or social approach. Radioactive waste disposal site selection and management can be characterised as one of these challenges that require a transdisciplinary approach, integrating social, philosophical and ethical aspects in a 'technical' practice. Along the spirit of this transdisciplinary approach, and in order to ensure the necessary public support for a policy decision regarding this practice, stakeholder involvement is more and more seen as a necessary policy element in the decision making process. The aim is to achieve the broad involvement of individuals from civil society, with significant representation from local communities, elected representatives and NGO's, as well as scientists from outside radioactive waste management organisations, together with established players in the field, such as the implementers of radioactive waste management, public authorities, experts and waste producers. Several initiatives regarding stakeholder involvement in radioactive waste management have been taken already in Europe, as well in the research era as in 'the real world'. The presentation will give a state of the art by examining some representative examples on both national and European level. The focus will be on the main social, philosophical and ethical aspects of the problem at stake, seen through a transdisciplinary research lens. The presentation will conclude with some ideas that could inspire as well theoretical researchers as stakeholders-in-the-field (Full text of contribution)

  7. Collaborative modelling for active involvement of stakeholders in urban flood risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Evers

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach to enhance the role of local stakeholders in dealing with urban floods. The concept is based on the DIANE-CM project (Decentralised Integrated Analysis and Enhancement of Awareness through Collaborative Modelling and Management of Flood Risk of the 2nd ERANET CRUE funding initiative. The main objective of the project was to develop and test an advanced methodology for enhancing the resilience of local communities to flooding. Through collaborative modelling, a social learning process was initiated that enhances the social capacity of the stakeholders due to the interaction process. The other aim of the project was to better understand how data from hazard and vulnerability analyses and improved maps, as well as from the near real-time flood prediction, can be used to initiate a public dialogue (i.e. collaborative mapping and planning activities in order to carry out more informed and shared decision-making processes and to enhance flood risk awareness. The concept of collaborative modelling was applied in two case studies: (1 the Cranbrook catchment in the UK, with focus on pluvial flooding; and (2 the Alster catchment in Germany, with focus on fluvial flooding. As a result of the interactive and social learning process, supported by sociotechnical instruments, an understanding of flood risk was developed amongst the stakeholders and alternatives for flood risk management for the respective case study area were jointly developed and ranked as a basis for further planning and management.

  8. "Expectations to Change" ((E2C): A Participatory Method for Facilitating Stakeholder Engagement with Evaluation Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Adrienne E.; Nnawulezi, Nkiru A.; Vandenberg, Lela

    2015-01-01

    From a utilization-focused evaluation perspective, the success of an evaluation is rooted in the extent to which the evaluation was used by stakeholders. This paper details the "Expectations to Change" (E2C) process, an interactive, workshop-based method designed to engage primary users with their evaluation findings as a means of…

  9. Stakeholder involvement: how to do it right: article 9 in Integrating and coordinating efforts in COPD guideline development. An official ATS/ERS workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluzeau, Françoise; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Kelson, Marcia; Corn, Judy; Kunz, Regina; Walsh, John; Schünemann, Holger J

    2012-12-01

    Professional societies, like many other organizations around the world, have recognized the need to use more rigorous processes to ensure that healthcare recommendations are informed by the best available research evidence with input from appropriate stakeholders. This is the ninth of a series of 14 articles that were prepared by an international panel to advise guideline developers in respiratory and other diseases on approaches for guideline development. We updated a review of the literature on stakeholder involvement, focusing on six key questions. In this review we addressed the following questions. (1) What are "stakeholders"? (2) Why involve stakeholders in guidelines? (3) At what stage should stakeholders contribute to guidelines? (4) What are the potential barriers to integrating stakeholder involvement? (5) How can stakeholders be involved effectively? (6) Should anyone be excluded from the process? We searched PubMed and other databases of methodological studies for existing systematic reviews and relevant methodological research. We did not conduct our own systematic reviews. Our conclusions are based on available evidence, the experience of guideline developers, and workshop discussions. Stakeholders are all those who have a legitimate interest in a guideline. They include healthcare professionals, patients and caregivers, public and private funding bodies, managers, employers, and manufacturers. Their engagement is justified for several reasons, including limitations of evidence, principles of transparency and democracy, ownership, and potential policy implications. They have a role to play at different points of guideline development, but their involvement can be complex. To be successful, stakeholder engagement needs to be inclusive, equitable, and adequately resourced.

  10. Complicity Revisited: Balancing Stakeholder Input and Roles in Evaluation Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturges, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on a qualitative study of an educational reform and its external evaluation, I describe how a well-intentioned but poorly conceptualized evaluation helped perpetuate asymmetries in the generation and use of evaluation findings. This article explores this project's failure to clarify evaluator roles, identify intended users and expected…

  11. Who are the stakeholders in environmental risk decisions? - How should they be involved?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    As we move toward diffuse, long-term environmental risks - especially those with large uncertainties and potentially grave consequences, such as those typified by high-level radioactive waste disposal - we need to move away from a stakeholder-centered model of environmental decision making. Instead, we need to move toward a model that draws upon the concept of collaborative learning, and emphasizes the long-term common good. Collaborative learning (which also has been referred to as adaptive work or transformative facilitation is especially appropriate when values are diverse and the dimensions of the problem and its possible solutions are not well-understood. Emphasis on the long-term common good calls upon people to think of themselves, not simply as self-interested stakeholders, but also as trustees for the well-being of other people and the environment. Together, the two concepts suggest a process that should challenge prevailing knowledge and values without being adversarial, that should have as a goal a sustainable future for all, and that should be deliberative and iterative. Incremental steps, revisited as needed, should be preferred over 'final solutions'. This ideal is far easier to prescribe than to implement. For example, political communication increasingly is dominated by specialists whose techniques historically are rooted in advertising, market research, and public relations, with the result that trust is diminished and ties between citizens and their leaders are weakened. Nevertheless, there is still reason to believe that it is possible to pursue models of decision making on critical issues of environmental risk that rely neither on stakeholder negotiations nor on manipulative persuasion

  12. Who are the stakeholders in environmental risk decisions? - How should they be involved?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, M.R. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center

    1999-12-01

    As we move toward diffuse, long-term environmental risks - especially those with large uncertainties and potentially grave consequences, such as those typified by high-level radioactive waste disposal - we need to move away from a stakeholder-centered model of environmental decision making. Instead, we need to move toward a model that draws upon the concept of collaborative learning, and emphasizes the long-term common good. Collaborative learning (which also has been referred to as adaptive work or transformative facilitation is especially appropriate when values are diverse and the dimensions of the problem and its possible solutions are not well-understood. Emphasis on the long-term common good calls upon people to think of themselves, not simply as self-interested stakeholders, but also as trustees for the well-being of other people and the environment. Together, the two concepts suggest a process that should challenge prevailing knowledge and values without being adversarial, that should have as a goal a sustainable future for all, and that should be deliberative and iterative. Incremental steps, revisited as needed, should be preferred over 'final solutions'. This ideal is far easier to prescribe than to implement. For example, political communication increasingly is dominated by specialists whose techniques historically are rooted in advertising, market research, and public relations, with the result that trust is diminished and ties between citizens and their leaders are weakened. Nevertheless, there is still reason to believe that it is possible to pursue models of decision making on critical issues of environmental risk that rely neither on stakeholder negotiations nor on manipulative persuasion.

  13. A successful effort to involve stakeholders in the selection of a site for a corrective action management unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, R.; Merkhofer, M.W.; Oms, E.

    1995-01-01

    As part of the effort to clean up hazardous waste sites, Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico (SNL/NM) adopted a novel approach to involving stakeholders in a key decision associated with its Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The decision was where to locate a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU), an area designed to consolidate, store, and treat wastes generated from cleanup activities. The decision-making approach was a variation of a technique known as multiattribute utility analysis (MUA). Although MUA has rarely been undertaken during normal Project activities, it proved to be a surprisingly effective means for involving stakeholders in the decision process, generating consensus over a selected site, and enhancing public trust and understanding of Project activities. Requirements and criteria for selecting CAMU sites are provided by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) CAMU Final Rule (EPA 1993). Recognizing the lack of experience with the Rule and the importance of community understanding and support, the ER Project sought an approach that would allow stakeholders to participate in the site-selection process

  14. The necessary burden of involving stakeholders in agent-based modelling for education and decision-making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommel, P.; Bautista Solís, P.; Leclerc, G.

    2016-12-01

    We implemented a participatory process with water stakeholders for improving resilience to drought at watershed scale, and for reducing water pollution disputes in drought prone Northwestern Costa Rica. The purpose is to facilitate co-management in a rural watershed impacted by recurrent droughts related to ENSO. The process involved designing "ContaMiCuenca", a hybrid agent-based model where users can specify the decisions of their agents. We followed a Companion Modeling approach (www.commod.org) and organized 10 workshops that included research techniques such as participatory diagnostics, actor-resources-interaction and UML diagrams, multi-agents model design, and interactive simulation sessions. We collectively assessed the main water issues in the watershed, prioritized their importance, defined the objectives of the process, and pilot-tested ContaMiCuenca for environmental education with adults and children. Simulation sessions resulted in debates about the need to improve the model accuracy, arguably more relevant for decision-making. This helped identify sensible knowledge gaps in the groundwater pollution and aquifer dynamics that need to be addressed in order to improve our collective learning. Significant mismatches among participants expectations, objectives, and agendas considerably slowed down the participatory process. The main issue may originate in participants expecting technical solutions from a positivist science, as constantly promoted in the region by dole-out initiatives, which is incompatible with the constructivist stance of participatory modellers. This requires much closer interaction of community members with modellers, which may be hard to attain in the current research practice and institutional context. Nevertheless, overcoming these constraints is necessary for a true involvement of water stakeholders to achieve community-based decisions that facilitate integrated water management. Our findings provide significant guidance for

  15. Stakeholder Involvement in nuclear issues. INSAG-20. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Many of the world's nuclear power plants were constructed long ago without much public involvement in the associated decision making. It is anticipated, however, that a variety of stakeholders will seek participation in such decisions now as the nuclear option is being revisited in many places. Accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, among other places, have served to arouse public concern. The development of 'here-and-now' media capabilities has created an awareness that may not have previously existed. Improvements in educational systems and the development of the Internet have made technical information and expertise available to individuals and locations that were previously without them. In addition, consideration of the environmental impacts of various energy strategies has moved to the fore. INSAG has concluded that the expectations of stakeholders of a right to participate in energy decisions are something that the nuclear community must address. Decisions regarding such matters as the siting and construction of a nuclear power plant are no longer largely the domain of a closed community of technical experts and utility executives. Today, the concerns and expectations of all manner of persons and organizations - from the local farmer to the international financial institution - must be considered. This report is intended for use by all stakeholders in the nuclear community - national regulatory authorities, nuclear power plant designers and operators, public interest organizations and individuals, the media and, not to be forgotten, local and national populations. INSAG's fundamental conclusion is that all stakeholders with an interest in nuclear decisions should be provided with an opportunity for full and effective participation in them. With this right, however, come certain obligations on all sides for openness, candour and civility. INSAG is hopeful that this report will help define the interests and roles of the stakeholders

  16. Involving stakeholders in radiological protection decision making: recovery history and lessons from the people of Fukushima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo, T

    2016-12-01

    Between September 2011 and August 2015, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) organised a series of 12 stakeholder dialogue workshops with residents of Fukushima Prefecture. Discussions focused on recovery, addressing topics such as protection of children, management of contaminated food, monitoring, and self-help measures. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) supported, and the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) Secretariat attended, all 12 meetings to listen directly to the concerns of affected individuals and draw lessons for CRPPH. To summarise the dialogue results, ICRP organised a final meeting in Date, Japan with the support of NEA and other organisations. The lessons from and utility of the dialogue meetings were praised by dialogue participants and sponsors, and ICRP agreed that some form of dialogue would continue, although with ICRP participation and support rather than leadership. This paper summarises the internationally relevant lessons learned by CRPPH from this important process.

  17. Cartographic Design in Flood Risk Mapping - A Challenge for Communication and Stakeholder Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, S.; Serrhini, K.; Dorner, W.

    2009-12-01

    In order to mitigate flood hazards and to minimise associated losses, technical protection measures have been additionally and increasingly supplemented by non-technical mitigation, i.e. land-use planning activities. This is commonly done by creating maps which indicate such areas by different cartographic symbols, such as colour, size, shape, and typography. Hazard and risk mapping is the accepted procedure when communicating potential threats to stakeholders, and is therefore required in the European Member States in order to meet the demands of the European Flood Risk Directive. However, available information is sparse concerning the impact of such maps on different stakeholders, i.e., specialists in flood risk management, politicians, and affected citizens. The lack of information stems from a traditional approach to map production which does not take into account specific end-user needs. In order to overcome this information shortage the current study used a circular approach such that feed-back mechanisms originating from different perception patterns of the end user would be considered. Different sets of small-scale as well as large-scale risk maps were presented to different groups of test persons in order to (1) study reading behaviour as well as understanding and (2) deduce the most attractive components that are essential for target-oriented communication of cartographic information. Therefore, the method of eye tracking was applied using a video-oculography technique. This resulted in a suggestion for a map template which fulfils the requirement to serve as an efficient communication tool for specialists and practitioners in hazard and risk mapping as well as for laypersons. Taking the results of this study will enable public authorities who are responsible for flood mitigation to (1) improve their flood risk maps, (2) enhance flood risk awareness, and therefore (3) create more disaster-resilient communities.

  18. Stakeholder issues and involvement in decommissioning nuclear facilities. Lessons learnt from WPDD and FSC activities and documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore, Claudio; Vari, Anna; Mays, C.; O'Sullivan, P.

    2007-01-01

    The expectation that significant numbers of nuclear power plants will reach the end of their operating lives in the coming decade or so, or will be shut down for economic or other reasons, is resulting in increasing emphasis being given in member countries to the involvement of stakeholders in the associated decision procedures. Although the need for public involvement during the siting process for a new nuclear facility is well established - given the potential for community disruption in terms of population changes and construction nuisance - the role of stakeholders during the shutdown and decommissioning phases is perhaps less well understood. The decision to shut down a nuclear facility before the end of its design lifetime is usually taken for economic, safety or political reasons. In general, there is no requirement in legislation to involve stakeholders directly in this decision; though there can be substantial consequences for local communities in terms of decreasing employment rate and an eventual reduction of revenues for the host municipality. On the other hand, stakeholders do generally have the legal right to be involved in the consequential decision about the strategy for decommissioning the shutdown plant - i.e. the actions taken to facilitate the end of regulatory oversight of the facility - typically through participation in an environmental impact assessment process. In this document, the arguments advanced in favour of stakeholder involvement, and the fostering of relationships with affected communities that are based on trust, are generally applicable to both the above decisions. Although those likely to be most affected by a decision to shut down a nuclear facility are those living nearby, it needs to be remembered that such decisions will sometimes have wider consequences, perhaps even at a national level, e.g. in the event that alternative sources of electricity need to be found to replace that from the shutdown plant. In these situations

  19. Facilitated workshop method to involve stakeholders and public in decision making process in radiological emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustonen, Raimo; Sinkko, Kari [STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland). Research and Environmental Surveillance; Haemaelaeinen, Raimo P. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Helsinki (Finland). System Analysis Laboratory

    2006-09-15

    International organisations in radiation protection have for many years recommended that key players, e.g. authorities, expert organisations, industry, producers of foodstuffs and even the public, should be involved in the planning of protective actions in case of a nuclear accident. In this work, we have developed and tested a facilitated workshop method where representatives from various fields of the society aim to identify and evaluate systematically protective actions. Decision analysis techniques have been applied in workshops in order to find out the most feasible countermeasure strategies and to make the decision making-process transparent and auditable. The work builds on case studies where it was assumed that a hypothetical accident had led to a release of considerable amounts of radionuclides and therefore various types of countermeasures should be considered. This paper provides experiences gained in several European countries on how to facilitate this kind of workshops and how modern decision analysis techniques can be applied in the decision-making process.

  20. Facilitated workshop method to involve stakeholders and public in decision making process in radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustonen, Raimo; Sinkko, Kari; Haemaelaeinen, Raimo P.

    2006-01-01

    International organisations in radiation protection have for many years recommended that key players, e.g. authorities, expert organisations, industry, producers of foodstuffs and even the public, should be involved in the planning of protective actions in case of a nuclear accident. In this work, we have developed and tested a facilitated workshop method where representatives from various fields of the society aim to identify and evaluate systematically protective actions. Decision analysis techniques have been applied in workshops in order to find out the most feasible countermeasure strategies and to make the decision making-process transparent and auditable. The work builds on case studies where it was assumed that a hypothetical accident had led to a release of considerable amounts of radionuclides and therefore various types of countermeasures should be considered. This paper provides experiences gained in several European countries on how to facilitate this kind of workshops and how modern decision analysis techniques can be applied in the decision-making process

  1. Evaluation of factors affecting stakeholder risk perception of contaminated sediment disposal in Oslo harbor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparrevik, M.; Ellen, G.J.; Duijn, M.

    2011-01-01

    The management of environmental pollution has changed considerably since the growth of environmental awareness in the late 1960s. The general increased environmental concern and involvement of stakeholders in today's environmental issues may enhance the need to consider risk in a much broader social

  2. Dealing with distrust and power dynamics: asymmetric relations among stakeholders in responsive evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baur, V.E.; van Elteren, A.H.G.; Nierse, C.J.; Abma, T.A.

    2010-01-01

    Asymmetric relations among stakeholders create challenges in participatory evaluation processes. Power and conflict may hinder equal and genuine communication about the value of the practices evaluated. Guidelines to deal with these sociopolitical challenges are scarce and usually focus on the need

  3. Stakeholder Engagement in Food Risk Management: Evaluation of an Iterated Workshop Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walls, J.; Rowe, G.; Frewer, L.J.

    2011-01-01

    There are considerable uncertainties regarding how stakeholder engagement should be enacted. The lack of clear guidelines on good practice is arguably a consequence of an absence of evaluations on the effectiveness of past engagement exercises. Here we describe the evaluation of one engagement event

  4. Stakeholders' Perspectives About and Priorities for Economic Evaluation of Health and Safety Programs in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompa, Emile; de Boer, Henriette; Macdonald, Sara; Alamgir, Hasanat; Koehoorn, Mieke; Guzman, Jaime

    2016-04-01

    This study identified and prioritized resources and outcomes that should be considered in more comprehensive and scientifically rigorous health and safety economic evaluations according to healthcare sector stakeholders. A literature review and stakeholder interviews identified candidate resources and outcomes and then a Delphi panel ranked them. According to the panel, the top five resources were (a) health and safety staff time; (b) training workers; (c) program planning, promotion, and evaluation costs; (d) equipment purchases and upgrades; and (e) administration costs. The top five outcomes were (a) number of injuries, illnesses, and general sickness absences; (b) safety climate; (c) days lost due to injuries, illnesses, and general sickness absences; (d) job satisfaction and engagement; and (e) quality of care and patient safety. These findings emphasize stakeholders' stated priorities and are useful as a benchmark for assessing the quality of health and safety economic evaluations and the comprehensiveness of these findings. © 2016 The Author(s).

  5. Canadian Whole-Farm Model Holos - Development, Stakeholder Involvement, and Model Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroebel, R.; Janzen, H.; Beauchemin, K. A.

    2017-12-01

    Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's Holos model, based mostly on emission factors, aims to explore the effect of management on Canadian whole-farm greenhouse gas emissions. The model includes 27 commonly grown annual and perennial crops, summer fallow, grassland, and 8 types of tree plantings, along with beef, dairy, sheep, swine and other livestock or poultry operations. Model outputs encompass net emissions of CO2, CH4, and N2O (in CO2 equivalents), calculated for various farm components. Where possible, algorithms are drawn from peer-reviewed publications. For consistency, Holos is aligned with the Canadian sustainability indicator and national greenhouse gas inventory objectives. Although primarily an exploratory tool for research, the model's design makes it accessible and instructive also to agricultural producers, educators, and policy makers. Model development, therefore, proceeds iteratively, with extensive stakeholder feedback from training sessions or annual workshops. To make the model accessible to diverse users, the team developed a multi-layered interface, with general farming scenarios for general use, but giving access to detailed coefficients and assumptions to researchers. The model relies on extensive climate, soil, and agronomic databases to populate regionally-applicable default values thereby minimizing keyboard entries. In an initial application, the model was used to assess greenhouse gas emissions from the Canadian beef production system; it showed that enteric methane accounted for 63% of total GHG emissions and that 84% of emissions originated from the cow-calf herd. The model further showed that GHG emission intensity per kg beef, nationally, declined by 14% from 1981 to 2011, owing to gains in production efficiency. Holos is now being used to consider further potential advances through improved rations or other management options. We are now aiming to expand into questions of grazing management, and are developing a novel carbon

  6. Using social network and stakeholder analysis to help evaluate infectious waste management: A step towards a holistic assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caniato, Marco; Vaccari, Mentore; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan; Zurbrügg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Assessment of infectious waste management in Bangkok, in particular incineration. • Integration of social network and stakeholder analysis assessment methods. • Assessment of stakeholder characteristics, role, interaction and communication. • Interviewees self-evaluate their own characteristics and the system. • Non-technical aspects are important for system acceptability, and sustainability. - Abstract: Assessing the strengths and weaknesses of a solid waste management scheme requires an accurate analysis and integration of several determining features. In addition to the technical aspects, any such system shows a complex interaction of actors with varying stakes, decision-making power and influence, as well as a favourable or disabling environment. When capitalizing on the knowledge and experience from a specific case, it is also crucial that experts do not “forget” or underestimate the importance of such social determinants and that they are familiar with the methods and tools to assess them. Social network analysis (SNA) and stakeholder analysis (SA) methods can be successfully applied to better understand actors’ role and actions, analyse driving forces and existing coordination among stakeholders, as well as identify bottlenecks in communication which affect daily operations or strategic planning for the future way forward. SNA and SA, appropriately adjusted for a certain system, can provide a useful integration to methods by assessing other aspects to ensure a comprehensive picture of the situation. This paper describes how to integrate SNA and SA in order to survey a solid waste management system. This paper presents the results of an analysis of On-Nuch infectious waste incinerator in Bangkok, Thailand. Stakeholders were interviewed and asked to prioritize characteristics and relationships which they consider particularly important for system development and success of the scheme. In such a way, a large quantity of information

  7. Using social network and stakeholder analysis to help evaluate infectious waste management: A step towards a holistic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caniato, Marco, E-mail: marcocaniato@gmail.com [University of Brescia, Research Centre on Appropriate Technologies for Environmental Management in Developing Countries (CeTAmb), Via Branze, 43, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Vaccari, Mentore, E-mail: mentore.vaccari@unibs.it [University of Brescia, Research Centre on Appropriate Technologies for Environmental Management in Developing Countries (CeTAmb), Via Branze, 43, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Visvanathan, Chettiyappan, E-mail: visu@ait.ac.th [Asian Institute of Technology (AIT), School of Environment, Resources and Development (SERD), P.O. Box 4, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Zurbrügg, Christian, E-mail: zurbrugg@eawag.ch [University of Brescia, Research Centre on Appropriate Technologies for Environmental Management in Developing Countries (CeTAmb), Via Branze, 43, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries (Sandec), Ueberlandstrasse 133, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Assessment of infectious waste management in Bangkok, in particular incineration. • Integration of social network and stakeholder analysis assessment methods. • Assessment of stakeholder characteristics, role, interaction and communication. • Interviewees self-evaluate their own characteristics and the system. • Non-technical aspects are important for system acceptability, and sustainability. - Abstract: Assessing the strengths and weaknesses of a solid waste management scheme requires an accurate analysis and integration of several determining features. In addition to the technical aspects, any such system shows a complex interaction of actors with varying stakes, decision-making power and influence, as well as a favourable or disabling environment. When capitalizing on the knowledge and experience from a specific case, it is also crucial that experts do not “forget” or underestimate the importance of such social determinants and that they are familiar with the methods and tools to assess them. Social network analysis (SNA) and stakeholder analysis (SA) methods can be successfully applied to better understand actors’ role and actions, analyse driving forces and existing coordination among stakeholders, as well as identify bottlenecks in communication which affect daily operations or strategic planning for the future way forward. SNA and SA, appropriately adjusted for a certain system, can provide a useful integration to methods by assessing other aspects to ensure a comprehensive picture of the situation. This paper describes how to integrate SNA and SA in order to survey a solid waste management system. This paper presents the results of an analysis of On-Nuch infectious waste incinerator in Bangkok, Thailand. Stakeholders were interviewed and asked to prioritize characteristics and relationships which they consider particularly important for system development and success of the scheme. In such a way, a large quantity of information

  8. Stakeholder involvement in the management of effluent discharges from nuclear installations in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudiz, A.; Sugier, A.; Schneider, Th.; Heriard Dubreuil, G.; Gadbois, S.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the work achieved by IRSN altogether with CEPN and Mutadis was to analyze the French and international experience in this field and to reflect on the existing fora of dialogue in France where the control of nuclear -sites is being discussed (public inquiry, local commission, pluralist expertise), to identify the assets of these fora and to bring out proposals in order to improve the follow-up of these installations from the point of view of the local population. A working group was set up in IRSN with experts from IRSN, CEPN and Mutadis. The task of the group was to prepare detailed case studies on the basis of the salient issues stemming from the report and to make a thorough collective analysis of the transverse questions emerging from the studies. In a second stage, the working group brought together the main conclusions of its analysis arid put forward some proposals which, it thought, could be considered to improve existing tools and fora taking into account local stakeholders' needs, concerns and expectations in the oversight of industrial facilities. (author)

  9. A holistic approach to chronic pain management that involves all stakeholders: change is needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Hans-Georg; Aldington, Dominic; Alon, Eli; Coaccioli, Stefano; Collett, Beverly; Coluzzi, Flaminia; Huygen, Frank; Jaksch, Wolfgang; Kalso, Eija; Kocot-Kępska, Magdalena; Mangas, Ana Cristina; Ferri, Cesar Margarit; Mavrocordatos, Philippe; Morlion, Bart; Müller-Schwefe, Gerhard; Nicolaou, Andrew; Hernández, Concepción Pérez; Sichère, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain affects a large proportion of the population, imposing significant individual distress and a considerable burden on society, yet treatment is not always instituted and/or adequate. Comprehensive multidisciplinary management based on the biopsychosocial model of pain has been shown to be clinically effective and cost-efficient, but is not widely available. A literature review of stakeholder groups revealed many reasons for this, including: i) many patients believe healthcare professionals lack relevant knowledge, and consultations are rushed, ii) general practitioners consider that pain management has a low priority and is under-resourced, iii) pain specialists cite non-adherence to evidence-based treatment, sub-optimal prescribing, and chronic pain not being regarded as a disease in its own right, iv) nurses', pharmacists' and physiotherapists' skills are not fully utilized, and v) psychological therapy is employed infrequently and often too late. Many of the issues relating to physicians could be addressed by improving medical training, both at undergraduate and postgraduate levels - for example, by making pain medicine a compulsory core subject of the undergraduate medical curriculum. This would improve physician/patient communication, increase the use of standardized pain assessment tools, and allow more patients to participate in treatment decisions. Patient care would also benefit from improved training for other multidisciplinary team members; for example, nurses could provide counseling and follow-up support, psychologists offer coping skills training, and physiotherapists have a greater role in rehabilitation. Equally important measures include the widespread adoption of a patient-centered approach, chronic pain being recognized as a disease in its own right, and the development of universal guidelines for managing chronic non-cancer pain. Perhaps the greatest barrier to improvement is lack of political will at both national and international

  10. Report on Stakeholder Evaluation of Aquatic Resources. Deliverable 5.2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Thi Dieu Phuong; Lund, Søren; Banta, Gary Thomas

    The present report on stakeholder evaluation of highland aquatic resources provides an overview of completed research activities undertaken within the HighARCS project on the value ascribed by users, local communities and stakeholders to functions, goods and services (including non-use values......) derived from the aquatic resources in the Northern and Central of Vietnam. The perceived impact of factors such as environmental degradation, changing demand for goods and services and modified highland aquatic resources management practices on these values has also been assessed....

  11. The role of regional information in the dose rate estimation of biota: from the view point of stakeholder involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urabe, Itsumasa

    2008-01-01

    A dose evaluation system developed to judge environmental radiation safety was proposed in order to evaluate the effect on environmental flora and fauna. However, it was noted that large differences exist between biota doses based on the regional data and those determined by the dose evaluation system developed. In order to realize successful mutual communication among stakeholders, information needed for environmental radiation protection has been investigated in various kinds of exposure situations, because the Japanese tend to act following the standards set by them to get the most appropriate results in the situations they are faced with. It became clear from the investigation on beliefs about environmental issues that the Japanese are concerned about regional characteristics of natural environments and biota through which they observe variations in their living conditions. Furthermore, the systematic approach for compilation of the regional environmental parameters and data becomes important to accomplish a social agreement on environmental safety. (author)

  12. Experience of Public Involvement in Canada Presented to the Forum for Stakeholder Confidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facella, Jo-Ann; Patton, Pat

    2008-01-01

    Pat Patton of NWMO, Canada, summarised the experiences of the organisation's three-year study aimed at identifying a broadly supported approach to managing Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The starting point of the study was the recognition that citizen perception of safety and acceptability are strongly interrelated, therefore understanding and addressing the social dimension of safety would be critical for finding a socially acceptable RWM approach. An iterative and collaborative dialogue was conducted between specialists and citizens to both identify how safety is to be assessed and to carry out the assessment. First, objectives, values and ethical principles were defined, which formed the basis for the criteria of selecting a preferred RWM approach. The dialogue revealed that adaptability of the management approach to new information and technological advancement is a key requirement. Continuous learning, RD and D, and citizen involvement over the course of implementation were also identified as important components of the management approach. Ms Patton presented an illustrative model for public involvement during the implementation process. According to the model, implementation would be a multi-stage process with a continuous interaction between scientific and technical specialists, potentially affected communities and the implementer. Finally, Ms Patton outlined some key challenges for future dialogues between non-specialists and experts, including the development of tools for involving citizens in increasingly more knowledge-intensive areas and communicating research results which address issues highlighted by citizens

  13. Stakeholder involvement and public outreach at two Department of Energy sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    Outreach efforts at two U.S. Department of Energy sites (i.e., the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington and Pantex Plant in the Texas panhandle) have involved a broad spectrum of communications media, including technical presentations and articles, information brochures and fact sheets, video productions; interactive exhibits; presentations at civic and other public meetings; and proactive interactions with the news media, regulators and concerned citizens. In addition, representatives of local communities operate offsite environmental monitoring stations and Native Americans are involved in studying cultural resources, fisheries, and other issues at Hanford, and a program to obtain environmental samples from neighbors property is underway at Pantex. All major environmental programs (e.g., the reconstruction of past radiological doses to offsite human populations at Hanford) are conducted with open public participation, the Pantex Plant has opened an Information office in Amarillo, Texas, and both sites now have Citizen's Advisory Boards. This presentation describes Hanford and Pantex public outreach and involvement efforts, our successes and failures, and the lessons learned

  14. NEA Workshop on Stakeholder Involvement in Nuclear Decision Making, 17-19 January 2017, OECD Conference Centre, Paris, Room CC9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, Stephen G.; Yanush, Maryna; Jendroska, Jerzy; Beyens, Marc; Emmerechts, Sam; Touitou-Durand, Florence; Crosland, Martha; Ziakova, Marta; Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic; Nuclear Regulation Authority; Ferapontov, Alexey; Hayano, Ryugo; Boyd, Mike; Mayall, Andrew; Tomkiv, Yevgeniya; Kawabuchi, Hideo; Kuenzi, Pascale; Shaver, Kathryn; Yngve Toernqvist, Johanna; Bjoerklund, Sara; Gerhardsson, Ansi; Kuenzi, Pascale; Birkhaeuser, Philip; Smith, Katherine; Katz, Sharonne; Vanhatalo, Hanna; Thome-Jassaud, Pierre-Franck; Bae, Su Hwan; Straub, Ralf; Gadano, Julian; Wolsink, Maarten; Komendantova, Nadejda; Kalaydjian, Francois; Harrington, Holly; Bouchot, Emmanuel; Runyon, Timothy; Gonzalez Herrero, Eva; Maclachlan, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear issues are embedded with broader societal issues such as the environment, risk management, energy and health policies, and sustainability. As such, nuclear projects often generate considerable interest and concern from stakeholders. In this context 'stakeholder' is intended to be taken in its broadest sense and should include concerned public, businesses, economic actors, NGOs, local, regional and national authorities, nuclear regulators, etc. Anyone who has relevant information, experience or concerns may seek to participate in the decision making process, and to interact with other stakeholders. Nuclear regulators, governments, operators, and other decision makers have a responsibility to ensure a high degree of transparency and to make clear and well-reasoned decisions. In this respect, there is an increasing demand for stakeholder involvement, participation and engagement. Across NEA member countries, many different approaches are taken to stakeholder involvement as decisions are made and implemented. Well-informed decisions broadly reflect the input of stakeholder views in a balanced fashion, the achievement of which can be difficult to assess. Attempts to achieve such broad understanding of views and acceptance of resulting decisions are an important part of building public confidence. Additionally, interested citizens, other stakeholders, and non-governmental organisations often call upon decision processes to be conducted in a manner that maintains public confidence. This workshop was not about what decision is made. Rather, it was about decision making processes used to reflect stakeholder concerns and input. How does one effectively involve stakeholders? How does one build and assess public confidence? How can broader stakeholder involvement help decision makers to make well-informed decisions that effectively address stakeholder views? On 17-19 January 2017, the NEA hosted a workshop on Stakeholder Involvement in Nuclear Decision Making

  15. Public/stakeholder involvement at two Department of Energy sites: Case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    Efforts to communicate the results of environmental studies and involve the public in environmental decisions have increased nationwide. Outreach efforts at two US Department of Energy sites (i.e., the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State and the Pantex Plant in the Texas Panhandle) have used a broad spectrum of communications media, including technical articles (open literature and symposium publications, annual and topical reports); information brochures and fact sheets; video productions; interactive exhibits, presentations at scientific, technical, civic, and other public meetings; and proactive interactions with the news media and with local, state, federal, and other agencies. In addition, representatives of local communities now operate offsite environmental monitoring stations and Native Americans are involved in studying cultural resources, fisheries, and other issues at Hanford and a program to obtain environmental samples from neighbor's property is underway at the Pantex Plant. All major environmental programs, such as the multi-year effort to reconstruct past radiological doses to offsite human populations at Hanford, are now conducted with open public participation

  16. Public/stakeholder involvement at two Department of Energy sites: Case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, R.H. [Battelle Pantex, Amarillo, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Efforts to communicate the results of environmental studies and involve the public in environmental decisions have increased nationwide. Outreach efforts at two US Department of Energy sites (i.e., the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State and the Pantex Plant in the Texas Panhandle) have used a broad spectrum of communications media, including technical articles (open literature and symposium publications, annual and topical reports); information brochures and fact sheets; video productions; interactive exhibits, presentations at scientific, technical, civic, and other public meetings; and proactive interactions with the news media and with local, state, federal, and other agencies. In addition, representatives of local communities now operate offsite environmental monitoring stations and Native Americans are involved in studying cultural resources, fisheries, and other issues at Hanford and a program to obtain environmental samples from neighbor`s property is underway at the Pantex Plant. All major environmental programs, such as the multi-year effort to reconstruct past radiological doses to offsite human populations at Hanford, are now conducted with open public participation.

  17. Evaluating a primary care psychology service in Ireland: a survey of stakeholders and psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Mark; Byrne, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Primary care psychology services (PCPS) represent an important resource in meeting the various health needs of our communities. This study evaluated the PCPS in a two-county area within the Republic of Ireland. The objectives were to (i) examine the viewpoints of the service for both psychologists and stakeholders (healthcare professionals only) and (ii) examine the enactment of the stepped care model of service provision. Separate surveys were sent to primary care psychologists (n = 8), general practitioners (GPs; n = 69) and other stakeholders in the two counties. GPs and stakeholders were required to rate the current PCPS. The GP survey specifically examined referrals to the PCPS and service configuration, while the stakeholder survey also requested suggestions for future service provision. Psychologists were required to provide information regarding their workload, time spent on certain tasks and productivity ideas. Referral numbers, waiting lists and waiting times were also obtained. All 8 psychologists, 23 GPs (33% response rate) and 37 stakeholders (unknown response rate) responded. GPs and stakeholders reported access to the PCPS as a primary concern, with waiting times of up to 80 weeks in some areas. Service provision to children and adults was uneven between counties. A stepped care model of service provision was not observed. Access can be improved by further implementation of a stepped care service, developing a high-throughput service for adults (based on a stepped care model), and employing a single waiting list for each county to ensure equal access. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Universal free school breakfast: a qualitative process evaluation according to the perspectives of senior stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Harvey-Golding

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade the provision of school breakfast has increased significantly in the UK. However, there is an absence of knowledge regarding senior stakeholder views on the processes and potential outcomes on different groups, within the communities served by school breakfast programs. The purpose of this study was to examine the views and experiences of senior level stakeholders and thereby provide an original qualitative contribution to the research. A sample of senior level stakeholders were recruited, including senior officers, directors and elected members, from within a Local Authority (LA involved in the leadership, implementation and delivery of a council-wide universal free school breakfast (USFB program, and from the senior staff body of mainstream primary and special schools, participating in the program. A grounded theory analysis of the data collected identified issues encountered in the implementation and delivery, and views on the funding and future of a USFB program, in addition to perceived outcomes of children, parents, families, schools and the wider community. The results refer to both positive and negative issues and implications associated with the program, according to the perspectives of senior level stakeholders. Perceived positive outcomes included benefits to children, families, schools and the community. For instance, alleviating hunger, improving health outcomes, and conferring financial benefits, with the potential to cumulate in overall improvements in educational, social and behavioral outcomes. Reported negative implications included the absence of an effective communication strategy in implementing the USFB program; in addition to concerns about the impacts of ‘double-breakfasting’ on obesity levels among children, particularly in less deprived communities. Findings were validated using theoretical sampling and saturation, triangulation methods, member checks, and inter-rater reliability measures. In

  19. Evaluation of a workplace disability prevention intervention in Canada: examining differing perceptions of stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiwald, Karin; de Rijk, Angelique; Guzman, Jaime; Schonstein, Eva; Yassi, Annalee

    2011-06-01

    INTRODUCTION Workplace disability prevention is important, but stakeholders can differ in their appreciation of such interventions. We present a responsive evaluation of a workplace disability prevention intervention in a Canadian healthcare organization. Three groups of stakeholders were included: designers of the intervention, deliverers, and workers. The aim was to examine the appreciation of this intervention by analyzing the discrepancies with respect to what these various stakeholders see as the causes of work disability, what the intervention should aim at to address this problem, and to what extent the intervention works in practice. METHODS A qualitative research method was used, including data-triangulation: (a) documentary materials; (b) semi-structured interviews with the deliverers and workers (n = 14); (c) participatory observations of group meetings (n = 6); (d) member-checking meetings (n = 3); (e) focus-group meetings (n = 2). A grounded theory approach, including some ethnographic methodology, was used for the data-analysis. RESULTS Stakeholders' perceptions of causes for work disability differ, as do preferred strategies for prevention. Designers proposed work-directed measures to change the workplace and work organizations, and individual-directed measures to change workers' behaviour. Deliverers targeted individual-directed measures, however, workers were mostly seeking work-directed measures. To assess how the intervention was working, designers sought a wide range of outcome measures. Deliverers focused on measurable outcomes targeted at reducing work time-loss. Workers perceived that this intervention offered short-term benefits yet fell short in ensuring sustainable return-to-work. CONCLUSION This study provides understanding of where discrepancies between stakeholders' perceptions about interventions come from. Our findings have implications for workplace disability prevention intervention development, implementation and evaluation

  20. NEA Workshop on Stakeholder Involvement in Nuclear Decision Making. Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haage, Monica; Henderson, David; Mays, Claire

    2017-01-01

    The present report summarises the NEA workshop proceedings. Chapter 1 recalls the setting in which the 2017 workshop was organised, the development of the workshop and the audience it gathered. Subsequent chapters are based on rapporteurs' accounts of the plenary and keynote talks (Chapter 2) and topical presentations (Chapter 3), as well as the dialogues among attendees which were then reported in plenary (Chapter 4). Quotes highlighted throughout the report were drawn from speakers' material or from the dialogues. In this way the publication reports the kaleidoscope of views and practices brought by NEA member countries and their experts from almost all nuclear areas as well as from some other energy technology sectors. It documents best practice and lessons learnt. Furthermore, Chapter 5 singles out the commonalities and differences found across the countries and sectors, as well as tangible take-away from the workshop. The reader will find that certain major messages are repeated in different parts of the report, as a sign of the convergence between different contexts, experts, sessions and discussions. Chapter 6 reports the attendees' evaluation of the workshop and the actions requested to progress. The annexes provide further resources: other NEA publications of interest; instructions for facilitating dialogue; and the list of participants

  1. Premarital HIV testing in Malaysia: a qualitative exploratory study on the views of major stakeholders involved in HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmania, Sima; Aljunid, Syed Mohamed

    2017-05-10

    HIV screening has existed in numerous methods as an important part of HIV prevention efforts over the years. Premarital HIV testing for couples who wish to marry has been implemented in a number of regions, which often operate in a mandatory rather than voluntary basis and is considered a contentious issue, with viewpoints held in favour and against. One such region is Malaysia which has a policy of mandatory premarital HIV testing of prospective Muslim married couples. The purpose of this study is to understand stakeholders' views on premarital HIV testing given the Malaysian Islamic context. 35 in-depth face to face semi-structured interviews were undertaken with key stakeholder groups involved in HIV prevention policy in Malaysia, namely, officials from the Ministry of Health, religious leaders and people living with HIV. Participants were recruited from the Klang Valley area, from July to December 2013, using purposive sampling techniques. Inclusion criteria necessitated that participants were over the age of 18 and provided full consent. Interviews were audiotaped, followed a standardised topic guide, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a framework analysis. Participants identified pre-marital HIV testing as an effective HIV prevention policy implemented in Malaysia and was viewed, for the most part, as a positive initiative across all stakeholders. Religious leaders were supportive of testing as it provides a protective mechanism, in line with the teachings of the Shariah, while Ministry of Health officials considered it a normal part of their HIV prevention screening initiatives. However, there were concerns surrounding issues such as confidentiality, counselling and discrimination surrounding the test described by the PLHIV group. The findings of this study show that among the participants interviewed was strong support for mandatory premarital HIV testing, which could possibly expose the vulnerability to HIV, reluctance to test and other areas in the

  2. Stakeholder Participation in Freshwater Monitoring and Evaluation Programs: Applying Thresholds of Potential Concern within Environmental Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conallin, John; McLoughlin, Craig A.; Campbell, Josh; Knight, Roger; Bright, Troy; Fisher, Ian

    2018-03-01

    The complex nature of freshwater systems provides challenges for incorporating evidence-based techniques into management. This paper investigates the potential of participatory evidence-based techniques to involve local stakeholders and make decisions based on different "knowledge" sources within adaptive management programs. It focuses on the application of thresholds of potential concern (TPC) within strategic adaptive management (SAM) for facilitating inclusive decision-making. The study is based on the case of the Edward-Wakool (E-W) "Fish and Flows" SAM project in the Murray-Darling River Basin, Australia. We demonstrate the application of TPCs for improving collaborative decision-making within the E-W, associated with environmental watering requirements, and other natural resource management programs such as fish stocking. The development of TPCs in the E-W fish and flows SAM project helped improve stakeholder involvement and understanding of the system, and also the effectiveness of the implemented management interventions. TPCs ultimately helped inform environmental flow management activities. The TPC process complemented monitoring that was already occurring in the system and provided a mechanism for linking formal and informal knowledge to form explicit and measurable endpoints from objectives. The TPC process faced challenges due to the perceived reduction in scientific rigor within initial TPC development and use. However, TPCs must remain tangible to managers and other stakeholders, in order to aid in the implementation of adaptive management. Once accepted by stakeholders, over time TPCs should be reviewed and refined in order to increase their scientific rigor, as new information is generated.

  3. Evaluation Policy Alternatives for the Reengineering of the Department of Defense Personal Property Shipment and Storage Program - A Stakeholder Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lepson, Michael

    1999-01-01

    ...) to evaluate the personal property pilot programs as part of Management Reform Memorandum # 6. This thesis evaluates the policy alternatives for reengineering the DOD personal property program using a stakeholder approach...

  4. Partnerships and Opportunity: A Canadian Success Story Community engagement on uranium mining in northern Saskatchewan. Informing and Involving Stakeholders in the Context of the Finnish Decision-making Process. Stakeholder involvement and public debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, Sharonne; Vanhatalo, Hanna; Thome-Jassaud, Pierre-Franck

    2017-01-01

    Session 5 featured case studies of stakeholder involvement in decisions related to new nuclear power and fuel cycle facilities. The chair highlighted that more than 30 countries either have nuclear power facilities or are considering developing them, and 15 countries are currently building new reactors. The topic of new nuclear facilities is quite broad, and the session covered three case studies that were quite different. Ms Katz of Natural Resources Canada Limited outlined stakeholder engagement commitments by a number of actors in Canada, including the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. She provided an overview on Cameco's behalf of their experience in engaging the local stakeholders of uranium mining activities. Ms Vanhatalo reviewed Fennovoima's activities related to the site selection and move towards construction of a new nuclear reactor. Mr Thome-Jassaud presented the experience of electricite de France on two proposed reactor projects with France's formalised public debate process. A central theme of the presentations was the importance of establishing and maintaining a good reputation, especially in the local community. Ms Katz relayed a story of Cameco inviting community leaders, near an Australian property that Cameco had acquired to visit a mining community in Saskatchewan. Instead of tightly controlling the interaction, Cameco left the Australian guests to stay with local families for several days to ask questions and hear directly from members of the Canadian community without any interference. This required confidence on the part of the company that it had built a strong and positive relationship with the Canadian host community. Ms Vanhatalo described how the success in siting nuclear power plant Hanhikivi 1 near Pyhaejoki was attributable not only to Fennovoima's commitment to engage the community, but also to the reputation that the company Teollisuuden Voima Oy had built with its Olkiluoto nuclear power plant and the positive association with

  5. Stakeholder involvement in the design of a patient-centered comparative effectiveness trial of the "On the Move" group exercise program in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brach, Jennifer S; Perera, Subashan; Gilmore, Sandra; VanSwearingen, Jessie M; Brodine, Deborah; Wert, David; Nadkarni, Neelesh K; Ricci, Edmund

    2016-09-01

    Group exercise programs for older adults often exclude the timing and coordination of movement. Stakeholder involvement in the research process is strongly encouraged and improves the relevance and adoption of findings. We describe stakeholder involvement in the design of a clinical trial of a group-based exercise program that incorporates timing and coordination of movement into the exercises. The study was a cluster randomized, single-blind intervention trial to compare the effects on function, disability and mobility of a standard group exercise program and the "On the Move" group exercise program in older adults residing in independent living facilities and senior apartment buildings, and attending community centers. Exercise classes were twice weekly for 12weeks delivered by study exercise leaders and facility activity staff personnel. The primary outcomes function, disability and mobility were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. Function and disability were assessed using the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument, and mobility using the Six-Minute Walk Test and gait speed. Patient and provider stakeholders had significant input into the study aims, design, sample, intervention, outcomes and operational considerations. A community-based exercise program to improve walking can be developed to address both investigator identified missing components in current exercise to improve walking and stakeholder defined needs and interest for the activity program. Involvement of stakeholders substantially improves the relevance of research questions, increases the transparency of research activities and may accelerate the adoption of research into practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Research priority setting for health policy and health systems strengthening in Nigeria: the policymakers and stakeholders perspective and involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uneke, Chigozie Jesse; Ezeoha, Abel Ebeh; Ndukwe, Chinwendu Daniel; Oyibo, Patrick Gold; Onwe, Friday; Aulakh, Bhupinder Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Nigeria is one of the low and middle income countries (LMICs) facing severe resource constraint, making it impossible for adequate resources to be allocated to the health sector. Priority setting becomes imperative because it guides investments in health care, health research and respects resource constraints. The objective of this study was to enhance the knowledge and understanding of policymakers on research priority setting and to conduct a research priority setting exercise. A one-day evidence-to-policy research priority setting meeting was held. The meeting participants included senior and middle level policymakers and key decision makers/stakeholders in the health sector in Ebonyi State southeastern Nigeria. The priorities setting meeting involved a training session on priority setting process and conduction of priority setting exercise using the essential national health research (ENHR) approach. The focus was on the health systems building blocks (health workforce; health finance; leadership/governance; medical products/technology; service delivery; and health information/evidence). Of the total of 92 policymakers invited 90(97.8%) attended the meeting. It was the consensus of the policymakers that research should focus on the challenges of optimal access to health products and technology; effective health service delivery and disease control under a national emergency situation; the shortfalls in the supply of professional personnel; and the issues of governance in the health sector management. Research priority setting exercise involving policymakers is an example of demand driven strategy in the health policymaking process capable of reversing inequities and strengthening the health systems in LMICs.

  7. Evaluating patient and stakeholder engagement in research: moving from theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmail, Laura; Moore, Emily; Rein, Alison

    2015-03-01

    Despite the growing demand for research that engages stakeholders, there is limited evidence in the literature to demonstrate its value - or return on investment. This gap indicates a general lack of evaluation of engagement activities. To adequately inform engagement activities, we need to further investigate the dividends of engaged research, and how to evaluate these effects. This paper synthesizes the literature on hypothesized impacts of engagement, shares what has been evaluated and identifies steps needed to reduce the gap between engagement's promises and the underlying evidence supporting its practice. This assessment provides explicit guidance for better alignment of engagement's promised benefits with evaluation efforts and identifies specific areas for development of evaluative measures and better reporting processes.

  8. Behavioural change phases of different stakeholders involved in the implementation process of ergonomics measures in bricklaying (vol 36, pg 449, 2005)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, H. F.; Sluiter, J. K.; Frings-Dresen, M. H. W.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this qualitative study was to assess whether a hypothesised sequential order of behavioural change phases would be fulfilled in different groups of stakeholders involved at the start of a process to implement ergonomic measures in bricklaying teams. The measures include trestles,

  9. The Role of Involvement and Use in Multisite Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrenz, Frances; King, Jean A.; Ooms, Ann

    2011-01-01

    A cross-case analysis of four National Science Foundation (NSF) case studies identified both unique details and common themes related to promoting the use and influence of multisite evaluations. The analysis provided evidence of diverse evaluation use by stakeholders and suggested that people taking part in the multisite evaluations perceived…

  10. Managing Diverse Stakeholders

    OpenAIRE

    Pipkin, Erin; Porter, Sean; Clark, Rickie

    2017-01-01

    For every public project, there is a diverse group of stakeholders who need and want information. During this session we outline important stakeholders, how and when to involve them in the planning process, and how targeted messaging might be the key to your project’s success. We also discuss how to identify and manage stakeholders who oppose your project.

  11. Study on corporate social responsibility evaluation system based on stakeholder theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J.; Deng, Liming

    2011-10-01

    The issue of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has been attracting the attention from many disciplines such as economics, management, laws, sociality and philosophy since last century. The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of CSR on performance and develop a CSR evaluation system. Building on the definition of CSR and Stakeholder theory, this article built a path-relationship model of CSR and business operation performance. The paper also constructed CSR evaluation system based on KLD index, GRJ report, CSR accounting account, SA8000, ISO14000 etc. The research provides a basis for future studies about the relationship between CSR and business performance and shed some light on the evaluation of CSR practices.

  12. Formal Theory versus Stakeholder Theory: New Insights from a Tobacco-Focused Prevention Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huey T.; Turner, Nannette C.

    2012-01-01

    Health promotion and social betterment program interventions are based on either formal theory from academia or stakeholder theory from stakeholders' observations and experiences in working with clients. Over time, formal theory-based interventions have acquired high prestige, while stakeholder theory-based interventions have been held in low…

  13. Project stakeholder management

    CERN Document Server

    Eskerod, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    Carrying out a project as planned is not a guarantee for success. Projects may fail because project management does not take the requirements, wishes and concerns of stakeholders sufficiently into account. Projects can only be successful though contributions from stakeholders. And in the end, it is the stakeholders that evaluate whether they find that the project is a success. To manage stakeholders effectively, you need to know your stakeholders, their behaviours and attitudes towards the project. In Project Stakeholder Management, the authors give guidance on how to adopt an analytical and s

  14. Trade-offs in ecosystem services and varying stakeholder preferences: evaluating conflicts, obstacles, and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth King

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In efforts to increase human well-being while maintaining the natural systems and processes upon which we depend, navigating the trade-offs that can arise between different ecosystem services is a profound challenge. We evaluated a recently developed simple analytic framework for assessing ecosystem service trade-offs, which characterizes such trade-offs in terms of their underlying biophysical constraints as well as divergences in stakeholders' values for the services in question. Through a workshop and subsequent discussions, we identified four different types of challenging situations under which the framework allows important insights to clarify the nature of stakeholder conflicts, obstacles to promoting more sustainable outcomes, and potential enabling factors to promote efficiency and sustainability of ecosystem service yields. We illustrated the framework's analytical steps by applying them to case studies representing three of the challenging situations. We explored the fourth challenging situation conceptually, using published literature for examples. We examined the potential utility and feasibility of using the framework as a participatory tool in resource management and conflict resolution. We concluded that the framework can be instrumental for promoting pluralism and insightful analysis of trade-offs. The insights offered here may be viewed as hypotheses to be tested and refined as additional unforeseen challenges and benefits are revealed as the framework is put into practice.

  15. Ethics and incentives: an evaluation and development of stakeholder theory in the health care industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elms, Heather; Berman, Shawn; Wicks, Andrew C

    2002-10-01

    This paper utilizes a qualitative case study of the health care industry and a recent legal case to demonstrate that stakeholder theory's focus on ethics, without recognition of the effects of incentives, severely limits the theory's ability to provide managerial direction and explain managerial behavior. While ethics provide a basis for stakeholder prioritization, incentives influence whether managerial action is consistent with that prioritization. Our health care examples highlight this and other limitations of stakeholder theory and demonstrate the explanatory and directive power added by the inclusion of the interactive effects of ethics and incentives in stakeholder ordering.

  16. Combining sound science, legal action and stakeholder involvement to protect a vulnerable coastal aquifer on the island of St. Kitts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahely, H.; Nettles, S.; Burrowes, R.; Haas, G.

    2011-12-01

    Water resources in small island developing states (SIDS), especially those in the Caribbean are among the most vulnerable systems to human activities and climate change. This vulnerability is exacerbated by a fragmented approach to water resources management. The unconfined coastal aquifer underlying the Basseterre Valley is a significant asset for the people of St. Kitts-Nevis. The potable water extracted from this aquifer represents over 40% of the total water supply for St. Kitts. The area is subject to urban encroachment, inappropriate land use and threats from pollution. A project was implemented using an integrated approach to help government and communities take practical actions to protect this vulnerable aquifer by demonstrating proper management on three fronts: mitigation of threats from contaminants, protection of the aquifer and improved water resources management. The project is funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) as part of the Integrating Watershed and Coastal Areas Management (IWCAM) project for Caribbean Small Island States. A comprehensive hydrogeologic evaluation of the aquifer was undertaken in order to aid in the development of a water resources management strategy for the Basseterre Valley Aquifer. Multi-electrode electrical resistivity (MER), a novel surface geophysical technique, was used to delineate the thickness and distribution of sediments throughout the aquifer, zones of increased porosity, zones of possible contamination and the fresh/salt water interface. Together with slowly declining static water levels and elevated dissolved solids levels, the early stages of salt water intrusion have been documented. Groundwater modelling suggests that adjusting the pumping regime, redeveloping some of the existing wells and relocating other wells is a viable option for increasing efficiency and preventing long term dewatering. Overall, the study has provided a wealth of new information about the aquifer for a reasonable cost. A

  17. INNOVATIVE TECHNIQUES USED BY EPA, SCDHEC, AND DOE TO INCREASE STAKEHOLDER AND PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT IN THE CLEANUP OF NUCLEAR PRODUCTION FACILITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mccollum, L

    2007-01-01

    This paper will describe the importance of public and stakeholder involvement to the decisions being made at Savannah River Site (SRS) regarding the cleanup of major production facilities. For over a decade the Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) have operated under a three party agreement (known as the Federal Facilities Agreement or FFA) to clean up the SRS from the remnants of the Cold War plutonium production at SRS. During this time, the 3 agencies have consulted with the surrounding and impacted public to gain stakeholder input on the decisions concerning the clean up of various wastes at the SRS. The primary instrument of public input has been and remains the SRS Community Advisory Board (CAB). Much progress has been made over the years in cleaning up the SRS and the CAB has provided invaluable stakeholder input. Many planned decisions have been modified and changed as a result of the input of the CAB. Recently, DOE has decided to move forward with the Decommissioning of excess facilities at the SRS. These facilities include many buildings involved in the various missions of radioactive isotope production at the SRS, including the reactors and the plutonium processing facilities. The discussions of the 3 agencies on how to best accomplish this work have always included discussions about how to best involve and receive input from all stakeholders. The innovative way the 3 agencies have worked together through the public involvement format has application nationally and DOE-Complex wide. The decisions made will impact the surrounding community and the country for years. Multiple meetings with the CAB and other stakeholders will be required and it will be incumbent on the 3 agencies to reach out to and involve all interested parties. At least 3 different approaches could be used for stakeholder involvement. (1) a typical CERCLA ''proposed plan

  18. Stakeholder value-linked sustainability assessment: Evaluating remedial alternatives for the Portland Harbor Superfund Site, Portland, Oregon, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apitz, Sabine E; Fitzpatrick, Anne G; McNally, Amanda; Harrison, David; Coughlin, Conor; Edwards, Deborah A

    2018-01-01

    Regulatory decisions on remediation should consider affected communities' needs and values, and how these might be impacted by remedial options; this process requires that diverse stakeholders are able to engage in a transparent consideration of value trade-offs and of the distribution of risks and benefits associated with remedial actions and outcomes. The Stakeholder Values Assessment (SVA) tool was developed to evaluate remedial impacts on environmental quality, economic viability, and social equity in the context of stakeholder values and priorities. Stakeholder values were linked to the pillars of sustainability and also to a range of metrics to evaluate how sediment remediation affects these values. Sediment remedial alternatives proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) for the Portland Harbor Superfund Site were scored for each metric, based upon data provided in published feasibility study (FS) documents. Metric scores were aggregated to generate scores for each value; these were then aggregated to generate scores for each pillar of sustainability. In parallel, the inferred priorities (in terms of regional remediation, restoration, planning, and development) of diverse stakeholder groups (SGs) were used to evaluate the sensitivity and robustness of the values-based sustainability assessment to diverse SG priorities. This approach, which addresses social indicators of impact and then integrates them with indicators of environmental and economic impacts, goes well beyond the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act's (CERCLA) 9 criteria for evaluating remedial alternatives because it evaluates how remedial alternatives might be ranked in terms of the diverse values and priorities of stakeholders. This approach identified trade-offs and points of potential contention, providing a systematic, semiquantitative, transparent valuation tool that can be used in community engagement. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2018

  19. Increasing Public Access to Scientific Research through Stakeholder Involvement: Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, S. C.; Stephens, S. H.; DeLorme, D. E.; Ruple, D.; Graham, L.

    2013-12-01

    Sea level rise (SLR) has the potential to have a myriad of deleterious effects on coastal ecology and human infrastructure. Stakeholders, including managers of coastal resources, must be aware of potential consequences of SLR and adjust their plans accordingly to protect and preserve the resources under their care. Members of the public, particularly those who live or work in coastal areas, should also be informed about the results of scientific research on the effects of SLR. However, research results are frequently published in venues or formats to which resource managers and the broader public have limited access. It is imperative for scientists to move beyond traditional publication venues in order to more effectively disseminate the results of their research (Dennison, W. 2007, Estu. Coast. Shelf Sci. 77, 185). One potentially effective way to advance public access to research is to incorporate stakeholder involvement into the research project process in order to target study objectives and tailor communication products toward stakeholder needs (Lemos, M. & Morehouse, B. 2005, Glob. Env. Chg. 15, 57). However, it is important to manage communication and clarify participant expectations during this type of research (Gawith, M. et al. 2009, Glob. Env. Chg. 19, 113). This presentation describes the process being undertaken by an ongoing 5-year multi-disciplinary NOAA-funded project, Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (EESLR-NGOM), to improve accessibility and utility of scientific research results through stakeholder engagement. The EESLR-NGOM project is assessing the ecological risks from SLR along the Mississippi, Alabama and Florida Panhandle coasts, coastal habitats, and floodplains. It has incorporated stakeholder involvement throughout the research process so as to better target and tailor the emerging research products to meet resource managers' needs, as well as to facilitate eventual public dissemination of results. An

  20. Can the impact of public involvement on research be evaluated? A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Rosemary; Boote, Jonathan D; Parry, Glenys D; Cooper, Cindy L; Yeeles, Philippa; Cook, Sarah

    2012-09-01

      Public involvement is central to health and social research policies, yet few systematic evaluations of its impact have been carried out, raising questions about the feasibility of evaluating the impact of public involvement.   To investigate whether it is feasible to evaluate the impact of public involvement on health and social research.   Mixed methods including a two-round Delphi study with pre-specified 80% consensus criterion, with follow-up interviews. UK and international panellists came from different settings, including universities, health and social care institutions and charitable organizations. They comprised researchers, members of the public, research managers, commissioners and policy makers, self-selected as having knowledge and/or experience of public involvement in health and/or social research; 124 completed both rounds of the Delphi process. A purposive sample of 14 panellists was interviewed.   Consensus was reached that it is feasible to evaluate the impact of public involvement on 5 of 16 impact issues: identifying and prioritizing research topics, disseminating research findings and on key stakeholders. Qualitative analysis revealed the complexities of evaluating a process that is subjective and socially constructed. While many panellists believed that it is morally right to involve the public in research, they also considered that it is appropriate to evaluate the impact of public involvement.   This study found consensus among panellists that it is feasible to evaluate the impact of public involvement on some research processes, outcomes and on key stakeholders. The value of public involvement and the importance of evaluating its impact were endorsed. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Can the impact of public involvement on research be evaluated? A mixed methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Rosemary; Boote, Jonathan D; Parry, Glenys D; Cooper, Cindy L; Yeeles, Philippa; Cook, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background  Public involvement is central to health and social research policies, yet few systematic evaluations of its impact have been carried out, raising questions about the feasibility of evaluating the impact of public involvement. Objective  To investigate whether it is feasible to evaluate the impact of public involvement on health and social research. Methods  Mixed methods including a two‐round Delphi study with pre‐specified 80% consensus criterion, with follow‐up interviews. UK and international panellists came from different settings, including universities, health and social care institutions and charitable organizations. They comprised researchers, members of the public, research managers, commissioners and policy makers, self‐selected as having knowledge and/or experience of public involvement in health and/or social research; 124 completed both rounds of the Delphi process. A purposive sample of 14 panellists was interviewed. Results  Consensus was reached that it is feasible to evaluate the impact of public involvement on 5 of 16 impact issues: identifying and prioritizing research topics, disseminating research findings and on key stakeholders. Qualitative analysis revealed the complexities of evaluating a process that is subjective and socially constructed. While many panellists believed that it is morally right to involve the public in research, they also considered that it is appropriate to evaluate the impact of public involvement. Conclusions  This study found consensus among panellists that it is feasible to evaluate the impact of public involvement on some research processes, outcomes and on key stakeholders. The value of public involvement and the importance of evaluating its impact were endorsed. PMID:21324054

  2. Determining barriers to developing geothermal power generation in Japan: Societal acceptance by stakeholders involved in hot springs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Hiromi; Hondo, Hiroki; Hienuki, Shunichi; Kaieda, Hideshi

    2013-01-01

    After many years of stagnant growth in geothermal power generation, development plans for new geothermal plants have recently emerged throughout Japan. Through a literature review, we investigated the relationships between the principal barriers to geothermal development and we thereby analyzed the deciding factors in the future success of such enterprises. The results show that the societal acceptance of geothermal power by local stakeholders is the fundamental barrier as it affects almost all other barriers, such as financial, technical, and political risks. Thus, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 26 stakeholders including developers, hot spring inn managers, and local government officials. Some hot spring inn managers and local government officials noted that they have always been strongly concerned about the adverse effects of geothermal power generation on hot springs; their opposition has delayed decision-making by local governments regarding drilling permits, prolonged lead times, and caused other difficulties. A key reason for opposition was identified as uncertainty about the reversibility and predictability of the adverse effects on hot springs and other underground structures by geothermal power production and reinjection of hot water from reservoirs. Therefore, we discuss and recommend options for improving the risk management of hot springs near geothermal power plants. - Highlights: • We clarify relationships between barriers to geothermal power development in Japan. • Local acceptance by hot spring managers is the most prominent barrier. • Uncertainty of reversibility and predictability induces low acceptance. • Risk transfer system and dialogue are needed to alleviate concerns

  3. Soft Law, Solid Implementation? The Influence of Precision, Monitoring and Stakeholder Involvement on Norwegian Implementation of Arctic Council Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Folkestad Soltvedt

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic Council has been criticized for its lack of legal status and, consequently, the supposedly low level of implementation among member states. Studying Norwegian implementation of six Arctic Council recommendations, this article challenges that view. I start by assuming that international law is not binary, that soft law is not a uniform phenomenon, and that soft law recommendations may entail certain characteristics—precision, monitoring, and stakeholder involvement—that can enhance their implementation nationally. Additionally, malignancy—an important barrier to national implementation—is taken into account. The Norwegian authorities have implemented several of the recommendations studied, and the characteristics are found to have a bearing on the outcomes. However, the absence of malignancy stands out as the most significant condition for achieving national implementation.

  4. Stakeholder evaluation of an online program to promote physical activity and workplace safety for individuals with disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery-Hurwit, Mara; Kincl, Laurel; Driver, Simon; Heller, Brittany

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with disabilities face increasing health and employment disparities, including increased risk of morbidity and mortality and decreased earnings, occupational roles, and greater risk of injury at work. Thus, there is a need to improve workplace safety and health promotion efforts for people with disability. The purpose of this study was to obtain stakeholder feedback about an online program, Be Active, Work Safe, which was developed to increase the physical activity and workplace safety practices of individuals with disability. Eight stakeholders (content experts and individuals with disability) evaluated the 8-week online program and provided feedback on accessibility, usability, and content using quantitative and qualitative approaches. Stakeholders suggested changes to the organization, layout and accessibility, and content. This included making a stronger connection between the physical activity and workplace safety components of the program, broadening content to apply to individuals in different vocational fields, and reducing the number of participant assessments. Engaging stakeholders in the development of health promotion programs is critical to ensure the unique issues of the population are addressed and facilitate engagement in the program. Feedback provided by stakeholders improved the program and provided insight on barriers for adoption of the program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of pemphigus cases involving oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagöz, Gizem; Bektaş-Kayhan, Kivanç; Ünür, Meral

    2014-09-01

    Pemphigus, defines a group of disorders in autoimmune etiology which could be life-threatening and clinical manifestations are mainly epithelial blistering affecting cutaneous and/or mucosal surfaces including oral mucosa. The aim of our study is to evaluate the clinical appearance of pemphigus with oral involvement by reported 15 pemphigus cases. This retrospective study of 15 cases of pemphigus obtained over a period of 7 years from 2006 to 2013 in Istanbul University, Dentistry Faculty, Oral Medicine and Surgery Department was designed. Age distribution of pemphigus was from 15 to 59 years with an average age of 41.3 years. Of the 15 patients, the male:female ratio was 1:2.75 (4 male, 11 female). The most common clinical various of pemphigus was pemphigus vulgaris, diagnosed in all patients. The buccal mucosa (34.3%) was the most commonly affected site followed by tongue (20%), gingiva (17.1%), palate (11.4%), lips (11.4%) and floor of mouth (5.7%). Our explanation of this conclusion, while speculative, is that socioeconomic situation related stress in males and hormonal changes like pregnancy and menostasis in females; systemic disease and using drugs; dental trauma and bruxism could be responsible for flare up in the disease.

  6. Using social network and stakeholder analysis to help evaluate infectious waste management: a step towards a holistic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniato, Marco; Vaccari, Mentore; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan; Zurbrügg, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Assessing the strengths and weaknesses of a solid waste management scheme requires an accurate analysis and integration of several determining features. In addition to the technical aspects, any such system shows a complex interaction of actors with varying stakes, decision-making power and influence, as well as a favourable or disabling environment. When capitalizing on the knowledge and experience from a specific case, it is also crucial that experts do not "forget" or underestimate the importance of such social determinants and that they are familiar with the methods and tools to assess them. Social network analysis (SNA) and stakeholder analysis (SA) methods can be successfully applied to better understand actors' role and actions, analyse driving forces and existing coordination among stakeholders, as well as identify bottlenecks in communication which affect daily operations or strategic planning for the future way forward. SNA and SA, appropriately adjusted for a certain system, can provide a useful integration to methods by assessing other aspects to ensure a comprehensive picture of the situation. This paper describes how to integrate SNA and SA in order to survey a solid waste management system. This paper presents the results of an analysis of On-Nuch infectious waste incinerator in Bangkok, Thailand. Stakeholders were interviewed and asked to prioritize characteristics and relationships which they consider particularly important for system development and success of the scheme. In such a way, a large quantity of information about organization, communication between stakeholders and their perception about operation, environmental and health impact, and potential alternatives for the system was collected in a systematic way. The survey results suggest that stakeholders are generally satisfied with the system operation, though communication should be improved. Moreover, stakeholders should be strategically more involved in system development planning

  7. [Training session on healthy environments: evaluation of an intervention for local stakeholders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Virginie; Rivard, Marie-Claude; Trudeau, François

    2016-01-01

    Around the world, various interventions have been developed to encourage the adoption of healthy lifestyles, particularly nutrition and physical activity. Physical, political, economic and socio-cultural environments have a major influence on individual attitudes in relation to healthy lifestyle. However, stakeholders with the greatest impact on improving these environments are not always well informed about the theory and their roles on the creation of environments favourable to healthy lifestyles. Various stakeholders from the province of Quebec were therefore invited to attend training sessions in order to prepare them to act on these four environments. 1) To describe the perceptions of the stakeholders who attended these sessions concerning the content and teaching methods and 2) to identify stakeholders’ changes of perceptions and practices following the training session. Twelve (12) focus groups and 52 individual interviews were conducted across Quebec with stakeholders who attended a training session. Our results indicate increased awareness of stakeholders on the importance of their role but also the need to more precisely target those aspects requiring increased awareness. A content better suited to the level of expertise is therefore proposed to maximize the benefits of these training sessions. Training sessions must be addressed to influential stakeholders with a limited knowledge on the subject, which is often the case for municipal decision-makers known to play a major role in promoting environments favourable to healthy eating and physical activity.

  8. Managing stakeholders in transformational government

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinwald, Anja Kaldahl; Kræmmergaard, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    a stakeholder perspective. The paper reports how they succeeded in involving the most important stakeholders in the process of reaching transformational government. Finally the paper offers six lessons learned, based on the case study, about how to manage the involved stakeholders to reach transformational...

  9. The influence of stakeholder groups in operation and maintenance services of offshore wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahsan, Dewan; Pedersen, Søren

    2018-01-01

    One of the prime challenges in offshore wind is to manage and coordinate with the various stakeholders involved in the operation and maintenance (O&M) phase. Therefore the aims of this paper are: i) to map the stakeholder groups involved in O&M of Offshore Wind Farm (OWF), ii) to assess...... the identified stakeholder group's interest and power to influence O&M, iii) to evaluate the relationship between different stakeholder groups and iv) to highlight potential strategies to manage the stakeholder groups. In this article, the stakeholder analysis approach is used. The results reveal that eleven key...

  10. Stakeholder-based evaluation categories for regional climate services - a case study at the German Baltic Sea coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Insa

    2017-08-01

    In this study, categories, dimensions, and criteria for evaluating regional climate services are derived by a participatory approach with potential service users at the German Baltic Sea coast. The development is carried out within nine face-to-face interviews conducted with decision makers, working in climate sensitive sectors at the German Baltic Sea coast. Three main groups of categories were localized which seem to matter most to the considered stakeholders and which seem to be crucial evaluation categories for regional climate services: (1) credibility, (2) relevance, and (3) appropriateness. For each of these evaluation categories several dimensions emerged, indicating certain perspectives of stakeholder demands. When summarizing these evaluation categories and their dimensions, 13 evaluation criteria for regional climate services can be derived (see Table 1). The results show that stakeholders do mainly address components other than those found in the literature (e.g. inputs, process, outputs, outcomes, and impacts). This might indicate that an evaluation, following solely literature-based (non-participative) components, is not sufficient to localize deficiencies or efficiencies within a regional climate service, since it might lead to results which are not relevant for potential users.

  11. Stakeholders and public involvement for flood protection: traditional river management organisations for a better consideration of local knowledge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utz, Stephan; Lane, Stuart; Reynard, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    This research explores participatory processes in the domain of river management in Switzerland. The main objective is to understand how traditional, highly participatory, local organisations for flood protection have been institutionalised into current river management policy, and to what extent this has impacted on wider participatory processes of producing knowledge. Traditionally, flood protection strategies have been based upon scientific knowledge but have often ignored the capacities of local actors to contribute to the development of the policy. Thus, there may be a gap between scientists, stakeholders and the public that favours controversies and leads to opposition to flood protection projects. In order to reduce this gap and to increase incorporation of local knowledge, participatory processes are set up. They are considered as allowing the integration of all the actors concerned by flood risks to discuss their positions and to develop alternative solutions. This is a particularly important goal in the Swiss political system where direct democracy (the possibility of calling the decision of any level of government into question through a popular vote) means that a reasonable level of project acceptance is a necessary element of project. In order to support implementation of participatory processes, federal funding includes a special grant to cover the additional costs due to these actions. It is considered that, since its introduction in 2008, this grant certainly furthered participatory processes for flood protection projects and fostered water management policy implementation. However, the implication of stakeholders and public in decision-making processes is much well-established than modern river management often assumes. In some regions, flood protection tasks have been traditionally assumed by local organisations such as dyke corporations (DCs). These comprise land and property owners who are DC members and have to participate in flood protection

  12. Involvement of local stakeholders in the development of new information schemes for the displaying of environmental radiological monitoring results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollinger, Francoise; Lebeau, Audrey; Petitfrere, Michael; Eimer, Michel; Ganay, Claude de; Gadbois, Serge; Leprieur, Fabrice; Vaillant, Ludovic

    2008-01-01

    Evolution of radionuclides concentration in the environment and associated potential health impacts are key and legitimate questions for the population living around nuclear facilities. In spite of the efforts from authorities, public experts and operators to make this information available and understandable, mainly through Local Liaison Committees (LLC), the way it is usually formalized makes it difficult to meet non-expert expectations. In this context, the IRSN launched a pilot project in the Loire Valley to define new schemes for the displaying of this information. This project brings together representatives from LLCs - local elected people, trade unions and environmental NGOs -, experts from the IRSN - environment and radiation protection departments - and facilitators - CEPN and MUTADIS -. Its objectives are: 1-) To identify all nuclear facilities and producers of measurements in the environment within the Valley; 2-) To clearly define local population expectations regards environmental radiological survey; 3-) To select adequate measurements values and presentational schemes; 4-) To provide recommendations regarding the environment monitoring strategy. This project is also connected with the French national measurement network. Within this national network, the IRSN is in charge of developing a database that brings together all the results from environmental radiological monitoring, in order to provide all these data to the population, including elements about impacts on human health. This network will take advantage of the work achieved within the pilot project. The facilitation process mainly consisted in fostering relations of trust (notably with the preparation of detailed minutes of the project meetings), and supporting both local stakeholders and IRSN experts in the project management and the development of a common language at the crossroad between scientific and technical knowledge and local actors' understanding of their own environment. This

  13. Evaluating barriers for reverse logistics implementation under a multiple stakeholders' perspective analysis using grey decision making approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzon, Marina; Govindan, Kannan; Rodriguez, Carlos Manuel Taboada

    2018-01-01

    In the past few decades, an interest in reverse logistics has attracted the attention of industries and also has become a subject of interest for researchers. However, while reverse logistics is becoming a mandatory element of the supply chain in developed countries particularly due to legislation...... issues, the subject is still in a state of infancy in emerging economies such as Brazil. In these connections, impediments to reverse logistics implementation must be considered and analyzed, as well as the many different perspectives from the key stakeholders for their development. The objective...... of this research is to evaluate the interrelationship among reverse logistics barriers from the perspectives of the most important stakeholders in the Brazilian context. For this purpose, a Multi-Criteria Decision Making tool named grey-based Decision Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (grey-DEMATEL) was used...

  14. What Do Stakeholders Know about School Library Programs? Results of a Focus Group Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Supporting the "Infrastructure Needs of 21st Century School Library Programs," also known as the Pennsylvania School Library Project, was a one-year project conducted in Pennsylvania to better identify and understand what stakeholders--teachers, administrators, parents, school and community leaders, and education associations--expect…

  15. Transforming primary healthcare by including the stakeholders involved in delivering care to people living in poverty: EQUIhealThY study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loignon, Christine; Hudon, Catherine; Boudreault-Fournier, Alexandrine; Dupéré, Sophie; Macaulay, Ann C; Pluye, Pierre; Gaboury, Isabelle; Haggerty, Jeannie L; Fortin, Martin; Goulet, Émilie; Lambert, Mireille; Pelissier-Simard, Luce; Boyer, Sophie; de Laat, Marianne; Lemire, Francine; Champagne, Louise; Lemieux, Martin

    2013-03-11

    Ensuring access to timely and appropriate primary healthcare for people living in poverty is an issue facing all countries, even those with universal healthcare systems. The transformation of healthcare practices and organization could be improved by involving key stakeholders from the community and the healthcare system in the development of research interventions. The aim of this project is to stimulate changes in healthcare organizations and practices by encouraging collaboration between care teams and people living in poverty. Our objectives are twofold: 1) to identify actions required to promote the adoption of professional practices oriented toward social competence in primary care teams; and 2) to examine factors that would encourage the inclusion of people living in poverty in the process of developing social competence in healthcare organizations. This study will use a participatory action research design applied in healthcare organizations. Participatory research is an increasingly recognized approach that is helpful for involving the people for whom the research results are intended. Our research team consists of 19 non-academic researchers, 11 academic researchers and six partners. A steering committee composed of academic researchers and stakeholders will have a decision-making role at each step, including knowledge dissemination and recommendations for new interventions. In this project we will adopt a multiphase approach and will use a variety of methods, including photovoice, group discussions and interviews. The proposed study will be one of only a few using participatory research in primary care to foster changes aimed at enhancing quality and access to care for people living in poverty. To our knowledge this will be the first study to use photovoice in healthcare organizations to promote new interventions. Our project includes partners who are targeted for practice changes and improvements in delivering primary care to persons living in poverty

  16. Commercial Bank Efficiency Evaluation in Consideration of the Undesirable Output and Its Link with Stakeholders Relationship: An Application of China’s Commercial Banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyue Ji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the modern contract theory, expectancy theory, and stakeholder theory, this paper analyzes how stakeholders relationship influences the efficiency of commercial banks and finds that the efficiency is a function of stakeholders relationship. A DEA model with Seiford's linear transformation function is developed to evaluate the efficiency in consideration of the undesirable output. The panel Tobit model is established to conduct empirical research with data of 14 Chinese commercial banks from 2004 to 2012. The study finds that except for business customer relation, stakeholder relationship is the key variable that influences comprehensive efficiency of commercial banks.

  17. Developing an evaluation framework for consumer-centred collaborative care of depression using input from stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Jane; Yaffe, Mark; Sussman, Tamara; Kates, Nick; Mulvale, Gillian; Jayabarathan, Ajantha; Law, Susan; Haggerty, Jeannie

    2013-03-01

    To develop a framework for research and evaluation of collaborative mental health care for depression, which includes attributes or domains of care that are important to consumers. A literature review on collaborative mental health care for depression was completed and used to guide discussion at an interactive workshop with pan-Canadian participants comprising people treated for depression with collaborative mental health care, as well as their family members; primary care and mental health practitioners; decision makers; and researchers. Thematic analysis of qualitative data from the workshop identified key attributes of collaborative care that are important to consumers and family members, as well as factors that may contribute to improved consumer experiences. The workshop identified an overarching theme of partnership between consumers and practitioners involved in collaborative care. Eight attributes of collaborative care were considered to be essential or very important to consumers and family members: respectfulness; involvement of consumers in treatment decisions; accessibility; provision of information; coordination; whole-person care; responsiveness to changing needs; and comprehensiveness. Three inter-related groups of factors may affect the consumer experience of collaborative care, namely, organizational aspects of care; consumer characteristics and personal resources; and community resources. A preliminary evaluation framework was developed and is presented here to guide further evaluation and research on consumer-centred collaborative mental health care for depression.

  18. Stakeholders' perceptions on factors influencing male involvement in prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV services in Blantyre, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyondo, Alinane Linda; Chimwaza, Angela Faith; Muula, Adamson Sinjani

    2014-07-07

    Male Involvement (MI) in the Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT) of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) services is essential in a patriarchal society where men are decision makers of the household. Male partners have a role in the woman's risk of acquiring HIV, uptake of HIV testing and participation in Mother to Child Transmission (MTCT) prevention programmes. Although MI is important for uptake of PMTCT interventions, it remains low in Africa. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that promote and hinder MI in PMTCT services in antenatal care (ANC) services in Blantyre, Malawi. Understanding of the factors that influence MI will assist in developing strategies that will involve men more in the programme thereby improving the uptake of PMTCT and HIV testing and counselling services by women and men respectively. An exploratory qualitative study was conducted from December 2012 to January 2013 at South Lunzu Health Centre (SLHC) in Blantyre, Malawi. It consisted of six face to face Key Informant Interviews (KIIs) with health care workers and four Focus Group discussions (FGDs) with 18 men and 17 pregnant women attending antenatal care at the clinic. The FGDs were divided according to sex and age. All FGDs and KIIs were digitally recorded and simultaneously transcribed and translated verbatim into English. Data were analysed using thematic content analysis. Participants in both FGDs and KIIs identified the following barriers: lack of knowledge of MI in PMTCT, socioeconomic factors, relationship issues, timidity to be seen in a woman's domain, unplanned and or extramarital pregnancies, fear of knowing one's HIV status, unwillingness to be associated with the service, health facility based factors, peer influence and cultural factors. The factors that would potentially promote male involvement were categorized into community, health facility and personal or family level factors. The factors that may hinder or promote MI arise from different

  19. Stakeholder Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flak, Leif Skiftenes; Rose, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    to e-Government. Originally a management theory, stakeholder theory advocates addressing the concerns of all stakeholders in a firm, as opposed to concentration on the interests of senior managers and stockholders. Apart from the original profit focus, there is no serious conceptual mismatch between...... of governance. Finally, the paper makes recommendations for future work in adapting ST to the e-government context....

  20. Stakeholder Salience in ERP Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Salhotra, Eashan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine stakeholder involvement in an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) System project that involves implementation and improvement of the implemented system. The study targets stakeholders, their classification, and their degree of importance during different phases of an ERP project life cycle, i.e. planning, implementation, stabilisation and improvement. The study shows that stakeholder involvement and their salience vary along the ERP project life cycle a...

  1. Searching for consensus among physicians involved in the management of sick-listed workers in the Belgian health care sector: a qualitative study among practitioners and stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanmeerbeek, Marc; Govers, Patrick; Schippers, Nathalie; Rieppi, Stéphane; Mortelmans, Katrien; Mairiaux, Philippe

    2016-02-17

    In Belgium, the management of sick leave involves general practitioners (GPs), occupational health physicians (OPs) and social insurance physicians (SIPs). A dysfunctional relationship among these physicians can impede a patient's ability to return to work. The objective of this study was to identify ways to improve these physicians' mutual collaboration. Two consensus techniques were successively performed among the three professional groups. Eight nominal groups (NGs) gathered 74 field practitioners, and a two-round Delphi process involved 32 stakeholders. From the results, it appears that two areas (reciprocal knowledge and evolution of the legal and regulatory framework) are objects of consensus among the three medical group that were surveyed. Information transfer, particularly electronic transfer, was stressed as an important way to improve. The consensual proposals regarding interdisciplinary collaboration indicate specific and practical changes to be implemented when professionals are managing workers who are on sick leave. The collaboration process appeared to be currently more problematic, but the participants correctly identified the need for common training. The three physician groups all agree regarding several inter-physician collaboration proposals. The study also revealed a latent conflict situation among the analysed professionals that can arise from a lack of mutual recognition. Practical changes or improvements must be included in an extended framework that involves the different determinants of interdisciplinary collaboration that are shown by theoretical models. Collaboration is a product of the actions and behaviours of various partners, which requires reciprocal knowledge and trust; collaboration also implies political and economic structures that are led by public health authorities.

  2. Stakeholder involvement in the design of a patient-centered comparative effectiveness trial of the “On the Move” group exercise program in community-dwelling older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brach, Jennifer S.; Perera, Subashan; Gilmore, Sandra; VanSwearingen, Jessie M.; Brodine, Deborah; Wert, David; Nadkarni, Neelesh K.; Ricci, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Background Group exercise programs for older adults often exclude the timing and coordination of movement. Stakeholder involvement in the research process is strongly encouraged and improves the relevance and adoption of findings. We describe stakeholder involvement in the design of a clinical trial of a group-based exercise program that incorporates timing and coordination of movement into the exercises. Methods The study was a cluster randomized, single-blind intervention trial to compare the effects on function, disability and mobility of a standard group exercise program and the “On the Move” group exercise program in older adults residing in independent living facilities and senior apartment buildings, and attending community centers. Exercise classes were twice weekly for 12 weeks delivered by study exercise leaders and facility activity staff personnel. Outcomes The primary outcomes function, disability and mobility were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. Function and disability were assessed using the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument, and mobility using the Six-Minute Walk Test and gait speed. Stakeholders Patient and provider stakeholders had significant input into the study aims, design, sample, intervention, outcomes and operational considerations. Summary A community-based exercise program to improve walking can be developed to address both investigator identified missing components in current exercise to improve walking and stakeholder defined needs and interest for the activity program. Involvement of stakeholders substantially improves the relevance of research questions, increases the transparency of research activities and may accelerate the adoption of research into practice. PMID:27521806

  3. A core outcome set for localised prostate cancer effectiveness trials: protocol for a systematic review of the literature and stakeholder involvement through interviews and a Delphi survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Steven; Bekema, Hendrika J; Williamson, Paula R; Campbell, Marion K; Stewart, Fiona; MacLennan, Sara J; N'Dow, James M O; Lam, Thomas B L

    2015-03-04

    Prostate cancer is a growing health problem worldwide. The management of localised prostate cancer is controversial. It is unclear which of several surgical, radiotherapeutic, ablative, and surveillance treatments is the most effective. All have cost, process and recovery, and morbidity implications which add to treatment decision-making complexity for patients and healthcare professionals. Evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is not optimal because of uncertainty as to what constitutes important outcomes. Another issue hampering evidence synthesis is heterogeneity of outcome definition, measurement, and reporting. This project aims to determine which outcomes are the most important to patients and healthcare professionals, and use these findings to recommend a standardised core outcome set for comparative effectiveness trials of treatments for localised prostate cancer, to optimise decision-making. The range of potentially important outcomes and measures will be identified through systematic reviews of the literature and semi-structured interviews with patients. A consultation exercise involving representatives from two key stakeholder groups (patients and healthcare professionals) will ratify the list of outcomes to be entered into a three round Delphi study. The Delphi process will refine and prioritise the list of identified outcomes. A methodological substudy (nested RCT design) will also be undertaken. Participants will be randomised after round one of the Delphi study to one of three feedback groups, based on different feedback strategies, in order to explore the potential impact of feedback strategies on participant responses. This may assist the design of a future core outcome set and Delphi studies. Following the Delphi study, a final consensus meeting attended by representatives from both stakeholder groups will determine the final recommended core outcome set. This study will inform clinical practice and future trials of interventions of

  4. Execution of a participatory supportive return to work program within the Dutch social security sector: a qualitative evaluation of stakeholders' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammerts, Lieke; Schaafsma, Frederieke G; van Mechelen, Willem; Anema, Johannes R

    2016-04-14

    A process evaluation of a participatory supportive return to work program, aimed at workers without a (permanent) employment contract who are sick-listed due to a common mental disorder, revealed that this program was executed less successfully than similar programs evaluated in earlier studies. The program consisted of a participatory approach, integrated care and direct placement in competitive employment. Aim of this study was to get a better understanding of the execution of the program by evaluating stakeholders' perceptions. In the absence of an employer, the program was applied by the Dutch Social Security Agency, in collaboration with vocational rehabilitation agencies. Together with the sick-listed workers, these were the main stakeholders. Our research questions involved stakeholders' perceptions of the function(s) of the program, and their perceptions of barriers and facilitators for a successful execution of the program within the Dutch social security sector. Semi-structured interviews were held with five sick-listed workers, eight professionals of the Social Security Agency, and two case managers of vocational rehabilitation agencies. Interview topics were related to experiences with different components of the program. Selection of respondents was based on purposive sampling and continued until data saturation was reached. Content analysis was applied to identify patterns in the data. Two researchers developed a coding system, based on predefined topics and themes emerging from the data. Although perceived functions of some components of the program were as intended, all stakeholders stressed that the program often had not resulted in return to work. Perceived barriers for a successful execution were related to a poor collaboration between the Dutch Social Security Agency, vocational rehabilitation agencies and healthcare providers, the type of experienced (health) problems, time constraints, and limited job opportunities. For future implementation

  5. Public hearing or 'hearing public'? an evaluation of the participation of local stakeholders in environmental impact assessment of Ghana's Jubilee oil fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawole, Justice Nyigmah

    2013-08-01

    This article investigates the involvement of local stakeholders in the environmental impact assessment (EIA) processes of Ghana's first off-shore oil fields (the Jubilee fields). Adopting key informants interviews and documentary reviews, the article argues that the public hearings and the other stakeholder engagement processes were cosmetic and rhetoric with the view to meeting legal requirements rather than a purposeful interest in eliciting inputs from local stakeholders. It further argues that the operators appear to lack the social legitimacy and social license that will make them acceptable in the project communities. A rigorous community engagement along with a commitment to actively involving local stakeholders in the corporate social responsibility (CSR) programmes of the partners may enhance the image of the partners and improve their social legitimacy. Local government agencies should be capacitated to actively engage project organisers; and government must mitigate the impact of the oil projects through well-structured social support programmes.

  6. Public Hearing or `Hearing Public'? An Evaluation of the Participation of Local Stakeholders in Environmental Impact Assessment of Ghana's Jubilee Oil Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawole, Justice Nyigmah

    2013-08-01

    This article investigates the involvement of local stakeholders in the environmental impact assessment (EIA) processes of Ghana's first off-shore oil fields (the Jubilee fields). Adopting key informants interviews and documentary reviews, the article argues that the public hearings and the other stakeholder engagement processes were cosmetic and rhetoric with the view to meeting legal requirements rather than a purposeful interest in eliciting inputs from local stakeholders. It further argues that the operators appear to lack the social legitimacy and social license that will make them acceptable in the project communities. A rigorous community engagement along with a commitment to actively involving local stakeholders in the corporate social responsibility (CSR) programmes of the partners may enhance the image of the partners and improve their social legitimacy. Local government agencies should be capacitated to actively engage project organisers; and government must mitigate the impact of the oil projects through well-structured social support programmes.

  7. Evaluating the Impact of Regional Marketing Projects on the Development of Regions from Different Stakeholder Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunze Kim-Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the competition for economically attractive stakeholders, regions have to implement strategies to gain and adhere those interest groups. Empirical studies concerning the migration motivations show that it is not only labor market but also soft locational factors of the social environment, nature and landscape that are of high importance: A majority of the population is willing to move or rather stay at a special place because of such soft locational factors. This study examines the impact of regional marketing projects on the development of regions from the perspectives of inhabitants and tourists as well as general attributes to measure a region’s attractiveness from the perspective of high potentials. We argue that those projects that fit to the region and its unique selling propositions contribute to positioning and building location brand value. We show that projects have a socio-economic effect on the attitude towards regions and contribute to building location brand value. An analysis of group differences shows that the project influence on the region and region attractiveness are perceived in significantly different manner depending on the knowledge level of the stakeholder group. Consequently, one should increase the awareness of marketing activities and regions and focus on soft locational factors while establishing and positioning a region brand.

  8. Incorporating stakeholders' preferences for ex ante evaluation of energy and climate policy interactions. Development of a Multi Criteria Analysis weighting methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grafakos, S.; Zevgolis, D.; Oikonomou, V.

    2008-03-01

    Evaluation of energy and climate policy interactions is a complex issue which has not been addressed systematically. Multi Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) evaluation processes have been applied widely to different policy and decision cases as they have the ability to cope with high complexity, by structuring and analyzing the policy problem in a transparent and systematic way. Criteria weights elicitation techniques are developed within the framework of MCDA to integrate stakeholders' preferential information in the decision making and evaluation process. There are variant methods to determine criteria weights which can be used in various ways for different policy evaluation purposes. During decision making, policy makers and relevant stakeholders implicitly or explicitly express their relative importance between the evaluation criteria by assigning weighting factors to them. More particular, climate change policy problems lack a simple, transparent and structured way to incorporate stakeholders' views and values. In order to incorporate stakeholders' weighting preferences into an ex ante evaluation of climate change and energy policy instruments interaction, an integrative constructive weighting methodology has been developed. This paper presents the main characteristics of evaluation of energy and climate policy interactions, the reasoning behind the development of the weighting tool, its main theoretical and functional characteristics and the results of its application to obtain and incorporate stakeholders' preferences on energy and climate change policy evaluation criteria. The weighting method that has been elaborated and applied to derive stakeholders' preferences for criteria weights is a combination of pair wise comparisons and ratio importance weighting methods. Initially introduces the stakeholders to the evaluation process through a warming up holistic approach for ranking the criteria and then requires them to express their ratio relative importance

  9. Strengthening stakeholder-engaged research and research on stakeholder engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Kristin N; Miller, Elizabeth

    2017-06-01

    Stakeholder engagement is an emerging field with little evidence to inform best practices. Guidelines are needed to improve the quality of research on stakeholder engagement through more intentional planning, evaluation and reporting. We developed a preliminary framework for planning, evaluating and reporting stakeholder engagement, informed by published conceptual models and recommendations and then refined through our own stakeholder engagement experience. Our proposed exploratory framework highlights contexts and processes to be addressed in planning stakeholder engagement, and potential immediate, intermediate and long-term outcomes that warrant evaluation. We use this framework to illustrate both the minimum information needed for reporting stakeholder-engaged research and the comprehensive detail needed for reporting research on stakeholder engagement.

  10. Stakeholder analysis methodologies resource book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babiuch, W.M.; Farhar, B.C.

    1994-03-01

    Stakeholder analysis allows analysts to identify how parties might be affected by government projects. This process involves identifying the likely impacts of a proposed action and stakeholder groups affected by that action. Additionally, the process involves assessing how these groups might be affected and suggesting measures to mitigate any adverse effects. Evidence suggests that the efficiency and effectiveness of government actions can be increased and adverse social impacts mitigated when officials understand how a proposed action might affect stakeholders. This report discusses how to conduct useful stakeholder analyses for government officials making decisions on energy-efficiency and renewable-energy technologies and their commercialization. It discusses methodological issues that may affect the validity and reliability of findings, including sampling, generalizability, validity, ``uncooperative`` stakeholder groups, using social indicators, and the effect of government regulations. The Appendix contains resource directories and a list of specialists in stakeholder analysis and involvement.

  11. Evaluation of the role of risk perception in stakeholder engagement to prevent lead exposure in an urban setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harclerode, Melissa A; Lal, Pankaj; Vedwan, Neeraj; Wolde, Bernabas; Miller, Michael E

    2016-12-15

    Stakeholder engagement is a vital sustainable remediation practice for obtaining useful feedback and identifying societal needs. Evaluating and integrating risk perception of stakeholders into remediation and outreach efforts allows for greater insight, increases the likelihood of success and ultimately, benefits the community by protecting its members from environmental hazards. In this study, we identified risk perception factors that influenced residents' level of concern for mitigating their exposure to elevated concentrations of lead in household paint and historic fill material. Risk perception factors were assessed by an in-person survey conducted in public green spaces. The analysis of survey participants' responses indicated that their perception of risk to exposed lead was mostly influenced by the presence of hazardous materials in close proximity to their residence, the ability to address pollution, and awareness, interest, and individual accountability in mitigating environmental risks. Responses also revealed that residents considered risk of lead and soil pollution as less menacing than the presence of more immediate and perceptible risks posed by factors such as air and water pollution. In addition, the community seemed to exhibit "optimism bias" and did not identify itself at high risk to susceptible and immediate hazards, including lead exposure. This lack of concern over lead exposure created a significant obstacle to community participation in state-led education and outreach programs. By integrating risk perception analysis and increasing stakeholder engagement, we can bring more attention to this issue, educate the public about the threat of lead pollution, and efficiently use financial resources to implement a more sustainable solution. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. PROGRAM EVALUATION INVOLVEMENT INDONESIAN NATIONAL ARMED FORCES (TNI ON MISSION UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS (UNPKO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gede Sumertha KY

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This research is constructed in order to study and to evaluate involvement TNI on mission United Nations Peacekeeping Operations (UNPKO in Lebanon program FY 2014-2015 due to achieve vision 4000 Peacekeepers. The CIPP model is using on apply the qualitative method for the research with consist of four evaluation components: (1 context; (2 input; (3 process; (4 product. The mechanism collecting data were collected through interviews, observations, questionnaires and documentation study. There are three levels of evaluation for judgment each aspect: low, moderate, and high. The summarized results and figured into case-order effect matrix was figure out of the categorization.The results of this research indicate that TNI involvement in mission UNPKO Lebanon, aspire to increase the number of peacekeepers up to 4.000 personnel in the category “high”, but still have some minor additional improvement especially on coordination among stakeholders. This is because the Results of Context Evaluation has a category of "high" with a scale of assessment "many" (75.3%; the Results of Input Evaluation has a category of "high" with a scale of assessment "moderate" (60.6%; the Results of Process Evaluation has a category of "high" with a scale of assessment "moderate" (65.3% and the Results of Product Evaluation has a category of "high" with a scale of assessment "moderate" (63.3% .

  13. SANitation CHoice Involving Stakeholders : a participatory multi-criteria method for drainage and sanitation system selection in developing cities applied in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buuren, van J.C.L.

    2010-01-01

    Keywords: sanitation; drainage; planning; multi-criteria decision analysis; stakeholder dialogues, developing countries

    The poor living in slums and other unplanned urban areas in developing countries have no access to adequate drainage and sanitation provisions with grave consequences

  14. Determination of the Support Level of Local Organizations in a Model Forest Initiative: Do Local Stakeholders Have Willingness to Be Involved in the Model Forest Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tolunay

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary cooperation and the support of stakeholders carry a major importance in the development of Model Forests. The identification of the support level of local organizations as stakeholders in the Bucak Model Forest initiative, located in the Mediterranean region of Turkey, constitutes the theme of this study. Within this scope, the views of the stakeholders comprising local government units (LGUs, non-governmental organizations (NGOs, village councils (VCs, professional organizations (POs and forest products enterprises (FPEs located in the district of Bucak were collected by utilizing a survey technique. The data were analysed by using non-parametric statistical analyses due to the absence of a normal distribution. The results show that the information provided about the Model Forest concept to the stakeholders located in the district on the Bucak Model Forest initiative was identified as a factor impacting the support level. Moreover, it was also observed that the stakeholders were more willing to provide advisory support rather than financial support. NGOs and VCs were identified as stakeholders who could not provide financial support due to their restricted budgets. We discuss the benefits for a Model Forest initiative of establishing international cooperation to strengthen the local and regional sustainable development process.

  15. Engaging stakeholder networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svendsen, A. [CoreRelation Consulting Inc., Delta, BC (Canada)]|[Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada); Laberge, M. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Management philosophies concerning stakeholder engagement were reviewed. This presentation provided guidelines for managers working from a sustainability value creation framework who wish to develop more effective ways to engage with stakeholders and high stakes issues that cross political, social and organizational boundaries. It was suggested that conflicts over resources, the demand for participation and the increasing power of Non-Governmental Organizations have all contributed to the increased need for stakeholder engagement. A review of different types of stakeholders was provided. Earlier strategies of managing stakeholders were examined, in which externalities such as environmental cost were not accounted for. By contrast, the emerging management philosophy presented here stressed a recognition that long term survival relied on the good health of external and internal environments. Core business strategies were discussed with reference to core values. It was suggested that a longer term focus, inclusiveness, and integration were beneficial to businesses as a whole. A case study of Clayoquot Sound was presented. The concept of social capital was examined. Individual and collective learning were evaluated. A model for engaging stakeholder networks was presented as well as a step by step procedural guide, which included the creation of a solid foundation; organizational alignment; strategy; the importance of asking questions; trust building; evaluation; and renewal. Challenges to stakeholder engagement included finding resources; ensuring consistency; patience; a tendency in business to measure success in short term payoffs; and maintaining a stakeholder perspective. It was concluded that the benefits of a sustainability value creation framework for businesses far outweighed any initial disadvantages. refs., tabs., figs.

  16. How Analogue Research Can Advance Descriptive Evaluation Theory: Understanding (and Improving) Stakeholder Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bernadette; Mark, Melvin M.

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation theories can be tested in various ways. One approach, the experimental analogue study, is described and illustrated in this article. The approach is presented as a method worthy to use in the pursuit of what Alkin and others have called descriptive evaluation theory. Drawing on analogue studies conducted by the first author, we…

  17. Ergonomic evaluation of subjects involved in orange ( Citrus sinensis )

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ergonomic evaluation of subjects involved in orange handling operation in Kano State was conducted. Anthropometric parameters were evaluated, where they were found to vary with age amongst the subjects selected. 20th and 80th percentiles of the dimensions were computed and recommended for usage in design of ...

  18. A pragmatic approach to monitor and evaluate implementation and impact of differentiated ART delivery for global and national stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenkranz, Peter D; Calleja, Jesus Mg; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Fakoya, Ade O; Ford, Nathan; Grimsrud, Anna; Harris, Kate L; Jed, Suzanne L; Low-Beer, Daniel; Patel, Sadhna V; Rabkin, Miriam; Reidy, William John; Reinisch, Annette; Siberry, George K; Tally, Leigh A; Zulu, Isaac; Zaidi, Irum

    2018-03-01

    The World Health Organization's (WHO) recommendation of "Treat All" has accelerated the call for differentiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery, a method of care that efficiently uses limited resources to increase access to HIV treatment. WHO has further recommended that stable individuals on ART receive refills every 3 to 6 months and attend clinical visits every 3 to 6 months. However, there is not yet consensus on how to ensure that the quality of services is maintained as countries strive to meet these standards. This commentary responds to this gap by defining a pragmatic approach to the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of the scale up of differentiated ART delivery for global and national stakeholders. Programme managers need to demonstrate that the scale up of differentiated ART delivery is achieving the desired effectiveness and efficiency outcomes to justify continued support by national and global stakeholders. To achieve this goal, the two existing global WHO HIV treatment indicators of ART retention and viral suppression should be augmented with two broad aggregate measures. The addition of indicators measuring the frequency of (1) clinical and (2) refill visits by PLHIV per year will allow evaluation of the pace of scale up while monitoring its overall effect on the quality and efficiency of services. The combination of these four routinely collected aggregate indicators will also facilitate the comparison of outcomes among facilities, regions or countries implementing different models of ART delivery. Enhanced monitoring or additional assessments will be required to answer other critical questions on the process of implementation, acceptability, effectiveness and efficiency. These proposed outcomes are useful markers for the effectiveness and efficiency of the health system's attempts to deliver quality treatment to those who need it-and still reserve as much of the available resource pool as possible for other key elements of the HIV response

  19. Ethical And Social Responsibility In Global Marketing: An Evaluation Of Corporate Commitment To Stakeholders

    OpenAIRE

    Ephraim Okoro

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, globalization of markets and business organizations has increased the number of entrepreneurs and corporate executives involved in international and multinational joint ventures and strategic alliances. Others are interested in direct investments in foreign markets in an attempt to extend domestic operations, increase profit margins, and expand market shares. While these strategic business initiatives and efforts are increasingly attractive because of their potential ...

  20. Engaging stakeholders for adaptive management using structured decision analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Elise R.; Kathryn, D.; Kennedy, Mickett

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive management is different from other types of management in that it includes all stakeholders (versus only policy makers) in the process, uses resource optimization techniques to evaluate competing objectives, and recognizes and attempts to reduce uncertainty inherent in natural resource systems. Management actions are negotiated by stakeholders, monitored results are compared to predictions of how the system should respond, and management strategies are adjusted in a “monitor-compare-adjust” iterative routine. Many adaptive management projects fail because of the lack of stakeholder identification, engagement, and continued involvement. Primary reasons for this vary but are usually related to either stakeholders not having ownership (or representation) in decision processes or disenfranchisement of stakeholders after adaptive management begins. We present an example in which stakeholders participated fully in adaptive management of a southeastern regulated river. Structured decision analysis was used to define management objectives and stakeholder values and to determine initial flow prescriptions. The process was transparent, and the visual nature of the modeling software allowed stakeholders to see how their interests and values were represented in the decision process. The development of a stakeholder governance structure and communication mechanism has been critical to the success of the project.

  1. Social media: the what, the why and the worry. ASN activity on social media. Communications Lessons Learned from the 2014 Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Spanish stakeholder for the NEA workshop on stakeholder involvement in nuclear decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, Holly; Bouchot, Emmanuel; Runyon, Timothy; Gonzalez Herrero, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Session 8 focused on the media and how it can be utilised to effectively garner stakeholder involvement. It highlighted the changes over the years in how decision makers interact with stakeholders in the nuclear community and the nuances of using the various social media platforms and traditional media outlets. The session had a heavier focus on social media as it is a new and quickly evolving means of engaging the public and other stakeholders. Cases provided insight on current usages, whether in continuing regulatory communication or in response to emergent events. The session included input from regulators, implementers and a media representative sharing the various perspectives on the public communication aspect of stakeholder involvement. They pointed out the various outlets and platforms that can be employed to involve and inform different stakeholders, acknowledging the advantages and disadvantages of each method. Speakers emphasised how important it is that the communication with stakeholders be two-way, allowing thoughts and opinions to be expressed even when they are in stark opposition to nuclear projects or when they are critical of regulatory practices. It is important to consider the stakeholders' perspective and how they may want to be involved in the decision-making process. As stated in the first presentation by Ms Harrington of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and echoed throughout the session, stakeholders in general want information that will update them as to current activities, how they could be affected and how they can possibly influence the process. During an emergency, there may be special risk communication needs. The strategic use of social media platforms can assist organisations in engaging stakeholders and provide the information and interaction they may want. Social media includes web sites and more specifically, applications that allow the user to create and share information. It was recognised during the presentations that the

  2. About evidence based and beyond: a discourse-analytic study of stakeholders' talk on involvement in the early development of personalized nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, L.I.; Molder, te H.F.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper draws on discourse analysis to examine how Dutch stakeholders in health education, health care, health insurance, social science, the food industry and the media make sense of innovations in the field of `personalized nutrition¿ and their own role and significance in an early stage of

  3. The Strategic Involvement of Stakeholders in the Efficiency of Non-Profit Sport Organisations: From a Perspective of Survival to Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Alexandra Marques Miragaia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to analyse the efficiency of non-profit sports clubs and identify the perceptions of their directors with regards to the stakeholders that exert the greatest influence over club efficiency levels. In order to analyse the efficiency of these clubs, we made recourse to the Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA method. We also applied the Mann-Whitney test, to identify whether there are significant differences between efficient and non-efficient clubs with regards to the influence held by their stakeholders. We thus report that the majority of clubs operate efficiently. Both the efficient and the non-efficient clubs classify the club managers, members, sponsors, fans and athletes as the most important stakeholders to their efficiency levels. The results convey how there are no significant differences among the management team perceptions on the role of stakeholders in attaining club efficiency. The study also details the respective procedures that inefficient clubs should adopt in order to approximate the efficiency frontier.

  4. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Tunable hybrid plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report resents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning Tunable Hybrid Plasma (THP) derived from a three-year program of stake holder involvement. THP destroys volatile organic compounds by directing a moderate energy electron beam into a flow of air containing organic contaminants. This report is for technology developers and for those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of THP to the remediation problems the face. In addition, this report presents data requirements for the technology`s field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on THP from stakeholders from four other sites throughout the western United States.

  5. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Tunable hybrid plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report resents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning Tunable Hybrid Plasma (THP) derived from a three-year program of stake holder involvement. THP destroys volatile organic compounds by directing a moderate energy electron beam into a flow of air containing organic contaminants. This report is for technology developers and for those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders' perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of THP to the remediation problems the face. In addition, this report presents data requirements for the technology's field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on THP from stakeholders from four other sites throughout the western United States

  6. A multi-perspective evaluation of a service robot for seniors: the voice of different stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedaf, Sandra; Marti, Patrizia; Amirabdollahian, Farshid; de Witte, Luc

    2017-07-31

    The potential of service robots for seniors is given increasing attention as the ageing population in Western countries will continue to grow as well as the demand for home care. In order to capture the experience of living with a robot at home, a multi-perspective evaluation was conducted. Older adults (n = 10) were invited to execute an actual interaction scenario with the Care-O-bot ® robot in a home-like environment and were questioned about their experiences. Additionally, interviews were conducted with the elderly participants, informal carers (n = 7) and professional caregivers (n = 11). Seniors showed to be more keen to accept the robot than their caregivers and relatives. However, the robot in its current form was found to be too limited and participants wished the robot could perform more complex tasks. In order to be acceptable a future robot should execute these complex tasks based on the personal preferences of the user which would require the robot to be flexible and extremely smart, comparable to the care that is delivered by a human carer. Developing the functional features to perform activities is not the only challenge in robot development that deserves the attention of robot developers. The development of social behaviour and skills should be addressed as well. This is possible adopting a person-centred design approach, which relies on validation activities with actual users in realistic environments, similar to those described in this paper. Implications for rehabilitation Attitude of older adults towards service robots Potential of service robots for older adults.

  7. Recalibrating Baseline Evidence in Burundi, Malawi, Senegal and Uganda: Exploring the Potential of Multi-Site, National-Level Stakeholder Engagement in Participatory Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, Karen; Marphatia, Akanksha A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper details our collaborative work on the Improving Learning Outcomes in Primary Schools (ILOPS) project in Burundi, Malawi, Uganda and Senegal. ILOPS set out to establish an innovative template for multi-stakeholder, multinational participatory evaluation (PE) and examine the fundamental roles, relationships and evidence that underpin the…

  8. Evaluation of the Role of Public Outreach and Stakeholder Engagement in Stormwater Funding Decisions in New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    A detailed report examining the role of public outreach and stakeholder engagement in stormwater funding decisions based on the experiences of eleven small and medium-sized communities in New England.

  9. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Passive soil vapor extraction using borehole flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.S.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) derived from a three-year program of stakeholder involvement. PSVE takes advantage of the naturally occurring tendency of soil vapor to leave the subsurface during periods of low barometric pressure. PSVE seeks to expedite the release of volatile contaminants through the use of boreholes and technological enhancements. This report is for technology developers and those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders' perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment to make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of PSVE to the remediation problems they face. The report provides: stakeholders' final evaluation of the acceptability of PSVE in light of the technology's field test; stakeholders' principal comments concerning PSVE; requirements that stakeholders have of any remediation technology. Technology decision makers should take these conclusions into account in evaluating the effectiveness and acceptability of any remedial method proposed for their site. In addition, the report presents data requirements for the technology's field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on PSVE from stakeholders from Sandia National Laboratory, Rocky Flats, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory

  10. Ethical considerations of worksite health promotion: an exploration of stakeholders' views

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkel, J.; Meershoek, A.; Janssens, M.J.P.A.; Boot, C.R.L.; Proper, K.I.; van der Beek, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Developing, implementing and evaluating worksite health promotion requires dealing with all stakeholders involved, such as employers, employees, occupational physicians, insurance companies, providers, labour unions and research and knowledge institutes. Although worksite health

  11. Diagnosing climate change impacts and identifying adaptation strategies by involving key stakeholder organisations and farmers in Sikkim, India: Challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhoni, Adani; Goyal, Manish Kumar

    2018-06-01

    Narrowing the gap between research, policy making and implementing adaptation remains a challenge in many parts of the world where climate change is likely to severely impact water security. This research aims to narrow this gap by matching the adaptation strategies being framed by policy makers to that of the perspectives of development agencies, researchers and farmers in the Himalayan state of Sikkim in India. Our case study examined the perspectives of various stakeholders for climate change impacts, current adaptation strategies, knowledge gaps and adaptation barriers, particularly in the context of implementing the Sikkim State Action Plan on Climate Change through semi-structured interviews carried out with decision makers in the Sikkim State Government, researchers, consultants, local academia, development agencies and farmers. Using Stakeholders Network Analysis tools, this research unravels the complexities of perceiving climate change impacts, identifying strategies, and implementing adaptation. While farmers are less aware about the global phenomenon of climate change impacts for water security, their knowledge of the local conditions and their close interaction with the State Government Agriculture Department provides them opportunities. Although important steps are being initiated through the Sikkim State Action Plan on Climate Change it is yet to deliver effective means of adaptation implementation and hence, strengthening the networks of close coordination between the various implementing agencies will pay dividends. Knowledge gaps and the need for capacity building identified in this research, based on the understandings of key stakeholders are highly relevant to both the research community and for informing policy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. 2nd FSC Workshop - Executive Summary and International Perspective, Stakeholder Involvement and Confidence in the Process of Decision-making for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Finland, 15-16 November 2001, Turku, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The 2. FSC workshop examined 'Stakeholder Involvement and Confidence in the Process of Decision-making for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Finland'. By gathering Finnish Stakeholders, those who expressed favour and opposition, as well as observer-participants from the other NEA/FSC countries, a joint reflection on a complex reality was achieved from which general conclusions can also be drawn concerning stakeholder involvement in the long-term management of radioactive waste. This Executive Summary gives an overview of the presentations and discussions that took place at the workshop. It presents, for the most part, a factual account of the individual presentations and of the discussions that took place. It relies importantly on the notes that were taken at the meeting. Most materials are elaborated upon in a fuller way in the texts that the various speakers and session moderators contributed for these proceedings. The structure of the Executive Summary follows the structure of the workshop itself. Complementary to this Executive Summary and also provided with this document, is a NEA Secretariat's perspective aiming to place the results of all discussions, feedback and site visit into an international perspective

  13. Engaging Community Stakeholders to Evaluate the Design, Usability, and Acceptability of a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Social Media Resource Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Beth; Chaney, Don; Paige, Samantha; Payne-Purvis, Caroline; Tennant, Bethany; Walsh-Childers, Kim; Sriram, PS; Alber, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often report inadequate access to comprehensive patient education resources. Objective The purpose of this study was to incorporate community-engagement principles within a mixed-method research design to evaluate the usability and acceptability of a self-tailored social media resource center for medically underserved patients with COPD. Methods A multiphase sequential design (qual → QUANT → quant + QUAL) was incorporated into the current study, whereby a small-scale qualitative (qual) study informed the design of a social media website prototype that was tested with patients during a computer-based usability study (QUANT). To identify usability violations and determine whether or not patients found the website prototype acceptable for use, each patient was asked to complete an 18-item website usability and acceptability questionnaire, as well as a retrospective, in-depth, semistructured interview (quant + QUAL). Results The majority of medically underserved patients with COPD (n=8, mean 56 years, SD 7) found the social media website prototype to be easy to navigate and relevant to their self-management information needs. Mean responses on the 18-item website usability and acceptability questionnaire were very high on a scale of 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree) (mean 4.72, SD 0.33). However, the majority of patients identified several usability violations related to the prototype’s information design, interactive capabilities, and navigational structure. Specifically, 6 out of 8 (75%) patients struggled to create a log-in account to access the prototype, and 7 out of 8 patients (88%) experienced difficulty posting and replying to comments on an interactive discussion forum. Conclusions Patient perceptions of most social media website prototype features (eg, clickable picture-based screenshots of videos, comment tools) were largely positive. Mixed-method stakeholder feedback was

  14. Stakeholder engagement in comparative effectiveness research: how will we measure success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallee, Danielle C; Williams, Carla J; Tambor, Ellen S; Deverka, Patricia A

    2012-09-01

    Stakeholder engagement in comparative effectiveness research continues to gain national attention. While various methods are used to gather stakeholder expertise and form recommendations, evaluation of the stakeholder experience is often missing. The lack of evaluation prohibits assessing how effective and meaningful engagement practices are for enhancing research efforts and limits the ability to identify areas for future improvement. We propose that an evaluation plan of engagement processes be developed before stakeholder involvement begins and be required as part of a request for proposal or research grant where stakeholder input is being sought. Furthermore, we recommend the inclusion of six meta-criteria that represent normative goals of multiple studies: respect, trust, legitimacy, fairness, competence and accountability. To aid in the development of future evaluations, we have developed definitions for and matched specific examples of measuring each meta-criterion to serve a guide for others in the field.

  15. Stakeholders' perception on including broader economic impact of vaccines in economic evaluations in low and middle income countries: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Putten, Ingeborg M; Evers, Silvia M A A; Deogaonkar, Rohan; Jit, Mark; Hutubessy, Raymond C W

    2015-04-10

    Current health economic evaluation guidelines mainly concentrate on immediate health gains and cost savings for the individual involved in the intervention. However, it has been argued that these guidelines are too narrow to capture the full impact of vaccination in low and middle income countries. The inclusion of broader economic impact of vaccines (BEIV) has therefore been proposed. Some examples of these are productivity-related gains, macro-economic impact, and different externalities. Despite their potency, the extent to which such benefits can and should be incorporated into economic evaluations of vaccination is still unclear. This mixed methods study aims to assess the relevance of BEIV to different stakeholders involved in the vaccine introduction decision making process. In this mixed method study an internet based survey was sent to attendees of the New and Underutilized Vaccines Initiative meeting in Montreux, Switzerland in 2011. Additionally, semi-structured interviews of 15 minutes each were conducted during the meeting. Study participants included decision makers, experts and funders of vaccines and immunization programs in low and middle income countries. Descriptive analysis of the survey, along with identification of common themes and factors extracted from the interviews and open survey questions was undertaken. Evidence on macro-economic impact, burden of disease and ecological effects were perceived as being most valuable towards aiding decision making for vaccine introduction by the 26 survey respondents. The 14 interviewees highlighted the importance of burden of disease and different types of indirect effects. Furthermore, some new interpretations of BEIVs were discussed, such as the potential negative impact of wastage during immunization programs and the idea of using vaccines as a platform for delivering other types of health interventions. Interviewees also highlighted the importance of using a broader perspective in connection to

  16. Pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis: evaluation by radiography and spirometry *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawassaki, Alexandre Melo; Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Uliana Kay, Fernando; Laurindo, Ieda Maria Magalhães; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine whether simple diagnostic methods can yield relevant disease information in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Patients with RA were randomly selected for inclusion in a cross-sectional study involving clinical evaluation of pulmonary function, including pulse oximetry (determination of SpO2, at rest), chest X-ray, and spirometry. Results: A total of 246 RA patients underwent complete assessments. Half of the patients in our sample reported a history of smoking. Spirometry was abnormal in 30% of the patients; the chest X-ray was abnormal in 45%; and the SpO2 was abnormal in 13%. Normal chest X-ray, spirometry, and SpO2 were observed simultaneously in only 41% of the RA patients. A history of smoking was associated with abnormal spirometry findings, including evidence of obstructive or restrictive lung disease, and with abnormal chest X-ray findings, as well as with an interstitial pattern on the chest X-ray. Comparing the patients in whom all test results were normal (n = 101) with those in whom abnormal test results were obtained (n = 145), we found a statistically significant difference between the two groups, in terms of age and smoking status. Notably, there were signs of airway disease in nearly half of the patients with minimal or no history of tobacco smoke exposure. Conclusions: Pulmonary involvement in RA can be identified through the use of a combination of diagnostic methods that are simple, safe, and inexpensive. Our results lead us to suggest that RA patients with signs of lung involvement should be screened for lung abnormalities, even if presenting with no respiratory symptoms. PMID:26398753

  17. Evaluating a tobacco leaf humidification system involving nebulisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Enrique Cerquera Peña

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A tobacco leaf humidifying system involving nebulisation was designned, implemented and evaluated; it had a system for monitoring and recording environmental conditions thereby producing an environment having more homogeneous relative humidity, ensuring better water use, better control of relative humidity and better control in managing cured tobacco leaf moisture content, thereby leading to a consequent improvement in final product quality. 55% to 75% relative humidity and 4 to 6 hour working ranges were obtained to en- sure leaf humidification reached 16% humidity on a wet basis. Two new designs are proposed for the conditioning stage regarding this conditioning chamber’s operational management, based on the results and field observations, which would allow better leaf management, thereby avoiding the risk of losses due to manipulation and over-humidification. This work strengthens research in the field of tobacco pos- tharvest technology, complementing other research projects which have been carried out in Colombia.

  18. Evaluation of a Blog Based Parent Involvement Approach by Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcinar, Zehra; Ekizoglu, Nihat

    2013-01-01

    Despite the well-known benefits of parent involvement in children's education, research clearly shows that it is difficult to effectively involve parents. This study aims to capture parents' views of a Blog Based Parent Involvement Approach (BPIA) designed to secure parent involvement in education by strengthening school-parent communication. Data…

  19. X-ray CT evaluation of pulmonary involvements of sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Koichi; Izumi, Takateru; Kitaichi, Masanori

    1987-01-01

    We evaluated high resolution CT in 60 patients with histologically diagnosed pulmonary sarcoidosis and, also, studied the relationship between CT and findings in open lung biopsy specimens in 2 cases. The CT findings were as follows: (1) thickening of bronchial wall shadows (27 out of 60 cases, 45.0 %), (2) irregular enlargement of pulmonary vascular shadows (39 cases, 65.0 %), (3) small or large nodular shadows (24 cases, 40.0 %), (4) local volume loss (14 cases, 23.3 %), (5) slightly increased density of localized lung field areas (24 cases, 40.0 %), (6) pleural or subpleural involvement (27 cases, 45.0 %), (7) lymph node enlargement (59 cases, 98.3 %). X-ray CT in 7 patients revealed no evidence of lung field involvement in patients with histologicall confirmed epithelioid cell granuloma in transbronchial lung biopsy specimens. Lesions located within vessels or in the vascular wall, perivascular sheath or alveoli surrounding blood vessels might cause pulmonary vascular shadows to appear swollen on CT. In a comparative study, we found irregular dilatation of pulmonary vascular shadows corresponding to granulomas in the connective tissue sheath of blood vessels. Also, thickening of bronchial wall shadows corresponded to granulomas in and around the bronchial wall. From the point of histopathological view epithelioid cell granulomas in the bronchovascular sheath were most marked in sarcoidosis, and they apperaed on CT as an irregular enlargement of pulmonary vascular shadows and thickening of the bronchial wall. On the other hand, we reported that collapse of alveoli and fibrosis surrounding blood vessels could cause irregular enlargement of pulmonary vascular shadows on CT in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Such shadows were seen on CT in both sarcoidosis and IPF but the mechanism of their appearance differed. (J.P.N.)

  20. Stakeholder acceptance analysis ResonantSonic drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning ResonantSonic Drilling (Sonic Drilling), derived from a three-year program of stakeholder involvement. Sonic Drilling is an innovative method to reach contamination in soil and groundwater. The resonant sonic drill rig uses counter-rotating weights to generate energy, which causes the drill pipe to vibrate elastically along its entire length. In the resonant condition, forces of up to 200,000 pounds are transmitted to the drill bit face to create a cutting action. The resonant energy causes subsurface materials to move back into the adjacent formation, permitting the drill pipe to advance. This report is for technology developers and those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders' perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment to make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of sonic drilling to the remediation problems they face

  1. Participatory evaluation of disaster resilience performance with urban stakeholders: An implementation case study before and after the 2015 Nepal Ghorka earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazai, B.; Anhorn, J.; Burton, C.

    2016-12-01

    Approaches that make resilience tangible and operational for decision makers have to deal effectively with the degree of impact and change required through different strategic actions in addressing agreed-upon resilience goals. A Resilience Performance Scorecard (RPS) has been designed to enable local stakeholders in identifying existing strengths and weaknesses through providing information on key performance targets along six dimensions of urban resilience both at the city and sub-city district level of geography. The purpose in the development of the Scorecard approach is to build a tool that can provide information on the overall resilience performance and capture the key functional and organizational areas for urban resilience with local government officials. The Resilience Performance Scorecard (RPS) was developed jointly by the Center for Disaster Management and Risk Reduction Technology (CEDIM) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, the South Asia Institute (SAI) at Heidelberg University, the and Global Earthquake Model (GEM) Foundation. It was initially implemented with the Lalitpur Sub-Metropolitan Municipality in Nepal one year before the 25 April 7.8 magnitude Gorkha earthquake event as a self-evaluation tool through a fully participatory process with local stakeholders. In a follow-up participatory assessment and implementation of the RPS one month after the earthquake, the results of the participatory resilience investigation demonstrate areas where action towards resilience should be prioritized and reflect the change in perception of resilience among the stakeholders in the face of a large damaging event.

  2. Pulmonary leukemic involvement: high-resolution computed tomography evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Ana Paola de; Marchiori, Edson; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in patients with leukemia and pulmonary symptoms, to establish the main patterns and to correlate them with the etiology. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of the HRCT of 15 patients with leukemia and pulmonary symptoms. The examinations were performed using a spatial high-resolution protocol and were analyzed by two independent radiologists. Results: The main HRCT patterns found were ground-glass opacity (n=11), consolidation (n=9), airspace nodules (n=3), septal thickening (n=3), tree-in-bud pattern (n=3), and pleural effusion (n=3). Pulmonary infection was the most common finding seen in 12 patients: bacterial pneumonia (n=6), fungal infection (n = 4), pulmonary tuberculosis (n=1) and viral infection (n=1). Leukemic pleural infiltration (n=1), lymphoma (n=1) and pulmonary hemorrhage (n=1) were detected in the other three patients. Conclusion: HRCT is an important tool that may suggest the cause of lung involvement, its extension and in some cases to guide invasive procedures in patients with leukemia. (author)

  3. The impact of active stakeholder involvement on recruitment, retention and engagement of schools, children and their families in the cluster randomised controlled trial of the Healthy Lifestyles Programme (HeLP): a school-based intervention to prevent obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, J; McHugh, C; Minton, J; Eke, H; Wyatt, K

    2017-08-14

    Recruitment and retention of participants is crucial for statistical power and internal and external validity and participant engagement is essential for behaviour change. However, many school-based interventions focus on programme content rather than the building of supportive relationships with all participants and tend to employ specific standalone strategies, such as incentives, to improve retention. We believe that actively involving stakeholders in both intervention and trial design improves recruitment and retention and increases the chances of creating an effective intervention. The Healthy Lifestyles Programme, HeLP (an obesity prevention programme for children 9-10 years old) was developed using intervention mapping and involved extensive stakeholder involvement in both the design of the trial and the intervention to ensure that: (i) delivery methods were suitably engaging, (ii) deliverers had the necessary skills and qualities to build relationships and (iii) the intervention dovetailed with the National Curriculum. HeLP was a year-long intervention consisting of 4 multi-component phases using a range of delivery methods. We recruited 1324 children from 32 schools from the South West of England to a cluster-randomised controlled trial to determine the effectiveness of HeLP in preventing obesity. The primary outcome was change in body mass index standard deviation score (BMI SDS) at 24 months post randomisation. Secondary outcomes included additional anthropometric and behavioural (physical activity and diet) measures at 18 and 24 months. Anthropometric and behavioural measures were taken in 99%, 96% and 94% of children at baseline, 18 and 24 months, respectively, with no differential follow up between the control and intervention groups at each time point. All children participated in the programme and 92% of children and 77% of parents across the socio-economic spectrum were considered to have actively engaged with HeLP. We attribute our excellent

  4. Evaluation in health: participatory methodology and involvement of municipal managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Cristiane Andrea Locatelli de; Tanaka, Oswaldo Yoshimi

    2016-08-04

    To analyze scopes and limits of the use of participatory methodology of evaluation with municipal health managers and administrators. Qualitative research with health policymakers and managers of the Comissão Intergestores Regional (CIR - Regional Interagency Commission) of a health region of the state of Sao Paulo in Brazil. Representatives from seven member cities participated in seven workshops facilitated by the researchers, with the aim of assessing a specific problem of the care line, which would be used as a tracer of the system integrality. The analysis of the collected empirical material was based on the hermeneutic-dialectic methodology and aimed at the evaluation of the applied participatory methodology, according to its capacity of promoting a process of assessment capable to be used as a support for municipal management. With the participatory approach of evaluation, we were able to promote in-depth discussions with the group, especially related to the construction of integral care and to the inclusion of the user's perspective in decision-making, linked to the search for solution to concrete problems of managers. By joint exploration, the possibility of using data from electronic information systems was opened, as well as information coming directly from the users of the services, to enhance discussions and negotiations between partners. The participants were disbelievers of the replication potential of this type of evaluation without the direct monitoring of the academy, given the difficulty of organizing the process in everyday life, already taken by emergency and political issues. Evaluations of programs and services carried out within the Regional Interagency Commission, starting from the local interest and facilitating the involvement of its members by the use of participatory methodologies, can contribute to the construction of integral care. To the extent that the act of evaluating stay invested with greater significance to the local actors

  5. Combining Human Resource and Stakeholder Management Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravazzani, Silvia; Mormino, Sara

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores collaborative learning activities involving HR and external stakeholders that organizations decide to plan and implement in order to obtain benefits in terms of knowledge sharing, stakeholder understanding and value creation. The increasing uncertainty and multiplicity of comp...... and corporate learning in a stakeholder-oriented perspective can play a strategic role in supporting business strategy, providing organizations the resources to meet internal and external needs (Wilson, 2005) and to interconnect with their value network.......This paper explores collaborative learning activities involving HR and external stakeholders that organizations decide to plan and implement in order to obtain benefits in terms of knowledge sharing, stakeholder understanding and value creation. The increasing uncertainty and multiplicity...... of competitive pressures and stakeholder demands (Harrison, St. John, 1996) require organizations, and in particular HR, to take on a more strategic role aimed to build new capability and support the overarching business strategy (Ulrich, Beatty 2001). This study draws on Strategic Human Resource Management...

  6. Stakeholder attitudes towards cumulative and aggregate exposure assessment of pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, Wim; Van Loo, Ellen J; Vanhonacker, Filiep; Delcour, Ilse; Spanoghe, Pieter; van Klaveren, Jacob D

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluates the attitudes and perspectives of different stakeholder groups (agricultural producers, pesticide manufacturers, trading companies, retailers, regulators, food safety authorities, scientists and NGOs) towards the concepts of cumulative and aggregate exposure assessment of pesticides by means of qualitative in-depth interviews (n = 15) and a quantitative stakeholder survey (n = 65). The stakeholders involved generally agreed that the use of chemical pesticides is needed, primarily for meeting the need of feeding the growing world population, while clearly acknowledging the problematic nature of human exposure to pesticide residues. Current monitoring was generally perceived to be adequate, but the timeliness and consistency of monitoring practices across countries were questioned. The concept of cumulative exposure assessment was better understood by stakeholders than the concept of aggregate exposure assessment. Identified pitfalls were data availability, data limitations, sources and ways of dealing with uncertainties, as well as information and training needs. Regulators and food safety authorities were perceived as the stakeholder groups for whom cumulative and aggregate pesticide exposure assessment methods and tools would be most useful and acceptable. Insights obtained from this exploratory study have been integrated in the development of targeted and stakeholder-tailored dissemination and training programmes that were implemented within the EU-FP7 project ACROPOLIS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Methods guiding stakeholder engagement in planning a pragmatic study on changing stroke systems of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Sabina B; Klein, Karen Potvin; Halladay, Jacqueline; Bettger, Janet Prvu; Freburger, Janet; Cummings, Doyle M; Lutz, Barbara J; Coleman, Sylvia; Bushnell, Cheryl; Rosamond, Wayne; Duncan, Pamela W

    2017-04-01

    The Comprehensive Post-Acute Stroke Services (COMPASS) Study is one of the first large pragmatic randomized-controlled clinical trials using comparative effectiveness research methods, funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. In the COMPASS Study, we compare the effectiveness of a patient-centered, transitional care intervention versus usual care for stroke patients discharged home from acute care. Outcomes include stroke patient post-discharge functional status and caregiver strain 90 days after discharge, and hospital readmissions. A central tenet of Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute-funded research is stakeholder engagement throughout the research process. However, evidence on how to successfully implement a pragmatic trial that changes systems of care in combination with robust stakeholder engagement is limited. This combination is not without challenges. We present our approach for broad-based stakeholder engagement in the context of a pragmatic trial with the participation of patients, caregivers, community stakeholders, including the North Carolina Stroke Care Collaborative hospital network, and policy makers. To maximize stakeholder engagement throughout the COMPASS Study, we employed a conceptual model with the following components: (1) Patient and Other Stakeholder Identification and Selection; (2) Patient and Other Stakeholder Involvement Across the Spectrum of Research Activities; (3) Dedicated Resources for Patient and Other Stakeholder Involvement; (4) Support for Patient and Other Stakeholder Engagement Through Organizational Processes; (5) Communication with Patients and Other Stakeholders; (6) Transparent Involvement Processes; (7) Tracking of Engagement; and (8) Evaluation of Engagement. In this paper, we describe how each component of the model is being implemented and how this approach addresses existing gaps in the literature on strategies for engaging stakeholders in meaningful and useful ways when conducting

  8. The impact of consumer involvement in research: an evaluation of consumer involvement in the London Primary Care Studies Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Katrina; Carter, Mary; Mahtani, Vinita; Barnard, Angela; Hawton, Annie; Britten, Nicky

    2008-06-01

    The value of consumer involvement in health services research is widely recognized. While there is a growing body of evidence about the principles of good consumer involvement, there is little research about the effect that involvement can have on the research. This evaluation assessed the level and impact of consumer involvement in the London Primary Care Studies Programme (LPCSP), all of whose individual projects had to demonstrate substantial involvement as a condition of funding. To evaluate consumer involvement in the LPSCP and understand what impact consumers had on the research process and outcomes. A multi-method case study approach was undertaken, using survey techniques, interviews, focus groups, observation and scrutiny of written documents. The overall data set comprised 61 questionnaires, 44 semi-structured interviews, 2 focus groups and 15 hours of observation of meetings. Eleven primary care-based research projects which together made up the LPCSP. An in-depth description of consumer involvement in the Programme was produced. Nine projects had consumers as co-applicants, four projects had been completed before the evaluation began and one was still ongoing at the time of the evaluation. Of the eight projects which have produced final reports, all met their aims and objectives. Consumers had had an additional impact in the research, in the initial design of the study, in recruitment of the research subjects, in developing data collection tools, in collecting the data, in analysis and disseminating the findings. Consumer involvement in National Health Service research is a relatively recent policy development and while there is an increasing amount of literature about how and why consumers should be involved in research, there is less evidence about the impact of such involvement. This evaluation provides evidence about the impact that consumers have not only on the research process but also on the outcomes of the research.

  9. Corporate responses to stakeholder activism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldam, Julie; Krause Hansen, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Corporations are increasingly expected to act responsibly. The purpose of this paper is to examine two types of corporate responses to these expectations: overt and covert responses. Specifically, it examines oil companies’ involvement in multi-stakeholder initiatives and sponsorships (overt...

  10. Hanford stakeholder participation in evaluating innovative technologies: VOC product line, Passive soil vapor extraction using borehole flux tunable hybrid plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.; McCabe, G.; Niesen, K.; Serie, P.

    1995-05-01

    A three-phased stakeholder participation program was conducted to support the Volatile Organic Compounds Arid Site Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID). The US DOE's Office of Technology Development (OTD) sponsored and directed the VOC-Arid ID. Its purpose was to develop and demonstrate new technologies for remediating VOC contamination in soil and ground water. The integrated demonstration, hosted by the Hanford site in Washington State, is being transitioned into the Department of Energy's (DOE) Plume Focus Area. The Plume Focus Area has the same basic objectives as the ID, but is broader in scope and is a team effort with technology developers and technology users. The objective is to demonstrate a promising technology once, and if results warrant deploy it broadly across the DOE complex and in private sector applications

  11. Evaluation of Stakeholder-Driven Groundwater Management through Integrated Modeling and Remote Sensing in the US High Plains Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deines, J. M.; Kendall, A. D.; Butler, J. J., Jr.; Hyndman, D. W.

    2017-12-01

    Irrigation greatly enhances agricultural yields and stabilizes farmer incomes, but overexploitation of water resources has depleted groundwater aquifers around the globe. In much of the High Plains Aquifer (HPA) in the United States, water-level declines threaten the continued viability of agricultural operations reliant on irrigation. Policy and management institutions to address this sustainability challenge differ widely across the HPA and the world. In Kansas, grassroots-driven legislation in 2012 allowed local stakeholder groups to establish Local Enhanced Management Areas (LEMAs) and work with state officials to generate enforceable and monitored water use reduction programs. The pioneering LEMA was formed in 2013, following a popular vote by farmers within a 256 km2 region in northwestern Kansas. The group sought to reduce groundwater pumping by 20% through 2017 in order to stabilize water levels while minimally reducing crop productivity. Initial statistical estimates indicate the LEMA has been successful; planning is underway to extend it for five years (2018-2022) and to implement additional LEMAs in the wider groundwater management district. Here, we assess the efficacy of this first LEMA with coupled crop-hydrology models to quantify water budget impacts and any associated trade-offs in crop productivity. We drive these models with a novel data fusion of water use data and our recent remotely sensed Annual Irrigation Maps (AIM) dataset, allowing detailed tracking of irrigation water in space and time. Results from these process-based models provide detailed insights into changes in the physical system resulting from the LEMA program that can inform future stakeholder-driven management in Kansas and in stressed aquifers around the world.

  12. Stakeholder Analysis Worksheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakeholder Analysis WorksheetA worksheet that can be used to document potential stakeholder groups, the information or expertise they hold, the role that they can play, their interests or concerns about the HIA

  13. Patient involvement in research programming and implementation: a responsive evaluation of the Dialogue Model for research agenda setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abma, T.A.; Pittens, C.A.C.M.; Visse, M.; Elberse, J.E.; Broerse, J.E.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Dialogue Model for research agenda-setting, involving multiple stakeholders including patients, was developed and validated in the Netherlands. However, there is little insight into whether and how patient involvement is sustained during the programming and implementation of research

  14. Stakeholder participation in comparative effectiveness research: defining a framework for effective engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deverka, Patricia A; Lavallee, Danielle C; Desai, Priyanka J; Esmail, Laura C; Ramsey, Scott D; Veenstra, David L; Tunis, Sean R

    2012-03-01

    AIMS: Stakeholder engagement is fundamental to comparative effectiveness research (CER), but lacks consistent terminology. This paper aims to define stakeholder engagement and present a conceptual model for involving stakeholders in CER. MATERIALS #ENTITYSTARTX00026; METHODS: The definitions and model were developed from a literature search, expert input and experience with the Center for Comparative Effectiveness Research in Cancer Genomics, a proof-of-concept platform for stakeholder involvement in priority setting and CER study design. RESULTS: Definitions for stakeholder and stakeholder engagement reflect the target constituencies and their role in CER. The 'analytic-deliberative' conceptual model for stakeholder engagement illustrates the inputs, methods and outputs relevant to CER. The model differentiates methods at each stage of the project; depicts the relationship between components; and identifies outcome measures for evaluation of the process. CONCLUSION: While the definitions and model require testing before being broadly adopted, they are an important foundational step and will be useful for investigators, funders and stakeholder groups interested in contributing to CER.

  15. Mapping and Analyzing Stakeholders in China's Essential Drug System by Using a Circular Model: Who We Should Deal with Next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hui; Li, Shixue; Xu, Lingzhong; Yang, Shuang; Thomas, Nicholas J; Mir, Mohammed Umer; Guo, Zhen; Ning, Bo; Shi, Lizheng

    2015-05-01

    To predict the prospects of the essential drug system by using the Stakeholder Impact Index (SII) and evaluate the current performance of each main stakeholder and suggested dangerous stakeholders and dormant stakeholders. A Delphi method was used, involving 36 experts with experience in implementation and evaluation of the essential drug policy, to construct the circular model as well as evaluate the performance of each stakeholder. The central government was a dominant stakeholder of the whole essential drug system. The provincial governments were definitive stakeholders, whereas local governments and medical institutions were dependent stakeholders. Furthermore, media and drug stores were dormant stakeholders and pharmaceutical manufacturers and delivery enterprises were dangerous stakeholders. Patients, community residents, and medical insurance programs were discretionary stakeholders. The SII for the essential drug system was positive (SII proj ⁎ = 2.72). The overall anticipation of the essential drug policy is optimistic. Letting definitive stakeholders (provincial governments) having more autonomy can efficiently accelerate the pace of implementation of the essential drug policy in the current situation. Central government, however, also needs to construct an experience exchange platform with the aim of building versatile methods for running the essential drug system in all provinces. Pharmaceutical manufacturers and delivery enterprises were dangerous stakeholders for the essential drug policy. Because of their potential threat to the implementation of the policy, the central government should motivate them to support the construction of the essential drug system spontaneously. In that case, provincial governments need to construct a fair, balanced, and self-stabilized bidding platform. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pseudomalignant myositis ossificans involving multiple masticatory muscles: Imaging evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamalapur, Muralidhar G; Patil, Pritam B; Joshi, Shyamsundar; Shastri, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Myositis ossificans is a rare cause of trismus. We present a case of pseudomalignant myositis ossificans involving medial pterygoid, lateral pterygoid, and temporalis muscles. Patient presented with gross limitation in mouth opening. There was no history of trauma. Computed tomography (CT) images revealed a bone density mass located in the region of medial and lateral pterygoid muscles on the right and temporalis muscle on the left. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed similar findings. Radiological diagnosis was pseudomalignant myositis ossificans. The masses were resected and histopathologic examination confirmed the above diagnosis. This report describes the characteristic CT and MRI features. The unique feature of this case is the absence of history of trauma with involvement of multiple masticatory muscles, which, to the best of our knowledge, has not been reported before

  17. Non-financial conflicts of interest in academic grant evaluation: a qualitative study of multiple stakeholders in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoul, Hendy; Perrey, Christophe; Tubach, Florence; Amiel, Philippe; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Alberti, Corinne

    2012-01-01

    Peer review is the most widely used method for evaluating grant applications in clinical research. Criticisms of peer review include lack of equity, suspicion of biases, and conflicts of interest (CoI). CoIs raise questions of fairness, transparency, and trust in grant allocation. Few observational studies have assessed these issues. We report the results of a qualitative study on reviewers' and applicants' perceptions and experiences of CoIs in reviews of French academic grant applications. We designed a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and direct observation. We asked members of assessment panels, external reviewers, and applicants to participate in semi-structured interviews. Two independent researchers conducted in-depth reviews and line-by-line coding of all transcribed interviews, which were also subjected to Tropes® software text analysis, to detect and qualify themes associated with CoIs. Most participants (73/98) spontaneously reported that non-financial CoIs predominated over financial CoIs. Non-financial CoIs mainly involved rivalry among disciplines, cronyism, and geographic and academic biases. However, none of the participants challenged the validity of peer review. Reviewers who felt they might be affected by CoIs said they reacted in a variety of ways: routine refusal to review, routine attempt to conduct an impartial review, or decision on a case-by-case basis. Multiple means of managing non-financial CoIs were suggested, including increased transparency throughout the review process, with public disclosure of non-financial CoIs, and careful selection of independent reviewers, including foreign experts and methodologists. Our study underscores the importance of considering non-financial CoIs when reviewing research grant applications, in addition to financial CoIs. Specific measures are needed to prevent a negative impact of non-financial CoIs on the fairness of resource allocation. Whether and how public disclosure of non

  18. Non-financial conflicts of interest in academic grant evaluation: a qualitative study of multiple stakeholders in France.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendy Abdoul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peer review is the most widely used method for evaluating grant applications in clinical research. Criticisms of peer review include lack of equity, suspicion of biases, and conflicts of interest (CoI. CoIs raise questions of fairness, transparency, and trust in grant allocation. Few observational studies have assessed these issues. We report the results of a qualitative study on reviewers' and applicants' perceptions and experiences of CoIs in reviews of French academic grant applications. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We designed a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and direct observation. We asked members of assessment panels, external reviewers, and applicants to participate in semi-structured interviews. Two independent researchers conducted in-depth reviews and line-by-line coding of all transcribed interviews, which were also subjected to Tropes® software text analysis, to detect and qualify themes associated with CoIs. Most participants (73/98 spontaneously reported that non-financial CoIs predominated over financial CoIs. Non-financial CoIs mainly involved rivalry among disciplines, cronyism, and geographic and academic biases. However, none of the participants challenged the validity of peer review. Reviewers who felt they might be affected by CoIs said they reacted in a variety of ways: routine refusal to review, routine attempt to conduct an impartial review, or decision on a case-by-case basis. Multiple means of managing non-financial CoIs were suggested, including increased transparency throughout the review process, with public disclosure of non-financial CoIs, and careful selection of independent reviewers, including foreign experts and methodologists. CONCLUSIONS: Our study underscores the importance of considering non-financial CoIs when reviewing research grant applications, in addition to financial CoIs. Specific measures are needed to prevent a negative impact of non-financial CoIs on the

  19. Results from the Wisdom stakeholder workshop on restoration management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisbet, A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A Workshop to extend the Involvement of Stakeholders in Decisions On restoration Management (WISDOM) will be held in Oxford in September 2003. The aim of the workshop is to promote awareness and interest in the wider application of stakeholder involvement in the formulation of strategies for the management of contaminated agricultural land and produce following a nuclear accident. A network of stakeholder groups has already been set up under the auspices of the European Communities 5th Framework Programme (FP5). The network, given the acronym FARMING, involves more than 100 stakeholders in UK, Finland, Belgium, Greece and France. Membership tends to be at a senior level and comprises a wide range of Government and non-government organizations, including the farming sector, the food, milk and water industries, consumers and green groups. The stakeholder groups have met regularly since 2001 and have advanced contingency planning and emergency response, both nationally and on a European basis. A compendium of countermeasure options produced by another FP5 project, STRATEGY, has helped provide stakeholders with a common focus for discussion and evaluation. The 2 1/2 day workshop comprises a mixture of invited and proffered papers as well as facilitated group discussions and plenary sessions that will address the following issues: lessons learnt from stakeholder engagement; influence of regional characteristics on countermeasure selection; practical aspects of countermeasure implementation; crisis management; maintaining consumer confidence; acceptability of intervention limits; social, ethical and economic consequences; future prospects for stakeholder networks. More than 30 FARMING stakeholders and facilitators have expressed an interest in attending the WISDOM workshop. GOs and NGOs will both be represented. There will also be representatives from the STRATEGY project and the European Commission. Invitations have been issued to representatives of a further

  20. Stakeholder involvement: views from a policy maker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    In 1999 powers and responsibilities were devolved from the UK government to the new devolved administrations in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. This paper deals with the issue of radioactive waste management in the Scottish context as, following devolution, responsibility for radioactive waste management in Scotland is a devolved responsibility of the Scottish Parliament. The founding principles of the Scottish Parliament are: Openness and participation, Accountability, Power sharing, Equal opportunities. The government of Scotland is known as the Scottish Executive and has 22 Ministers covering a wide range of devolved responsibilities including: wider environmental matters, health, socioeconomic, skills and education. The Scottish Ministers also have specific responsibility in legislation regarding the governance of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA). Scotland also has its own agencies to deliver his government policies, such as the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) and enterprise and skills delivery bodies. There is a high level of interest in nuclear and radioactive waste issues in Scotland as Scotland has both civil nuclear and defense sites around the country which generate radioactive waste. Alongside this is its close proximity to the largest nuclear site in the UK: Sellafield

  1. Public involvement in multi-objective water level regulation development projects-evaluating the applicability of public involvement methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaentaenen, Ari; Marttunen, Mika

    2005-01-01

    Public involvement is a process that involves the public in the decision making of an organization, for example a municipality or a corporation. It has developed into a widely accepted and recommended policy in environment altering projects. The EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) took force in 2000 and stresses the importance of public involvement in composing river basin management plans. Therefore, the need to develop public involvement methods for different situations and circumstances is evident. This paper describes how various public involvement methods have been applied in a development project involving the most heavily regulated lake in Finland. The objective of the project was to assess the positive and negative impacts of regulation and to find possibilities for alleviating the adverse impacts on recreational use and the aquatic ecosystem. An exceptional effort was made towards public involvement, which was closely connected to planning and decision making. The applied methods were (1) steering group work, (2) survey, (3) dialogue, (4) theme interviews, (5) public meeting and (6) workshops. The information gathered using these methods was utilized in different stages of the project, e.g., in identifying the regulation impacts, comparing alternatives and compiling the recommendations for regulation development. After describing our case and the results from the applied public involvement methods, we will discuss our experiences and the feedback from the public. We will also critically evaluate our own success in coping with public involvement challenges. In addition to that, we present general recommendations for dealing with these problematic issues based on our experiences, which provide new insights for applying various public involvement methods in multi-objective decision making projects

  2. Stakeholder Relationships in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Juha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a stakeholder map to describe the most important stakeholders and the process of stakeholder relationships in higher education. According to the perspective of the balanced scorecard, the classification of stakeholders integrates stakeholders into strategic management. Stakeholder maps are essential in…

  3. Stakeholder engagement for improved school policy: development and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The health and education departments of government share a responsibility for promoting the health of children through policies in the school setting. These policies can be enhanced through the involvement of such stakeholders as school personnel, students, parents or caregivers, health professionals, the non-profit sector and industry. Although there is little evidence-based literature on the roles of stakeholders in school policy development and implementation, stakeholder involvement appears to be critical throughout the policy process. This article discusses stakeholder involvement in the development and implementation of school policies that promote and support healthy eating and physical activity. Canadian examples illustrate stakeholder engagement in this context.

  4. Evaluation of the perception and application of social responsibility practices in micro, small and medium companies in Barranquilla. An analysis from the theory of Stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillén León

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the degree of comprehension and enforcement of social responsibility (SR practices in micro, small and medium companies in Barranquilla (Colombia, based on the Stakeholders theory. Using an exploratory factor analysis on 779 companies it was found that the variables with a stronger explanatory influence for socially responsible performance are employees, environment, and community. By contrast, corporate management, value chain, and government/public sector condition the development of SR actions. Particularly, there is a weak perception and lack of will among owners and company managers to undertake comprehensive programs of social responsibility, as well as the formalization of those actions with an impact on the SR.

  5. Patient and Stakeholder Engagement in the PCORI Pilot Projects: Description and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Laura P; Ellis, Lauren E; Edmundson, Lauren; Sabharwal, Raj; Rein, Alison; Konopka, Kristen; Frank, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Patients and healthcare stakeholders are increasingly becoming engaged in the planning and conduct of biomedical research. However, limited research characterizes this process or its impact. We aimed to characterize patient and stakeholder engagement in the 50 Pilot Projects funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), and identify early contributions and lessons learned. A self-report instrument was completed by researchers between 6 and 12 months following project initiation. Forty-seven principal investigators or their designees (94 % response rate) participated in the study. MAIN MEASURES Self-report of types of stakeholders engaged, stages and levels of engagement, facilitators and barriers to engagement, lessons learned, and contributions from engagement were measured. Most (83 %) reported engaging more than one stakeholder in their project. Among those, the most commonly reported groups were patients (90 %), clinicians (87 %), health system representatives (44 %), caregivers (41 %), and advocacy organizations (41 %). Stakeholders were commonly involved in topic solicitation, question development, study design, and data collection. Many projects engaged stakeholders in data analysis, results interpretation, and dissemination. Commonly reported contributions included changes to project methods, outcomes or goals; improvement of measurement tools; and interpretation of qualitative data. Investigators often identified communication and shared leadership strategies as "critically important" facilitators (53 and 44 % respectively); lack of stakeholder time was the most commonly reported challenge (46 %). Most challenges were only partially resolved. Early lessons learned included the importance of continuous and genuine partnerships, strategic selection of stakeholders, and accommodation of stakeholders' practical needs. PCORI Pilot Projects investigators report engaging a variety of stakeholders across many stages of research, with specific

  6. Engaging stakeholders on complex, and potentially contested, science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, John; Atherton, Elizabeth; Tweed, Cherry

    2014-01-01

    is built at an interpersonal level between those involved in the process. - Honest brokers: Can play an important role, mediating between the people and organisations involved, and interpreting the science and its significance for decisions. - Stakeholders as 'scientists': Involving stakeholders in the generation and interpretation of scientific knowledge promotes ownership and helps ensure that it is socially robust. - Communicating about uncertainty: Establishing uncertainty as an inherent feature of science, and discussing uncertainties in a way which is helpful to stakeholders while remaining true to the science. - Protected spaces: Creating spaces in which productive dialogue can take place between scientists and stakeholders, where issues and questions can be explored in a process of honest enquiry. For RWMD the scientific uncertainties inherent in evaluating the performance of a geological disposal facility into the far future present a challenge of engaging productively with stakeholders on the science. The stakeholders who are fundamentally opposed to disposal will focus on remaining uncertainties as just cause for their position. Whatever the process of stakeholder engagement on science that is eventually developed, it will be important to build in evaluation and learning, together with the flexibility to adjust the process as experience is gained. Its development should also keep one eye on the planning and legal framework to ensure that synergies, rather than pitfalls, are built in. (authors)

  7. Cultural heritage evaluation: a reappraisal of some critical concepts involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela IACOB

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to build a synoptic picture of the facets of the economic category called “value”, with practicality in the tangible cultural heritage field, from the point of view of a traditionally economists-specific approach: concern for the financial sustainability of any decision. Moreover, the methods from the economics literature regarding the valences of the “cultural value” concept prove the obsoleteness of the common opinion according to which the economic approach is primarily interested in financial metrics. In as much as the ultimate goal of the scientific process is to identify the most effective cultural heritage preservation and evaluation methods, the study also reflects the public-private interference in this area.

  8. Evaluating the oil sands reclamation process: Assessing policy capacity and stakeholder access for government and non-governmental organizations operating in Alberta's oil sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Tyler

    By employing interpretive policy analysis this thesis aims to assess, measure, and explain policy capacity for government and non-government organizations involved in reclaiming Alberta's oil sands. Using this type of analysis to assess policy capacity is a novel approach for understanding reclamation policy; and therefore, this research will provide a unique contribution to the literature surrounding reclamation policy. The oil sands region in northeast Alberta, Canada is an area of interest for a few reasons; primarily because of the vast reserves of bitumen and the environmental cost associated with developing this resource. An increase in global oil demand has established incentive for industry to seek out and develop new reserves. Alberta's oil sands are one of the largest remaining reserves in the world, and there is significant interest in increasing production in this region. Furthermore, tensions in several oil exporting nations in the Middle East remain unresolved, and this has garnered additional support for a supply side solution to North American oil demands. This solution relies upon the development of reserves in both the United States and Canada. These compounding factors have contributed to the increased development in the oil sands of northeastern Alberta. Essentially, a rapid expansion of oil sands operations is ongoing, and is the source of significant disturbance across the region. This disturbance, and the promises of reclamation, is a source of contentious debates amongst stakeholders and continues to be highly visible in the media. If oil sands operations are to retain their social license to operate, it is critical that reclamation efforts be effective. One concern non-governmental organizations (NGOs) expressed criticizes the current monitoring and enforcement of regulatory programs in the oil sands. Alberta's NGOs have suggested the data made available to them originates from industrial sources, and is generally unchecked by government

  9. Balancing Competing Rights: A Stakeholder Model for Democratic Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Shaheen

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I discuss a Canadian public school controversy and Supreme Court of Canada decision involving competing stakeholder rights to freedom of religion, safety and equality. Policy considerations that allowed one group of stakeholders to express their constitutional rights raised concerns among other stakeholders. A policy vacuum and a…

  10. Enhancing participatory approach in water resources management: development of a survey to evaluate stakeholders needs and priorities related to software capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, L.; Rossetto, R.; Borsi, I.; Josef, S.; Boukalova, Z.; Triana, F.; Ghetta, M.; Sabbatini, T.; Bonari, E.; Cannata, M.; De Filippis, G.

    2016-12-01

    The EU H2020 FREEWAT project (FREE and open source software tools for WATer resource management) aims at simplifying the application of EU-water related Directives, by developing an open source and public domain, GIS-integrated platform for planning and management of ground- and surface-water resources. The FREEWAT platform is conceived as a canvas, where several distributed and physically-based simulation codes are virtually integrated. The choice of such codes was supported by the result of a survey performed by means of questionnaires distributed to 14 case study FREEWAT project partners and several stakeholders. This was performed in the first phase of the project within the WP 6 (Enhanced science and participatory approach evidence-based decision making), Task 6.1 (Definition of a "needs/tools" evaluation grid). About 30% among all the invited entities and institutions from several EU and non-EU Countries expressed their interest in contributing to the survey. Most of them were research institutions, government and geoenvironmental companies and river basin authorities.The result of the questionnaire provided a spectrum of needs and priorities of partners/stakeholders, which were addressed during the development phase of the FREEWAT platform. The main needs identified were related to ground- and surface-water quality, sustainable water management, interaction between groundwater/surface-water bodies, and design and management of Managed Aquifer Recharge schemes. Needs and priorities were then connected to the specific EU Directives and Regulations to be addressed.One of the main goals of the questionnaires was to collect information and suggestions regarding the use of existing commercial/open-source software tools to address needs and priorities, and regarding the needs to address specific water-related processes/problems.

  11. Stakeholder engagement in dredged material management decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Zachary A; Bates, Matthew E; Wood, Matthew D; Linkov, Igor

    2014-10-15

    Dredging and disposal issues often become controversial with local stakeholders because of their competing interests. These interests tend to manifest themselves in stakeholders holding onto entrenched positions, and deadlock can result without a methodology to move the stakeholder group past the status quo. However, these situations can be represented as multi-stakeholder, multi-criteria decision problems. In this paper, we describe a case study in which multi-criteria decision analysis was implemented in a multi-stakeholder setting in order to generate recommendations on dredged material placement for Long Island Sound's Dredged Material Management Plan. A working-group of representatives from various stakeholder organizations was formed and consulted to help prioritize sediment placement sites for each dredging center in the region by collaboratively building a multi-criteria decision model. The resulting model framed the problem as several alternatives, criteria, sub-criteria, and metrics relevant to stakeholder interests in the Long Island Sound region. An elicitation of values, represented as criteria weights, was then conducted. Results show that in general, stakeholders tended to agree that all criteria were at least somewhat important, and on average there was strong agreement on the order of preferences among the diverse groups of stakeholders. By developing the decision model iteratively with stakeholders as a group and soliciting their preferences, the process sought to increase stakeholder involvement at the front-end of the prioritization process and lead to increased knowledge and consensus regarding the importance of site-specific criteria. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Ethical considerations of worksite health promotion: an exploration of stakeholders' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berkel, Jantien; Meershoek, Agnes; Janssens, Rien M J P A; Boot, Cécile R L; Proper, Karin I; van der Beek, Allard J

    2014-05-16

    Developing, implementing and evaluating worksite health promotion requires dealing with all stakeholders involved, such as employers, employees, occupational physicians, insurance companies, providers, labour unions and research and knowledge institutes. Although worksite health promotion is becoming more common, empirical research on ethical considerations of worksite health promotion is scarce. We explored the views of stakeholders involved in worksite health promotion in focus group discussions and we described the ethical considerations that result from differences between these views. The focus group discussions were organised per stakeholder group. Data were analysed according to the constant comparison method. Our analyses show that although the definition of occupational health is the same for all stakeholders, namely 'being able to perform your job', there seem to be important differences in the views on what constitutes a risk factor to occupational health. According to the employees, risk factors to occupational health are prevailingly job-related. Labour unions agree with them, but other stakeholders, including the employer, particularly see employee-related issues such as lifestyle behaviour as risk factors to occupational health. The difference in definition of occupational health risk factors translates into the same categorisation of worksite health promotion; employee-related activities and work-related activities. The difference in conceptualisation of occupational health risk factors and worksite health promotion resonates in the way stakeholders understand 'responsibility' for lifestyle behaviour. Even though all stakeholders agree on whose responsibility lifestyle behaviour is, namely that of the employee, the meaning of 'responsibility' differs between employees, and employers. For employees, responsibility means autonomy, while for employers and other stakeholders, responsibility equals duty. This difference may in turn contribute to

  13. The RACER (risk analysis, communication, evaluation, and reduction) stakeholder environmental data transparency project for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echohawk, John Chris; Dorries, Alison M.; Eberhart, Craig F.; Werdel, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    The RACER (Risk Analysis, Communication, Evaluation, and Reduction) project was created in 2003, as an effort to enhance the Los Alamos National Laboratory's ability to effectively communicate the data and processes used to evaluate environmental risks to the public and the environment. The RACER project staff consists of members of Risk Assessment Corporation, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). RACER staff worked closely with members of the community, tribal governments, and others within NMED and LANL to create innovative tools and a process that could provide information to regulators, LANL and the community about the sources of public health risk and ecological impact from LAN L operations. The RACER Data Analysis Tool (DA T) provides the public with webbased access to environmental measurement data collected in and around the LANL site. Its purpose is to provide a 'transparent' view to the public of all data collected by LANL and NMED regarding the LANL site. The DAT is available to the public at 'www.racernm.com'.

  14. Transitioning a Large Scale HIV/AIDS Prevention Program to Local Stakeholders: Findings from the Avahan Transition Evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bennett

    Full Text Available Between 2009-2013 the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation transitioned its HIV/AIDS prevention initiative in India from being a stand-alone program outside of government, to being fully government funded and implemented. We present an independent prospective evaluation of the transition.The evaluation drew upon (1 a structured survey of transition readiness in a sample of 80 targeted HIV prevention programs prior to transition; (2 a structured survey assessing institutionalization of program features in a sample of 70 targeted intervention (TI programs, one year post-transition; and (3 case studies of 15 TI programs.Transition was conducted in 3 rounds. While the 2009 transition round was problematic, subsequent rounds were implemented more smoothly. In the 2011 and 2012 transition rounds, Avahan programs were well prepared for transition with the large majority of TI program staff trained for transition, high alignment with government clinical, financial and managerial norms, and strong government commitment to the program. One year post transition there were significant program changes, but these were largely perceived positively. Notable negative changes were: limited flexibility in program management, delays in funding, commodity stock outs, and community member perceptions of a narrowing in program focus. Service coverage outcomes were sustained at least six months post-transition.The study suggests that significant investments in transition preparation contributed to a smooth transition and sustained service coverage. Notwithstanding, there were substantive program changes post-transition. Five key lessons for transition design and implementation are identified.

  15. Models of care for musculoskeletal health: a cross-sectional qualitative study of Australian stakeholders' perspectives on relevance and standardised evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Andrew M; Jordan, Joanne E; Speerin, Robyn; Jennings, Matthew; Bragge, Peter; Chua, Jason; Slater, Helen

    2015-11-16

    health system had been considered prior to implementation was strongly supported, while 'success' was perceived as an already familiar evaluation concept. Perceived challenges associated with standardised evaluation included identifying, defining and measuring key 'readiness' and 'success' indicators; impacts of systems and context changes; cost; meaningful stakeholder consultation and developing a widely applicable framework. A standardised evaluation framework that includes a strong focus on 'readiness' is important to ensure successful and sustainable implementation of musculoskeletal MoCs.

  16. Stakeholder analysis of Agroparks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubben, E.F.M.; Isakhanyan, G.

    2011-01-01

    An agropark is a cluster in which several primary producers and processors cooperate to enhance sustainable agrofood production. Because agroparks represent complex system innovations, this article studies their realisation trajectories from the stakeholder management perspective. By using the case

  17. Stakeholder Attitudes EBM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) conducted a survey of fisheries stakeholders on the Gulf and East Coasts of the United States seeking their views on...

  18. Stakeholders: theory and practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedman, Andrew L; Miles, Samantha

    2006-01-01

    ... of the concept on practice and policy. However, as the concept has become more popular, the path has become tangled with the many different ways the concept has been used. For example, different practices have come to be called stakeholder activities, particularly by those seeking to use the label to legitimize their actions. Also, a range of different definitions as to what a stakeholder is has emerged. Concentrating on these issues encourages a view of a second future path of the stake...

  19. Stakeholder Values and Ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Sveinsdottir, Thordis; Wessels, Bridgette; Smallwood, Rod; Linde, Peter; Kalla, Vasso; Tsoukala, Victoria; Sondervan, Jeroen

    2013-01-01

    This report is the deliverable for Work Package 1 (WP1), Stakeholder Values and Ecosystems, of the EU FP7 funded project RECODE (Grant Agreement No: 321463), which focuses on developing Policy Recommendations for Open Access to Research Data in Europe. WP1 focuses on understanding stakeholder values and ecosystems in Open Access, dissemination and preservation in the area of scientific and scholarly data (thus not government data). The objectives of this WP are as follows: • Identify and map ...

  20. THE STAKEHOLDER MODEL REFINED

    OpenAIRE

    Y. FASSIN

    2008-01-01

    The popularity of the stakeholder model has been achieved thanks to its powerful visual scheme and its very simplicity. Stakeholder management has become an important tool to transfer ethics to management practice and strategy. Nevertheless, legitimate criticism continues to insist on clarification and emphasises on the perfectible nature of the model. Here, rather than building on the discussion from a philosophical or theoretical point of view, a different and innovative approach has been c...

  1. The Regional Advisory Councils: what is their potential to incorporate stakeholder knowledge into fisheries governance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Sebastian; Dreyer, Marion; Sellke, Piet

    2011-03-01

    The protection of the Baltic Sea ecosystem is exacerbated by the social, environmental and economic complexities of governing European fisheries. Increased stakeholder participation and knowledge integration are suggested to improve the EU's Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), suffering from legitimacy, credibility and compliance problems. As a result, the CFP was revised in 2002 to involve fisheries representatives, NGOs and other stakeholders through so called Regional Advisory Councils (RACs) in the policy process. We address the RAC's task to incorporate stakeholder knowledge into the EU's fisheries governance system in empirical and theoretical perspectives. Drawing on a four-stage governance concept we subsequently suggest that a basic problem is a mismatch between participation purpose (knowledge inclusion) and the governance stage at which RACs are formally positioned (evaluation of management proposals). We conclude that, if the aim is to broaden the knowledge base of fisheries management, stakeholders need to be included earlier in the governance process.

  2. Higher Education Quality: Perception Differences among Internal and External Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Munirul

    2015-01-01

    Conceptually, education quality of higher education can be determined by evaluation of their stakeholders's satisfaction level. The purpose of this study is to describe how students as external stakeholder and lecturers as internal stakeholder, perceived their satisfaction of learning experience in the university. This study was conducted in…

  3. Using Participatory Learning & Action (PLA) research techniques for inter-stakeholder dialogue in primary healthcare: an analysis of stakeholders' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brún, T; O'Reilly-de Brún, M; Van Weel-Baumgarten, E; Burns, N; Dowrick, C; Lionis, C; O'Donnell, C; Mair, F S; Papadakaki, M; Saridaki, A; Spiegel, W; Van Weel, C; Van den Muijsenbergh, M; MacFarlane, A

    2017-01-01

    It is important for health care workers to know the needs and expectations of their patients. Therefore, service users have to be involved in research. To achieve a meaningful dialogue between service users, healthcare workers and researchers, participatory methods are needed. This paper describes how the application of a specific participatory methodology, Participatory Learning and Action (PLA) can lead to such a meaningful dialogue. In PLA all stakeholders are regarded as equal partners and collaborators in research.During 2011-2015, a European project called RESTORE used PLA in Austria, Greece, Ireland, The Netherlands and the UK to investigate how communication between primary health care workers and their migrant patients could be improved.Seventy eight migrants, interpreters, doctors, nurses and other key stakeholders (see Table 2) participated in 62 PLA sessions. These dialogues (involving discussions, activities, PLA techniques and evaluations) were generally 2-3 h long and were recorded and analysed by the researchers.Participants reported many positive experiences about their dialogues with other stakeholders. There was a positive, trusting atmosphere in which all stakeholders could express their views despite differences in social power. This made for better understanding within and across stakeholder groups. For instance a doctor changed her view on the use of interpreters after a migrant explained why this was important. Negative experiences were rare: some doctors and healthcare workers thought the PLA sessions took a lot of time; and despite the good dialogue, there was disappointment that very few migrants used the new interpreting service. Background In order to be effective, primary healthcare must understand the health needs, values and expectations of the population it serves. Recent research has shown that the involvement of service users and other stakeholders and gathering information on their perspectives can contribute positively to many

  4. Comparing Approaches for the Integration of Stakeholder Perspectives in Environmental Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Scolobig

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Including stakeholder perspectives in environmental decision making is in many countries a legal requirement and is widely seen as beneficial as it can help increase decision legitimacy, likelihood of implementation, and quality of the outcome. Whereas the theoretical literature on stakeholder engagement is large, less attention has been devoted to comparing and discussing different methodological approaches. Here, we compare three approaches—multi-criteria analysis, plural rationality theory, and scenario construction—that include stakeholders’ perspectives in environmental decision making. We find differences between the approaches concerning the assumptions about stakeholder rationality and whether experts and/or stakeholders are in charge of framing the problem. Further differences concern the type of data input from stakeholders and how it is used by the experts, as well as the role of stakeholders and whether they are involved early—already for identifying options—or later in the process, for evaluating or ranking alternatives analyzed by the experts. The choice of approach thus predetermines the type and depth of stakeholder engagement. No approach is “better” than another, but they are suited for different problems and research aims: the choice of the approach, however, has a large impact on the results.

  5. A developmental evaluation to enhance stakeholder engagement in a wide-scale interactive project disseminating quality improvement data: study protocol for a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laycock, Alison; Bailie, Jodie; Matthews, Veronica; Cunningham, Frances; Harvey, Gillian; Percival, Nikki; Bailie, Ross

    2017-07-13

    Bringing together continuous quality improvement (CQI) data from multiple health services offers opportunities to identify common improvement priorities and to develop interventions at various system levels to achieve large-scale improvement in care. An important principle of CQI is practitioner participation in interpreting data and planning evidence-based change. This study will contribute knowledge about engaging diverse stakeholders in collaborative and theoretically informed processes to identify and address priority evidence-practice gaps in care delivery. This paper describes a developmental evaluation to support and refine a novel interactive dissemination project using aggregated CQI data from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary healthcare centres in Australia. The project aims to effect multilevel system improvement in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary healthcare. Data will be gathered using document analysis, online surveys, interviews with participants and iterative analytical processes with the research team. These methods will enable real-time feedback to guide refinements to the design, reports, tools and processes as the interactive dissemination project is implemented. Qualitative data from interviews and surveys will be analysed and interpreted to provide in-depth understanding of factors that influence engagement and stakeholder perspectives about use of the aggregated data and generated improvement strategies. Sources of data will be triangulated to build up a comprehensive, contextualised perspective and integrated understanding of the project's development, implementation and findings. The Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) of the Northern Territory Department of Health and Menzies School of Health Research (Project 2015-2329), the Central Australian HREC (Project 15-288) and the Charles Darwin University HREC (Project H15030) approved the study. Dissemination will include articles in peer-reviewed journals, policy

  6. Evaluating public participation in environmental decision-making: EPA's superfund community involvement program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Charnley; Bruce. Engelbert

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses an 8-year, ongoing project that evaluates the Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund community involvement program. The project originated as a response to the Government Performance and Results Act, which requires federal agencies to articulate program goals, and evaluate and report their progress in meeting those goals. The evaluation...

  7. Influencing organizations to promote health: applying stakeholder theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Gerjo; Gurabardhi, Zamira; Gottlieb, Nell H; Zijlstra, Fred R H

    2015-04-01

    Stakeholder theory may help health promoters to make changes at the organizational and policy level to promote health. A stakeholder is any individual, group, or organization that can influence an organization. The organization that is the focus for influence attempts is called the focal organization. The more salient a stakeholder is and the more central in the network, the stronger the influence. As stakeholders, health promoters may use communicative, compromise, deinstitutionalization, or coercive methods through an ally or a coalition. A hypothetical case study, involving adolescent use of harmful legal products, illustrates the process of applying stakeholder theory to strategic decision making. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  8. Stakeholder interaction within the ERICA Integrated Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinger, I; Oughton, D H; Jones, S R

    2008-09-01

    Within the ERICA project, stakeholder involvement has been addressed within three main areas: generic interactions throughout the project, specific consultation by means of attendance to events and considerations as part of the ERICA Integrated Approach and Assessment Tool. The word stakeholders meant namely any individual or group who may be affected by or have an interest in an issue, and to include experts, lay-people and the public. An End-Users-Group (EUG) was set up to facilitate the two-way dialogue between the ERICA Consortium and stakeholders. The ERICA EUG consisted of representatives of 60 organisations ranging from regulatory bodies, national advisory bodies, academia, non-governmental organisations, industry, consultants and inter-governmental organisations. Stakeholder interaction was included from the very start of the project. Inputs from the EUG were recorded and in most instances incorporated within the development of the project and thus influenced and helped to shape some of the ERICA deliverables.

  9. STAKEHOLDER DISTRUST - Implications of Distrust Research for Stakeholder Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Laude, Daniel; Weibel, Antoinette; Sachs, Sybille; Schafheitle, Simon Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Stakeholder theory has addressed the role of trust in organization-stakeholder relationships in depth. Although it is similarly relevant, distrust as a distinct construct from (low) trust has received relatively little consideration by stakeholder theorists. Thus, this article focuses on stakeholder distrust and reflects on the findings of distrust research in organizational studies and the implications for stakeholder theory. For this purpose, we conduct a systematic literature review of org...

  10. Shareholder, stakeholder-owner or broad stakeholder maximization

    OpenAIRE

    Mygind, Niels

    2004-01-01

    With reference to the discussion about shareholder versus stakeholder maximization it is argued that the normal type of maximization is in fact stakeholder-owner maxi-mization. This means maximization of the sum of the value of the shares and stake-holder benefits belonging to the dominating stakeholder-owner. Maximization of shareholder value is a special case of owner-maximization, and only under quite re-strictive assumptions shareholder maximization is larger or equal to stakeholder-owner...

  11. Mapping the Views of Adolescent Health Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewan, Lindsay A; McLinden, Daniel; Biro, Frank; DeJonckheere, Melissa; Vaughn, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Health research that includes youth and family stakeholders increases the contextual relevance of findings, which can benefit both the researchers and stakeholders involved. The goal of this study was to identify youth and family adolescent health priorities and to explore strategies to address these concerns. Stakeholders identified important adolescent health concerns, perceptions of which were then explored using concept mapping. Concept mapping is a mixed-method participatory research approach that invites input from various stakeholders. In response to prompts, stakeholders suggested ways to address the identified health conditions. Adolescent participants then sorted the statements into groups based on content similarity and rated the statements for importance and feasibility. Multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis were then applied to create the concept maps. Stakeholders identified sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and obesity as the health conditions they considered most important. The concept map for STIs identified 7 clusters: General sex education, support and empowerment, testing and treatment, community involvement and awareness, prevention and protection, parental involvement in sex education, and media. The obesity concept map portrayed 8 clusters: Healthy food choices, obesity education, support systems, clinical and community involvement, community support for exercise, physical activity, nutrition support, and nutrition education. Ratings were generally higher for importance than for feasibility. The concept maps demonstrate stakeholder-driven ideas about approaches to target STIs and obesity in this context. Strategies at multiple social ecological levels were emphasized. The concept maps can be used to generate discussion regarding these topics and to identify interventions. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dimeric ligands for GPCRs involved in human reproduction : synthesis and biological evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonger, Kimberly Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Dimeric ligands for G-protein coupled receptors that are involved in human reproduction, namely the gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor, the luteinizing hormone receptor and the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor, were synthesized and biologically evaluated.

  13. Stakeholder analysis for the development of a community pharmacy service aimed at preventing cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Trigo, L; Hossain, L N; Durks, D; Fam, D; Inglis, S C; Benrimoj, S I; Sabater-Hernández, D

    Participatory approaches involving stakeholders across the health care system can help enhance the development, implementation and evaluation of health services. These approaches may be particularly useful in planning community pharmacy services and so overcome challenges in their implementation into practice. Conducting a stakeholder analysis is a key first step since it allows relevant stakeholders to be identified, as well as providing planners a better understanding of the complexity of the health care system. The main aim of this study was to conduct a stakeholder analysis to identify those individuals and organizations that could be part of a leading planning group for the development of a community pharmacy service (CPS) to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Australia. An experienced facilitator conducted a workshop with 8 key informants of the Australian health care system. Two structured activities were undertaken. The first explored current needs and gaps in cardiovascular care and the role of community pharmacists. The second was a stakeholder analysis, using both ex-ante and ad-hoc approaches. Identified stakeholders were then classified into three groups according to their relative influence on the development of the pharmacy service. The information gathered was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The key informants identified 46 stakeholders, including (1) patient/consumers and their representative organizations, (2) health care providers and their professional organizations and (3) institutions and organizations that do not directly interact with patients but organize and manage the health care system, develop and implement health policies, pay for health care, influence funding for health service research or promote new health initiatives. From the 46 stakeholders, a core group of 12 stakeholders was defined. These were considered crucial to the service's development because they held positions that could drive or inhibit progress

  14. Improving access to medicines via the Health Impact Fund in India: a stakeholder analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, Patrick; Ajay, Vamadevan S; Srinivas, Ravi; Bhalla, Sandeep; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Banerjee, Amitava

    2018-01-01

    In India, 50-65% of the population face difficulties in accessing medicines. The Health Impact Fund (HIF) is a novel proposal whereby pharmaceutical companies would be paid based on the measured global health impact of their drugs. We conducted a key stakeholder analysis to explore access to medicines in India, acceptability of the HIF and potential barriers and facilitators at policy level. To conduct a stakeholder analysis of the HIF in India: to determine key stakeholder views regarding access to medicines in India; to evaluate acceptability of the HIF; and to assess potential barriers and facilitators to the HIF as a policy. In New Delhi, we conducted semi-structured interviews. There was purposive recruitment of participants with snowball sampling. Transcribed data were analysed using stakeholder analysis frameworks and directed content analysis. Participation rate was 29% (14/49). 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted among stakeholders in New Delhi. All participants highlighted access to medicines as a problem in India. There were mixed views about the HIF in terms of relevance and scaleability. Stakeholders felt it should focus on diseases with limited or no market and potentially incorporate direct investment in research. First, access to medicines is perceived to be a major problem in India by all stakeholders, but affordability is just one factor. Second, stakeholders despite considerable support for the idea of the HIF, there are major concerns about scaleability, generalisability and impact on access to medicines. Third, the HIF and other novel drug-related health policies can afford to be more radical, e.g. working outside the existing intellectual property rights regime, targeting generic as well as branded drugs, or extending to research and development. Further innovations in access to medicines must involve country-specific key stakeholders in order to increase the likelihood of their success.

  15. Corporate Stakeholding and Globalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauesen, Linne Marie

    2016-01-01

    , the global warming, the disasters of global consumerism in terms of the collapse of the Rana Plaza factory in the fashion industry, are examples of how the stakeholder concept cannot continue to be defined as narrow as corporations usually does. The butterfly effect of globalism has shown to be – yes, global....... Even the smallest company, the single consumer and the tiniest decision made by anyone may in the future – perhaps even tomorrow – affect stakeholders, we didn’t know existed. The future generation is also to be considered as stakeholders, which decisions made today may affect. Companies, consumers......, everyday people including children already know this even from the first day at school if not before. What we need is not knowledge about these phenomena – it is how to think globally when we decide locally: in companies, in daily households, in education of our future generations. This chapter discusses...

  16. EDUCATIONAL PROJECTS STAKEHOLDER MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юлія Юріївна ГУСЄВА

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An approach based on an integration of requirements breakdown structure and work breakdown structure of the project is proposed. It can complement existing methods of project stakeholders classification with the indicator of resource input, which can be defined in monetary terms. A method of requirements monitoring is proposed, which allows you to track the requirements of project stakeholders over time according to the actual amount of resources spent by analogy with the earned value method. Proposed indexes are the basis not only for monitoring but for the forecast of the project. The need of creating of a mechanism for getting baseline data taking into account the existence of different types of requirements of project stakeholders is grounded.

  17. Limitations of CT and ultrasound diagnoses in the evaluation of uterine cancer involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yasumi; Maki, Masahiro; Seki, Haruo; Saito, Yoshiharu.

    1988-01-01

    The concordance rates between preoperative diagnostic imagings and postoperative pathologic findings were examined in a total of 36 patients with resectable uterine cancer (19 with cervical cancer and 27 with endometrial cancer). The accuracy of CT was 47 % in the evaluation of cervical cancer involvement to the parametrium; and was 83 % in the evaluation of wall involvement of endometrial cancer. The concordance rate was 74 % in the evaluation of stage-grouping in endometrial cancer. Out of 8 patients with resectable stage II cervical cancer, four (50 %) were found to have had involvement to the parametrium by transrectal echography. The results indicate that CT scanning and transrectal echography have limitations in the diagnosis of cervical cancer involvement to the parametrium. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. Addressing issues raised by stakeholders: experiences of eight organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vari, Anna

    2004-01-01

    Demand for stakeholder involvement has become imperative in the field of radioactive waste management. Providing for fair and competent stakeholder involvement, however, raises several questions of practice, for example: How to address issues raised by stakeholders? How to take stakeholders' views into consideration if they are divergent or conflicting? This paper reviews eight case studies prepared for the Topical Session on Addressing Issues Raised by Stakeholders, aimed at analysing the impacts of stakeholder involvement on decisions in RWM organisations. The studies outline the experiences of the following organisations: Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC); Canadian Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO); Nuclear Waste Management Organisation of Japan (NUMO); Posiva, Finland; Radioactive Waste Repository Authority, Czech Republic (RAWRA); Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI); United Kingdom Environment Agency; United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Case study reports are included in the Annex of this volume. The paper outlines the main trends and lessons learned from the above case studies. The first section focuses on impacts of stakeholder involvement on specific RWM decisions regarding policy and process. Examples presented in the second section illustrate how stakeholders' concerns may influence general decision-making practices and organisational behaviour. In the third section various approaches to handling divergent stakeholder views are introduced. The paper concludes with recommendations extracted and derived from the eight reports. (author)

  19. Prioritizing comparative effectiveness research for cancer diagnostics using a regional stakeholder approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Gregory; Gold, Laura S; Sullivan, Sean D; Buist, Diana S M; Ramsey, Scott; Kreizenbeck, Karma; Snell, Kyle; Loggers, Elizabeth Trice; Gifford, Joseph; Watkins, John B; Kessler, Larry

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes our process to engage regional stakeholders for prioritizing comparative effectiveness research (CER) in cancer diagnostics. We also describe a novel methodology for incorporating stakeholder data and input to inform the objectives of selected CER studies. As an integrated component to establishing the infrastructure for community-based CER on diagnostic technologies, we have assembled a regional stakeholder group composed of local payers, clinicians and state healthcare representatives to not only identify and prioritize CER topics most important to the western Washington State region, but also to inform the study design of selected research areas. A landscape analysis process combining literature searches, expert consultations and stakeholder discussions was used to identify possible CER topics in cancer diagnostics. Stakeholders prioritized the top topics using a modified Delphi/group-nominal method and a standardized evaluation criteria framework to determine a final selected CER study area. Implementation of the selected study was immediate due to a unique American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding structure involving the same researchers and stakeholders in both the prioritization and execution phases of the project. Stakeholder engagement was enhanced after study selection via a rapid analysis of a subset of payers' internal claims, coordinated by the research team, to obtain summary data of imaging patterns of use. Results of this preliminary analysis, which we termed an 'internal analysis,' were used to determine with the stakeholders the most important and feasible study objectives. Stakeholders identified PET and MRI in cancers including breast, lung, lymphoma and colorectal as top priorities. In an internal analysis of breast cancer imaging, summary data from three payers demonstrated utilization rates of advanced imaging increased between 2002 and 2009 in the study population, with a great deal of variability in use between

  20. Prioritizing comparative effectiveness research for cancer diagnostics using a regional stakeholder approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Gregory; Gold, Laura S; Sullivan, Sean D; Buist, Diana SM; Ramsey, Scott; Kreizenbeck, Karma; Snell, Kyle; Loggers, Elizabeth Trice; Gifford, Joseph; Watkins, John B; Kessler, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Aims This paper describes our process to engage regional stakeholders for prioritizing comparative effectiveness research (CER) in cancer diagnostics. We also describe a novel methodology for incorporating stakeholder data and input to inform the objectives of selected CER studies. Materials & methods As an integrated component to establishing the infrastructure for community-based CER on diagnostic technologies, we have assembled a regional stakeholder group composed of local payers, clinicians and state healthcare representatives to not only identify and prioritize CER topics most important to the western Washington State region, but also to inform the study design of selected research areas. A landscape analysis process combining literature searches, expert consultations and stakeholder discussions was used to identify possible CER topics in cancer diagnostics. Stakeholders prioritized the top topics using a modified Delphi/group-nominal method and a standardized evaluation criteria framework to determine a final selected CER study area. Implementation of the selected study was immediate due to a unique American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding structure involving the same researchers and stakeholders in both the prioritization and execution phases of the project. Stakeholder engagement was enhanced after study selection via a rapid analysis of a subset of payers’ internal claims, coordinated by the research team, to obtain summary data of imaging patterns of use. Results of this preliminary analysis, which we termed an ‘internal analysis,’ were used to determine with the stakeholders the most important and feasible study objectives. Results Stakeholders identified PET and MRI in cancers including breast, lung, lymphoma and colorectal as top priorities. In an internal analysis of breast cancer imaging, summary data from three payers demonstrated utilization rates of advanced imaging increased between 2002 and 2009 in the study population, with a great

  1. Essential Skills for Project Stakeholders Identification: Sustainability Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mashiur Rahman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In every life cycle of the project there are numerous people or organizations involved either directly or indirectly. While these type of people and organizations involved are called stakeholders and these may include the project team, client or customer, community, environment, suppliers, government. Stakeholders contribute and share their experiences, knowledge, and insights to support the project throughout its life cycle and therefore it is crucial to capture their input. However, before initiation of the project, stakeholders need to be identified. Following the fact that there are strategies and processes for stakeholder identification, it is not clear what skills are needed to employ those strategies for stakeholder identification. These skills are exceedingly important to have because in today's corporate world, the project team must be flexible in every aspect of their job and be able to complement their skills for the success of stakeholder identification. Using literature review, this paper seeks to describe the skills of project leader needed to identify the project team and the external stakeholders. Inductive approach was followed in this study and data was collected qualitatively using secondary sources. There are two essential skills i.e. relationship building skills and communication skills for internal stakeholders and four major skills i.e. communication skills, people skills, intellectual skills and conceptual skills for external stakeholders are identified for the identification of project stakeholders through literature review considering the sustainability issues in the project management.

  2. Shareholder, stakeholder-owner or broad stakeholder maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Niels

    2004-01-01

    With reference to the discussion about shareholder versus stakeholder maximization it is argued that the normal type of maximization is in fact stakeholder-owner maxi-mization. This means maximization of the sum of the value of the shares and stake-holder benefits belonging to the dominating...... including the shareholders of a company. Although it may be the ultimate goal for Corporate Social Responsibility to achieve this kind of maximization, broad stakeholder maximization is quite difficult to give a precise definition. There is no one-dimensional measure to add different stakeholder benefits...... not traded on the mar-ket, and therefore there is no possibility for practical application. Broad stakeholder maximization instead in practical applications becomes satisfying certain stakeholder demands, so that the practical application will be stakeholder-owner maximization un-der constraints defined...

  3. Part A: An Exploration of Stakeholder Engagement in Social Enterprise

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, Roopam

    2008-01-01

    This report sets out to explore stakeholder engagement as currently practised in social enterprises in Nottingham City. The literature displays confusion about many of the characteristics of social enterprise, but there is overwhelming consensus that social enterprises are built on stakeholder engagement. Given the debate about definitions of and this expectation of stakeholder involvement in Social Enterprise, this report addresses the following questions in the context of three social e...

  4. Microfoundations for stakeholder theory: Managing stakeholders with heterogeneous motives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bridoux, F.; Stoelhorst, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Instrumental stakeholder theory proposes a positive relationship between fairness toward stakeholders and firm performance. Yet, some firms are successful with an arms-length approach to stakeholder management, based on bargaining power rather than fairness. We address this puzzle by relaxing the

  5. Differentiating innovation priorities among stakeholder in hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambooij, Mattijs S; Hummel, Marjan J

    2013-08-16

    Decisions to adopt a particular innovation may vary between stakeholders because individual stakeholders may disagree on the costs and benefits involved. This may translate to disagreement between stakeholders on priorities in the implementation process, possibly explaining the slow diffusion of innovations in health care. In this study, we explore the differences in stakeholder preferences for innovations, and quantify the difference in stakeholder priorities regarding costs and benefits. The decision support technique called the analytic hierarchy process was used to quantify the preferences of stakeholders for nine information technology (IT) innovations in hospital care. The selection of the innovations was based on a literature review and expert judgments. Decision criteria related to the costs and benefits of the innovations were defined. These criteria were improvement in efficiency, health gains, satisfaction with care process, and investments required. Stakeholders judged the importance of the decision criteria and subsequently prioritized the selected IT innovations according to their expectations of how well the innovations would perform for these decision criteria. The stakeholder groups (patients, nurses, physicians, managers, health care insurers, and policy makers) had different preference structures for the innovations selected. For instance, self-tests were one of the innovations most preferred by health care insurers and managers, owing to their expected positive impacts on efficiency and health gains. However, physicians, nurses and patients strongly doubted the health gains of self-tests, and accordingly ranked self-tests as the least-preferred innovation. The various stakeholder groups had different expectations of the value of the nine IT innovations. The differences are likely due to perceived stakeholder benefits of each innovation, and less to the costs to individual stakeholder groups. This study provides a first exploratory quantitative

  6. Multi-stakeholder Virtual Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Niels; Mühlbacher, Hans

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces the special issue on multi-stakeholder virtual dialogue. Research as well as managerial practice in marketing has traditionally focused on single stakeholders and a one-way communication perspective. This special issue takes a novel approach by directing attention...... success. While marketing literature increasingly recognizes that divers stakeholders have an impact on a company''s success, little is known about how virtual multi-stakeholder dialogue changes marketing research and management. This special issue provides insights on what roles stakeholders may play...... to the simultaneous interaction with and of a variety of stakeholders and the fact that customers and other stakeholders of a company can take the initiative to that interaction. Stakeholders can launch a discussion, spread news, participate in value creation, can heavily influence each other and a company''s market...

  7. Introducing the politics of stakeholder influence: A review essay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bakker, F.G.A.; den Hond, F.

    2008-01-01

    If stakeholder theory is to become a full theory of business-society relationships, it will have to develop a better understanding of processes by which stakeholders may gain and hold influence over firms. A better understanding of the political processes involved is required. This paper-as well as

  8. Influence of involvement and motivation to correction on product evaluation: Asymmetry for strong and weak brands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Styśko-Kunkowska Małgorzata A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In previous research, studies on motivated correction in the evaluation of branded products are rare. This experimental study with 246 participants examined how the motivation to correct the impact of brand knowledge influences the product evaluation of actual strong and weak brands in low and high involvement situations. As predicted, asymmetry between the strong and weak brands was observed. After the induction of the motivation to correction, the smaller brand effect occurred only in the cases of low involvement and the weak (negative brand. The effect of motivated correction was smaller than the effect of high involvement; therefore, the overall results suggest that conscious explicit motivation to correction evokes correction only in cases of weak brands under certain circumstances. However, this impact is not as strong as the influence of high motivation or a strong brand, even though explicit instructions are given to avoid the negative influence of the brand.

  9. A Group Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating Parent Involvement in Whole-School Actions to Reduce Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Donna; Lester, Leanne; Pearce, Natasha; Barnes, Amy; Beatty, Shelley

    2018-01-01

    Parents can significantly affect children's peer relationships, including their involvement in bullying. The authors developed and evaluated ways to enhance parents' knowledge, self-efficacy, attitudes, and skills related to parent-child communication about bullying. The 3-year Friendly Schools Friendly Families whole-school intervention included…

  10. Housing Services for Child Welfare-Involved Families: An Initial Evaluation Using Observational Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Patrick J.; Taylor, Jeremy J.; Rufa, Anne K.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of housing services among child welfare-involved families using observational data. Propensity score matching with data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being compared intact families (n = 183) who received housing services 12 months after initial investigation to nontreated families balanced on…

  11. Caregiving in severe mental illness: the psychometric properties of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire in Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goncalves-Pereira, Manuel; van Wijngaarden, Bob; Xavier, Miguel; Papoila, Ana L.; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose M.; Schene, Aart H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Despite the achievements of previous research, caregiving assessments in severe mental illness should be crossculturally validated in order to define risk groups or to evaluate family work. This study reports on the psychometric properties of the European version of the Involvement

  12. Evaluation of autophagy as a mechanism involved in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation of autophagy as a mechanism involved in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injuryHenriquez, A.1, Snow, S.2, Miller, D1.,Schladweiler, M.2 and Kodavanti, U2.1 Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC. 2 EPHD/NHEERL, US EPA, RTP, Durham, NC. ...

  13. Development and oversight of ethical health promotion quality assurance and evaluation activities involving human participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Peter

    2015-12-01

    This paper considers the role of ethics and ethics review processes in the development of health promotion quality assurance and evaluation activities involving human participants. The Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research and associated documents provide the framework for the ethical conduct and independent review of research (including quality assurance and evaluation) involving humans in Australia. Identifying the level of risk to which participants may be exposed by participation in quality assurance and evaluation activities is essential for health promotion workers undertaking such activities. Organisations can establish processes other than review by a Human Research Ethics Committee for negligible and low risk research activities. Health promotion quality assurance and evaluation activities often involve negligible and low risk to participants. Seven triggers that indicate the need for ethics review of quality assurance and evaluation activities and a procedural checklist for developing ethical quality assurance and evaluation activities are provided. Health promotion workers should be familiar with the NHMRC's National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research. When ethical considerations underpin the planning and conduct of all quality assurance and evaluation from the very beginning, the activity is the better for it, independent 'ethics approval' can mostly be secured without much trouble and workers' frustration levels are reduced. So what? Health promotion quality assurance and evaluation activities must be ethically justified. Health promotion workers should be familiar with the NHMRC's National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research and should use it when developing health promotion quality assurance and evaluation activities.

  14. Implementation of Point-of-Care Diagnostics in Rural Primary Healthcare Clinics in South Africa: Perspectives of Key Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashamba-Thompson, Tivani P; Jama, Ngcwalisa A; Sartorius, Benn; Drain, Paul K; Thompson, Rowan M

    2017-01-08

    Key stakeholders' involvement is crucial to the sustainability of quality point-of-care (POC) diagnostics services in low-and-middle income countries. The aim of this study was to explore key stakeholder perceptions on the implementation of POC diagnostics in rural primary healthcare (PHC) clinics in South Africa. We conducted a qualitative study encompassing in-depth interviews with multiple key stakeholders of POC diagnostic services for rural and resource-limited PHC clinics. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim prior to thematic content analysis. Thematic content analysis was conducted using themes guided by the World Health Organisation (WHO) quality-ASSURED (Affordable, Sensitive, Specific, User friendly, Rapid and to enable treatment at first visit and Robust, Equipment free and Delivered to those who need it) criteria for POC diagnostic services in resource-limited settings. 11 key stakeholders participated in the study. All stakeholders perceived the main advantage of POC diagnostics as enabling access to healthcare for rural patients. Stakeholders perceived the current POC diagnostic services to have an ability to meet patients' needs, but recommended further improvement of the following areas: research on cost-effectiveness; improved quality management systems; development of affordable POC diagnostic and clinic-based monitoring and evaluation. Key stakeholders of POC diagnostics in rural PHC clinics in South Africa highlighted the need to assess affordability and ensure quality assurance of current services before adopting new POC diagnostics and scaling up current POC diagnostics.

  15. Multicriteria mapping of stakeholder preferences in regulating nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2010-01-01

    In order to facilitate stakeholder discussions on how to regulate nanotechnology, the opensource program multicriteria mapping (MCM) was used to structure 26 interviews with stakeholders in the USA. MCM offers a systematic part quantitative, part qualitative approach to clarify why some regulatory options (bans, moratoriums, voluntary measures, etc.) were deemed to be acceptable/unacceptable by various stakeholders and which criteria stakeholders used to evaluate the different regulatory options. Adopting an incremental approach and implementing a new regulatory framework was evaluated as the best options whereas a complete ban and no additional regulation of nanotechnology were found to be the least favorable. Criteria applied differed substantially among stakeholders and included social, ethical, regulatory, environmental, and health issues. Opinions on future regulation seem far less polarized than expected and it seems that stakeholders would welcome a combination of voluntary measures, an incremental approach and forming of a new regulatory framework.

  16. Multicriteria mapping of stakeholder preferences in regulating nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2010-08-01

    In order to facilitate stakeholder discussions on how to regulate nanotechnology, the opensource program multicriteria mapping (MCM) was used to structure 26 interviews with stakeholders in the USA. MCM offers a systematic part quantitative, part qualitative approach to clarify why some regulatory options (bans, moratoriums, voluntary measures, etc.) were deemed to be acceptable/unacceptable by various stakeholders and which criteria stakeholders used to evaluate the different regulatory options. Adopting an incremental approach and implementing a new regulatory framework was evaluated as the best options whereas a complete ban and no additional regulation of nanotechnology were found to be the least favorable. Criteria applied differed substantially among stakeholders and included social, ethical, regulatory, environmental, and health issues. Opinions on future regulation seem far less polarized than expected and it seems that stakeholders would welcome a combination of voluntary measures, an incremental approach and forming of a new regulatory framework.

  17. Earning empowerment from stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.T.

    1994-01-01

    If you want to be stopped in your tracks today through political action, litigation or both, then ignore the concerns of stakeholders who believe that they have been or will be adversely impacted by what you want to do. The frustrated attempts by the United States to permanently dispose of its high level radioactive waste confirm this reality. Unless and until fundamental changes are made in the decision making process, the gridlock of litigation and political maneuvering precipitated by efforts to perfect a permanent repository will remain and likely intensify

  18. Stakeholder Relations Office

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Scientists, politicians, the public, school children, our neighbours, you. All of these groups of people have a stake in CERN, and all are important to us.   The list of stakeholders in an organisation as large and complex as CERN is a long and ever lengthening one. Each group has its own specific interests and needs in terms of what kind of information it requires from CERN and how we should engage. It’s important, therefore, for us to ensure that we’re communicating optimally with everyone we care about and who cares about us. This is something that CERN has always taken seriously. The CERN Courier, for example, was first published in 1959 and we had a pro-active public information office right from the start. Today, our stakeholder relations are spread between several groups and teams, reflecting the nature of CERN today. But while we’re already doing a good job, I think we can do better by exploiting the synergies between these teams, and that’s wh...

  19. Stakeholder engagement and knowledge exchange in environmental research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipson, Jeremy; Lowe, Philip; Proctor, Amy; Ruto, Eric

    2012-03-01

    It is commonly put forward that effective uptake of research in policy or practice must be built upon a foundation of active knowledge exchange and stakeholder engagement during the research. However, what is often lacking is a systematic appreciation of the specific practices of knowledge exchange and their relative merits. The paper reports on a 2009 survey of 21 research projects within the UK Research Councils' Rural Economy and Land Use Programme regarding the involvement and perceived impact of over a thousand stakeholders in the research. The survey reveals that most stakeholders were involved as research subjects or as event participants. Large numbers were also engaged in the research process itself, including involvement in shaping the direction of research. Stakeholder engagement is perceived as bringing significant benefits to the process of knowledge production. A close relationship is found between mechanisms and approaches to knowledge exchange and the spread of benefits for researchers and stakeholders. Mutual benefits are gained from exchange of staff or where stakeholders are members of research advisory groups. Different stakeholder sectors are also associated with different patterns of engagement, which lead to contrasting impact patterns. Any efforts to alter knowledge exchange processes and outcomes must overcome these differing engagement tendencies. Overall, much greater attention should be given to early processes of knowledge exchange and stakeholder engagement within the lifetime of research projects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Stakeholder analysis in the management of irrigation in Kampili area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumiati; Ali, M. S. S.; Fahmid, I. M.; Mahyuddin

    2018-05-01

    Irrigation has appreciable contribution in building food security, particularly rice crops. This study aims to analyze the role of stakeholders involved in distributing of irrigation water. The study was conducted in the Kampili Irrigation Area in South Sulawesi Province Indonesia, the data were obtained through observation and interviews with stakeholders involved, and analysed by stakeholder analysis, based on the interests and power held by the actors. This analysis is intended to provide an optimal picture of the expected role of each stakeholder in the management of irrigation resources. The results show that there were many stakeholders involved in irrigation management. In the arrangement of irrigation distribution there was overlapping authority of the stakeholders to its management, every stakeholder had different interests and power between each other. The existence have given positive and negative values in distributing irrigation water management, then in the stakeholder collaboration there was contestation between them. This contestation took place between the agriculture department, PSDA province, the Jeneberang River Region Hall, the Farmers Group and the P3A.

  1. The Role of Fecal Calprotectin in Evaluating Intestinal Involvement of Behçet’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Özşeker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the regions of involvement of Behçet’s disease (BD, a systematic inflammatory vasculitis with unknown etiology, is the gastrointestinal (GI tract. Upper GI endoscopy, colonoscopy, and capsule endoscopy are frequently used methods to diagnose the intestinal involvement of BD. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of fecal calprotectin (FC in the evaluation of intestinal involvement in BD. Material and Method. A total of 30 patients who were diagnosed with BD and had no GI symptoms and 25 individuals in the control group were included in this study. Results. Levels of FC were statistically significantly higher in patients with BD compared to the control group (p<0.001. The correlation analysis performed including FC and markers of disease activity revealed a positive and statistically significant correlation between FC level and CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r: 0.255, p<0.049, and r: 0.404, p<0.001, resp.. FC levels in patients who were detected to have ulcers in the terminal ileum and colon in the colonoscopic examination were statistically significantly higher compared to the patients with BD without intestinal involvement (p=0.01. Conclusion. The measurement of FC levels, in patients with BD who are asymptomatic for GI involvement, may be helpful to detect the possible underlying intestinal involvement.

  2. Implementing stakeholder-informed research in the substance abuse treatment sector: strategies used by Connections, a Canadian knowledge translation and exchange project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Joanna; Sword, Wendy; Niccols, Alison; Dobbins, Maureen

    2014-05-29

    Researcher-stakeholder collaboration has been identified as critical to bridging research and health system change. While collaboration models vary, meaningful stakeholder involvement over time ("integrated knowledge translation") is advocated to improve the relevance of research to knowledge users. This short report describes the integrated knowledge translation efforts of Connections, a knowledge translation and exchange project to improve services for women with substance abuse problems and their children, and implementation barriers and facilitators. Strategies of varying intensities were used to engage diverse stakeholders, including policy makers and people with lived experience, and executive directors, program managers, and service providers from Canadian addiction agencies serving women. Barriers to participation included individual (e.g., interest), organizational (e.g., funding), and system level (e.g., lack of centralized stakeholder database) barriers. Similarly, facilitators included individual (e.g., perceived relevance) and organizational (e.g., support) facilitators, as well as initiative characteristics (e.g., multiple involvement opportunities). Despite barriers, Connections' stakeholder-informed research efforts proved essential for developing clinically relevant and feasible processes, measures, and implementation strategies. Stakeholder-researcher collaboration is possible and robust integrated knowledge translation efforts can be productive. Future work should emphasize developing and evaluating a range of strategies to address stakeholders' knowledge translation needs and to facilitate sustained and meaningful involvement in research.

  3. What it Takes to Successfully Implement Technology for Aging in Place: Focus Groups With Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Sebastiaan Theodorus Michaël; Wouters, Eveline J M; Luijkx, Katrien G; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M

    2016-05-03

    There is a growing interest in empowering older adults to age in place by deploying various types of technology (ie, eHealth, ambient assisted living technology, smart home technology, and gerontechnology). However, initiatives aimed at implementing these technologies are complicated by the fact that multiple stakeholder groups are involved. Goals and motives of stakeholders may not always be transparent or aligned, yet research on convergent and divergent positions of stakeholders is scarce. To provide insight into the positions of stakeholder groups involved in the implementation of technology for aging in place by answering the following questions: What kind of technology do stakeholders see as relevant? What do stakeholders aim to achieve by implementing technology? What is needed to achieve successful implementations? Mono-disciplinary focus groups were conducted with participants (n=29) representing five groups of stakeholders: older adults (6/29, 21%), care professionals (7/29, 24%), managers within home care or social work organizations (5/29, 17%), technology designers and suppliers (6/29, 21%), and policy makers (5/29, 17%). Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. Stakeholders considered 26 different types of technologies to be relevant for enabling independent living. Only 6 out of 26 (23%) types of technology were mentioned by all stakeholder groups. Care professionals mentioned fewer different types of technology than other groups. All stakeholder groups felt that the implementation of technology for aging in place can be considered a success when (1) older adults' needs and wishes are prioritized during development and deployment of the technology, (2) the technology is accepted by older adults, (3) the technology provides benefits to older adults, and (4) favorable prerequisites for the use of technology by older adults exist. While stakeholders seemed to have identical aims, several underlying differences emerged, for example, with regard

  4. Using Principal-Agent Theory as a Framework for Analysis in Evaluating the Multiple Stakeholders Involved in the Accreditation and Quality Assurance of International Medical Branch Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgos, Jill E.

    2013-01-01

    This article applies the theoretical framework of principal-agent theory in order to better understand the complex organisational relationships emerging between entities invested in the establishment and monitoring of cross-border international branch campus medical schools. Using the key constructs of principal-agent theory, information asymmetry…

  5. Evaluation of myocardial involvement in Duchenne's progressive muscular dystrophy with thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Naoki; Sotobata, Iwao; Okada, Mitsuhiro

    1985-01-01

    Myocardial involvement in progressive muscular dystrophy of the Duchenne type was evaluated in 19 patients using thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging. A qualitative analysis was performed from five projection images by three experienced physicians. Distinct perfusion defects were shown in 13 patients, especially in the LV posterolateral or posterior wall (11 patients). There was no significant relationship between the presence of perfusion defects and the skeletal muscle involvements or thoracic deformities assessed by transmission computed tomography. Extensive perfusion defects were shown in 2 patients who died of congestive heart failure 1 to 2 years after the scintigraphic study. Progression of the myocardial scintigraphic abnormalities were considered to be minimal in 7 of 9 patients who underwent two serial scintigraphic studies over 2 to 3 years. It was concluded that thallium myocardial perfusion imaging is a useful clinical technique to assess myocardial involvement in Duchenne's progressive muscular dystrophy. (author)

  6. Internal dose evaluation of workers involved in radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals handling for medical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesar, R.B.P.; Mesquita, C.H. de

    1987-01-01

    The internal dose levels of IPEN workers, involved in the production of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals for medical use are surveyed. In this production, the workers were splited in six group: research and development, routine production, quality control, packaging, radiological protection and maintenance. The internal dose was evaluated according to the models described by ICRP-30, from the results obtained in the whole body counters monitoring. (C.G.C.) [pt

  7. Exploring perceived barriers, drivers, impacts and the need for evaluation of public involvement in health and social care research: a modified Delphi study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snape, D; Kirkham, J; Britten, N; Froggatt, K; Gradinger, F; Lobban, F; Popay, Jennie; Wyatt, K; Jacoby, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore areas of consensus and conflict in relation to perceived public involvement (PI) barriers and drivers, perceived impacts of PI and ways of evaluating PI approaches in health and social care research. Background Internationally and within the UK the recognition of potential benefits of PI in health and social care research is gathering momentum and PI is increasingly identified by organisations as a prerequisite for funding. However, there is relatively little examination of the impacts of PI and how those impacts might be measured. Design Mixed method, three-phase, modified Delphi technique, conducted as part of a larger MRC multiphase project. Sample Clinical and non-clinical academics, members of the public, research managers, commissioners and funders. Findings This study found high levels of consensus about the most important barriers and drivers to PI. There was acknowledgement that tokenism was common in relation to PI; and strong support for the view that demonstrating the impacts and value of PI was made more difficult by tokenistic practice. PI was seen as having intrinsic value; nonetheless, there was clear support for the importance of evaluating its impact. Research team cohesion and appropriate resources were considered essential to effective PI implementation. Panellists agreed that PI can be challenging, but can be facilitated by clear guidance, together with models of good practice and measurable standards. Conclusions This study is the first to present empirical evidence of the opinions voiced by key stakeholders on areas of consensus and conflict in relation to perceived PI barriers and drivers, perceived impacts of PI and the need to evaluate PI. As such it further contributes to debate around best practice in PI, the potential for tokenism and how best to evaluate the impacts of PI. These findings have been used in the development of the Public Involvement Impact Assessment Framework (PiiAF), an online resource which offers

  8. Managing Sustainable Development Conflicts: The Impact of Stakeholders in Small-Scale Hydropower Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkin, Laura Jane; Kemp, Paul S.; Williams, Ian D.; Harwood, Ian A.

    2012-06-01

    The growing importance of the environment and its management has simultaneously emphasized the benefits of hydroelectric power and its environmental costs. In a changing policy climate, giving importance to renewable energy development and environmental protection, conflict potential between stakeholders is considerable. Navigation of conflict determines the scheme constructed, making sustainable hydropower a function of human choice. To meet the needs of practitioners, greater understanding of stakeholder conflict is needed. This paper presents an approach to illustrate the challenges that face small-scale hydropower development as perceived by the stakeholders involved, and how they influence decision-making. Using Gordleton Mill, Hampshire (UK), as an illustrative case, soft systems methodology, a systems modeling approach, was adopted. Through individual interviews, a range of problems were identified and conceptually modeled. Stakeholder bias towards favoring economic appraisal over intangible social and environmental aspects was identified; costs appeared more influential than profit. Conceptual evaluation of the requirements to meet a stakeholder-approved solution suggested a complex linear systems approach, considerably different from the real-life situation. The stakeholders introduced bias to problem definition by transferring self-perceived issues onto the project owner. Application of soft systems methodology caused a shift in project goals away from further investigation towards consideration of project suitability. The challenge of sustainable hydropower is global, with a need to balance environmental, economic, and social concerns. It is clear that in this type of conflict, an individual can significantly influence outcomes; highlighting the need for more structured approaches to deal with stakeholder conflicts in sustainable hydropower development.

  9. Managing sustainable development conflicts: the impact of stakeholders in small-scale hydropower schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkin, Laura Jane; Kemp, Paul S; Williams, Ian D; Harwood, Ian A

    2012-06-01

    The growing importance of the environment and its management has simultaneously emphasized the benefits of hydroelectric power and its environmental costs. In a changing policy climate, giving importance to renewable energy development and environmental protection, conflict potential between stakeholders is considerable. Navigation of conflict determines the scheme constructed, making sustainable hydropower a function of human choice. To meet the needs of practitioners, greater understanding of stakeholder conflict is needed. This paper presents an approach to illustrate the challenges that face small-scale hydropower development as perceived by the stakeholders involved, and how they influence decision-making. Using Gordleton Mill, Hampshire (UK), as an illustrative case, soft systems methodology, a systems modeling approach, was adopted. Through individual interviews, a range of problems were identified and conceptually modeled. Stakeholder bias towards favoring economic appraisal over intangible social and environmental aspects was identified; costs appeared more influential than profit. Conceptual evaluation of the requirements to meet a stakeholder-approved solution suggested a complex linear systems approach, considerably different from the real-life situation. The stakeholders introduced bias to problem definition by transferring self-perceived issues onto the project owner. Application of soft systems methodology caused a shift in project goals away from further investigation towards consideration of project suitability. The challenge of sustainable hydropower is global, with a need to balance environmental, economic, and social concerns. It is clear that in this type of conflict, an individual can significantly influence outcomes; highlighting the need for more structured approaches to deal with stakeholder conflicts in sustainable hydropower development.

  10. Management of Stakeholders in Urban Regeneration Projects. Case Study: Baia-Mare, Transylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina M. Rădulescu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The process of regeneration of abandoned areas or deteriorated structures in the cities of Romania has become a strategy of urban-integrated development. Conversions and/or regeneration of facilities in the form of assets, with different destinations, are part of the new trend of urban regeneration and a strategy used to attract investment capital. The disappearance of mining industry sites in Maramures County, Romania, has allowed the expansion and planning of new spaces for public use and/or semipublic, and most cities have opened new development perspectives. The study is based on empirical research conducted on the brownfields of Baia-Mare City. This research investigates how stakeholders of an urban regeneration project can be more actively involved in the decision-making processes with regard to the strategic elements of the renewal project of Cuprom, as a former mining industry area. This research contributes to the development of the investigation of new types of knowledge of stakeholder analysis and improves the available practices for stakeholder salience. Social networks created and consolidated by stakeholders of an urban regeneration project are the object of analysis, evaluation, and monitoring of the equilibrium between project management and grant of resources and capital. This paper studies the salience of stakeholders of the SEPA-CUPROM project from Baia-Mare using the social networking approach. Visualization by graphical methods of social networking analysis is a useful instrument in the decision-making process of brownfield projects as part of sustainable strategies in Romania.

  11. Multi-stakeholder perspectives in defining health-services quality in cataract care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolk-Vos, Aline C; van de Klundert, Joris J; Maijers, Niels; Zijlmans, Bart L M; Busschbach, Jan J V

    2017-08-01

    To develop a method to define a multi-stakeholder perspective on health-service quality that enables the expression of differences in systematically identified stakeholders' perspectives, and to pilot the approach for cataract care. Mixed-method study between 2014 and 2015. Cataract care in the Netherlands. Stakeholder representatives. We first identified and classified stakeholders using stakeholder theory. Participants established a multi-stakeholder perspective on quality of cataract care using concept mapping, this yielded a cluster map based on multivariate statistical analyses. Consensus-based quality dimensions were subsequently defined in a plenary stakeholder session. Stakeholders and multi-stakeholder perspective on health-service quality. Our analysis identified seven definitive stakeholders, as follows: the Dutch Ophthalmology Society, ophthalmologists, general practitioners, optometrists, health insurers, hospitals and private clinics. Patients, as dependent stakeholders, were considered to lack power by other stakeholders; hence, they were not classified as definitive stakeholders. Overall, 18 stakeholders representing ophthalmologists, general practitioners, optometrists, health insurers, hospitals, private clinics, patients, patient federations and the Dutch Healthcare Institute sorted 125 systematically collected indicators into the seven following clusters: patient centeredness and accessibility, interpersonal conduct and expectations, experienced outcome, clinical outcome, process and structure, medical technical acting and safety. Importance scores from stakeholders directly involved in the cataract service delivery process correlated strongly, as did scores from stakeholders not directly involved in this process. Using a case study on cataract care, the proposed methods enable different views among stakeholders concerning quality dimensions to be systematically revealed, and the stakeholders jointly agreed on these dimensions. The methods

  12. Stakeholder Engagement: Achieving Sustainability in the Construction Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Fearon

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Achieving sustainability-related targets in construction projects is increasingly becoming a key performance driver. Yet sustainability is a complex concept in projects and there are many diverse stakeholders. Some stakeholders are generally recognized as important, i.e., the client and main contractor, yet there are others not always perceived as such and whose absence from the decision-making processes may result in a failure to address sustainability issues. Hence there is a need for a systematic approach to engage with stakeholders with high salience in relation to sustainability. This paper reports the results of an exploratory study involving interviews with construction project practitioners that are involved in sustainability in some way. Data were collected from the practitioners in terms of the processes for engaging with stakeholders to deliver sustainability. The data suggests six steps to a stakeholder engagement process: (i identification; (ii relating stakeholders to different sustainability-related targets; (iii prioritization; (iv managing; (v measuring performance; and (vi putting targets into action. The results suggest that understanding the different sustainability agendas of stakeholders and measuring their performance using key performance indicators are important stages to be emphasized in any stakeholder engagement process to achieve sustainability-related goals.

  13. Patient-centred outcomes research: perspectives of patient stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatre, Sumedha; Gallo, Joseph J; Wittink, Marsha; Schwartz, J Sanford; Jayadevappa, Ravishankar

    2017-11-01

    To elicit patient stakeholders' experience and perspectives about patient-centred care. Qualitative. A large urban healthcare system. Four patient stakeholders who are prostate cancer survivors. Experience and perspectives of patient stakeholders regarding patient-centred care and treatment decisions. Our patient stakeholders represented a diverse socio-demographic group. The patient stakeholders identified engagement and dialogue with physicians as crucial elements of patient-centred care model. The degree of patient-centred care was observed to be dependent on the situations. High severity conditions warranted a higher level of patient involvement, compared to mild conditions. They agreed that patient-centred care should not mean that patients can demand inappropriate treatments. An important attribute of patient-centred outcomes research model is the involvement of stakeholders. However, we have limited knowledge about the experience of patient stakeholders in patient-centred outcomes research. Our study indicates that patient stakeholders offer a unique perspective as researchers and policy-makers aim to precisely define patient-centred research and care.

  14. Stakeholder Participation in System Change: A New Conceptual Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Tammy; Higuchi, Kathryn S; Hogg, William

    2016-08-01

    A recent change in Canada's primary care system led to the introduction of Nurse Practitioner-Led clinics. The literature suggests that stakeholders can influence system change initiatives. However, very little is known about healthcare stakeholder motivations, particularly stakeholders who are seen as resistors to change. To examine stakeholder participation in the system change process that led to the introduction of the first Nurse Practitioner-Led clinic in Ontario. This single case study included two site visits, semistructured individual tape-recorded interviews, and the examination of relevant public documents. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. Sixteen individuals from different healthcare sectors and professions participated in the interviews and 20 documents were reviewed. Six key themes emerged from the data. Linking Evidence to Action The findings from the study present a new perspective on stakeholder participation that includes both those who supported the proposed change and those who advocated for a different change. The findings identify stakeholder activities used to shape, share, and protect their visions for system change. The conceptual model presented in this study adds to the understanding of challenges and complexities involved in healthcare system change. Understanding why and how stakeholders participate in change can help healthcare leaders in planning activities to enhance stakeholder involvement in healthcare system change. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  15. National Automated Highway System Consortium: Modeling Stakeholder Preferences Project

    OpenAIRE

    Lathrop, John; Chen, Kan

    1997-01-01

    This document is the final report of the Modeling Stakeholder Preferences Project. The results of the project consist of three results: 1) evaluation framework; 2) focus group non-quantitative findings/ recommendations; and, 3) performance/impact measures, their endpoints, rankings and weights, for each stakeholder group.

  16. Integrating Environmental and Stakeholder Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2001-01-01

    Regulation has been an important instrument in pushing the business community towards im-proved environmental performance. However, there has also been increasing pressure from a growing number of stakeholders, including employees, customers, neighbours and NGOs, etc. In order to improve corporate...... relationships with various stakeholders, companies need to be able to identify these stakeholders and assess their influence. The first part of this paper will discuss the relevant theory and introduce a model to analyse and identify the most significant stakeholder groups and their influence on corporate...

  17. Evaluation of an educational exhibition on global issues and consumer responsibility: From involvement to hopelessness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Činčera

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the evaluation of an interactive exhibition for secondary education students (15-19 years old, focusing on global problems and consumer responsibility. The evaluation was conducted in three schools. Data were obtained from interviews with teachers (N=3 and questionnaires (N=204 distributed among students after the exhibition. For the analysis, both quantitative and qualitative approaches were used. The results suggest that the exhibition was successful in terms of involving students and increasing their awareness of the problems. Some students evaluated the exhibition as manipulative. An unintended effect of the exhibition was students’ feeling of hopelessness. This article discusses the results and suggests a change in strategy when dealing with global problems in schools.

  18. Stakeholders and Apart Hotels: Multiple Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Kyoko Wada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Means of accommodation involve a wide range of social actors and agents, as well as different business models. Management strategies in this sector have been increasingly important for long-term sustainability and competitiveness of business organizations. This study aims to analyze the interactions between apart-hotels and their stakeholders to foster an improvement of services provided, aligning the interface of strategic management from the point of view of managers and their key stakeholders. It is an exploratory study, with qualitative chacter, along with multiple case studies of the following establishments: Travel Inn, Hotels Slaviero and Etoile george v. Brazilian enterprises, which manage lodging facilities with apart-hotel concepts, combining features that enable comparative analysis of the study. For conceptual understanding, this study was based on literature about stakeholders, taking the work of Freeman (1984 and Freeman et al (2010 as main references. The research was conducted through semi-structured interviews with managers of lodging facilities and their key stakeholders and through direct observation and documentation. We found that not all groups of influence are considered in the planning of service flats. However, the organizations surveyed indicated that the market has realized the importance of the groups that exert influence and are influenced by their goals, and are therefore increasingly alert for integration of such groups in their strategic planning.

  19. Collaborative Stakeholder Engagement. Special Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Matt; Chrislip, David; Workman, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Stakeholder engagement and collaboration are essential to the development of an effective state plan. Engaging a diverse group of stakeholders tasked with working together to create education policies that will have a positive, lasting impact on students is not as easy as it sounds. Experts in the field argue that the traditional stakeholder…

  20. Stakeholder relations and financial performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, B.; Zhou, Y.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze how shareholder performance can be associated with stakeholder relations. As such, we try to find out whether there is an association between financial performance and stakeholder relations with respect to different theoretical notions about the firm. Financial performance is

  1. Stakeholder orientation vs. shareholder value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Caspar

    2003-01-01

    management in listed firms and other traditional remedies. The theoretical insightsare applied on a case from the Danish Supreme Court (Louis Poulsen A/S) where theinterests of the stakeholders were decisive. However, it is shown that the verdict mayinstead harm the relevant stakeholders illustrating how...

  2. Evaluating public involvement in the National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The Department of Energy contracted with the Keystone Center to evaluate the effectiveness of the National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program's public-involvement efforts. The Center chose six evaluators with diverse training and experience related to low-level waste management and public-participation programs. Keystone's evaluation was based on (a) observations by the evaluators who attended the National Program-sponsored strategy review meetings and fairs; (b) interviews with low-level waste generators, local government officials, state legislators, public-interest groups, and members of the general public; and (c) observations of the final National Program strategy task force meeting. The evaluators concluded that, overall, the public-participation processes yielded some very positive results - for policy development and for DOE and the EG and G staff. They judged the strategy document to be complete, concise, and helpful to public dialogue on low-level waste issues. They also made specific recommendations for improvements to the public-participation program

  3. Evaluating public involvement in the national low-level radioactive-waste-management program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    An extensive public involvement approach has been developed to obtain the views and assistance of state and local governments, citizen groups, industry, professional societies and other organizations in the preparation and review of a national strategy document on low-level radioactive wastes. Six evaluators who have a wide diversity of backgrounds were selected to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach. This final report presents findings discussed under the headings: Introduction to the Recent History of Low-level Waste Policy Development (LLWMP) and the Role of Public Participation; Public Participation Mechanisms Employed in Preparing the National Strategy Document; the Keystone's Evaluation Process; and Findings. The overall evaluation of the process was very positive. It was clear that the LLWMP staff was seriously committed to building a credible public participation process. The evaluation team was provided rough cost figures for the various components of the LLWMP effort and concluded that, in its opinion, the public participation process provided benefits to the federal government that exceeded its costs. Moreover, the costs of the individual components were not out of line with each one's usefulness and contribution to the overall effort

  4. Evaluation of venous involvement with oral and neck legions by CT-angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Yasuhiko; Hiraoka, Takashi; Sato, Tsuyoshi; Noikura, Takenori [Kagoshima Univ. Dental School (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Intravenous contrast enhancements were employed in eight cases at CT to evaluate the involvement of head and neck lesions at the neck artery and vein. Cases were branchial cyst, inflammation of the oral floor, a hemangioma, and five malignant tumors. A total of 100 ml contrast enhancement media (240 mg/ml iodine) was injected using a automatic injector at a speed of 0.7-1.0 ml/sec. A spiral CT (Somatom Plus, Siemens, Germany) was used in this study. Spiral scans with 3-5 mm slice thickness and the table speed of 3-5 mm/rotations were performed at data acquisition. Three scans were usually performed before, during, and just after enhancement. Images were reconstructed every one or two mm from the data during enhancement. The relations between the lesions and artery and vein were observed using cine-mode display. The results showed that involvement with malignant tumor: Two cases which were diagnosed as free from involvement with tumors at artery were correctly diagnosed in corresponding to clinical findings at surgery and follow-up examination. Other three cases were diagnosed as having tumors at the arteries. In case No. 5, diagnosed as having tumor involvement, the external carotid artery was shown at surgery to be free from infiltration. Other diseases: CT images offer useful information about the vessels in cases of cyst or inflammation. High enhancement effect of tumor was also helpful for the diagnosis of hemangioma. The result indicated that spiral scan and cine-mode display were useful to identify the veins and arteries. For the more accurate diagnosis of tumor involvement, method or diagnostic criterion that could reduce the false-positive case are requested. (author)

  5. Evaluation of Stomach Involvement of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sevki Uyanik

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gastrointestinal tract is the most common site of involvement in non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. Appropriate treatment regiments were not defined because of rare involvement. In the present study we aimed to evaluate treatment response of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma patients with stomach involvement.    Methodology: 26 patients with stomach involvement were retrospectively analyzed between 01/01/1998 and 01/06/2014. Descriptive statistic was performed to analyze data.Results: 20 of the patients (76.9% were composed of primary stomach non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 6 of the patients (23.1% were composed of patients secondary involvement of the advanced stage disease. All of the patients were subtypes of B cell lymphoma. 3 of the patients (11.5% was indolent, 22 of the patients (84.6% was aggressive, and 1 of them (3.8% was very aggressive. Diffuse large B cell lymphoma was 72.9%; Maltoma was 8.7%, and Mantle cell lymphoma was %3.8. Complete response was achieved at 10 patients, partial response was achieved in 1 patient, and 7 patients were failed to response the treatment. Treatment response, and overall survival of low grade and high grade patients, both according to Ann-Arbor and Lugano classification systems were similar. Patients with elevated sedimentation rate had significant lower survival than patients with normal sedimentation rate (p=0.027.Discussion: Together with the data from recent studies, aggressive treatment approach without organ preservation should not be performed on patients without higher inflammatory response and early stage presentation. Sedimentation rate might help to clinicians for the treatment of choice. 

  6. Evaluate More General Integrals Involving Universal Associated Legendre Polynomials via Taylor's Theorem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.Ya(n)ez-Navarro; Guo-Hua Sun; Dong-Sheng Sun; Chang-Yuan Chen; Shi-Hai Dong

    2017-01-01

    A few important integrals involving the product of two universal associated Legendre polynomials Pl'm'(x),Pk'n'(x) and x2a(1-x2)-p-1,xb(1 ±x)-p-1 and xc(1-x2)-p-1 (1 ±-x) are evaluated using the operator form of Taylor's theorem and an integral over a single universal associated Legendre polynomial.These integrals are more general since the quantum numbers are unequal,i.e.l'≠ k'and m'≠ n'.Their selection rules are also given.We also verify the correctness of those integral formulas numerically.

  7. Development of a new simulation code for evaluation of criticality transients involving fissile solution boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basoglu, Benan; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Okuno, Hiroshi; Nomura, Yasushi

    1998-03-01

    In this work, we report on the development of a new computer code named TRACE for predicting the excursion characteristics of criticality excursions involving fissile solutions. TRACE employs point neutronics coupled with simple thermal-hydraulics. The temperature, the radiolytic gas effects, and the boiling phenomena are estimated using the transient heat conduction equation, a lumped-parameter energy model, and a simple boiling model, respectively. To evaluate the model, we compared our results with the results of CRAC experiments. The agreement in these comparisons is quite satisfactory. (author)

  8. Open Innovation and Stakeholder Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Wayne Gould

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paradox of open innovation lies in the conflict between the practical desire to reap the benefits of open innovation and concern over the risk that others will misappropriate those benefits. Stakeholder theory and recent developments in value creation through stakeholder engagement can assist with reconciliation of this inherent structural risk. The limitations of existing open innovation typologies are identified, and a process-based model of open innovation is proposed. The model is then expanded to include stakeholder engagement. When integrated with stakeholder engagement, open innovation processes can be understood to generate benefits beyond the acquisition of specific information sought from external experts. The addition of stakeholder engagement to the open innovation model allows for greater understanding and easier acceptance of the risks inherent in the open innovation process.

  9. Stakeholder Thinking in Sustainability Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Hove Henriksen, Morten; Frier, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The objective of the paper is to describe and discuss how the biotech company Novozymes integrates stakeholder thinking into everyday sustainability practices. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on first-hand experiences as well as secondary information from Novozymes' sta...... to make sense of stakeholder thinking. Originality/value – The contribution of this paper is to provide a detailed analysis of how various stakeholder relations management methods can be used in practice to integrate sustainability in an organisation.......' stakeholder-oriented sustainability activities. Findings – The paper illustrates how a company is striving to transform the general stakeholder principles into concrete, manageable actions. Moreover, the paper describes some of the needs, challenges, and paradoxes experienced by an organisation that is trying...

  10. Online Company-stakeholder Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Rikke Augustinus; Morsing, Mette

    Based on a systematic data collection we study one of the first pioneering company-stakeholder communication campaigns in social media: the case of energy company Vattenfall A/S’s pan-European campaign ‘The Climate Manifesto’. Our findings challenge the general assumption, that stakeholder...... lacked between the company and stakeholders. Vattenfall was accused of green-washing, resulting in a communications crisis. Negative stakeholder reactions consisted of prejudiced and non-negotiable argumentation indicating that social media imposes new managerial challenges since communication processes...... technologies and we question to what extent social media serve the enhancement of improved understandings across corporate and civil society on CSR issues. This paper suggests that managers face a risk of the “double-edge of stakeholder communication” when incorporating social media into their CSR strategies...

  11. Analyzing stakeholder preferences for managing elk and bison at the National Elk Refuge and Grand Teton National Park: An example of the disparate stakeholder management approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Lynne; Hoag, Dana L.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and the National Park Service (NPS) are preparing a management plan for bison and elk inhabiting the National Elk Refuge (NER) and Grand Teton National Park (GTNP) near Jackson Hole, Wyoming. A management plan is needed to evaluate current and possible changes to habitat management, disease management, winter feeding and hunting programs related to the NER and GTNP. In order to make good decisions, managers need to incorporate the opinions and values of the involved stakeholders as well as understand the complex institutional constraints and opportunities that influence the decision making process. Federal, state, local, private and public stakeholders have diverse values and preferences about how to use and manage resources, and underlying institutional factors give certain stakeholders more influence over the outcome. How stakeholders use their influence can greatly affect the time, effort and costs of the decision making process. The overall result will depend both on the stakeholder’s relative power and level of conviction for their preferences.

  12. Implementation of Point-of-Care Diagnostics in Rural Primary Healthcare Clinics in South Africa: Perspectives of Key Stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tivani P. Mashamba-Thompson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Key stakeholders’ involvement is crucial to the sustainability of quality point-of-care (POC diagnostics services in low-and-middle income countries. The aim of this study was to explore key stakeholder perceptions on the implementation of POC diagnostics in rural primary healthcare (PHC clinics in South Africa. Method: We conducted a qualitative study encompassing in-depth interviews with multiple key stakeholders of POC diagnostic services for rural and resource-limited PHC clinics. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim prior to thematic content analysis. Thematic content analysis was conducted using themes guided by the World Health Organisation (WHO quality-ASSURED (Affordable, Sensitive, Specific, User friendly, Rapid and to enable treatment at first visit and Robust, Equipment free and Delivered to those who need it criteria for POC diagnostic services in resource-limited settings. Results: 11 key stakeholders participated in the study. All stakeholders perceived the main advantage of POC diagnostics as enabling access to healthcare for rural patients. Stakeholders perceived the current POC diagnostic services to have an ability to meet patients’ needs, but recommended further improvement of the following areas: research on cost-effectiveness; improved quality management systems; development of affordable POC diagnostic and clinic-based monitoring and evaluation. Conclusions: Key stakeholders of POC diagnostics in rural PHC clinics in South Africa highlighted the need to assess affordability and ensure quality assurance of current services before adopting new POC diagnostics and scaling up current POC diagnostics.

  13. FINANCIAL POSITION AND ITS RELEVANCE TO STAKEHOLDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRON VASILE-CRISTIAN-IOACHIM

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The financial position of an economic entity is a concept that can have different meanings, depending on the stakeholder category that make its analysis. In energy sector, which is considered of high importance in the national economy, we consider that the most important category of stakeholder is the state (government, because ensuring the functionality of this sector is an crucial condition for development of others sectors from national economy. For this reason, we can look at the informational needs of other stakeholder categories trough the state’s “sine qua non” condition to ensure the optimal functionality of this sector, which manifests itself like this: the functioning of the sector involves the attraction of investors, the functioning of the sector involves the existence of human resources, the functioning of the sector cannot be ensured without the existence of commercial relations that involves suppliers and clients and for insuring the functioning of the sector it is often require various financing sources. All those aspects are giving raise to some categories of stakeholder interested over the parameters in which the energy sector entities are functioning, one of the interest domain being the financial position of the companies activating in its field. Over the present study we had in view to highlight the main present approaches regarding the concept of financial position, but also the main issues fallowed by the main stakeholder categories in their attempt to appreciate the financial position of the entities activating in energy sector which are listed to Bucharest Stock Exchange. The results of this study have showed that there is some base requirements regarding the informational needs of stakeholder regarding the financial position of the companies activating in energy sector, and those are related to the concepts of going concern, overall solvency ratio, general liquidity ratio and indebtedness degree. After this study

  14. Statistical evaluation of the analytical method involved in French nuclear glasses leaching rate determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broudic, V.; Marques, C.; Bonnal, M

    2004-07-01

    Chemical durability studies of nuclear glasses involves a large number of water leaching experiments at different temperatures and pressures on both, glasses doped with fission products and actinides and non radioactive surrogates. The leaching rates of these glasses are evaluated through ICPAES analysis of the leachate over time. This work presents a statistical evaluation of the analysis method used to determine the concentrations of various vitreous matrix constituents: Si, B, Na, Al, Ca, Li as major elements and Ba, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Sr, Zn, Zr as minor elements. Calibration characteristics, limits of detection, limits of quantification and uncertainties quantification are illustrated with different examples of analysis performed on surrogates and on radioactive leachates in glove box. (authors)

  15. Statistical evaluation of the analytical method involved in French nuclear glasses leaching rate determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broudic, V.; Marques, C.; Bonnal, M.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical durability studies of nuclear glasses involves a large number of water leaching experiments at different temperatures and pressures on both, glasses doped with fission products and actinides and non radioactive surrogates. The leaching rates of these glasses are evaluated through ICPAES analysis of the leachate over time. This work presents a statistical evaluation of the analysis method used to determine the concentrations of various vitreous matrix constituents: Si, B, Na, Al, Ca, Li as major elements and Ba, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Sr, Zn, Zr as minor elements. Calibration characteristics, limits of detection, limits of quantification and uncertainties quantification are illustrated with different examples of analysis performed on surrogates and on radioactive leachates in glove box. (authors)

  16. A multi-actor multi-criteria framework to assess the stakeholder support for different biofuel options: The case of Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcksin, Laurence; Macharis, Cathy; Lebeau, Kenneth; Boureima, Faycal; Van Mierlo, Joeri; Bram, Svend; De Ruyck, Jacques; Mertens, Lara; Jossart, Jean-Marc; Gorissen, Leen; Pelkmans, Luc

    2011-01-01

    The multi-actor multi-criteria analysis (MAMCA) is a methodology to evaluate different policy measures, whereby different stakeholders' opinions are explicitly taken into account. In this paper, the framework is used to assess several biofuel options for Belgium that can contribute to the binding target of 10% renewable fuels in transport by 2020, issued by the Renewable Energy Directive (RED). Four biofuel options (biodiesel, ethanol, biogas and synthetic biodiesel (also referred to as 'biomass-to-liquid' or BTL)) together with a reference fossil fuel option, are evaluated on the aims and objectives of the different stakeholders involved in the biofuel supply chain (feedstock producers, biofuel producers, fuel distributors, end users, vehicle manufacturers, government, NGOs and North-South organizations). Overall, the MAMCA provided insights in the stakeholder's position and possible implementation problems for every biofuel option. As such, it helps decision makers in establishing a supportive policy framework to facilitate implementation and to ensure market success, once they have decided on which biofuel option (or combination of options) to implement. - Research Highlights: → Stakeholder support is an indispensable factor for market success of biofuels. → A MAMCA explicitly includes stakeholder visions in the decision-making process. → The MAMCA shows strengths and weaknesses of alternatives for different stakeholders. →Information on stakeholder's position helps to establish implementation pathways. → Policy makers should focus on combination of biofuel options to reach EU 2020 target.

  17. Stakeholders and Radiation Protection in Today's World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rick Jones, C.; Lochard, J.; Lazo, T.

    2006-01-01

    In looking forward the C.R.P.P.H.(Nea 's Committee on radiation protection and public health) identified three influences that will condition the way we address emerging issues, and will alter how we address ongoing issues. These are the involvement of stakeholders in decision making processes, the evolution of radiological protection science and its changing place in risk assessment and management, and the experience gained in implementing the current system of radiological protection. First among there is the growing importance of stakeholder involvement in radiation protection decision making. This has affected the way that the principles of justification, optimization and limitation are viewed, the way the role of the radiation protection professional in risk assessment and management is viewed, and the relative importance of case specific circumstances in relation to harmonized, internationally accepted criteria. In the wake of this change, the international system of radiological protection is being updated by the ICRP, and discussions of the most appropriate direction to take are nearing their end. Second, radiological protection science continues to identify specific aspects that do not fit the conventional linear non threshold model, and which us to consider that, at the very least, the risks from different exposures and exposure situations may not be as simply and universally comparable assumed. This will affect the way that risks are managed, and all relevant stakeholder involvement processes. In addition, decisions relating to public, worker and environmental health and safety are increasingly seen as judgement social choices. Although such choices must be guided by an understanding of state-of-the-art scientific and its uncertainties, the final, choice will generally be made by society, not scientists. Third, since the issuance of ICRP Publication 60 in 1990, and the International Basic Safety Standards in 1996, extensive experience has been amassed in

  18. Evaluation of cardiac involvement using radionuclide myuocardial imaging in patients with Takayasu arteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Minfu; Guo Xinhua; He Zuoxiang; Jiang Xiongjing; Dou Kefei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the value of radionuclide myocardial imaging in the evaluation of cardiac involvement in patients with Takayasu arteritis (TA). Methods: The 99 Tc m -methoxyisobutylisonitrile myocardial perlusion imaging (MIBI-MPI) and (or) 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET imaging findings in 12 TA patients [3 men and 9 women, mean age (35 ± 15) years] with coronary lesions (CL; n=8) or aortic insufficiency (AI; n=4) were retrospectively reviewed and analysed. Of the 4 AI-TA patients, 1 underwent exercise MIBI-MPI, 1 underwent pharmacologic stress MIBI-MPI and 2 un- derwent resting MIBI-MPI. Of the 8 CL-TA patients, 4 pnderwent MIBI-MPI (2 stress and 2 rest) and 4 un- derwent a dual-isotope simultaneous acquisition (DISA) SPECT protocol after injection of MIBI and FDG. Results: All 4 AI-TA patients showed left ventricular enlargement but no peffusion abnormalities. In 3 CL- TA patients with no documented infarct, MPI or DISA showed stress ischemia (n=2) or mismatched perfusion-metabolism defects (n=1). In the remaining 5 CL-TA patients with documented infarcts, 2 showed large perfusion defects on resting MIBI and 3 showed matched perfusion-metabolism defects on DISA SPECT. Conclusion: Radionuclide imaging is useful in providing a comprehensive functional evaluation for TA patients with cardiac involvement. (authors)

  19. Evaluation of skeletal muscular involvement in neuromuscular disorders with thallium-201 whole body scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Sotobata, Iwao; Indo, Toshikatsu; Matsuoka, Yukihiko; Matsushima, Hideo; Suzuki, Akio; Abe, Tetsutaro; Sakuma, Sadayuki

    1986-01-01

    The extent as well as severity of pathologic changes of skeletal muscles were analyzed with thallium-201 whole body scintigraphy (WBS) in 29 cases of various types of neuromuscular diseases (18 cases of myogenic and 11 cases of neurogenic muscular diseases) and 14 cases of normal controls. After intravenous injection of 2 mCi of thallium-201 chloride, WBS was performed for 15 minutes using a gamma camera with twin-opposed large rectangular detectors. Counts at brachia, forearms, thighs, and calves were assessed after reconstruction of the scintigram of the whole body by taking the geometric mean of the anterior and posterior data. WBS showed uniform tracer activities in the 4 extremities in 12 cases among 14 controls. Laterality in distribution of counts of both legs and arms was noted in the remaining 2 controls. WBS revealed decrease of perfusion in the extremities with muscular atrophy and/or weakness in neuromuscular diseases. The overall diagnostic accuracy of WBS for evaluation of skeletal muscle involvement was 75 to 80 % except for the bilateral brachia for which it decreased to 65 %. All of the three cases of muscular dystrophy with pseudohypertrophy of the calves or thighs showed unequivocal decrease of perfusion of those regions in WBS. In conclusion, thallium-201 WBS was considered to be a useful clinical means in evaluating the extent and severity of muscular involvement of various types of neuromuscular disorders. (author)

  20. An Investigation of the Relationship between Involvement in and Use of Evaluation in Three Multi-Site Evaluations when Those Involved Are Not the Primary Intended Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseland, Denise L.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation research describes an investigation that explores the nature of the relationship between participation in evaluation and the use of evaluation findings and processes within three large-scale multisite evaluations. The purpose of this study is to test whether assumptions and theories about participation translate into evaluation…

  1. Evaluation of common variants in 16 genes involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release in ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Mora, Cristina; Cormand, Bru; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Hervás, Amaia; Bosch, Rosa; Palomar, Glòria; Nogueira, Mariana; Gómez-Barros, Núria; Richarte, Vanesa; Corrales, Montse; Garcia-Martinez, Iris; Corominas, Roser; Guijarro, Silvina; Bigorra, Aitana; Bayés, Mònica; Casas, Miguel; Ribasés, Marta

    2013-06-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurobehavioral disorder characterized by inappropriate difficulties to sustain attention, control impulses and modulate activity level. Although ADHD is one of the most prevalent childhood psychiatric disorders, it also persists into adulthood in around 30-50% of the cases. Based on the effect of psychostimulants used in the pharmacological treatment of ADHD, dysfunctions in neuroplasticity mechanisms and synapses have been postulated to be involved in the pathophysiology of ADHD. With this background, we evaluated, both in childhood and adulthood ADHD, the role of several genes involved in the control of neurotransmitter release through synaptic vesicle docking, fusion and recycling processes by means of a population-based association study. We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms across 16 genes in a clinical sample of 950 ADHD patients (506 adults and 444 children) and 905 controls. Single and multiple-marker analyses identified several significant associations after correcting for multiple testing with a false discovery rate (FDR) of 15%: (i) the SYT2 gene was strongly associated with both adulthood and childhood ADHD (p=0.001, OR=1.49 (1.18-1.89) and p=0.007, OR=1.37 (1.09-1.72), respectively) and (ii) STX1A was found associated with ADHD only in adults (p=0.0041; OR=1.28 (1.08-1.51)). These data provide preliminary evidence for the involvement of genes that participate in the control of neurotransmitter release in the genetic predisposition to ADHD through a gene-system association study. Further follow-up studies in larger cohorts and deep-sequencing of the associated genomic regions are required to identify sequence variants directly involved in ADHD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  2. How stakeholders view the use of analogues in safety cases: PAMINA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherton, Elizabeth; Bailey, Lucy

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this presentation is to provide an overview of some research that has been undertaken in the UK to investigate stakeholders' views of analogues. There are various reasons for using analogues including: to try and explain difficult concepts; to compare disposal facility features with familiar and/or natural systems; to provide an alternative, non-numerical line of reasoning to support the Safety Case conclusions; to provide evidence of behaviour over very long timescales, that cannot be achieved in the laboratory. There are some dangers when using analogues that people should be aware of: the analogue conditions may not be the same as those found in a disposal facility, so the analogue may have limited application. Some analogues may have negative implications, for example artefacts that have corroded. Analogues can be taken too far and used in inappropriate ways to try and support an assumption. So it is important to find out how stakeholders view the use of analogues in a safety case. NDA is involved in an EC funded project called Pamina (Performance Assessment Methodologies in Application). The project involves 26 partners from 11 European countries, plus other associated members and runs for 3 years from October 2006 to October 2009. The NDA is involved in several parts of the project: Exploring issues of modelling uncertainty; Evaluating effectiveness of approaches for communicating safety cases with stakeholders. NDA ran a workshop in October 2007 in Manchester. The aims of the workshop were to explore how different methods of communicating aspects of a safety case were received by stakeholders. The workshop presented stakeholders with: Examples of different repository concepts; Descriptions of barrier performance; Different ways of presenting numerical results; Use of natural analogues

  3. Evaluating patient and public involvement in health research: from theoretical model to practical workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Andy; Welsman, Jo; Britten, Nicky

    2017-10-01

    There is a growing literature on evaluating aspects of patient and public involvement (PPI). We have suggested that at the core of successful PPI is the dynamic interaction of different forms of knowledge, notably lay and professional. We have developed a four-dimensional theoretical framework for understanding these interactions. We explore the practical utility of the theoretical framework as a tool for mapping and evaluating the experience of PPI in health services research. We conducted three workshops with different PPI groups in which participants were invited to map their PPI experiences on wall charts representing the four dimensions of our framework. The language used to describe the four dimensions was modified to make it more accessible to lay audiences. Participants were given sticky notes to indicate their own positions on the different dimensions and to write explanatory comments if they wished. Participants' responses were then discussed and analysed as a group. The three groups were distinctive in their mapped responses suggesting different experiences in relation to having a strong or weak voice in their organization, having few or many ways of getting involved, addressing organizational or public concerns and believing that the organization was willing to change or not. The framework has practical utility for mapping and evaluating PPI interactions and is sensitive to differences in PPI experiences within and between different organizations. The workshops enabled participants to reflect collaboratively on their experiences with a view to improving PPI experiences and planning for the future. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Involving youth with disabilities in the development and evaluation of a new advocacy training: Project TEAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Jessica; Barth, Yishai; Curtis, Katie; Livingston, Kit; O'Neil, Madeline; Smith, Zach; Vallier, Samantha; Wolfe, Ashley

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes a participatory research process in which six youth with disabilities (Youth Panel) participated in the development and evaluation of a manualized advocacy training, Project TEAM (Teens making Environment and Activity Modifications). Project TEAM teaches youth with disabilities how to identify environmental barriers, generate solutions, and request accommodations. The Youth Panel conducted their evaluation after the university researcher implemented Project TEAM with three groups of trainees. The Youth Panel designed and administered a survey and focus group to evaluate enjoyment and usefulness of Project TEAM with support from an advocate/researcher. Members of the Youth Panel analyzed survey response frequencies. The advocate/researcher conducted a content analysis of the open-ended responses. Sixteen of 21 Project TEAM trainees participated in the evaluation. The evaluation results suggest that the trainees found the interactive and individualized aspects of the Project TEAM most enjoyable and useful. Some instructional materials were difficult for trainees with cognitive disabilities to understand. The Youth Panel's involvement in the development of Project TEAM may explain the relatively positive experiences reported by trainees. Project TEAM should continue to provide trainees with the opportunity to apply concepts in real-life situations. Project TEAM requires revisions to ensure it is enjoyable and useful for youth with a variety of disabilities. • Group process strategies, picture-based data collection materials, peer teamwork, and mentorship from adults with disabilities can enable youth with disabilities to engage in research. • Collaborating with youth with disabilities in the development of new rehabilitation approaches may enhance the relevance of interventions for other youth with disabilities. • Youth with cognitive disabilities participating in advocacy and environment-focused interventions may prefer interactive and

  5. A Stakeholder Approach to Media Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anker Brink

    2016-01-01

    Historically, government regulation has significantly impacted the room for manoeuvre enjoyed by media managers, especially in public service media but increasingly also in privately owned firms. Currently stakeholders of many different kinds attempt to influence media industries, using a number...... of the world arguably features the most complex and continuous development in these aspects. Our particular interest investigates media governance, which is not understood as an external given but considered as a premise of strategic management. It is argued that to secure an appropriate remit for an industry...... or firm to that guarantees a longer-term licence to operate, media managers must engage different audiences and authorities in relation to restrictive as well as prescriptive regulation. Achieving that requires approaching media governance from a stakeholder perspective, which inherently involves a broad...

  6. Identifying non-traditional stakeholders with whom to engage, when mitigating antimicrobial resistance in foodborne pathogens (Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majowicz, Shannon E; Parmley, E Jane; Carson, Carolee; Pintar, Katarina

    2018-03-12

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a critical public health issue that involves interrelationships between people, animals, and the environment. Traditionally, interdisciplinary efforts to mitigate AMR in the food chain have involved public health, human and veterinary medicine, and agriculture stakeholders. Our objective was to identify a more diverse range of stakeholders, beyond those traditionally engaged in AMR mitigation efforts, via diagramming both proximal and distal factors impacting, or impacted by, use and resistance along the Canadian food chain. We identified multiple stakeholders that are not traditionally engaged by public health when working to mitigate AMR in the food chain, including those working broadly in the area of food (e.g., nutrition, food security, international market economists) and health (e.g., health communication, program evaluation), as well as in domains as diverse as law, politics, demography, education, and social innovation. These findings can help researchers and policymakers who work on issues related to AMR in the food chain to move beyond engaging the 'traditional' agri-food stakeholders (e.g., veterinarians, farmers), to also engage those from the wider domains identified here, as potential stakeholders in their AMR mitigation efforts.

  7. Cultivating stakeholder interaction in emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, W.J.; Brownell, L.F.

    1994-01-01

    The Secretary of Energy has defined the mission for the Department. Her vision for the Department of Energy (DOE) is to promote environmental excellence, economic growth, and leadership in science and technology. The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), which is responsible for implementing an emergency management system for EM facilities and the transport of non-weapons-related radioactive materials, has addressed this mission through the establishment of six goals. This paper specifically discusses efforts to accomplish the last goal: Develop a stronger partnership between the DOE and its stakeholders. EM's Emergency Management Program supports strong partnerships with all interested parties. The EM Emergency Management Program provides the capability for preparedness in the event of an operational emergency at EM facilities, and it gives DOE the capability for preparedness in the event of an operational emergency involving DOE shipments of non-weapons-related radioactive and hazardous materials in transit. The Program is committed to plan, train, and provide material resources for the protection and safety of DOE workers, the public, and the environment. A great deal of stakeholder interaction is associated with the transport of DOE radioactive materials. To assure a communication link to other DOE program areas and interested stakeholders outside the DOE, the Emergency Management Program has committed extensive resources within the transportation program to promote and support EM's commitment to stakeholder involvement. The Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) develops and enhances integrated emergency preparedness in the area of transportation. TEPP coordinates programs across the DOE complex and supplies a DOE-wide unified approach to the public

  8. African stakeholders' views of research options to improve nutritional status in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Michelle; Kruger, Annamarie; Nago, Eunice; Lachat, Carl; Mamiro, Peter; Smit, Karlien; Garimoi-Orach, Chris; Kameli, Yves; Roberfroid, Dominique; Kolsteren, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Setting research priorities for improving nutrition in Africa is currently ad hoc and there is a need to shift the status quo in the light of slow progress in reducing malnutrition. This study explored African stakeholders' views on research priorities in the context of environmental and socio-demographic changes that will impact on nutritional status in Africa in the coming years. Using Multi-Criteria Mapping, quantitative and qualitative data were gathered from 91 stakeholders representing 6 stakeholder groups (health professionals, food Industry, government, civil society, academics and research funders) in Benin, Mozambique, South Africa, Tanzania, Togo and Uganda. Stakeholders appraised six research options (ecological nutrition, nutritional epidemiology, community nutrition interventions, behavioural nutrition, clinical nutrition and molecular nutrition) for how well they could address malnutrition in Africa. Impact (28.3%), research efficacy (23.6%) and social acceptability (22.4%) were the criteria chosen the most to evaluate the performance of research options. Research on the effectiveness of community interventions was seen as a priority by stakeholders because they were perceived as likely to have an impact relatively quickly, were inexpensive and cost-effective, involved communities and provided direct evidence of what works. Behavioural nutrition research was also highly appraised. Many stakeholders, particularly academics and government were optimistic about the value of ecological nutrition research (the impact of environmental change on nutritional status). Research funders did not share this enthusiasm. Molecular nutrition was least preferred, considered expensive, slow to have an impact and requiring infrastructure. South Africa ranked clinical and molecular nutrition the highest of all countries. Research funders should redirect research funds in Africa towards the priorities identified by giving precedence to develop the evidence for effective

  9. How embedded is public involvement in mainstream health research in England a decade after policy implementation? A realist evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Patricia; Mathie, Elspeth; Poland, Fiona; Keenan, Julia; Howe, Amanda; Munday, Diane; Kendall, Sally; Cowe, Marion; Staniszewska, Sophie; Goodman, Claire

    2018-04-01

    Objectives To explore how embedded patient and public involvement is within mainstream health research following two decades of policy-driven work to underpin health research with patient and public involvement in England. Methods Realist evaluation using Normalization Process Theory as a programme theory to understand what enabled patient and public involvement to be embedded as normal practice. Data were collected through a national scoping and survey, and qualitative methods to track patient and public involvement processes and impact over time within 22 nationally funded research projects. Results In research studies that were able to create reciprocal working relationships and to embed patient and public involvement this was contingent on: the purpose of patient and public involvement being clear; public contributors reflecting research end-beneficiaries; researchers understanding the value of patient and public involvement; patient and public involvement opportunities being provided throughout the research and ongoing evaluation of patient and public involvement. Key contested areas included: whether to measure patient and public involvement impact; seeking public contributors to maintain a balance between being research-aware and an outsider standpoint seen as 'authentically' lay; scaling-up patient and public involvement embedded within a research infrastructure rather than risk token presence and whether patient and public involvement can have a place within basic science. Conclusions While patient and public involvement can be well-integrated within all types of research, policy makers should take account of tensions that must be navigated in balancing moral and methodological imperatives.

  10. Multiple stakeholders in multi-criteria decision-making in the context of Municipal Solid Waste Management: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltani, Atousa; Hewage, Kasun; Reza, Bahareh; Sadiq, Rehan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We review Municipal Solid Waste Management studies with focus on multiple stakeholders. • We focus on studies with multi-criteria decision analysis methods and discover their trends. • Most studies do not offer solutions for situations where stakeholders compete for more benefits or have unequal voting powers. • Governments and experts are the most participated stakeholders and AHP is the most dominant method. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste Management (MSWM) is a complicated process that involves multiple environmental and socio-economic criteria. Decision-makers look for decision support frameworks that can guide in defining alternatives, relevant criteria and their weights, and finding a suitable solution. In addition, decision-making in MSWM problems such as finding proper waste treatment locations or strategies often requires multiple stakeholders such as government, municipalities, industries, experts, and/or general public to get involved. Multi-criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) is the most popular framework employed in previous studies on MSWM; MCDA methods help multiple stakeholders evaluate the often conflicting criteria, communicate their different preferences, and rank or prioritize MSWM strategies to finally agree on some elements of these strategies and make an applicable decision. This paper reviews and brings together research on the application of MCDA for solving MSWM problems with more focus on the studies that have considered multiple stakeholders and offers solutions for such problems. Results of this study show that AHP is the most common approach in consideration of multiple stakeholders and experts and governments/municipalities are the most common participants in these studies

  11. Multiple stakeholders in multi-criteria decision-making in the context of Municipal Solid Waste Management: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani, Atousa; Hewage, Kasun; Reza, Bahareh; Sadiq, Rehan, E-mail: Rehan.sadiq@ubc.ca

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • We review Municipal Solid Waste Management studies with focus on multiple stakeholders. • We focus on studies with multi-criteria decision analysis methods and discover their trends. • Most studies do not offer solutions for situations where stakeholders compete for more benefits or have unequal voting powers. • Governments and experts are the most participated stakeholders and AHP is the most dominant method. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste Management (MSWM) is a complicated process that involves multiple environmental and socio-economic criteria. Decision-makers look for decision support frameworks that can guide in defining alternatives, relevant criteria and their weights, and finding a suitable solution. In addition, decision-making in MSWM problems such as finding proper waste treatment locations or strategies often requires multiple stakeholders such as government, municipalities, industries, experts, and/or general public to get involved. Multi-criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) is the most popular framework employed in previous studies on MSWM; MCDA methods help multiple stakeholders evaluate the often conflicting criteria, communicate their different preferences, and rank or prioritize MSWM strategies to finally agree on some elements of these strategies and make an applicable decision. This paper reviews and brings together research on the application of MCDA for solving MSWM problems with more focus on the studies that have considered multiple stakeholders and offers solutions for such problems. Results of this study show that AHP is the most common approach in consideration of multiple stakeholders and experts and governments/municipalities are the most common participants in these studies.

  12. Stakeholder expectation and satisfaction in road maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hietbrink, M.; Hartmann, Andreas; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the process of stakeholder satisfaction is a prerequisite for successful stakeholder management. The expectancy disconfirmation model describes the process of stakeholder satisfaction by relating customers’ satisfaction with a product or service to discrepancy between the perceived

  13. Ontario Energy Board 2005 survey of stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    A survey was conducted among members of the Ontario Energy Board's (OEB) various stakeholder groups in order to measure the Board's performance and to help the Board identify areas for improvement in the way it operates. The survey included telephone interviews with consumer groups, advocacy groups, the energy sector, electricity and gas distributors, financial organizations as well as other stakeholders. The topics addressed in the survey were key energy issues and priority issues; the perceived role of the OEB; the OEB strengths and weaknesses; the importance of various OEB functions; the overall performance of the OEB; an evaluation of OEB communication with industry and consumers; an evaluation of service quality; and, awareness and participation in regulatory policy initiatives. Respondents used a 10-point scale in their evaluation. This report presented the main findings and their interpretations. Major stakeholders identified electricity supply issues and the price of electricity as being the most important energy issues facing Ontario. This report also presented the detailed findings for questions regarding the lack of generator capacity, policy stability, the coal phase out program, electricity blackouts, conservation, electricity restructuring and investment. The major finding of the survey was an overall increase in satisfaction with the OEB's performance. It was suggested that the OEB can improve in timeliness and providing consumer information. The major areas of strength were found to be its professionalism in conducting hearings and the fairness of the Board's decisions and regulations. tabs

  14. Linking environmental and stakeholder management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    1999-01-01

    is to discuss how the influence from an increasing number of stakeholders may influence the companies to adopt a more proactive attitude towards environmentally related initiatives. The first part of the paper will discuss the relevant theory and introduce a model to analyse and identify the most relevant......Regulation has been an important instrument in pushing the business community towards a more sustainable way of conduct. But recently an increasing pressure from a growing number of stakeholders including employees, customers, neighbours, NGO's etc has been observed. The purpose of this paper...... stakeholder groups and their influence. Based on a recent survey among Danish companies the second part of the paper will report on the actual perceived influence from a variety of stakeholders to force companies to introduce environmentally-related initiatives. The results will then be discussed in light...

  15. Port Stakeholder Summit - April 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's National Port Stakeholders Summit, Advancing More Sustainable Ports, focused on actions to protect air quality while reducing climate risk and supporting economic growth, making ports more environmentally sustainable.

  16. Myocardial involvement in diabetic patients evaluated by exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy and cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Sumio; Genda, Akira; Nakayama, Akira; Igarashi, Yutaka; Takeda, Ryoyu

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate myocardial involvement in diabetes mellitus, we studied 39 patients with negative double-Master's test and without hypertension by exercise thallium-201 (Tl-201) myocardial scintigraphy using a bicycle ergometer. Among the 39 patients, 12 (30.8 %) showed filling defects in the scintigrams (positive cases), including eight with stress-induced defects and four with fixed defects. The positive cases had higher scores of diabetic complications (3.6 +- 2.4 vs 2.1 +- 1.8; p < 0.05) and longer durations of diabetes as compared with those of the negative cases. The frequency of insulin therapy was also greater in the positive cases. Eleven patients (5 positive and 6 negative cases) who underwent cardiac catheterization had no significant stenotic lesions of their coronary arteries. However, all of the positive cases showed abnormal wall motion, mainly hypokinesis, by left ventriculography (LVG). The abnormalities of the LVG corresponded to the findings of the scintigrams (i.e. filling defects and decrease in washout ratios by circumferential profile analysis). These results suggest that in some diabetics myocardial involvement exists in the early stage without overt cardiac disease and exercise Tl-201 scintigraphy is useful in detecting pre-clinical cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathy in diabetics seems to be due to disturbances of the myocardial microcirculation. (author)

  17. Interlobar fissures involvement by lung cancer. Evaluation with thin-section computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yuji; Yamada, Kouzo; Nomura, Ikuo; Noda, Kazumasa; Ishiwa, Naoki; Maehara, Takamitsu; Kameda, Youichi

    1998-01-01

    Pleural involvement of interlobar fissure by a tumor is one of the most important factors in the clinical diagnosis of lung cancer. A positive finding of incomplete interlobar fissure of the lung influences not only the surgical procedure but also the prognosis. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the usefulness of thin-section computed tomography (CT) compared with conventional CT in the detection of pleural invasion of the interlobar fissure by lung cancer or incomplete interlobar fissure, and the results of surgery, according to the involvement of the pleural surface. We reviewed 90 patients whose tumors were adjacent to the interlobar fissure of the lung through conventional CT scans and subsequent thoracotomy. A comparison of diagnoses based on the findings of thin-section CT and pathologic examination showed that thin-section CT was 94% accurate for pleural invasion of the interlobar fissure, and 100% for incomplete interlobar fissure. Conventional CT, however, was only 63% accurate for pleural invasion of the interlobar fissure and 31% for incomplete interlobar fissure. This leads us to conclude that thin-section CT is helpful in the accurate evaluation of pleural invasion of the interlobar fissure and in the findings of incomplete interlobar fissure in lung cancer for patients in whom tumors are adjacent to the interlobar fissure on conventional CT findings. (author)

  18. Evaluation of Different Normalization and Analysis Procedures for Illumina Gene Expression Microarray Data Involving Small Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Daniel M.; Riveros, Carlos; Heidari, Moones; Graham, Ross M.; Trinder, Debbie; Berretta, Regina; Olynyk, John K.; Scott, Rodney J.; Moscato, Pablo; Milward, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    While Illumina microarrays can be used successfully for detecting small gene expression changes due to their high degree of technical replicability, there is little information on how different normalization and differential expression analysis strategies affect outcomes. To evaluate this, we assessed concordance across gene lists generated by applying different combinations of normalization strategy and analytical approach to two Illumina datasets with modest expression changes. In addition to using traditional statistical approaches, we also tested an approach based on combinatorial optimization. We found that the choice of both normalization strategy and analytical approach considerably affected outcomes, in some cases leading to substantial differences in gene lists and subsequent pathway analysis results. Our findings suggest that important biological phenomena may be overlooked when there is a routine practice of using only one approach to investigate all microarray datasets. Analytical artefacts of this kind are likely to be especially relevant for datasets involving small fold changes, where inherent technical variation—if not adequately minimized by effective normalization—may overshadow true biological variation. This report provides some basic guidelines for optimizing outcomes when working with Illumina datasets involving small expression changes. PMID:27605185

  19. Stakeholders of Nature Tourism Management in SPTN Area II Majalengka, Gunung Ciremai National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mita Anindisa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ecotourism management in Gunung Ciremai National Park is fully managed by third party which are community organizations, state-owned enterprises, and non-governmental organizations. The aims of this research is to identify stakeholders, categorize stakeholders based on interests and influences, also to identify space and determine the level of stakeholder participation. The data obtained using questionnaire, interview, and direct observation were analyzed with stakeholder analysis matrix and the level of stakeholder participation. Fourteen stakeholders involved within the programs based on interests and influences are governmental institutions, cooperations, non-governmental organizations, and community organization with two classifications (key player and crowd. In this management there is no subject and context setter. Most of the stakeholders participate to control level in level of participation. Keywords: ecotourism, interest and influence, level of participation, stakeholder

  20. Conducting research in risk communication that is both beneficial for stakeholders and scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrière, Marie; Bogaard, Thom; Junier, Sandra; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Mostert, Erik

    2015-04-01

    One of the key tasks for disaster risk reduction is raising awareness. On way to increase it is through risk communication, including visual risk communication. Previous research showed that visual risk communication linked to natural hazards is mostly evaluated in terms of user's requirements, ability to understand the content, or satisfaction with the diverse components of the tool(s): Its impact on risk awareness is not researched. Most of the risk communication evaluations are performed in a lab-type environments and thus their conclusions might not be fully valid in real life settings. Our approach differs in the sense that we decided to test a real communication effort. However, we did not use an existing one but designed our own. This process was conducted according to collaborative research principles, meaning that we created the communication effort in collaboration with the local stakeholders in order to respect the social environment of the case study. Moreover, our research activity should be beneficial and significant for the community in which we work as well as for science. This contribution will present the process that allowed us to design an exhibition in the Ubaye Valley (France) and the methodology that was developed to measure changes in risk awareness. During a 2-years project, we collaborated with local and regional stakeholders (politicians and technicians). Informal meetings with local stakeholders were organized to determine what they perceived as the needs in term of risk communication and to investigate the potential to develop activities that would benefit both them and us. We were offered the opportunity to design an exhibition for the local public library. We proposed the content and this was adjusted in interaction with the stakeholders. Later local technicians and inhabitants contributed to the content of the exhibition and regional stakeholders helped with the funding of the exhibition. Finally, employees of the public library took

  1. Stakeholder collaboration and heritage management

    OpenAIRE

    Aas, C.; Ladkin, Adele; Fletcher, John

    2005-01-01

    This article examines a collaborative approach to the relationship between heritage management and tourism development in Luang Prabang, Laos. The purpose is to examine stakeholder collaboration and management roles, heritage tourism development, as well as the interdependence of the heritage conservation and tourism relationship. The research examines a UNESCO/Norwegian government project, which aiming to promote collaboration between heritage conservation and tourism through stakeholder inv...

  2. Stakeholder conflicts and dividend policy

    OpenAIRE

    Bøhren, Øyvind; Josefsen, Morten G.; Steen, Pål E.

    2012-01-01

    This is the authors’ final, accepted and refereed manuscript to the article This paper compares the dividend policy of owner-controlled firms with that of firms where the owners are a minority relative to non-owner employees, customers, and community citizens. We find that regardless of whether owners or non-owners control the firm, the strong stakeholder uses the dividend payout decision to mitigate rather than to intensify the conflict of interest with the weak stakeholder. H...

  3. Portuguese Public University Student Satisfaction: A Stakeholder Theory-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardes, Emerson; Alves, Helena; Raposo, Mario

    2013-01-01

    In accordance with the importance of the student stakeholder to universities, the objective of this research project was to evaluate student satisfaction at Portuguese public universities as regards their self-expressed core expectations. The research was based both on stakeholder theory itself and on previous studies of university stakeholders.…

  4. Corporate communications and stakeholder management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Mira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporate communications represent a modern communications discipline used by businesses across the globe to communicate with key stakeholders. Chief executive officers and executive management teams strive to create, protect and advance corporate reputation through corporate communications. Further, by communicating with key stakeholders the company adequately prepares for good news and future problems. With the benefit of technology and greater transparency, corporations of the future will continue to use corporate communications approaches to advance their business. Company's reputation derives from the way stakeholders perceive the organization, how they think, feel or act towards it. It is therefore vital that organizations interested in developing and building their reputational capital; pay careful attention to the way they are perceived and that they manage the relationships with their various stakeholders like a strategic resource. Stakeholders represent both opportunity and threat for the organizations. For instance, if an institution has a good reputation with stakeholders they may provide the organization more latitude to operate. On the other hand a poor reputation may result in creating the legislative that can make it more difficult for an institution to operate.

  5. Evaluation of myocardial involvement in Duchenne progressive muscular dystrophy with thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Naoki; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Okada, Mitsuhiro (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1983-12-01

    Myocardial involvement in progressive muscular dystrophy of the Duchenne type was evaluated in 19 patients using thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging. The qualitative analysis was performed in anterior, 3 left anterior oblique and left lateral projection images by three experienced physicians. Distinct perfusion defects were shown in 13 patients, especially in LV posterolateral or posterior walls (11 patients). There was no significant relationship between the presence of perfusion defects and the skeletal muscle changes or thoracic deformities assessed by transmission computed tomography. Slightly increased thallium-201 activity in RV free wall and lungs was shown in nine and one patient, respectively. The extensive perfusion defects were shown in 2 patients who died of congestive heart failure 1 to 2 years after the scintigraphic study. The myocardial scintigraphic changes were considered to be minimal in 7 of 9 patients who underwent two serial scintigraphic studies in 2 to 3 years. It was concluded that the thallium myocardial perfusion imaging was a useful clinical technique to evaluate the cardiomyopathy in Duchenne progressive muscular dystrophy.

  6. Evaluation of myocardial involvement in muscular dystrophy with thallium-201 emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Sotobata, Iwao; Indo, Toshikatsu; Matsuoka, Yukihiko; Kawai, Naoki; Matsushima, Hideo; Suzuki, Akio; Abe, Tetsutaro; Sakuma, Sadayuki

    1986-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scanning with emission computed tomography (ECT) for evaluation of left ventricular myocardial fibrosis was assessed on 47 patients with Duchenne (DMD), facioscapulohumeral (FSH), limb-girdle (LG) and myotonic (MT) dystrophy. Trans-, long- and short-axial images were interpreted quantitatively by circumferential profile analysis, and the fibrotic tissue size (%FIB) was estimated by integration of hypoperfused areas in 6 to 8 consecutive short-axial slices. Lung/mediastinum count ratios (L/M ratio), LV cavity dilatation, aneurysm formation and cardiac malrotations were also assessed with ECT. Distinct ECT perfusion defect was observed in 26 of 29 DMDs, and in 11 of 18 patients with other types. Perfusion defect was demonstrated in 95 of total 235 segments, and was observed specifically in the posterior wall (82 %) and the apex (65 %) in DMD, and was scattered in all LV wall segments in FSH, LG, and MT. Percent FIB correlated significantly with L/M ratio (r = 0.82, p < 0.01), and did not with age or clinical stage score. ECT showed marked LV dilatation in 7, apical aneurysm in 5 and cardiac malrotation in 23 of the 47 patients. In conclusion, ECT was considered to be a useful clinical means of evaluating myocardial involvement in patients with muscular dystrophy. (author)

  7. Evaluation of myocardial involvement in Duchenne progressive muscular dystrophy with thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Naoki; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Okada, Mitsuhiro

    1983-01-01

    Myocardial involvement in progressive muscular dystrophy of the Duchenne type was evaluated in 19 patients using thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging. The qualitative analysis was performed in anterior, 3 left anterior oblique and left lateral projection images by three experienced physicians. Distinct perfusion defects were shown in 13 patients, especially in LV posterolateral or posterior walls (11 patients). There was no significant relationship between the presence of perfusion defects and the skeletal muscle changes or thoracic deformities assessed by transmission computed tomography. Slightly increased thallium-201 activity in RV free wall and lungs was shown in nine and one patient, respectively. The extensive perfusion defects were shown in 2 patients who died of congestive heart failure 1 to 2 years after the scintigraphic study. The myocardial scintigraphic changes were considered to be minimal in 7 of 9 patients who underwent two serial scintigraphic studies in 2 to 3 years. It was concluded that the thallium myocardial perfusion imaging was a useful clinical technique to evaluate the cardiomyopathy in Duchenne progressive muscular dystrophy. (author)

  8. Caregiving in severe mental illness: the psychometric properties of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalves-Pereira Manuel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the achievements of previous research, caregiving assessments in severe mental illness should be crossculturally validated in order to define risk groups or to evaluate family work. This study reports on the psychometric properties of the European version of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire (IEQ-EU in Portugal. Methods A Portuguese translation of the IEQ-EU was developed according to the 'European Psychiatric Services: Inputs Linked to Outcome Domains and Needs' (EPSILON group guidelines. We then studied 194 caregivers who were related to patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders in psychiatric outpatient services. All relatives were assessed using the IEQ-EU. In order to describe the corresponding patients' sample, the majority (n = 162 was evaluated with the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHO-DAS II; 108 patients were also assessed with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF. Results The factor structure of the Portuguese version of the questionnaire was similar to the original; internal consistency was good, with Cronbach's α ranging from 0.71 to 0.87 in the IEQ-EU scales (total score and domains: tension, supervision, worrying, urging; test-retest reliability yielded intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs from 0.80 to 0.94, concerning the same scores. Ecological validity was confirmed. Most caregiving consequences were reported on the worrying domain of the IEQ-EU. Conclusions Validity and reliability of the Portuguese IEQ-EU translation were established. Specifically the four IEQ-EU subscale domains seem to be valid in Portugal.

  9. Who has a stake? How stakeholder processes influence partnership sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Ellen Boyle

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available As universities attempt to expand their relevance by engaging with local and regional societal challenges, various kinds of partnerships are emerging. A broad range of stakeholders, from both the university and the community, are typically engaged in and influence the development, implementation and perpetuation of these partnerships. This paper juxtaposes analysis of three community-university partnerships in Worcester, Massachusetts, USA, paying particular attention to the partnerships’ stakeholders, and to their relative importance. This research builds upon current understandings of critical factors in partnership sustainability, as these three partnerships have different goals, involve different university and community stakeholders, and are at different points in their organisational history. The fact that they share the same context – the same city – offers a unique opportunity for comparative case study analysis. The theory of stakeholder salience is used to explain findings about partnership sustainability and to make suggestions for strengthening existing partnerships. Specifically, we argue that stakeholder power and legitimacy, along with stakeholder urgency, are key factors in sustaining community-university partnerships. Keywords Community-university partnerships; economic development; community development; stakeholder salience

  10. Lessons learned on stakeholder issues in decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, P.; Pescatore, C.

    2008-01-01

    Issues of public concern during decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) are partly the same and partly different from those of the preceding phases (planning, construction and operation). While in the course of construction and operation the main challenges include meeting expectations of a higher quality of life, accommodating a growing population, mitigating construction nuisances, and assuring the safe operation of the facility, the main concerns in the D and D phase are decreasing employment rate, the eventual reduction of revenues for the municipality, the future use of the affected land and negative social impacts (e.g., out-migration). The decommissioning phase is characterised by heterogeneity of stakeholder interests and values, difficulties of reaching consensus or compromise, and difficulties in connection with the harmonization of energy production, environmental protection and sustainable socio-economic development considerations. Typically, there might also be tensions between local and regional decisions. As in other phases, the building of trust between stakeholder is crucial from the point of view of conflict management, and social lessons learnt from the siting and developments of nuclear facilities are widely applicable in the field of D and D as well. A review is presented of major lessons to be learnt from NEA activities in the field of decommissioning and stakeholder involvement. (author)

  11. Lessons learned on stakeholder issues in decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Sullivan, P.; Pescatore, C. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 92 - Issy les Moulineaux (France)

    2008-07-01

    Issues of public concern during decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) are partly the same and partly different from those of the preceding phases (planning, construction and operation). While in the course of construction and operation the main challenges include meeting expectations of a higher quality of life, accommodating a growing population, mitigating construction nuisances, and assuring the safe operation of the facility, the main concerns in the D and D phase are decreasing employment rate, the eventual reduction of revenues for the municipality, the future use of the affected land and negative social impacts (e.g., out-migration). The decommissioning phase is characterised by heterogeneity of stakeholder interests and values, difficulties of reaching consensus or compromise, and difficulties in connection with the harmonization of energy production, environmental protection and sustainable socio-economic development considerations. Typically, there might also be tensions between local and regional decisions. As in other phases, the building of trust between stakeholder is crucial from the point of view of conflict management, and social lessons learnt from the siting and developments of nuclear facilities are widely applicable in the field of D and D as well. A review is presented of major lessons to be learnt from NEA activities in the field of decommissioning and stakeholder involvement. (author)

  12. Stakeholder views on pharmacogenomic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Haridarshan N; Ursan, Iulia D; Zueger, Patrick M; Cavallari, Larisa H; Pickard, A Simon

    2014-02-01

    Pharmacogenomics has an important role in the evolution of personalized medicine, and its widespread uptake may ultimately depend on the interests and perspectives of key players in health care. Our aim was to summarize studies on stakeholder perspectives and attitudes toward pharmacogenomic testing. Thus, we conducted a review of original research studies that reported stakeholder views on pharmacogenomic testing using a structured approach in PubMed, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and EMBASE. A standardized data abstraction form was developed that included stakeholder group of interest-patients, general public, providers, and payers. Stakeholder views regarding barriers to pharmacogenetic implementation were organized into the following themes: ancillary information-related, clinical, economic, educational, ethical or legal, medical mistrust, and practicality. Of 34 studies that met our inclusion criteria, 37 perspectives were reported (15 on providers, 9 on the general public, 9 on patients, and 4 on payers). The most common topics that arose in studies of providers related to clinical usefulness of genetic data (n=11) and educational needs (n=11). Among the general public, the most common concerns were medical mistrust (n=5), insufficient education (n=5), and practicality (n=5). The most prevalent issues from the patient perspective were ethical or legal (n=6) and economic (n=5) issues. Among payers, leading issues were practicality (n=4) and clinical usefulness (n=3). There was overlap in the topics and concerns across stakeholder perspectives, including lack of knowledge about pharmacogenomic testing. Views on issues related to privacy, cost, and test result dissemination varied by stakeholder perspective. Limited research had been conducted in underrepresented groups. Efforts to address the issues raised by stakeholders may facilitate the implementation of pharmacogenomic testing into

  13. Study on National Sustainable Development Strategy Management Based on Stakeholders Management Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Huarong; Wang Xiaoming

    2012-01-01

    Based on the stakeholders management theory, this pa- per provides a new strategic management method for the National Sustainable Development Strategy. By taking China's National Sustainable Development Strategy Management as an example, this paper identifies all the stakeholders involved and then as- sesses stakeholders from two dimensions, namely "Importance" and "Attitude", by which all of the stakeholders are divided into six categories. On this basis, further analysis is made to work out strategic management programme by scheduling the strate- gic emphases, steps and management countermeasures for dif- ferent types of stakeholders so as to provide theortical evidence for the practice of National Sustainable Developnent Strategy management.

  14. Understanding dyadic promoter-stakeholder relations in complex projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janita Vos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose a Bilateral Double Motive framework of stakeholder cooperation in complex projects. The framework analyses and explains dyadic promoter-stakeholder relationships at a micro level by acknowledging both transactional and relational motives. We demonstrate the framework’s usefulness by illustrating its explanatory power in two instances of cooperation and two of non-cooperation within two health information technology projects. The study contributes to project management theory through its combined focus on transactional and relational motives. Further, the study contributes to practice by providing a tool for planning and evaluating cooperation in health Information Technology projects and similar complex multi-stakeholder environments.

  15. Experienced emotional burden in caregivers: psychometric properties of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire in caregivers of brain injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, Gert J.; Meijer, Ron; van Heugten, Caroline M.; Martina, Juan D.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the psychometric properties (internal consistency, discriminant validity, and responsiveness) of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire for Brain Injury measuring emotional burden in caregivers of patients with chronic acquired brain injury. Inception cohort study. Caregivers of chronic

  16. Experienced emotional burden in caregivers: psychometric properties of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire in caregivers of brain injured patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, G.J.; Meijer, R.; Heugten, C.M. van; Martina, J.D.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the psychometric properties (internal consistency, discriminant validity, and responsiveness) of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire for Brain Injury measuring emotional burden in caregivers of patients with chronic acquired brain injury. DESIGN: Inception cohort study.

  17. Public perception and stakeholder involvement in the crisis management of sediment-related disasters and their mitigation: the case of the Stože debris flow in NW Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikoš, Matjaz

    2011-04-01

    as Judgment-Based Crisis Management, respectively. The Quantitative Risk Assessment came into play in the second remediation phase through special law enforcement. Even after 10 years since the disaster, general public perception speaks in favor of judgment-based risk management rather than quantitative risk assessment, a situation that can be explained by the poor understanding of the system by local inhabitants, by low public involvement in the preparation of the final remediation plan undertaken by the state agencies, and by the fact that the final remediation is still not finished. Copyright © 2010 SETAC.

  18. Planning that works: Empowerment through stakeholder focused interactive planning (SFIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, J.E.; Ison, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a powerful planning tool that can enable government, private industries, and public interest organizations to actualize their visions through sound decision making. The stakeholder focused interactive planning model is designed to integrate and ultimately gain stakeholder investment in the success of attainment of their vision. The only concessions required of the planning organization using this process is the acceptance of the premise that sustained vision success requires the support of both internal and external stakeholders and that each step in the process must be used as a validation of the previous step and essential to the completion of the next step. What is stakeholder/public involvement? It is the process in which the stakeholders (both internal and external) values, interests and expectations are included in decision-making processes. The primary goal of public involvement efforts is to include all those who have a stake in the decision, whether or not they have already been identified. Stakeholders are individuals, contractors, clients, suppliers, public organizations, state and local governments, Indian tribes, federal agencies, and other parties affected by decisions

  19. Stakeholder Analysis on Community Forest Management Partnership and Independent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimas Alfred Pasetia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Timber of community forest in one of the alternative supply that is needed by the wood processing industries. Partnership and independent of community forest can be realized in the relationship between farmers and industry. However, parts of the community forest system is represented by different stakeholders, which are interrelated in a system. This study analyzed stakeholder interest, influences and relationships between partnership and independent of community forest management. The study was conducted in Probolinggo District and respondents were selected using snowball sampling. There were 15 stakeholders identified as being involved in the partnership of community forest management of which were classified 4 as key players, 2 as context setters, 5 as subjects and 5 as crowds. There were 12 stakeholders identified as being involved in the independent of community forest management of which were classified 3 as key players, 1 as context setters, 5 as subjects and 3 as crowd. The performances of each stakeholder can be controlled if the integration of relationships and rules has been established. Keywords: community forest, independent, partnership, stakeholders

  20. Who are the stakeholders in environmental risk decisions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    In this talk, I discuss the concept of 'stakeholder involvement' in environmental decisions, including but not limited to radioactive waste management decisions. As a prelude, I mention ways in which public participation opportunities have been expanded but still remain deficient in two key respects. These deficiencies have opened the door for stakeholder involvement. Stakeholder involvement has, over the past decade, been touted as an approach (perhaps the approach) to more egalitarian, interactive environmental decisions that take into account different interests and perspectives. After mentioning two key dimensions of environmental decisions - their spatial and temporal reach - I consider the extent to which different types of stakeholders can and should be centrally involved in various decisions. I conclude with a plea for the need to down-play the notion of 'stakeholders', especially on decisions whose impacts will extend far across space and time. Instead, especially on such decisions, we need to cultivate the notion of our shared responsibility to serve as trustees, putting aside our vested interests and deliberating together iteratively on the best ways to achieve the long-term common good. (author)

  1. Cardiac involvement in ANCA (+) and ANCA (-) Churg-Strauss syndrome evaluated by cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogeni, Sophie; Karabela, Georgia; Gialafos, Elias; Stavropoulos, Efthymios; Spiliotis, George; Katsifis, Gikas; Kolovou, Genovefa

    2013-10-01

    The cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) pattern of Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) includes myopericarditis, diffuse subendocardial vasculitis or myocardial infarction with or without cardiac symptoms and is usually associated with lack of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). To correlate the CMR pattern with ANCA in CSS, compare it with healthy controls and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and re-evaluate 2 yrs after the first CMR. 28 consecutive CSS, aged 42±7 yrs, were referred for CMR and 2 yrs re-evaluation. The CMR included left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), T2-weighted (T2-W), early (EGE) and late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) imaging. Their results were compared with 28 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) under remission and 28 controls with normal myocardial perfusion, assessed by scintigraphy. CMR revealed acute cardiac lesions in all ANCA (-) CSS with active disease and acute cardiac symptoms and only in one asymptomatic ANCA (+) CSS, with active disease. Diffuse subendocardial fibrosis (DSF) or past myocarditis was identified in both ANCA(+) and ANCA (-) CSS, but with higher incidence and fibrosis amount in ANCA (-) CSS (p<0.05). In comparison to SLE, both ANCA (+) and ANCA (-) CSS had higher incidence of DSF, lower incidence of myocarditis and no evidence of myocardial infarction, due to coronary artery disease (p<0.05). In 2 yrs CMR follow up, 1/3 of CSS with DSF presented LV function deterioration and one died, although immunosuppressive treatment was given early after CSS diagnosis. Cardiac involvement either as DSF or myocarditis, can be detected in both ANCA (+) and ANCA (-) CSS, although more clinically overt in ANCA (-). DSF carries an ominous prognosis for LV function. CMR, due to its capability to detect disease severity, before cardiac dysfunction takes place, is an excellent tool for CSS risk stratification and treatment individualization.

  2. Transformational Leadership and Stakeholder Management in Library Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Sucozhañay

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyse the role of library managers as change agent when implementing Library 2.0, using transformational leadership and stakeholder management approaches. To do so, a case study in a Latin American academic library was performed. The experiences acquired for a period of six years were analysed, during which three library managers were involved in managing change. Qualitative data from documents, interviews, and observations were collected, and qualitative analysis methods were used to obtain in-depth understanding of the change process. Results show that lack of transformational leadership and stakeholder management contribute to delayed implementation and limited adoption of innovations. Although library managers recognized the importance of different stakeholders to implement changes, they did not apply systematic and proactive strategies to define and manage them. All in all, library managers should be trained as change agents, with emphasis on transformational leadership and stakeholder management skills.

  3. The Differential Effect of Various Stakeholder Groups in Place Marketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eshuis, Jasper; Braun, Erik; Klijn, Erik-Hans

    2017-01-01

    This article analyses whether involving various stakeholder groups in place marketing has effects on the content of place brands, and on how place marketing influences other policy fields, i.e. spatial planning and tourism/leisure policies. The research applies structural equation modelling...... to nationwide surveys in the Netherlands and Germany among professionals in place marketing (N = 444). The study shows that different stakeholder groups have a varied influence; involving residents and public managers increases the influence of place marketing on spatial planning policies, whereas involving...... businesses increases influence on tourism/leisure policies. Other studies have shown varying influence of stakeholder groups in cases, but not in quantitative studies. The research also addresses the mechanisms at play in Germany and the Netherlands, showing mainly commonalities....

  4. Evaluating efficiency of split VMAT plan for prostate cancer radiotherapy involving pelvic lymph nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Jun Ki; Son, Sang Jun; Kim, Dae Ho; Seo, Seok Jin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of Split VMAT planning(Contouring rectum divided into an upper and a lower for reduce rectum dose) compare to Conventional VMAT planning(Contouring whole rectum) for prostate cancer radiotherapy involving pelvic lymph nodes. A total of 9 cases were enrolled. Each case received radiotherapy with Split VMAT planning to the prostate involving pelvic lymph nodes. Treatment was delivered using TrueBeam STX(Varian Medical Systems, USA) and planned on Eclipse(Ver. 10.0.42, Varian, USA), PRO3(Progressive Resolution Optimizer 10.0.28), AAA(Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm Ver. 10.0.28). Lower rectum contour was defined as starting 1 cm superior and ending 1 cm inferior to the prostate PTV, upper rectum is a part, except lower rectum from the whole rectum. Split VMAT plan parameters consisted of 10 MV coplanar 360° arcs. Each arc had 30° and 30° collimator angle, respectively. An SIB(Simultaneous Integrated Boost) treatment prescription was employed delivering 50.4 Gy to pelvic lymph nodes and 63- 70 Gy to the prostate in 28 fractions. D{sub mean} of whole rectum on Split VMAT plan was applied for DVC(Dose Volume Constraint) of the whole rectum for Conventional VMAT plan. In addition, all parameters were set to be the same of existing treatment plans. To minimize the dose difference that shows up randomly on optimizing, all plans were optimized and calculated twice respectively using a 0.2 cm grid. All plans were normalized to the prostate PTV{sub 100%} = 90% or 95%. A comparison of D{sub mean} of whole rectum, upperr ectum, lower rectum, and bladder, V{sub 50%} of upper rectum, total MU and H.I.(Homogeneity Index) and C.I.(Conformity Index) of the PTV was used for technique evaluation. All Split VMAT plans were verified by gamma test with portal dosimetry using EPID. Using DVH analysis, a difference between the Conventional and the Split VMAT plans was demonstrated. The Split VMAT plan demonstrated better in the D

  5. Evaluation of the stages involved in cold ischemia time in renal transplants in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgueta, S; Fuentes, C; Arenas, A; Labraña, C; Gajardo, J G; Lopez, M; Hernandez, J; Rodriguez, H; Rodriguez, L

    2010-01-01

    Cold ischemia time (CIT) is one of the factors that determine the evolution of a renal transplant; taking measures to reduce this time requires knowledge of its stages. The objective of this study was to evaluate the times in the stages that determine CIT in renal transplants. We analyzed 108 donors and 201 kidney transplantations performed in Chile in 2008, establishing the CIT for the kidney transplanted by the center that extracted the kidneys (local kidney) and for the kidney transplanted in another center (shared kidney). Average CIT was 18.8 hours: namely, 16.9 hours for local and 20.2 hours for shared kidneys (P = .0001484). CIT for cases in which samples were sent to histocompatibility laboratory prior to nephrectomy was 7.3 hours less than for those sent postnephrectomy. The mean time between the allocation of the kidney and the transplant was 7.3 hours; 5.6 hours for local kidneys and 8.4 hours for shared kidneys (P = .000007124). We identified the stages at which intervention is possible to reduce the CIT, mainly for shared kidneys. All involved parties should make an effort to reduce this time.

  6. On the use of the HOTSPOT code for evaluating accidents involving radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattinger, D.; Sarussi, R.; Tzarfati, Y.; Levinson, S.; Tshuva, A.

    2004-01-01

    The HOTSPOT Health Physics code was created by LLNL in order to provide Health Physics personnel with a fast, field portable calculation tool for evaluating accidents involving radioactive materials. The HOTSPOT code is a first order approximation of the radiation effects associated with the atmospheric release of radioactive materials. HOTSPOT programs are reasonably accurate for a timely initial assessment. More importantly, HOTSPOT code produce a consistent output for the same input assumptions, and minimize the probability of errors associated with reading a graph incorrectly. Four general programs, Plume, Explosion, Fire, and Resuspension, calculate a downwind assessment following the release of radioactive material resulting from a continuous or puff release, explosive release, fuel or fire, or an area contamination event. Additional programs estimate the dose commitment from inhalation of any one of the radionuclides listed in the database of radionuclides, calibrate a radiation survey instrument for ground survey measurements, and screening of alpha emitters in the Lung. We believe that the HOTSPOT code is extremely valuable in providing reasonable and reliable guidance for a diversity of application. For example, we demonstrate the release of 241 Am(20Ci) to the atmosphere

  7. Evaluating the evidence surrounding pontine cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin P Grace

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement (REM sleep - characterized by vivid dreaming, motor paralysis, and heightened neural activity - is one of the fundamental states of the mammalian central nervous system. Initial theories of rapid eye movement (REM sleep generation posited that induction of the state required activation of the ‘pontine REM sleep generator’ by cholinergic inputs. Here we review and evaluate the evidence surrounding cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation. We submit that: (i the capacity of pontine cholinergic neurotransmission to generate REM sleep has been firmly established by gain-of-function experiments, (ii the function of endogenous cholinergic input to REM sleep generating sites cannot be determined by gain-of-function experiments; rather, loss-of-function studies are required, (iii loss-of-function studies show that endogenous cholinergic input to the PFT is not required for REM sleep generation, and (iv Cholinergic input to the pontine REM sleep generating sites serve an accessory role in REM sleep generation: reinforcing non-REM-to-REM sleep transitions making them quicker and less likely to fail.

  8. 78 FR 20119 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2012-0042] Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY... concerning the Broad Stakeholder Survey. DHS previously published this ICR in the Federal Register on August... across the Nation. The Broad Stakeholder Survey is designed to gather stakeholder feedback on the...

  9. Development of a comprehensive model for stakeholder management in mental healthcare.