WorldWideScience

Sample records for stainless steel microstructure

  1. Microstructure of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available and martensite with 10% ferrite for Material B. Table 7 - Proposed martensitic stainless steel alloys for laser cladding Material C* Cr Ni Mn Si Mo Co Ms (ºC)* Cr eq Ni eq Material A 0.4 13 - 1 0.5 2.5 5.5 120 16.5 12.5 Material B 0.2 15 2 1 0.7 2.5 5.5 117... dilution, low heat input, less distortion, increased mechanical and corrosion properties excellent repeatability and control of process parameters. Solidification of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel is primarily austenitic. Microstructures...

  2. Microstructural stability of 21-6-9 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krenzer, R.W.; Sanderson, E.C.

    1978-01-01

    Two experiments were designed to better define parameters for thermomechanical processing of 21-6-9 stainless steel. This steel is one of the nitrogen-strengthened chromium, manganese, and nickel austenitic stainless steels having mechanical properties that can be improved by a combination of plastic deformation and heat treatments. By heat-treating coupons, the time-temperature relationship of the precipitate phase, and the solutionizing, recrystallizing, and stress-relieving temperature ranges in 21-6-9 were established. Secondly, mechanical properties and microstructure as a function of percent deformation and stress-relieving temperature are reported

  3. Stainless steel valves with enhanced performance through microstructure optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barani, A. A.; Boukhattam, M.; Haggeney, M.; Güler, S.

    2017-08-01

    Compressor valves are made of hardened and tempered martensitic steels. The main design criterion for the material selection is the fatigue performance of the material under bending loads. In some cases impact loads and corrosive atmospheres additionally act on the part. For the first time, the microstructure of the most commonly used stainless steel and its influence on the properties relevant for flapper valves is presented and described in this paper. It is demonstrated how the tensile properties of a martensitic stainless steel can be enhanced by tailoring the microstructure. Electron back scatter diffraction method is carried out to explain the changes in monotonic mechanical properties. Through a modified heat treatment the martensite microstructure is refined resulting in an increase of yield and ultimate tensile strength and at the same time a significant increase of elongation.

  4. Effects of microstructure on ultrasonic examination of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Reimann, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of cast stainless steel components or stainless steel welds is difficult, and the results obtained are hard to interpret. The present study describes the effects of stainless steel microstructure on ultrasonic test results. Welded coupons, 2.5 and 5.0 cm thick, were fabricated from Type 304 stainless steel, with Type 308 stainless steel as the weld material. Metallography of the base material shows grain sizes of 15 and 80 μm, and dendrites aligned from the top to the bottom surface in cast material. X-ray diffraction and ultrasonic velocity measurements indicate a random crystal orientation in the base material, but the cast sample had aligned dendrites. The weld material exhibits a dendritic structure with a preferred (100) direction perpendicular to the weld pass. Spectral analysis of ultrasonic broad-band signals through the base materials shows drastic attenuation of higher frequencies with increasing grain size (Rayleigh scattering). Annealing and recrystallization increases the ultrasonic attenuation and produces carbide precipitation at grain boundaries. The microstructural differences of the base metal, heat-affected zone, and weld metal affect the amplitude of ultrasonic reflections from artificial flaws in these zones. Data obtained from two samples of different grain sizes indicate that grain size has little effect when a 1-MHz transducer is used. When going from a 15 to an 80-μm crystalline structure, a 5-MHz unit suffers a 30-dB attenuation in the detection of a 1.2 mm deep notch. The anisotropy of the dendritic structure in stainless steel renewed the interest in the effect of shear-wave polarization. In the (110) crystallographic orientation of stainless steel, two modes of shear waves can be generated, which have velocities differing by a factor of two. This effect may be helpful in ''tuning'' of shear waves by polarization to obtain better penetration in large grain materials such as welds

  5. Microstructural Characterization of Low Temperature Gas Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present work presents microstructural investigations of the surface zone of low temperature gas nitrided precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel AISI 630. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate the present phases after successive removal of very thin sections...... of the sample surface. The development of epsilon nitride, expanded austenite and expanded martensite resulted from the low temperature nitriding treatments. The microstructural features, hardness and phase composition are discussed with emphasis on the influence of nitriding duration and nitriding potential....

  6. Failure of Stainless Steel Welds Due to Microstructural Damage Prevented by In Situ Metallography

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez,Juan Manuel Salgado; Alvarado,María Inés; Hernandez,Hector Vergara; Quiroz,José Trinidad Perez; Olmos,Luis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In stainless steels, microstructural damage is caused by precipitation of chromium carbides or sigma phase. These microconstituents are detrimental in stainless steel welds because they lead to weld decay. Nevertheless, they are prone to appear in the heat affected zone (HAZ) microstructure of stainless steel welds. This is particularly important for repairs of industrial components made of austenitic stainless steel. Non-destructive metallography can be applied in welding repairs of...

  7. Influence of laser power on microstructure of laser metal deposited 17-4 ph stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adeyemi, AA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of laser power on the microstructure of 17-4 PH stainless steel produced by laser metal deposition was investigated. Multiple-trackof 17-4 stainless steel powder was deposited on 316 stainless steel substrate using laser metal...

  8. Effects of surface treatments on microstructure in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabuchi, Yasuhiro; Tamako, Hiroaki; Kaneda, Junya; Yamashita, Norimichi; Miyakawa, Masahiko

    2009-01-01

    It is revealed that Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) on the surface of the L-grade stainless steels in Nuclear Power Plants is caused by heavily cold work of the materials. The microstructure, hardness and residual stress on the surface of the material are factors for SCC initiation. There are surface treatment methods that is effective reduction on SCC such as Flap Wheel (FW) polishing, Clean N Strip (CNS) polishing, Water Jet Peening (WJP) and Shot Peening (SP). In this paper, the characteristics of the surface cold worked layer of the L-grade stainless steels conducted by above-mentioned surface treatments are analyzed, and effects of the surface treatments on the surface layer are discussed. (author)

  9. Microstructural characterization of second phase regions in cast stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoelzer, D.; Kenik, E.A.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Busby, J.; Vitek, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Cast austenitic stainless steels offer the possibility of directly producing large and/or relatively complex structures, such as the first wall shield modules or the divertor cassette for the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER). Unfortunately, one of the inherent problems associated with casting stainless steel, especially large castings, is the formation of coarse dendrites with possibly inhomogeneously distributed second phases separated by up to several hundred microns in the microstructure. These microstructural features result from temperature and composition gradients that develop during solidification and subsequent cooling. However, detailed characterization of the second phase regions in the cast microstructures can be quite challenging to techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which is useful for phase identification. furthermore, the information about the phases that may be present in the cast microstructures, both equilibrium and nonequilibrium, is important as input as well as for confirming predictions made by computational thermodynamics and solidification modeling. In this study, the investigation of second phase regions that formed in a large cast of a 316 stainless steel (equivalent to CF3M) will be presented and compared to simulations of the phases predicted by computational thermodynamic modeling of the solidification process. The preliminary TEM investigation of the cast microstructure was performed with specimens that were prepared by jet-polishing of 3 mm diameter discs. Although this approach allowed for the identification of the sigma and chi phases, which was consistent with the simulations, it was not suitable for detailed analysis of the second phase regions since these specimens often contained only grains of the gamma austenite phase. A better approach for preparing TEM specimens consisted of strategically lifting small sections of material from second phase regions

  10. Microstructural development during laser cladding of low-C martensitic stainless steel.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Heat input plays an important role in the microstructural development of 12%Cr martensitic stainless steel. The microstructure of low-C 12%Cr martensitic stainless steel resulting from laser cladding was investigated. For 410L a ferritic...

  11. Studies of microstructure-property relationships in austenitic stainless steels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruiell, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    A final review is presented of the research carried out to provide better understanding of elevated temperature service of austenitic stainless steels, and especially the microstructural stability of both wrought-annealed steels and welded joints

  12. Microstructural observation of ion-irradiated austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawai, T.; Hamada, S.; Hishinuma, A.

    1992-01-01

    Type 316 stainless steel, base metal and weld metal obtained from an electron beam weld joint, was irradiated with 90 MeV Br +6 in the JAERI tandem accelerator. Cross-sectional TEM specimens were obtained by nickel plating. Microstructural observation revealed a band of tiny dislocation loops was observed around the mean projected range and the measured distance from the surface was 6.75±0.15μm. This is slightly larger than the calculated value using Ziegler's stopping power. Defect clusters were also observed around defect sinks within the mean projected range, suggesting cascade-sink interaction. These sinks are the grain boundary in the base metal specimen and preexisting dislocation lines in the weld metal specimen. Surface roughness of polished specimen was detected at the shallower side of the peak damage band, although no visible crystalline defect cluster was observed. This suggests radiation-induced microchemical evolution prior to sever microstructural evolution. (author)

  13. Failure of Stainless Steel Welds Due to Microstructural Damage Prevented by In Situ Metallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Salgado Lopez

    Full Text Available Abstract In stainless steels, microstructural damage is caused by precipitation of chromium carbides or sigma phase. These microconstituents are detrimental in stainless steel welds because they lead to weld decay. Nevertheless, they are prone to appear in the heat affected zone (HAZ microstructure of stainless steel welds. This is particularly important for repairs of industrial components made of austenitic stainless steel. Non-destructive metallography can be applied in welding repairs of AISI 304 stainless steel components where it is difficult to ensure that no detrimental phase is present in the HAZ microstructure. The need of microstructural inspection in repairs of AISI 304 is caused because it is not possible to manufacture coupons for destructive metallography, with which the microstructure can be analyzed. In this work, it is proposed to apply in situ metallography as non-destructive testing in order to identify microstructural damage in the microstructure of AISI 304 stainless steel welds. The results of this study showed that the external surface micrographs of the weldment are representative of HAZ microstructure of the stainless steel component; because they show the presence of precipitated metallic carbides in the grain boundaries or sigma phase in the microstructure of the HAZ.

  14. Characterization of microstructures in austenitic stainless steels by ultrasonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Baldev; Palanichamy, P.; Jayakumar, T.; Kumar, Anish; Vasudevan, M.; Shankar, P.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, many nondestructive techniques have been considered for microstructural characterization of materials to enable in-situ component assessment for pre-service quality and in-service performance. Ultrasonic parameters have been used for estimation of average grain size, evaluation of recrystallization after cold working, and characterization of Cr2N precipitation during thermal aging in different grades of austenitic stainless steels. Ultrasonic first back wall echo signals were obtained from several specimens of AISI type 316 stainless steel with different grain sizes. Shift in the spectral peak frequency and the change in the full width at half maximum of the autopower spectrum of the first back wall echo are correlated with the grain size in the range 30-150 microns. The advantages of this method are: (i) independence of variation in couplant conditions (ii), applicable even to highly attenuating materials, (iii) direct correlation of the ultrasonic parameters with yield strength and (iv) suitability for shop-floor applications. Recrystallization behavior (temperature range 973-1173 K and time durations 0.5-1000 h) of cold worked titanium modified 316 stainless steel (D9) has been characterized using ultrasonic velocity measurements. A velocity parameter derived using a combination of shear and longitudinal wave velocities is correlated with the degree of recrystallization. These velocity measurement could also identify onset, progress and completion of recrystallization more accurately as compared to hardness and strength measurements. Ultrasonic velocity measurements were performed in thermally aged (at 1123 K for 10 to 2000 h) nuclear grade 316 LN stainless steel. Change in velocity due to thermal aging treatment could be used to reveal the formation of (i) Cr-N clusters associated with high lattice strains, (ii) coherent Cr2N precipitation, (iii) loss of coherency and (iv) growth of incoherent Cr2N precipitates. Microstructural characterization by

  15. Microstructural evolution in fast-neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    The present work has focused on the specific problem of fast-neutron-induced radiation damage to austenitic stainless steels. These steels are used as structural materials in current fast fission reactors and are proposed for use in future fusion reactors. Two primary components of the radiation damage are atomic displacements (in units of displacements per atom, or dpa) and the generation of helium by nuclear transmutation reactions. The radiation environment can be characterized by the ratio of helium to displacement production, the so-called He/dpa ratio. Radiation damage is evidenced microscopically by a complex microstructural evolution and macroscopically by density changes and altered mechanical properties. The purpose of this work was to provide additional understanding about mechanisms that determine microstructural evolution in current fast reactor environments and to identify the sensitivity of this evolution to changes in the He/dpa ratio. This latter sensitivity is of interest because the He/dpa ratio in a fusion reactor first wall will be about 30 times that in fast reactor fuel cladding. The approach followed in the present work was to use a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis. The experimental component of the work primarily involved the examination by transmission electron microscopy of specimens of a model austenitic alloy that had been irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A major aspect of the theoretical work was the development of a comprehensive model of microstructural evolution. This included explicit models for the evolution of the major extended defects observed in neutron irradiated steels: cavities, Frank faulted loops and the dislocation network. 340 refs., 95 figs., 18 tabs

  16. Effect of temperature on sintered austeno-ferritic stainless steel microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munez, C.J. [Departamento de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: claudio.munez@urjc.es; Utrilla, M.V.; Urena, A. [Departamento de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-09-08

    The influence of temperature on microstructural changes of sintered austeno-ferritic steels has been investigated. PM stainless steels have been obtained by sintering mixtures of austenitic and ferritic stainless steel powders. Only temperature-induced phase transformation was observed in austenite, as a result of elements interdiffusion between both phases. Microstructural characterization was completed with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and micro- and nano-indentation test, it is revealed an increase in the hardness with respect to the solutionized materials.

  17. Microstructural characterization in dissimilar friction stir welding between 304 stainless steel and st37 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafarzadegan, M.; Feng, A.H.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Saeid, T.; Shen, J.; Assadi, H.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, 3 mm-thick plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by friction stir welding at a welding speed of 50 mm/min and tool rotational speed of 400 and 800 rpm. X-ray diffraction test was carried out to study the phases which might be formed in the welds. Metallographic examinations, and tensile and microhardness tests were used to analyze the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Four different zones were found in the weld area except the base metals. In the stir zone of the 304 stainless steel, a refined grain structure with some features of dynamic recrystallization was evidenced. A thermomechanically-affected zone was characterized on the 304 steel side with features of dynamic recovery. In the other side of the stir zone, the hot deformation of the st37 steel in the austenite region produced small austenite grains and these grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite and some products of displacive transformations such as Widmanstatten ferrite and martensite by cooling the material after friction stir welding. The heat-affected zone in the st37 steel side showed partially and fully refined microstructures like fusion welding processes. The recrystallization in the 304 steel and the transformations in the st37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld area and therefore, improved the tensile properties of the joint. - Highlights: ► FSW produced sound welds between st37 low carbon steel and 304 stainless steel. ► The SZ of the st37 steel contained some products of allotropic transformation. ► The material in the SZ of the 304 steel showed features of dynamic recrystallization. ► The finer microstructure in the SZ increased the hardness and tensile strength.

  18. Investigation of Microstructure and Corrosion Propagation Behaviour of Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel Plates

    OpenAIRE

    Abidin Kamal Ariff Zainal; Ismail Elya Atikah; Zainuddin Azman; Hussain Patthi

    2014-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels are commonly used for fabricating components. For many applications, an increase in surface hardness and wear resistance can be beneficial to improve performance and extend service life. However, the improvement in hardness of martensitic steels is usually accompanied by a reduction in corrosion strength. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of nitriding on AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel, in terms of microstructure and corrosion propagat...

  19. Stablization of Nanotwinned Microstructures in Stainless Steels Through Alloying and Microstructural Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    Effects of carbon content, deformation, and interfacial energetics on carbide precipitation and corrosion sensitization in 304 stainless steel , Acta...Alumina- Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels Strengthened by LAves Phase and MC Carbide Precipitates , Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A...nano- precipitate engineering---of nanotwinned stainless steels . This preliminary work has provided valuable insight into the mechanisms responsible

  20. Investigation of Microstructure and Corrosion Propagation Behaviour of Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abidin Kamal Ariff Zainal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Martensitic stainless steels are commonly used for fabricating components. For many applications, an increase in surface hardness and wear resistance can be beneficial to improve performance and extend service life. However, the improvement in hardness of martensitic steels is usually accompanied by a reduction in corrosion strength. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of nitriding on AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel, in terms of microstructure and corrosion propagation behavior. The results indicate that the microstructure and phase composition as well as corrosion resistance were influenced by nitriding temperatures.

  1. Microstructure and wear resistance of spray-formed supermartensitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Zepon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the early 90's the oil industry has been encouraging the development of corrosion and wear resistant alloys for onshore and offshore pipeline applications. In this context supermartensitic stainless steel was introduced to replace the more expensive duplex stainless steel for tubing applications. Despite the outstanding corrosion resistance of stainless steels, their wear resistance is of concern. Some authors reported obtaining material processed by spray forming, such as ferritic stainless steel, superduplex stainless steel modified with boron, and iron-based amorphous alloys, which presented high wear resistance while maintaining the corrosion performance1,2. The addition of boron to iron-based alloys promotes the formation of hard boride particles (M2B type which improve their wear resistances3-9. This work aimed to study the microstructure and wear resistance of supermartensitic stainless steel modified with 0.3 wt. (% and 0.7 wt. (% processed by spray forming (SF-SMSS 0.3%B and SF-SMSS 0.7%B, respectively. These boron contents were selected in order to improve the wear resistance of supermartensitic stainless steel through the formation of uniformly distributed borides maintaining the characteristics of the corrosion resistant matrix. SF-SMSS 0.7%B presents an abrasive wear resistance considerably higher than spray-formed supermartensitic stainless steel without boron addition (SF-SMSS.

  2. Deformation Induced Martensitic Transformation and Its Initial Microstructure Dependence in a High Alloyed Duplex Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Lin; Huang, Tian Lin; Wang, Yu Hui

    2017-01-01

    Deformation induced martensitic transformation (DIMT) usually occurs in metastable austenitic stainless steels. Recent studies have shown that DIMT may occur in the austenite phase of low alloyed duplex stainless steels. The present study demonstrates that DIMT can also take place in a high alloyed...... Fe–23Cr–8.5Ni duplex stainless steel, which exhibits an unexpectedly rapid transformation from γ-austenite into α′-martensite. However, an inhibited martensitic transformation has been observed by varying the initial microstructure from a coarse alternating austenite and ferrite band structure...

  3. The effects of laser welding parameters on the microstructure of ferritic and duplex stainless steels welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkarinen, J.; Kujanpää, V.

    This study is focused to determine empirically, which microstructural changes occur in ferritic and duplex stainless steels when heat input is controlled by welding parameters. Test welds were done autogenously bead-on-plate without shielding gas using 5 kW fiber laser. For comparison, some gas tungsten arc welds were made. Used test material were 1.4016 (AISI 430) and 1.4003 (low-carbon ferritic) type steels in ferritic steels group and 1.4162 (low-alloyed duplex, LDX2101) and 1.4462 (AISI 2205) type steels in duplex steels group. Microstructural changes in welds were identified and examined using optical metallographic methods.

  4. Dose dependence of the microstructural evolution in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Maziasz, P.J.; Stoller, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    Microstructural data on the evolution of the dislocation loop, cavity, and precipitate populations in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels are reviewed in order to estimate the displacement damage levels needed to achieve the 'steady state' condition. The microstructural data can be conveniently divided into two temperature regimes. In the low temperature regime (below about 200 degrees C) the microstructure of austenitic stainless steel is dominated by 'black spot' defect clusters and faulted interstitial dislocation loops. The dose needed to approach saturation of the loop and defect cluster densities is generally on the order of 1 displacement per atom (dpa) in this regime. In the high temperature regime (∼300 to 700 degrees C), cavities, precipitates, loops and network dislocations are all produced during irradiation; doses in excess of 10 dpa are generally required to approach a 'steady state' microstructural condition. Due to complex interactions between the various microstructural components that form during irradiation, a secondary transient regime is typically observed in commercial stainless steels during irradiation at elevated temperatures. This slowly evolving secondary transient may extend to damage levels in excess of 50 dpa in typical 300-series stainless steels, and to >100 dpa in radiation-resistant developmental steels. The detailed evolution of any given microstructural component in the high-temperature regime is sensitive to slight variations in numerous experimental variables, including heat-to-heat composition changes and neutron spectrum

  5. On the processing, microstructure, mechanical and wear properties of cermet/stainless steel layer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farid, Akhtar; Guo Shiju

    2007-01-01

    This study deals with layer composites of carbide reinforcements and stainless steel prepared successfully by powder technology. The layer material consisted of two layers. The top layer consisted of reinforcements (TiC and NbC) and 465 stainless steel as the binder material for the carbides. The bottom layer was entirely of binder material (465 stainless steel). The microstructure of the composite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The microstructural study revealed that the top layer (TiC-NbC/465 stainless steel) showed the typical core-rim microstructure of conventional steel bonded cermets and the bottom layer showed the structure of sintered steel. An intermediate layer was found with a gradient microstructure, having a higher carbide content towards the cermet layer and lower carbide content towards the stainless steel layer. The bending strength of the layered material measured in the direction perpendicular to the layer alignment was remarkably high. The variation of strength as a function of the thickness of the bottom layer revealed that the character of the material changed from the cermet, to a layer composite and then towards metallic materials. The wear resistance of the top layer was studied against high speed steel. The wear mechanisms were discussed by means of microscopical observations on the worn surfaces. The wear was severe at higher wear loads and lower TiC content. Microploughing of the stainless steel matrix was found to be the dominant wear mechanism. Heavy microploughing and rapid removal of material from the wear surface was observed at high wear load. The fracture morphologies of the top, bottom and intermediate layers are reported

  6. TiC-Maraging stainless steel composite: microstructure, mechanical and wear properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akhtar Farid; GUO Shiju; FENG Peizhong; Khadijah Ali Shah; Syed Javid Askari

    2006-01-01

    Particulate TiC reinforced 17-4PH and 465 maraging stainless steel matrix composites were processed by conventional powder metallurgy (P/M). TiC-maraging stainless steel composites with theoretical density >97% were produced using conventional P/M. The microstructure, and mechanical and wear properties of the composites were evaluated. The microstructure of the composites consisted of (core-rim structure) spherical and semi-spherical TiC particles depending on the wettability of the matrix with TiC particles. In TiC-maraging stainless steel composites, 465 stainless steel binder phase showed good wettability with TiC particles. Some microcracks appeared in the composites, indicating the presence of tensile stresses in the composites produced during sintering. The typical properties, hardness, and bend strength were reported for the composites. After heat treatment and aging, an increase in hardness was observed. The increase in hardness was attributed to the aging reaction in maraging stainless steel. The specific wear behavior of the composites strongly depends on the content of TiC particles and their interparticle spacing, and on the heat treatment of the maraging stainless steel.

  7. Evolution of microstructure in stainless martensitic steel for seamless tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyshmintsev, I. Yu.; Bityukov, S. M.; Pastukhov, V. I.; Danilov, S. V.; Vedernikova, L. O.; Lobanov, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with orientation analysis by the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) method is used to study microstructures and textures formed in the 0.08C-13Cr-3Ni-Mo-V-Nb steel through seamless tube production route: after hot deformation by extrusion; after quenching from various temperatures and subsequent high tempering. It is shown that the martensitic microstructure formed both after hot deformation and after quenching is characterized by the presence of deformation crystallographic texture, which is predetermined by the texture of austenite. The effect of heat treatment on texture, packet refinement, lath width, precipitation of carbides and Charpy impact energy is analyzed.

  8. Effects of high energy nitrogen implantation on stainless steel microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, H.; Mille, P.; Cornet, A.; Grob, J. J.; Stoquert, J. P.; Muller, D.

    1999-01-01

    Low energy ion implantation is known to improve chemical and mechanical surface properties of metals. This treatment is often used to enhance wear and corrosion resistance or mechanical life-time of fatigue test of stainless steel or titanium alloys. The aim of this work is to investigate these effects at higher energy, for which deeper (and still not well understood) modifications occur. High fluence (10 18 cm -2) 15N and 14N implantations at 1 MeV have been performed in the 316LL stainless steel and some specimen have been annealed in the 200-500°C temperature range. Nitrogen concentration distribution, structure, morphology and microhardness have been examined with Nuclear Resonance Analysis, Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction and Nanoindentation, respectively. Precipitates of steel and chromium nitride phases and a superficial martensitic transformation can be observed, leading to a significant increase of hardness. The best result is obtained after one hour annealing at 425°C, due to a larger and more homogeneous repartition of nitride species. In this case, a near surface accumulation is observed and explained in terms of diffusion and precipitation mechanisms.

  9. Overview of microstructural evolution in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are important structural materials common to several different reactor systems, including light water and fast breeder fission, and magnetic fusion reactors (LWR, FBR, and MFR, respectively). The microstructures that develop in 300 series austenitic stainless steels during neutron irradiation at 60-700 C include combinations of dislocation loops and networks, bubbles and voids, and various kinds of precipitate phases (radiation-induced, or -enhanced or -modified thermal phases). Many property changes in these steels during neutron irradiation are directly or indirectly related to radiation-induced microstructural evolution. Even more important is the fact that radiation-resistance of such steels during either FBR or MFR irradiation is directly related to control of the evolving microstructure during such irradiation. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the large and complex body of data accumulated from various fission reactor irradiation experiments conducted over the many years of research on microstructural evolution in this family of steels. The data can be organized into several different temperature regimes which then define the nature of the dominant microstructural components and their sensitivities to irradiation parameters (dose, helium/dpa ratio, dose rate) or metallurgical variables (alloy composition, pretreatment). The emphasis in this paper will be on the underlying mechanisms driving the microstructure to evolve during irradiation or those enabling microstructural stability related to radiation resistance. (orig.)

  10. Microstructural characterization of thermally-aged duplex stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomoto, A.; Hamaoka, T.; Nishida, K.; Dohi, K.; Soneda, N.

    2011-01-01

    The embrittlement of duplex stainless steels is of concern for the long term operation of light water reactors. The objectives of this work was to characterize solute atom distribution in ferrite phase of thermally aged duplex stainless steels by using atom tomography probe and to measure the hardness of ferrite phase by using nano-indentation technique. This series of slides highlights 4 main conclusions. First, phase separation quickly evolves and then slows down during the thermal ageing. Secondly, precipitates are formed after ageing for 1000 hr at 400 C and 2000 hr at 350 C. The clusters become larger with time at 400 C. Chemical composition of the clusters do not change very much with cluster size and ageing time at 400 C. Thirdly, no cluster formation is observed in the materials aged at 450 C. It is likely that precipitation occurs faster than phase separation at lower temperatures. Fourthly, hardness changes are well described by combining the contributions of phase separation and G phase formation. 'Variation' is a good parameter to describe hardness change due to phase separation. Contribution of G-phase needs to be considered separately

  11. Microstructural characterization of pulsed plasma nitrided 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asgari, M.; Barnoush, A.; Johnsen, R.; Hoel, R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The low temperature pulsed plasma nitrided layer of 316 SS was studied. → The plastic deformation induced in the austenite due to nitriding is characterized by EBSD at different depths (i.e., nitrogen concentration). → Nanomechanical properties of the nitride layer was investigated by nanoindentation at different depths (i.e., nitrogen concentration). → High hardness, high nitrogen concentration and high dislocation density is detected in the nitride layer. → The hardness and nitrogen concentration decreased sharply beyond the nitride layer. - Abstract: Pulsed plasma nitriding (PPN) treatment is one of the new processes to improve the surface hardness and tribology behavior of austenitic stainless steels. Through low temperature treatment (<440 deg. C), it is possible to obtain unique combinations of wear and corrosion properties. Such a combination is achieved through the formation of a so-called 'extended austenite phase'. These surface layers are often also referred to as S-phase, m-phase or γ-phase. In this work, nitrided layers on austenitic stainless steels AISI 316L (SS316L) were examined by means of a nanoindentation method at different loads. Additionally, the mechanical properties of the S-phase at different depths were studied. Electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) examination of the layer showed a high amount of plasticity induced in the layer during its formation. XRD results confirmed the formation of the S-phase, and no deleterious CrN phase was detected.

  12. Microstructure Evolution During Creep of Cold Worked Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishan Yadav, Hari; Ballal, A. R.; Thawre, M. M.; Vijayanand, V. D.

    2018-04-01

    The 14Cr–15Ni austenitic stainless steel (SS) with additions of Ti, Si, and P has been developed for their superior creep strength and better resistance to void swelling during service as nuclear fuel clad and wrapper material. Cold working induces defects such as dislocations that interact with point defects generated by neutron irradiation and facilitates recombination to make the material more resistant to void swelling. In present investigation, creep properties of the SS in mill annealed condition (CW0) and 40 % cold worked (CW4) condition were studied. D9I stainless steel was solution treated at 1333 K for 30 minutes followed by cold rolling. Uniaxial creep tests were performed at 973 K for various stress levels ranging from 175-225 MPa. CW4 samples exhibited better creep resistance as compared to CW0 samples. During creep exposure, cold worked material exhibited phenomena of recovery and recrystallization wherein new strain free grains were observed with lesser dislocation network. In contrast CW0 samples showed no signs of recovery and recrystallization after creep exposure. Partial recrystallization on creep exposure led to higher drop in hardness in cold worked sample as compared to that in mill annealed sample. Accelerated precipitation of carbides at the grain boundaries was observed during creep exposure and this phenomenon was more pronounced in cold worked sample.

  13. Microstructure and microhardness of 17-4 PH stainless steel made by laser metal deposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bayode, A

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available variety of metallic powders. This paper investigates the evolving properties of laser deposited 17-4PH stainless steel. The microstructure was martensitic with a dendritic structure. The average microhardness of the samples was found to be less than...

  14. Microstructural characterization of AISI 431 martensitic stainless steel laser-deposited coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmati, I.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    High cooling rates during laser cladding of stainless steels may alter the microstructure and phase constitution of the claddings and consequently change their functional properties. In this research, solidification structures and solid state phase transformation products in single and multi layer

  15. Study on microstructure and mechanical characteristics of low-carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkari Khorrami, Mahmoud; Mostafaei, Mohammad Ali; Pouraliakbar, Hesam, E-mail: hpouraliakbar@alum.sharif.edu; Kokabi, Amir Hossein

    2014-07-01

    In this work, examinations on the microstructure and mechanical properties of plain carbon steel and AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel dissimilar welds are carried out. Welding is conducted in both autogenous and using ER309L austenitic filler rod conditions through gas tungsten arc welding process. The results indicate that fully-ferritic and duplex ferritic–martensitic microstructures are formed for autogenous and filler-added welds, respectively. Carbide precipitation and formation of martensite at ferrite grain boundaries (intergranular martensite) as well as grain growth occur in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of AISI 430 steel. It is found that weld heat input can strongly affect grain growth phenomenon along with the amount and the composition of carbides and intergranular martensite. Acquired mechanical characteristics of weld in the case of using filler metal are significantly higher than those of autogenous one. Accordingly, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), hardness, and absorbed energy during tensile test of weld metal are increased from 662 MPa to 910 MPa, 140 Hv to 385 Hv, and 53.6 J m{sup −3} to 79 J m{sup −3}, respectively by filler metal addition. From fracture surfaces, predominantly ductile fracture is observed in the specimen welded with filler metal while mainly cleavage fracture occurs in the autogenous weld metal.

  16. Heat treatment giving a stable high temperature micro-structure in cast austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Donald L.; Lemkey, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    A novel micro-structure developed in a cast austenitic stainless steel alloy and a heat treatment thereof are disclosed. The alloy is based on a multicomponent Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-Nb-C system consisting of an austenitic iron solid solution (.gamma.) matrix reinforced by finely dispersed carbide phases and a heat treatment to produce the micro-structure. The heat treatment includes a prebraze heat treatment followed by a three stage braze cycle heat treatment.

  17. Microstructure and properties of gravity sintered 316l stainless steel powder with nickel boride addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božić Dušan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work demonstrates a procedure for synthesis of stainless steel powder by gravity sintering method. As an additive to the basic powder, NiB powder was added in the amount of 0.2 - 1.0 wt.%. Gravity sintering was done in vacuum, at the temperatures of 1100°C-1250°C, in the course of 3 - 60 min, using ceramic mould. Structural characterization was conducted by XRD, and microstructural analysis by optical and scanning electron microscope (SEM. Mechanical properties were investigated by tensile tests with steel rings. Density and permeability were determined by standard techniques for porous samples. Gravity sintered stainless steel with NiB addition had more superior mechanical and physico-chemical properties compared to stainless steel obtained by standard powder metallurgy procedures - pressing and sintering. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172005

  18. Microstructure and Hardness of High Temperature Gas Nitrided AISI 420 Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Nor Nurulhuda Md.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the microstructure and hardness of as-received and nitrided AISI 420 martensitic stainless steels. High temperature gas nitriding was employed to treat the steels at 1200°C for one hour and four hours using nitrogen gas, followed by furnace cooled. Chromium nitride and iron nitride were formed and concentrated at the outmost surface area of the steels since this region contained the highest concentration of nitrogen. The grain size enlarged at the interior region of the nitrided steels due to nitriding at temperature above the recrystallization temperature of the steel and followed by slow cooling. The nitrided steels produced higher surface hardness compared to as-received steel due to the presence of nitrogen and the precipitation of nitrides. Harder steel was produced when nitriding at four hours compared to one hour since more nitrogen permeated into the steel.

  19. Microstructural and thermal stability of selective laser melted 316L stainless steel single tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krakhmalev, P.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To remove residual stresses, an as-built SLM object is usually post- treated. This treatment can affect the microstructure, changing the final mechanical characteristics. This investigation is focused on the microstructural characterisation of 316L austenitic stainless steel in as-built and annealed conditions. The SLM microstructure was relatively stable up to 900°C, when cell boundaries start to disappear. At higher temperatures, an insignificant grain coarsening was detected. These microstructural changes caused a gradual drop in the hardness. The obtained result is background for the future development of post-treatment regimens to achieve a high level in the final mechanical properties of SLM objects.

  20. Heat treatment temperature influence on ASTM A890 GR 6A super duplex stainless steel microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Marcelo; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Duplex and super duplex stainless steels are ferrous alloys with up to 26% chromium, 8% nickel, 5% molybdenum and 0.3% nitrogen, which are largely used in applications in media containing ions from the halogen family, mainly the chloride ion (Cl - ). The emergence of this material aimed at substituting Copper-Nickel alloys (Cupro-Nickel) that despite presenting good corrosion resistance, has mechanical properties quite inferior to steel properties. The metallurgy of duplex and super duplex stainless steel is complex due to high sensitiveness to sigma phase precipitation that becomes apparent, due to the temperatures they are exposed on cooling from solidification as well as from heat treatment processes. The objective of this study was to verify the influence of heat treating temperatures on the microstructure and hardness of ASTM A890/A890M Gr 6A super duplex stainless steel type. Microstructure control is of extreme importance for castings, as the chemical composition and cooling during solidification inevitably provide conditions for precipitation of sigma phase. Higher hardness in these materials is directly associated to high sigma phase concentration in the microstructure, precipitated in the ferrite/austenite interface. While heat treatment temperature during solution treatment increases, the sigma phase content in the microstructure decreases and consequently, the material hardness diminishes. When the sigma phase was completely dissolved by the heat treatment, the material hardness was influenced only due to ferrite and austenite contents in the microstructure

  1. A Short review on wrought austenitic stainless steels at high temperatures: processing, microstructure, properties and performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Lesley Plaut

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Wrought austenitic stainless steels are widely used in high temperature applications. This short review discusses initially the processing of this class of steels, with emphasis on solidification and hot working behavior. Following, a brief summary is made on the precipitation behavior and the numerous phases that may appear in their microstructures. Creep and oxidation resistance are, then, briefly discussed, and finalizing their performance is compared with other high temperature metallic materials.

  2. Microstructure in 316LN stainless steel fatigued at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruml, T.; Polak, J.

    2000-01-01

    The internal structure of AISI 316LN austenitic stainless steel cyclically strained at liquid nitrogen temperature has been studied using transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. High amplitude cyclic straining promotes the transformation of austenite with face centred cubic (f.c.c.) structure into ε-martensite with hexagonal close packed (h.c.p.) structure and α'-martensite with distorted base centred cubic (b.c.c.) structure. Thin plates containing ε-martensite were identified in all grains. α'-martensite nucleates at the intersection of the plates in grains with two or more systems of plates and can grow in the bands. The orientation of transformed phases follows the Shoji-Nichiyama and Kurdjumov-Sachs relations. Mechanisms of low temperature cyclic straining are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties in Dissimilar Austenitic/Super Duplex Stainless Steel Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Mehdi; Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza

    2014-10-01

    To study the effect of chemical composition on microstructural features and mechanical properties of dissimilar joints between super duplex and austenitic stainless steels, welding was attempted by gas tungsten arc welding process with a super duplex (ER2594) and an austenitic (ER309LMo) stainless steel filler metal. While the austenitic weld metal had vermicular delta ferrite within austenitic matrix, super duplex stainless steel was mainly comprised of allotriomorphic grain boundary and Widmanstätten side plate austenite morphologies in the ferrite matrix. Also the heat-affected zone of austenitic base metal comprised of large austenite grains with little amounts of ferrite, whereas a coarse-grained ferritic region was observed in the heat-affected zone of super duplex base metal. Although both welded joints showed acceptable mechanical properties, the hardness and impact strength of the weld metal produced using super duplex filler metal were found to be better than that obtained by austenitic filler metal.

  4. Formation of microstructural features in hot-dip aluminized AISI 321 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huilgol, Prashant; Rajendra Udupa, K.; Udaya Bhat, K.

    2018-02-01

    Hot-dip aluminizing (HDA) is a proven surface coating technique for improving the oxidation and corrosion resistance of ferrous substrates. Although extensive studies on the HDA of plain carbon steels have been reported, studies on the HDA of stainless steels are limited. Because of the technological importance of stainless steels in high-temperature applications, studies of their microstructural development during HDA are needed. In the present investigation, the HDA of AISI 321 stainless steel was carried out in a pure Al bath. The microstructural features of the coating were studied using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. These studies revealed that the coating consists of two regions: an Al top coat and an aluminide layer at the interface between the steel and Al. The Al top coat was found to consist of intermetallic phases such as Al7Cr and Al3Fe dispersed in an Al matrix. Twinning was observed in both the Al7Cr and the Al3Fe phases. Furthermore, the aluminide layer comprised a mixture of nanocrystalline Fe2Al5, Al7Cr, and Al. Details of the microstructural features are presented, and their formation mechanisms are discussed.

  5. Influence of microstructure on low cycle fatigue in some single phase and biphasic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolarz, J. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, Centre SMS, URA CNRS 1884, Saint-Etienne (France)

    2004-07-01

    This overview deals with the effects of microstructural parameters in different single phase and biphasic stainless steels on short crack behaviour and on fatigue life in the low cycle regime. The effect of the grain size is investigated in a single phase austenitic stainless steel. Under plastic strain control, the fatigue life increases when the grain size decreases. The results are discussed by analysing the distributions of crack depths as a function of the grain size. The second type of material is a metastable austenitic steel which partially transforms into martensite during LCF at temperatures between -50 C and +120 C. The grain size of the initially single phase austenitic microstructure has a combined influence on the volume fraction of martensite produced during fatigue and on the fatigue life. In this case, the grain size effect is still considerable but totally indirect because all fatigue cracks grow exclusively in the martensite. The cyclic behaviour analysis in biphasic alloys in which two phases undergo plastic deformation during LCF is considerably more complex because the conventional concept of microstructural barriers cannot be applied. The possible damage patterns in a pair of grains with different mechanical properties are discussed on the example of a solution treated and aged superduplex austenitic-ferritic stainless steel (SDSS). The hardening of one phase (ferrite) through ageing at 475 C changes the cyclic behaviour of the initial ''quasi single phase'' microstructure. Consequently, the fatigue life under plastic strain control decreases compared with the solution treated SDSS. The discussion is focussed on LCF damage mechanisms at the microstructure size scale with a particular accent put on the propagation of short cracks in the bulk. All the microstructures exhibit some common features with respect to the behaviour of short cracks. In particular a strong effect of microstructural barriers in the bulk and the

  6. Microstructural Evolutions During Reversion Annealing of Cold-Rolled AISI 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghizadeh, Meysam; Mirzadeh, Hamed

    2018-06-01

    Microstructural evolutions during reversion annealing of a plastically deformed AISI 316 stainless steel were investigated and three distinct stages were identified: the reversion of strain-induced martensite to austenite, the primary recrystallization of the retained austenite, and the grain growth process. It was found that the slow kinetics of recrystallization at lower annealing temperatures inhibit the formation of an equiaxed microstructure and might effectively impair the usefulness of this thermomechanical treatment for the objective of grain refinement. By comparing the behavior of AISI 316 and 304 alloys, it was found that the mentioned slow kinetics is related to the retardation effect of solute Mo in the former alloy. At high reversion annealing temperature, however, an equiaxed austenitic microstructure was achieved quickly in AISI 316 stainless steel due to the temperature dependency of retardation effect of molybdenum, which allowed the process of recrystallization to happen easily. Conclusively, this work can shed some light on the issues of this efficient grain refining approach for microstructural control of austenitic stainless steels.

  7. Microstructure and mechanical properties of resistance upset butt welded 304 austenitic stainless steel joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharifitabar, M.; Halvaee, A.; Khorshahian, S.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Three different microstructural zones formed at different distances from the joint interface in resistance upset butt welding of 304 austenitic stainless steel. Highlights: → Evaluation of microstructure in resistance upset welding of 304 stainless steel. → Evaluation of welding parameters effects on mechanical properties of the joint. → Introducing the optimum welding condition for joining stainless steel bars. -- Abstract: Resistance upset welding (UW) is a widely used process for joining metal parts. In this process, current, time and upset pressure are three parameters that affect the quality of welded products. In the present research, resistance upset butt welding of 304 austenitic stainless steel and effect of welding power and upset pressure on microstructure, tensile strength and fatigue life of the joint were investigated. Microstructure of welds were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was used to distinguish the phase(s) that formed at the joint interface and in heat affected zone (HAZ). Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) linked to the SEM was used to determine chemical composition of phases formed at the joint interface. Fatigue tests were performed using a pull-push fatigue test machine and the fatigue properties were analyzed drawing stress-number of cycles to failure (S-N) curves. Also tensile strength tests were performed. Finally tensile and fatigue fracture surfaces were studied by SEM. Results showed that there were three different microstructural zones at different distances from the joint interface and delta ferrite phase has formed in these regions. There was no precipitation of chromium carbide at the joint interface and in the HAZ. Tensile and fatigue strengths of the joint decreased with welding power. Increasing of upset pressure has also considerable influence on tensile strength of the joint. Fractography of fractured samples showed that formation of hot spots at

  8. Studies on microstructure, mechanical and pitting corrosion behaviour of similar and dissimilar stainless steel gas tungsten arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Dilkush; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to weld dissimilar alloys of 5mm thick plates i.e., austenitic stainless steel (316L) and duplex stainless steel (2205) and compared with that of similar welds. Welds are made with conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process with two different filler wires namely i.e., 309L and 2209. Welds were characterized using optical microscopy to observe the microstructural changes and correlate with mechanical properties using hardness, tensile and impact testing. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were carried out to observe the pitting corrosion behaviour in different regions of the welds. Results of the present study established that change in filler wire composition resulted in microstructural variation in all the welds with different morphology of ferrite and austenite. Welds made with 2209 filler showed plate like widmanstatten austenite (WA) nucleated at grain boundaries. Compared to similar stainless steel welds inferior mechanical properties was observed in dissimilar stainless steel welds. Pitting corrosion resistance is observed to be low for dissimilar stainless steel welds when compared to similar stainless steel welds. Overall study showed that similar duplex stainless steel welds having favorable microstructure and resulted in better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Relatively dissimilar stainless steel welds made with 309L filler obtained optimum combination of mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance when compared to 2209 filler and is recommended for industrial practice.

  9. Effect of solution treatment on microstructure and properties of duplex stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. Y.; Luo, J. M.; Huang, L. Q.; Wang, H. B.; Ma, C. W.

    2017-09-01

    The influence of solution treatment on microstructure and properties of 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) was studied. The microstructure, precipitates and corrosion resisting property were observed and analyzed by means of optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical methods. The results showed that a large number of brittle σ-phase precipitates, which deteriorate the plasticity and corrosion resistance of the material, were easy to produce in the duplex stainless steel under the low temperature. The precipitation of σ-phase can be decreased and the plasticity and corrosion resistance can be improved by increasing solution temperature. In addition, the ferrite content increases with the increase of solution temperature, while less affected by cooling rate.

  10. Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded SAF 2507 super duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Y.S.; Nelson, T.W.; Sterling, C.J.; Steel, R.J.; Pettersson, C.-O.

    2005-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir (FS) welded SAF 2507 super duplex stainless steel were examined. High-quality, full-penetration welds were successfully produced in the super duplex stainless steel by friction stir welding (FSW) using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) tool. The base material had a microstructure consisting of the ferrite matrix with austenite islands, but FSW refined grains of the ferrite and austenite phases in the stir zone through dynamic recrystallisation. Ferrite content was held between 50 and 60% throughout the weld. The smaller grain sizes of the ferrite and austenite phases caused increase in hardness and strength within the stir zone. Welded transverse tensile specimen failed near the border between the stir zone and TMAZ at the retreating side as the weld had roughly the same strengths as the base material

  11. Relationship between microstructure and fracture types in a UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victoria Biezma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Duplex stainless steels are susceptible to the formation of sigma phase at high temperature which could potentially be responsible for catastrophic service failure of components. Thermal treatments were applied to duplex stainless steels in order to promote the precipitation of different fractions of sigma phase into a ferrite-austenite microstructure. Quantitative image analysis was employed to characterize the microstructure and Charpy impact tests were used in order to evaluate the mechanical degradation caused by sigma phase presence. The fracture morphology of the Charpy test specimens were thoroughly observed in SEM, looking for a correlation between the microstructure and the fracture types in UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel. The main conclusion is the strong embrittlement effect of sigma phase since it is possible to observe a transition from transgranular fracture to intergranular fracture as increases the percentage of sigma phase. Thus, the mixed modes of fracture are predominant in the present study with high dependence on sigma phase percentages obtained by different thermal treatments.

  12. Microstructural characterization of dissimilar welds between Incoloy 800H and 321 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayiram, G., E-mail: sayiram.g@vit.ac.in; Arivazhagan, N.

    2015-04-15

    In this work, the microstructural character of dissimilar welds between Incoloy 800H and 321 Stainless Steel has been discussed. The microscopic examination of the base metals, fusion zones and interfaces was characterized using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy. The results revealed precipitates of Ti (C, N) in the austenitic matrix along the grain boundaries of the base metals. Migration of grain boundaries in the Inconel 82 weld metal was very extensive when compared to Inconel 617 weldment. Epitaxial growth was observed in the 617 weldment which increases the strength and ductility of the weld metal. Unmixed zone near the fusion line between 321 Stainless Steel and Inconel 82 weld metal was identified. From the results, it has been concluded that Inconel 617 filler metal is a preferable choice for the joint between Incoloy 800H and 321 Stainless Steel. - Highlights: • Failure mechanisms produced by dissimilar welding of Incoloy 800H to AISI 321SS • Influence of filler wire on microstructure properties • Contemplative comparisons of metallurgical aspects of these weldments • Microstructure and chemical studies including metallography, SEM–EDS • EDS-line scan study at interface.

  13. Influence of microstructure on the microbial corrosion behaviour of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, D. A.; Ibars, J. R.; Ranninger, C.

    2000-01-01

    Several stainless steels (Type UNS S30300, S30400, S30403; S31600, S31603 and S42000) with different microstructural characteristics have been used to study the influence of heat treatments on microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Bio corrosion and accelerated electrochemical testing was performed in various microbiological media. Two species of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have been used in order to ascertain the influence of microstructure. The morphology of corrosion pits produced in both chloride and chloride plus sulphide-SRB metabolites, was inspected by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) complemented with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Results have shown different behaviours regarding corrosion resistance in each case studied. Sensitized austenitic stainless steels were more affected by the presence of aggressive anions and pitting potential (Ep) values were more cathodic than those of as-received state. A corrosion enhancement is produced by the synergistic action of biogenic sulphides and chloride anions. Pitting corrosion in martensitic stainless steel Type UNS S42000 was found in biocorrosion test. The pitting morphology is correlated to the chemical composition, the microstructure and the electrolyte. (Author) 36 refs

  14. Microstructural investigations of fast reactor irradiated austenitic and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueev, V.S.; Medvedeva, E.A.; Mitrofanova, N.M.; Romanueev, V.V.; Tselishev, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    Electron microscopy has been used to characterize the microstructural changes induced in advanced fast reactor fuel claddings fabricated from Cr16Ni15Mo3NbB and Cr16Ni15Mo2Mn2TiVB austenitic stainless steels in the cold worked condition and Cr13Mo2NbVB ferritic -martensitic steel following irradiation in the BOR-60, BN-350 and BN-600 fast reactors. The data are compared with the results obtained from a typical austenitic commercial cladding material, Cr16Ni15Mo3Nb, in the cold worked condition. The results reveal a beneficial effect of boron and other alloying elements in reducing void swelling in 16Cr-15Ni type austenitic steels. The high resistance of ferritic-martensitic steels to void swelling has been confirmed in the Cr13Mo2NbVB steel. (author)

  15. Microstructures of cast-duplex stainless steel after long-term aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.

    1985-10-01

    Microstructures of cast-duplex stainless steels subjected to long-term aging either in the laboratory or during in-reactor service have been characterized and compared by TEM, SEM, and optical microscopy. The microstructural characteristics have been correlated with the impact failure behavior of the material. G-phase, α', and an unidentified Type X precipitate were responsible for the ferrite-phase embrittlement. Precipitation of M 23 C 6 carbides on austenite-ferrite boundaries further degraded the reactor-aged material

  16. An investigation of fusion zone microstructures in electron beam welding of copper-stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnabosco, I.; Ferro, P.; Bonollo, F.; Arnberg, L.

    2006-01-01

    The article presents a study of three different welded joints produced by electron beam welding dissimilar materials. The junctions were obtained between copper plates and three different austenitic stainless steel plates. Different welding parameters were used according to the different thicknesses of the samples. Morphological, microstructural and mechanical (micro-hardness test) analyses of the weld bead were carried out. The results showed complex heterogeneous fusion zone microstructures characterized both by rapid cooling and poor mixing of the materials which contain main elements which are mutually insoluble. Some defects such as porosity and microfissures were also found. They are mainly due to the process and geometry parameters

  17. The Microstructure and Properties of Super Martensitic Stainless Steel Microalloyed with Tungsten and Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dong; Li, Jun; Liu, Yu-Rong; Yong, Qi-Long; Su, Jie; Cao, Jian-Chun; Tao, Jing-Mei; Zhao, Kun-Yu

    2011-06-01

    The microstructure and properties of super martensitic stainless steel (SMSS) microalloyed with tungsten and copper were studied by means of optical microscopy, dilatometer, X-ray diffraction, and tensile tests. The results showed that the microstructure of SMSS, after quenching and tempering, was a typical biphase structure with tempered martensite and reversed austenite dispersedly distributed in the martensite matrix. W and Cu were added into the SMSS to reduce the transformation temperature (Ms) and improve the strength and hardness of the matrix by grain refining and solid solution strengthening. Thermocalc calculations confirmed that M23C6 compound and Laves phase were precipitated during tempering in the investigated steel. Compared with the traditional SMSS, the steel microalloyed with W and Cu performed better mechanical properties.

  18. Effect of Microstructure on the Wear Behavior of Heat Treated SS-304 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sliding wear characteristics of some heat treated SS-304 stainless steel against EN-8 steel in dry condition have been studied in the present experimental work. Samples of SS-304 stainless steel have been heated in a muffle furnace in desired temperature and allowed to dwell for two hours. The heated specimen are then cooled in different media namely inside the furnace, open air, cutting grade oil (grade 44 and water at room temperature to obtain different grades of heat treatment. Microstructures and corresponding micro hardness of the samples have been measured along with Feritscopic studies. Wear characteristics have been studied in a multi tribo-tester (Ducom in dry sliding condition against EN-8 steel roller. Speed, load on job and duration of test run have been considered as the experimental parameters. The wear of the samples have been obtained directly from ‘Winducom 2006’ software. Mass loss of the samples before and after operation has also been considered as the measure of wear in the present study. All the samples have been slid against EN-8 steel roller with fixed experimental parameters. The data have been plotted, compared and analyzed. Effect of microstructures as well as micro hardness on the wear behavior has been studied and concluded accordingly.

  19. Microstructural evolution of 316L stainless steels with yttrium addition after mechanical milling and heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotan, Hasan, E-mail: hasankotan@gmail.com

    2015-10-28

    Nanocrystalline 316L stainless steels with yttrium addition were prepared by mechanical milling at cryogenic temperature and subjected to annealing treatments at various temperatures up to 1200 °C. The dependence of hardness on the microstructure was utilized to study the mechanical changes in the steels occurring during annealing. The microstructural evolution of the as-milled and annealed steels was characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), focused ion beam microscopy (FIB) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The results have revealed that austenite in as-received powder partially transformed to martensite phase during mechanical milling whereas the annealing induced reverse transformation of martensite-to-austenite. Furthermore, while the austenite-to-martensite phase ratio increased with increasing annealing temperature, the equilibrium structure was not achieved after three hours heat treatments up to 1200 °C resulting in a dual-phased steels with around 10% martensite. The grain size of 316L steel was 19 nm after mechanical milling and remained around 116 nm at 1100 °C with yttrium addition as opposed to micron size grains of plain 316L steel at the same annealing temperature. Such microstructural features facilitate the use of these materials at elevated temperatures, as well as the development of scalable processing routes into a dense nanocrystalline compact.

  20. Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Laser Additively Manufactured 316L Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelewicz, Jason R.; Halada, Gary P.; Donaldson, Olivia K.; Manogharan, Guha

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) of metal alloys to produce complex part designs via powder bed fusion methods such as laser melting promises to be a transformative technology for advanced materials processing. However, effective implementation of AM processes requires a clear understanding of the processing-structure-properties-performance relationships in fabricated components. In this study, we report on the formation of micro and nanoscale structures in 316L stainless steel samples printed by laser AM and their implications for general corrosion resistance. A variety of techniques including x-ray diffraction, optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, x-ray fluorescence, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were employed to characterize the microstructure and chemistry of the laser additively manufactured 316L stainless steel, which are compared with wrought 316L coupons via electrochemical polarization. Apparent segregation of Mo has been found to contribute to a loss of passivity and an increased anodic current density. While porosity will also likely impact the environmental performance (e.g., facilitating crevice corrosion) of AM alloys, this work demonstrates the critical influence of microstructure and heterogeneous solute distributions on the corrosion resistance of laser additively manufactured 316L stainless steel.

  1. Influence o the microstructure of duplex stainless steels on their failure characteristics during hot deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis G.S.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Two types of duplex stainless steels were deformed by torsion at a temperature range of 900 to 1200 °C and strain rate of 1.0 s-1 and their final microstructures were observed. The austenite volume fraction of steel A (26.5Cr - 4.9Ni - 1.6Mo is approximately 25% at room temperature, after conventional annealing, while that of steel B (24Cr - 7.5Ni - 2.3Mo is around 55%. Experimental data show that steel A is ductile at high temperatures and displays low ductility at low temperatures, while steel B has low ductility in the entire range of temperatures studied. At high temperatures, steel A is essentially ferritic and shows dynamic recrystallized grains after deformation. When steel A is strained at low temperatures and displays low austenite volume fraction, microstructural observations indicate that failure is triggered by grain boundary sliding due to the formation of an austenite net structure at the ferrite grain boundaries. At intermediate volume fraction, when austenite forms a dispersed second-phase in steels A and B, failure begins at the ferrite/ferrite boundaries since some of the new ferrite grains may become immobilized by the austenite particles. When steel B is strained at volume fraction of around 50% of austenite and both phases percolate the microstructure, failure occurs after low straining as a consequence of the different plastic behaviors of each of the phases. The failure characteristics of both steels are correlated not only with the volume fraction of austenite but also with its distribution within the ferrite matrix, which limits attainable strain without failure.

  2. Interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of brazed aluminum / stainless steel - joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, V.; Elßner, M.; Uhlig, T.; Wagner, G.

    2017-03-01

    Due to the demand of mass and cost reduction, joints based on dissimilar metals become more and more interesting. Especially there is a high interest for joints between stainless steel and aluminum, often necessary for example for automotive heat exchangers. Brazing offers the possibilities to manufacture several joints in one step at, in comparison to fusion welding, lower temperatures. In the recent work, aluminum / stainless steel - joints are produced by induction brazing using an AlSi10 filler and a non-corrosive flux. The mechanical properties are determined by tensile shear tests as well as fatigue tests at ambient and elevated temperatures. The microstructure of the brazed joints and the fracture surfaces of the tested samples are investigated by SEM.

  3. Microstructural evolution and strain hardening behavior of the cold-drawn austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jeom Yong; Jin, Won

    1998-01-01

    The strain induced α ' -martensite formation and the strain hardening behavior of metastable austenitic stainless steel during cold drawing have been investigated. The strain induced α ' -martensite nucleates mainly at the intersection of the mechanical twins rather than ε-martensite. It could be explained by the increase of stacking fault energy which arises from the heat generated during high speed drawing and, for AISI 304/Cu, the additional effect of Cu additions. The strain hardening behavior of austenitic stainless steel is strongly related to the microstructural evolution accompanied by strain induced α ' -martensite. The work hardening rates of cold-drawn 304 increased with increasing interstitial element(C,N) contents which affect the strength of the strain induced α ' -martensite

  4. Effect of irradiation temperature on microstructural changes in self-ion irradiated austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hyung-Ha; Ko, Eunsol; Lim, Sangyeob; Kwon, Junhyun; Shin, Chansun

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the microstructural and hardness changes in austenitic stainless steel after Fe ion irradiation at 400, 300, and 200 °C using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nanoindentation. The size of the Frank loops increased and the density decreased with increasing irradiation temperature. Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) was detected across high-angle grain boundaries, and the degree of RIS increases with increasing irradiation temperature. Ni-Si clusters were observed using high-resolution TEM in the sample irradiated at 400 °C. The results of this work are compared with the literature data of self-ion and proton irradiation at comparable temperatures and damage levels on stainless steels with a similar material composition with this study. Despite the differences in dose rate, alloy composition and incident ion energy, the irradiation temperature dependence of RIS and the size and density of radiation defects followed the same trends, and were very comparable in magnitude.

  5. Effect of titanium on microstructural changes in SUS 316 stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawanishi, H.; Yamada, M.; Fukuya, K.; Ishino, S.

    1982-01-01

    The microstructural changes have been examined in order to study the effect of titanium addition to type 316 stainless steels on void swelling. Titanium ions of 400 keV from an accelerator have been implanted at room temperature to solution treated SUS 316 stainless steels which have the original titanium content of 0.02 wt.% to the concentration increase of titanium by 0.01, 0.02 and 0.1 wt.%. Following the preinjection of 20 at.ppm helium at ambient temperature, 400 keV-aluminium ions have been irradiated to the specimen to 40 dpa at 550, 625 and 675 0 C. The TEM observations have revealed that the void number density is drastically increased in the specimen with the content of implanted titanium of more than 0.01 wt.%, whereas the void diameter is remarkably decreased with the titanium content. (orig.)

  6. Weldability and microstructural analysis of nuclear-grade austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.H.

    1988-01-01

    This study evaluated the hot-ductility response, and hot-cracking susceptibility (fusion-zone solidification cracking and HAZ liquation cracking) of modified nuclear-grade and standard austenitic stainless steels. Extensive microstructural characterization using state-of-the-art analytical electron microscopy (TEM and STEM) as well as SEM (EDAX) and OLM was performed to correlate the material behavior with metallurgical characteristics. In addition, studies of the effect of Si, N, and rare earth elements on hot-cracking susceptibility, significance of the ductility dip phenomena and backfilled solidification cracks were also performed. Furthermore, based on the metallurgical evaluation, the possible mechanisms involved in solidification cracking and HAZ liquation cracking of the modified alloys are proposed. Finally, the optimized chemical specifications and requirements for nuclear-grade stainless steels are also suggested

  7. Tensile Deformation Temperature Impact on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AISI 316LN Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yi; He, Tiantian; Lu, Yan; Ren, Fengzhang; Volinsky, Alex A.; Cao, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Uniaxial tensile tests were conducted on AISI 316LN austenitic stainless steel from - 40 to 300 °C at a rate of 0.5 mm/min. Microstructure and mechanical properties of the deformed steel were investigated by optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopies, x-ray diffraction, and microhardness testing. The yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, elongation, and microhardness increase with the decrease in the test temperature. The tensile fracture morphology has the dimple rupture feature after low-temperature deformations and turns to a mixture of transgranular fracture and dimple fracture after high-temperature ones. The dominating deformation microstructure evolves from dislocation tangle/slip bands to large deformation twins/slip bands with temperature decrease. The deformation-induced martensite transformation can only be realized at low temperature, and its quantity increases with the decrease in the temperature.

  8. Improved swelling resistance for PCA austenitic stainless steel under HFIR irradiation through microstructural control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.

    1983-01-01

    Six microstructural variants of Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA) were evaluated for swelling resistance during HFIR irradiation, together with several heats of type 316 stainless steel (316). Swelling was negligible in all the steels at 300 0 C after approx. 44 dpa. At 500 to 600 0 C 25%-cold-worked PCA showed better void swelling resistance than type 316 at approx. 44 dpa. There was less swelling variability among alloys at 400 0 C, but again 25%-cold-worked PCA was the best. Microstructurally, swelling resistance correlated with development of fine, stable bubbles whereas high swelling was due to coarser distributions of bubbles becoming unstable and converting to voids (bias-driven cavities)

  9. Influence of nitrogen on the sensitization, corrosion, mechanical, and microstructural properties of stainless steels. Second annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.A.T.

    1983-04-01

    In order to elucidate the mechanistic role of nitrogen on the SCC of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water, slow-strain-rate tests in 0.01M Na 2 SO 4 and 0.01M NaCl aqueous solutions, at 250 0 C, and metallographic observations of the microstructure by TEM and SEM were carried out in the current study on austenitic stainless steels with various nitrogen contents

  10. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of shielded metal arc-welded dissimilar joints comprising duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, P. Bala; Muthupandi, V.; Sivan, V.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Dietzel, W.

    2006-12-01

    This work describes the results of an investigation on a dissimilar weld joint comprising a boiler-grade low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel (DSS). Welds produced by shielded metal arc-welding with two different electrodes (an austenitic and a duplex grade) were examined for their microstructural features and properties. The welds were found to have overmatching mechanical properties. Although the general corrosion resistance of the weld metals was good, their pitting resistance was found to be inferior when compared with the DSS base material.

  11. Influence of Silicon on Swelling and Microstructure in Russian Austenitic Stainless Steels Irradiated to High Neutron Doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porollo, S.I.; Shulepin, S.V.; Konobeev, Y.V.; Garner, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: For some applications in fusion devices austenitic stainless steels are still considered to be candidates for use as structural components, but high neutron exposures must be endured by the steels. Operational experience of fast reactors in Western Europe, USA and Japan provides evidence of the possible use of austenitic steels up to ∼ 150 dpa. Studies aimed at improvement of existing Russian austenitic steels are being carried out in Russia. For improvement of irradiation resistance of Russian steels it is necessary to understand the basic mechanisms responsible for deterioration of steel properties. This understanding can be achieved by continuing detailed investigations of the microstructure of cladding steels after irradiation to high doses. By investigating the evolution of radiation-induced microstructure in neutron irradiated steels of different chemical composition one can study the effect of chemical variations on steel properties. Silicon is one of the most important chemical elements that strongly influence the behavior of austenitic steel properties under irradiation. In this paper results are presented of investigations of the effect of silicon additions on void swelling and microstructure of base austenitic stainless steel EI-847 (0.06C-16Cr-15Ni- 3Mo-Nb) irradiated as fuel pin cladding of both regular and experimental assemblies in the BOR-60, BN-350 and BN-600 fast reactors to neutron doses up to 49 dpa. The possible mechanisms of silicon's effect on void swelling in austenitic stainless steels are presented and analyzed. (authors)

  12. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Electron Beam Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, John W.; Ellsworth, G. Fred; Florando, Jeffrey N.; Golosker, Ilya V.; Mulay, Rupalee P.

    2017-04-01

    Welds can either be stronger or weaker than the base metals that they join depending on the microstructures that form in the fusion and heat-affected zones of the weld. In this paper, weld strengthening in the fusion zone of annealed 21-6-9 stainless steel is investigated using cross-weld tensile samples, hardness testing, and microstructural characterization. Due to the stronger nature of the weld, the cross-weld tensile tests failed in the base metal and were not able to generate true fusion zone mechanical properties. Nanoindentation with a spherical indenter was instead used to predict the tensile behavior for the weld metal. Extrapolation of the nanoindentation results to higher strains was performed using the Steinberg-Guinan and Johnson-Cook strength models, and the results can be used for weld strength modeling purposes. The results illustrate how microstructural refinement and residual ferrite formation in the weld fusion zone can be an effective strengthener for 21-6-9 stainless steel.

  13. Effect of Molybdenum on the Microstructures and Properties of Stainless Steel Coatings by Laser Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiming Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Stainless steel powders with different molybdenum (Mo contents were deposited on the substrate surface of 45 steel using a 6 kW fiber laser. The microstructure, phase, microhardness, wear properties, and corrosion resistance of coatings with different Mo contents were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA, X-ray diffraction (XRD, microhardness tester, wear tester, and electrochemical techniques. The results show that good metallurgical bonding was achieved between the stainless steel coating and the substrate. The amount of M7(C, B3 type borocarbide decreases and that of M2B and M23(C, B6 type borocarbides increases with the increase of Mo content in the coatings. The amount of martensite decreases, while the amount of ferrite gradually increases with the increase of Mo content. When the Mo content is 4.0 wt. %, Mo2C phase appears in the coating. The microstructure of the coating containing Mo is finer than that of the Mo-free coating. The microhardness decreases and the wear resistance of the coating gradually improves with the increase of Mo content. The wear resistance of the 6.0 wt. % Mo coating is about 3.7 times that of the Mo-free coating. With the increase of Mo content, the corrosion resistance of the coating firstly increases and then decreases. When the Mo content is 2.0 wt. %, the coating has the best corrosion resistance.

  14. Microstructural stability of fast reactor irradiated 10 to 12% Cr ferritic-martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, E.A.; Stoter, L.P.

    1982-01-01

    The strength and microstructural stability of three 10 to 12% Cr ferritic-martensitic stainless steels have been characterized following fast reactor irradiation to damage levels of 30 displacements per atom (dpa) at temperatures in the range 380 to 615 0 C. Irradiation results in either increases or decreases in room temperature hardness depending on the irradiation temperature. These strength changes can be qualitatively rationalized in terms of the combined effects of irradiation-induced interstitial dislocation loop formation and recovery of the dislocation networks comprising the initial tempered martensite structures. Precipitate evolution in the irradiated steels is associated with the nonequilibrium segregation of the elements nickel, silicon, molybdenum, chromium and phosphorus, brought about by solute-point defect interactions. The principal irradiation-induced precipitates identified are M 6 X, intermetallic chi and sigma phases and also α' (Cr-rich ferrite). The implications of the observed microstructural changes on the selection of martensitic stainless steels for fast reactor wrapper applications are briefly considered

  15. The effect of fiber laser parameters on microhardness and microstructure of duplex stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Ghusoon R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was implement to study the influence of laser power, and speed of the welding on hardness, microstructure, and penetration of laser welding bead on plate duplex stainless steel, which is not exhibited so far. A fiber laser was selected for welding duplex stainless steel sheet with 2 mm thickness. Then, optical microscope (OM was used in the morphologic observation of cross section, penetration depth, and bead width. Microhardness of the welded sheet was measured using Vickers hardness. Profiles of hardness and microstructure were utilized to discriminate welding line and to propose superior welding parameters. The experimental results displayed that, a good quality of duplex steel welds can be acquired when a suitable fiber laser welding parameters were selected. It was found that microhardness profiles showed a rise in the hardness of the weld and heat-affected zones as the solidification process proceeds rapidly. Additionally, the crystal solidification process induced by the fiber laser welding was schematically clarified and systematically exposed.

  16. Characterization of carbon ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Kai; Wang, Yibo [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, Zhuguo, E-mail: lizg@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steel 316L is ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluences of 1.2 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, 2.4 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, and 4.8 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}. The ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel is investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is evaluated by potentiodynamic test. It is found that the initial phase is austenite with a small amount of ferrite. After low fluence carbon ion implantation, an amorphous layer and ferrite phase enriched region underneath are formed. Nanophase particles precipitate from the amorphous layer due to energy minimization and irradiation at larger ion implantation fluence. The morphology of the precipitated nanophase particles changes from circular to dumbbell-like with increasing implantation fluence. The corrosion resistance of stainless steel is enhanced by the formation of amorphous layer and graphitic solid state carbon after carbon ion implantation. - Highlights: • Carbon implantation leads to phase transformation from austenite to ferrite. • The passive film on SS316L becomes thinner after carbon ion implantation. • An amorphous layer is formed by carbon ion implantation. • Nanophase precipitate from amorphous layer at higher ion implantation fluence. • Corrosion resistance of SS316L is improved by carbon implantation.

  17. Ultrasonic Characterization And Micro-Structural Studies On 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel In Thermal Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernice Victoria

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to increasing concern on potential impact of materials on human health and environment the materials used in hygienic applications should be durable corrosion resistant clean surface etc. Type 2205 duplex stainless steel is a preferred material for use in biomedical pharmaceutical nuclear pressure vessels chemical tankers etc. it exhibits good mechanical strength and high resistance to corrosion. The strength toughness hardness of such materials are usually determined by destructive tests. However continuous destructive measurements are generally difficult to perform during the productive process which creates a need for a fast and easy nondestructive method of material characterization. Microstructural changes in duplex stainless steel due to changes in annealing temperature are characterized by ultrasonic pulse echo technique and optical microscopy. Type 2205 duplex stainless steel are heat treated at 1000 deg C 1050 deg C 1100 deg C 1150 deg C and 1200 deg C for 15 min and water quenched. There is an appreciable change in the morphology of all the heat treated samples and the ultrasonic velocity is dependent on both ferrite and austenite ratio and the grain size.

  18. Physical properties and microstructure study of stainless steel 316L alloy fabricated by selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nurul Kamariah Md Saiful; Harun, Wan Sharuzi Wan; Ghani, Saiful Anwar Che; Omar, Mohd Asnawi; Ramli, Mohd Hazlen; Ismail, Muhammad Hussain

    2017-12-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) demonstrates the 21st century's manufacturing infrastructure in which powdered raw material is melted by a high energy focused laser, and built up layer-by-layer until it forms three-dimensional metal parts. SLM process involves a variation of process parameters which affects the final material properties. 316L stainless steel compacts through the manipulation of building orientation and powder layer thickness parameters were manufactured by SLM. The effect of the manipulated parameters on the relative density and dimensional accuracy of the 316L stainless steel compacts, which were in the as-build condition, were experimented and analysed. The relationship between the microstructures and the physical properties of fabricated 316L stainless steel compacts was investigated in this study. The results revealed that 90° building orientation has higher relative density and dimensional accuracy than 0° building orientation. Building orientation was found to give more significant effect in terms of dimensional accuracy, and relative density of SLM compacts compare to build layer thickness. Nevertheless, the existence of large number and sizes of pores greatly influences the low performances of the density.

  19. TEM study of microstructure in explosive welded joints between Zircaloy-4 and stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Hairong; Zhou Bangxin

    1996-10-01

    The microstructure of explosive welded joints between Zircaloy-4 and 18/8 stainless steel has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The metallurgical bonding was achieved by combining effect of diffusion and local melting when the explosive parameters were selected correctly. The molten region which consists of amorphous and crystalline with hexagonal crystal structure is hard and brittle. But the welded joints can be pulled, bent and cold rolled without cracks formed on the bonding layer, so as the molten regions are small and distributed as isolated islands. (6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.)

  20. Effect of Cu addition on microstructure and mechanical properties of 15%Cr super martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Dong; Li, Jun; Jiang, Wen; Su, Jie; Zhao, Kunyu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cu contributes to refine the grains. ► Cu solutes in matrix under quenching and precipitates as ε-Cu during tempering. ► Cu promotes the kinetics of reversed austenite formation. ► Mechanical properties are significantly influenced by austenite amount. ► Cu alloyed super martensitic stainless steel exhibits greatly improved mechanical properties. -- Abstract: The effect of adding different content of Cu (0 wt.%, 1.5 wt.% and 3 wt.%) to the 15%Cr super martensitic stainless steel (SMSS) was investigated using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Its consequence on mechanical properties was examined to clarify the role of Cu in the tested steels. The experimental results indicate that the microstructures of three tested steels are tempered martensite, retained austenite and reversed austenite; two kinds of austenites are dispersedly distributed among martensite matrix. Cu can solute in matrix under quenching condition and can precipitate as Cu-rich nanometer phase (ε-Cu) during tempering. Cu is helpful for the grain refinement and to promote the formation of reversed austenite during tempering. The maximum volume fraction of austenite is 55.9% in the steel with 3 wt.% Cu, which is responsible for the improvement of ductility. The results of the mechanical properties tests reveal that the mechanical properties are significantly influenced by the volume fraction of austenite. Cu can cause solid solution strengthening, precipitation strengthening and grain refinement strengthening in SMSS. Cu alloyed super martensitic stainless steel exhibits greatly improved mechanical properties.

  1. Welding of nickel free high nitrogen stainless steel: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffi Mohammed

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available High nitrogen stainless steel (HNS is a nickel free austenitic stainless steel that is used as a structural component in defence applications for manufacturing battle tanks as a replacement of the existing armour grade steel owing to its low cost, excellent mechanical properties and better corrosion resistance. Conventional fusion welding causes problems like nitrogen desorption, solidification cracking in weld zone, liquation cracking in heat affected zone, nitrogen induced porosity and poor mechanical properties. The above problems can be overcome by proper selection and procedure of joining process. In the present work, an attempt has been made to correlate the microstructural changes with mechanical properties of fusion and solid state welds of high nitrogen steel. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW, electron beam welding (EBW and friction stir welding (FSW processes were used in the present work. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction were used to characterize microstructural changes. Hardness, tensile and bend tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of welds. The results of the present investigation established that fully austenitic dendritic structure was found in welds of SMAW. Reverted austenite pools in the martensite matrix in weld zone and unmixed zones near the fusion boundary were observed in GTA welds. Discontinuous ferrite network in austenite matrix was observed in electron beam welds. Fine recrystallized austenite grain structure was observed in the nugget zone of friction stir welds. Improved mechanical properties are obtained in friction stir welds when compared to fusion welds. This is attributed to the refined microstructure consisting of equiaxed and homogenous austenite grains.

  2. Characterization and understanding of ion irradiation effect on the microstructure of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volgin, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in nuclear industry for internal structures. These structures are located close to the fuel assemblies, inside the pressure vessel. The exposure of these elements to high irradiation doses (the accumulated dose, after 40 years of operation, can reach 80 dpa), at temperature close to 350 C, modifies the macroscopic behavior of the steel: hardening, swelling, creep and corrosion are observed. Moreover, in-service inspections of some of the reactor internal structures have revealed the cracking of some baffle bolts. This cracking has been attributed to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). In order to understand this complex phenomenon, a first step is to identify the microstructural changes occurring during irradiation, and to understand the mechanisms at the origin of this evolution. In this framework, a large part of the European project 'PERFORM 60' is dedicated to the study of the irradiation damage in austenitic stainless steels. The objective of this PhD work is to bring comprehensive data on the irradiation effects on microstructure. To reach this goal, two model alloys (FeNiCr and FeNiCrSi) and an industrial austenitic stainless steel (316 steel) are studied using Atom Probe Tomography (APT), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS). They are irradiated by Ni ions in CSNSM (Orsay) at two temperatures (200 and 450 C) and three doses (0.5, 1 and 5 dpa). TEM observations have shown the appearance of dislocation loops, cavities and staking fault tetrahedra. The dislocation loops in 316 steel were preferentially situated in the vicinity of dislocations, while they were randomly distributed in the FeNiCr alloy. APT study has shown the redistribution of Ni and Si under irradiation in FeNiCrSi model alloy and 316 steel, leading to the appearance of (a) Cottrell clouds along dislocation lines, dislocation loops and other non-identified crystalline defects and (b

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti/TiN film coated on AISI 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ji Yoon; Kim, Kwan Hyu; Choe, Han Cheol

    1999-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti/TiN film coated on AISI 304 stainless steels have been studied. AISI 304 stainless steels containing 0.1∼1.0 wt% Ti were fabricated by using vacuum furnace and followed by solutionization treatment at 1050 .deg. C for 1hr. The specimens were coated by Ti and TiN with 1 μm and 2 μm thickness by electron-beam PVD method. The microstructure and phase analysis were carried out by using XRD, WDS and SEM. Mechanical properties such as hardness (micro-Vickers) and wear resistance were examined. Coated films showed fine columnar structure and some defects. Surface roughness increased in all specimens after TiN coating. XRD patterns showed that the TiN(111) peak was major in TiN single-layer and the other peaks were very weak, but TiN(220) and TiN(200) peaks were developed in Ti/TiN double-layer. The hardness of the coating film was higher in Ti/TiN double-layer than in TiN single-layer and not affected by the Ti content of substrate. Ti/TiN double-layer showed better wear resistance than TiN single-layer. The observed wear traces were sheared type in all coated specimens

  4. Effects of microstructure and residual stress on fatigue crack growth of stainless steel narrow gap welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Changheui; Cho, Pyung-Yeon; Kim, Minu; Oh, Seung-Jin; Yang, Jun-Seog

    2010-01-01

    The effects of weld microstructure and residual stress distribution on the fatigue crack growth rate of stainless steel narrow gap welds were investigated. Stainless steel pipes were joined by the automated narrow gap welding process typical to nuclear piping systems. The weld fusion zone showed cellular-dendritic structures with ferrite islands in an austenitic matrix. Residual stress analysis showed large tensile stress in the inner-weld region and compressive stress in the middle of the weld. Tensile properties and the fatigue crack growth rate were measured along and across the weld thickness direction. Tensile tests showed higher strength in the weld fusion zone and the heat affected zone compared to the base metal. Within the weld fusion zone, strength was greater in the inner weld than outer weld region. Fatigue crack growth rates were several times greater in the inner weld than the outer weld region. The spatial variation of the mechanical properties is discussed in view of weld microstructure, especially dendrite orientation, and in view of the residual stress variation within the weld fusion zone. It is thought that the higher crack growth rate in the inner-weld region could be related to the large tensile residual stress despite the tortuous fatigue crack growth path.

  5. Development of Weld Metal Microstructures in Pulsed Laser Welding of Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirakhorli, F.; Malek Ghaini, F.; Torkamany, M. J.

    2012-10-01

    The microstructure of the weld metal of a duplex stainless steel made with Nd:YAG pulsed laser is investigated at different travel speeds and pulse frequencies. In terms of the solidification pattern, the weld microstructure is shown to be composed of two distinct zones. The presence of two competing heat transfer channels to the relatively cooler base metal and the relatively hotter previous weld spot is proposed to develop two zones. At high overlapping factors, an array of continuous axial grains at the weld centerline is formed. At low overlapping factors, in the zone of higher cooling rate, a higher percentage of ferrite is transformed to austenite. This is shown to be because with extreme cooling rates involved in pulsed laser welding with low overlapping, the ferrite-to-austenite transformation can be limited only to the grain boundaries.

  6. Microstructure and wear behavior of stellite 6 cladding on 17-4 PH stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholipour, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, M., E-mail: shamanian@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashrafizadeh, F. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-04-07

    Research highlights: > The microstructure of the surface layer consisted of carbides embedded in a Co-rich solid solution with dendritic structure. Primary phases formed during the process were identified as Co(FCC) and lamellar eutectic phases (M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, M{sub 6}C, Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}). > Microhardness profiles showed that hardness increases from interface to the coating surface. This is due to the finer size of the grains at coating surface in comparison to that at interface and also diffusion of Fe adjacent to the interface. > The delamination was suggested as the dominant mechanism of the wear. In this regard, plate-like wear debris consisted of voids and cracks. In addition, due to increase in surface temperature, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide phase was formed during wear tests. - Abstract: This paper deals with the investigation of the microstructure and wear behavior of the stellite 6 cladding on precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel (17-4PH) using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) method. 17-4 PH stainless steel is widely used in oil and gas industries. Optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were employed to study the microstructure and wear mechanisms. X-ray diffraction analysis was also used to identify phases formed in the coating. The results showed that the microstructure of the surface layer consisted of carbides embedded in a Co-rich solid solution with a dendritic structure. In addition, the dendritic growth in the coating was epitaxial. Primary phases formed during the process were Co (fcc), Co (hcp), lamellar eutectic phases, M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} type carbides. The results of the wear tests indicated that the delamination was the dominant mechanism. So, it is necessary to apply an inter-layer between the substrate and top coat.

  7. Microstructure characteristics of high borated stainless steel fabricated by hot-pressing sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xuan; Wang, Mingjia, E-mail: mingjiawangysu@126.com; Zhao, Hongchang

    2016-04-25

    The present study investigated the microstructure of powder metallurgy (P/M) high borated stainless steel through hot-pressing sintering in a temperature range of 1000–1150 °C within 30 min under 30 MPa. Microstructure and phase examinations were carried out by applying scanning electron microscope, electron backscatter diffraction and X-ray diffraction analysis. The results of as-atomized powders demonstrated that many powders kept egg-type structure with an austenite outer layer and the eutectic borides were much finer than those in traditional cast products. Microstructure studies revealed that borides suffered Ostwald ripening and were significantly influenced by the sintering temperature. Orientation maps indicated that the inter-particle contact areas consisted of equiaxed grains and the regions consisting of large elongated grains partly inherited the microstructure characteristics of as-atomized powder particles. Furthermore, the mechanisms governing the morphological changes in microstructure were discussed. - Highlights: • Near-complete densification could be obtained through hot-pressing sintering. • There was no phase transformation and present phases were M{sub 2}B and austenite. • Borides suffered Ostwald ripening and were significantly influenced by temperature. • Inter-particle contact areas consisted of equiaxed grains for recrystallization. • Deformation-free zones exhibited elongated grains for dendritic arms coarsening.

  8. Cryogenic treatments on AISI 420 stainless steel: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto, G.; Ipiña, J.E. Perez; Tuckart, W.R.

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic treatments have been employed over the last three decades in both tool and high-alloy steels to improve wear resistance, mainly through the transformation of retained austenite and the precipitation of fine carbides. The application of these treatments to low-alloy steels and even to non-ferrous materials is becoming the subject of several investigations, due to their potentiality to reduce wear. This study was aimed at analyzing the microstructural changes and the effect of cryogenic treatments on hardness and impact toughness in martensitic AISI 420 stainless steel. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was employed for phase analysis and characterization, while carbide volume fraction, size and composition evaluation was measured by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX) and Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS). Hardness was assessed with Vickers technique and the impact toughness was measured by means of Charpy's V-notch tests. Fracture surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy to evaluate the fracture micromechanisms. In this study, it has been experimentally demonstrated that cryogenic treatments favors the precipitation of small carbides, which also present a more homogeneous size distribution. It was observed that this microstructural feature is responsible for the improvement in the mechanical properties of the material

  9. Cryogenic treatments on AISI 420 stainless steel: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto, G., E-mail: german.prieto@uns.edu.ar [Tribology Group, Universidad Nacional del Sur/CONICET, Av. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Ipiña, J.E. Perez [GMF UNComa/CONICET, Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquén (Argentina); Tuckart, W.R. [Tribology Group, Universidad Nacional del Sur/CONICET, Av. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina)

    2014-05-01

    Cryogenic treatments have been employed over the last three decades in both tool and high-alloy steels to improve wear resistance, mainly through the transformation of retained austenite and the precipitation of fine carbides. The application of these treatments to low-alloy steels and even to non-ferrous materials is becoming the subject of several investigations, due to their potentiality to reduce wear. This study was aimed at analyzing the microstructural changes and the effect of cryogenic treatments on hardness and impact toughness in martensitic AISI 420 stainless steel. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was employed for phase analysis and characterization, while carbide volume fraction, size and composition evaluation was measured by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX) and Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS). Hardness was assessed with Vickers technique and the impact toughness was measured by means of Charpy's V-notch tests. Fracture surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy to evaluate the fracture micromechanisms. In this study, it has been experimentally demonstrated that cryogenic treatments favors the precipitation of small carbides, which also present a more homogeneous size distribution. It was observed that this microstructural feature is responsible for the improvement in the mechanical properties of the material.

  10. Local microstructures, Hardness and mechanical properties of a stainless steel pipe-welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongxiang; Gao Qing; Cai Lixun

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation is carefully performed into the local microstructures, hardness values and monotonic mechanical properties of the three zones (the base metal, heat affecting zone and weld metal) of 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel pipe-welded joint. The local microstructures are observed by a metallurgical test and a surface replica technology, the local hardness values are measures by a random Vickers hardness test, and the local mechanical properties are characterized by the Ramberg-Osgood and modified Ramberg-Osgood stress-stain relations. The investigation reveals that there are significant differences of the three zones in the local microstructures, hardness values and monotonic mechanical properties, especially of the three zones in the local microstructure, hardness values and monotonic mechanical properties, especially of the weld metal. The weld metal exhibits the largest heterogeneity of local microstructures and monotonic mechanical properties, and the largest scatter of local hardness values. It is necessary to consider these difference and introduce the reliability method to model the scatter in the pipe analysis. In addition, it is verified that a columnar grain structure, which is made up of matrix-rich δ ferrite bands, can characterize the weld metal and the distance between the neighboring rich δ ferrite bands is an appropriate measurement of the columnar grain structure. This measurement is in accordance with the transition point between the microstructural short crack and physical small crack stages, which are generally used for characterizing the short fatigue crack behavior of materials. This indicates that the microstructure controls the fatigue damage character of the present material

  11. Microstructure and mechanical properties of annealed SUS 304H austenitic stainless steel with copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Indrani [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Amankwah, E. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Department of Materials Science, African University of Science and Technology, Abuja (Nigeria); Kumar, N.S. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Fleury, E. [Center for High Temperature Energy Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Oh-ishi, K.; Hono, K. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Ramamurty, U., E-mail: ramu@materials.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2011-05-25

    Research highlights: {yields} SUS 304H austenitic stainless steel containing 3 wt.% Cu was annealed at 700 deg. C for up to 100 h. {yields} Microstructure and mechanical properties of annealed alloys are examined. {yields} Nano-sized Cu-rich precipitation upon annealing. {yields} Strength of the alloy remains invariant with annealing whereas ductility improves. {yields} Fatigue crack growth threshold of 3 wt.% Cu added alloy increases with annealing. - Abstract: An experimental investigation into the effect of Cu on the mechanical properties of 0 and 3 wt.% Cu added SUS 304H austenitic stainless steel upon annealing at 700 deg. C for up to 100 h was conducted. Optical microscopy reveals grain coarsening in both the alloys upon annealing. Observations by transmission electron microscopy revealed the precipitation of nanometer-sized spherical Cu particles distributed within the austenitic grains and the presence of carbides at the dislocations. Both the yield and ultimate tensile strengths of the alloys were found to remain invariant with annealing. Tensile ductility and the threshold stress intensity factor range for fatigue crack growth for 3 wt.% Cu added alloy increase with annealing. These are attributed to the grain coarsening with annealing. In all, the addition of Cu to SUS 304H does not affect the mechanical performance adversely while improving creep resistance.

  12. Microstructure characterization and corrosion testing of MAG pulsed duplex stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitelea, Ion; Utu, Ion Dragos; Urlan, Sorin Dumitru; Karancsi, Olimpiu [Politehnica Univ. Timisoara (Romania). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

    2017-08-01

    Duplex stainless steels are extremely attractive construction materials for their usage in intense aggressive environments. They offer numerous advantages compared to the austenitic stainless steels having an excellent behavior to pitting and cavernous corrosion, and a high resistance to stress cracking corrosion in chlorides media. However, their corrosion properties are largely dependent on the microstructural factors such as: the quantitative ratio of the two phases ferrite/austenite (F/A), the presence of intermetallic compounds and the distribution of the alloying elements between the ferrite and austenite. As a result of the thermal cycles experienced by the base metal without a post-weld heat treatment, the mechanical properties are significantly different in the heat affected zone and the deposited metal compared with the properties of the base metal. The present paper highlights the effect of the post-weld solution treatment in order to restore the balance between austenite and ferrite in the welded joint areas and also to limit undesirable precipitation of secondary phases with implications for increasing the corrosion resistance.

  13. Microstructure characterization and corrosion testing of MAG pulsed duplex stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitelea, Ion; Utu, Ion Dragos; Urlan, Sorin Dumitru; Karancsi, Olimpiu

    2017-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels are extremely attractive construction materials for their usage in intense aggressive environments. They offer numerous advantages compared to the austenitic stainless steels having an excellent behavior to pitting and cavernous corrosion, and a high resistance to stress cracking corrosion in chlorides media. However, their corrosion properties are largely dependent on the microstructural factors such as: the quantitative ratio of the two phases ferrite/austenite (F/A), the presence of intermetallic compounds and the distribution of the alloying elements between the ferrite and austenite. As a result of the thermal cycles experienced by the base metal without a post-weld heat treatment, the mechanical properties are significantly different in the heat affected zone and the deposited metal compared with the properties of the base metal. The present paper highlights the effect of the post-weld solution treatment in order to restore the balance between austenite and ferrite in the welded joint areas and also to limit undesirable precipitation of secondary phases with implications for increasing the corrosion resistance.

  14. Microstructural stability and mechanical properties of a high nitrogen super duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, J.-O. [AB Sandvik Steel, Sandviken (Sweden). Dept. of Phys. Metall.; Kangas, P.; Wilson, A. [AB Sandvik Steel, Sandviken (Sweden). Dept. of Tube Research; Karlsson, T. [Swedish Inst. for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-07-01

    A time temperature transformation (TTT)-diagram with respect to the formation of intermetallic phase in the range 700-1000 C has been assessed by point counting for a 29Cr-6Ni-2Mo-0.38N super duplex stainless steel. Using a computer program developed by the authors a continuous cooling transformation (CCT)-diagram was calculated from the TTT-diagram assuming that the transformation can be described by an Avrami type equation. A comparison of impact toughness and hardness showed that toughness was a very sensitive measure of intermetallic phase formation while hardness was insensitive and showed no significant increase until the material was catastrophically brittle. It was found that Thermo-Calc could be used in a qualitative manner for predicting microstructural changes at various temperatures but was unable to predict variables such as dissolution temperature and volume percentage with accuracy. (orig.)

  15. Microstructure, Corrosion and Magnetic Behavior of an Aged Dual-Phase Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziouche, A.; Haddad, A.; Badji, R.; Zergoug, M.; Zoubiri, N.; Bedjaoui, W.; Abaidia, S.

    2018-03-01

    In the present work, the effect of the precipitation phenomena on corrosion and magnetic behavior of an aged dual-phase stainless steel was investigated. Aging treatment caused the precipitation of the σ phase, chromium carbides and secondary austenite, which was accompanied by the shifting of the δ/γ interfaces inside the δ ferrite grains. Aging between 700 and 850 °C strongly deteriorated the pitting corrosion resistance of the studied material. Magnetic investigation of the aged material using the vibration sample magnetic technique revealed the sensitivity of the intrinsic magnetic properties to the smallest microstructural change. This was confirmed by the Eddy current technique that led also to the evaluation of the aging-induced localized corrosion.

  16. Correlation of yield strength with irradiation-induced microstructure in AISI 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, R.L.; Hulbert, L.A.

    1985-10-01

    Improvements in the correlation of radiation-induced change in yield strength in AISI 316 stainless steel with microstructure were made by re-examining the role of short-range obstacles. Effects due to the size of the obstacles relative to their spacing and shape of the obstacles were applied. The concept of shearing the precipitates instead of bowing around them was used to explain the effects of precipitate hardening. It is concluded that large changes in yield strength may be produced in high swelling materials. Voids will dominate the hardening at high dpa. The increase in hardening will depend on the diameter of the voids even though the swelling in the material is the same. Precipitate hardening at high fluence (>15 dpa) make a significant contribution for irradiation temperatures above 500 0 C

  17. Microstructure and intergranular corrosion resistance of UNS S17400 (17-4PH) stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, S.S.M., E-mail: ssmtavares@terra.com.b [Universidade Federal Fluminense - Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica (PGMEC), Rua Passo da Patria, 156 - CEP 24210-240 - Niteroi/RJ (Brazil); Silva, F.J. da; Scandian, C. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo - Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica - Av. Fernando Ferrrari, 514 - CEP 29075-910 - Vitoria/ES (Brazil); Silva, G.F. da [Universidade Federal Fluminense - Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica (PGMEC), Rua Passo da Patria, 156 - CEP 24210-240 - Niteroi/RJ (Brazil); Abreu, H.F.G. de [Universidade Federal do Ceara - Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica e Materiais - Campus do Pici, Bloco 702 - CEP 60455-760 - Fortaleza/CE (Brazil)

    2010-11-15

    UNS S17400 or 17-4PH is a precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel with many industrial applications. Quite different mechanical properties can be produced in this material by varying the aging temperature. In this work, the influence of aging temperature on the intergranular corrosion susceptibility was evaluated by electrochemical and metallographic tests. The microstructural features were investigated by X-ray diffraction, optical and scanning electron microscopy. Intergranular chromium carbide precipitation occurs in specimens aged at high temperatures, although NbC carbides were also observed. The results obtained by double loop electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation tests (DL-EPR) show that the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion resistance increases with the increase of aging temperature. Healing due to Cr diffusion in the 600-650 {sup o}C range was not observed by DL-EPR tests.

  18. Microstructure and intergranular corrosion resistance of UNS S17400 (17-4PH) stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, S.S.M.; Silva, F.J. da; Scandian, C.; Silva, G.F. da; Abreu, H.F.G. de

    2010-01-01

    UNS S17400 or 17-4PH is a precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel with many industrial applications. Quite different mechanical properties can be produced in this material by varying the aging temperature. In this work, the influence of aging temperature on the intergranular corrosion susceptibility was evaluated by electrochemical and metallographic tests. The microstructural features were investigated by X-ray diffraction, optical and scanning electron microscopy. Intergranular chromium carbide precipitation occurs in specimens aged at high temperatures, although NbC carbides were also observed. The results obtained by double loop electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation tests (DL-EPR) show that the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion resistance increases with the increase of aging temperature. Healing due to Cr diffusion in the 600-650 o C range was not observed by DL-EPR tests.

  19. Influence of the austenitic stainless steel microstructure on the void swelling under ion irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouxel Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the role of different metallurgical parameters on the void formation mechanisms, various austenitic stainless steels were elaborated and irradiated with heavy ions. Two alloys, in several metallurgical conditions (15Cr/15Ni–Ti and 15Cr/25Ni–Ti, were irradiated in the JANNUS-Saclay facility at 600 °C with 2 MeV Fe2+ ions up to 150 dpa. Resulting microstructures were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM. Different effects on void swelling are highlighted. Only the pre-aged samples, which were consequently solute and especially titanium depleted, show cavities. The nickel-enriched matrix shows more voids with a smaller size. Finally, the presence of nano-precipitates combined with a dense dislocation network decreases strongly the number of cavities.

  20. Microstructure and composition of 304 stainless steel implanted with Ti and C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Knapp, J.A.; Pope, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    The microstructure and composition of surface alloys formed by implanting Ti and C into 304 stainless steel are examined for a range of Ti fluences, both with and without additional implanted C. The resulting amorphous layers are found to contain TiC precipitates, apparently with some Cr on Ti lattice sites, when the metal-atom fraction of Ti+Cr exceeds 55%. The depth profiles of Ti and C are measured, and the amounts of C incorporated into the alloys during Ti implantation are determined. Small amounts of H are also incorporated during the high-fluence Ti implantations. Thicker amorphous layers than those resulting from Ti implantation alone can be formed when additional C is implanted either before or after the Ti. (orig.)

  1. Corrosion and microstructural aspects of dissimilar joints of titanium and type 304L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudali, U. Kamachi.; Ananda Rao, B.M.; Shanmugam, K.; Natarajan, R.; Raj, Baldev

    2003-01-01

    To link titanium and zirconium metal based (Ti, Zr-2, Ti-5%Ta, Ti-5%Ta-1.8Nb) dissolver vessels containing highly radioactive and concentrated corrosive nitric acid solution to other nuclear fuel reprocessing plant components made of AISI type 304L stainless steel (SS), high integrity and corrosion resistant dissimilar joints between them are necessary. Fusion welding processes produce secondary precipitates which dissolve in nitric acid, and hence solid-state processes are proposed. In this work, various dissimilar joining processes available for producing titanium-304L SS joints with adequate strength, ductility and corrosion resistance for this critical application are highlighted. Developmental efforts made at IGCAR, Kalpakkam are outlined. The possible methods and the microstructural-metallurgical properties of the joints along with corrosion results obtained with three phase (liquid, vapour, condensate) corrosion testing are discussed. Based on the results, dissimilar joint produced by the explosive joining process was adopted for plant application

  2. The Localized Corrosion Behavior Associated with Microstructure of F53 Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soon-Tae; Lee, In-Sung; Kong, Kyeong-Ho; Park, Yong-Soo; Lee, Jong-Hoon; Yang, Won-Jon

    2015-01-01

    The localized corrosion behavior associated with microstructure of F53 super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) was investigated using a potentiodynamic polarization test, a critical crevice temperature test, an electron probe micro-analyzer analysis, and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy analyses. Crevice corrosion was initiated at the α/γ phase boundaries, MO x inclusions (where M is Cr, Mn, Al, Fe, or Ti), as well as Cr and Mo depleted areas adjacent to the σ-phases precipitated in the F53 SDSS alloy. This alloy had been annealed at 1050 ℃ followed by improper water-cooling, and the corrosion was propagated into the α-phases because the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of the α-phase was smaller than that of the γ-phase. As cooling rate increased, the variation of the α-phases decreased, and the content of the Cr and Mo rich σ-phases decreased, thereby increasing the corrosion resistance.

  3. Microstructural characteristics and corrosion behavior of a super duplex stainless steel casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Marcelo; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos

    2009-01-01

    The machining of super duplex stainless steel castings is usually complicated by the difficulty involved in maintaining the dimensional tolerances required for given applications. Internal stresses originating from the solidification process and from subsequent heat treatments reach levels that exceed the material's yield strength, promoting plastic strain. Stress relief heat treatments at 520 deg. C for 2 h are an interesting option to solve this problem, but because these materials present a thermodynamically metastable condition, a few precautions should be taken. The main objective of this work was to demonstrate that, after solution annealing at 1130 deg. C and water quenching, stress relief at 520 deg. C for 2 h did not alter the duplex microstructure or impair the pitting corrosion resistance of ASTM A890/A890M Grade 6A steel. This finding was confirmed by microstructural characterization techniques, including light optical and scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Corrosion potential measurements in synthetic sea water containing 20,000 ppm of chloride ions were also conducted at three temperatures: 5 deg. C, 25 deg. C and 60 deg. C

  4. Microstructure and failure behavior of dissimilar resistance spot welds between low carbon galvanized and austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marashi, P.; Pouranvari, M.; Amirabdollahian, S.; Abedi, A.; Goodarzi, M.

    2008-01-01

    Resistance spot welding was used to join austenitic stainless steel and galvanized low carbon steel. The relationship between failure mode and weld fusion zone characteristics (size and microstructure) was studied. It was found that spot weld strength in the pullout failure mode is controlled by the strength and fusion zone size of the galvanized steel side. The hardness of the fusion zone which is governed by the dilution between two base metals, and fusion zone size of galvanized carbon steel side are dominant factors in determining the failure mode

  5. Effect of Microstructure on the Wear Behavior of Heat Treated SS-304 Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    S. Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Sliding wear characteristics of some heat treated SS-304 stainless steel against EN-8 steel in dry condition have been studied in the present experimental work. Samples of SS-304 stainless steel have been heated in a muffle furnace in desired temperature and allowed to dwell for two hours. The heated specimen are then cooled in different media namely inside the furnace, open air, cutting grade oil (grade 44) and water at room temperature to obtain different grades of heat treatment. Microstr...

  6. Welding of nickel free high nitrogen stainless steel: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Raffi Mohammed; G. Madhusudhan Reddy; K. Srinivasa Rao

    2017-01-01

    High nitrogen stainless steel (HNS) is a nickel free austenitic stainless steel that is used as a structural component in defence applications for manufacturing battle tanks as a replacement of the existing armour grade steel owing to its low cost, excellent mechanical properties and better corrosion resistance. Conventional fusion welding causes problems like nitrogen desorption, solidification cracking in weld zone, liquation cracking in heat affected zone, nitrogen induced porosity and poo...

  7. Effects of Heat Input on Microstructure, Corrosion and Mechanical Characteristics of Welded Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steels: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghusoon Ridha Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of input heat of different welding processes on the microstructure, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics of welded duplex stainless steel (DSS are reviewed. Austenitic stainless steel (ASS is welded using low-heat inputs. However, owing to differences in the physical metallurgy between ASS and DSS, low-heat inputs should be avoided for DSS. This review highlights the differences in solidification mode and transformation characteristics between ASS and DSS with regard to the heat input in welding processes. Specifically, many studies about the effects of heat energy input in welding process on the pitting corrosion, intergranular stress, stresscorrosion cracking, and mechanical properties of weldments of DSS are reviewed.

  8. Studies on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of high nitrogen stainless steel shielded metal arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of high nitrogen stainless steel shielded metal arc (SMA) welds made with Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microstructures of the welds were characterized using optical microscopy (OM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) mainly to determine the morphology, phase analysis, grain size and orientation image mapping. Hardness, tensile and ductility bend tests were carried out to determine mechanical properties. Potentio-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance using a GillAC basic electrochemical system. Constant load type testing was carried out to study stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of welds. The investigation results shown that the selected Cr–Mn–N type electrode resulted in favourable microstructure and completely solidified as single phase coarse austenite. Mechanical properties of SMA welds are found to be inferior when compared to that of base metal and is due to coarse and dendritic structure.

  9. Microstructural sensitivity of 316H austenitic stainless steel: Residual stress relaxation and grain boundary fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, B., E-mail: b.chen@bristol.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom); Flewitt, P.E.J. [Interface Analysis Centre, University of Bristol, 121 St Michael' s Hill, Bristol BS2 8BS (United Kingdom); H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Smith, D.J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Triaxial residual macro-stresses have been measured by neutron diffraction. {yields} Rates of stress relaxation are shown to be a function of the microstructure. {yields} Quantification of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitation was undertaken by a novel approach. {yields} Intergranular M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitation promotes the potential to intergranular fracture. {yields} Phosphorous segregation further enhances the potential to intergranular fracture. - Abstract: The present work considers the role of thermo-mechanical history on the generation and relaxation of residual stresses, typical of those encountered in Type 316H austenitic stainless steel thick section weldments. A series of thermo-mechanical pre-treatments have been developed and applied to simulate the critical microstructures observed within the heat affected zone of the thick section parent material. The through thickness distributions of the residual macro-stresses in cylindrical specimens have been measured by neutron diffraction and then the rates of the relaxation are shown to be a function of microstructure. The susceptibility to intergranular brittle fracture at a temperature of -196 deg. C is shown to be a function of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide precipitates and phosphorous segregation at the grain boundaries. Finally, the link of the present study to the understanding of the reheat cracking is briefly discussed.

  10. Modeling of Microstructure Evolution in Austenitic Stainless Steels Irradiated Under Light Water Reactor Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, J.; Stoller, R.E.; Was, G.S.

    1998-01-01

    A model for the development of microstructure during irradiation in fast reactors has been adapted for light water reactor (LWR) irradiation conditions (275 approximately 325 C, up to approximately10 dpa). The original model was based on the rate-theory, and included descriptions of the evolution of both dislocation loops and cavities. The model was modified by introducing in-cascade interstitial clustering, a term to account for the dose dependence of this clustering, and mobility of interstitial clusters. The purpose of this work was to understand microstructural development under LWR irradiation with a focus on loop nucleation and saturation of loop density. It was demonstrated that in-cascade interstitial clustering dominates loop nucleation in neutron irradiation in LWRS. Furthermore it was shown that the dose dependence of in-cascade interstitial clustering is needed to account for saturation behavior as commonly observed. Both quasi-steady-state (QSS) and non-steady-state (NSS) solutions to the rate equations were obtained. The difference between QSS and NSS treatments in the calculation of defect concentration is reduced at LWR temperature when in-cascade interstitial clustering dominates loop nucleation. The mobility of interstitial clusters was also investigated and its impact on loop density is to reduce the nucleation term. The ultimate goal of this study is to combine the evolution of microstructure and microchemistry together to account for the radiation damage in austenitic stainless steels

  11. Microstructural evolution and pitting resistance of annealed lean duplex stainless steel UNS S32304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ziying; Han Dong; Jiang Yiming; Shi Chong; Li Jin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The relationship between pitting corrosion resistance and annealing temperature for UNS S32304 was systemically studied. ► The specimens annealed at 1080 °C for 1 h, quenched in water exhibit the best pitting corrosion resistance. ► The relationship between microstructural evolution and pitting resistance of annealed UNS S32304 was discussed in detail. ► The pitting corrosion resistance is consistent with pitting resistance equivalent number of weaker phase for UNS S32304 alloy. - Abstract: The effect of annealing temperature in the range from 1000 to 1200 °C on the pitting corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel UNS S32304 was investigated by the potentiodynamic polarization and potentiostatic critical pitting temperature techniques. The microstructural evolution and pit morphologies were studied using a scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that the nucleation of metastable pits transformed from austenite phase to ferrite phase with the increasing annealing temperature. As the annealing temperature increased, the pitting corrosion resistance firstly increased and then decreased. The highest pitting corrosion resistance was obtained at 1080 °C with the highest critical pitting temperature value and pitting nucleation resistance. The results could be well explained by the microstructural evolution of ferrite and austenite phases induced by annealing treatment.

  12. Effect of current and travel speed variation of TIG welding on microstructure and hardness of stainless steel SS 316L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatimurti, Wikan; Abdillah, Fakhri Aulia; Kurniawan, Budi Agung; Rochiem, Rochman

    2018-04-01

    One of the stainless steel types that widely used in industry is SS 316L, which is austenitic stainless steel. One of the welding methods to join stainless steel is Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), which can affect its morphology, microstructure, strength, hardness, and even lead to cracks in the weld area due to the given heat input. This research has a purpose of analyzing the relationship between microstructure and hardness value of SS 316L stainless steel after TIG welding with the variation of current and travel speed. The macro observation shows a distinct difference in the weld metal and base metal area, and the weld form is not symmetrical. The metallographic test shows the phases that formed in the specimen are austenite and ferrite, which scattered in three welding areas. The hardness test showed that the highest hardness value found in the variation of travel speed 12 cm/min with current 100 A. Welding process and variation were given do not cause any defects in the microstructure, such as carbide precipitation and sigma phase, means that it does not affect the hardness and corrosion resistance of all welded specimen.

  13. Microstructural characterization and model of hardening for the irradiated austenitic stainless steels of the internals of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokor, C.

    2003-01-01

    The core internals of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) are composed of SA 304 stainless steel plates and CW 316 stainless steel bolts. These internals undergo a neutron flux at a temperature between 280 deg C and 380 deg C which modifies their mechanical properties. These modifications are due to the changes in the microstructure of these materials under irradiation which depend on flux, dose and irradiation temperature. We have studied, by Transmission Electron Microscopy, the microstructure of stainless steels SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti irradiated in a mixed flux reactor (OSIRIS at 330 deg C between 0,8 dpa et 3,4 dpa) and in a fast breeder reactor at 330 deg C (BOR-60) up to doses of 40 dpa. Moreover, samples have been irradiated at 375 deg C in a fast breeder reactor (EBR-II) up to doses of 10 dpa. The microstructure of the irradiated stainless steels consists in faulted Frank dislocation loops in the [111] planes of austenitic, with a Burgers vector of [111]. It is possible to find some voids in the solution annealed samples irradiated at 375 deg C. The evolution of the dislocations loops and voids has been simulated with a 'cluster dynamic' model. The fit of the model parameters has allowed us to have a quantitative description of our experimental results. This description of the microstructure after irradiation was coupled together with a hardening model by Frank loops that has permitted us to make a quantitative description of the hardening of SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti stainless steels after irradiation at a certain dose, flux and temperature. The irradiation doses studied grow up to 90 dpa, dose of the end of life of PWR internals. (author)

  14. Microstructure, Hardness, and Corrosion Behavior of TiC-Duplex Stainless Steel Composites Fabricated by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Shicheng; Chen, Hua; Ran, Xu

    2017-08-01

    Duplex stainless steel composites with various weight fractions of TiC particles are prepared by spark plasma sintering. Ferritic 434L and austenitic 316L stainless steel powders are premixed in a 50:50 weight ratio and added with 3-9 wt.% TiC. The compacts are sintered in the solid state under vacuum conditions at 1223 K for 5 min. The effects of TiC content on the microstructure, hardness, and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel composites fabricated by powder metallurgy are evaluated. The results indicate that the TiC particulates as reinforcements can be distributed homogeneously in the steel matrix. Densification of sintered composites decreases with increasing TiC content. M23C6 carbide precipitates along grain boundary, and its neighboring Cr-Mo-depleted region is formed in the sintered microstructure, which can be eliminated subsequently with appropriate heat treatment. With the addition of TiC, the hardness of duplex stainless steel fabricated by powder metallurgy can be markedly enhanced despite increased porosity in the composites. However, TiC particles increase the corrosion rate and degrade the passivation capability, particularly for the composite with TiC content higher than 6 wt.%. Weakened metallurgical bonding in the composite with high TiC content provides the preferred sites for pitting nucleation and/or dissolution.

  15. Processing, Microstructures and Properties of a Dual Phase Precipitation-Hardening PM Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, Christopher

    To improve the mechanical properties of PM stainless steels in comparison with their wrought counterparts, a PM stainless steel alloy was developed which combines a dual-phase microstructure with precipitation-hardening. The use of a mixed microstructure of martensite and ferrite results in an alloy with a combination of the optimum properties of each phase, namely strength and ductility. The use of precipitation hardening via the addition of copper results in additional strength and hardness. A range of compositions was studied in combination with various sintering conditions to determine the optimal thermal processing to achieve the desired microstructure. The microstructure could be varied from predominately ferrite to one containing a high percentage of martensite by additions of copper and a variation of the sintering temperature before rapid cooling. Mechanical properties (transverse rupture strength (TRS), yield strength, tensile strength, ductility and impact toughness) were measured as a function of the v/o ferrite in the microstructure. A dual phase alloy with the optimal combination of properties served as the base for introducing precipitation hardening. Copper was added to the base alloy at various levels and its effect on the microstructure and mechanical properties was quantified. Processing at various sintering temperatures led to a range of microstructures; dilatometry was used utilized to monitor and understand the transformations and the formation of the two phases. The aging process was studied as a function of temperature and time by measuring TRS, yield strength, tensile strength, ductility, impact toughness and apparent hardness. It was determined that optimum aging was achieved at 538°C for 1h. Aging at slightly lower temperatures led to the formation of carbides, which contributed to reduced hardness and tensile strength. As expected, at the peak aging temperature, an increase in yield strength and ultimate tensile strength as well as

  16. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld

  17. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eghlimi, Abbas, E-mail: a.eghlimi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, Morteza [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eskandarian, Masoomeh [Department of Materials Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabolian, Azam [Department of Natural Resources, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Szpunar, Jerzy A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld

  18. Effects of laser shock processing on mechanical properties and micro-structure of ANSI 304 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, K.Y.; Lu, J.Z.; Zhang, Y.K.; Zhou, J.Z.; Zhang, L.F.; Dai, F.Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhong, J.W.; Cui, C.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Effects of LSP on mechanical properties of stainless steel ANSI 304 are evaluated. → LSP can clearly enhance the values of mechanical properties in the shocked region. → Martensite transformation does not take place in the surface layer subjected to LSP. → Enhancement mechanisms of LSP on mechanical property of stainless steel are revealed. → The results can provide some insights on the surface modification of stainless steel. - Abstract: The aim of this article is to address the effects of a single laser shock processing (LSP) impact on the nano-hardness, elastic modulus, residual stress and phase transformation of ANSI 304 austenitic stainless steel. Residual stress distribution of the LSP-shocked region is determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) with sin 2 ψ method, and the micro-structural features in the near-surface layer are characterized by using cross-sectional optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By comparing with the untreated samples, LSP can clearly improve nano-hardness, elastic modulus, and residual stress in the LSP-shocked region. The underlying enhancement mechanisms of LSP on nano-hardness, elastic modulus and residual stress of stainless steel ANSI 304 are also revealed. These studies may provide some important insights into surface modification for metal materials.

  19. Surface Nb-ALLOYING on 0.4C-13Cr Stainless Steel: Microstructure and Tribological Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shengwang; You, Kai; Liu, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Yihui; Wang, Zhenxia; Liu, Xiaoping

    2016-02-01

    0.4C-13Cr stainless steel was alloyed with niobium using double glow plasma surface alloying and tribological properties of Nb-alloyed steel such as hardness, friction and wear were measured. Effects of the alloying temperature on microstructure and the tribological behavior of the alloyed steel were investigated compared with untreated steel. Formation mechanisms of Nb-alloyed layers and increased wear resistance were also studied. The result shows that after surface Nb-alloying treatment, the 0.4C-13Cr steel exhibits a diffusion adhesion at the alloyed layer/substrate interface and improved tribological property. The friction coefficient of Nb-alloyed steel is decreased by about 0.3-0.45 and the wear rate after Nb-alloying is only 2-5% of untreated steel.

  20. Self-ion emulation of high dose neutron irradiated microstructure in stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Z.; Michalicka, J.; Was, G. S.

    2018-04-01

    Solution-annealed 304L stainless steel (SS) was irradiated to 130 dpa at 380 °C, and to 15 dpa at 500 °C and 600 °C, and cold-worked 316 SS (CW 316 SS) was irradiated to 130 dpa at 380 °C using 5 MeV Fe++/Ni++ to produce microstructures and radiation-induced segregation (RIS) for comparison with that from neutron irradiation at 320 °C to 46 dpa in the BOR60 reactor. For the 304L SS alloy, self-ion irradiation at 380 °C produced a dislocation loop microstructure that was comparable to that by neutron irradiation. No voids were observed in either the 380 °C self-ion irradiation or the neutron irradiation conditions. Irradiation at 600 °C produced the best match to radiation-induced segregation of Cr and Ni with the neutron irradiation, consistent with the prediction of a large temperature shift by Mansur's invariant relations for RIS. For the CW 316 SS alloy irradiated to 130 dpa at 380 °C, both the irradiated microstructure (dislocation loops, precipitates and voids) and RIS reasonably matched the neutron-irradiated sample. The smaller temperature shift for RIS in CW 316 SS was likely due to the high sink (dislocation) density induced by the cold work. A single self-ion irradiation condition at a dose rate ∼1000× that in reactor does not match both dislocation loops and RIS in solution-annealed 304L SS. However, a single irradiation temperature produced a reasonable match with both the dislocation/precipitate microstructure and RIS in CW 316 SS, indicating that sink density is a critical factor in determining the temperature shift for self-ion irradiations.

  1. Hierarchical evolution and thermal stability of microstructure with deformation twins in 316 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Jozaghi, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Karaman, I., E-mail: ikaraman@tamu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Arroyave, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Chumlyakov, Y.I. [Siberian Physical Technical Institute, Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-10

    We report extensive nano-twin formation in 316 stainless steel (SS) and the evolution of a hierarchical microstructure through the formation of multi-scale twin bundles after uniaxial tension with uniform elongation levels of 20%, 30%, and 40%. Multiscale characterization techniques were employed to reveal the nature of these twins. The twin density increases with the increasing strain level, however, the twin width remains the same, notably reducing the mean free path of dislocations. Concurrently, significant work hardening is observed during subsequent deformation. The deformation-induced nano-twins are thermally stable up to ~800 °C, shown by both interrupted and in-situ transmission electron microscopy experiments, above which the recrystallization takes place in the vicinity of the twins. Such favorable thermal stability of the twins in nano-twin strengthened 316 SS offers a promising approach for microstructurally engineering these materials for potential applications at elevated temperatures. The related strengthening mechanisms are discussed in the light of the mean free path of dislocations and the dislocation interactions with twin boundaries.

  2. Microstructural Study of 17-4PH Stainless Steel after Plasma-Transferred Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewei Deng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of the surface qualities and surface hardening of precipitation hardened martensitic stainless steel 17-4PH was achieved by the plasma-transferred arc welding (PTAW process deposited with Co-based alloy. The microstructure of the heat affected zone (HAZ and base metal were characterized by optical microscope (OM, scanning electron microscope (SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM. The results show that there are obvious microstructural differences between the base metal and HAZ. For example, base material is transformed from lath martensite to austenite due to the heateffect of the welding process. On the other hand, the precipitate in the matrix (bar-like shape Cr7C3 phase with a width of about one hundred nanometres and a length of hundreds of nanometres grows to a rectangular appearance with a width of about two hundred nanometres and a length of about one micron. Stacking fault could also be observed in the Cr7C3 after PTAW. The above means that welding can obviously improve the surface qualities.

  3. Microstructural Study of 17-4PH Stainless Steel after Plasma-Transferred Arc Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dewei; Chen, Rui; Sun, Qi; Li, Xiaona

    2015-01-29

    The improvement of the surface qualities and surface hardening of precipitation hardened martensitic stainless steel 17-4PH was achieved by the plasma-transferred arc welding (PTAW) process deposited with Co-based alloy. The microstructure of the heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal were characterized by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results show that there are obvious microstructural differences between the base metal and HAZ. For example, base material is transformed from lath martensite to austenite due to the heateffect of the welding process. On the other hand, the precipitate in the matrix (bar-like shape Cr₇C₃ phase with a width of about one hundred nanometres and a length of hundreds of nanometres) grows to a rectangular appearance with a width of about two hundred nanometres and a length of about one micron. Stacking fault could also be observed in the Cr₇C₃ after PTAW. The above means that welding can obviously improve the surface qualities.

  4. Microstructure analysis of AISI 304 stainless steel produced by twin-roll thin strip casting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The microstructure of AISI 304 austenite stainless steel fabricated by the thin strip casting process were investigated using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD).The microstructures of the casting strips show a duplex structure consisting of delta ferrite and austenite. The volume fraction of the delta ferrite is about 9.74vol% at the center and 6.77vol% at the surface of the casting thin strip, in vermicular and band shapes. On account of rapid cooling and solidification in the continuous casting process, many kinds of inclusions and precipitates have been found. Most of the inclusions and precipitates are spherical complex compounds consisting of oxides, such as, SiO2, MnO, Al2O3,Cr2O3,and FeO or their multiplicity oxides of MnO·Al2O3,2FeO·SiO2, and 2MnO·SiO2. Many defects including dislocations and stacking faults have also formed during the rapid cooling and solidification process, which is helpful to improve the mechanical properties of the casting strips.

  5. Microstructure and mechanical properties of stainless steel/calcium silicate composites manufactured by selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zeng; Wang, Lianfeng; Jia, Min; Cheng, Lingyu; Yan, Biao

    2017-02-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is raised as one kind of additive manufacturing (AM) which is based on the discrete-stacking concept. This technique can fabricate advanced composites with desirable properties directly from 3D CAD data. In this research, 316L stainless steel (316L SS) and different fractions of calcium silicate (CaSiO 3 ) composites (weight fractions of calcium silicate are 0%, 5%,10% and 15%, respectively) were prepared by SLM technique with a purpose to develop biomedical metallic materials. The relative density, tensile, microhardness and elastic modulus of the composites were tested, their microstructures and fracture morphologies were observed using optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was found that the addition of CaSiO 3 particles influenced the microstructure and mechanical properties of specimens significantly. The CaSiO 3 precipitates from the overlap of adjacent tracks and became the origin of the defects. The tensile strength of specimens range 320-722MPa. The microhardness and elastic modulus are around 250HV and 215GPa respectively. These composites were ductile materials and the fracture mode of the composites was mixed mode of ductile and brittle fracture. The 316L SS/CaSiO 3 composites can be a potential biomedical metallic materials in the medical field. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Rapid Tempering of Martensitic Stainless Steel AISI420: Microstructure, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi-Khazaei, Bijan; Mollaahmadi, Akbar

    2017-04-01

    In this research, the effect of rapid tempering on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel has been investigated. At first, all test specimens were austenitized at 1050 °C for 1 h and tempered at 200 °C for 1 h. Then, the samples were rapidly reheated by a salt bath furnace in a temperature range from 300 to 1050 °C for 2 min and cooled in air. The tensile tests, impact, hardness and electrochemical corrosion were carried out on the reheated samples. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the microstructure and fracture surface. To investigate carbides, transmission electron microscopy and also scanning electron microscopy were used. X-ray diffraction was used for determination of the retained austenite. The results showed that the minimum properties such as the tensile strength, impact energy, hardness and corrosion resistance were obtained at reheating temperature of 700 °C. Semi-continuous carbides in the grain boundaries were seen in this temperature. Secondary hardening phenomenon was occurred at reheating temperature of 500 °C.

  7. Effect of Hot Rolling on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nitrogen Alloyed Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenna Krishna, S.; Karthick, N. K.; Jha, Abhay K.; Pant, Bhanu; Cherian, Roy M.

    2018-05-01

    In the present investigation, the effect of multi-pass hot rolling in the temperature range of 700-1000 °C on the microstructure and mechanical properties of nitrogen alloyed austenitic stainless steel was studied with the aid of optical microscopy, tensile testing and x-ray diffraction measurements. The microstructural changes that occurred in the hot rolled specimens were elongation of grains in rolling direction, nucleation of new grains at the grain boundaries of elongated grains and growth of nucleated grains to form fully recrystallized grains. Elongated grains formed at lower rolling temperature (700-800 °C) due to inadequate strain/temperature for the initiation of dynamic recrystallization. At higher rolling temperature (900-1000 °C), fine grains formed due to dynamic recrystallization. Tensile properties showed strong dependency on the rolling temperature. Tensile strength increased with the decrease in the rolling temperature at the cost of ductility. Maximum strength was observed in samples hot rolled at 700 °C with yield strength of 917 MPa and ductility of 25%. This variation in the tensile properties with the rolling temperature is attributed to changes in the dislocation density and grain structure. The estimated yield strength from the dislocation density, solid solution and grain boundary strengthening closely matched with experimentally determined yield strength confirming the role of dislocation density and grain size in the strengthening.

  8. Effect of vibration on microstructures and mechanical properties of 304 stainless steel GTA welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chih-Chun; Lai, Chien-Hong; Wu, Weite

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the microstructures and mechanical properties of 304 stainless steel at various vibration frequencies during simultaneous vibration welding. The experimental results demonstrated that simultaneous vibration welding could accelerate the nucleation and grain refinement of the microstructures. The effect of the grain refinement was more evident at the resonant frequency (375 Hz) and a minimum content of residual δ-ferrite (4.0%). The γ phase grew in the preferential orientation of the (111) direction with and without vibration. The full width at half maximum of the diffraction peak widened after the vibration, which was attributed to the grain refinement. The residual stress could be efficiently removed through simultaneous vibration welding when the amplitude of the vibration was increased. Furthermore, the lowest residual stress (139 MPa) was found when the vibration frequency was 375 Hz. The hardness and Young's modulus exhibited slight increases with low and medium frequencies. The hardness values were increased by 7.6% and Young's modulus was increased by 15% when the vibration frequency was resonant (375 Hz).

  9. Modelling of microstructural creep damage in welded joints of 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouche, G.

    2000-01-01

    Welded joints of 316L stainless steel under service conditions at elevated temperature are known to be preferential sites of creep damage, as compared to the base material. This damage results in the formation of cavities and the development of creep cracks which can lead to a premature failure of welded components. The complex two-phase microstructure of 316L welds was simulated by manually filling a mould with longitudinal deposited weld beads. The moulded material was then aged during 2000 hours at 600 deg. C. High resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy was largely used to examine the microstructure of the simulated material before and after ageing. Smooth and notched creep specimens were cut from the mould and tested at 600 deg. C under various stress levels. A comparison of the lifetime versus nominal stress curves for the base and welded materials shows a greater dependence of the welded material to creep phenomena. Observation and EBSD analysis show that damage is preferentially located along the austenite grain boundaries. The stress and strain fields in the notched specimens were calculated by finite element method. A correlation of this field to the observed damage was made in order to propose a predictive law relating the creep damage to the mechanical conditions applied locally. Further mechanical tests and simulation on CT specimens and mode II tubular specimens allowed validating the model under various multiaxial loading conditions. (author)

  10. Effect of Nb addition on microstructure and corrosion resistance of novel stainless steels fabricated by direct laser metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. Q.; Zhang, C. H.; Zhang, S.; Wang, Q.; Liu, Y.; Abdullah, Adil O.

    2018-03-01

    The study demonstrated the successful fabrication of novel stainless steels by direct laser metal deposition with the aim of investigating the impact of niobium content (Nb = 0, 0.25, 0.75, 1.25 wt%) on their microstructure and electrochemical properties. The microstructure and phase evolution of the as-built stainless steels were studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD). Corrosion behavior of the samples was evaluated using electrochemical workstation in 3.5 wt% NaCl. Experimental results have shown that the crystal structure of as-built stainless steels was BCC with a small trace of dispersive carbides and FCC phase. Grain refinement was observed with increasing niobium content. Large-angle boundaries were obtained in different Nb-containing samples with distribution from 50° to 60°. An increase in niobium content extremely improved the corrosion resistance of as-built stainless steels and the as-built samples with 1.25 wt% exhibited the best corrosion resistance among the tested samples as indicated by its lowest corrosion rate, which was an order of magnitude lower than that of Nb-free samples.

  11. Effect of nitrogen alloying on the microstructure and abrasive wear of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawk, J.A.; Simmons, J.W.; Rawers, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Alloying stainless steels with nitrogen has distinct advantages. Nitrogen is a strong austenite stabilizer and a potent solid-solution strengthener, and nitrogen has greater solubility than carbon iron. This study investigates the relationship among nitrogen concentration, precipitate microstructure, and abrasive wear using two high-nitrogen stainless steel alloys: Fe-19Cr-5Mn-5Ni-3Mo (SS1) and Fe-16Cr-7Mn-5Ni(SS2). Alloy SS1 contained 0.7 wt% N and was solution annealed at 1,150 C, thereby dissolving the nitrogen interstitially in the austenite. Subsequent aging, or cold work and aging, at 900 C led to the grain-boundary, cellular, and transgranular precipitation of Cr 2 N. Alloy SS2 was remelted in a high-pressure (200 MPa) N 2 atmosphere, leading to a spatial gradient of nitrogen in the alloy in the form of interstitial nitrogen and Cr 2 N and CrN precipitates. Nitrogen contents varied from a low of approximately 0.7 wt% at the bottom of the billet to a high of 3.6 wt% at the top. Nitrogen in excess of approximately 0.7 wt% formed increasingly coarser and more numerous Cr 2 N and CrN precipitates. The precipitate morphology created in alloy SS1 due to aging, or cold work and aging, had little effect on the abrasive wear of the alloy. However, a decrease in the abrasive wear rate in alloy SS2 was observed to correspond to the increase in number and size of the Cr 2 N and CrN precipitates

  12. Microstructure, corrosion and tribological and antibacterial properties of Ti-Cu coated stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaomin; Gao, Lizhen; Liu, Erqiang; Yu, Feifei; Shu, Xuefeng; Wang, Hefeng

    2015-10-01

    A Ti-Cu coated layer on 316L stainless steel (SS) was obtained by using the Closed Field Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering (CFUBMS) system to improve antibacterial activity, corrosion and tribological properties. The microstructure and phase constituents of Ti-Cu coated layer were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES). The corrosion and tribological properties of a stainless steel substrate, SS316L, when coated with Ti-Cu were investigated in a simulated body fluid (SBF) environment. The viability of bacteria attached to the antibacterial surface was tested using the spread plate method. The results indicate that the Ti-Cu coated SS316L could achieve a higher corrosion polarization resistance and a more stable corrosion potential in an SBF environment than the uncoated SS316L substrate. The desirable corrosion protection performance of Ti-Cu may be attributable to the formation of a Ti-O passive layer on the coating surface, protecting the coating from further corrosion. The Ti-Cu coated SS316L also exhibited excellent wear resistance and chemical stability during the sliding tests against Si3N4 balls in SBF environment. Moreover, the Ti-Cu coatings exhibited excellent antibacterial abilities, where an effective reduction of 99.9% of Escherichia coli (E.coli) within 12h was achieved by contact with the modified surface, which was attributed to the release of copper ions when the Ti-Cu coatings are in contact with bacterial solution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fine scale microstructure in cast and aged duplex stainless steels investigated by small angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epperson, J.E.; Lin, J.S.; Spooner, S.

    1986-02-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) allows clustering phenomena to be studied in systems for which the constituent atoms do not differ greatly in atomic number. This investigation used SANS to characterize the fine scale microstructure in two cast and aged duplex stainless steels; aging times extended up to eight years. The steels differed in ferrite content by about a factor of two. The scattering at lowest q was dominated by magnetic scattering effects associated with the ferrite phase. In the range 0.025 less than or equal to q less than or equal to 0.2A -1 , additional scattering due to a precipitating phase rich in Ni and Si was observed. This scattering was rather intense and revealed a volume fraction of precipitate, in the ferrite, estimated to be 12 to 18% after long time aging. After about 70,000 hours at 400 0 C, there were about 10 18 precipitate particles per cm 3 some 50A in mean diameter, and they were distributed in a nonrandom manner, i.e., spatially, short-range-ordered. This investigation suggests that after aging some 70,000 hours at 400 0 C, the precipitate in the ferrite phase is undergoing Ostwald ripening. The present data are insufficient to indicate at what time this ripening process began

  14. Cold deformation effect on the microstructures and mechanical properties of AISI 301LN and 316L stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Paulo Maria de O.; Abreu, Hamilton Ferreira G. de; Albuquerque, Victor Hugo C. de; Neto, Pedro de Lima; Tavares, Joao Manuel R.S.

    2011-01-01

    As austenitic stainless steels have an adequate combination of mechanical resistance, conformability and resistance to corrosion they are used in a wide variety of industries, such as the food, transport, nuclear and petrochemical industries. Among these austenitic steels, the AISI 301LN and 316L steels have attracted prominent attention due to their excellent mechanical resistance. In this paper a microstructural characterization of AISI 301LN and 316L steels was made using various techniques such as metallography, optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy and atomic force microscopy, in order to analyze the cold deformation effect. Also, the microstructural changes were correlated with the alterations of mechanical properties of the materials under study. One of the numerous uses of AISI 301LN and 316L steels is in the structure of wagons for metropolitan surface trains. For this type of application it is imperative to know their microstructural behavior when subjected to cold deformation and correlate it with their mechanical properties and resistance to corrosion. Microstructural analysis showed that cold deformation causes significant microstructural modifications in these steels, mainly hardening. This modification increases the mechanical resistance of the materials appropriately for their foreseen application. Nonetheless, the materials become susceptible to pitting corrosion.

  15. Microstructural study of thermally aged duplex stainless steel deformation and fracture modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaeghe, B.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the micro mechanisms of deformation and rupture of an austeno ferritic stainless steel (Z 3 CND 22-10 M) with 33 % of ferrite. It is studied after ageing 1 000 h at 400 deg. C and 8 000 h at 350 deg. C and compared to the 'as received' state. During ageing the ferritic phase undergoes microstructural evolutions which affects its properties. The two ageing treatments lead to roughly the same level of embrittlement. Microstructural characterisation shows that both phases percolate and exhibit orientation relationships close to Kurdjumov-Sachs ones. Mechanical properties of the steel were characterised for different ageing treatments at room temperature and at 320 deg. C. The interface is particularly strong and ensures the load transfer to ferrite even if this phase contains cleavage cracks. Moreover the interface does not oppose slip transmission which is instead controlled by localised glide in the ferritic phase. If activated slip systems of austenite are common with ferrite, slip transmission from austenite to ferrite indeed occurs through the=e interface. If they are not common, dislocations cross-slip back into the austenite. At 320 deg. C cross-slip occurs even far from the interface. Damage starts by nucleation in ferrite of cleavage cracks which propagate between austenite islands. Crack propagation is controlled by stretching of austenite ligaments. The material breaks by ductile tearing of austenite islands when the crack eventually percolates in the ferritic phase. The ductility of the material can be correctly describer using a simple model that takes into account the tearing-off the ductile-phase. (author)

  16. Effect of stress during neutron irradiation on the microstructure of type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brager, H.R.; Garner, F.A.; Guthrie, G.L.

    1976-04-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination was performed on solution annealed and 20 percent cold-worked Type 316 stainless steel specimens stressed during irradiation at 500 0 C in EBR-II. Hoop stress levels ranged from 0 to 327 MN/m 2 (47,300 psi) and fluences between 2.0 and 3.0 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E greater than 0.1 MeV). Data confirm that applied tensile stresses enhance swelling in the solution annealed steel. The number densities of both voids and Frank loops were sensitive to the stress environment. Total swelling in the annealed material increased with stress, but not in direct proportion to the increased void nucleation. While the effect of cold working was to suppress swelling, the nucleation and growth of Frank loops was unaffected by the cold worked microstructure. The individual planar loop densities within any one specimen were quite sensitive to the magnitude of the stress component normal to the loop plane, while the total loop number density was sensitive to a smaller degree of the magnitude of the hydrostatic stress level. The number and size distribution of the loop populations were unaffected by the planar shear stress components, but the mean loop sizes were found to be limited by the probability of loop intersection with dislocations and loops. The stress dependence of void and loop densities allowed determination of the critical nuclei sizes, approximately sixteen vacancies for voids and six atoms for loops. Many observations were made on the probable creep mechanisms. Both dislocation and void microstructures evolved in a consistent stress-dependent manner, giving support to models which predict a coupling of the swelling and irradiation creep phenomena through the stress environment. 13 figures, 3 tables

  17. Properties, microstructure and resistance to metal corrosion from pure runoff of supermartensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zappa, S; Burgueno, A; Svoboda, H. G; Ramini de Rissone, M; Surian, E. S

    2008-01-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels (AISM) are characterized by their very low carbon content, providing good tenacity and weldability. They also contain Ni as a stabilizing agent of the austenite and Mo to improve corrosion resistance. The weldability of these materials is fundamentally important for their applications, mainly in the gas and oil industries. The presence of CO 2 , H 2 S, water with a high solids content and condensed water in the production of hydrocarbons together with the large amounts of Cl in these aqueous phases make localized corrosion one of the mechanisms for the degradation of these steels while in service. The protective gases used in the semiautomatic welding process with heavy or tubular wires (GMAW, FCAW) affect the chemical composition of the deposits, particularly the contents of C, O and N, generating variations in their properties. The mechanical properties of these steels are usually optimized after a post-welding heat treatment (PWHT), which may also significantly affect the corrosion resistance of the welding deposits. This work studied the influence of the welding procedure (protective gas and PWHT) on corrosion resistance from pitting of the unalloyed AISM metal. Two test pieces of unalloyed metal were welded according to ANSI/AWS A5.22-95 with a GMAW process using a 1.2 mm diameter tubular wire with metal filling that deposits a supermartensitic stainless steel. The effect of the gas protection was evaluated, welding one of the test pieces with Ar- 5%He and the other with Ar-18%CO 2 . The effect of the PWHT was analyzed, for which samples were extracted from each welded test piece, which were thermally treated at 650 o C for 15 minutes, producing as-welded (AW) samples and with PWHT. The chemical composition for both welding conditions was determined. Microstructural characterization was carried out for the four conditions , using optic and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, and the Vickers microhardness was

  18. Effect of high temperature tempering on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the modified 410 martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Pasaribu, Rahmat Ramadhan; Sugandi, Moh. Tri; Sunardi

    2018-05-01

    This paper reports the influence of high tempering temperature and holding time on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the recently modified 410 martensitic stainless steel. The modified steel was prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The hardness and tensile strength of the steels decreased with increasing tempering temperature from 600 to 700 °C and with increasing holding time from 1 to 6 h. Based on microstructural images, it was observed the coarsening of lath martensite and of the metal carbides as well. However, a relatively high hardness and strength were still exibited by this steel after tempering at a such high temperature of 600-700 °C. The partition of Mo into the carbides identified by EDS analysis may correlate with this situation.

  19. Influence of microstructure on the microbial corrosión behaviour of stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno, Diego Alejandro

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Several stainless steels (Types UNS S30300, S30400, S30403, S31600, S31603 and S42000 with different microstructural characteristics have been used to study the influence of heat treatments on microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC. Biocorrosion and accelerated electrochemical testing was performed in various microbiological media. Two species of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB have been used in order to ascertain the influence of microstructure. The morphology of corrosion pits produced in both chloride and chloride plus sulphide -SRB metabolites- was inspected by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM complemented with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis. Results have shown different behaviours regarding corrosion resistance in each case studied. Sensitized austenitic stainless steels were more affected by the presence of aggressive anions and pitting potential (Ep values were more cathodic than those of as-received state. A corrosion enhancement is produced by the synergistic action of biogenic sulphides and chloride anions. Pitting corrosion in martensitic stainless Steel Type UNS S42000 was found in a- biocorrosion test. The pitting morphology is correlated to the chemical composition, the microstructure and the electrolyte.

    Se han utilizado aceros inoxidables de los tipos UNS S30300, S30400, S30403, S31600, S31603 y S42000, en diferentes estados microestructurales, para estudiar la influencia de los tratamientos térmicos sobre la corrosión microbiana. Para ello, se han realizado ensayos electroquímicos y ensayos de biocorrosión, en diferentes medios microbiológicos, utilizándose dos especies de bacterias reductoras de sulfatos (SRB. La morfología de las picaduras, producidas en presencia de cloruros y en presencia de cloruros más sulfuros -metabolitos de SRB-, se ha analizado por microscopía óptica y por microscopía electrónica de barrido (SEM complementada con análisis por energía dispersiva de rayos X

  20. Environmental Fatigue Behaviors of CF8M Stainless Steel in 310 .deg. C Deoxygenated Water - Effects of Hydrogen and Microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hun; Cho, Pyungyeon; Jang, Changheui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Soon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    The effects of environment and microstructure on low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviors of CF8M stainless steels containing 11% of ferrites were investigated in a 310 .deg. C deoxygenated water environment. The reduction of LCF life of CF8M in a 310 .deg. C deoxygenated water was smaller than 316LN stainless steels. Based on the microstructure and fatigue surface analyses, it was confirmed that the hydrogen induced cracking contributed to the reduction in LCF life for CF8M as well as for 316LN. However, many secondary cracks were found on the boundaries of ferrite phases in CF8M, which effectively reduced the stress concentration at the crack tip. Because of the reduced stress concentration, the accelerated fatigue crack growth by hydrogen induced cracking was less significant, which resulted in the smaller environmental effects for CF8M than 316LN in a 310 .deg. C deoxygenated water.

  1. Microstructure and mechanical properties of stainless steel/calcium silicate composites manufactured by selective laser melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China); Shanghai Key Lab. of D& A for Metal-Functional Materials, Shanghai 201804 (China); Wang, Lianfeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China); Shanghai Aerospace Equipments Manufacturer, Shanghai 200240 (China); Jia, Min [Shanghai Aircraft Manufacturing Co., Ltd, Shanghai 200436 (China); Cheng, Lingyu [Shanghai Aerospace Equipments Manufacturer, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yan, Biao, E-mail: 84016@tongji.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China); Shanghai Key Lab. of D& A for Metal-Functional Materials, Shanghai 201804 (China)

    2017-02-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is raised as one kind of additive manufacturing (AM) which is based on the discrete-stacking concept. This technique can fabricate advanced composites with desirable properties directly from 3D CAD data. In this research, 316L stainless steel (316L SS) and different fractions of calcium silicate (CaSiO{sub 3}) composites (weight fractions of calcium silicate are 0%, 5%,10% and 15%, respectively) were prepared by SLM technique with a purpose to develop biomedical metallic materials. The relative density, tensile, microhardness and elastic modulus of the composites were tested, their microstructures and fracture morphologies were observed using optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was found that the addition of CaSiO{sub 3} particles influenced the microstructure and mechanical properties of specimens significantly. The CaSiO{sub 3} precipitates from the overlap of adjacent tracks and became the origin of the defects. The tensile strength of specimens range 320–722 MPa. The microhardness and elastic modulus are around 250 HV and 215 GPa respectively. These composites were ductile materials and the fracture mode of the composites was mixed mode of ductile and brittle fracture. The 316L SS/CaSiO{sub 3} composites can be a potential biomedical metallic materials in the medical field. - Highlights: • 316L SS/CaSiO{sub 3} composites were fabricated by selective laser melting. • Microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance of samples was studied. • Composites is a ductile material and mixed mode of ductile and brittle fracture. • Composites is a potential biomedical metallic materials in the medical field.

  2. Effects of Ultrasonic Nanocrystal Surface Modification on the Residual Stress, Microstructure, and Corrosion Resistance of 304 Stainless Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang; Telang, Abhishek; Gill, Amrinder; Wen, Xingshuo; Mannava, Seetha R.; Qian, Dong; Vasudevan, Vijay K.

    2018-03-01

    In this study, ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM) of 304 stainless steel welds was carried out. UNSM effectively eliminates the tensile stress generated during welding and imparts beneficial compressive residual stresses. In addition, UNSM can effectively refine the grains and increase hardness in the near-surface region. Corrosion tests in boiling MgCl2 solution demonstrate that UNSM can significantly improve the corrosion resistance due to the compressive residual stresses and changes in the near-surface microstructure.

  3. Preliminary microstructural characterization by transmission electron microscopy of 14 MeV neutron irradiated type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echer, C.J.

    1977-01-01

    Substantial changes in the mechanical properties of 316 stainless steel were observed after neutron irradiation (phi/sub t/ = 2.3 x 10 21 n/m 2 and E = 14 MeV) at 25 0 C. Comparison of microstructures of the unirradiated and neutron irradiated materials were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. Evidence of small defect clusters in the irradiated material was found. These findings are consistent with other investigators also evaluating low dose irradiations

  4. Effect of heat input on dissimilar welds of ultra high strength steel and duplex stainless steel: Microstructural and compositional analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasalloti, H., E-mail: hamed.tasalloti.kashani@student.lut.fi; Kah, P., E-mail: paul.kah@lut.fi; Martikainen, J., E-mail: jukka.martikainen@lut.fi

    2017-01-15

    The effect of heat input on the microstructure and compositional heterogeneity of welds of direct-quenched ultra high strength steel (Optim 960 QC) and duplex stainless steel (UNS S32205) was studied. The dissimilar welds were made using GMAW with a fully austenitic filler wire. In addition to grain coarsening in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the ferritic side, it was found that an increase in heat input correlatively increased the proportional volume of bainitic to martensitic phases. Coarse ferritic grains were observed in the duplex HAZ. Higher heat input, however, had a beneficial effect on the nucleation of austenite in the HAZ. Heat input had a regulatory effect on grain growth within the austenitic weld and more favorable equiaxed austenite was obtained with higher heat input. On the ferritic side of the welds, macrosegregation in the form of a martensitic intermediate zone was observed for all the cooling rates studied. However, on the duplex side, macrosegregation in the fusion boundary was only noticed with higher cooling rates. Microstructural observations and compositional analysis suggest that higher heat input could be beneficial for the structural integrity of the weld despite higher heat input increasing the extent of adverse coarse grains in the HAZ, especially on the ferritic side. - Highlights: •The effect of heat input on dissimilar welds of UHSS and DSS was studied. •Transmutation of the microstructure was discussed in detail. •The influence of heat input on compositional heterogeneity of welds was described. •Higher heat input enhanced bainitic transformation on the ferritic side. •Macrosegregation was affected by the amount of heat input on the DSS side.

  5. Microstructural stability of austenitic stainless steels on exposure to irradiation and elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parameswaran, P.; Radhika, M.; Saroja, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.; Nanda Gopal, M.

    2011-01-01

    Cold worked 316 stainless steels employed as core material in fast reactors on exposure to neutron irradiation to 40 dpa at ∼ 450 deg C have resulted in microstructural changes in terms of formation of voids and extensive precipitation of carbides, eta phase and nickel silicides. As a consequence there is degradation in the mechanical properties of the material, particularly ductility. In order to achieve higher burnup it is essential to find better materials, which would exhibit less void swelling and retain the microstructure over long radiation doses. Accordingly alloy D9 with appropriate modifications of Ni and Cr content with Ti additions has been developed. Further modification of alloy D9 with respect to minor alloying additions namely Si and P is being studied, in order to enhance the radiation resistance for extending the service life of components. The effectiveness of these elements can be achieved if and only if they are retained in solution over long time of exposure at high temperatures and irradiation. Therefore, the thermal stability of the newly developed improved D9 alloys, with a constant Ti:C ratio and different levels of Si and P has been studied with respect to microstructural evolution and its influence on the mechanical properties. Thermal aging behavior of the alloy with varying titanium contents at elevated temperatures was also studied in detail to identify the optimum alloying levels. The alloys in the 20% cold worked condition exhibit austenitic grains interspersed with bands of fine cold worked grains. On aging in the temperature range of 873-1073K for various durations upto two years the alloy showed the presence of different phases such as M 23 C 6 , intermetallics and TiC whose quantity varies with temperature. The hardness values showed a trend of an initial increase in all the alloys but at longer times the hardness either showed saturation or a decrease followed by saturation. The microstructural parameters like grain size and

  6. The Effects of Nitrogen Gas on Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of TIG Welded S32205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Barış Başyiğit

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Duplex stainless steels are gaining greater interest due to their increasing amounts of application fields. Accordingly, there is a need for awareness of problems associated with improper microstructural distributions such as δ-ferrite (delta-ferrite, austenite and other important intermetallic phases that may form in these steel weldments. Since δ-ferrite versus austenite ratio profoundly influences corrosion and mechanical properties, optimum δ-ferrite ratios must be kept approximately within 35–65 vol % and balance austenite to maintain satisfactory corrosion and mechanical properties on welding of these steels. Cooling rates of welds and alloying elements in base metal are the major factors that determine the final microstructure of these steels. In this work, 3 mm thickness of 2205 duplex stainless-steel plates were TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas welded with various amounts of nitrogen gas added to argon shielding gas. Specimens were joined within the same welding parameters and cooling conditions. As nitrogen is a potential austenite stabilizer and an interstitial solid solution hardener, the effects of nitrogen on mechanical properties such as hardness profiles, grain sizes and microstructural modifications are investigated thoroughly by changing the welding shielding gas compositions. Increasing the nitrogen content in argon shielding gas also increases the amount of austenitic phase while δ-ferrite ratios decreases. Nitrogen spherodized the grains of austenitic structure much more than observed in δ-ferrite. The strength values of specimens that welded with the addition of nitrogen gas into the argon shielding gas are increased more in both austenitic and delta-ferritic structure as compared to specimens that welded with plain argon shielding gas. The addition of 1 vol % of nitrogen gas into argon shielding gas provided the optimum phase balance of austenite and δ-ferrite in S32205 duplex stainless-steel TIG-welded specimens.

  7. TIG welding of 22-05 duplex stainless steels (Uranus 45 N and Avesta). Microstructural studies and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez de Salazar, J.M.; Urena, A.; Cobollo, M.; Barranco, V.; Alvarez, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    TIG welding of two different duplex stainless steels is carried out. Are-discharge on base-material plates by means of the TIG technique without filler metal and varying the energetic conditions (E.N.A.) has been performed. A comparative study concerning the microstructural evolution as well as mechanical properties is carried out. The relation between hardness profiles, the microstructural variations and the ferrite δ concentration is established. Further, the above mentioned properties are related to the E.N.A. for each welded joint. (Author) 8 refs

  8. Microstructure and fracture toughness of irradiated stainless steel retrieved from the field: the potential role of radiation-induced clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, P.; Soneda, N.; Nishida, K.; Dohi, K.; Marquis, E.A.; Chen, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The microstructures of six material/fluence combinations of stainless steels retrieved from BWR components (top guide and control rods) have been examined by atom probe tomography; the irradiated microstructure had been already characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fracture toughness of two material/fluence combinations had been previously measured. The aggregate results strongly suggest that radiation-induced clusters play a significant role in the degradation of fracture toughness that occurs at fluences below ∼ 13 dpa. Because TEM has not been able to consistently identify and quantify the nano-sized clusters in this fluence range, it has not highlighted the potential role of radiation-induced clusters. (authors)

  9. Processing conditions and microstructural features of porous 316L stainless steel components by DMLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Dongdong [College of Materials Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 29 Yudao Street, 210016 Nanjing (China)], E-mail: dongdonggu@nuaa.edu.cn; Shen Yifu [College of Materials Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 29 Yudao Street, 210016 Nanjing (China)

    2008-12-30

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), due to its flexibility in materials and shapes, would be especially interesting to produce complex shaped porous metallic components. In the present work, processing conditions and microstructural characteristics of direct laser sintered porous 316L stainless steel components were studied. It was found that a partial melting mechanism of powders gave a high feasibility in obtaining porous sintered structures possessing porosities of {approx}21-{approx}55%. Linear energy density (LED), which was defined by the ratio of laser power to scan speed, was used to tailor the laser sintering mechanism. A moderate LED of {approx}3400-{approx}6000 J/m and a lower scan speed less than 0.06 m/s proved to be feasible. With the favorable sintering mechanism prevailed, lowering laser power or increasing scan speed, scan line spacing, and powder layer thickness generally led to a higher porosity. Metallurgical mechanisms of pore formation during DMLS were addressed. It showed that the presence of pores was through: (i) the formation of liquid bridges between partially melted particles during laser irradiation; and (ii) the growth of sintering necks during solidification, leaving residual pores between solidified metallic agglomerates.

  10. Processing conditions and microstructural features of porous 316L stainless steel components by DMLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dongdong; Shen, Yifu

    2008-12-01

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), due to its flexibility in materials and shapes, would be especially interesting to produce complex shaped porous metallic components. In the present work, processing conditions and microstructural characteristics of direct laser sintered porous 316L stainless steel components were studied. It was found that a partial melting mechanism of powders gave a high feasibility in obtaining porous sintered structures possessing porosities of ˜21-˜55%. Linear energy density (LED), which was defined by the ratio of laser power to scan speed, was used to tailor the laser sintering mechanism. A moderate LED of ˜3400-˜6000 J/m and a lower scan speed less than 0.06 m/s proved to be feasible. With the favorable sintering mechanism prevailed, lowering laser power or increasing scan speed, scan line spacing, and powder layer thickness generally led to a higher porosity. Metallurgical mechanisms of pore formation during DMLS were addressed. It showed that the presence of pores was through: (i) the formation of liquid bridges between partially melted particles during laser irradiation; and (ii) the growth of sintering necks during solidification, leaving residual pores between solidified metallic agglomerates.

  11. Influence of the addition of gadolinium on the microstructure and mechanical properties of duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Ji-Ho; Jung, Hyun-Do; Im, Jae-Han; Jung, Ki Ho; Moon, Byung-Moon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of gadolinium addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of duplex stainless steel (DSS) fabricated using a normal casting method. The oxygen content in the cast DSS alloy with gadolinium decreased because of the high reactivity of gadolinium with oxygen. The area fraction and size of non-intermetallic inclusions in the alloy decreased from 0.80±0.12% to 0.58±0.04% and from 6.9±0.7 to 5.8±0.4 μm upon gadolinium addition, respectively. Notably, the ultimate tensile strength and strain at break of the cast alloy significantly increased with the addition of gadolinium from 919±25 to 969±8 MPa and from 24.8±1.9% to 28.4±1.1%, respectively. The hardness of the cast alloy with gadolinium increased from 23.6±1.3 to 25.0±1.2 HRC. A significant increase in the impact energy of the cast alloy was observed and the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature slightly decreased by approximately 10 °C with the addition of gadolinium.

  12. Effects of Thermal Aging on Microstructure and Impact Properties of 316LN Stainless Steel Weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUO Qiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To study the thermal aging of nuclear primary pipe material 316LN stainless steel weld, accelerated thermal aging experiment was performed at 400℃ for 15000h. Microstructure evolution of weld after aging was investigated by TEM and HREM. Impact properties of weld thermally aged at different time was measured by Charpy impact test. Meanwhile, taking Charpy impact energy as the standard of thermal aging embrittlement, the thermal kinetics formula was obtained by the fitting method. Finally, the Charpy impact properties of the weld during 60 years of service at the actual operation temperature were estimated by the thermal kinetics formula. The results indicate that the spinodal decomposition occurs in the ferrite of the weld after thermal aging at 400℃ for 1000h, results in α (Fe-rich and α'(Cr-rich phases, and meanwhile, the G-phase is precipitated in the ferrite; the spinodal decomposition and the G-phase precipitation lead to the decrease in the impact energy of weld as time prolongs; the prediction results show that the Charpy impact energy of weld decreases quickly in the early 25 years, and then undergoes a slow decrease during the subsequent operation process.

  13. Reactive sintering and microstructure development of tungsten carbide-AISI 304 stainless steel cemented carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, C.M. [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CEMUC-Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Oliveira, F.J. [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Senos, A.M.R., E-mail: anamor@ua.pt [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2017-06-01

    Sintering of WC-stainless steel (SS) composites within a typical binder range from 6 up to 15 wt% SS was investigated through constant heating rate dilatometry, in vacuum conditions, complemented by differential thermal analysis and by the study of the high temperature wetting behavior of SS on WC. The densification starts ∼900 °C with a typical densification curve for all compositions, where three distinct regions are discernible: the first one with a slow densification rate, followed by a second region where a sharp increase in the densification rate up to a maximum value dependent on the binder amount is observed and, finally, a third one with a slowdown of the densification rate until the end of the thermal cycle. The attained final density at 1450 °C is dependent on the binder amount, increasing proportionally to its initial content. The final microstructure presents a normal grain size distribution and appreciable amounts of eta-phase, besides the major WC phase and residual iron rich phase. The reactive densification behavior and the role of the liquid phase are interpreted accordingly with structural and kinetic data. - Highlights: • Sintering of WC-AISI304 composites starts ∼900 °C and involves three stages. • Densification is largely dominated by a reactive liquid phase sintering process. • Eta-phase constitutes a transient liquid phase during sintering. • Sintering cycles are dependent on the initial binder content.

  14. Tensile properties and fracture of (α+γ) two phase stainless steel with fine grained microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogiyama, Hiroyuki; Tsukuda, Hitoshi; Soyama, Yoshiro

    1989-01-01

    The tensile properties and fracture of the (α+γ) two phase stainless steel with very fine γ grains were investigated. Two different microstructures with very fine γ grains can be obtianed by the thermomechanical treatments; One has both very fine γ and α grains, and the other has very fine γ and large α grains. The specimens were prepared in quenched and aged (475degC) conditions. The results obtained are as follows. The 0.2 % proof stress and tensile strength increase with the aging at 475degC for all specimens. The refinement of the γ grains plays an important role for the increase of strength in both quenched and aged conditions, and also for the ductility in the quenched condition. The refinement of α grains, however, contributes to the increase of the ductility in the aged condition. Accordingly, it is found that very good combinations of tensile strength and ductility can be achieved by the aging and the refinement of the γ and α grains (micro duplex structure). (author)

  15. SCC of 2304 Duplex Stainless Steel-Microstructure, Residual Stress and Surface Grinding Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nian; Peng, Ru Lin; Schönning, Mikael; Pettersson, Rachel

    2017-02-23

    The influence of surface grinding and microstructure on chloride induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of 2304 duplex stainless steel has been investigated. Grinding operations were performed both parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction of the material. SCC tests were conducted in boiling magnesium chloride according to ASTM G36; specimens were exposed both without external loading and with varied levels of four-point bend loading. Residual stresses were measured on selected specimens before and after exposure using the X-ray diffraction technique. In addition, in-situ surface stress measurements subjected to four-point bend loading were performed to evaluate the deviation between the actual applied loading and the calculated values according to ASTM G39. Micro-cracks, initiated by grinding induced surface tensile residual stresses, were observed for all the ground specimens but not on the as-delivered surfaces. Loading transverse to the rolling direction of the material increased the susceptibility to chloride induced SCC. Grinding induced tensile residual stresses and micro-notches in the as-ground surface topography were also detrimental.

  16. Fractographic and microstructural aspects of fracture toughness testing in irradiated 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, W.H.; Hiser, A.L.; Hawthorne, J.R.; Abramczyk, G.A.; Caskey, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    Fracture toughness and Charpy impact test results on 304 stainless steel baseplate, weld and heat-affected zone (HAZ) tested at 25 0 C and 125 0 C are correlated with the microstructural and fractographic features observed in these materials. Specimens were collected from several sections of 12.7 mm (0.5 in.) wall thickness piping removed from a process system, and were characterized by different material chemistries and thermomechanical histories. As a result, mechanical properties vary over a considerable range from one pipe section to another. The presence of delta ferrite in some of the samples caused significant degradations in the toughness properties for certain crack orientations. Decreases in Charpy impact energies occur in the same material for different crack orientations. Materials irradiated showed 40% decreases in Charpy impact energy, but little change in fracture morphology. An increase in the test temperature resulted in an expected increase in Charpy energies for all materials. Fractographic features did not change appreciably with respect to the 100 0 C increase in test temperature. In unirradiated specimens, a test temperature increase caused lower J/sub Ic/ and J-R curve values with tearing modules values increased. The latter is due to the large decreases in tensile strength with increasing test temperature. The weld metals tend to have the highest tearing resistance, while the HAZ's tend to have the lowest. 30 figs., 3 tabs

  17. 3D Printing of 316L Stainless Steel and Its Effect on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawn, Penn

    Laser powder bed fusion or 3D printing is a potential candidate for net shape forming and manufacturing complex shapes. Understanding of how various parameters affect build quality is necessary. Specimens were made from 316L stainless steel at 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° angles measured from the build plate. Three tensile and four fatigue specimens at each angle were produced. Fracture morphology investigation was performed to determine the fracture mode of specimens at each build angle. Microstructural analysis was performed on one of each orientation. The average grain size of the samples was marginally influenced by the build angle orientation. Tensile yield strength was the highest for 0° and decreased in the order of 60°, 30°, and 90° angles; all had higher yield strength than wrought. Unlike with the tensile results, the 60° had the highest fatigue strength followed by the 0°, then the 30°, and the 90° build angle had the lowest fatigue strength. Tensile specimens all failed predominantly by ductile fracture, with a few locations of brittle fracture suspected to be caused by delamination. Fatigue fracture always initiated at void space.

  18. Effect of microstructure on the localized corrosion of Fe-Cr-Mn-N stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Young; Park, Yong Soo; Kim, Young Sik

    1998-01-01

    This paper dealt with the effect of microstructure on the localized corrosion of Fe-Cr-Mn-N stainless steels. The experimental alloys were made by vacuum induction melting and then hot rolled. The alloys were designed by controlling Cr eq /Ni eq ratio. Two alloys had austenitic phase and one alloy showed (austenite+ferrite) du-plex phase. High nitrogen addition in austenitic alloys stabilized the austenitic structure and then suppressed the formations of ferrite and α martensite, but martensite was formed in the case of large Cr eq /Ni eq ratio and low nitrogen addition. Pitting initiation site was grain boundary in austenitic alloys and was ferrite/austenite phase boundary in duplex alloy in the HCl solution. In sulfuric acids, austenitic alloys showed uniform corrosion, but ferrite phase was preferentially corroded in duplex alloy. The preferential dissolution seems to be related with the distribution of alloying elements between ferrite and austenite. Intergranular corrosion test showed that corrosion rate by immersion Huey test had a linear relation with degree of sensitization by EPR test

  19. Investigation on Microstructure and Impact Toughness of Different Zones in Duplex Stainless Steel Welding Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Jing, Hongyang; Xu, Lianyong; Han, Yongdian; Li, Guolu; Zhao, Lei

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigated on microstructure and impact toughness of different zones in duplex stainless steel welding joint. High-temperature heat-affected zone (HTHAZ) contained coarse ferrite grains and secondary precipitates such as secondary austenite, Cr2N, and sigma. Intergranular secondary austenite was prone to precipitation in low-temperature heat-affected zone (LTHAZ). Both in weld metal (WM) and in HTHAZ, the austenite consisted of different primary and secondary austenite. The ferrite grains in base metal (BM) presented typical rolling texture, while the austenite grains showed random orientation. Both in the HTHAZ and in the LTHAZ, the ferrite grains maintained same texture as the ferrite in the BM. The secondary austenite had higher Ni but lower Cr and Mo than the primary austenite. Furthermore, the WM exhibited the highest toughness because of sufficient ductile austenite and unapparent ferrite texture. The HTHAZ had the lowest toughness because of insufficient austenite formation in addition to brittle sigma and Cr2N precipitation. The LTHAZ toughness was higher than the BM due to secondary austenite precipitation. In addition, the WM fracture was dominated by the dimple, while the cleavage was main fracture mode of the HTHAZ. Both BM and LTHAZ exhibited a mixed fracture mode of the dimple and quasi-cleavage.

  20. The Localized Corrosion Behavior Associated with Microstructure of F53 Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soon-Tae; Lee, In-Sung; Kong, Kyeong-Ho; Park, Yong-Soo [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-Hoon; Yang, Won-Jon [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    The localized corrosion behavior associated with microstructure of F53 super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) was investigated using a potentiodynamic polarization test, a critical crevice temperature test, an electron probe micro-analyzer analysis, and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy analyses. Crevice corrosion was initiated at the α/γ phase boundaries, MO{sub x} inclusions (where M is Cr, Mn, Al, Fe, or Ti), as well as Cr and Mo depleted areas adjacent to the σ-phases precipitated in the F53 SDSS alloy. This alloy had been annealed at 1050 ℃ followed by improper water-cooling, and the corrosion was propagated into the α-phases because the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of the α-phase was smaller than that of the γ-phase. As cooling rate increased, the variation of the α-phases decreased, and the content of the Cr and Mo rich σ-phases decreased, thereby increasing the corrosion resistance.

  1. Processing conditions and microstructural features of porous 316L stainless steel components by DMLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Dongdong; Shen Yifu

    2008-01-01

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), due to its flexibility in materials and shapes, would be especially interesting to produce complex shaped porous metallic components. In the present work, processing conditions and microstructural characteristics of direct laser sintered porous 316L stainless steel components were studied. It was found that a partial melting mechanism of powders gave a high feasibility in obtaining porous sintered structures possessing porosities of ∼21-∼55%. Linear energy density (LED), which was defined by the ratio of laser power to scan speed, was used to tailor the laser sintering mechanism. A moderate LED of ∼3400-∼6000 J/m and a lower scan speed less than 0.06 m/s proved to be feasible. With the favorable sintering mechanism prevailed, lowering laser power or increasing scan speed, scan line spacing, and powder layer thickness generally led to a higher porosity. Metallurgical mechanisms of pore formation during DMLS were addressed. It showed that the presence of pores was through: (i) the formation of liquid bridges between partially melted particles during laser irradiation; and (ii) the growth of sintering necks during solidification, leaving residual pores between solidified metallic agglomerates.

  2. Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded 18Cr–2Mo ferritic stainless steel thick plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jian; Li, Huijun; Zhu, Zhixiong; Barbaro, Frank; Jiang, Laizhu; Xu, Haigang; Ma, Li

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We focus on friction stir welding of 18Cr–2Mo ferritic stainless steel thick plate. • We produce high-quality joints with special tool and optimised welding parameters. • We compare microstructure and mechanical properties of steel and joint. • Friction stir welding is a method that can maintain the properties of joint. - Abstract: In this study, microstructure and mechanical properties of a friction stir welded 18Cr–2Mo ferritic stainless steel thick plate were investigated. The 5.4 mm thick plates with excellent properties were welded at a constant rotational speed and a changeable welding speed using a composite tool featuring a chosen volume fraction of cubic boron nitride (cBN) in a W–Re matrix. The high-quality welds were successfully produced with optimised welding parameters, and studied by means of optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) and standard hardness and impact toughness testing. The results show that microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints are affected greatly, which is mainly related to the remarkably fine-grained microstructure of equiaxed ferrite that is observed in the friction stir welded joint. Meanwhile, the ratios of low-angle grain boundary in the stir zone regions significantly increase, and the texture turns strong. Compared with the base material, mechanical properties of the joint are maintained in a comparatively high level

  3. Effect of friction time on the microstructure and mechanic properties of friction welded AISI 1040/Duplex stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İhsan Kırık

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect on the characteristic microstructure and mechanic properties of friction time on the couple steels AISI 1040/AISI 2205 stainless steel joining with friction welding method was experimentally investigated. Friction welding experiment were carried out in privately prepared PLC controlled continuous friction welding machine by us. Joints were carried out under 1700 rpm rotation speed, with 30MPa process friction pressure, 60MPa forging pressure, 4 second forging pressure and under 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 second friction time, respectively. After friction welding, the bonding interface microstructures of the specimens were examined by SEM microscopy and EDS analysis. After weld microhardness and tensile strength of specimens were carried out. The result of applied tests and observations pointed out that the properties of microstructure were changed with friction time increased. The excellent tensile strength of joint observed on 1700 rpm rotation speed and 3 second friction time sample.

  4. Microstructure and antibacterial properties of microwave plasma nitrided layers on biomedical stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Li-Hsiang; Chen, Shih-Chung; Wu, Ching-Zong; Hung, Jing-Ming; Ou, Keng-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Nitriding of AISI 303 austenitic stainless steel using microwave plasma system at various temperatures was conducted in the present study. The nitrided layers were characterized via scanning electron microscopy, glancing angle X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Vickers microhardness tester. The antibacterial properties of this nitrided layer were evaluated. During nitriding treatment between 350 deg. C and 550 deg. C, the phase transformation sequence on the nitrided layers of the alloys was found to be γ → (γ + γ N ) → (γ + α + CrN). The analytical results revealed that the surface hardness of AISI 303 stainless steel could be enhanced with the formation of γ N phase in nitriding process. Antibacterial test also demonstrated the nitrided layer processed the excellent antibacterial properties. The enhanced surface hardness and antibacterial properties make the nitrided AISI 303 austenitic stainless steel to be one of the essential materials in the biomedical applications.

  5. Microstructure of rapidly solidified Al2O3-dispersion-strengthened Type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megusar, J.; Arnberg, L.; Vander Sande, J.B.; Grant, N.J.

    1981-01-01

    An aluminum oxide dispersion strengthened 316 stainless steel was developed by surface oxidation. Surface oxidation was chosen as a preferred method in order to minimize formation of less stable chromium oxides. Ultra low C+N 316 stainless steel was alloyed with 1 wt % Al, rapidly solidified to produce fine powders and attrited to approximately 0.5 μm thick flakes to provide for surface oxidation. Oxide particles in the extruded material were identified mostly as Al oxides. In the preirradiated condition, oxide dispersion retarded crystallization and grain growth and had an effect on room temperature tensile properties. These structural modifications are expected to have an effect on the swelling resistance, structure stability and high temperature strength of austenitic stainless steels

  6. Microstructure Refinement and Mechanical Properties of 304 Stainless Steel by Repetitive Thermomechanical Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fadhalah, Khaled; Aleem, Muhammad

    2018-04-01

    Repetitive thermomechanical processing (TMP) was applied for evaluating the effect of strain-induced α'-martensite transformation and reversion annealing on microstructure refinement and mechanical properties of 304 austenitic stainless steel. The first TMP scheme consisted of four cycles of tensile deformation to strain of 0.4, while the second TMP scheme applied two cycles of tensile straining to 0.6. For both schemes, tensile tests were conducted at 173 K (- 100 °C) followed by 5-minute annealing at 1073 K (800 °C). The volume fraction of α'-martensite in deformed samples increased with increasing cycles, reaching a maximum of 98 vol pct. Examination of annealed microstructure by electron backscattered diffraction indicated that increasing strain and/or number of cycles resulted in stronger reversion to austenite with finer grain size of 1 μm. Yet, increasing strain reduced the formation of Σ3 boundaries. The annealing textures generally show reversion of α'-martensite texture components to the austenite texture of brass and copper orientations. The increase in strain and/or number of cycles resulted in stronger intensity of copper orientation, accompanied by the formation of recrystallization texture components of Goss, cube, and rotated cube. The reduction in grain size with increasing cycles caused an increase in yield strength. It also resulted in an increase in strain hardening rate during deformation due to the increase in the formation of α'-martensite. The increase in strain hardening rate occurred in two consecutive stages, marked as stages II and III. The strain hardening in stage II is due to the formation of α'-martensite from either austenite or ɛ-martensite, while the stage-III strain hardening is attributed to the necessity to break the α'-martensite-banded structure for forming block-type martensite at high strains.

  7. Microstructural characterization and electron backscatter diffraction analysis across the welded interface of duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Jing, Hongyang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin 300350 (China); Xu, Lianyong, E-mail: xulianyong@tju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin 300350 (China); Han, Yongdian; Gao, Zhanqi; Zhao, Lei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin 300350 (China); Zhang, Jianli [Welding laboratory, Offshore Oil Engineering (Qing Dao) Company, Qing Dao 266520 (China)

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • Apparent change in LTHAZ was the intergranular secondary austenite precipitation. • Ferrite in HAZ maintained same distribution as ferrite texture in base metal. • Different austenite in different zones showed different orientation with ferrite. • Ferrite and austenite grains exhibited different boundary characteristics. • Local deformations were generated in grain boundary and within deformed grain. - Abstract: The microstructural evolution, orientation relationships, boundary characteristics, grain type, local deformation, and microhardness across the welded interface of duplex stainless steel (DSS) were investigated. The DSS welded joint consisted of four typical zones: base metal (BM), low-temperature heat-affected zone (LTHAZ), high-temperature heat-affected zone (HTHAZ), and weld metal (WM). The apparent microstructural changes in the HTHAZ and LTHAZ were secondary austenite and Cr{sub 2}N precipitation. A modified cooperative precipitation mechanism of secondary austenite and Cr{sub 2}N at the interface was proposed. Furthermore, the ferrite in both the HTHAZ and LTHAZ maintained the same distribution as the ferrite texture in the BM, while this ferrite texture disappeared completely in the WM. Different austenite grains in the different zones exhibited different orientation relationships with the ferrite matrix. Special grain boundaries were mainly distributed between the austenite grains, while the ferrite grains primarily contained random grain boundaries. Austenite twins constituted the largest proportion of the special boundaries. The special austenite grain boundaries in the BM and LTHAZ were higher in relative frequency than those in the HTHAZ and WM. The ferrite grains in the HTHAZ and WM mainly consisted of substructured grains. In the BM, the recrystallization degree of ferrite was significantly lower than that of austenite grains. The local deformations were mainly generated in the grain boundaries and within the deformed

  8. Influence of microstructure and elemental partitioning on pitting corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel welding joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Jing, Hongyang; Xu, Lianyong; Han, Yongdian; Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Jianli

    2017-02-01

    The influences of microstructure and elemental partitioning on pitting corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel joints welded by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with different shielding gas compositions were studied by optical microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and potentiostatic and potentiodynamic polarization methods The adding 2% N2 in shielding gas facilitated primary austenite formation in GTAW weld metal (WM) and suppressed Cr2N precipitation in GTAW weld root. In the HAZ, the banded microstructure disappeared while the coarse ferrite grains maintained same orientation as the banded ferrite in the BM. In the WM, the ferrite had one single orientation throughout a grain, whereas several families of austenite appeared. The austenite both in BM and WM enriched in Ni and nitro`gen, while Cr and Mo were concentrated in the ferrite and thus no element showed clear dendritic distribution in the WM (ER2209 and E2209T1). In addition, the secondary austenite had higher Ni content but lower Cr and Mo content than the primary austenite. The N2-supplemented shielding gas promoted nitrogen solid-solution in the primary and secondary austenite. Furthermore, the secondary austenite had relatively lower pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) than the ferrite and primary austenite, thereby resulting in its preferential corrosion. The Cr2N precipitation led to relatively poor resistance to pitting corrosion in three HAZs and pure Ar shielding GTAW weld root. The N2-supplemented shielding gas improved pitting corrosion resistance of GTAW joint by increasing PREN of secondary austenite and suppressing Cr2N precipitation. In addition, the FCAW WM had much poorer resistance to pitting corrosion than the GTAW WM due to many O-Ti-Si-Mn inclusions. In the BM, since the austenite with lower PREN compared

  9. Microstructural characterization and electron backscatter diffraction analysis across the welded interface of duplex stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Jing, Hongyang; Xu, Lianyong; Han, Yongdian; Gao, Zhanqi; Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Jianli

    2017-08-01

    The microstructural evolution, orientation relationships, boundary characteristics, grain type, local deformation, and microhardness across the welded interface of duplex stainless steel (DSS) were investigated. The DSS welded joint consisted of four typical zones: base metal (BM), low-temperature heat-affected zone (LTHAZ), high-temperature heat-affected zone (HTHAZ), and weld metal (WM). The apparent microstructural changes in the HTHAZ and LTHAZ were secondary austenite and Cr2N precipitation. A modified cooperative precipitation mechanism of secondary austenite and Cr2N at the interface was proposed. Furthermore, the ferrite in both the HTHAZ and LTHAZ maintained the same distribution as the ferrite texture in the BM, while this ferrite texture disappeared completely in the WM. Different austenite grains in the different zones exhibited different orientation relationships with the ferrite matrix. Special grain boundaries were mainly distributed between the austenite grains, while the ferrite grains primarily contained random grain boundaries. Austenite twins constituted the largest proportion of the special boundaries. The special austenite grain boundaries in the BM and LTHAZ were higher in relative frequency than those in the HTHAZ and WM. The ferrite grains in the HTHAZ and WM mainly consisted of substructured grains. In the BM, the recrystallization degree of ferrite was significantly lower than that of austenite grains. The local deformations were mainly generated in the grain boundaries and within the deformed grains. The HTHAZ exhibited the highest hardness, while the BM had the lowest hardness. The LTHAZ had a lower hardness than the HTHAZ and higher hardness than the BM.

  10. An investigation on microstructure and mechanical property of thermally aged stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, X.Y. [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Zhu, P. [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute Co. Ltd., 1788 Xihuan Road, 215004 Suzhou (China); Ding, X.F. [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Lu, Y.H., E-mail: lu_yonghao@mater.ustb.edu.cn [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Shoji, T. [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, 6-6-01 Aoba AramakiAobaku, 980-8579 Sendai (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    Microstructural evolution and mechanical property change of E308L stainless steel weld overlay cladding aged at 400 °C for 400, 1000 and 5000 h were investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and small punch test (SPT). The results indicated that thermal aging had no obvious effect on the volume fraction of ferrite, but can cause microstructural evolution by spinodal decomposotion and G-phase precipitation in the ferrite phase. Spinodal decomposition took place after aging up to 1000 h, while G-phase formed along dislocations, and growed up to 2–11 nm after aging for 5000 h. The total energy for inducing deformation and fracture by the small punch tests decreased with the increase of thermal aging time, and this decline was associated with spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation. Plastic deformation of the aged ferrite proceeded via formation of curvilinear slip bands. Nucleation of microcracks occurred at the δ/γ interface along the slip bands. The hardening of the ferrite and high stress concentration on δ/γ phase interface resulted in brittle fracture and phase boundary separation after thermal aging. - Highlights: •Spinodal decomposition took place after long-term therml aging at 400 °C. •Dislocations were the preferable sites for G-phase formation aged at 400 °C for 5000 h. •Spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation induced reduction of small punch energy. •Thermal aging led to brittle fracture and phase boundary separation. •Nucleation of microcracks occurred at the δ/γ interface along the slip bands in the aged ferrite phase.

  11. An investigation on microstructure and mechanical property of thermally aged stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, X.Y.; Zhu, P.; Ding, X.F.; Lu, Y.H.; Shoji, T.

    2017-01-01

    Microstructural evolution and mechanical property change of E308L stainless steel weld overlay cladding aged at 400 °C for 400, 1000 and 5000 h were investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and small punch test (SPT). The results indicated that thermal aging had no obvious effect on the volume fraction of ferrite, but can cause microstructural evolution by spinodal decomposotion and G-phase precipitation in the ferrite phase. Spinodal decomposition took place after aging up to 1000 h, while G-phase formed along dislocations, and growed up to 2–11 nm after aging for 5000 h. The total energy for inducing deformation and fracture by the small punch tests decreased with the increase of thermal aging time, and this decline was associated with spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation. Plastic deformation of the aged ferrite proceeded via formation of curvilinear slip bands. Nucleation of microcracks occurred at the δ/γ interface along the slip bands. The hardening of the ferrite and high stress concentration on δ/γ phase interface resulted in brittle fracture and phase boundary separation after thermal aging. - Highlights: •Spinodal decomposition took place after long-term therml aging at 400 °C. •Dislocations were the preferable sites for G-phase formation aged at 400 °C for 5000 h. •Spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation induced reduction of small punch energy. •Thermal aging led to brittle fracture and phase boundary separation. •Nucleation of microcracks occurred at the δ/γ interface along the slip bands in the aged ferrite phase.

  12. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by super duplex filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eghlimi, Abbas, E-mail: a.eghlimi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, Morteza [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eskandarian, Masoomeh [Department of Materials Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabolian, Azam [Department of Natural Resources, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Szpunar, Jerzy A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon SK S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    In the present paper, microstructural changes across an as-welded dissimilar austenitic/duplex stainless steel couple welded by a super duplex stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process is characterized with optical microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction techniques. Accordingly, variations of microstructure, texture, and grain boundary character distribution of base metals, heat affected zones, and weld metal were investigated. The results showed that the weld metal, which was composed of Widmanstätten austenite side-plates and allotriomorphic grain boundary austenite morphologies, had the weakest texture and was dominated by low angle boundaries. The welding process increased the ferrite content but decreased the texture intensity at the heat affected zone of the super duplex stainless steel base metal. In addition, through partial ferritization, it changed the morphology of elongated grains of the rolled microstructure to twinned partially transformed austenite plateaus scattered between ferrite textured colonies. However, the texture of the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone was strengthened via encouraging recrystallization and formation of annealing twins. At both interfaces, an increase in the special character coincident site lattice boundaries of the primary phase as well as a strong texture with <100> orientation, mainly of Goss component, was observed. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Weld metal showed local orientation at microscale but random texture at macroscale. • Intensification of <100> orientated grains was observed adjacent to the fusion lines. • The austenite texture was weaker than that of the ferrite in all duplex regions. • Welding caused twinned partially transformed austenites to form at SDSS HAZ. • At both interfaces, the ratio of special CSL boundaries of the primary phase increased.

  13. Weldability of Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    It gives an outline of metallographic properties of welding zone of stainless steels, generation and mechanisms of welding crack and decreasing of corrosion resistance of welding zone. It consists of seven chapters such as introduction, some kinds of stainless steels and properties, metallographic properties of welding zone, weld crack, toughness of welding zone, corrosion resistance and summary. The solidification modes of stainless steels, each solidification mode on the cross section of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy phase diagram, each solidification mode of weld stainless steels metal by electron beam welding, segregation state of alloy elements at each solidification mode, Schaeffler diagram, Delong diagram, effects of (P + S) mass content in % and Cr/Ni equivalent on solidification cracking of weld stainless steels metal, solidification crack susceptibility of weld high purity stainless steels metal, effects of trace impurity elements on solidification crack susceptibility of weld high purity stainless steels metal, ductile fracture susceptibility of weld austenitic stainless steels metal, effects of H2 and ferrite content on generation of crack of weld 25Cr-5N duplex stainless steels, effects of O and N content on toughness of weld SUS 447J1 metals, effect of ferrite content on aging toughness of weld austenitic stainless steel metal, corrosion morphology of welding zone of stainless steels, generation mechanism of knife line attack phenomenon, and corrosion potential of some kinds of metals in seawater at room temperature are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  14. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part I. the model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, Ø.

    1999-11-01

    The present investigation is concerned with modeling of the microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steels under thermal conditions applicable to welding. The important reactions that have been modeled are the dissolution of austenite during heating, subsequent grain growth in the delta ferrite regime, and finally, the decomposition of the delta ferrite to austenite during cooling. As a starting point, a differential formulation of the underlying diffusion problem is presented, based on the internal-state variable approach. These solutions are later manipulated and expressed in terms of the Scheil integral in the cases where the evolution equation is separable or can be made separable by a simple change of variables. The models have then been applied to describe the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution during both thick-plate and thin-plate welding of three commercial duplex stainless steel grades: 2205, 2304, and 2507. The results may conveniently be presented in the form of novel process diagrams, which display contours of constant delta ferrite grain size along with information about dissolution and reprecipitation of austenite for different combinations of weld input energy and peak temperature. These diagrams are well suited for quantitative readings and illustrate, in a condensed manner, the competition between the different variables that lead to structural changes during welding of duplex stainless steels.

  15. SEM and TEM characterization of microstructure of stainless steel composites reinforced with TiB2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulima, Iwona; Boczkal, Sonia; Jaworska, Lucyna

    2016-01-01

    Steel-8TiB 2 composites were produced by two new sintering techniques, i.e. Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) and High Pressure-High Temperature (HP-HT) sintering. This study discusses the impact of these sintering methods on the microstructure of steel composites reinforced with TiB 2 particles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS), X-ray diffraction, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to analyze the microstructure evolution in steel matrix composites. The results of microscopic examinations revealed a close relationship between the composite microstructure and the methods and conditions of sintering. Substantial differences were observed in the grain size of materials sintered by HP-HT and SPS. It has been demonstrated that the composites sintered by HP-HT tend to form a chromium-iron-nickel phase in the steel matrix. In contrast, the microstructure of the composites sintered by SPS is characterized by the presence of complex borides and chromium-iron phase. - Highlights: •The steel-8TiB 2 composites were fabricated by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) and High Pressure-High Temperature (HP-HT). •Sintering techniques has an important effect on changes in the microstructure of steel-8TiB 2 composites. •New phases of different size and morphology were identified.

  16. Evaluation of long-term creep-fatigue life of stainless steel weldment based on a microstructure degradation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asayama, Tai; Hasebe, Shinichi

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a newly developed analytical method of evaluation of creep-fatigue strength of stainless weld metals. Based on the observation that creep-fatigue crack initiates adjacent to the interface of sigma-phase/delta-ferrite and matrix, a mechanistic model which allows the evaluation of micro stress/strain concentration adjacent to the interface was developed. Fatigue and creep damage were evaluated using the model which describes the microstructure after exposed to high temperatures for a long time. Thus it was made possible to predict analytically the long-term creep-fatigue life of stainless steel metals whose microstructure is degraded as a result of high temperature service. (author)

  17. Swelling, mechanical properties, and microstructure of Type 316 stainless steel at fusion reactor damage levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, J.A.; Bloom, E.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Stiegler, J.O.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1979-01-01

    Alloys such as AISI 316 stainless steel exhibit more swelling and larger decreases in ductility when irradiated to produce fusion reactor He and dpa levels than at fast reactor He and dpa levels. For T approx. 0 C to ensure adequate ductility for long-term service

  18. Additive Manufacturing of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel: Post-processing Heat Treatment to Achieve Uniform Reproducible Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheruvathur, Sudha; Lass, Eric A.; Campbell, Carelyn E.

    2016-03-01

    17-4 precipitation hardenable (PH) stainless steel is a useful material when a combination of high strength and good corrosion resistance up to about 315°C is required. In the wrought form, this steel has a fully martensitic structure that can be strengthened by precipitation of fine Cu-rich face-centered cubic phase upon aging. When fabricated via additive manufacturing (AM), specifically laser powder-bed fusion, 17-4 PH steel exhibits a dendritic structure containing a substantial fraction of nearly 50% of retained austenite along with body centered cubic/martensite and fine niobium carbides preferentially aligned along interdendritic boundaries. The effect of post-build thermal processing on the material microstructure is studied in comparison to that of conventionally produced wrought 17-4 PH with the intention of creating a more uniform, fully martensitic microstructure. The recommended stress relief heat treatment currently employed in industry for post-processing of AM 17-4 PH steel is found to have little effect on the as-built dendritic microstructure. It is found that, by implementing the recommended homogenization heat treatment regimen of Aerospace Materials Specification 5355 for CB7Cu-1, a casting alloy analog to 17-4 PH, the dendritic solidification structure is eliminated, resulting in a microstructure containing about 90% martensite with 10% retained austenite.

  19. Friction Welding For Cladding Applications: Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inertia Friction Welds of Stainless Steel to Low Carbon Steel and Evaluation of Wrought and Welded Austenitic Stainless Steels for Cladding Applications in Acidchloride Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzner, Nathan

    Friction welding, a solid-state joining method, is presented as a novel alternative process step for lining mild steel pipe and forged components internally with a corrosion resistant (CR) metal alloy for petrochemical applications. Currently, fusion welding is commonly used for stainless steel overlay cladding, but this method is costly, time-consuming, and can lead to disbonding in service due to a hard martensite layer that forms at the interface due to partial mixing at the interface between the stainless steel CR metal and the mild steel base. Firstly, the process parameter space was explored for inertia friction butt welding using AISI type 304L stainless steel and AISI 1018 steel to determine the microstructure and mechanical properties effects. A conceptual model for heat flux density versus radial location at the faying surface was developed with consideration for non-uniform pressure distribution due to frictional forces. An existing 1 D analytical model for longitudinal transient temperature distribution was modified for the dissimilar metals case and to account for material lost to the flash. Microstructural results from the experimental dissimilar friction welds of 304L stainless steel to 1018 steel were used to discuss model validity. Secondly, the microstructure and mechanical property implications were considered for replacing the current fusion weld cladding processes with friction welding. The nominal friction weld exhibited a smaller heat softened zone in the 1018 steel than the fusion cladding. As determined by longitudinal tensile tests across the bond line, the nominal friction weld had higher strength, but lower apparent ductility, than the fusion welds due to the geometric requirements for neck formation adjacent to a rigid interface. Martensite was identified at the dissimilar friction weld interface, but the thickness was smaller than that of the fusion welds, and the morphology was discontinuous due to formation by a mechanism of solid

  20. Review of mechanical properties and microstructures of types 304 and 316 stainless steel after long-term aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, J.A.; Sikka, V.K.; Raske, D.T.

    Because commercial liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) will be designed to last for 35 to 40 years, an understanding of the mechanical behavior of the structural alloys used is required for times of 2.2 to 2.5x10 5 h (assuming a 70% availability factor). Types 304 and 316 stainless steel are used extensively in LMFBR systems. These alloys are in a metastable state when installed and evolve to a more stable state and, therefore, microstructure during plant operation. Correlations of microstructures and mechanical properties during aging under representative LMFBR temperature and loading conditions is desirable from the standpoint of assuring safe, reliable, and economic plant operation. We reviewed the mechanical properties and microstructures of types 304 and 316 stainless steel wrought alloys, welds, and castings after long-term aging in air to 9x10 4 h (about 10-1/2 years). The principal effect of such aging is to reduce fracture toughness (as measured in Charpy impact tests) and tensile ductility. Examples are cited, however, where, because stable microstructures are achieved, these as well as strength-related properties can be expected to remain adequate for service life exposures. (author)

  1. Effect of Welding Process on Microstructure, Mechanical and Pitting Corrosion Behaviour of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt has been made to weld 2205 Duplex stainless steel of 6mm thick plate using conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and activated gas tungsten arc welding (A- GTAW) process using silica powder as activated flux. Present work is aimed at studying the effect of welding process on depth of penetration, width of weld zone of 2205 duplex stainless steel. It also aims to observe the microstructural changes and its effect on mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel welds. Metallography is done to observe the microstructural changes of the welds using image analyzer attached to the optical microscopy. Hardness studies, tensile and ductility bend tests were evaluated for mechanical properties. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were carried out using a basic GillAC electro-chemical system in 3.5% NaCl solution to observe the pitting corrosion behaviour. Results of the present investigation established that increased depth of penetration and reduction of weld width in a single pass by activated GTAW with the application of SiO2 flux was observed when compared with conventional GTAW process. It may be attributed to the arc constriction effect. Microstructure of the weld zones for both the welds is observed to be having combination of austenite and delta ferrite. Grain boundary austenite (GBA) with Widmanstatten-type austenite (WA) of plate-like feature was nucleated from the grain boundaries in the weld zone of A-GTAW process. Mechanical properties are relatively low in activated GTAW process and are attributed to changes in microstructural morphology of austenite. Improved pitting corrosion resistance was observed for the welds made with A-GTAW process.

  2. Predicting Microstructure Development During HighTemperature Nitriding of Martensitic Stainless SteelsUsing Thermodynamic Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Tschiptschin, André Paulo

    2002-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations of the Fe-Cr-N System in the region of the Gas Phase Equilibria have been compared with experimental results of maximum nitrogen absorption during nitriding of two Martensitic Stainless Steels (a 6 mm thick sheet of AISI 410S steel and green powder compacts of AISI 434L steel) under N2 atmospheres. The calculations have been performed combining the Fe-Cr-N System description contained in the SGTE Solid Solution Database and the gas phase for the N System contained i...

  3. Microstructural features of dissimilar welds between 316LN austenitic stainless steel and alloy 800

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sireesha, M.; Sundaresan, S.

    2000-01-01

    For joining type 316LN austenitic stainless steel to modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for power plant application, a trimetallic configuration using an insert piece (such as alloy 800) of intermediate thermal coefficient of expansion (CTE) has been sometimes suggested for bridging the wide gap in CTE between the two steels. Two joints are thus involved and this paper is concerned with the weld between 316LN and alloy 800. These welds were produced using three types of filler materials: austenitic stainless steels corresponding to 316,16Cr-8Ni-2Mo, and the nickel-base Inconel 182 1 . The weld fusion zones and the interfaces with the base materials were characterised in detail using light and transmission electron microscopy. The 316 and Inconel 182 weld metals solidified dendritically, while the 16-8-2(16%Cr-8%Ni-2%Mo) weld metal showed a predominantly cellular substructure. The Inconel weld metal contained a large number of inclusions when deposited from flux-coated electrodes, but was relatively inclusion-free under inert gas-shielded welding. Long-term elevated-temperature aging of the weld metals resulted in embrittling sigma phase precipitation in the austenitic stainless steel weld metals, but the nickel-base welds showed no visible precipitation, demonstrating their superior metallurgical stability for high-temperature service. (orig.)

  4. Long-term aging of type 308 stainless steel welds: Effects on properties and microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.J.; Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    Multipass gas tungsten arc welds with type 308 stainless steel filler metal in type 304L base plate have been aged at 400, 475, or 550 degrees C for times up to 5,000 h. The changes in mechanical properties as a result of these agings have been followed with tensile, impact, and fracture toughness testing, using subsize tensile, half-size Charpy, and 0.45T compact specimens, respectively. The changes in the microstructure were evaluated with optical and transmission electron microscopy. Relatively little change was observed in the tensile properties for any of the aging treatments, but significant embrittlement was observed in the impact and fracture toughness testing. The transition temperatures increased rapidly for aging at 475 or 550 degrees C, and more slowly for aging at 400 degrees C. The upper-shelf energies and the fracture toughness showed similar responses, with only a small decrease for 400 degrees C aging, but much greater and rapid decreases with aging at 475 or 550 degrees C. Aging at 400 or 475 degrees C resulted in the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite phase in the weld metal into iron-rich alpha and chromium-enriched alpha prime. In addition, at 475 degrees C G-phase precipitates formed homogeneously in the ferrite and also at dislocations. At 550 degrees C carbides formed and grew at the ferrite-austenite interfaces, and some ferrite transformed to sigma phase. These changes must all be considered in determining the effect of aging on the fracture properties

  5. Concurrent microstructural evolution of ferrite and austenite in a duplex stainless steel processed by high-pressure torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Y.; Wang, Y.B.; An, X.H.; Liao, X.Z.; Kawasaki, M.; Ringer, S.P.; Langdon, T.G.; Zhu, Y.T.

    2014-01-01

    A duplex stainless steel with approximately equal volume fractions of ferrite and austenite was processed by high-pressure torsion. Nano-indentation, electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the hardness and microstructure evolutions of the steel. Despite the different strain-hardening rates of individual ferrite and austenite, the microstructures of the two phases evolved concurrently in such a way that the neighbouring two phases always maintained similar hardness. While the plastic deformation and grain refinement of ferrite occurred mainly via dislocation activities, the plastic deformation and grain refinement process of austenite were more complicated and included deformation twinning and de-twinning in coarse grains, grain refinement by twinning and dislocation–twin interactions, de-twinning in ultrafine grains and twin boundary subdivision

  6. Influence of mechanical and thermal treatments on microstructure and mechanical properties of titanium stabilized austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidhom, H.

    1983-12-01

    Thermal and mechanical treatments for microstructure optimization in titanium stabilized austenitic stainless steels used in nuclear industry are examined. The steels studied Z10CNDT15-15B and Z6CNDT17-13 are of the type 15-15 Ti and 316 Ti. These treatments allow the elimination of casting heterogeneity produced by dendritic solidification, improve mechanical properties particularly creep and the best compromise between grain size solid solution of metal additions is obtained. Secondary precipitation of (TiMo)C on dislocations is improved by a previous strain hardening. The precipitation reinforce the good effect of strain hardening by stabilization of the microstructure producing a better resistance to recrystallization [fr

  7. Detailed Microstructural Characterization and Restoration Mechanisms of Duplex and Superduplex Stainless Steel Friction-Stir-Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, T. F. A.; Torres, E. A.; Lippold, J. C.; Ramirez, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Duplex stainless steels are successfully used in a wide variety of applications in areas such as the food industry, petrochemical installations, and sea water desalination plants, where high corrosion resistance and high mechanical strength are required. However, during fusion welding operations, there can be changes to the favorable microstructure of these materials that compromise their performance. Friction stir welding with a non-consumable pin enables welded joints to be obtained in the solid state, which avoids typical problems associated with solidification of the molten pool, such as segregation of alloying elements and the formation of solidification and liquefaction cracks. In the case of superduplex stainless steels, use of the technique can avoid unbalanced proportions of ferrite and austenite, formation of deleterious second phases, or growth of ferritic grains in the heat-affected zone. Consolidated joints with full penetration were obtained for 6-mm-thick plates of UNS S32101 and S32205 duplex stainless steels, and S32750 and S32760 superduplex steels. The welding heat cycles employed avoided the conditions required for formation of deleterious phases, except in the case of the welded joint of the S32760 steel, where SEM images indicated the formation of secondary phases, as corroborated by decreased mechanical performance. Analysis using EBSD and transmission electron microscopy revealed continuous dynamic recrystallization by the formation of cellular arrays of dislocations in the ferrite and discontinuous dynamic recrystallization in the austenite. Microtexture evaluation indicated the presence of fibers typical of shear in the thermomechanically affected zone. These fibers were not obviously present in the stir zone, probably due to the intensity of microstructural reformulation to which this region was subjected.

  8. Behaviour and microstructure of stainless steels irradiated in the french fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubuisson, P.; Gilbon, D.

    1991-01-01

    The burn-up of Fast Breeder Reactors is limited by the irradiation induced dimensional changes and mechanical properties of structural materials used for replaceable in-core components. This paper describes the behaviour improvements and also the radiation-induced microstructures of the different steels used for fuel pin cladding and wrapper tubes in French reactors. Materials of fuel pin cladding are austenitic steels whose main problem is swelling. Improvements in swelling resistance by cold-working, titanium additions and modifications of matrix (Fe-Cr-Ni) from SA 316 to CW 15-15 Ti are shown. These improvements are correlated with a best stability of microstructure under irradiation. Beneficial effects of phosphorus addition and multistabilisation (NbVTi) on radiation induced microstructure and swelling resistance are also shown. Austenitic steels used for wrapper tubes are limited both by swelling and by void embrittlement. The ferritic F17 (17Cr), ferritic-martensitic EM12 (9Cr-2MoNbV) and martensitic EM10 (9Cr-1Mo) steels present high swelling resistance. Nevertheless radiation-induced embrittlement is observed in EM12 and especially in F17. This embrittlement results from a fine and uniform radiation enhanced precipitation in ferrite grains. By contrast, the microstructure of fully martensitic EM10 steel is mush more stable and its ductile-brizzle transition temperature stays below 0 0 C. 12 figs

  9. Microstructure, mechanical properties and chemical degradation of brazed AISI 316 stainless steel/alumina systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva, O.C.; Barbosa, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The main aims of the present study are simultaneously to relate the brazing parameters with: (i) the correspondent interfacial microstructure, (ii) the resultant mechanical properties and (iii) the electrochemical degradation behaviour of AISI 316 stainless steel/alumina brazed joints. Filler metals on such as Ag-26.5Cu-3Ti and Ag-34.5Cu-1.5Ti were used to produce the joints. Three different brazing temperatures (850, 900 and 950 deg. C), keeping a constant holding time of 20 min, were tested. The objective was to understand the influence of the brazing temperature on the final microstructure and properties of the joints. The mechanical properties of the metal/ceramic (M/C) joints were assessed from bond strength tests carried out using a shear solicitation loading scheme. The fracture surfaces were studied both morphologically and structurally using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The degradation behaviour of the M/C joints was assessed by means of electrochemical techniques. It was found that using a Ag-26.5Cu-3Ti brazing alloy and a brazing temperature of 850 deg. C, produces the best results in terms of bond strength, 234 ± 18 MPa. The mechanical properties obtained could be explained on the basis of the different compounds identified on the fracture surfaces by XRD. On the other hand, the use of the Ag-34.5Cu-1.5Ti brazing alloy and a brazing temperature of 850 deg. C produces the best results in terms of corrosion rates (lower corrosion current density), 0.76 ± 0.21 μA cm -2 . Nevertheless, the joints produced at 850 deg. C using a Ag-26.5Cu-3Ti brazing alloy present the best compromise between mechanical properties and degradation behaviour, 234 ± 18 MPa and 1.26 ± 0.58 μA cm -2 , respectively. The role of Ti diffusion is fundamental in terms of the final value achieved for the M/C bond strength. On the contrary, the Ag and Cu distribution along the brazed interface seem to

  10. Influence of microstructure and elemental partitioning on pitting corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel welding joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Jing, Hongyang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin 300350 (China); Xu, Lianyong, E-mail: xulianyong@tju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin 300350 (China); Han, Yongdian; Zhao, Lei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin 300350 (China); Zhang, Jianli [Welding laboratory, Offshore Oil Engineering (Qing Dao) Company, Qing Dao 266520 (China)

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • N{sub 2}-supplemented shielding gas promoted nitrogen solid-solution in the austenite. • Secondary austenite had higher Ni but lower Cr and Mo than primary austenite. • Pitting corrosion preferentially occurred at secondary austenite and Cr{sub 2}N. • Adding N{sub 2} in shielding gas improved pitting corrosion resistance of GTAW joint. • E2209T{sub 1} weld metal had very poor pitting corrosion resistance due to inclusions. - Abstract: The influences of microstructure and elemental partitioning on pitting corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel joints welded by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with different shielding gas compositions were studied by optical microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and potentiostatic and potentiodynamic polarization methods The adding 2% N{sub 2} in shielding gas facilitated primary austenite formation in GTAW weld metal (WM) and suppressed Cr{sub 2}N precipitation in GTAW weld root. In the HAZ, the banded microstructure disappeared while the coarse ferrite grains maintained same orientation as the banded ferrite in the BM. In the WM, the ferrite had one single orientation throughout a grain, whereas several families of austenite appeared. The austenite both in BM and WM enriched in Ni and nitrogen, while Cr and Mo were concentrated in the ferrite and thus no element showed clear dendritic distribution in the WM (ER2209 and E2209T{sub 1}). In addition, the secondary austenite had higher Ni content but lower Cr and Mo content than the primary austenite. The N{sub 2}-supplemented shielding gas promoted nitrogen solid-solution in the primary and secondary austenite. Furthermore, the secondary austenite had relatively lower pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) than the ferrite and primary austenite, thereby resulting in its preferential

  11. Cold rolled texture and microstructure in types 304 and 316L austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasnik, D.N.; Samajdar, I.; Gopalakrishnan, I.K.; Yakhmi, J.V.; Kain, V.

    2003-01-01

    Two grades of austenitic stainless steel (ASS), types 304 (UNS S 30400) and 316L (UNS S 31603), were cold rolled to different reductions by unidirectional and by cross-rolling. The steels had reasonable difference in stacking fault energy (estimated respectively as 15 and 61 mJ/m 2 in types 304 and 316L) and also in starting (or pre-deformation) crystallographic texture-being relatively weak and reasonably strong in types 304 and 316L respectively. The cold rolling increased texturing in type 304, but not in type 316L ASS. The more significant effect of cold rolled texture development was in the relative increase of Brass ({011} ) against Copper ({112} ) and S ({231} ) orientations. In type 304 the increase in Brass was significant, while in type 316L the increase in Copper and S was stronger. This effect could be captured by Taylor type deformation texture simulations considering stronger twinning contributions in type 304 - for example the respective 'best-fits' (in terms of matching the changes in the volume fractions of Brass against Copper and S) were obtained by full constraint Taylor model with 1:100 and 1:10 slip:twin activities in types 304 and 316L ASS respectively. Microstructural developments during cold rolling were generalized as strain induced martensite formation and developments of dislocation substructure. The former, as estimated by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), increased with cold reduction, being significantly more in type 304 and was also noticeably stronger in both grades under cross-rolling. The most significant aspect of substructural developments was the formation of strain localizations. These were observed as dense dislocation walls (DDWs), micro-bands (MBs) and twin lamellar structures (TLS). The TLS contribution gained significance at higher reductions and during cross-rolling, especially in type 304. Large misorientation development and the accompanying grain splittings were always associated with such strain localizations

  12. Hydrogen embrittlement of austenitic stainless steels revealed by deformation microstructures and strain-induced creation of vacancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, M.; Fujinami, M.; Arai, K.; Fujii, H.; Nagumo, M.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of austenitic stainless steels has been examined with respect to deformation microstructures and lattice defects created during plastic deformation. Two types of austenitic stainless steels, SUS 304 and SUS 316L, uniformly hydrogen-precharged to 30 mass ppm in a high-pressure hydrogen environment, are subjected to tensile straining at room temperature. A substantial reduction of tensile ductility appears in hydrogen-charged SUS 304 and the onset of fracture is likely due to plastic instability. Fractographic features show involvement of plasticity throughout the crack path, implying the degradation of the austenitic phase. Electron backscatter diffraction analyses revealed prominent strain localization enhanced by hydrogen in SUS 304. Deformation microstructures of hydrogen-charged SUS 304 were characterized by the formation of high densities of fine stacking faults and ε-martensite, while tangled dislocations prevailed in SUS 316L. Positron lifetime measurements have revealed for the first time hydrogen-enhanced creation of strain-induced vacancies rather than dislocations in the austenitic phase and more clustering of vacancies in SUS 304 than in SUS 316L. Embrittlement and its mechanism are ascribed to the decrease in stacking fault energies resulting in strain localization and hydrogen-enhanced creation of strain-induced vacancies, leading to premature fracture in a similar way to that proposed for ferritic steels

  13. Femtosecond laser fabrication of highly hydrophobic stainless steel surface with hierarchical structures fabricated by combining ordered microstructures and LIPSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-Calderon, M.; Rodríguez, A.; Dias-Ponte, A.; Morant-Miñana, M.C.; Gómez-Aranzadi, M.; Olaizola, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Femtosecond laser treatment to achieve highly hydrophobic behavior on stainless steel. • Combination of micro-machined patterns with LIPSS into hierarchical structures. • Contact angles as high as 156° with only the femtosecond laser irradiation. - Abstract: In this work we have developed hierarchical structures that consist of micro-patterned surfaces covered by nanostructures with a femtosecond laser. The first part of this work is a study to determine the microscale modifications produced on a stainless steel alloy (AISI304) surface at high pulse energy, different velocities, and number of overscans in order to obtain microstructures with a selected depth of around 10 μm and line widths of 20 μm. The second part of the work is focused on finding the optimal irradiation parameters to obtain the nanostructure pattern. Nanostructures have been defined by means of Laser Induced Periodical Surface Structures (LIPSS) around 250 nm high and a period of 580 nm, which constitute the nanostructure pattern. Finally, dual scale gratings of 50 mm"2 were fabricated with different geometries and their effect on the measured contact angle. Combining the micro-pattern with the LIPSS nano-pattern, highly hydrophobic surfaces have been developed with measured static contact angles higher than 150° on a stainless steel alloy.

  14. Femtosecond laser fabrication of highly hydrophobic stainless steel surface with hierarchical structures fabricated by combining ordered microstructures and LIPSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Calderon, M., E-mail: mmcalderon@ceit.es [CEIT-IK4 & Tecnun (University of Navarra), Paseo Manuel Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); Rodríguez, A.; Dias-Ponte, A.; Morant-Miñana, M.C.; Gómez-Aranzadi, M.; Olaizola, S.M. [CEIT-IK4 & Tecnun (University of Navarra), Paseo Manuel Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Femtosecond laser treatment to achieve highly hydrophobic behavior on stainless steel. • Combination of micro-machined patterns with LIPSS into hierarchical structures. • Contact angles as high as 156° with only the femtosecond laser irradiation. - Abstract: In this work we have developed hierarchical structures that consist of micro-patterned surfaces covered by nanostructures with a femtosecond laser. The first part of this work is a study to determine the microscale modifications produced on a stainless steel alloy (AISI304) surface at high pulse energy, different velocities, and number of overscans in order to obtain microstructures with a selected depth of around 10 μm and line widths of 20 μm. The second part of the work is focused on finding the optimal irradiation parameters to obtain the nanostructure pattern. Nanostructures have been defined by means of Laser Induced Periodical Surface Structures (LIPSS) around 250 nm high and a period of 580 nm, which constitute the nanostructure pattern. Finally, dual scale gratings of 50 mm{sup 2} were fabricated with different geometries and their effect on the measured contact angle. Combining the micro-pattern with the LIPSS nano-pattern, highly hydrophobic surfaces have been developed with measured static contact angles higher than 150° on a stainless steel alloy.

  15. Microstructure and thermomechanical pretreatment effects on creep behaviour of helium-implanted DIN 1.4970 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matta, M.K.; Kesternich, W.

    1990-01-01

    Microstructure investigations were carried out on unimplanted and 150 at ppm helium implanted foil specimens of DIN 1.4970 austenitic stainless steel after various thermomechanical pretreatments. Creep test were also carried out for both helium-implanted and unimplanted specimens at 700degC and 800degC. The strength, ductility and rupture time are correalted with the dislocation and precipitate distributions. Helium embrittlement can be reduced in these experiments when dispersive TiC precipitate distributions are produced by proper pretreatments or allowed to form during creep test. (author). 14 refs., 11 figs

  16. Effect of annealing treatment on microstructure evolution and the associated corrosion behavior of a super-duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, B.; Jiang, Y.M.; Gao, J.; Li, J.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of annealing temperature on the pitting corrosion of a super-duplex stainless steel (SDSS) with mischmetal addition was investigated in chloride solution by critical pitting temperature (CPT) measurement. The corrosion behavior is strongly dependent on the microstructure, namely the presence of secondary phases, elemental partitioning behavior and volume fractions of ferrite and austenite. Based on CPT results and alloying rules, the optimal annealing temperature is determined as 1070 o C and a guideline for further development of improved SDSS is formulated.

  17. Improved swelling resistance for PCA austenitic stainless steel under HFIR irradiation through microstructural control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    Swelling evaluation of PCA variants and 20%-cold-worked (N-Lot) type 316 stainless steel (CW 316) at 300 to 600 0 C was extended to 44 dpa. Swelling was negligible in all the steels at 300 0 C after approx. 44 dpa. At 500 to 600 0 C 25%-cold-worked PCA showed better void swelling resistance than type 316 at approx. 44 dpa. There was less swelling variation among alloys at 400 0 C, but again 25%-cold-worked PCA was the best

  18. Synergistic Computational and Microstructural Design of Next- Generation High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaman, Ibrahim [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States); Arroyave, Raymundo [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-07-31

    The purpose of this project was to: 1) study deformation twinning, its evolution, thermal stability, and the contribution on mechanical response of the new advanced stainless steels, especially at elevated temperatures; 2) study alumina-scale formation on the surface, as an alternative for conventional chromium oxide, that shows better oxidation resistance, through alloy design; and 3) design new generation of high temperature stainless steels that form alumina scale and have thermally stable nano-twins. The work involved few baseline alloys for investigating the twin formation under tensile loading, thermal stability of these twins, and the role of deformation twins on the mechanical response of the alloys. These baseline alloys included Hadfield Steel (Fe-13Mn-1C), 316, 316L and 316N stainless steels. Another baseline alloy was studied for alumina-scale formation investigations. Hadfield steel showed twinning but undesired second phases formed at higher temperatures. 316N stainless steel did not show signs of deformation twinning. Conventional 316 stainless steel demonstrated extensive deformation twinning at room temperature. Investigations on this alloy, both in single crystalline and polycrystalline forms, showed that deformation twins evolve in a hierarchical manner, consisting of micron–sized bundles of nano-twins. The width of nano-twins stays almost constant as the extent of strain increases, but the width and number of the bundles increase with increasing strain. A systematic thermomechanical cycling study showed that the twins were stable at temperatures as high as 900°C, after the dislocations are annealed out. Using such cycles, volume fraction of the thermally stable deformation twins were increased up to 40% in 316 stainless steel. Using computational thermodynamics and kinetics calculations, we designed two generations of advanced austenitic stainless steels. In the first generation, Alloy 1, which had been proposed as an alumina

  19. Microstructural characterization and properties of dissimilar joints between stainless steels done by fusion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauly, Julio Cesar

    2000-01-01

    The chemical, mechanical and microstructural characterization of a dissimilar joint between SA-336 class F347 austenitic and SA-479 type 414 martensitic stainless steels were done, welded by GTAW process. The results of the tensile strength of the joint welded with the consumable ER Ni Cr-3, showed higher values compared to those of the base metal SA-336 class F347 of lower resistance in the dissimilar joint. These results were complemented by longitudinal bends tests, susceptibility to intergranular attack tests, hardness tests, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and chemical analysis. That characterization compared to the one of dissimilar joint welded with ER309L consumable, submitted to the same mentioned tests, leads to the conclusion that the consumable of nickel ERNiCr-3 seems to be the best applicable consumable, compared the ER309L. The main welding parameters were also obtained, in order to compose a database for a future qualification of the welding procedure. Besides, situations possible to be joint in this type of joint, were simulated, such as its weldability using the laser processing, joint welded without material addition and without root protection with inert gas. The results of the tensile strength of these welded joint, showed values superior to the base metal SA-336 class F347 of lower resistance in the dissimilar joint. These results were complemented by hardness tests and chemical analysis, also confirming that these simulated situations assist to the values of the strength of the joint, even if diverging with the theoretical studies done with the application of the Schaeffler Diagram as well as with the well known weldability techniques for this type of dissimilar joint. A theoretical discussion was also done, using the Schaeffler Diagram, with base in a review of the literature, where the welding needs was analyzed with or without metal addition, using the values of chemical composition of the base metals and specified

  20. Influence of microstructure of different stainless steels on their low cycle fatigue damage mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baffie, Natacha

    2002-01-01

    The present study is focused on understanding low cycle fatigue damage mechanisms in three different kind of stainless steels. In all structures, crack propagation is conditioned by microstructural barriers. In single phase austenitic alloys, short cracks initiation and growth are crystallographic. Cracks are arrested by grain and twin boundaries both at surface and in the bulk. Grain size refinement improve the fatigue life at applied Δε p . The second barrier in the bulk is shown to be very efficient because of the important number of misoriented grains. In the metastable austenitic alloy, the martensitic transformation induced by cyclic straining leads to significant modifications of damage mechanisms. The fatigue behaviour has been investigated between -50 deg. C and 120 deg. C. The γ→α' transformation takes place at the surface, in the bulk (except at 120 deg. C) and locally at the crack tip. At all temperatures, the amount of martensite formed and the fatigue life increase as the grain size decreases, even if at the same Δε p , the maximal stresses are considerably higher than in a stable γ. Short cracks growth takes place in transformed regions, γ→α' transformation being assisted by strain concentrations at the crack tip. This mechanism consumes a part of plastic deformation, which would have been available for crack propagation. Such a dynamic barrier can decrease crack propagation rate. The austenite grain size is shown to have a decisive influence both on the amount of martensite formed and on the fatigue resistance through the effect of γ grain boundaries as indirect barriers to the crack propagation. The fatigue life of the 475 deg. C aged α/γ alloy decreases sharply at high applied Δε p compared to the solution annealed one. This behaviour is explained by the modification of short cracks nucleation sites. Indeed, cleavage occurs in the hard and brittle α phase, even if plastic deformation is concentrated in γ phase. Then, easy

  1. Microstructural development of diffusion-brazed austenitic stainless steel to magnesium alloy using a nickel interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elthalabawy, Waled M.; Khan, Tahir I.

    2010-01-01

    The differences in physical and metallurgical properties of stainless steels and magnesium alloys make them difficult to join using conventional fusion welding processes. Therefore, the diffusion brazing of 316L steel to magnesium alloy (AZ31) was performed using a double stage bonding process. To join these dissimilar alloys, the solid-state diffusion bonding of 316L steel to a Ni interlayer was carried out at 900 deg. C followed by diffusion brazing to AZ31 at 510 deg. C. Metallographic and compositional analyses show that a metallurgical bond was achieved with a shear strength of 54 MPa. However, during the diffusion brazing stage B 2 intermetallic compounds form within the joint and these intermetallics are pushed ahead of the solid/liquid interface during isothermal solidification of the joint. These intermetallics had a detrimental effect on joint strengths when the joint was held at the diffusion brazing temperature for longer than 20 min.

  2. Welding Metallurgy and Weldability of Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippold, John C.; Kotecki, Damian J.

    2005-03-01

    Welding Metallurgy and Weldability of Stainless Steels, the first book in over twenty years to address welding metallurgy and weldability issues associated with stainless steel, offers the most up-to-date and comprehensive treatment of these topics currently available. The authors emphasize fundamental metallurgical principles governing microstructure evolution and property development of stainless steels, including martensistic, ferric, austenitic, duplex, and precipitation hardening grades. They present a logical and well-organized look at the history, evolution, and primary uses of each stainless steel, including detailed descriptions of the associated weldability issues.

  3. Cracking behavior and microstructure of austenitic stainless steels and alloy 690 irradiated in BOR-60 reactor, phase I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Soppet, W. K.; Shack, W. J.; Yang, Y.; Allen, T. R.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2010-02-16

    Cracking behavior of stainless steels specimens irradiated in the BOR-60 at about 320 C is studied. The primary objective of this research is to improve the mechanistic understanding of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of core internal components under conditions relevant to pressurized water reactors. The current report covers several baseline tests in air, a comparison study in high-dissolved-oxygen environment, and TEM characterization of irradiation defect structure. Slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in air and in high-dissolved-oxygen (DO) water with selected 5- and 10-dpa specimens. The results in high-DO water were compared with those from earlier tests with identical materials irradiated in the Halden reactor to a similar dose. The SSRT tests produced similar results among different materials irradiated in the Halden and BOR-60 reactors. However, the post-irradiation strength for the BOR-60 specimens was consistently lower than that of the corresponding Halden specimens. The elongation of the BOR-60 specimens was also greater than that of their Halden specimens. Intergranular cracking in high-DO water was consistent for most of the tested materials in the Halden and BOR-60 irradiations. Nonetheless, the BOR-60 irradiation was somewhat less effective in stimulating IG fracture among the tested materials. Microstructural characterization was also carried out using transmission electron microscopy on selected BOR-60 specimens irradiated to {approx}25 dpa. No voids were observed in irradiated austenitic stainless steels and cast stainless steels, while a few voids were found in base and grain-boundary-engineered Alloy 690. All the irradiated microstructures were dominated by a high density of Frank loops, which varied in mean size and density for different alloys.

  4. Study of the microstructure evolution of ferritic stainless ODS steels during hot working

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karch, Abdellatif

    2014-01-01

    The production of ODS steels involves a powder consolidation step usually using the hot extrusion (HE) process. The anisotropic properties of extruded materials, especially in the ODS ferritic grades (≥wt%12Cr), need a better understanding of the metallurgical phenomena which may occur during HE and lead to the observed microstructure. The hot working behavior of these materials is of particular interest. The methodology of this work includes the microstructure analysis after interrupted hot extrusion, hot torsion and hot compression (1000-1200 C) tests of ferritic steels with 14%Cr and different amounts in Ti and Y 2 O 3 . The microstructure evolution during hot extrusion process is associated with continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX). It leads to the creation of new grains by the formation of low angle boundaries, and then the increase of their misorientation under plastic deformation. The investigations highlight also the role of precipitation on the kinetics of this mechanism; it remains incomplete in the presence of fine and dense nano-precipitates. After hot deformation in torsion and compression, it is noticed that both precipitates and temperature deformation have a significant impact on the deformation mechanisms and microstructure evolution. Indeed, the CDRX is dominant when temperature and amount of reinforcement are limited. However, when they are increased, limited microstructure evolution is observed. In this case, the results are interpreted through a mechanism of strain accommodation at grain boundaries, with low dislocation activity in the bulk of the grains. (author) [fr

  5. Quantitative Evaluation of Aged AISI 316L Stainless Steel Sensitization to Intergranular Corrosion: Comparison Between Microstructural Electrochemical and Analytical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhom, H.; Amadou, T.; Sahlaoui, H.; Braham, C.

    2007-06-01

    The evaluation of the degree of sensitization (DOS) to intergranular corrosion (IGC) of a commercial AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel aged at temperatures ranging from 550 °C to 800 °C during 100 to 80,000 hours was carried out using three different assessment methods. (1) The microstructural method coupled with the Strauss standard test (ASTM A262). This method establishes the kinetics of the precipitation phenomenon under different aging conditions, by transmission electronic microscope (TEM) examination of thin foils and electron diffraction. The subsequent chromium-depleted zones are characterized by X-ray microanalysis using scanning transmission electronic microscope (STEM). The superimposition of microstructural time-temperature-precipitation (TTP) and ASTM A262 time-temperature-sensitization (TTS) diagrams provides the relationship between aged microstructure and IGC. Moreover, by considering the chromium-depleted zone characteristics, sensitization and desensitization criteria could be established. (2) The electrochemical method involving the double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test. The operating conditions of this test were initially optimized using the experimental design method on the bases of the reliability, the selectivity, and the reproducibility of test responses for both annealed and sensitized steels. The TTS diagram of the AISI 316L stainless steel was established using this method. This diagram offers a quantitative assessment of the DOS and a possibility to appreciate the time-temperature equivalence of the IGC sensitization and desensitization. (3) The analytical method based on the chromium diffusion models. Using the IGC sensitization and desensitization criteria established by the microstructural method, numerical solving of the chromium diffusion equations leads to a calculated AISI 316L TTS diagram. Comparison of these three methods gives a clear advantage to the nondestructive DL-EPR test when it is

  6. Microstructure Evolution and Selective Corrosion Resistance in Underwater Multi-pass 2101 Duplex Stainless Steel Welding Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu; Shi, Yonghua; Shen, Xiaoqin; Wang, Zhongmin

    2018-05-01

    A recently developed promising material, 2101 lean duplex stainless steel, represents an alternative to 304 austenite stainless steel. In this work, multi-pass 2101 weld joints were fabricated using the flux-cored arc welding method in a hyperbaric chamber. The pressure varied from 0 to 0.75 MPa. The evolution of the welding process and microstructure was investigated. γ 2 formation in the reheated zones of the WM and HAZ was not uniform. The closer the reheated zone is to the subsequent heat source, the greater the γ 2 formation in the reheated zone. Sufficient primary austenite transformation inhibited Cr2N precipitation and the subsequent intragranular γ 2 formation in the reheated weld passes of the 0.45 MPa weld metal. The localized corrosion resistance of each zone of the 0.45 MPa DSS joint was measured using non-destructive double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation tests. The localized corrosion was induced by γ 2 and Cr2N. The root region of the 0.45 MPa weld metal underwent two subsequent welding thermal cycles, which induced increased γ 2 formation and lower resistance to corrosion because of the decreased pitting resistance value of γ 2. The correlation between microstructure evolution and the distribution of selective corrosion was determined.

  7. Study on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 304 Stainless Steel Joints by Tig-Mig Hybrid Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogundimu, Emmanuel O.; Akinlabi, Esther T.; Erinosho, Mutiu F.

    Stainless steel is a family of Fe-based alloys having excellent resistance to corrosion and as such has been used imperatively for kitchen utensils, transportation, building constructions and much more. This paper presents the work conducted on the material characterizations of a tungsten inert gas (TIG)-metal inert gas (MIG) hybrid welded joint of type 304 austenitic stainless steel. The welding processes were conducted in three phases. The phases of welding employed are MIG welding using a current of 170A, TIG welding using a current of 190A, and a hybrid TIG-MIG welding with currents of 190/170A, respectively. The MIG, TIG, and hybrid TIG-MIG weldments were characterized with incomplete penetration, full penetration and excess penetration of weld. Intergranular austenite was created toward transition and heat affected zones. The thickness of the delta ferrite (δ-Fe) formed in the microstructures of the TIG weld is more than the thickness emerged in the microstructures of MIG and hybrid TIG-MIG welds. A TIG-MIG hybrid weld of specimen welded at the currents of 190/170A has the highest ultimate tensile strength value and percentage elongation of 397.72MPa and 35.7%. The TIG-MIG hybrid welding can be recommended for high-tech industrial applications such as nuclear, aircraft, food processing, and automobile industry.

  8. Heat input effect on the microstructural transformation and mechanical properties in GTAW welds of a 409L ferritic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, J. A.; Ambriz, R. R.; Cuenca-Alvarez, R.; Alatorre, N.; Curiel, F. F.

    2016-10-01

    Welds without filler metal and welds using a conventional austenitic stainless steel filler metal (ER308L) were performed to join a ferritic stainless steel with Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process (GTAW). Welding parameters were adjusted to obtain three different heat input values. Microstructure reveals the presence of coarse ferritic matrix and martensite laths in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ). Dilution between filler and base metal was correlated with the presence of austenite, martensite and ferrite in the weld metal. Weld thermal cycles were measured to correlate the microstructural transformation in the HAZ. Microhardness measurements (maps and profiles) allow to identify the different zones of the welded joints (weld metal, HAZ, and base metal). Comparing the base metal with the weld metal and the HAZ, a hardness increment (∼172 HV{sub 0}.5 to ∼350 HV{sub 0}.5 and ∼310 HV{sub 0}.5, respectively) was observed, which has been attributed to the martensite formation. Tensile strength of the welded joints without filler metal increased moderately with respect to base metal. In contrast, ductility was approximately 25% higher than base metal, which provided a toughness improvement of the welded joints. (Author)

  9. Effect of prior deformation on microstructural development and Laves phase precipitation in high-chromium stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Z-W; Chen, D; Kuo, J-C; Lin, D-Y

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the influence of deformation on precipitation behaviour and microstructure change during annealing. Here, the prior deformation of high-chromium stainless steel was tensile deformation of 3%, 6% and 10%, and the specimens were then annealed at 700˚C for 10 h. The specimens were subsequently analyzed using backscattered electron image and electron backscattering diffraction measurements with SEM. Compared with the deformation microstructure, the grains revealed no preferred orientation. The precipitates of TiN and NbC were formed homogenously in the grain interior and at grain boundaries after annealing. Fine Laves phase precipitates were observed in grains and along subgrain boundaries as the deformation increased. Furthermore, the volume fraction of Laves phase increased, but the average particle diameter of precipitate was reduced as the deformation increased. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  10. Swelling and microstructural development in path A PCA and type 316 stainless steel irradiated in HFIR to about 22 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.

    1983-01-01

    Irradiation of several microstructural variants of PCA and 20%-cold-worked N-lot type 316 stainess steel (CW 316) in HFIR to about 10 dpa produced no visible cavities at 300 0 C, bubbles at 400 0 C, and varying distributions of bubbles and voids at 500 and 600 0 C. The PCA-B1 swells the most and CW 316 (N-lot) the least at 600 0 C. Irradiations have been extended to about 22 dpa. The PCA-Al swells 0.06%/dpa at 600 0 C but at a much lower rate at 500 0 C. The PCA-A3 shows the lowest swelling at 600 0 C, about the half the swelling rate of type 316 stainless steel

  11. Effects of heat treatment influencing factors on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shaohong; Yuan, Xiaohong; Jiang, Wen; Sun, Hudai; Li, Jun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Zhao, Kunyu, E-mail: zhaokunyu.kmust@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Yang, Maosheng [Department of Structural Materials, Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2014-05-01

    The effects of different heat treatment parameters and cryogenic treatment (−75 °C) on microstructural changes and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel were investigated. These analyses were performed via the optical microscope (OM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results showed that the execution of cryogenic treatment on quenched and tempered bearing steel increases hardness, tensile strength and decreases toughness with the increment of cryogenic treatment and tempering cycles. This paper also showed that the cryogenic cycle's treatment incorporating tempering can refine the martensite laths resulting in improvement of tensile strength. In addition, cryogenic treatment further reduces the retained austenite content but it cannot make retained austenite transform into martensite completely even tempering at high temperature.

  12. Effects of heat treatment influencing factors on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shaohong; Yuan, Xiaohong; Jiang, Wen; Sun, Hudai; Li, Jun; Zhao, Kunyu; Yang, Maosheng

    2014-01-01

    The effects of different heat treatment parameters and cryogenic treatment (−75 °C) on microstructural changes and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel were investigated. These analyses were performed via the optical microscope (OM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results showed that the execution of cryogenic treatment on quenched and tempered bearing steel increases hardness, tensile strength and decreases toughness with the increment of cryogenic treatment and tempering cycles. This paper also showed that the cryogenic cycle's treatment incorporating tempering can refine the martensite laths resulting in improvement of tensile strength. In addition, cryogenic treatment further reduces the retained austenite content but it cannot make retained austenite transform into martensite completely even tempering at high temperature

  13. Microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of multiple-layer laser cladding coating of 308L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kaibin; Li, Dong, E-mail: lid@sues.edu.cn; Liu, Dongyu; Pei, Guangyu; Sun, Lei

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Grain morphology transformations of 308L stainless steel multiple-layer are studied. • The cladding metals solidify in AF mode and consist of austenite and about 10.48% δ ferrite. • The ferrite content distributes into an increasing trend as the number of layers increase. • The distribution of hardness from the substrate to the coating is relatively uniform. • The cladding tensile sample shows good tensile properties, and the fracture mode is the ductile fracture. - Abstract: Multiple-layer laser cladding of 308L stainless steel was obtained by a fiber laser using a way of wire feeding to repair the surface scrapped or erosive parts of 316L stainless steel. The microstructure of the coating was measured by a metallographic microscope, and phase composition was determined by X-ray diffraction. The results show that good metallurgical bonding can be obtained between the 308L stainless steel coating and 316L stainless steel substrate. The coating is mainly composed of columnar dendrites, and there are also a few planar crystals and cellular dendrites distributed in the bonding zone. Meanwhile, some equiaxed grains and steering dendrites are distributed in the apex of the coating. Grains incorporate in epitaxial columnar dendrite's growth between different layers and tracks. It has been proved using XRD that the coating basically consists of austenite and a small amount of δ ferrite. The coating solidifies in FA mode according to the Creq/Nieq ratio and metallurgical analysis results. The average content of δ ferrite is about 10.48% and morphologies of the ferrite are mostly vermicular, skeletal and lathy. Due to heat treatment and different cooling rate, the δ ferrite content generally increases as the number of laser cladding layers increases. The coating and the substrate have equivalent microhardness, and softening zone does not appear in the heat affected zone. The tensile strength and elongation of the coating are 548 MPa and 40

  14. Fabrication and characterization of microstructure of stainless steel matrix composites containing up to 25 vol% NbC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, Wen Hao, E-mail: wkan6795@uni.sydney.edu.au [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ye, Zi Jie; Zhu, Yue [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Bhatia, Vijay Kumar [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Dolman, Kevin; Lucey, Timothy; Tang, Xinhu [Weir Minerals Australia, Artarmon, NSW 2064 (Australia); Proust, Gwénaëlle [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cairney, Julie [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2016-09-15

    AISI 440 stainless steels reinforced with various volume fractions of niobium carbide (NbC) particles of up to 25 vol% were fabricated in-situ using an argon arc furnace and then heat-treated to produce a martensitic matrix. Optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques were used to analyze the microstructure, phases and composition of these composites. Interestingly, it was found that Chinese-script NbC could nucleate on existing primary NbC particles creating NbC clusters with complex microstructures. Additionally, hardness tests were used to evaluate viability in mining and mineral processing applications. The increase in NbC content resulted in an overall increase in the hardness of the composites while causing a marginal decrease in the amount of Cr in solid solution with the matrix, which could be a concern for corrosion resistance. The latter was due to the fact that the NbC lattice could dissolve a minor amount of Cr. Thermodynamic simulations also attributed this to a slight increase in M{sub 7}C{sub 3} precipitation. Nonetheless, these novel composites show great promise for applications in wear and corrosive environments. - Highlights: •Stainless steels reinforced with NbC particles of up to 25 vol% were fabricated. •NbC was formed in-situ in the steels using an arc melter. •Martensitic transformation of the matrix of each sample was achieved. •NbC reinforcements increased the bulk hardness values of the steels. •Dissolved Cr in the matrix of each sample was sufficient for passivity in theory.

  15. Effect of welding process on the microstructure and properties of dissimilar weld joints between low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Min-xu; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Wei; Xu, Li-ning; Hu, Li-hua

    2012-06-01

    To obtain high-quality dissimilar weld joints, the processes of metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding for duplex stainless steel (DSS) and low alloy steel were compared in this paper. The microstructure and corrosion morphology of dissimilar weld joints were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); the chemical compositions in different zones were detected by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS); the mechanical properties were measured by microhardness test, tensile test, and impact test; the corrosion behavior was evaluated by polarization curves. Obvious concentration gradients of Ni and Cr exist between the fusion boundary and the type II boundary, where the hardness is much higher. The impact toughness of weld metal by MIG welding is higher than that by TIG welding. The corrosion current density of TIG weld metal is higher than that of MIG weld metal in a 3.5wt% NaCl solution. Galvanic corrosion happens between low alloy steel and weld metal, revealing the weakness of low alloy steel in industrial service. The quality of joints produced by MIG welding is better than that by TIG welding in mechanical performance and corrosion resistance. MIG welding with the filler metal ER2009 is the suitable welding process for dissimilar metals jointing between UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel in practical application.

  16. Influence of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of 13 Wt Pct Cr-Type Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Si-Yuan; Yao, Ke-Fu; Chen, Yun-Bo; Wang, Miao-Hui; Ge, Xue-Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and the electrochemical properties of a typical corrosion-resistant plastic mold steel in Cl--containing solution were studied in this research. Through X-ray diffraction patterns, SEM and TEM analysis, it was found that the sequence of the precipitates in the steels tempered at 573 K, 773 K, and 923 K (300 °C, 500 °C, and 650 °C) was θ-M3C carbides, nano-sized Cr-rich M23C6 carbides, and micro/submicron-sized Cr-rich M23C6 carbides, respectively. The results of the electrochemical experiments showed that the pitting potential of the as-quenched martensitic stainless steels increased with the austenitizing temperature. However, the corrosion resistance of the steels would decreased after tempering, especially when tempered at 773 K (500 °C), no passivation regime could be found in the polarization curve of the MSSs and no effective passive film could be formed on the steels in Cl--containing environments. The present results suggested that the temperature around 773 K (500 °C) should be avoided for tempering process of MSS used as plastic molds.

  17. Predicting Microstructure Development During HighTemperature Nitriding of Martensitic Stainless SteelsUsing Thermodynamic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tschiptschin André Paulo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic calculations of the Fe-Cr-N System in the region of the Gas Phase Equilibria have been compared with experimental results of maximum nitrogen absorption during nitriding of two Martensitic Stainless Steels (a 6 mm thick sheet of AISI 410S steel and green powder compacts of AISI 434L steel under N2 atmospheres. The calculations have been performed combining the Fe-Cr-N System description contained in the SGTE Solid Solution Database and the gas phase for the N System contained in the SGTE Substances Database. Results show a rather good agreement for total nitrogen absorption in the steel and nitrogen solubility in austenite in the range of temperatures between 1273 K and 1473 K and in the range of pressures between 0.1 and 0.36 MPa. Calculations show that an appropriate choice of heat treatment parameters can lead to optimal nitrogen absorption in the alloy. It was observed in the calculations that an increased pressure stabilizes CrN at expenses of Cr2N - type nitrides.

  18. Microstructure of reactive synthesis TiC/Cr18Ni8 stainless steel bonded carbides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Junsheng; Liu Junbo; Wang Limei

    2008-01-01

    TiC/Cr18Ni8 steel bonded carbides were synthesized by vacuum sintering with mixed powders of iron, ferrotitanium, ferrochromium, colloidal graphite and nickel as raw materials. The microstructure and microhardness of the steel bonded carbides were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM),X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rockwell hardometer. Results show that the phases of steel bonded carbides mainly consist of TiC and Fe-Cr-Ni solid solution. The synthesized TiC particles are fine. Most of them are not more than 1 μm With the increase of sintering temperature, the porosity of TiC/Cr18Ni8 steel bonded carbides decreases and the density and hardness increase, but the size of TiC panicles slightly increases. Under the same sintering conditions, the density and hardness of steel bonded carbides with C/Ti atomic ratio 0.9 are higher than those with C/Ti atomic ratio 1.0.The TiC particles with C/Ti atomic ratio 0.9 are much finer and more homogeneous.

  19. Structure and microstructure evolution of a ternary Fe–Cr–Ni alloy akin to super martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravi Kumar, B.; Sharma, Sailaja; Munda, Parikshit; Minz, R.K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Reaustenisation by recrystallisation rather by a diffusion controlled process. • Ultrafine grained austenite formation in martensite matrix by recrystallisation. • In situ high temperature austenite transformation studies by X-ray diffraction. • Microstructure tailoring to achieve tensile strength (∼1 GPa) with good ductility. - Abstract: A ternary Fe–Cr–Ni alloy, akin to super martensitic stainless steels was prepared in vacuum induction furnace. The as cast ingot was solution treated at 1200 °C for 25 h and then hot forged and rolled to reduce into plate form. The hot rolled plate of martensitic microstructure was then cold rolled to 80% of thickness reduction. The phase transformation studies by X-ray diffraction analysis of hot and cold rolled specimens showed presence of retained austenite in air cooled as well as in water quenched state after annealing/austenising temperature of 1060 °C. The reaustenisation behaviour of the cold rolled alloy in water quenched state was studied by high temperature X-ray diffraction analysis. It showed very stable martensitic phase and the completion of reaustenisation process were observed to occur at about 950 °C. The recrystallisation behaviour of cold rolled material under isothermal and repeated annealing treatment was studied in detail by electron microscope. The tensile properties of the material were evaluated after various annealing treatments. The study revealed that by a suitable sequence of repetitive annealing process microstructure could be tailored to achieve tensile strength above 1 GPa with good ductility in a super martensitic stainless steel

  20. Effect of borides on hot deformation behavior and microstructure evolution of powder metallurgy high borated stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xuan [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Wang, Mingjia, E-mail: mingjiawangysu@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Fu, Yifeng [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Wang, Zixi; Li, Yanmei [Yanming Alloy Roll Co. Ltd, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Yang, Shunkai; Zhao, Hongchang; Li, Hangbo [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2017-02-15

    To investigate borides effect on the hot deformation behavior and microstructure evolution of powder metallurgy high borated stainless steel, hot compression tests at the temperatures of 950– 1150 °C and the strain rates of 0.01– 10 s{sup −1} were performed. Flow stress curves indicated that borides increased the material's stress level at low temperature but the strength was sacrificed at temperatures above 1100 °C. A hyperbolic-sine equation was used to characterize the dependence of the flow stress on the deformation temperature and strain rate. The hot deformation activation energy and stress exponent were determined to be 355 kJ/mol and 3.2, respectively. The main factors leading to activation energy and stress exponent of studied steel lower than those of commercial 304 stainless steel were discussed. Processing maps at the strains of 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 showed that flow instability mainly concentrated at 950– 1150 °C and strain rate higher than 0.6 s{sup −1}. Results of microstructure illustrated that dynamic recrystallization was fully completed at both high temperature-low strain rate and low temperature-high strain rate. In the instability region cracks were generated in addition to cavities. Interestingly, borides maintained a preferential orientation resulting from particle rotation during compression. - Highlights: •The decrement of activation energy was affected by boride and boron solution. •The decrease of stress exponent was influenced by composition and Cottrell atmosphere. •Boride represented a preferential orientation caused by particle rotation.

  1. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Dissimilar Friction Stir Spot Welding Between St37 Steel and 304 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadi, Ali; Shamanian, Morteza; Karimzadeh, Fathallah

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, St37 low-carbon steel and 304 stainless steel were welded successfully, with the thickness of 2 mm, by a friction stir spot welding process carried out at the tool dwell time of 6 s and two different tool rotational speeds of 630 and 1250 rpm. Metallographic examinations revealed four different zones including SZ and HAZ areas of St37 steel and SZ and TMAZ regions of 304 stainless steel in the weld nugget, except the base metals. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy experiments were used to investigate the possible formation of such phases as chromium carbide. Based on these experiments, no chromium carbide precipitation was found. The recrystallization of the weld nugget in the 304 steel and the phase transformations of the weld regions in the St37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld joint. Hardness changes of joint were acceptable and approximately uniform, as compared to the resistance spot weld. In this research, it was also observed that the tensile/shear strength, as a crucial factor, was increased with the rise in the tool rotational speed. The bond length along the interface between metals, as an effective parameter to increase the tensile/shear strength, was also determined. At higher tool rotational speeds, the bond length was found to be improved, resulting in the tensile/shear strength of 6682 N. Finally, two fracture modes were specified through the fracture mode analysis of samples obtained from the tensile/shear test consisting of the shear fracture mode and the mixed shear/tensile fracture mode.

  2. Hydrogen embrittlement of the 22 Cr5 Ni austeno-ferritic stainless steel. Role of the microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacoviello, Francesco

    1997-01-01

    Austenitic-ferritic stainless steels are characterised by very good mechanical properties and by a high corrosion resistance, especially to stress-corrosion and to pitting. However, their duplex structure shows a sensitivity to hydrogen embrittlement. Among duplex stainless steels, the 22 Cr 5 Ni grade has gradually became the most used. In this work the tensile properties and the resistance to fatigue crack propagation of 22 Cr5 Ni duplex stainless steel have been analysed, with and without hydrogen charging, after it had been treated at temperatures ranging between 200-1050 deg. C for varying times. The heat treatment times and temperatures were chosen to characterise completely the effects of the different intermetallic and the carbide and nitride phases and to compare these results with those from the tensile tests and those in the literature. A technique for obtaining the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in the steel was optimised and was shown to be alternative to the permeation technique. Thermal analysis was used to determine the activation energy of the hydrogen traps in the steel. From the results the following conclusions were established: - Grain boundaries and dislocations have very little influence on the process of hydrogen diffusion. - The quantity of hydrogen absorbed depends in that any type of precipitate decrease the absorption. This decrease was probably due to changes in the diffusivity and solubility of hydrogen caused by the precipitation. - The charging with hydrogen caused a large decrease in ε m pc for the steel for all heat treatments temperature, except 1050 deg. C. At this temperature the effect was much less as the dislocation density was very low and the precipitates were now in solution. - Hydrogen charging of the steel did not affect the YS and the decrease in UTS produced depended on the microstructure. Use of the embrittlement index 'F' showed that spinodal decomposition and precipitation of G phase decrease hydrogen embrittlement

  3. Ultrasonic Characterization of Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Microstructure: Discrimination between Equiaxed- and Columnar-Grain Material – An Interim Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Good, Morris S.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.; Watson, Bruce E.; Peters, Timothy J.; Dixit, Mukul; Bond, Leonard J.

    2009-10-27

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and inspection of cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) components used in the nuclear power industry is neither as effective nor reliable as is needed due to detrimental effects upon the interrogating ultrasonic beam and interference from ultrasonic backscatter. The root cause is the coarse-grain microstructure inherent to this class of materials. Some ultrasonic techniques perform better for particular microstructural classifications and this has led to the hypothesis that an ultrasonic inspection can be optimized for a particular microstructural class, if a technique exists to reliably classify the microstructure for feedback to the inspection. This document summarizes scoping experiments of in-situ ultrasonic methods for classification and/or characterization of the material microstructures in CASS components from the outside surface of a pipe. The focus of this study was to evaluate ultrasonic methods and provide an interim report that documents results and technical progress. An initial set of experiments were performed to test the hypothesis that in-service characterization of cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) is feasible, and that, if reliably performed, such data would provide real-time feedback to optimize in-service inspections in the field. With this objective in mind, measurements for the experiment were restricted to techniques that should be robust if carried forward to eventual field implementation. Two parameters were investigated for their ability to discriminate between different microstructures in CASS components. The first parameter was a time-of-flight ratio of a normal incidence shear wave to that of a normal incidence longitudinal wave (TOFRSL). The ratio removed dependency on component thickness which may not be accurately reported in the field. The second parameter was longitudinal wave attenuation. The selected CASS specimens provided five equiaxed-grain material samples and five columnar

  4. Microstructural characterization and density change of 304 stainless steel reflector blocks after long-term irradiation in EBR-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y., E-mail: yina.huang@materials.ox.ac.uk [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Wiezorek, J.M.K. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Garner, F.A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, 2003 Howell Ave., Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Freyer, P.D. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA 15235 (United States); Okita, T. [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Sagisaka, M.; Isobe, Y. [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Allen, T.R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    While thin reactor structural components such as cladding and ducts do not experience significant gradients in dpa rate, gamma heating rate, temperature or stress, thick components can develop strong local variations in void swelling and irradiation creep in response to gradients in these variables. In this study we conducted microstructural investigations by transmission electron microscopy of two 52 mm thick 304-type stainless steel hex-blocks irradiated for 12 years in the EBR-II reactor with accumulated doses ranging from ∼0.4 to 33 dpa. Spatial variations in the populations of voids, precipitates, Frank loops and dislocation lines have been determined for 304 stainless steel sections exposed to different temperatures, different dpa levels and at different dpa rates, demonstrating the existence of spatial gradients in the resulting void swelling. The microstructural measurements compare very well with complementary density change measurements regarding void swelling gradients in the 304 stainless steel hex-block components. The TEM studies revealed that the original cold-worked-state microstructure of the unirradiated blocks was completely erased by irradiation, replaced by high densities of interstitial Frank loops, voids and carbide precipitates at both the lowest and highest doses. At large dose levels the amount of volumetric void swelling correlated directly with the gamma heating gradient-related temperature increase (e.g. for 28 dpa, ∼2% swelling at 418 °C and ∼2.9% swelling at 448 °C). Under approximately iso-thermal local conditions, volumetric void swelling was found to increase with dose level (e.g. ∼0.2% swelling at 0.4 dpa, ∼0.5% swelling at 4 dpa and ∼2% swelling at 28 dpa). Carbide precipitate formation levels were found to be relatively independent of both dpa level and temperature and induced a measurable densification. Void swelling was dominant at the higher dose levels and caused measurable decreases in density. Void

  5. Microstructural characterization and density change of 304 stainless steel reflector blocks after long-term irradiation in EBR-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.; Wiezorek, J. M. K.; Garner, F. A.; Freyer, P. D.; Okita, T.; Sagisaka, M.; Isobe, Y.; Allen, T. R.

    2015-10-01

    While thin reactor structural components such as cladding and ducts do not experience significant gradients in dpa rate, gamma heating rate, temperature or stress, thick components can develop strong local variations in void swelling and irradiation creep in response to gradients in these variables. In this study we conducted microstructural investigations by transmission electron microscopy of two 52 mm thick 304-type stainless steel hex-blocks irradiated for 12 years in the EBR-II reactor with accumulated doses ranging from ∼0.4 to 33 dpa. Spatial variations in the populations of voids, precipitates, Frank loops and dislocation lines have been determined for 304 stainless steel sections exposed to different temperatures, different dpa levels and at different dpa rates, demonstrating the existence of spatial gradients in the resulting void swelling. The microstructural measurements compare very well with complementary density change measurements regarding void swelling gradients in the 304 stainless steel hex-block components. The TEM studies revealed that the original cold-worked-state microstructure of the unirradiated blocks was completely erased by irradiation, replaced by high densities of interstitial Frank loops, voids and carbide precipitates at both the lowest and highest doses. At large dose levels the amount of volumetric void swelling correlated directly with the gamma heating gradient-related temperature increase (e.g. for 28 dpa, ∼2% swelling at 418 °C and ∼2.9% swelling at 448 °C). Under approximately iso-thermal local conditions, volumetric void swelling was found to increase with dose level (e.g. ∼0.2% swelling at 0.4 dpa, ∼0.5% swelling at 4 dpa and ∼2% swelling at 28 dpa). Carbide precipitate formation levels were found to be relatively independent of both dpa level and temperature and induced a measurable densification. Void swelling was dominant at the higher dose levels and caused measurable decreases in density. Void swelling

  6. Microstructure, crystallography of phase transformations and multiple precipitations in PH 15-7Mo stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hongwei; Liu, Jiangwen; Luo, Chengping; Liu, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure and crystallographic features of a semi-austenitic precipitation hardening steel PH 15-7Mo during solution treatment, roddrawing and aging were investigated by means of optical microscope, X-ray diffraction analyzer and transmission electron microscope. It was found that the microstructure of the steel was consist of dominant austenite, small amount of martensite and 10–15 vol.% δ-ferrite after solution treatment at 1050 °C followed by cooling in water at room temperature. The austenite transformed into lath martensite during tensile roddrawing about 60% deforming companied with some coherent fine β-NiAl particles precipitated within martensite. With higher aging temperature and longer holding time, tiny carbide M_2_3C_6 particles precipitated from martensite, which kept the cubic–cubic orientation relationship (OR) with austenite and G-T OR with martensite which is different with all the reported orientations. The OR between tiny carbide M_2_3C_6 particles G-T OR with martensite was discussed in terms of crystallography of phase transformations. - Highlights: • Microstructure changes of austenitic steel PH15-7Mo were due to alloying elements, service condition and carbide M_2_3C_6. • Lath-shape martensitic laths keep pseudo {112} twinning relationship. • β-NiAl particles hold a typical cubic-to-cubic orientation relationship with martensite. • M_2_3C_6 carbide kept a cubic–cubic orientation relationship (OR) with austenite and an unusual G-T OR with martensite. • Multiple orientation relationship between M_2_3C_6 and austenite is correlative with their structural similarity.

  7. Microstructure, crystallography of phase transformations and multiple precipitations in PH 15-7Mo stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hongwei [The Australia Centre Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW, 2006 (Australia); Liu, Jiangwen, E-mail: mejwliu@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China); Luo, Chengping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China); Liu, Zhijian [Guangdong Research Institute of Iron and Steel, Guangzhou, 510640 (China)

    2016-07-05

    The microstructure and crystallographic features of a semi-austenitic precipitation hardening steel PH 15-7Mo during solution treatment, roddrawing and aging were investigated by means of optical microscope, X-ray diffraction analyzer and transmission electron microscope. It was found that the microstructure of the steel was consist of dominant austenite, small amount of martensite and 10–15 vol.% δ-ferrite after solution treatment at 1050 °C followed by cooling in water at room temperature. The austenite transformed into lath martensite during tensile roddrawing about 60% deforming companied with some coherent fine β-NiAl particles precipitated within martensite. With higher aging temperature and longer holding time, tiny carbide M{sub 23}C{sub 6} particles precipitated from martensite, which kept the cubic–cubic orientation relationship (OR) with austenite and G-T OR with martensite which is different with all the reported orientations. The OR between tiny carbide M{sub 23}C{sub 6} particles G-T OR with martensite was discussed in terms of crystallography of phase transformations. - Highlights: • Microstructure changes of austenitic steel PH15-7Mo were due to alloying elements, service condition and carbide M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. • Lath-shape martensitic laths keep pseudo {112} twinning relationship. • β-NiAl particles hold a typical cubic-to-cubic orientation relationship with martensite. • M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide kept a cubic–cubic orientation relationship (OR) with austenite and an unusual G-T OR with martensite. • Multiple orientation relationship between M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and austenite is correlative with their structural similarity.

  8. Effects of helium content of microstructural development in Type 316 stainless steel under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1985-11-01

    This work investigated the sensitivity of microstructural evolution, particularly precipitate development, to increased helium content during thermal aging and during neutron irradiation. Helium (110 at. ppM) was cold preinjected into solution annealed (SA) DO-heat type 316 stainess steel (316) via cyclotron irradiation. These specimens were then exposed side by side with uninjected samples. Continuous helium generation was increased considerably relative to EBR-II irradiation by irradiation in HFIR. Data were obtained from quantitative analytical electron microscopy (AEM) in thin foils and on extraction replicas. 480 refs., 86 figs., 19 tabs.

  9. Effects of helium content of microstructural development in Type 316 stainless steel under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1985-11-01

    This work investigated the sensitivity of microstructural evolution, particularly precipitate development, to increased helium content during thermal aging and during neutron irradiation. Helium (110 at. ppM) was cold preinjected into solution annealed (SA) DO-heat type 316 stainess steel (316) via cyclotron irradiation. These specimens were then exposed side by side with uninjected samples. Continuous helium generation was increased considerably relative to EBR-II irradiation by irradiation in HFIR. Data were obtained from quantitative analytical electron microscopy (AEM) in thin foils and on extraction replicas. 480 refs., 86 figs., 19 tabs

  10. Low temperature gaseous surface hardening of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The present contribution gives an overview of some of the technological aspects of low temperature thermochemical treatment of stainless steel. Examples of low temperature gaseous nitriding, carburising and nitrocarburising of stainless steel are presented and discussed. In particular......, the morphology, microstructure and characteristics of so-called expanite “layers” on stainless steel are addressed....

  11. The microstructure of type 304 stainless steel implanted with titanium and carbon and its relation to friction and wear tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Pope, L.E.; Knapp, J.A.; Picraux, S.T.; Yost, F.G.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have used transmission electron microscopy to examine the microstructure of type 304 stainless steel which was ion implanted with high doses (2 X 10 17 atoms cm -2 ) of titanium and carbon. It is found that the resulting surface alloy is an amorphous phase similar to that observed when pure iron is identically implanted. This result is important for identifying the mechanisms by which the coefficient of friction and the wear depth are reduced in unlubricated pin-on-disc tests of type 304 stainless steel implanted with titanium and carbon. The effect of temperature on the amorphous alloy during annealing in the microscope has also been examined. It is found that devitrification begins after 15 min at 500 0 C and that the alloy fully crystallizes into f.c.c., b.c.c. and TiC phases after 15 min at 650 0 C. A comparison of mechanical test results from devitrified specimens with results from amorphous specimens demonstrates that the reduction in the coefficient of friction correlates with the presence of the amorphous layer, whereas the reduction in the wear depth is obtained for both amorphous and crystalline alloys. (Auth.)

  12. Effect of heat treatment on mechanical properties and microstructure of selective laser melting 316L stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamariah, M. S. I. N.; Harun, W. S. W.; Khalil, N. Z.; Ahmad, F.; Ismail, M. H.; Sharif, S.

    2017-10-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) has been one of the preferred Additive Manufacturing process to fabricate parts due to its merits in terms of design freedom, lower material waste and faster production when compare to the conventional manufacturing processes. However, due to the thermal gradient experienced during the process, the parts are exposed to the residual stress that leads to parts distortion. This work presents the effect of heat treatments on the micro-hardness of 316L stainless steel parts. In current study, SLM has been employed to fabricate 316L stainless steel compacts. Different heat treatments of 650°C, 950°C, and 1100°C for 2 hours were applied on the compacts. Hardness test were performed on the as-built and heat-treated compacts. The relationship between the microstructures and micro-hardness were discussed in this paper. The results revealed that the micro-hardness of the as-built compacts is between 209.0 and 212.2 HV, which is much higher than the heattreated compacts.

  13. Influence of Annealing on the Depth Microstructure of the Shot Peened Duplex Stainless Steel at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qiang; She, Jia; Xiang, Yong; Wu, Xianyun; Wang, Chengxi; Jiang, Chuanhai

    The depth profiles of residual stresses and lattice parameters in the surface layers of shot peened duplex stainless steel at elevated temperature were investigated utilizing X-ray diffraction analysis. At each deformation depth, residual stress distributions in both ferrite and austenite were studied by X-ray diffraction stress analysis which is performed on the basis of the sin2ψ method and the lattice parameters were explored by Rietveld method. The results reveal that difference changes of depth residual compressive stress profiles between ferrite and austenite under the same annealing condition are resulted from the diverse coefficient of thermal expansion, dislocation density, etc. for different phases in duplex stainless steel. The relaxations of depth residual stresses in austenite are more obvious than those in ferrite. The lattice parameters decrease in the surface layer with the extending of annealing time, however, they increase along the depth after annealing for 16min. The change of the depth lattice parameters can be ascribed to both thermal expansion and the relaxation of residual stress. The different changes of microstructure at elevated temperature between ferrite and austenite are discussed.

  14. Microstructural design of PCA austenitic stainless steel for improved resistance to helium embrittlement under HFIR irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.

    1983-01-01

    Several variants of Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA) with different preirradiation thermal-mechanical treatments were irradiated in HFIR and were evaluated for embrittlement resistance via disk-bend tensile testing. Comparison tests were made on two heats of 20%-cold-worked type 316 stainless steel. None of the alloys were brittle after irradiation at 300 to 400 0 C to approx. 44 dpa and helium levels of 3000 to approx.3600 at. ppm. However, all were quite brittle after similar exposure at 600 0 C. Embrittlement varied with alloy and pretreatment for irradiation to 44 dpa at 500 0 C and to 22 dpa at 600 0 C. Better relative embrittlement resistance among PCA variants was found in alloys which contained prior grain boundary MC carbide particles that remained stable under irradiation

  15. Studies on Fusion Welding of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel: Microstructure, Mechanical and corrosion Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt has been made in the present investigation to weld high nitrogen steel of 5mm thick plates using various process i.e., shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and autogenous electron beam welding (EBW) process. Present work is aimed at studying the microstructural changes and its effects on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Microstructure is characterized by optical, scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction technique. Vickers hardness, tensile properties, impact toughness and face bend ductility testing of the welds was carried out. Pitting corrosion resistance of welds was determined using potentio-dynamic polarization testing in 3.5%NaCl solution. Results of the present investigation established that SMA welds made using Cr-Mn-N electrode were observed to have a austenite dendritic grain structure in the weld metal and is having poor mechanical properties but good corrosion resistance. GTA welds made using 18Ni (MDN 250) filler wire were observed to have a reverted austenite in martensite matrix of the weld metal and formation of unmixed zone at the fusion boundary which resulted in better mechanical properties and poor corrosion resistance. Fine grains and uniform distribution of delta ferrite in the austenite matrix and narrow width of weld zone are observed in autogeneous electron beam welds. A good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance was achieved for electron beam welds of high nitrogen steel when compared to SMA and GTA welds.

  16. Early detection of micro-structural changes due to fatigue of non-corrosive austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkhof, D.; Niffenegger, M.; Grosse, M.

    2003-03-01

    In view of life extension efforts of nuclear power plants, many investigations are in progress in order to assess the structural integrity of different components. In many cases, this involves unexpected loads, which were not taken into account during design of components, e.g. temperature cycling arising from unforeseen stratification flow conditions. Under certain power plant transients (start-up/shut-down, hot stand-by, thermal stratification) at critical locations of piping and nozzles, material degradation caused by accumulated cyclic plastic strain takes place. However, materials subjected to cyclic loading exhibit changes in microstructure already before macroscopic crack initiation begins, this period covers a considerable part of fatigue life. Existing methods for in-service inspection are mainly specialised for crack detection. Advanced non-destructive testing methods for monitoring of material degradation are sensitive to any micro-structural changes in the material leading to a degradation of the mechanical properties. Therefore, these indirect methods require a careful interpretation of the measured signal in terms of micro-structural evolutions due to ageing. During cyclic loading of austenitic stainless steel, microstructural changes occur, which affect both the mechanical and the physical properties. Typical features are the rearrangement of dislocations and, in some cases, a deformation-induced martensitic phase transformation. In our investigation martensite formation was used as an indication for material degradation due to fatigue. Knowledge about mechanisms and influencing parameters of the martensitic transformation process is essential for the application in a lifetime monitoring system. The investigations showed that for a given austenitic stainless steel the deformation-induced martensite depends on the applied strain amplitude, the cycle number (usage factor, lifetime) and the temperature. It was demonstrated that the volume fraction of

  17. Cluster dynamics modeling of the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructure of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brimbal, Daniel, E-mail: Daniel.brimbal@areva.com [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, 1 Place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Fournier, Lionel [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, 1 Place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Barbu, Alain [Alain Barbu Consultant, 6 Avenue Pasteur Martin Luther King, 78230 Le Pecq (France)

    2016-01-15

    A mean field cluster dynamics model has been developed in order to study the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructural evolution of metals. In this model, self-interstitial clusters, stacking-fault tetrahedra and helium-vacancy clusters are taken into account, in a configuration well adapted to austenitic stainless steels. For small helium-vacancy cluster sizes, the densities of each small cluster are calculated. However, for large sizes, only the mean number of helium atoms per cluster size is calculated. This aspect allows us to calculate the evolution of the microstructural features up to high irradiation doses in a few minutes. It is shown that the presence of stacking-fault tetrahedra notably reduces cavity sizes below 400 °C, but they have little influence on the microstructure above this temperature. The binding energies of vacancies to cavities are calculated using a new method essentially based on ab initio data. It is shown that helium has little effect on the cavity microstructure at 300 °C. However, at higher temperatures, even small helium production rates such as those typical of sodium-fast-reactors induce a notable increase in cavity density compared to an irradiation without helium. - Highlights: • Irradiation of steels with helium is studied through a new cluster dynamics model. • There is only a small effect of helium on cavity distributions in PWR conditions. • An increase in helium production causes an increase in cavity density over 500 °C. • The role of helium is to stabilize cavities via reduced emission of vacancies.

  18. Microstructure characterization in the weld joint of a high nickel austenitic alloy and Cr18-Ni8 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Na; Li, Yajiang; Wang, Juan [Shandong Univ., Jinan (CN). Key Lab. for Liquid - Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education)

    2012-06-15

    High nickel austenitic alloy, 6 mm thick, and Cr18-Ni8 stainless steel with a thickness of 0.6 mm were joined by pulsed current tungsten inert gas arc welding without filler metal in this work. Metallographic examination, microhardness measurement and electron microprobe analysis were used to reveal microstructural characteristics in the joint. The results indicated that the weld metal consisted of {gamma}-austenite, {delta}-ferrite and carbides without the appearance of martensite. There were dendrite crystals at the edge of the weld metal near the high nickel austenitic alloy and isometric crystals in the center of the weld metal. The microhardness of the weld metal was the highest due to the existence of carbides and its finer structure. Graphite flakes were still embedded in the austenite matrix of the heat-affected zone without the formation of martensite. (orig.)

  19. Joining of aluminum and stainless steel using AlSi10 brazing filler: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Vasilii; Uhlig, Thomas; Wagner, Guntram

    2017-07-01

    Joining of dissimilar materials like stainless steel and aluminum is of special interest for automotive applications. Due to the different properties of these materials, suitable joining techniques are required. Brazing offers the possibilities to manufacture high performance joints in one step and at low joining temperatures. However, these joints often need to withstand a high number of high cyclic loads during application. Therefore, in addition to the monotonic properties, the fatigue behavior of the produced joints must be considered and evaluated. In the present work, specimens are manufactured by induction brazing using an AlSi10 filler and a non-corrosive flux. The mechanical properties are determined by tensile shear tests as well as in fatigue tests at ambient and elevated temperatures. The microstructure of the brazed joints and the fracture surfaces of the tested samples are investigated by SEM.

  20. Microstructural, Micro-hardness and Sensitization Evaluation in HAZ of Type 316L Stainless Steel Joint with Narrow Gap Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Faisal Shafiqul; Jang, Changheui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Shi Chull [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    From Micro-hardness measurement HAZ zone was found approximately 1-1.5 mm in NGW and DL-EPR test confirmed that 316L NGW HAZ was not susceptible to sensitization as DOS <1% according to sensitization criteria based on reference. In nuclear power plants 316L stainless steels are commonly used material for their metallurgical stability, high corrosion resistance, and good creep and ductility properties at elevated temperatures. Welding zone considered as the weakest and failure initiation source of the components. For safety and economy of nuclear power plants accurate and dependable structural integrity assessment of main components like pressure vessels and piping are need as it joined by different welding process. In similar and dissimilar metal weld it has been observed that weld microstructure cause the variation of mechanical properties through the thickness direction. In the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) relative to the fusion line face a unique thermal experience during welding.

  1. Effect of friction stir welding speed on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeid, T.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Assadi, H.; Malek Ghaini, F.

    2008-01-01

    The present study focuses on the effect of the welding speed on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the stir zone (SZ) in friction stir welding (FSW) of SAF 2205 duplex stainless steel. A single tool, made of a WC-base material, was used to weld 2 mm-thick plates at a constant rotational speed of 600 rpm. X-ray radiography revealed that sound welds were successfully obtained for the welding speeds in the range of 50-200 mm/min, whereas a groove-like defect was formed at the higher speed of 250 mm/min. Moreover, increasing the welding speed decreased the size of the α and γ grains in the SZ, and hence, improved the mean hardness value and the tensile strength of the SZ. These results are interpreted with respect to interplay between the welding speed and the peak temperature in FSW

  2. Microstructural defect evolution in neutron – Irradiated 12Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel during subsequent isochronous annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsay, K.V.; Maksimkin, O.P.; Turubarova, L.G.; Rofman, O.V. [Institute of Nuclear Physics NNC RK, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Garner, F.A., E-mail: frank.garner@dslextreme.com [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Transmission electron microscopy and microhardness measurements were used to examine changes in microstructure and associated strengthening induced in austenitic stainless steel 12Cr18Ni9Ti irradiated to ∼0.001 and ∼5 dpa in the WWR-K reactor before and after being subjected to post-irradiation isochronal annealing. The relatively low values of irradiation temperature and dpa rate (∼80 °C and ∼1.2 × 10{sup −8} dpa/s) experienced by this steel allowed characterization of defect microstructures over a wide range of defect ensembles, all at constant composition, produced first by irradiation and then by annealing at temperatures between 450 and 1050 °C. It was shown that the dispersed barrier hardening model with commonly accepted physical properties successfully predicted the observed hardening. It was also observed that when TiC precipitates form at higher annealing temperatures, the alloy does not change in hardness, reflecting a balance between precipitate-hardening and matrix-softening due to removal of solute-strengthening elements titanium and carbon. Such matrix-softening is not often considered in other studies, especially where the contribution of precipitates to hardening is a second-order effect.

  3. Microstructural defect evolution in neutron – Irradiated 12Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel during subsequent isochronous annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsay, K.V.; Maksimkin, O.P.; Turubarova, L.G.; Rofman, O.V.; Garner, F.A.

    2013-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and microhardness measurements were used to examine changes in microstructure and associated strengthening induced in austenitic stainless steel 12Cr18Ni9Ti irradiated to ∼0.001 and ∼5 dpa in the WWR-K reactor before and after being subjected to post-irradiation isochronal annealing. The relatively low values of irradiation temperature and dpa rate (∼80 °C and ∼1.2 × 10 −8 dpa/s) experienced by this steel allowed characterization of defect microstructures over a wide range of defect ensembles, all at constant composition, produced first by irradiation and then by annealing at temperatures between 450 and 1050 °C. It was shown that the dispersed barrier hardening model with commonly accepted physical properties successfully predicted the observed hardening. It was also observed that when TiC precipitates form at higher annealing temperatures, the alloy does not change in hardness, reflecting a balance between precipitate-hardening and matrix-softening due to removal of solute-strengthening elements titanium and carbon. Such matrix-softening is not often considered in other studies, especially where the contribution of precipitates to hardening is a second-order effect

  4. Comparison of the microstructure, deformation and crack initiation behavior of austenitic stainless steel irradiated in-reactor or with protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kale J.; Was, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the microstructures, microchemistry, hardening, susceptibility to IASCC initiation, and deformation behavior resulting from proton or reactor irradiation. Two commercial purity and six high purity austenitic stainless steels with various solute element additions were compared. Samples of each alloy were irradiated in the BOR-60 fast reactor at 320 °C to doses between approximately 4 and 12 dpa or by a 3.2 MeV proton beam at 360 °C to a dose of 5.5 dpa. Irradiated microstructures consisted mainly of dislocation loops, which were similar in size but lower in density after proton irradiation. Both irradiation types resulted in the formation of Ni-Si rich precipitates in a high purity alloy with added Si, but several other high purity neutron irradiated alloys showed precipitation that was not observed after proton irradiation, likely due to their higher irradiation dose. Low densities of small voids were observed in several high purity proton irradiated alloys, and even lower densities in neutron irradiated alloys, implying void nucleation was in process. Elemental segregation at grain boundaries was very similar after each irradiation type. Constant extension rate tensile experiments on the alloys in simulated light water reactor environments showed excellent agreement in terms of the relative amounts of intergranular cracking, and an analysis of localized deformation after straining showed a similar response of cracking to surface step height after both irradiation types. Overall, excellent agreement was observed after proton and reactor irradiation, providing additional evidence that proton irradiation is a useful tool for accelerated testing of irradiation effects in austenitic stainless steel.

  5. Comparison of the microstructure, deformation and crack initiation behavior of austenitic stainless steel irradiated in-reactor or with protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, Kale J., E-mail: kalejs@umich.edu; Was, Gary S.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Dislocation loops were the prominent defect, but neutron irradiation caused higher loop density. • Grain boundaries had similar amounts of radiation-induced segregation. • The increment in hardness and yield stress due to irradiation were very similar. • Relative IASCC susceptibility was nearly identical. • The effect of dislocation channel step height on IASCC was similar. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to compare the microstructures, microchemistry, hardening, susceptibility to IASCC initiation, and deformation behavior resulting from proton or reactor irradiation. Two commercial purity and six high purity austenitic stainless steels with various solute element additions were compared. Samples of each alloy were irradiated in the BOR-60 fast reactor at 320 °C to doses between approximately 4 and 12 dpa or by a 3.2 MeV proton beam at 360 °C to a dose of 5.5 dpa. Irradiated microstructures consisted mainly of dislocation loops, which were similar in size but lower in density after proton irradiation. Both irradiation types resulted in the formation of Ni–Si rich precipitates in a high purity alloy with added Si, but several other high purity neutron irradiated alloys showed precipitation that was not observed after proton irradiation, likely due to their higher irradiation dose. Low densities of small voids were observed in several high purity proton irradiated alloys, and even lower densities in neutron irradiated alloys, implying void nucleation was in process. Elemental segregation at grain boundaries was very similar after each irradiation type. Constant extension rate tensile experiments on the alloys in simulated light water reactor environments showed excellent agreement in terms of the relative amounts of intergranular cracking, and an analysis of localized deformation after straining showed a similar response of cracking to surface step height after both irradiation types. Overall, excellent agreement was observed

  6. The Influence of Post-Build Microstructure on the Electrochemical Behavior of Additively Manufactured 17-4 PH Stainless Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoudt, M R; Ricker, R E; Lass, E A; Levine, L E

    2017-03-01

    The additive manufacturing (AM) build process produces a segregated microstructure with significant variations in composition and phases that are uncommon in traditional wrought materials. As such, the relationship between the post-build microstructure and the corrosion resistance is not well understood. Stainless steel alloy 17-4PH is an industrially-relevant alloy for applications requiring high-strength and good corrosion resistance. A series of potentiodynamic scans conducted in a deaerated 0.5 mol/L NaCl solution evaluated the influence of these microstructural differences on the pitting behavior of SS17-4. The pitting potentials were found to be higher in the samples of additively-processed material than in samples of the alloy in wrought form. This indicates that the additively-processed material is more resistant to localized corrosion and pitting in this environment than the wrought alloy. The results also suggest that after homogenization, the additively-produced SS17-4 could be more resistant to pitting than wrought SS17-4 in an actual service environment.

  7. A Study on Microstructure Change and Pitting Corrosion Resistance of Ferritic Stainless Steel Weldment According to Nb Contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong-Min; Shin, Yong-Taek; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Lee, Jun-Hee; Lee, Hae-Woo [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung-Riong [Kangwon National University, ChunCheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soon-Ho [Silla University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    This paper identified the effects of Nb on microstructure. Also, it has studied on uniform and pitting corrosion resistance in a ferritic stainless steel weld metal of the automobile exhaust system. We fabricated 3 flux cored wires designed with 0-1.0 wt% Nb and performed Flux Cored Arc Welding. We observed the microstructure with the SEM/EDS and EBSD. To evaluate the uniform and pitting corrosion resistance, we performed a potentiodynamic polarization test in 0.2 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 M NaCl. As a result of the tests, we found that as the amount of addition of Nb rose, the amount of Cr-carbide fell. The microstructure became more refined. The specimen with 1.0%Nb added had the highest uniform and pitting corrosion resistance. After the pitting corrosion test, a pit was formed at the grain boundary that has no addition of Nb. In addition, in the specimen with added Nb, pits were formed at the inclusions.

  8. Effect of heat input on the microstructure, residual stresses and corrosion resistance of 304L austenitic stainless steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unnikrishnan, Rahul, E-mail: rahulunnikrishnannair@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Idury, K.S.N. Satish, E-mail: satishidury@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Ismail, T.P., E-mail: tpisma@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Bhadauria, Alok, E-mail: alokbhadauria1@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Shekhawat, S.K., E-mail: satishshekhawat@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IITB), Powai, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra (India); Khatirkar, Rajesh K., E-mail: rajesh.khatirkar@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Sapate, Sanjay G., E-mail: sgsapate@yahoo.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India)

    2014-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in high performance pressure vessels, nuclear, chemical, process and medical industry due to their very good corrosion resistance and superior mechanical properties. However, austenitic stainless steels are prone to sensitization when subjected to higher temperatures (673 K to 1173 K) during the manufacturing process (e.g. welding) and/or certain applications (e.g. pressure vessels). During sensitization, chromium in the matrix precipitates out as carbides and intermetallic compounds (sigma, chi and Laves phases) decreasing the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the present investigation, 304L austenitic stainless steel was subjected to different heat inputs by shielded metal arc welding process using a standard 308L electrode. The microstructural developments were characterized by using optical microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction, while the residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction using the sin{sup 2}ψ method. It was observed that even at the highest heat input, shielded metal arc welding process does not result in significant precipitation of carbides or intermetallic phases. The ferrite content and grain size increased with increase in heat input. The grain size variation in the fusion zone/heat affected zone was not effectively captured by optical microscopy. This study shows that electron backscattered diffraction is necessary to bring out changes in the grain size quantitatively in the fusion zone/heat affected zone as it can consider twin boundaries as a part of grain in the calculation of grain size. The residual stresses were compressive in nature for the lowest heat input, while they were tensile at the highest heat input near the weld bead. The significant feature of the welded region and the base metal was the presence of a very strong texture. The texture in the heat affected zone was almost random. - Highlights: • Effect of heat input on microstructure, residual

  9. Influence of ageing time on hardness, microstructure and wear behaviour of AISI2507 super duplex stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davanageri, Mahesh; Narendranath, S.; Kadoli, Ravikiran

    2017-08-01

    The effect of ageing time on hardness, microstructure and wear behaviour of super duplex stainless AISI 2507 is examined. The material was solution treated at 1050 °C and water quenched, further the ageing has been carried out at 850 °C for 30 min, 60 min and 90 min. The chromium (Cr) and molybdenum (Mo) enriched intermetallic sigma phase (σ) were found to precipitate at the ferrite/austenite interface and within the ferrite region. The concentration of intermetallic sigma phase (σ), which was quantified by a combination of scanning electron microscopy and image analysis, increases with increasing ageing time, leading to significant increase in the hardness. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) was employed to investigate the element distribution and phase identification. Wear characterstics of the aged super duplex stainless steel were measured by varying normal loads, sliding speeds, sliding distance and compared with solution treated (as-cast) specimens. Scanning electron microscopy was used to assist in analysis of worn out surfaces. The outcomes suggested that the increase in percentage of sigma phase increases hardness and wear resistance in heat-treated specimens compared to solution treated specimens (as-cast).

  10. Effect of heat input on the microstructure and mechanical properties of gas tungsten arc welded AISI 304 stainless steel joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Subodh; Shahi, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Welding procedure is established for welding 6 mm thick AISI 304 using GTAW process. → Mechanical properties of the weld joints are influenced strongly by the heat input. → Highest tensile strength of 657.32 MPa is achieved by joints using low heat input. → Welding parameters affect heat input and hence microstructure of weld joints. → Extent of grain coarsening in the HAZ increases with increase in the heat input. -- Abstract: Influence of heat input on the microstructure and mechanical properties of gas tungsten arc welded 304 stainless steel (SS) joints was studied. Three heat input combinations designated as low heat (2.563 kJ/mm), medium heat (2.784 kJ/mm) and high heat (3.017 kJ/mm) were selected from the operating window of the gas tungsten arc welding process (GTAW) and weld joints made using these combinations were subjected to microstructural evaluations and tensile testing so as to analyze the effect of thermal arc energy on the microstructure and mechanical properties of these joints. The results of this investigation indicate that the joints made using low heat input exhibited higher ultimate tensile strength (UTS) than those welded with medium and high heat input. Significant grain coarsening was observed in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of all the joints and it was found that the extent of grain coarsening in the heat affected zone increased with increase in the heat input. For the joints investigated in this study it was also found that average dendrite length and inter-dendritic spacing in the weld zone increases with increase in the heat input which is the main reason for the observable changes in the tensile properties of the weld joints welded with different arc energy inputs.

  11. Microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steel irradiated with triple-beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Shozo; Miwa, Yukio; Yamaki, Daiju [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Yichuan, Zhang

    1997-03-01

    An austenitic stainless steel was simultaneously irradiated with nickel, helium and hydrogen ions at the temperature range of 573-673 K. The damage level and injected concentration of He and H ions in the triple-beam irradiated region are 57 dpa, 19000 and 18000 at.ppm, respectively. Following to irradiation, the cross sectional observation normal to the incident surface of the specimen was carried out with a transmission electron microscope. Two bands parallel to the incident surface were observed in the irradiated specimen, which consist of dislocation loops and lines of high number density. These locate in the range of the depth of 0.4 to 1.3 {mu}m and 1.8 to 2.4 {mu}m from the incident surface, respectively. The region between two bands, which corresponds to the triple beam irradiated region, shows very low number density of dislocations than that in each band. Observation with higher magnification of this region shows that fine cavities with high number density uniformly distribute in the matrix. (author)

  12. Microstructural characterization of pulsed-laser deposited thin films of type 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, A.K.; Kaul, R.; Misra, P.; Rai, S.K.; Das, A.K.; Deb, S.K.; Kukreja, L.M.; Toppo, Anita; Shaikh, Hasan; Dayal, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SS), in spite of having excellent ductility and general corrosion resistance, are particularly susceptible to localized corrosion, e.g. crevice, pitting, inter-granular corrosion (IGC) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In nuclear fuel reprocessing, waste management industries, and in many chemical industries, the main corrosion problem is IGC when nitric acid is used as the process fluid. Sensitization is the main cause for inter-granular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in certain environments, e.g., oxidizing water chemistry in boiling water reactors. IGC and IGSCC of austenitic SS arise from inter-granular precipitation of Cr-rich carbides in the temperature range of 773-1073 K. Inter-granular carbide precipitation is accompanied by the development of Cr-depleted zone adjacent to grain boundaries. Chromium-depleted zones, being anodic with respect to grain interior, are preferentially attacked in the corrosive environment, leading to IGC. Grain refinement of austenitic SS is known to increase material resistance against sensitization. The present investigation has been undertaken with objective of developing nano-grained surface layer on austenitic SS substrate to induce enhanced resistance against sensitization and IGC and IGSCC in type 304 SS. (author)

  13. The Microstructure and Pitting Resistance of Weld Joints of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingfang; Liu, Fei; Pu, Juan; Anderson, Neil E.; Li, Leijun; Liu, Dashuang

    2017-11-01

    2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) was welded by submerged arc welding. The effects of both heat input and groove type on the ferrite/austenite ratio and elemental diffusion of weld joints were investigated. The relationships among welding joint preparation, ferrite/austenite ratio, elemental diffusion, and pitting corrosion resistance of weld joints were analyzed. When the Ni content of the weld wire deposit was at minimum 2-4% higher than that of 2205 DSS base metal, the desired ratio of ferrite/austenite and elemental partitioning between the austenite and ferrite phases were obtained. While the pitting sensitivity of weld metal was higher than that of base metal, the self-healing capability of the passive film of weld metal was better than that of the base metal when a single V-type groove was used. Furthermore, the heat input should be carefully controlled since pitting corrosion occurred readily in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone near the fusion line of welded joints.

  14. Mechanical and microstructural integrity of nickel-titanium and stainless steel laser joined wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannod, J.; Bornert, M.; Bidaux, J.-E.; Bataillard, L.; Karimi, A.; Drezet, J.-M.; Rappaz, M.; Hessler-Wyser, A.

    2011-01-01

    The biomedical industry shows increasing interest in the joining of dissimilar metals, especially with the aim of developing devices that combine different mechanical and corrosive properties. As an example, nickel-titanium shape memory alloys joined to stainless steel are very promising for new invasive surgery devices, such as guidewires. A fracture mechanics study of such joined wires was carried out using in situ tensile testing and scanning electron microscopy imaging combined with chemical analysis, and revealed an unusual fracture behaviour at superelastic stress. Nanoindentation was performed to determine the mechanical properties of the welded area, which were used as an input for mechanical computation in order to understand this unexpected behaviour. Automated image correlation allowed verification of the mechanical modelling and a reduced stress-strain model is proposed to explain the special fracture mechanism. This study reveals the fact that tremendous property changes at the interface between the NiTi base wire and the weld area have more impact on the ultimate tensile strength than the chemical composition variation across the welded area.

  15. Effect of heat input on microstructure and mechanical properties of dissimilar joints between super duplex stainless steel and high strength low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghian, M.; Shamanian, M.; Shafyei, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The microstructure of weld metal consists of austenite and ferrite. • The HAZ of the API X-65 shows different transformation. • Impact strength of sample with low heat input was lower than base metals. • The heat input at 0.506 kJ/mm is not the suitable for dissimilar joining between UNS S32750/API X-65. - Abstract: In the present study, microstructure and mechanical properties of UNS S32750 super duplex stainless steel (SDSS)/API X-65 high strength low alloy steel (HSLA) dissimilar joint were investigated. For this purpose, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) was used in two different heat inputs: 0.506 and 0.86 kJ/mm. The microstructures investigation with optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction showed that an increase in heat input led to a decrease in ferrite percentage, and that detrimental phases were not present. It also indicated that in heat affected zone of HSLA base metal in low heat input, bainite and ferrite phases were created; but in high heat input, perlite and ferrite phases were created. The results of impact tests revealed that the specimen with low heat input exhibited brittle fracture and that with high heat input had a higher strength than the base metals

  16. Mechanical property degradation and microstructural evolution of cast austenitic stainless steels under short-term thermal aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Timothy G.; Byun, Thak Sang; Leonard, Keith J.

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical testing and microstructural characterization were performed on short-term thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) to understand the severity and mechanisms of thermal-aging degradation experienced during extended operation of light water reactor (LWR) coolant systems. Four CASS materials-CF3, CF3M, CF8, and CF8M-were thermally aged for 1500 h at 290 °C, 330 °C, 360 °C, and 400 °C. All four alloys experienced insignificant change in strength and ductility properties but a significant reduction in absorbed impact energy. The primary microstructural and compositional changes during thermal aging were spinodal decomposition of the δ-ferrite into α/α‧, precipitation of G-phase in the δ-ferrite, segregation of solute to the austenite/ferrite interphase boundary, and growth of M23C6 carbides on the austenite/ferrite interphase boundary. These changes were shown to be highly dependent on chemical composition, particularly the concentration of C and Mo, and aging temperature. The low C, high Mo CF3M alloys experienced the most spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation coinciding the largest reduction in impact properties.

  17. Microstructural response of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels to neutron exposure of 70 dpa in FFTF/MOTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Yutai; Kohno, Yutaka; Kohyama, Akira

    1994-01-01

    JPCA, a titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel, in solution-annealed or cold-worked condition and a compositionally modified JPCA in solution-annealed condition were examined by transmission electron microscopy following irradiation in FFTF/MOTA to an exposure level of up to about 70 dpa at 390 to 600 C. At lower temperatures, all the materials developed qualitatively similar cavity-, dislocation- and precipitate-microstructures. The lower-temperature swelling peak, which appeared at near 410 C, was more efficiently suppressed by phosphorus addition than cold-working. Irradiation at or above 520 C produced substantially large swelling in solution-annealed JPCA. The cavities contributed to this higher-temperature swelling developed in association with M 6 C-type precipitates. Neither cavities other than very small helium bubbles nor massive particles of M 6 C-type precipitates were observed in cold-worked and phosphorus-modified materials, in which MC-type precipitates developed at very high concentration. The effect of pre-irradiation microstructure and compositional modification on the behavior of these precipitates is discussed. ((orig.))

  18. Microstructure and Interfacial Reactions During Vacuum Brazing of Stainless Steel to Titanium Using Ag-28 pct Cu Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laik, A.; Shirzadi, A. A.; Sharma, G.; Tewari, R.; Jayakumar, T.; Dey, G. K.

    2015-02-01

    Microstructural evolution and interfacial reactions during vacuum brazing of grade-2 Ti and 304L-type stainless steel (SS) using eutectic alloy Ag-28 wt pct Cu were investigated. A thin Ni-depleted zone of -Fe(Cr, Ni) solid solution formed on the SS-side of the braze zone (BZ). Cu from the braze alloy, in combination with the dissolved Fe and Ti from the base materials, formed a layer of ternary compound , adjacent to Ti in the BZ. In addition, four binary intermetallic compounds, CuTi, CuTi, CuTi and CuTi formed as parallel contiguous layers in the BZ. The unreacted Ag solidified as islands within the layers of CuTi and CuTi. Formation of an amorphous phase at certain locations in the BZ could be revealed. The -Ti(Cu) layer, formed due to diffusion of Cu into Ti-based material, transformed to an -Ti + CuTi eutectoid with lamellar morphology. Tensile test showed that the brazed joints had strength of 112 MPa and failed at the BZ. The possible sequence of events that led to the final microstructure and the mode of failure of these joints were delineated.

  19. An investigation on microstructure and mechanical propertiesof a Nb-microalloyed nano/ultrafine grained 201 austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samaei Baghbadorani, H., E-mail: h.samaeibaghbadorani@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kermanpur, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafizadeh, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fould Institute of Technology, Fouldshare 84916-63763 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behjati, P.; Rezaee, A.; Moallemi, M. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-11

    The present study was aimed to investigate the mechanical properties of a nano/ultrafine grained Nb-containing 201 austenitic stainless steel. For this purpose, 90% cold rolled sheets with fully martensitic microstructure were isothermally annealed at 900 °C for different times of 1 to 1800 s, leading to the reversion of strain- induced α′-martensite to austenite and significant grain refinement. Ferritescopy, X-ray diffractometery and optical/electron microscopy techniques along with hardness measurements and tensile tests were used to study the evolution in microstructure and mechanical properties in the course of annealing. It was found that heavy cold-rolling promoted formation of Nb-rich carbonitrides which effectively retarded the growth of fine reverted austenite grains. The obtained results showed that the complete transformation of martensite to austenite took about 60 s with the corresponding austenite grain size of about 90 nm. This sample had an ultrahigh yield strength of 1170 MPa, which was almost four times higher than that of the raw material and outstanding elongation of 37%. Further, the true stress–strain curves of the reversion annealed samples revealed two distinct uniform elongation stages (stage I and stage II), whereas, the onset of stage II was concurrent with pronounced strain hardening. This was related to the sharp increase in the formation of α′-martensite upon tensile straining.

  20. Influence of heat input in electron beam process on microstructure and properties of duplex stainless steel welded interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Jing, Hongyang; Xu, Lianyong; Han, Yongdian; Zhao, Lei; Lv, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jianyang

    2018-03-01

    The influence of heat input in electron beam (EB) process on microstructure, mechanical properties, and pitting corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel (DSS) welded interface was investigated. The rapid cooling in EB welding resulted in insufficient austenite formation. The austenite mainly consisted of grain boundary austenite and intragranular austenite, and there was abundant Cr2N precipitation in the ferrite. The Ni, Mo, and Si segregation indicated that the dendritic solidification was primarily ferrite in the weld. The weld exhibited higher hardness, lower toughness, and poorer pitting corrosion resistance than the base metal. The impact fractures of the welds were dominated by the transgranular cleavage failure of the ferrite. The ferrite was selectively attacked because of its lower pitting resistance equivalent number than that of austenite. The Cr2N precipitation accelerated the pitting corrosion. In summary, the optimised heat input slightly increased the austenite content, reduced the segregation degree and ferrite texture intensity, decreased the hardness, and improved the toughness and pitting corrosion resistance. However, the effects were limited. Furthermore, optimising the heat input could not suppress the Cr2N precipitation. Taking into full consideration the microstructure and properties, a heat input of 0.46 kJ/mm is recommended for the EB welding of DSS.

  1. Microstructure characterization in domestically-made TP310HNbN austenitic stainless steel after creep test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Lin, Lin; Hou, Shufang; Wang, Bohan

    Microstructure characterization of domestically-made TP310HNbN austenitic stainless steel after creep test was investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed that M23C6 carbides precipitated both inside grains and at the grain boundaries and NbCrN particles were located inside grains for creep-rupture samples. It was clear that sigma phase and NbC particles precipitated inside grains for the creep-rupture sample at 670 C. M23C6 carbides with lattice parameter of three times of the austenite matrix grow in a cube to cube orientation relationship with the matrix. The amount of M23C6 carbide particles obviously increased with the testing time prolonged. Deformation hardening induced an enhanced hardness nearby rupture surface for the creep-rupture samples with a short testing time. For the domestically-made TP310HNbN steel, great attention should be paid to the distribution, size and amount of sigma phase and M23C6 during service.

  2. Effect of Rolling and Subsequent Annealing on Microstructure, Microtexture, and Properties of an Experimental Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Arka; Patra, Sudipta; Chakrabarti, Debalay; Singh, Shiv Brat

    2017-12-01

    A lean duplex stainless steel (LDSS) has been prepared with low-N content and processed by different thermo-mechanical schedules, similar to the industrial processing that comprised hot-rolling, cold-rolling, and annealing treatments. The microstructure developed in the present study on low-N LDSS has been compared to that of high-N LDSS as reported in the literature. As N is an austenite stabilizer, lower-N content reduced the stability of austenite and the austenite content in low-N LDSS with respect to the conventional LDSS. Due to low stability of austenite in low-N LDSS, cold rolling resulted in strain-induced martensitic transformation and the reversion of martensite to austenite during subsequent annealing contributed to significant grain refinement within the austenite regions. δ-ferrite grains in low-N LDSS, on the other hand, are refined by extended recovery mechanism. Initial solidification texture (mainly cube texture) within the δ-ferrite region finally converted into gamma-fiber texture after cold rolling and annealing. Although MS-brass component dominated the austenite texture in low-N LDSS after hot rolling and cold rolling, that even transformed into alpha-fiber texture after the final annealing. Due to the significant grain refinement and formation of beneficial texture within both austenite and ferrite, good combination of strength and ductility has been achieved in cold-rolled and annealed sample of low-N LDSS steel.

  3. Microstructure and hardness investigation of 17-4PH stainless steel by laser quenching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Zhaoyun, E-mail: zhaoyunchenlaoshi@126.com [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Superlight Materials and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, Harbin Engineering University, Nantong ST 145, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhou Guijuan, E-mail: zgjghpx@126.com [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Superlight Materials and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, Harbin Engineering University, Nantong ST 145, Harbin 150001 (China); Chen Zhonghua, E-mail: jickdahua@163.com [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Superlight Materials and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, Harbin Engineering University, Nantong ST 145, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2012-02-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface hardening of 17-4PH is highly achieved by laser transformation hardening. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A hardened layer with a thickness of 1.75 mm is formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phase similar to {epsilon}-Cu precipitates re-segregation after dissolved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The strengthening phase is composed of classic lath martensite, coarse NbC and a lot of finer fcc copper-rich phases. - Abstract: Surface hardening of 17-4PH was achieved by laser transformation hardening using 5 kW continuous wave CO{sub 2} laser system. The microstructure of the laser-quenched sample was investigated by optical microscopy, transmission electron microscope and {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectrometer. The hardness profile was determined by a Vickers hardness tester. The hardened layer with a thickness of 1.75 mm was formed, and it was composed of classic lath martensite, coarse NbC and a lot of finer fcc copper-rich phases which were similar to {epsilon}-Cu precipitates. The maximal hardness value of hardened zone is 446 HV which is 50 HV higher than that of the substrate (386-397 HV). The higher hardness in laser transformation layer of the 17-4PH steel could be attributed to the following aspects: the matrix with a high dislocation density; the fine microstructure; the finer fcc copper-rich phases that were similar to the {epsilon}-Cu precipitates as well as the transforming of retained austenite into lath martensite.

  4. Characterization of laser metal deposited 316L stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bayode, A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available investigates the effects of laser power on the structural integrity, microstructure and microhardness of laser deposited 316L stainless steel. The result showed that the laser power has much influence on the evolving microstructure and microhardness...

  5. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffi Mohammed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure and pitting corrosion behaviour of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen steel made of Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microscopic studies were carried out using optical microscopy (OM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM. Energy back scattered diffraction (EBSD method was used to determine the phase analysis, grain size and orientation image mapping. Potentio-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance in aerated 3.5% NaCl environment using a GillAC electrochemical system. The investigation results showed that the selected Cr–Mn–N type electrode resulted in a maximum reduction in delta-ferrite and improvement in pitting corrosion resistance of the weld zone was attributed to the coarse austenite grains owing to the reduction in active sites of the austenite/delta ferrite interface and the decrease in galvanic interaction between austenite and delta-ferrite.

  6. Effect of 0.2 and 0.5% Ti on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 13Cr supermartensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Yong; Huang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Cheng; Gao, Wen; Zhao, Chao

    2015-11-01

    The effect that a 0, 0.2, and 0.5 wt.% titanium content has on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 13Cr supermartensitic stainless steel was investigated using an optical microscope, transmission electron microscope, and X-ray diffraction. The resultant microstructures of the three steels were tempered martensite with a reversed austenite dispersed throughout the matrix. Additionally, the formation of Cr-rich carbides was suppressed by stable Ti(C, N), which improved the strength without severely decreasing in the Ti-microalloyed steel toughness. Nano-precipitation of Ni3Ti was found for the 0.5 wt.% Ti steel during tempering, which significantly increased the strength, but decreased the toughness. The reversed austenite volume fraction also significantly influenced the mechanical properties.

  7. Microstructure and mechanical properties of nickel coated multi walled carbon nanotube reinforced stainless steel 316L matrix composites by laser sintering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanthesha, P.; Mohankumar, G. C.

    2018-04-01

    Electroless Ni coated Multi-walled Carbon nanotubes reinforced with Stainless Steel 316L matrix composite was developed by Direct Metal Laser Sintering process (DMLS). Homogeneous mixture of Stainless Steel 316L powder and carbon nanotubes in different vol. % was obtained by using double cone blender machine. Characterization of electroless Ni coated carbon nanotubes was done by using X-ray diffraction, FESEM and EDS. Test samples were fabricated at different laser scan speeds. Effect of process parameters and CNT vol. % content on solidification microstructure and mechanical properties of test samples was investigated by using Optical microscopy, FESEM, and Hounsfield tensometer. Experimental results reveal DMLS process parameters affect the density and microstructure of sintered parts. Dense parts with minimum porosity when processed at low laser scan speeds and low CNT vol. %. Tensile fractured surface of test specimens evidences the survival of carbon nanotubes under high temperature processing condition.

  8. Microstructure and mechanical properties of hot wire laser clad layers for repairing precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Peng; Cai, Zhipeng; Feng, Zhenhua; Wang, Gang

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel (PH-MSS) is widely used as load-bearing parts because of its excellent overall properties. It is economical and flexible to repair the failure parts instead of changing new ones. However, it is difficult to keep properties of repaired part as good as those of the substrate. With preheating wire by resistance heat, hot wire laser cladding owns both merits of low heat input and high deposition efficiency, thus is regarded as an advantaged repairing technology for damaged parts of high value. Multi-pass layers were cladded on the surface of FV520B by hot wire laser cladding. The microstructure and mechanical properties were compared and analyzed for the substrate and the clad layer. For the as-cladded layer, microstructure was found non-uniform and divided into quenched and tempered regions. Tensile strength was almost equivalent to that of the substrate, while ductility and impact toughness deteriorated much. With using laser scanning layer by layer during laser cladding, microstructure of the clad layers was tempered to fine martensite uniformly. The ductility and toughness of the clad layer were improved to be equivalent to those of the substrate, while the tensile strength was a little lower than that of the substrate. By adding TiC nanoparticles as well as laser scanning, the precipitation strengthening effect was improved and the structure was refined in the clad layer. The strength, ductility and toughness were all improved further. Finally, high quality clad layers were obtained with equivalent or even superior mechanical properties to the substrate, offering a valuable technique to repair PH-MSS.

  9. Microstructural evolution during aging at 800 °C and its effect on the magnetic behavior of UNS S32304 lean duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dille, J.; Areiza, M.C.L.; Tavares, S.S.M.; Pereira, G.R.; De Almeida, L.H.; Rebello, J.M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels are high strength and corrosion resistant alloys extensively used in chemical and petrochemical industries. However, exposition to temperatures in the range 300–1000 °C leads to precipitation of different phases having a detrimental effect on the mechanical properties and on the corrosion resistance of the alloy. In this work, the microstructural evolution during aging of a UNS S32304 lean duplex stainless steel was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and magnetic force microscopy. Formation of secondary austenite as well as Cr_2N and Cr_2_3C_6 precipitation and, consequently, a decrease of ferrite volume fraction were observed. EDX analysis indicated that secondary austenite is depleted in chromium which is detrimental to the corrosion resistance of the alloy. A variation of magnetic properties and Eddy current measurement parameters during aging was simultaneously detected and can be explained by the decrease of ferrite volume content. Therefore, Eddy current non-destructive testing can be successfully applied to detect the formation of deleterious phases during aging. - Highlights: • Aging of UNS S32304 lean duplex stainless steel at 800 °C is investigated. • STEM reveals formation of Cr-depleted secondary austenite and precipitation of Cr_2_3C_6 and Cr_2N. • Microstructural transformation occurs only during the first 30 min of aging. • Microstructural evolution during aging is correlated to magnetic properties evolution. • Eddy current testing permits to survey the formation of deleterious secondary austenite.

  10. Mechanism of creep in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, S.N.; Silveira, T.L.

    In the present work the creep criterions to identify the deformation mechanisms through the exponent of the strain rate versus stress relationship are presented. When applied to several stainless steels these criterions show an apparent contradiction for the proper mechanism acting at Σ/D above 10 9 /cm 2 . Microstructural aspects interfering in different manners with the fracture of these steels could be a reason for rationalizing the contradictory behavior. This is discussed in suggested deformation maps for the steels investigated [pt

  11. Corrosion and microstructural analysis data for AISI 316L and AISI 347H stainless steels after exposure to a supercritical water environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ruiz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents corrosion data and microstructural analysis data of austenitic stainless steels AISI 316L and AISI 347H exposed to supercritical water (25 MPa, 550 °C with 2000 ppb of dissolved oxygen. The corrosion tests lasted a total of 1200 h but were interrupted at 600 h to allow measurements to be made. The microstructural data have been collected in the grain interior and at grain boundaries of the bulk of the materials and at the superficial oxide layer developed during the corrosion exposure.

  12. Microstructure, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of Friction Stir Welding High Nitrogen Martensitic Stainless Steel 30Cr15Mo1N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Geng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available High nitrogen martensitic stainless steel 30Cr15Mo1N plates were successfully welded by friction stir welding (FSW at a tool rotation speed of 300 rpm with a welding speed of 100 mm/min, using W-Re tool. The sound joint with no significant nitrogen loss was successfully produced. Microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of an FSW joint were investigated. The results suggest that the grain size of the stir zone (SZ is larger than the base metal (BM and is much larger the case in SZ-top. Some carbides and nitrides rich in chromium were found in BM while not observed in SZ. The martensitic phase in SZ could transform to austenite phase during the FSW process and the higher peak temperature, the greater degree of transformation. The hardness of SZ is significantly lower than that of the BM. An abrupt change of hardness defined as hard zone (HZ was found in the thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ on the advancing side (AS, and the HZ is attributed to a combination result of temperature, deformation, and material flow behavior. The corrosion resistance of SZ is superior to that of BM, which can be attributed to less precipitation and lower angle boundaries (LABs. The corrosion resistance of SZ-bottom is slight higher than that of SZ-top because of the finer grained structure.

  13. Microstructural changes of a thermally aged stainless steel submerged arc weld overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kameda, J.; Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K.

    2012-06-01

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes in stainless steel submerged arc weld-overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels was investigated using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to post-welding heat treatments (PWHTs), with a subsequent furnace cooling, a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was observed due to spinodal decomposition in the δ-ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the δ-ferrite phase. The degree of the spinodal decomposition in the submerged arc weld sample was similar to that in the electroslag weld one reported previously. We also observed a carbide on the γ-austenite and δ-ferrite interface. There were no Cr depleted zones around the carbide.

  14. Microstructural changes of a thermally aged stainless steel submerged arc weld overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T., E-mail: takeuchi.tomoaki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kameda, J. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T.; Matsukawa, Y. [Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes in stainless steel submerged arc weld-overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels was investigated using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to post-welding heat treatments (PWHTs), with a subsequent furnace cooling, a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was observed due to spinodal decomposition in the {delta}-ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 Degree-Sign C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the {delta}-ferrite phase. The degree of the spinodal decomposition in the submerged arc weld sample was similar to that in the electroslag weld one reported previously. We also observed a carbide on the {gamma}-austenite and {delta}-ferrite interface. There were no Cr depleted zones around the carbide.

  15. Microstructural evolution in 13Cr-8Ni-2.5Mo-2Al martensitic precipitation-hardened stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ping, D.H.; Ohnuma, M.; Hirakawa, Y.; Kadoya, Y.; Hono, K.

    2005-01-01

    The microstructure of 13Cr-8Ni-2.5Mo-2Al martensitic precipitation-hardened (PH) stainless steel has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy, three-dimensional atom probe and small-angle X-ray scattering. A high number density (∼10 23-25 m -3 ) of ultra-fine (1-6 nm) β-NiAl precipitates are formed during aging at 450-620 deg. C, which are spherical in shape and dispersed uniformly with perfect coherency with the matrix. As the annealing temperature increases, the size and concentration of the precipitates increase concurrently while the number density decreases. The Mo and Cr segregation to the precipitate-matrix interface has been detected and is suggested to suppress precipitate coarsening. In the sample aged for 500 h at 450 deg. C, the matrix decomposes into Cr-rich (α') and Cr-poor (α) regions. The decrease in the strength at higher temperature (above 550 deg. C) is attributed to the formation of larger carbides and reverted austenite

  16. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Stainless Steel/Brass Joints Brazed by Sn-Electroplated Ag Brazing Filler Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingxing; Peng, Jin; Cui, Datian

    2018-05-01

    To develop a high-Sn-content AgCuZnSn brazing filler metal, the BAg50CuZn was used as the base filler metal and a Sn layer was electroplated upon it. Then, the 304 stainless steel and the H62 brass were induction-brazed with the Sn-plated brazing filler metals. The microstructures of the joints were examined with an optical microscope, a scanning electron microscope and an x-ray diffractometer. The corresponding mechanical properties were obtained with a universal tensile testing machine. The results indicated that the induction brazed joints consisted of the Ag phase, the Cu phase and the CuZn phase. When the content of Sn in the Sn-plated Ag brazing filler metal was 6.0 or 7.2 wt.%, the Cu5Zn8, the Cu41Sn11 and the Ag3Sn phases appeared in the brazed joint. The tensile strength of the joints brazed with the Sn-plated filler metal was higher compared to the joints with the base filler metal. When the content of Sn was 6.0 wt.%, the highest tensile strength of the joint reached to 395 MPa. The joint fractures presented a brittle mode, mixed with a low amount of ductile fracture, when the content of Sn exceeded 6.0 wt.%.

  17. Effect of electropulsing on surface mechanical properties and microstructure of AISI 304 stainless steel during ultrasonic surface rolling process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haibo [Advanced Materials Institute, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Song, Guolin [Advanced Materials Institute, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Tang, Guoyi, E-mail: tanggy@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Advanced Materials Institute, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-04-26

    The present work integrates 3D digital optical microscopy (OM), nano-indentation, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to systematically investigate the effect of electropulsing on the surface mechanical properties and microstructure of AISI 304 stainless steel during the ultrasonic surface rolling process (USRP). Compared with the original USRP, the introduction of electropulsing with optimal parameters can effectively facilitate surface crack healing and improve surface hardness and wear resistance dramatically, and the residual compressive stress is further enhanced. Meanwhile, more martensite phase and fewer deformation twins can be found in the strengthened layer. Rapid improvement of the surface mechanical properties should be attributed to the ultra-refined grains, accelerated martensitic phase transformation and suppressed deformation twining induced by the coupling effect of USRP and electropulsing. The high strain rate given by USRP, increased stacking fault energy and accelerated dislocation mobility caused by electropulsing are likely the primary intrinsic reasons for the observed phenomena.

  18. Microchemical and microstructural evolution of AISI 304 stainless steel irradiated in EBR-II at PWR-relevant dpa rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Sencer, B.H. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Garner, F.A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Marquis, E.A., E-mail: emarq@umich.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    AISI 304 stainless steel was irradiated at 416 °C and 450 °C at a 4.4 × 10{sup −9} and 3.05 × 10{sup −7} dpa/s to ∼0.4 and ∼28 dpa, respectively, in the reflector of the EBR-II fast reactor. Both unirradiated and irradiated conditions were examined using standard and scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and atom probe tomography on very small specimens produced by focused ion beam milling. These results are compared with previous electron microscopy examination of 3 mm disks from essentially the same material. By comparing a very low dose specimen with a much higher dose specimen, both derived from a single reactor assembly, it has been demonstrated that the coupled microstructural and microchemical evolution of dislocation loops and other sinks begins very early, with elemental segregation producing at these sinks what appears to be measurable precursors to fully formed precipitates found at higher doses. The nature of these sinks and their possible precursors are examined in detail.

  19. Microchemical and microstructural evolution of AISI 304 stainless steel irradiated in EBR-II at PWR-relevant dpa rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Y.; Sencer, B. H.; Garner, F. A.; Marquis, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    AISI 304 stainless steel was irradiated at 416 °C and 450 °C at a 4.4 × 10-9 and 3.05 × 10-7 dpa/s to ∼0.4 and ∼28 dpa, respectively, in the reflector of the EBR-II fast reactor. Both unirradiated and irradiated conditions were examined using standard and scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and atom probe tomography on very small specimens produced by focused ion beam milling. These results are compared with previous electron microscopy examination of 3 mm disks from essentially the same material. By comparing a very low dose specimen with a much higher dose specimen, both derived from a single reactor assembly, it has been demonstrated that the coupled microstructural and microchemical evolution of dislocation loops and other sinks begins very early, with elemental segregation producing at these sinks what appears to be measurable precursors to fully formed precipitates found at higher doses. The nature of these sinks and their possible precursors are examined in detail.

  20. Effects of nitrogen in shielding gas on microstructure evolution and localized corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel welding joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Jing, Hongyang; Xu, Lianyong; Han, Yongdian; Zhao, Lei; Zhou, Chao

    2017-05-01

    The effects of nitrogen addition in shielding gas on microstructure evolution and localized corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel (DSS) welds were studied. N2-supplemented shielding gas facilitated the primary austenite formation, suppressed the Cr2N precipitation in weld root, and increased the microhardnesses of weld metal. Furthermore, N2-supplemented shielding gas increased pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of austenite, but which decreased slightly PREN of ferrite. The modified double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation in 2 M H2SO4 + 1 M HCl was an effective method to study the localized corrosion of the different zones in the DSS welds. The adding 2% N2 to pure Ar shielding gas improved the localized corrosion resistance in the DSS welds, which was due to compensation for nitrogen loss and promoting nitrogen further solution in the austenite phases, suppression of the Cr2N precipitation in the weld root, and increase of primary austenite content with higher PREN than the ferrite and secondary austenite. Secondary austenite are prone to selective corrosion because of lower PREN compared with ferrite and primary austenite. Cr2N precipitation in the pure Ar shielding weld root and heat affected zone caused the pitting corrosion within the ferrite and the intergranular corrosion at the ferrite boundary. In addition, sigma and M23C6 precipitation resulted in the intergranular corrosion at the ferrite boundary.

  1. Cyclic deformation behavior and microstructural changes of 12Cr-WMoV martensitic stainless steel at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, X.L.; Yang, G.X.; Zhou, S.L.; Fan, H.; Yang, S.S.; Zhu, J.W.; Liu, Y.N.

    2008-01-01

    Strain-controlled uniaxial push-pull low-cycle fatigue tests were performed on 12Cr-WMoV martensitic stainless steel at room temperature and 600 deg. C. Specimens were tested at total strain amplitudes of 1.5% and 0.8% with a constant strain rate of 0.004 s -1 . The microstructures of the specimens subjected to different cycles were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cyclic softening was observed at room temperature and 600 deg. C. TEM investigations revealed that cellular structures of dislocations were formed in the fatigued specimens at both room and elevated temperatures. Dynamic recovery has a very significant effect on the dislocation structure of specimens tested at elevated temperature. The thickness and density of the dislocation cell walls formed in specimens cycled at 600 deg. C are less than that at room temperature. Cellular dislocation structures formed during cycling are annihilated in the specimens subjected to 1 h annealing at 600 deg. C

  2. Interfacial Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Joints of Commercially Pure Aluminum and 304 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Balamagendiravarman; Thirunavukarasu, Gopinath; Kundu, Sukumar; Kailas, Satish V.; Chatterjee, Subrata

    2018-05-01

    In the present investigation, friction stir welding of commercially pure aluminum and 304 stainless steel was carried out at varying tool rotational speeds from 200 to 1000 rpm in steps of 200 rpm using 60 mm/min traverse speed at 2 (degree) tool tilt angle. Microstructural characterization of the interfacial zone was carried out using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy indicated the presence of FeAl3 intermetallic phase. Thickness of the intermetallic layer increased with the increase in tool rotational speed. X-ray diffraction studies indicated the formation of intermetallic phases like FeAl2, Fe4Al13, Fe2Al5, and FeAl3. A maximum tensile strength of 90% that of aluminum along with 4.5% elongation was achieved with the welded sample at tool rotational speed of 400 rpm. The stir zone showed higher hardness as compared to base metals, heat affected zone, and thermo-mechanically affected zone due to the presence of intermetallics. The maximum hardness value at the stir zone was achieved at 1000 rpm tool rotational speed.

  3. Microstructure Evolution During Stainless Steel-Copper Vacuum Brazing with a Ag/Cu/Pd Filler Alloy: Effect of Nickel Plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, R. K.; Laik, A.; Mishra, P.

    2017-03-01

    Vacuum brazing of stainless steel and copper plates was done using a silver-based filler alloy. In one set of experiments, around 30-µm-thick nickel coatings were electrochemically applied on stainless steel plates before carrying out the brazing runs and its effect in making changes in the braze-zone microstructure was studied. For brazing temperature of 830 °C, scanning electron microscopy examination of the braze-zone revealed that relatively sound joints were obtained when brazing was done with nickel-coated stainless steel than with uncoated one. However, when brazing of nickel-coated stainless steel and copper plates was done at 860 °C, a wide crack appeared in the braze-zone adjacent to copper side. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis and electron microprobe analysis confirmed that at higher temperature, the diffusion of Cu atoms from copper plate towards the braze-zone was faster than that of Ni atoms from nickel coating. Helium leak rate of the order 10-11 Pa m3/s was obtained for the crack-free joint, whereas this value was higher than 10-4 Pa m3/s for the joint having crack. The shear strength of the joint was found to decrease considerably due to the presence of crack.

  4. Effect of Titanium on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of High-Carbon Martensitic Stainless Steel 8Cr13MoV

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Tao Yu; Jing Li; Cheng-Bin Shi; Qin-Tian Zhu

    2016-01-01

    The effect of titanium on the carbides and mechanical properties of martensitic stainless steel 8Cr13MoV was studied. The results showed that TiCs not only acted as nucleation sites for δ-Fe and eutectic carbides, leading to the refinement of the microstructure, but also inhibited the formation of eutectic carbides M7C3. The addition of titanium in steel also promoted the transformation of M7C3-type to M23C6-type carbides, and consequently more carbides could be dissolved into the matrix duri...

  5. Mechanical properties and microstructure of copper alloys and copper alloy-stainless steel laminates for fusion reactor high heat flux applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leedy, Kevin Daniel

    A select group of copper alloys and bonded copper alloy-stainless steel panels are under consideration for heat sink applications in first wall and divertor structures of a planned thermonuclear fusion reactor. Because these materials must retain high strengths and withstand high heat fluxes, their material properties and microstructures must be well understood. Candidate copper alloys include precipitate strengthened CuNiBe and CuCrZr and dispersion strengthened Cu-Alsb2Osb3 (CuAl25). In this study, uniaxial mechanical fatigue tests were conducted on bulk copper alloy materials at temperatures up to 500sp°C in air and vacuum environments. Based on standardized mechanical properties measurement techniques, a series of tests were also implemented to characterize copper alloy-316L stainless steel joints produced by hot isostatic pressing or by explosive bonding. The correlation between mechanical properties and the microstructure of fatigued copper alloys and the interface of copper alloy-stainless steel laminates was examined. Commercial grades of these alloys were used to maintain a degree of standardization in the materials testing. The commercial alloys used were OMG Americas Glidcop CuAl25 and CuAl15; Brush Wellman Hycon 3HP and Trefimetaux CuNiBe; and Kabelmetal Elbrodur and Trefimetaux CuCrZr. CuAl25 and CuNiBe alloys possessed the best combination of fatigue resistance and microstructural stability. The CuAl25 alloy showed only minimal microstructural changes following fatigue while the CuNiBe alloy consistently exhibited the highest fatigue strength. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that small matrix grain sizes and high densities of submicron strengthening phases promoted homogeneous slip deformation in the copper alloys. Thus, highly organized fatigue dislocation structure formation, as commonly found in oxygen-free high conductivity Cu, was inhibited. A solid plate of CuAl25 alloy hot isostatically pressed to a 316L stainless steel

  6. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Hardness of 17Cr-0.17N-0.43C-1.7 Mo Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, S. Chenna; Gangwar, Narendra Kumar; Jha, Abhay K.; Pant, Bhanu; George, Koshy M.

    2015-04-01

    The microstructure and hardness of a nitrogen-containing martensitic stainless steel were investigated as a function of heat treatment using optical microscopy, electron microscopy, amount of retained austenite, and hardness measurement. The steel was subjected to three heat treatments: hardening, cryo treatment, and tempering. The hardness of the steel in different heat-treated conditions ranged within 446-620 HV. The constituents of microstructure in hardened condition were lath martensite, retained austenite, M23C6, M7C3, MC carbides, and M(C,N) carbonitrides. Upon tempering at 500 °C, two new phases have precipitated: fine spherical Mo2C carbides and needle-shaped Cr2N particles.

  7. An assessment of microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar welds between Inconel 718 and 310S austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortezaie, A.; Shamanian, M.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, dissimilar welding between Inconel 718 nickel-base superalloy and 310S austenitic stainless steel using gas tungsten arc welding process was performed to determine the relationship between the microstructure of the welds and the resultant mechanical and corrosion properties. For this purpose, three filler metals including Inconel 625, Inconel 82 and 310 stainless steel were used. Microstructural observations showed that weld microstructures for all filler metals were fully austenitic. In tension tests, welds produced by Inconel 625 and 310 filler metals displayed the highest and the lowest ultimate tensile strength, respectively. The results of Charpy impact tests indicated that the maximum fracture energy was related to Inconel 82 weld metal. According to the potentiodynamic polarization test results, Inconel 82 exhibited the highest corrosion resistance among all tested filler metals. Finally, it was concluded that for the dissimilar welding between Inconel 718 and 310S, Inconel 82 filler metal offers the optimum properties at room temperature. - Highlights: • Three filler metals including Inconel 625, Inconel 82 and 310 SS were used. • A columnar to equiaxed dendritic structure was seen for IN-625 weld metal. • A granular austenitic microstructure obtained for Inconel 82 weld metal. • Microstructure of 310 weld metal includes solidification cracks along SSGB. • IN-82 weld metal showed the highest corrosion potential

  8. Advances in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldev Raj; Jayakumar, T.; Saibaba, Saroja; Sivaprasad, P.V.; Shankar, P.

    2010-01-01

    This book covers a broad spectrum of topics spanning the entire life cycle of stainless steel-from alloy design and characterization to engineering design, fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, quality assurance of components, in-service performance assessment, life prediction and finally failure analysis of materials and components. The contents provide useful feedback for further developments aimed at effective utilization of this class of materials. The book comprises articles that bring out contemporary developments in stainless steels and is thematically classified into the following sections. 1. Component design, modelling and structural integrity, 2. Manufacturing technology, 3. Property evaluation, 4. Alloy development and applications, 5. NDE methods, 6. Corrosion and surface modification. The book commences with articles on component design and structural integrity, thus opening up the areas of challenge for researchers and academia. The articles in the book relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  9. Fusion welding of borated stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robino, C.V.; Cieslak, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Borated austenitic stainless steels have been developed for use in the nuclear industry where storage, transport, and reprocessing of nuclear materials are required. The objective of this work is to develop appropriate joining technology for borated stainless steels based upon understanding the response of these materials to thermal processing involving melting. This understanding is being developed through the application of physical metallurgy techniques to determine the evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties within the various regions of the HAZ. Initial investigations include development of the kinetics of boride coarsening in the solid-state region of HAZ and the effect of boride coarsening on the impact properties of this region of the weld zone. Microstructures of the borated stainless steels, their response to high temperature isothermal heat treatments, and the implications of these heat treatments with respect to welding behavior will be presented

  10. Microstructural Characterization and the Effect of Phase Transformations on Toughness of the UNS S31803 Duplex Stainless Steel Aged Treated at 850 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zucato Igor

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Duplex stainless steels, with ferritic-austenitic microstructure, have excellent mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, when duplex stainless steels are exposed to temperatures between 600 and 1000 °C, some phase transformations can occur such as chromium nitrides precipitation, chromium carbides precipitation and the sigma phase formation. The formation of such compounds leads to loss in both corrosion resistance and fracture toughness. The negative effects of the formation of chromium nitrides, carbides and the sigma phase are due to the chromium depletion in the matrix. The phase transformations cited above occur initially at ferritic-austenitic interfaces and at the grain boundaries. The aim of this work is to identify and characterize the phase transformations, which occur when aging heat treatments are carried out at temperatures at which the kinetics is the fastest for the reactions mentioned. At first, the samples were annealed at 1100 °C for 40 min. The aging heat treatments were then carried out at 850 °C for 6, 40 e 600 min. Microstructural characterization was done by using optical microscopy with different etchings, in order to identify each phase formed in the duplex stainless steel during aging heat treatments. The toughness was also evaluated by using Charpy impact test. Impact tests show that loss of toughness was related to phase transformations.

  11. Microstructural evolution and response to double-loop reactivation testing of heat-treated PH 13-8 Mo martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cieslak, W.R.; Cieslak, M.J.; Hills, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Compared to the austenitic stainless steels, relatively few studies have been reported of the intergranular corrosion suceptibility of martensitic stainless steels, particularly those containing 0.05 corresponds to a ditch structure in ASTM A 262-A (oxalic acid)

  12. Effect of Titanium on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of High-Carbon Martensitic Stainless Steel 8Cr13MoV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tao Yu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of titanium on the carbides and mechanical properties of martensitic stainless steel 8Cr13MoV was studied. The results showed that TiCs not only acted as nucleation sites for δ-Fe and eutectic carbides, leading to the refinement of the microstructure, but also inhibited the formation of eutectic carbides M7C3. The addition of titanium in steel also promoted the transformation of M7C3-type to M23C6-type carbides, and consequently more carbides could be dissolved into the matrix during hot processing as demonstrated by the determination of extracted carbides from the steel matrix. Meanwhile, titanium suppressed the precipitation of secondary carbides during annealing. The appropriate amount of titanium addition decreased the size and fraction of primary carbides in the as-cast ingot, and improved the mechanical properties of the annealed steel.

  13. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part II. Application to electron beam welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, Ø.; Klokkehaug, S.

    2000-03-01

    In the present investigation, a process model for electron beam (EB) welding of different grades of duplex stainless steels (i.e. SAF 2205 and 2507) has been developed. A number of attractive features are built into the original finite element code, including (1) a separate module for prediction of the penetration depth and distribution of the heat source into the plate, (2) adaptive refinement of the three-dimensional (3-D) element mesh for quick and reliable solution of the differential heat flow equation, and (3) special subroutines for calculation of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) microstructure evolution. The process model has been validated by comparison with experimental data obtained from in situ thermocouple measurements and optical microscope examinations. Subsequently, its aptness to alloy design and optimization of welding conditions for duplex stainless steels is illustrated in different numerical examples and case studies pertaining to EB welding of tubular joints.

  14. Microstructure of reaction zone in WCp/duplex stainless steels matrix composites processing by laser melt injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do Nascimento, A. M.; Ocelik, V.; Ierardi, M. C. F.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2008-01-01

    The laser melt injection (LMI) process has been used to create a metal matrix composite consisting of 80gm sized multi-grain WC particles embedded in three cast duplex stainless steels. The microstruture was investigated by scanning electron microscopy with integrated EDS and electron back-scatter

  15. Hydrogen effects in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on stainless steels have been reviewed and are summarized in this paper. Discussion covers hydrogen solution and transport in stainless steels as well as the effects of hydrogen on deformation and fracture under various loading conditions. Damage is caused also by helium that arises from decay of the hydrogen isotope tritium. Austenitic, ferritic, martensite, and precipitation-hardenable stainless steels are included in the discussion. 200 references

  16. Influence of temperature, cold deformation and a constant mechanical load on the microstructural stability of a nitrogen alloyed duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisbrodt-Reisch, A.; Brummer, M.; Hadler, B.; Wolbank, B.; Werner, E.A.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of temperature, cold deformation and constant mechanical load on the microstructural stability and the kinetics of phase decomposition of a nitrogen-alloyed duplex stainless steel (0.34 wt.% N) was investigated. Calculation of the phase equilibria was done with THERMOCALC using the steel database TCFE3 in order to predict the stability of the phases and to estimate the influence of temperature on the fraction and chemical composition of the phases. Various ageing treatments between 800 deg. C and 1300 deg. C were performed for different time intervals with controlled heating and cooling rates. In order to determine the influence of deformation, annealing at 800 deg. C after cold deformation as well as dilatometry experiments were performed under a constant mechanical compressive load at 800 deg. C and 900 deg. C. Microstructural characterization was carried out by means of light microscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. It was found that the microstructural evolution under a thermal load alone in the temperature range above 950 deg. C concerns mainly the transformation of austenite to ferrite, while below 950 deg. C ferrite decomposition and precipitation of nitrides occur. Since duplex stainless steels possess a microstructure consisting of paramagnetic austenite and ferromagnetic ferrite, the kinetics of ferrite decomposition can be determined easily by magnetic inductive measurements. The results of the microstructural investigations and the measurements of the saturation magnetization show that there is a satisfactory agreement with the theoretical predictions based on THERMOCALC. Ferrite decomposition is significantly accelerated by strain introduced during cold deformation. Furthermore, even under a small mechanical load the kinetics of phase decomposition behaviour at 900 deg. C is drastically changed. Whereas during short annealing times the microstructure remains nearly stable the same annealing conditions under a constant

  17. Review of effects of long-term aging on the mechanical properties and microstructures of Types 304 and 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, J.A.; Sikka, V.K.; Raske, D.T.

    1985-01-01

    Because commercial liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) are designed to last for 40 years or more, an understanding of the mechanical behavior of the structural alloys used in them is required for times on the order of 2.5 x 10 5 h (assuming a 70% availability factor). Types 304 and 316 stainless steel are used extensively in LMFBR systems. At the beginning of life these alloys are in a metastable state and evolve to a more stable state and, therefore, more stable microstructure during plant operation. Correlations of microstructures and mechanical properties during aging under representative LMFBR temperature and loading conditions are desirable from the standpoint of assuring safe, reliable, and economic plant operation. We reviewed the mechanical properties and microstructures of types 304 and 316 stainless steel wrought alloys after long-term aging in air for times up to 9 x 10 4 h (about 10-1/2 years). The principal effect of such aging is to reduce low temperature fracture toughness (as measured by Charpy impact test) and tensile ductility. Examples are cited, however, where, because stable microstructures are achieved, these as well as strength-related properties can be expected to remain adequate for anticipated service life conditions. 16 refs., 19 figs

  18. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-09-19

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K.

  19. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K

  20. Effect of carbon content on microstructure and mechanical properties of hot-rolled low carbon 12Cr-Ni stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, H.; Ye, X.N.; Li, J.D.; Jiang, L.Z.; Liu, Z.Y.; Wang, G.D.; Wang, B.S.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Hot-rolled ultra low carbon martensite is characterized by dislocation cells substructure. → The formation of dislocation cells is attributed to high Ms and low interstitial atoms content. → Hot-rolled ultra low carbon 12Cr-Ni stainless steel has excellent impact toughness. → Delta ferrite deteriorates the impact toughness of hot-rolled 12Cr-Ni stainless steel. - Abstract: 12Cr-Ni stainless steels containing different carbon contents from 0.004 wt.% to 0.034 wt.% were hot-rolled and air-cooled. Their corresponding microstructures were observed with optical microscope and transmission electron microscope, and the Vickers hardness, tensile and impact tests were also carried out. It was found that the martensitic morphology was significantly influenced by carbon content. The as-received ultra low carbon martensite in the steel containing 0.004 wt.% C is characterized by dislocation cells substructure. The formation of dislocation cells is attributed to high martensite finishing point (above 400 deg. C) and low interstitial atoms content. On the other hand, the martensite in the steel containing 0.034 wt.% C consists mainly of typical martensite laths because of low martensite finishing point and high interstitial atoms content which hinder dislocation motion. Furthermore, carbon content has an evident effect on the mechanical properties of 12Cr-Ni steels. The hardness and strength of the as-received steels increase with an increase in carbon content, but their elongation and impact toughness decrease with the carbon content. The steel containing 0.004 wt.% C has excellent impact toughness due to the ultra low carbon content in the martensite composed of dislocation cells.

  1. Microstructural aspects of thermal ageing of AISI type 316 LN stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, P.; Sundararaman, D.; Raghunathan, V.S.; Ranganathan, S.

    1995-01-01

    The various stages of precipitation of Cr 2 N in austenite and the associated microstructural features are presented. The role of nitrogen on the interface structure is discussed. The fine sub-structure of the cellular bands are described based on high resolution transmission electron microscope studies. (author). 2 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  2. Interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of diffusion-bonded titanium-stainless steel joints using a nickel interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, S.; Chatterjee, S.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion bonding was carried out between commercially pure titanium and 304 stainless steel using nickel interlayer in the temperature range of 800-950 deg. C for 3.6 ks under 3 MPa load in vacuum. The transition joints thus formed were characterized in optical and scanning electron microscopes. TiNi 3 , TiNi and Ti 2 Ni are formed at the nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) interface; whereas, stainless steel-nickel (SS-Ni) interface is free from intermetallic compounds up to 900 deg. C processing temperatures. At 950 deg. C, Ni-Ti interface exhibits the presence of β-Ti discrete islands in the matrix of Ti 2 Ni and the phase mixture of λ + χ + α-Fe, λ + α-Fe, λ + FeTi + β-Ti and FeTi + β-Ti occurs at the stainless steel-nickel interface. Nickel is able to inhibit the diffusion of Ti to stainless steel side up to 900 deg. C temperature; however, becomes unable to restrict the migration of Ti to stainless steel at 950 deg. C. Bond strength was also evaluated and maximum tensile strength of ∼302 MPa and shear strength of ∼219 MPa were obtained for the diffusion couple processed at 900 deg. C temperature due to better contact of the mating surfaces and failure takes place at the Ni-Ti interface. At higher joining temperature, the formation of Fe-Ti bases intermetallics reduces the bond strength and failure occurs at the SS-Ni interface

  3. Effect of Sintering Atmosphere and Solution Treatment on Density, Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Duplex Stainless Steels Developed from Pre-alloyed Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Arun Prasad; Mahendran, Sudhahar; Ramajayam, Mariappan; Ganesan, Dharmalingam; Chinnaraj, Raj Kumar

    2017-10-01

    In this research, Powder Metallurgy (P/M) of Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS) of different compositions were prepared through pre-alloyed powders and elemental powders with and without addition of copper. The powder mix was developed by pot mill for 12 h to obtain the homogeneous mixture of pre-alloyed powder with elemental compositions. Cylindrical green compacts with the dimensions of 30 mm diameter and 12 mm height were compacted through universal testing machine at a pressure level of 560 ± 10 MPa. These green compacts were sintered at 1350 °C for 2 h in hydrogen and argon atmospheres. Some of the sintered stainless steel preforms were solution treated at 1050 °C followed by water quenching. The sintered as well as solution treated samples were analysed by metallography examination, Scanning Electron Microscopy and evaluation of mechanical properties. Ferrite content of sintered and solution treated DSS were measured by Fischer Ferritoscope. It is inferred that the hydrogen sintered DSS depicted better density (94% theoretical density) and tensile strength (695 MPa) than the argon sintered steels. Similarly the microstructure of solution treated DSS revealed existence of more volume of ferrite grains than its sintered condition. Solution treated hydrogen sintered DSS A (50 wt% 316L + 50 wt% 430L) exhibited higher tensile strength of 716 MPa and elongation of 17%, which are 10-13% increment than the sintered stainless steels.

  4. Microstructure and properties of hot roll bonding layer of dissimilar metals. 2. Bonding interface microstructure of Zr/stainless steel by hot roll bonding and its controlling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuyama, Masanori; Ogawa, Kazuhiro; Taka, Takao; Nakasuji, Kazuyuki; Nakao, Yoshikuni; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi.

    1996-01-01

    The hot roll bonding of zirconium and stainless steel inserted with tantalium was investigated using the newly developed rolling mill. The effect of hot rolling temperatures of zirconium/stainless steel joints on bonding interface structure was evaluated. Intermetallic compound layer containing cracks was observed at the bonding interface between stainless steel and tantalium when the rolling temperature was above 1373K. The hardness of the bonding layer of zirconium and tantalium bonded above 1273K was higher than tantalium or zirconium base metal in spite of absence of intermetallic compound. The growth of reaction layer at the stainless steel and tantalium interface and at the tantalium and zirconium interface was conforming a parabolic low when that was isothermally heated after hot roll bonding, and the growth rate was almost same as that of static diffusion bonding without using hot roll bonding process. It is estimated that the strain caused by hot roll bonding gives no effect on the growth of reaction layer. It was confirmed that the dissimilar joint of zirconium and stainless steel with insert of tantalium having the sound bonding interface were obtained at the suitable bonding temperature of 1173K by the usage of the newly developed hot roll bonding process. (author)

  5. Thermal ageing of duplex stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massoud, J.P.; Van Duysen, J.C.; Zacharie, G.; Auger, P.; Danoix, F.

    1992-03-01

    The evolution of the mechanical properties of Mobearing anf Mo-free cast duplex stainless steels, induced by long term ageing in the range 300-400 deg C, has been studied in relation with the evolution of their microstructure. The unmixing of the ferritic Fe-Cr-Ni, solid solution by three-dimensional (sponge-like) spinodal decomposition and the precipitation of intermetallic G-phase particles are the main characteristics of this microstructural evolution

  6. Corrosion behavior of sensitized duplex stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, F J; Panyayong, W; Rogers, W; Velasquez-Plata, D; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1998-01-01

    The present work investigates the corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel in 0.9% NaCl solution after various heat-treatments, and compares it to that of 316L austenitic stainless steel. Both stainless steels were heat-treated at 500, 650, and 800 degrees C in air for 1 h, followed by furnace cooling. Each heat-treated sample was examined for their microstructures and Vickers micro-hardness, and subjected to the X-ray diffraction for the phase identification. Using potentiostatic polarization method, each heat-treated sample was corrosion-tested in 37 degrees C 0.9% NaCl solution to estimate its corrosion rate. It was found that simulated sensitization showed an adverse influence on both steels, indicating that corrosion rates increased by increasing the sensitization temperatures.

  7. Cladding of aluminum on AISI 304L stainless steel by cold roll bonding: Mechanism, microstructure, and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akramifard, H.R., E-mail: akrami.1367@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirzadeh, H., E-mail: hmirzadeh@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Metalforming and Thermomechanical Processing Laboratory, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parsa, M.H., E-mail: mhparsa@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence for High Performance Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Metalforming and Thermomechanical Processing Laboratory, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-08

    The AA1050 aluminum alloy and AISI 304L stainless steel sheets were stacked together to fabricate Al/304L/Al clad sheet composites by the cold roll bonding process, which was performed at temperatures of ∼100 and 23 °C to produce austenitic and austenitic–martensitic microstructures in the AISI 304L counterpart, respectively. The peel test results showed that the threshold reduction required to make a suitable bond at room temperature is below 10%, which is significantly lower than the required reduction for cold roll bonding of Al sheets. The tearing of the Al sheet during the peel test signified that the bond strength of the roll bonded sheets by only 38% reduction has reached the strength of Al, which is a key advantage of the developed sheets. The extrusion of Al through the surface cracks and settling inside the 304L surface valleys due to strong affinity between Al and Fe was found to be the bonding mechanism. Subsequently, the interface and tensile behaviors of three-layered clad sheets after soaking at 200–600 °C for 1 h were investigated to characterize the effect of annealing treatment on the formation and thickening of intermetallic compound layer and the resultant mechanical properties. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and optical microscopy techniques revealed that an intermediate layer composed mainly of Al{sub 13}Fe{sub 4}, FeC and Al{sub 8}SiC{sub 7} forms during annealing at 500–600 °C. A significant drop in tensile stress–strain curves after the maximum point (UTS) was correlated to the interface debonding. It was found that the formation of intermediate layer by post heat treatment deteriorates the bond quality and encourages the debonding process. Moreover, the existence of strain-induced martensite in clad sheets was found to play a key role in the enhancement of tensile strength.

  8. Effect of Different Chromium Additions on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Multipass Weld Joint of Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dong Hoon; Lee, Hae Woo

    2012-12-01

    The correlation between the mechanical properties and ferrite volume fraction (approximately 40, 50, and 60 Ferrite Number [FN]) in duplex stainless steel weld metals were investigated by changing the Cr content in filler wires with a flux-cored arc-welding (FCAW) process. The interpass temperature was thoroughly maintained under a maximum of 423 K (150 °C), and the heat input was also sustained at a level under 15 KJ/cm in order to minimize defects. The microstructure examination demonstrated that the δ-ferrite volume fraction in the deposited metals increased as the Cr/Ni equivalent ratio increased, and consequently, chromium nitride (Cr2N) precipitation was prone to occur in the ferrite domains due to low solubility of nitrogen in this phase. Thus, more dislocations are pinned by the precipitates, thereby lowering the mobility of the dislocations. Not only can this lead to the strength improvement, but also it can accentuate embrittlement of the weld metal at subzero temperature. Additionally, the solid-solution strengthening by an increase of Cr and Mo content in austenite phase depending on the reduction of austenite proportion also made an impact on the increase of the tensile and yield strength. On the other hand, the impact test (at 293 K, 223 K, and 173 K [20 °C, -50 °C, and -100 °C]) showed that the specimen containing about 40 to 50 FN had the best result. The absorbed energy of about 40 to 50 J sufficiently satisfied the requirements for industrial applications at 223 K (-50 °C), while the ductile-to-brittle transition behavior exhibited in weldment containing 60 FN. As the test temperature decreased under 223 K (-50 °C), a narrow and deep dimple was transformed into a wide and shallow dimple, and a significant portion of the fracture surface was occupied by a flat cleavage facet with river patterns.

  9. An Analysis of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties on Friction Stir Welded Joint of Dissimilar 304 Stainless Steel and Commercially Pure Aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balamagendiravarman M.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, friction stir welding of dissimilar 304 stainless steel and commercially pure aluminium was performed under the following condition of tool rotational speed 1000 rpm, traverse speed 60 mm/min and tool tilt angle 2 degree. Microstructural characterisation was carried out by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM. Optical images shows that the microstructural change is very minimum in steel side when compared to aluminium side due to the difference in mechanical and thermal properties. The intermetallic compound Al3Fe was observed at the interfacial region and stir region of the welded joint. The maximum ultimate tensile strength is 78% of commercially pure aluminium base metal. Microhardness profile was measured across the weld interface and the maximum value reaches at the stir zone due to the formation of intermettalics.

  10. Influence of titanium addition on the microstructure of the novel ferrous-based stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chia-Cheng; Lin, Li-Hsiang; Hung, Jing-Ming; Shih, Yung-Hsun; Wu, Ching-Zong; Ou, Keng-Liang; Chao, Chih-Yeh

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The microstructure of the as-quenched alloy is a mixture of γ, (α + B2 + DO 3 ), and TiC x phases. → The TiC x carbide had a face-center-cubic structure with a lattice parameter a = 0.432 nm.→ Formation of the TiC x carbide causing a γ → (α + γ) transition in the matrix of the alloy. → Addition of Ti promotes the formation of the α phase at high temperatures. - Abstract: The microstructural characteristics of the Fe-9Al-30Mn-1C-5Ti (wt.%) alloy were determined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The microstructure of the alloy was essentially a mixture of (γ + TiC x + (α + B2 + DO 3 )) phases during solution treatment between 950 deg. C and 1150 deg. C. The TiC x carbide had a face-center-cubic structure with a lattice parameter a of 0.432 nm. When the as-quenched alloy was subjected to aging treatment at temperatures of 450-850 deg. C, the following microstructural transformation occurred: (γ + TiC x + κ + (α + DO 3 )) → (γ + TiC x + κ + (α + B2 + DO 3 + TiC x )) → (γ + TiC x + κ + κ' + (α + B2 + DO 3 )) → (γ + TiC x + (α + B2 + DO 3 )). Addition of Ti promotes the formation of the α phase at high temperatures.

  11. The influence of cooling rate on the microstructure of stainless steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, J.W.

    1988-09-01

    The emergence of high energy density welding, laser surface modification and rapid solidification as commonly used metallurgical processing techniques has greatly increased the range of cooling rates that can be accessed during the solidification of metals and alloys. The microstructures which develop during these rapid cooling conditions may be significantly different from those which develop during low cooling rate conditions as the result of access to new metastable phases with the additional kinetic limitations that accompany rapid solidification. This investigation explores the influence of cooling rate on a series of seven ternary alloys which span the line of two-fold saturation in the Fe-Ni-Cr system. High speed electron beam surface melting was used to resolidify these alloys at scan speeds up to 5 m/s. The resulting cooling rates were estimated from dendrite arm spacing measurements and were confirmed by heat flow modeling to vary from 7 /times/ 10/sup 0/ /degree/C/s to 8 /times/ 10/sup 6/ /degree/C/s. The microstructures that developed from each solidification condition were examined using optical metallography, electron microprobe analysis, scanning electron microscopy and a vibrating sample magnetometer. These results were used to create diagrams to predict the primary mode of solidification, the ferrite content and the complex microstructural morphologies which develop as a function of interface velocity and composition. 158 refs., 90 figs., 45 tabs.

  12. Microstructural evolution in an austenitic stainless steel fusion reactor first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, R.E.; Odette, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    A detailed rate-theory-based model of microstructural evolution under fast neutron irradiation has been developed. The prominent new aspect of this model is a treatment of dislocation evolution in which Frank faulted loops nucleate, grow and unfault to provide a source for network dislocations while the dislocation network can be simultaneously annihilated by a climb/glide process. The predictions of this model compare very favorably with the observed dose and temperature dependence of these key microstructural features over a broad range. This new description of dislocation evolution has been coupled with a previously developed model of cavity evolution and good agreement has been obtained between the predictions of the composite model and fast reactor swelling data as well. The results from the composite model also reveal that the various components of the irradiation-induced microstructure evolve in a highly coupled manner. The predictions of the composite model are more sensitive to parametric variations than more simple models. Hence, its value as a tool in data analysis and extrapolation is enhanced

  13. Microstructure of Au-ion irradiated 316L and FeNiCr austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jublot-Leclerc, S., E-mail: stephanie.jublot-leclerc@csnsm.in2p3.fr [CSNSM, Univ Paris-Sud, CNRS, Université Paris Saclay, 91405 Orsay (France); Li, X. [CSNSM, Univ Paris-Sud, CNRS, Université Paris Saclay, 91405 Orsay (France); Legras, L.; Lescoat, M.-L. [EDF R& D, Groupe Métallurgie, Les Renardières, 77818 Moret sur Loing (France); Fortuna, F.; Gentils, A. [CSNSM, Univ Paris-Sud, CNRS, Université Paris Saclay, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2016-11-15

    Thin foils of 316L were irradiated in situ in a Transmission Electron Microscope with 4 MeV Au ions at 450 °C and 550 °C. Similar irradiations were performed at 450 °C in FeNiCr. The void and dislocation microstructure of 316L is found to depend strongly on temperature. At 450 °C, a dense network of dislocation lines is observed in situ to grow from black dot defects by absorption of other black dots and interstitial clusters whilst no Frank loops are detected. At 550 °C, no such network is observed but large Frank loops and perfect loops whose sudden appearance is concomitant with a strong increase in void density as a result of a strong coupling between voids and dislocations. Moreover, differences in both alloys microstructure show the major role played by the minor constituents of 316L, increasing the stacking fault formation energy, and possibly leading to significant differences in swelling behaviour. - Highlights: • 316L and FeNiCr were ion irradiated in situ in a TEM at elevated temperature. • The minor constituents of 316L play a major role in the resulting microstructure. • A dense network of dislocations develops in both alloys from black dot defects. • The nucleation and growth of voids and dislocations are strongly correlated. • The Frank loop mean size saturates at similar dpa values as in neutron irradiation.

  14. Microstructure and intergranular corrosion of the austenitic stainless steel 1.4970

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Maysa; Saiki, Mitiko; Costa, Isolda; Padilha, Angelo Fernando

    2006-01-01

    The precipitation behaviour of the DIN 1.4970 steel and its effect on the intergranular corrosion resistance were studied. Time-temperature-precipitation diagrams for the secondary phases (Ti, Mo)C (Cr, Fe, Mo, Ni) 23 C 6 and (Cr, Fe) 2 B are presented and representative samples have been selected for corrosion studies. The susceptibility to intergranular corrosion of the samples was evaluated using the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation technique. The results showed that the solution-annealed samples and those aged at 1173 K did not present susceptibility to intergranular corrosion, whereas aging treatment from 873 to 1073 K resulted in small susceptibility to intergranular attack that decreased with aging temperature. The preferential formation of (Ti, Mo)C at higher aging temperatures comparatively to M 23 C 6 , retained the chromium in solid solution preventing steel sensitization and, consequently, intergranular corrosion

  15. Impact of Defects in Powder Feedstock Materials on Microstructure of 304L and 316L Stainless Steel Produced by Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Benjamin M.; Lienert, Thomas J.; Knapp, Cameron M.; Sutton, Jacob O.; Brand, Michael J.; Pacheco, Robin M.; Livescu, Veronica; Carpenter, John S.; Gray, George T.

    2018-05-01

    Recent work in both 304L and 316L stainless steel produced by additive manufacturing (AM) has shown that in addition to the unique, characteristic microstructures formed during the process, a fine dispersion of sub-micron particles, with a chemistry different from either the powder feedstock or the expected final material, are evident in the final microstructure. Such fine-scale features can only be resolved using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or similar techniques. The present work uses electron microscopy to study both the initial powder feedstock and microstructures in final AM parts. Special attention is paid to the chemistry and origin of these nanoscale particles in several different metal alloys, and their impact on the final build. Comparisons to traditional, wrought material will be made.

  16. The Effect of Si and Mn on Microstructure and Selected Properties of Cr-Ni Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalandyk B.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cast stainless steel of the Cr-Ni duplex type is used, among others, for the cast parts of pumps and valves handling various chemically aggressive media. Therefore, the main problem discussed in this article is the problem of abrasion wear resistance in a mixture of SiC and water and resistance to electrochemical corrosion in a 3% NaCl-H2O solution of selected cast steel grades, i.e. typical duplex cast steel, high silicon and manganese duplex cast steel, and Cr-Ni austenitic cast steel (type AISI 316L. The study shows that the best abrasion wear resistance comparable to Ni-Hart cast iron was obtained in the cast duplex steel, where Ni was partially replaced with Mn and N. This cast steel was also characterized by the highest hardness and matrix microhardness among all the tested cast steel grades. The best resistance to electrochemical corrosion in 3% NaCl-H2O solution showed the cast duplex steel with high content of Cr, Mo and N. The addition of Ni plays rather insignificant role in the improvement of corrosion resistance of the materials tested.

  17. Corrosion-induced microstructural developments in 316 stainless steel during exposure to molten Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}(FLiBe) salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Guiqiu, E-mail: guiqiuzheng@gmail.com [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); He, Lingfeng [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Fall, ID (United States); Carpenter, David [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The microstructural developments in the near-surface regions of AISI 316 stainless steel during exposure to molten Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} (FLiBe) salt have been investigated with the goal of using this material for the construction of the fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR), a leading nuclear reactor concept for the next generation nuclear plants (NGNP). Tests were conducted in molten FLiBe salt (melting point: 459 °C) at 700 °C in graphite crucibles and 316 stainless steel crucibles for exposure duration of up to 3000 h. Corrosion-induced microstructural changes in the near-surface regions of the samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with EDS capabilities. Intergranular corrosion attack in the near-surface regions was observed with associated Cr depletion along the grain boundaries. High-angle grain boundaries (15–180°) were particularly prone to intergranular attack and Cr depletion. The depth of attack extended to the depths of 22 μm after 3000-h exposure for the samples tested in graphite crucible, while similar exposure in 316 stainless steel crucible led to the attack depths of only about 11 μm. Testing in graphite crucibles led to the formation of nanometer-scale Mo{sub 2}C, Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} and Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} particle phases in the near-surface regions of the material. The copious depletion of Cr in the near-surface regions induced a γ-martensite to α-ferrite phase (FeNi{sub x}) transformation. Based on the microstructural analysis, a thermal diffusion controlled corrosion model was developed and experimentally validated for predicting long-term corrosion attack depth.

  18. Microstructural evolution during aging at 800 °C and its effect on the magnetic behavior of UNS S32304 lean duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dille, J., E-mail: jdille@metalmat.ufrj.br [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, COPPE - Federal University of Rio de Janeiro Cidade Universitária, Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco F, CEP 21941-914 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Areiza, M.C.L. [Laboratory of Nondestructive Testing, Corrosion and Welding, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Rio of Janeiro, CEP 21941-596 (Brazil); Tavares, S.S.M. [Universidade Federal Fluminense – Departamento de Engenharia Mecânica, Rua Passo da Pátria, 156, CEP 24210-240 Niterói (Brazil); Pereira, G.R.; De Almeida, L.H.; Rebello, J.M.A. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, COPPE - Federal University of Rio de Janeiro Cidade Universitária, Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco F, CEP 21941-914 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    Duplex stainless steels are high strength and corrosion resistant alloys extensively used in chemical and petrochemical industries. However, exposition to temperatures in the range 300–1000 °C leads to precipitation of different phases having a detrimental effect on the mechanical properties and on the corrosion resistance of the alloy. In this work, the microstructural evolution during aging of a UNS S32304 lean duplex stainless steel was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and magnetic force microscopy. Formation of secondary austenite as well as Cr{sub 2}N and Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitation and, consequently, a decrease of ferrite volume fraction were observed. EDX analysis indicated that secondary austenite is depleted in chromium which is detrimental to the corrosion resistance of the alloy. A variation of magnetic properties and Eddy current measurement parameters during aging was simultaneously detected and can be explained by the decrease of ferrite volume content. Therefore, Eddy current non-destructive testing can be successfully applied to detect the formation of deleterious phases during aging. - Highlights: • Aging of UNS S32304 lean duplex stainless steel at 800 °C is investigated. • STEM reveals formation of Cr-depleted secondary austenite and precipitation of Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} and Cr{sub 2}N. • Microstructural transformation occurs only during the first 30 min of aging. • Microstructural evolution during aging is correlated to magnetic properties evolution. • Eddy current testing permits to survey the formation of deleterious secondary austenite.

  19. Effect of Dynamic Reheating Induced by Weaving on the Microstructure of GTAW Weld Metal of 25% Cr Super Duplex Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Joon Sung

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the additional growth and/or transformation of the austenite phase that occurs in weld metals of super duplex stainless steel upon reheating is known. However, the effects have not been fully investigated, especially with respect to reheating induced by weaving during single-pass welding. In this work, bead-on-pipe gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW was conducted on super duplex stainless steel to understand the effect of weaving on the microstructure of weld metal. Microstructural analysis, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD, and focused ion beam transmission electron microscopy (FIB-TEM were carried out to investigate the relationship between weaving and microstructural change. The weaving of GTAW produced a dynamic reheated area just before the weld bead during welding. It was revealed that extensive reheated weld existed even after one welding pass, and that the content of the austenite phase in the reheated area was higher than that in the non-reheated area, indicating the existence of a large quantity of intragranular austenite phase. In addition, the Cr2N content in the reheated area was lower than that in the non-reheated area. This reduction of Cr2N was closely related to the reheating resulting from weaving. TEM analysis revealed that Cr2N in the non-reheated area was dispersed following heating and transformed to secondary austenite.

  20. Stainless steels low temperature nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, T.; Darbeida, A.; Von Stebut, J.; Michel, H.; Lebrun, J.P.; Hertz, D.

    1995-01-01

    Nitrogen ions implantation of 316L stainless steel leads to monophasic diffusion layers, which are constituted of a solid solution (γ N ) fcc, metastable, nitrogen sur-saturated, and without order. This article shows that for 316L stainless steels,these layers improve the tribological properties without degradation of the corrosion resistance. (A.B.). 13 refs. 6 figs

  1. Microstructure and properties of 13Cr5Ni1Mo0.025Nb0.09V0.06N super martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, X.P.; Wang, L.J. [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Liu, C.M., E-mail: cmliu@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Subramanian, S.V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, L8S-4L7 (Canada)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of the microstructures of a commercial martenistic stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excess N content causes the occurrence of coarse carbo-nitride and Cr{sub 2}N. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Correlation of microstructures with mechanical and corrosion properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The poor pitting resistance is due to Cr rich precipitates. - Abstract: The morphological microstructure, the density and dispersion of high angle boundaries, morphology and micro chemical composition of precipitates and the volume fraction of retained austenite of a commercial super martensitic stainless steel (SMSS) normalized and tempered at various temperatures were characterized by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the light of equilibrium phase diagram of the alloy calculated using Thermo-Calc software. The mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance were determined to correlate with microstructures. Two kinds of morphology of precipitate were observed in tempered commercial super martensitic stainless. Besides the globular Nb and V rich carbo-nitride precipitates, rod-like Cr rich nitrides were formed due to excess N content. While high density of high angle boundaries and precipitates contribute to strength properties, the dislocation softening of the matrix and retained austenite from tempering restore the ductility and impact toughness properties. The poor resistance to pitting corrosion is attributed to the occurrence of Cr rich precipitates. It is demonstrated that by lowering the nitrogen content and adding niobium, the Cr rich precipitates can be suppressed and the mechanical properties and resistance to pitting corrosion can be significantly improved.

  2. Microstructure and properties of 13Cr5Ni1Mo0.025Nb0.09V0.06N super martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, X.P.; Wang, L.J.; Liu, C.M.; Subramanian, S.V.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Characterization of the microstructures of a commercial martenistic stainless steel. ► Excess N content causes the occurrence of coarse carbo-nitride and Cr 2 N. ► Correlation of microstructures with mechanical and corrosion properties. ► The poor pitting resistance is due to Cr rich precipitates. - Abstract: The morphological microstructure, the density and dispersion of high angle boundaries, morphology and micro chemical composition of precipitates and the volume fraction of retained austenite of a commercial super martensitic stainless steel (SMSS) normalized and tempered at various temperatures were characterized by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the light of equilibrium phase diagram of the alloy calculated using Thermo-Calc software. The mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance were determined to correlate with microstructures. Two kinds of morphology of precipitate were observed in tempered commercial super martensitic stainless. Besides the globular Nb and V rich carbo-nitride precipitates, rod-like Cr rich nitrides were formed due to excess N content. While high density of high angle boundaries and precipitates contribute to strength properties, the dislocation softening of the matrix and retained austenite from tempering restore the ductility and impact toughness properties. The poor resistance to pitting corrosion is attributed to the occurrence of Cr rich precipitates. It is demonstrated that by lowering the nitrogen content and adding niobium, the Cr rich precipitates can be suppressed and the mechanical properties and resistance to pitting corrosion can be significantly improved.

  3. Microstructural, Mechanical, and Electrochemical Analysis of Duplex and Superduplex Stainless Steels Welded with the Autogenous TIG Process Using Different Heat Input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucio Soares da Fonseca

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS and Superduplex Stainless Steels (SDSS have a strong appeal in the petrochemical industry. These steels have excellent properties, such as corrosion resistance and good toughness besides good weldability. Welding techniques take into account the loss of alloying elements during the process, so this loss is usually compensated by the addition of a filler metal rich in alloying elements. A possible problem would be during the welding of these materials in adverse conditions in service, where the operator could have difficulties in welding with the filler metal. Therefore, in this work, two DSS and one SDSS were welded, by autogenous Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG, i.e., without addition of a filler metal, by three different heat inputs. After welding, microstructural, mechanical, and electrochemical analysis was performed. The microstructures were characterized for each welding condition, with the aid of optical microscopy (OM. Vickers hardness, Charpy-V, and cyclic polarization tests were also performed. After the electrochemical tests, the samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The SDSS welded with high heat input kept the balance of the austenite and ferrite, and toughness above the limit value. The hardness values remain constant in the weld regions and SDSS is the most resistant to corrosion.

  4. Microstructure-strength relations in a hardenable stainless steel with 16 pct Cr, 1.5 pct Mo, and 5 pct Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobner, P. J.; Blšs, V.

    1984-07-01

    Metallographic studies have been conducted on a 0.024 pct C-16 pct Cr-1.5 pct Mo-5 pct Ni stainless steel to study the phase reactions associated with heat treatments and investigate the strengthening mechanisms of the steel. In the normalized condition, air cooled from 1010 °C, the microstructure consists of 20 pct ferrite and 80 pct martensite. Tempering in a temperature range between 500 and 600 °C results in a gradual transformation of martensite to a fine mixture of ferrite and austenite. At higher tempering temperatures, between 600 and 800 °C, progressively larger quantities of austenite form and are converted during cooling to proportionally increasing amounts of fresh martensite. The amount of retained austenite in the microstructure is reduced to zero at 800 °C, and the microstructure contains 65 pct re-formed martensite and 35 pct total ferrite. Chromium rich M23C6 carbides precipitate in the single tempered microstructures. The principal strengthening is produced by the presence of martensite in the microstructure. Additional strengthening is provided by a second tempering treatment at 400 °C due to the precipitation of ultrafine (Cr, Mo) (C,N) particles in the ferrite.

  5. Effects of Aging and W Addition on the Microstructure of Fe-Cr-Mn-N Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Yu Taek; Joo, Uk Hyon; Park, Yong Soo; Kim, Young Sik

    2000-01-01

    The effects of aging treatment on the precipitation behaviors of Fe-Cr-Mn-N stainless steels were studied using a transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy and XRD. In the austenitic stainless steel having a single phase. M23C6 carbides were first precipitated in the grain boundary by aging and then grew from grain boundary into grain with aging time. Carbides showed lamellar structures. It was shown from the analysis of spot patterns that carbides had a coherent relation with matrix and their lattice parameter was roughly three times that of austenite. During initial stages of M23C6 carbide precipitation, the iron content was quite high. With increasing aging time, the chromium content was increased. As the tungsten was added to improve the corrosion resistance of the Fe-Cr-Mn-N stainless steels, ferrite phase was formed. This ferrite phase was decomposed to chi(χ) phase and secondary austenite. Chi phase was mainly enriched with tungsten, chromium and tungsten were depleted in the secondary austenite due to the formation of chi phase. M23C6 carbides were also formed in the grain boundary. Nickel stabilized the austenite phase and decreased the ferrite volume fraction. But nickel content was not sufficient to suppress the formation of ferrite, and precipitation behaviors were not changed

  6. Effects of aging treatment and W addition on the microstructure of Fe-Cr-Mn stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeoun, Y. T.; Zoo, W. H.; Kim, Y. S.; Park, Y. S.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of aging treatment on the precipitaion behaviors of Fe-Cr-Mn-W stainless steels were studied using a transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy and XRD. In the austenitic stainless steel showing a single phase, M 23 C 6 carbides were first precipitated in the grain boundary by aging and then grew from grain boundary into grain with aging time. Carbides showed lamellar structures. It was shown from the analysis of spot patterns that carbides had a coherent relation with matrix and their lattice parameter was roughly three times that of austenite. During initial stages of M 23 C 6 carbide precipitaion, the iron content was quite high. With increasing aging time, the chromium content increased. As the tungsten was added to improve the corrosion resistance of the Fe-Cr-Mn stainless steels, ferrite phase was formed. These ferrite phase was decomposed to chi(χ) phase and secondary austenite. Chi phase was mainly enriched with tungsten, chromium and tungsten were depleted in the secondary austenite due to the formation of chi phase. M 23 C 6 carbides were also formed in the grain boundary. Nickel stabilized the austenite phase and decreased the ferrite volume fraction. But nickel content was not sufficient to suppress the formation of ferrite, and precipitaion behaviors were not changed

  7. Preparation, characterization and microstructural optimization of a thin {gamma}-alumina membrane on a porous stainless steel substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abedini, Sanam [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Hafez Street, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parvin, Nader, E-mail: naderparvin@yahoo.com [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Hafez Street, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashtari, Parviz [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-01-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mesoporous {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane was synthesized on conventional {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane was potential for CO{sub 2} separation at high pressure test conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus, it was required to provide the membrane layer with more strength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}-Alumina substrate was substituted with porous stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A stainless steel supported {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane with better properties was synthesized. - Abstract: In this work, a supported mesoporous (MEP) {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane was synthesized on conventional {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates by sol-gel dip coating process. In the following, the preparation of a novel metallic-ceramic composite membrane was studied, which incorporated desirable properties of both ceramic membrane and porous metallic substrate. For this purpose, mesoporous alumina membrane layer was developed on a porous 316L stainless steel substrate. The substrate was prepared by loose powder sintering and modified by soaking-rolling and fast drying method. The prepared membranes were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and N{sub 2}-adsorption/desorption measurements (BET analyses). The results revealed that a defect-free {gamma}-alumina membrane with 2.1 nm average pore size can be produced. Permeation tests with N{sub 2} gas revealed that the stainless steel substrate had 40 times more permeability than conventionally used alumina support. Additionally, single gas permeation of {gamma}-alumina membrane for CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} was compared. It was observed that CO{sub 2} could be separated from N{sub 2} by the MEP {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane in high pressure permeation condition, where stainless steel

  8. Effect of rare earth element yttrium addition on microstructures and properties of a 21Cr-11Ni austenitic heat-resistant stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Lei; Ma, Xiaocong; Wang, Longmei; Ye, Xiaoning

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Applications of Y in 21Cr-11Ni austenitic heat-resistant stainless steel. → Sensible characteristics of microstructure and properties have been observed. → Y has been found be effective in improving hot ductility of 21Cr-11Ni steel. → Inhibitory effect of Y on S segregation to the grain boundary has been observed. -- Abstract: In this comparative study, the microstructure and the mechanical properties of a 21Cr-11Ni austenitic heat-resistant stainless steel with and without addition of rare earth (RE) element yttrium have been investigated. The results show that a number of fine spherical yttrium-rich oxide particles are not uniformly distributed in the matrix of steel with yttrium; instead, they are aligned along the rolling direction. The grains surrounding the alignment are nearly one order of magnitude smaller than those farther away from the alignment. The approximate calculation results indirectly show that the grain refinement may be mainly attributed to the stimulation for nucleation of recrystallization rather than to pinning by particles. Furthermore, the alignment has resulted in significant loss in transverse impact toughness and tensile elongation at room temperature. There is a trough in the hot ductility-temperature curve, which is located between 973 and 1173 K. The ductility trough of steel with yttrium becomes shallow within a certain temperature range, especially around 1073 K, indicating that improvement on hot ductility is achieved by yttrium addition. The results may be attributed to the increase of grain boundary cohesion indicated by the effective improvement on intergranular failure tendency, and the inhibitory effect of yttrium on sulfur segregation to grain boundaries is believed to be an important cause.

  9. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1985-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast-duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Data from room-temperature Charpy-impact tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 450 0 C are presented and compared with results from other studies. Microstructures of cast-duplex stainless steels subjected to long-term aging either in the laboratory or in reactor service have been characterized. The results indicate that at least two processes contribute to the low-temperature embrittleent of duplex stainless steels, viz., weakening of the ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitation and embrittlement of ferrite matrix by the formation of additional phases such as G-phase, Type X, or the α' phase. Carbide precipitation has a significant effect on the onset of embrittlement of CF-8 and -8M grades of stainless steels aged at 400 or 450 0 C. The existing correlations do not accurately represent the embrittlement behavior over the temperature range 300 to 450 0 C. 18 refs., 13 figs

  10. Characterization of microstructure, chemical composition, corrosion resistance and toughness of a multipass weld joint of superduplex stainless steel UNS S32750

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, S.S.M.; Pardal, J.M.; Lima, L.D.; Bastos, I.N.; Nascimento, A.M.; Souza, J.A. de

    2007-01-01

    The superduplex stainless steels have an austeno-ferritic microstructure with an average fraction of each phase of approximately 50%. This duplex microstructure improves simultaneously the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Welding of these steels is often a critical operation. In this paper we focus on characterization and analysis of a multipass weld joint of UNS S32750 steel prepared using welding conditions equal to industrial standards. The toughness and corrosion resistance properties of the base metal, root pass welded with gas tungsten arc welding, as well as the filler passes, welded with shielded metal arc welding, were evaluated. The microstructure and chemical composition of the selected areas were also determined and correlated to the corrosion and mechanical properties. The root pass was welded with low nickel filler metal and, as a consequence, presented low austenite content and significant precipitation. This precipitation is reflected in the corrosion and mechanical properties. The filler passes presented an adequate ferrite:austenite proportion but, due to their high oxygen content, the toughness was lower than that of the root pass. Corrosion properties were evaluated by cyclic polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl and H 2 SO 4 media

  11. Influence of temperature histories during reactor startup periods on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasahara, Shigeki, E-mail: kasahara.shigeki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kitsunai, Yuji [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development, 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Chimi, Yasuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Chatani, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Masato [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development, 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Yutaka [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    This paper addresses influence of two different temperature profiles during startup periods in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor and a boiling water reactor upon microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons to about 1 dpa and 3 dpa. One of the temperature profiles was that the specimens experienced neutron irradiation in both reactors, under which the irradiation temperature transiently increased to 290 °C from room temperature with increasing reactor power during reactor startup periods. Another was that the specimens were pre-heated to about 150 °C prior to the irradiation to suppress the transient temperature increase. Tensile tests at 290 °C and Vickers hardness tests at room temperature were carried out, and their microstructures were observed by FEG-TEM. Difference of the temperature profiles was observed obviously in interstitial cluster formation, in particular, growth of Frank loops. Although influence of neutron irradiation involving transient temperature increase to 290 °C from room temperature on the yield strength and the Vickers hardness is buried in the trend curves of existing data, the influence was also found certainly in increment of in yield strength, existence of modest yield drop, and loss of strain hardening capacity and ductility. As a result, Frank loops, which were observed in austenitic stainless steel irradiated at doses of 1 dpa or more, seemed to have important implications regarding the interpretation of not irradiation hardening, but deformation of the austenitic stainless steel.

  12. Microstructures and mechanical properties of magnesium alloy and stainless steel weld-joint made by friction stir lap welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Yanni; Li, Jinglong; Xiong, Jiangtao; Huang, Fu; Zhang, Fusheng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → Friction stir lap welding technology with cutting pin was successfully employed to form lap joint of magnesium and steel. → The cutting pin made the lower steel participate in deformation and the interface was no longer flat. → A saw-toothed structure formed due to a mechanical mixing of the magnesium and steel was found at the interface. → A high-strength joint was produced which fractured in the magnesium side. -- Abstract: Friction stir lap welding was conducted on soft/hard metals. A welding tool was designed with a cutting pin of rotary burr made of tungsten carbide, which makes the stirring pin possible to penetrate and cut the surface layer of the hard metal. Magnesium alloy AZ31 and stainless steel SUS302 were chosen as soft/hard base metals. The structures of the joining interface were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The joining strength was evaluated by tensile shear test. The results showed that flower-like interfacial morphologies were presented with steel flashes and scraps, which formed bonding mechanisms of nail effect by long steel flashes, zipper effect by saw-tooth structure and metallurgical bonding. The shear strength of the lap joint falls around the shear strength of butt joint of friction stir welded magnesium alloy.

  13. Gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding of ultrafine grained AISI 304L stainless steel: Microstructural and mechanical behavior characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabooni, S., E-mail: s.sabooni@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimzadeh, F.; Enayati, M.H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ngan, A.H.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Jabbari, H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    In the present study, an ultrafine grained (UFG) AISI 304L stainless steel with the average grain size of 650 nm was successfully welded by both gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and friction stir welding (FSW). GTAW was applied without any filler metal. FSW was also performed at a constant rotational speed of 630 rpm and different welding speeds from 20 to 80 mm/min. Microstructural characterization was carried out by High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) with Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Nanoindentation, microhardness measurements and tensile tests were also performed to study the mechanical properties of the base metal and weldments. The results showed that the solidification mode in the GTAW welded sample is FA (ferrite–austenite) type with the microstructure consisting of an austenite matrix embedded with lath type and skeletal type ferrite. The nugget zone microstructure in the FSW welded samples consisted of equiaxed dynamically recrystallized austenite grains with some amount of elongated delta ferrite. Sigma phase precipitates were formed in the region ahead the rotating tool during the heating cycle of FSW, which were finally fragmented into nanometric particles and distributed in the weld nugget. Also there is a high possibility that the existing delta ferrite in the microstructure rapidly transforms into sigma phase particles during the short thermal cycle of FSW. These suggest that high strain and deformation during FSW can promote sigma phase formation. The final austenite grain size in the nugget zone was found to decrease with increasing Zener–Hollomon parameter, which was obtained quantitatively by measuring the peak temperature, calculating the strain rate during FSW and exact examination of hot deformation activation energy by considering the actual grain size before the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization. Mechanical properties observations showed that the welding

  14. Characterization of friction stir welded joint of low nickel austenitic stainless steel and modified ferritic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Mounarik; Das, Hrishikesh; Ahn, Eun Yeong; Hong, Sung Tae; Kim, Moon-Jo; Han, Heung Nam; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) of dissimilar stainless steels, low nickel austenitic stainless steel and 409M ferritic stainless steel, is experimentally investigated. Process responses during FSW and the microstructures of the resultant dissimilar joints are evaluated. Material flow in the stir zone is investigated in detail by elemental mapping. Elemental mapping of the dissimilar joints clearly indicates that the material flow pattern during FSW depends on the process parameter combination. Dynamic recrystallization and recovery are also observed in the dissimilar joints. Among the two different stainless steels selected in the present study, the ferritic stainless steels shows more severe dynamic recrystallization, resulting in a very fine microstructure, probably due to the higher stacking fault energy.

  15. Study on microstructural changes in thermally-aged stainless steel weld-overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T., E-mail: takeuchi.tomoaki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kameda, J. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T. [Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Microstructural changes in stainless steel electroslag weld-overlay cladding. > Thermal aging caused progress of spinodal decomposition and precipitation of G phases in the {delta}-ferrite phase. > The degree of the spinodal decomposition had a linear relationship to the hardness. - Abstract: The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes was investigated in stainless steel weld-overlay cladding composed of 90% austenite and 10% {delta}-ferrite phases using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to cooling process after post-welding heat treatments (PWHT), a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was already observed due to spinodal decomposition in the ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 deg. C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the ferrite phase. The chemical compositions of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} type carbides seemed to be formed at the austenite/ferrite interface were analyzed. The analyses of the magnitude of the spinodal decomposition and the hardness implied that the spinodal decomposition was the main cause of the hardening.

  16. Fission-fusion correlations for swelling and microstructure in stainless steels: effect of the helium-to-displacement-per-atom ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, G.R.; Maziaz, P.J.; Spitznagel, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The initial irradiated structural materials data base for fusion applications will be developed in fission reactors. Hence, this data may need to be adjusted using physically-based procedures to represent behavior in fusion environments, viz. - fission-fusion correlations. Such correlation should reflect a sound mechanistic understanding, and be verified in facilities which most closely simulate fusion conditions. In this paper we review the effects of only one of a number of potentially significant damage variables, the helium to displacement per atom ratio, on microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steels. Dual-ion and helium preinjection data are analyzed to provide mechanistic guidance; these results appear to be qualitatively consistent with a more detailed comparison made between fast (EBR-II) and mixed (HFIR) spectrum neutron data for a single heat of 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel. These two fission environments bound fusion (He/dpa ratios. A model calibrated to the fission reactor data is used to extrapolate to fusion conditions. Both the theory and broad empirical observation suggest that helium to dpa ratios have both a qualitative and quantitative influence on microstructural evolution; and that the very high and low ratios found in HFIR and EBR-II may not result in behavior which brackets intermediate fusion conditions

  17. Stainless steel decontamination manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Three, large-volume coverage manipulator systems were designed and built for the Defense Water Processing Facility at the Savannah River Laboratory. These stainless steel systems will be used for high-pressure spray decontamination of waste containers and large process equipment modules. Each system has a manipulator arm, folding boom, and vertical drive and guide structure. Handling capacity is 45 kg, horizontal reach is 4.6 m with a 180-deg swing motion, and the vertical travel is 6 m. The system is remotely removable and replaceable in modules using an overhead crane and an impact wrench. The manipulator arm has seven motions: Shoulder rotation and pivot, elbow pivot, wrist pivot and rotation, and grip open-close. All motions are variable speed and are slip-clutch protected to prevent overloading from external forces (collisions)

  18. Mechanical and Microstructural Properties of Friction Welded AISI 304 Stainless Steel to AISI 1060 Steel AISI 1060

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ates H.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Rotary Friction welding is one of the most popular methods of joining similar and dissimilar materials. It is widely used with metals and thermoplastics in a wide variety of aviation, transport and aerospace industrial component designs. This study investigates the influence of friction and upsetting pressures on the hardness, tensile properties and microstructure of the welds. The experimental results showed that as the friction and upsetting pressures increased, the hardness and tensile strength values increased, as well. The tensile fracture of welded joint occurred in the AISI 1060 side. The friction processed joints were evaluated for their integrity and quality aspects by optical and scanning electron microscopy. For the perfect interfacial bonding, sufficient upsetting and friction pressures are necessary to reach the optimal temperature and severe plastic deformation to bring these materials within the attraction range.

  19. Assessment of microstructure stability of cold worked Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel during aging using ultrasonic velocity measurements and correlation with mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudevan, M.; Palanichamy, P.

    2003-01-01

    As ultrasonic velocity is sensitive to the changes in texture, it is a more reliable technique than mechanical property measurements for assessment of microstructural stability (recrystallization behaviour) of cold worked alloy where recrystallization is coupled with precipitation. Hence ultrasonic velocity measurements have been employed for studying the influence of Ti/C ratio on the microstructural stability of cold worked Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel during isochronal aging. In this alloy precipitation of TiC is known to retard recovery and recrystallization. The variation in ultrasonic velocity with aging temperature exhibited a three stage behaviour at all three frequencies employed (2, 10 and 20 MHz) and correlated well with the microstructural changes. Based on the microstructural investigations, the three stages have been identified to be recovery, progress of recrystallization and completion of recrystallization. There was one to one correspondence between the variation in the hardness, strength values and the variation in the ultrasonic velocity values as a function of aging temperature in assessing the microstructural changes, except when the interaction between the TiC precipitation and recrystallization is stronger

  20. Effects of alloys elements, impurities and microstructural factors in austenitic stainless steel to utilize in fuel rod of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, A.

    1988-08-01

    Austenitic Stainless Steel is used as cladding material of pressurized water reactor fuel rods because of its good performance. The addition of alloy elements and the control of impurities make this to happen. Fission products do not contribute to corrosion. Dimensional changes are not critical up to 1,0 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E>0,1 MeV) of neutronic doses. The hydrogen does not cause embrittlement in the reactor operation temperatures, and helium contributes to embrittlement if the material is warmed upon 650 0 C. (author) [pt

  1. Evolution of the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the 15-5PH martensitic stainless steel after ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herny, E.; Lafont, M.C.; Andrieu, E.; Lours, P.; Herny, E.; Lagain, P.; Cloue, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The structural hardening martensitic stainless steel 15-5PH is used in aerospace and nuclear industries for the manufacture of pieces which are thermo-mechanically highly stressed. For this reason, the steel has to have good mechanical properties in a large range of running temperatures as well as a good corrosion resistance. During long time periods between 300 and 400 C, the 15-5PH is susceptible to embrittlement due to the decomposition of the martensite into a Cr-rich area and a Fe-rich area. This embrittlement induces a drop of the impact strength and of the ductility with a strong increase of the ductile-brittle transition and of the tensile properties. Transition electron microscopy observations have revealed the appearance of a thin chromium carbides precipitation after ageing. The spinodal decomposition of the martensite has been revealed by the tomographic atomic probe. (O.M.)

  2. Influence of severe plastic deformation obtained by warm rolling on microstructure and mechanical properties of the ferritic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Luana Alves; Campos, Wagner Reis Costa; Vilela, Jefferson José, E-mail: luana_alves_barbosa@hotmail.com, E-mail: wrrc@cdtn.br, E-mail: jjv@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Miqueletti, Estevesson Ferreira; Mazzer, Eric Marchezini; Santos, Dagoberto B., E-mail: estevess@demet.ufmg.br, E-mail: marchezini@demet.ufmg.br, E-mail: dsantos@demet.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Generation IV reactors require research on new materials. For example, materials that will be used in the reactor vessel must be resistant to creep and have high toughness. Grain refining is a technique used to improve toughness. This grain refinement can be achieved by severe plastic deformation. In this work, the stainless steel 409 was used to simulate the EUROFER one type of ODS steel. The rolling process was applied to make the severe plastic deformation. The rolling was performed at 600°C which corresponds to the warm working condition in the absence of dynamic recrystallization. The rolling schedule studied allowed a logarithmic strain accumulation of 3.16. The rolled sheet had a yield stress of 822 MPa and a hardness of 302 HV. The grains became quite elongated characteristic of a severe plastic deformation. The recrystallization temperature of the rolled sheet was approximately 500°C. It was obtained by heat treatment and hardness measurement. (author)

  3. Influence of severe plastic deformation obtained by warm rolling on microstructure and mechanical properties of the ferritic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Luana Alves; Campos, Wagner Reis Costa; Vilela, Jefferson José; Miqueletti, Estevesson Ferreira; Mazzer, Eric Marchezini; Santos, Dagoberto B.

    2017-01-01

    Generation IV reactors require research on new materials. For example, materials that will be used in the reactor vessel must be resistant to creep and have high toughness. Grain refining is a technique used to improve toughness. This grain refinement can be achieved by severe plastic deformation. In this work, the stainless steel 409 was used to simulate the EUROFER one type of ODS steel. The rolling process was applied to make the severe plastic deformation. The rolling was performed at 600°C which corresponds to the warm working condition in the absence of dynamic recrystallization. The rolling schedule studied allowed a logarithmic strain accumulation of 3.16. The rolled sheet had a yield stress of 822 MPa and a hardness of 302 HV. The grains became quite elongated characteristic of a severe plastic deformation. The recrystallization temperature of the rolled sheet was approximately 500°C. It was obtained by heat treatment and hardness measurement. (author)

  4. Phase Transformation in Cast Superaustenitic Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Phillips, Nathaniel Steven [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Superaustenitic stainless steels constitute a group of Fe-based alloys that are compositionally balanced to have a purely austenitic matrix and exhibit favorable pitting and crevice corrosion resistant properties and mechanical strength. However, intermetallic precipitates such as sigma and Laves can form during casting or exposure to high-temperature processing, which degrade the corrosion and mechanical properties of the material. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the solid-solid phase transformations seen in cast superaustenitic stainless steels. Heat treatments were performed to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formations in alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, WDS). The equilibrium microstructures, composed primarily of sigma and Laves within purely austenitic matrices, showed slow transformation kinetics. Factors that determine the extent of transformation, including diffusion, nucleation, and growth, are discussed.

  5. Austenitic stainless steel weld inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mech, S.J.; Emmons, J.S.; Michaels, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical techniques applied to ultrasonic waveforms obtained from inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds are described. Experimental results obtained from a variety of geometric and defect reflectors are presented. Specifically, frequency analyses parameters, such as simple moments of the power spectrum, cross-correlation techniques, and adaptive learning network analysis, all represent improvements over conventional time domain analysis of ultrasonic waveforms. Results for each of these methods are presented, and the overall inspection difficulties of austenitic stainless steel welds are discussed

  6. Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) imaging of deuterium assisted cracking in a 2205 duplex stainless steel micro-structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobol, Oded; Holzlechner, Gerald; Nolze, Gert; Wirth, Thomas [BAM – Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany); Eliezer, Dan [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel); Boellinghaus, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.boellinghaus@bam.de [BAM – Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany); Unger, Wolfgang E.S. [BAM – Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-10-31

    In the present work, the influence of deuterium on the microstructure of a duplex stainless steel type EN 1.4462 has been characterized by Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) supported by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam (FIB), electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) investigations. Characterization has been carried out before and after electrochemical charging with deuterium which has been used as a tracer, due to its similar behavior to hydrogen in the steel microstructure. In a first approach, the distribution of the deuterium occurring at temperatures above −58 °C has been visualized. Further it turned out that sub-surface micro blisters are formed in the ferrite-austenite interface, followed by the formation of needle shaped plates and subsequent cracking at the ferrite surface. In the austenite phase, parallel cracking alongside twins and hexagonal close packed (martensitic) regions has been observed. In both phases and even in the apparent interface, cracking has been associated with high deuterium concentrations, as compared to the surrounding undamaged microstructure. Sub-surface blistering in the ferrite has to be attributed to the accumulation and recombination of deuterium at the ferrite-austenite interface underneath the respective ferrite grains and after fast diffusing through this phase. Generally, the present application of chemometric imaging and structural analyses allows characterization of hydrogen assisted degradation at a sub-micron lateral resolution.

  7. Gaseous surface hardening of martensitic stainless steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibollo, Chiara; Villa, Matteo; Christiansen, Thomas L.

    The present work addresses heat and surface treatments of martensitic stainless steel EN 1.4028. Different combinations of heat treatments and surface treatments were performed: conventional austenitisation, cryogenic treatment and in particular high temperature solution nitriding (HTSN) and low...... that cubic lath martensite in conventionally austenitised EN 1.4028 dissolves nitrogen and develops expanded martensite (ferrite) during LTSH. HTSN leads to a microstructure of tetragonal plate martensite and retained austenite. The content of retained austenite can be reduced by a cryo...

  8. Development of commercial nitrogen-rich stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljas, M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of nitrogen alloyed stainless steels. Nitrogen alloying of austenitic stainless steels started at an early stage and was to a large extent caused by nickel shortage. However, direct technical advantages such as increased strength of the nitrogen alloyed steels made them attractive alternatives to the current steels. It was not until the advent of the AOD (argon oxygen decarburisation) process in the late 1960s that nitrogen alloying could be controlled to such accuracy that it became successful commercially on a broader scale. The paper describes production aspects and how nitrogen addition influences microstructure and the resulting properties of austenitic and duplex stainless steels. For austenitic steels there are several reasons for nitrogen alloying. Apart from increasing strength nitrogen also improves structural stability, work hardening and corrosion resistance. For duplex steels nitrogen also has a decisive effect in controlling the microstructure during thermal cycles such as welding. (orig.)

  9. Effects of Mo Content on Microstructure and Mechanical Property of PH13-8Mo Martensitic Precipitation-Hardened Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yubing, Pei; Tianjian, Wang; Zhenhuan, Gao; Hua, Fan; Gongxian, Yang

    This paper introduces the effects of Mo content on microstructure and mechanical property of PH13-8Mo martensitic precipitation-hardened stainless steel which is used for LP last stage blade in steam turbine. Thermodynamic software Thermo-Calc has been used to calculate precipitation temperature and the mass fraction of precipitated phases in PH13-8Mo steel with different Mo content. The result shows that when the mass of Mo is below 0.6wt.%, chi-phase mu-phase and sigma-phase could disappear. The microstructure and mechanical property of high Mo PH13-8Mo (Mo=0.57wt.%) and low Mo PH13-8Mo (Mo=2.15wt.%)have been investigated in different heat treatments. The investigations reveal that austenitizing temperature decrease with the reduce of Mo content, so the optimum solution temperature for low Mo PH13-8Mo is lower than that for high Mo PH13-8Mo.The influence of solution temperature on grain size is weakened with the increase of Mo content, Mo rich carbides could retard coarsening of grain. An enormous amount of nano-size uniformly distributed β-NiAl particles are found in both kinds of steels using transmission electron microscopy, they are the most important strengthening phase in PH13-8Mo.

  10. Microstructure and tribology of ion-mixed Fe/Ti/C multilayers on AISI 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nastasi, M.; Hirvonen, J.P.; Zocco, T.G.; Jervis, T.R.

    1991-01-01

    A multilayered Fe/Ti/C structure consisting of eleven alternating sublayers, four Fe, four Ti and three C, was ion mixed on an AISI 304 stainless steel substrate with 400 keV Xe 2+ . Complete mixing was observed after an irradiation of 1x10 17 Xe/cm 2 at 550degC. Electron diffraction revealed the formation of the compounds TiC and Fe 3 C and a small amount of an amorphous phase. Some samples were given a second irradiation with 5x10 15 Xe/cm 2 at 0degC. The phases present following the second irradiation were TiC, α-Fe and an amorphous phase. Tribological and nanoindentation measurements revealed that both types of samples possessed similar hardness and friction properties. The ion mixed samples possessed an increased hardness and a decreased friction coefficient relative to untreated polished stainless-steel substrate. However, the wear life of the hot ion mixed sample was consistently longer than the wear life of the sample processed at both 550 and 0degC. These results are explained by differences in adhesive wear which result from differences in the chemical reactivity of the phases formed during ion beam processing. (orig.)

  11. Effect of Long-Term Thermal Exposures on Microstructure and Impression Creep in 304HCu Grade Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Manmath Kumar; Karthikeyan, T.; Mythili, R.; Vijayanand, V. D.; Saroja, S.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the results of microstructural evolution and mechanical properties in 304H Cu grade austenite stainless (SS 304HCu) during long-term exposure at high temperatures. The predicted phase composition as a function of temperature obtained using JMatPro® software was confirmed in conjunction with the microstructural evolution characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Microstructures revealed primary Nb(C,N), M23C6 precipitates at γ-grain boundaries, fine secondary Nb(C,N) intragranular carbides, and a uniform precipitation of <40-nm-sized spherical Cu-rich phase after thermal aging for 10,000 hours at 903 K (630 °C). The impression creep rate at 300 MPa increased by a factor of 20 between 873 K and 923 K (600 °C and 650 °C). The creep rate at 903 K (630 °C) was found to moderately reduce with aging time, signifying the role of Cu-rich phase in improving the creep resistance. The deformation zones and the recrystallization behavior of the plastic zone in creep tested specimen was assessed using Electron backscatter diffraction technique.

  12. Effects of Induction Heat Bending Process on Microstructure and Corrosion Properties of ASME SA312 Gr.TP304 Stainless Steel Pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nam In; Kim, Young Sik; Kim, Kyung Soo; Chang, Hyun Young; Park, Heung Bae; Sung, Gi Ho; Sung, Gi Ho

    2015-01-01

    The usage of bending products recently have increased since many industries such as automobile, aerospace, shipbuilding, and chemical plants need the application of pipings. Bending process is one of the inevitable steps to fabricate the facilities. Induction heat bending is composed of compressive bending process by local heating and cooling. This work focused on the effect of induction heat bending process on the properties of ASME SA312 Gr. TP304 stainless steel pipes. Tests were performed for base metal and bended area including extrados, intrados, crown up, and down parts. Microstructure was analyzed using an optical microscope and SEM. In order to determine intergranular corrosion resistance, Double Loop Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (DL-EPR) test and ASTM A262 practice A and C tests were done. Every specimen revealed non-metallic inclusion free under the criteria of 1.5i of the standard and the induction heat bending process did not affect the non-metallic inclusion in the alloys. Also, all the bended specimens had finer grain size than ASTM grain size number 5 corresponding to the grain sizes of the base metal and thus the grain size of the pipe bended by induction heat bending process is acceptable. Hardness of transition start, bend, and transition end areas of ASME SA312 TP304 stainless steel was a little higher than that of base metal. Intergranular corrosion behavior was determined by ASTM A262 practice A and C and DL-EPR test, and respectively step structure, corrosion rate under 0.3 mm/y, and Degree of Sensitization (DOS) of 0.001 - 0.075 % were obtained. That is, the induction heat bending process didn't affect the intergranular corrosion behavior of ASME SA312 TP304 stainless steel

  13. Nano/ultrafine grained austenitic stainless steel through the formation and reversion of deformation-induced martensite: Mechanisms, microstructures, mechanical properties, and TRIP effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirdel, M., E-mail: mshirdel1989@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirzadeh, H., E-mail: hmirzadeh@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Metalforming and Thermomechanical Processing Laboratory, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parsa, M.H., E-mail: mhparsa@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence for High Performance Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Metalforming and Thermomechanical Processing Laboratory, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    A comprehensive study was carried out on the strain-induced martensitic transformation, its reversion to austenite, the resultant grain refinement, and the enhancement of strength and strain-hardening ability through the transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect in a commercial austenitic 304L stainless steel with emphasis on the mechanisms and the microstructural evolution. A straightforward magnetic measurement device, which is based on the measurement of the saturation magnetization, for evaluating the amount of strain-induced martensite after cold rolling and reversion annealing in metastable austenitic stainless steels was used, which its results were in good consistency with those of the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. A new parameter called the effective reduction in thickness was introduced, which corresponds to the reasonable upper bound on the obtainable martensite fraction based on the saturation in the martensitic transformation. By means of thermodynamics calculations, the reversion mechanisms were estimated and subsequently validated by experimental results. The signs of thermal martensitic transformation at cooling stage after reversion at 850 °C were found, which was attributed to the rise in the martensite start temperature due to the carbide precipitation. After the reversion treatment, the average grain sizes were around 500 nm and the nanometric grains of the size of ~ 65 nm were also detected. The intense grain refinement led to the enhanced mechanical properties and observation of the change in the work-hardening capacity and TRIP effect behavior. A practical map as a guidance for grain refining and characterizing the stability against grain growth was proposed, which shows the limitation of the reversion mechanism for refinement of grain size. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nano/ultrafine grained austenitic stainless steel through martensite treatment • A parameter descriptive of a reasonable upper bound on

  14. Nano/ultrafine grained austenitic stainless steel through the formation and reversion of deformation-induced martensite: Mechanisms, microstructures, mechanical properties, and TRIP effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirdel, M.; Mirzadeh, H.; Parsa, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive study was carried out on the strain-induced martensitic transformation, its reversion to austenite, the resultant grain refinement, and the enhancement of strength and strain-hardening ability through the transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect in a commercial austenitic 304L stainless steel with emphasis on the mechanisms and the microstructural evolution. A straightforward magnetic measurement device, which is based on the measurement of the saturation magnetization, for evaluating the amount of strain-induced martensite after cold rolling and reversion annealing in metastable austenitic stainless steels was used, which its results were in good consistency with those of the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. A new parameter called the effective reduction in thickness was introduced, which corresponds to the reasonable upper bound on the obtainable martensite fraction based on the saturation in the martensitic transformation. By means of thermodynamics calculations, the reversion mechanisms were estimated and subsequently validated by experimental results. The signs of thermal martensitic transformation at cooling stage after reversion at 850 °C were found, which was attributed to the rise in the martensite start temperature due to the carbide precipitation. After the reversion treatment, the average grain sizes were around 500 nm and the nanometric grains of the size of ~ 65 nm were also detected. The intense grain refinement led to the enhanced mechanical properties and observation of the change in the work-hardening capacity and TRIP effect behavior. A practical map as a guidance for grain refining and characterizing the stability against grain growth was proposed, which shows the limitation of the reversion mechanism for refinement of grain size. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nano/ultrafine grained austenitic stainless steel through martensite treatment • A parameter descriptive of a reasonable upper bound on

  15. Influence of Solution Treatment Temperature on Microstructural Properties of an Industrially Forged UNS S32750/1.4410/F53 Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Dănuț Cojocaru

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this present study, the influence of solution annealing temperature on microstructural properties of a forged Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS was investigated by SEM-BSE (Scanning Electron Microscopy-Backscattered Electrons and SEM-EBSD (Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Backscatter Diffraction techniques. A brief solution treatment was applied to the forged super duplex alloy, at different temperatures between 800 °C and 1100 °C, with a constant holding time of 0.6 ks (10 min. Microstructural characteristics such as nature, weight fraction, distribution and morphology of constituent phases, average grain-size and grain misorientation were analysed in relation to the solution annealing temperature. Experimental results have shown that the constituent phases in the SDSS alloy are δ-Fe, γ-Fe and σ (Cr-Fe and that their properties are influenced by the solution treatment temperature. SEM examinations revealed microstructural modifications induced by the Cr rich precipitates along the δ/γ and δ/δ grain boundaries, which may significantly affect the toughness and the corrosion resistance of the alloy. Solution annealing at 1100 °C led to complete dissolution of σ (Cr-Fe phase, the microstructure being formed of primary δ-Fe and γ-Fe. The orientation relationship between δ/δ, γ/γ and δ/γ grains was determined by electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD. Both primary constituent phase’s microhardness and global microhardness were determined.

  16. Microstructure and mechanical properties of 2024-T3 and 7075-T6 aluminum alloys and austenitic stainless steel 304 after being exposed to hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofyan, Nofrijon Bin Imam

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide used as a decontaminant agent on selected aircraft metallic materials has been investigated. The work is divided into three sections; bacterial attachment behavior onto an austenitic stainless steel 304 surface; effect of decontamination process on the microstructure and mechanical properties of aircraft metallic structural materials of two aluminum alloys, i.e. 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, and an austenitic stainless steel 304 as used in galley and lavatory surfaces; and copper dissolution rate into hydrogen peroxide. With respect to bacterial attachment, the results show that surface roughness plays a role in the attachment of bacteria onto metallic surfaces at certain extent. However, when the contact angle of the liquid on a surface increased to a certain degree, detachment of bacteria on that surface became more difficult. In its relation to the decontamination process, the results show that a corrosion site, especially on the austenitic stainless steel 304 weld and its surrounding HAZ area, needs more attention because it could become a source or a harborage of bio-contaminant agent after either incidental or intentional bio-contaminant delivery. On the effect of the decontamination process on the microstructure and mechanical properties of aircraft metallic structural materials, the results show that microstructural effects are both relatively small in magnitude and confined to a region immediately adjacent to the exposed surface. No systematic effect is found on the tensile properties of the three alloys under the conditions examined. The results of this investigation are promising with respect to the application of vapor phase hydrogen peroxide as a decontaminant agent to civilian aircraft, in that even under the most severe circumstances that could occur; only very limited damage was observed. The results from the dissolution of copper by concentrated liquid hydrogen peroxide showed that the rate of copper dissolution increased for

  17. Microstructural characterisation and change in a.c. magnetic susceptibility of duplex stainless steel during spinodal decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, K.H., E-mail: KHLO@umac.m [Department of Electromechanical Engineering, University of Macau, Macau (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Lai, J.K.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2010-06-15

    The microstructural changes during long-term (up to 10,000 h) spinodal decomposition in a duplex stain less steel, 7MoPLUS, have been characterised using TEM, a.c. magnetic susceptibility, X-ray diffractometry, microhardness measurement and optical microscopy. The microstructural changes and deformation microstructures of ferrite and austenite upon spinodal decomposition are characterised. The use of a.c. magnetic susceptibility to study the progress of spinodal decomposition is discussed. Above 450 {sup o}C, recent research by K.L. Weng et al. Mater. Sci. Eng. A 379 (2004) 119 has established that spinodal decomposition leads to crisscrossing of dislocations and the development of mottled contrast in the ferrite phase. The present work has shown that at 350 {sup o}C (the low-end of the spinodal range), crisscrossing of dislocations still occurs, but mottled contrast is absent. The G phase tends to be in contact with dislocations and its precipitation lags behind the occurrence of spinodal decomposition. No noticeable microstructural changes could be observed in the austenite phase in the spinodal temperature regime.

  18. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  19. Long term properties and microstructural evolution of 18Cr-10Ni-3Cu-Ti-Nb austenitic stainless steel for boiler tube application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, Y.; Fukui, T.; Ono, T. [TenarisNKK Tubes, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Caminada, S. [TenarisDalmine, Dalmine, BG (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    The allowable tensile stress of 0.1C-18Cr-10Ni-3Cu-Ti-Nb steel (TEMPALOY AA-1; ASME C.C. 2512) is more than 30% higher compared with that of ASME SA-213 Grade TP347H in the temperature range 600-700 C. This high creep rupture strength is obtained by the precipitation of MC and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides, and Cu-rich phase. Long term creep rupture tests over 10{sup 5}h enabled to verify the superior creep rupture strength of this steel. The investigation of microstructural evolution on the creep ruptured and aged specimens has shown the high structural stability of this material. Hardness and impact properties after high temperature aging reveal similar performance as conventional 18-8 stainless steels. Excellent steam oxidation resistance can be achieved by a shot-blasting method. The scale thickness of shot-blasted tube after 1000h at 750 C is below a few micron meters. These results have revealed that the mechanical properties and environmental resistance of this steel enable the use of TEMPALOY AA-1 in the latest generation of advanced USC boiler. (orig.)

  20. The effect of heat treatment on recrystallized microstructure, precipitation and ductility of hot-rolled Fe–Cr–Al–REM ferritic stainless steel sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, H.P.; Lang, Y.P.; Yao, C.F.; Chen, H.T.; Yang, C.Q.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents research works about the effects of heat treatment on recrystallized equiaxed grain size, precipitation, room temperature (RT) toughness and ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of Fe–Cr–Al–REM ferritic stainless steel (FSS) hot-rolled sheet. Results showed that the recrystallization of hot-rolled Fe–Cr–Al–REM FSS sheet could be completed after annealing treatment at 750 °C for 15 min with the equiaxed grain diameter of approximately 50 μm. Inappropriate annealing treatment would inevitably leads to the unexpected grain coarsening. On the other hand, a great deal of needle-like or spot-like fine aluminum–lanthanum compound Al 11 La 3 precipitates were observed in the ferrite matrix after 1 h aging treatment at 750 °C. The microstructure observation results associated with the impact test definitely illustrated that the Al 11 La 3 precipitates was the reason for the brittle crack in the as-casted ingot and as-forged slab. The real DBTT of the annealed Fe–Cr–Al–REM FSS sheet with average grain size of about 50 μm was −4 °C. Meanwhile, the DBTT of the hot-rolled Fe–Cr–Al–REM stainless steel sheet was evidently increased as the recrystallized grain size increased.

  1. Effects of Loading Frequency on Fatigue Behavior, Residual Stress, and Microstructure of Deep-Rolled Stainless Steel AISI 304 at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, I.; Juijerm, P.

    2018-02-01

    The effects of loading frequency on the fatigue behavior of non-deep-rolled (NDR) and deep-rolled (DR) austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 were systematically clarified at elevated temperatures, especially at temperatures exhibiting the dynamic strain aging (DSA) phenomena. Tension-compression fatigue tests were performed isothermally at temperatures of 573 K and 773 K (300 °C and 500 °C) with different loading frequencies of 5, 0.5, 0.05, and 0.005 Hz. For the DR condition, the residual stresses and work-hardening states will be presented. It was found that DSA would be detected at appropriate temperatures and deformation rates. The cyclic deformation curves and the fatigue lives of the investigated austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 are considerably affected by the DSA, especially on the DR condition having high dislocation densities at the surface and in near-surface regions. In the temperature range of the DSA, residual stresses and work-hardening states of the DR condition seem to be stabilized. The microstructural alterations were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). At an appropriate temperature with low loading frequency, the plastic deformation mechanism shifted from a wavy slip manner to a planar slip manner in the DSA regimes, whereas the dislocation movements were obstructed.

  2. The Interfacial Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Diffusion-Bonded Joints of 316L Stainless Steel and the 4J29 Kovar Alloy Using Nickel as an Interlayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingfeng Song

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available 316L stainless steel (Fe–18Cr–11Ni and a Kovar (Fe–29Ni–17Co or 4J29 alloy were diffusion-bonded via vacuum hot-pressing in a temperature range of 850–950 °C with an interval of 50 °C for 120 min and at 900 °C for 180 and 240 min, under a pressure of 34.66 MPa. Interfacial microstructures of diffusion-bonded joints were characterized by optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. The inter-diffusion of the elements across the diffusion interface was revealed via electron probe microanalysis (EPMA. The mechanical properties of the joints were investigated via micro Vickers hardness and tensile strength. The results show that an Ni interlayer can serve as an effective diffusion barrier for the bonding of 316L stainless steel and the 4J29 Kovar alloy. The composition of the joints was 316L/Ni s.s (Fe–Cr–Ni/remnant Ni/Ni s.s (Fe–Co–Ni/4J29. The highest tensile strength of 504.91 MPa with an elongation of 38.75% was obtained at 900 °C for 240 min. After the width of nickel solid solution (Fe–Co–Ni sufficiently increased, failure located at the 4J29 side and the fracture surface indicated a ductile nature.

  3. The effect of heat treatment on recrystallized microstructure, precipitation and ductility of hot-rolled Fe-Cr-Al-REM ferritic stainless steel sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, H.P., E-mail: quhuapeng0926@163.com [Institute for Special Steels (Formerly Institute for Structural Materials), Central Iron and Steel Research Institute (CISRI), 76 HaiDianNan Road, Beijing 100081 (China); Lang, Y.P. [Institute for Special Steels (Formerly Institute for Structural Materials), Central Iron and Steel Research Institute (CISRI), 76 HaiDianNan Road, Beijing 100081 (China); Yao, C.F. [Institute for Special Steels (Formerly Institute for Structural Materials), Central Iron and Steel Research Institute (CISRI), 76 HaiDianNan Road, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhuozhou Works, Central Iron and Steel Research Institute (CISRI), 2 HuoJuNan Road, Zhuozhou 072750, Hebei (China); Chen, H.T.; Yang, C.Q. [Institute for Special Steels (Formerly Institute for Structural Materials), Central Iron and Steel Research Institute (CISRI), 76 HaiDianNan Road, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2013-02-01

    This study presents research works about the effects of heat treatment on recrystallized equiaxed grain size, precipitation, room temperature (RT) toughness and ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of Fe-Cr-Al-REM ferritic stainless steel (FSS) hot-rolled sheet. Results showed that the recrystallization of hot-rolled Fe-Cr-Al-REM FSS sheet could be completed after annealing treatment at 750 Degree-Sign C for 15 min with the equiaxed grain diameter of approximately 50 {mu}m. Inappropriate annealing treatment would inevitably leads to the unexpected grain coarsening. On the other hand, a great deal of needle-like or spot-like fine aluminum-lanthanum compound Al{sub 11}La{sub 3} precipitates were observed in the ferrite matrix after 1 h aging treatment at 750 Degree-Sign C. The microstructure observation results associated with the impact test definitely illustrated that the Al{sub 11}La{sub 3} precipitates was the reason for the brittle crack in the as-casted ingot and as-forged slab. The real DBTT of the annealed Fe-Cr-Al-REM FSS sheet with average grain size of about 50 {mu}m was -4 Degree-Sign C. Meanwhile, the DBTT of the hot-rolled Fe-Cr-Al-REM stainless steel sheet was evidently increased as the recrystallized grain size increased.

  4. Nondestructive characterization of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, T.; Kumar, Anish

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the non-destructive methodologies developed at the authors' laboratory for characterization of various microstructural features, residual stresses and corrosion in austenitic stainless steels. Various non-destructive evaluation (NDE) parameters such as ultrasonic velocity, ultrasonic attenuation, spectral analysis of the ultrasonic signals, magnetic hysteresis parameters and eddy current amplitude have been used for characterization of grain size, precipitation behaviour, texture, recrystallization, thermomechanical processing, degree of sensitization, formation of martensite from metastable austenite, assessment of residual stresses, degree of sensitization and propensity for intergranular corrosion in different austenitic steels. (author)

  5. Microstructural-Scale Model for Surfaces Spreading of Intergranular Corrosion in Sensitized Stainless Steels and Aluminum-Magnesium (AA5XXX) Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Swati

    Components from AA5XXX (Al-Mg alloys with more than 3 wt% Mg) alloys are X attractive due to availability of low cost, high strength to weight ratio and good weldability. Therefore, these alloys have potential applications in Naval ships. However, these alloys become susceptible to IGC (intergranular corrosion) due to beta-phase precipitation due to improper heat treatment or inadvertent thermal exposure. Stainless steels may also become susceptible due to carbide precipitation and chromium depletion on grain boundaries. IGC susceptibility depends on the interplay between the metallurgical conditions, electrochemical conditions, and chemical conditions. Specific combinations cause IGC while others do not. The objective of this study is to investigate the conditions which bring about surface spreading of IGC in these alloy classes. To accomplish this goal, a microstructure scale model was developed with experimental inputs to understand the 2-D IGC spreading in stainless steels and AA5XXX alloys. The conditions strongly affecting IGC spreading were elucidated. Upon natural and artificial aging, the stainless steels become susceptible to intergranular corrosion because of chromium depletion in the grain boundaries. After aging Al-Mg (AA5XXX) alloys show susceptibility due to the precipitation of the beta-phase (Al3Mg7) in the grain boundaries. Chromium depleted grain boundaries in stainless steels are anodically more active as compared to the interior of the grains. (3-phase rich grain boundaries have lower OCP (open circuit potential) and pitting potentials as compared to the Al-Mg solid solutions. A new approach to modeling the IGC surface spreading in polycrystalline materials that is presented. This model is the first to couple several factors into one granular scale model that illustrates the way in which they interact and IGC occurs. It sheds new information on conditions which cause IGC spreading in two alloy classes and describes a new theory for the critical

  6. Stainless steel fibre reinforced aluminium matrix composites processed by squeeze casting: relationship between processing conditions and interfacial microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin, C.; Marchal, Y.; Boland, F.; Delannay, F.

    1993-01-01

    This work investigates the influence of some processing parameters on the extent of interfacial reaction in squeeze cast aluminium matrix composites reinforced with 12 μm diameter, continuous stainless steel fibres. The average thickness of the reaction layer at fibre/matrix interfaces was measured by image analysis. When casting was made in a die at room temperature, the thickness of the reaction layer was affected on a distance of several mm from the lateral surface or from the bottom of the preform. The results indicate that the major part of the reaction occurs before solidification of the liquid metal. The control of the extent of interfacial reaction can be achieved through optimization of both infiltration parameters and features of the preform such as the volume fraction of the fibres. (orig.)

  7. Modification of the grain boundary microstructure of the austenitic PCA stainless steel to improve helium embrittlement resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Grain boundary MC precipitation was produced by a modified thermal-mechanical pretreatment in 25% cold worked (CW) austenitic prime candidate alloy (PCA) stainless steel prior to HFIR irradiation. Postirradiation tensile results and fracture analysis showed that the modified material (B3) resisted helium embrittlement better than either solution annealed (SA) or 25% CW PCA irradiated at 500 to 600 0 C to approx.21 dpa and 1370 at. ppM He. PCA SA and 25% CW were not embrittled at 300 to 400 0 C. Grain boundary MC survives in PCA-B3 during HFIR irradiation at 500 0 C but dissolves at 600 0 C; it does not form in either SA or 25% CW PCA during similar irradiation. The grain boundary MC appears to play an important role in the helium embrittlement resistance of PCA-B3

  8. Early detection of micro-structural changes due to fatigue of non-corrosive austenitic stainless steels; Frueherkennung von mikrostrukturellen Aenderungen bei Ermuedung in nichtrostenden austenitischen Staehlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalkhof, D.; Niffenegger, M.; Grosse, M

    2003-03-01

    In view of life extension efforts of nuclear power plants, many investigations are in progress in order to assess the structural integrity of different components. In many cases, this involves unexpected loads, which were not taken into account during design of components, e.g. temperature cycling arising from unforeseen stratification flow conditions. Under certain power plant transients (start-up/shut-down, hot stand-by, thermal stratification) at critical locations of piping and nozzles, material degradation caused by accumulated cyclic plastic strain takes place. However, materials subjected to cyclic loading exhibit changes in microstructure already before macroscopic crack initiation begins, this period covers a considerable part of fatigue life. Existing methods for in-service inspection are mainly specialised for crack detection. Advanced non-destructive testing methods for monitoring of material degradation are sensitive to any micro-structural changes in the material leading to a degradation of the mechanical properties. Therefore, these indirect methods require a careful interpretation of the measured signal in terms of micro-structural evolutions due to ageing. During cyclic loading of austenitic stainless steel, microstructural changes occur, which affect both the mechanical and the physical properties. Typical features are the rearrangement of dislocations and, in some cases, a deformation-induced martensitic phase transformation. In our investigation martensite formation was used as an indication for material degradation due to fatigue. Knowledge about mechanisms and influencing parameters of the martensitic transformation process is essential for the application in a lifetime monitoring system. The investigations showed that for a given austenitic stainless steel the deformation-induced martensite depends on the applied strain amplitude, the cycle number (usage factor, lifetime) and the temperature. It was demonstrated that the volume fraction of

  9. Surface quality and microstructure of low-vacuum sintered orthodontic bracket 17-4 PH stainless steel fabricated by MIM process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharno, Bambang; Suharno, Lingga Pradinda; Saputro, Hantoro Restucondro; Irawan, Bambang; Prasetyadi, Tjokro; Ferdian, Deni; Supriyadi, Sugeng

    2018-02-01

    Surface roughness and microstructure play important role on orthodontic bracket quality. Therefore, orthodontic brackets need to have smooth surface roughness to reduce the friction and bacterial adhesion. Microstructure of orthodontic brackets also determine the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. There are two methods to produce orthodontic bracket, investment casting and metal injection molding. The purpose of this study is to observe the surface roughness and microstructure of orthodontic bracket which were made from two different fabrication methods. To produce orthodontic bracket with metal injection molding method, 17-4 PH stainless steel feedstock was injected to the orthodontic bracket mold using injection molding machine. After injection, the binder was eliminated with solvent and thermal debinding. Solvent debinding process was conducted with hexane at 50 °C on magnetic stirrer for 1.5 hours. Thermal debinding process was conducted at 510 °C with 0.5 °C/min heat rate and 120 min holding time. Hereafter, sintering process were performed with vacuum tube furnace at 1360 °C with heat rate 5 °C/min and 90 min holding time in low vacuum atmosphere. To produce orthodontic bracket with investment casting method, the wax was injected into the mold then the wax pattern was arranged into the tree form. The tree form was then dipped into ceramic slurry and allowed to harden, the ceramic slurry has a thickness in the region of 10 mm. The ceramic mold was then heated at a temperature of over than 1100°C to strengthen the ceramic mold and to remove the remaining wax. After that, the molten 17-4 PH stainless steel was poured into the ceramic mold at a temperature of over 1600°C. The natural cooling process was carried out at temperature of 25°C, after which the ceramic mold was broken away. Then, the orthodontic bracket was cut from the tree form. The results show that the orthodontic bracket which were made with investment casting fabrication

  10. Electron Microscopy Study of Stainless Steel Radiation Damage Due to Long-Term Irradation by Alpha Particles Emitted From Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unlu, Kenan [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Rios-Martinez, Carlos [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Saglam, Mehmet [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Hart, Ron R. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Shipp, John D. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Rennie, John [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1998-04-16

    Radiation damage and associated surface and microstructural changes produced in stainless steel encapsulation by high-fluence alpha particle irradiations from weapons-grade plutonium of 316-stainless steel are being investigated.

  11. Simulation and experimental comparison of the thermo-mechanical history and 3D microstructure evolution of 304L stainless steel tubes manufactured using LENS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kyle L.; Rodgers, Theron M.; Underwood, Olivia D.; Madison, Jonathan D.; Ford, Kurtis R.; Whetten, Shaun R.; Dagel, Daryl J.; Bishop, Joseph E.

    2017-12-01

    Additive manufacturing enables the production of previously unachievable designs in conjunction with time and cost savings. However, spatially and temporally fluctuating thermal histories can lead to residual stress states and microstructural variations that challenge conventional assumptions used to predict part performance. Numerical simulations offer a viable way to explore the root causes of these characteristics, and can provide insight into methods of controlling them. Here, the thermal history of a 304L stainless steel cylinder produced using the Laser Engineered Net Shape process is simulated using finite element analysis (FEA). The resultant thermal history is coupled to both a solid mechanics FEA simulation to predict residual stress and a kinetic Monte Carlo model to predict the three-dimensional grain structure evolution. Experimental EBSD measurements of grain structure and in-process infrared thermal data are compared to the predictions.

  12. A new methodology based on ultrasonic attenuation to characterize dynamically recrystallized microstructure in a 15Cr-15Ni-2.2Mo-Ti modified austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, S.; Kumar, A.; Sivaprasad, P.V.; Jayakumar, T.; Baldev Raj; Kumar, S.; Samajdar, I.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a C-scan ultrasonic imaging system has been employed for imaging the microstructural variations during dynamic recrystallization (DRX) of a 15Cr-15Ni-2.2Mo-Ti modified austenitic stainless steel. Four specimens were forged at 1273 K for different strains in the range of 0.1-0.5. It has been observed that the specimen with 0.2 strain or lower did not show any variation in the amplitude of the first backwall echo. However, at and above 0.3 strain, a visible variation in the C-scan images has been observed. This variation has been attributed to the evolution of fine grains. The formation of fine grains, on the other hand, was related to DRX, as indicated by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD). (author)

  13. Use of cyclic current reversal polarization voltammetry for investigating the relationship between corrosion resistance and heat-treatment induced variations in microstructures of 400 C martensitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Software for running a cyclic current reversal polarization voltammagram has been developed for use with a EG&G Princeton Applied Research Model 273 potentiostat/galvanostat system. The program, which controls the magnitude, direction and duration of an impressed galvanostatic current, will produce data in ASCII spreadsheets (Lotus, Quattro) for graphical representation of CCRPV voltammograms. The program was used to determine differences in corrosion resistance of 440 C martenstic stainless steel produced as a result of changes in microstructure effected by tempering. It was determined that tempering at all temperatures above 400 F resulted in increased polarizability of the material, with the increased likelihood that pitting would be initiated upon exposure to marine environments. These results will be used in development of remedial procedures for lowering the susceptibility of these alloys toward the stress corrosion cracking experienced in bearings used in high pressure oxygen turbopumps used in the main engines of space shuttle orbiters.

  14. Simulation and experimental comparison of the thermo-mechanical history and 3D microstructure evolution of 304L stainless steel tubes manufactured using LENS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kyle L.; Rodgers, Theron M.; Underwood, Olivia D.; Madison, Jonathan D.; Ford, Kurtis R.; Whetten, Shaun R.; Dagel, Daryl J.; Bishop, Joseph E.

    2018-05-01

    Additive manufacturing enables the production of previously unachievable designs in conjunction with time and cost savings. However, spatially and temporally fluctuating thermal histories can lead to residual stress states and microstructural variations that challenge conventional assumptions used to predict part performance. Numerical simulations offer a viable way to explore the root causes of these characteristics, and can provide insight into methods of controlling them. Here, the thermal history of a 304L stainless steel cylinder produced using the Laser Engineered Net Shape process is simulated using finite element analysis (FEA). The resultant thermal history is coupled to both a solid mechanics FEA simulation to predict residual stress and a kinetic Monte Carlo model to predict the three-dimensional grain structure evolution. Experimental EBSD measurements of grain structure and in-process infrared thermal data are compared to the predictions.

  15. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened 2205 duplex stainless steel composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladayo OLANIRAN

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Composites of duplex stainless steel were produced by oxide dispersion strengthening with comparatively improved mechanical properties by hot press sintering of partially stabilized Zirconia (PSZ, 3% yttria, mole fraction dispersion in 2205 duplex stainless steels. Ceramic oxide was added as reinforcement, while chromium (Cr and Nickel (Ni were incorporated to maintain the austenitic/ferritic phase balance of the duplex stainless steel. The powders and sintered were characterized in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The microstructural evolution and phase formation during oxide dispersion strengthening of duplex stainless steel composites were investigated. The influence of composition variation of the reinforcements on the microstructural and corrosion behaviour in simulated mine water of the composites were investigated. In this manuscript, it was established that composition has great influence on the structure/properties relationship of the composites developed.

  16. Some observations on the relationship between microstructures, fatigue and creep behaviours in a type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, C.A.P.; Lai, J.K.L.; Skelton, R.P.

    Comparisons have been made between microstructures in Type 316 steel after high strain fatigue or creep at 625 deg. C and which had been subjected to various pre-test ageing treatments. The microstructures observed in the specimens generally consisted of a three dimensional dislocation network together with 'cells' delineated by dislocation sub-boundaries. In fatigue, under strain control conditions, pre-ageing reduced the dislocation density and coarsened the cell structure produced during test. This was related to less solute hardening and strain induced precipitation after pre-ageing and was accompanied by a lower rate of cyclic strain hardening. During fatigue with dwell, the dislocations introduced led to five times more precipitation than that observed during stress free ageing solution treated material. The 'cell' structure produced by fatigue was retained even after solution treatment at 1050 deg. C. In creep, under constant loads, a coarser and more clearly defined dislocation sub-grain structure developed and its size was not influenced by pre-ageing. However, creep testing after various pre-treatments, including fatigue, demonstrated that the creep resistance was dependent on a combination of solution strengthening, cell size and dislocation density. Consequently prior fatigue considerably increased the creep resistance. The work has demonstrated the microstructural aspects of creep-fatigue interaction and that the use of creep data obtained from solution treated material is likely to lead to errors in creep-fatigue life fraction summations

  17. Effect of Spheroidizing Annealing on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of High-Carbon Martensitic Stainless Steel 8Cr13MoV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Tao; Li, Jing; Shi, Cheng-Bin; Zhu, Qin-Tian

    2017-02-01

    The effects of holding time during both austenitizing and spheroidizing on microstructure and mechanical properties of high-carbon martensitic stainless steel 8Cr13MoV were experimentally studied. The results showed that the amount of carbides and the proportion of fine carbides decrease first and then increase with the increase in austenitizing time ( t 1) in the case of short spheroidizing time ( t 2), whereas the amount of the lamellar carbides increases. In the case of long t 2, both the amount of carbides and the proportion of fine carbides decrease, and the amount of the lamellar carbides did not increase. The hardness of the steel decreases first and then increases with the increase of t 1. Under the conditions of different t 1, the change in the size of carbides and hardness of the steel show a same trend with the variation of t 2. The size of spheroidized carbides increases, whereas the hardness of the steel decreases with increasing t 2. The longer the holding time of austenitizing, the higher is the spheroidizing rate at the earlier stage. However, the spheroidizing rate shows an opposite trend with t 1 at the later stage of spheroidizing. The effect of cooling rate on microstructure is similar with t 2. With increasing cooling rate, the dimension of carbides became smaller, and the amount of lamellar carbides increased. The elongation of the sample fracture exhibits no corresponding relationship with holding time, whereas it is closely related to the precipitation of secondary carbides caused by the alloying elements segregation.

  18. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1986-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Microstructures of cast materials subjected to long-term aging either in reactor service or in the laboratory have been characterized by TEM, SANS, and APFIM techniques. Two precipitate phases, i.e., the Cr-rich α' and Ni- and Si-rich G phase, have been identified in the ferrite matrix of the aged steels. The results indicate that the low-temperature embrittlement is primarily caused by α' precipitates which form by spinodal decomposition. The relative contribution of G phase to loss of toughness is now known. Microstructural data also indicate that weakening of ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitates has a significant effect on the onset and extent of embrittlement of the high-carbon CF-8 and CF-8M grades of stainless steels, particularly after aging at 400 or 450 0 C. Data from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 450 0 C are presented and correlated with the microstructural results. Thermal aging of the steels results in an increase in tensile strength and a decrease in impact energy, J/sub IC/, and tearing modulus. The fracture toughness results show good agreement with the Charpy-impact data. The effects of compositional and metallurgical variables on loss of toughness are discussed

  19. Influence of Solution Treatment Duration on Microstructural Features of an Industrial Forged UNS S32750/1.4410/F53 Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS) Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, Vasile Dănuţ; Răducanu, Doina; Angelescu, Mariana Lucia; Vintilă, Adrian Nicolae; Şerban, Nicolae; Dan, Ioan; Cojocaru, Elisabeta Mirela; Cinca, Ion

    2017-08-01

    The microstructural changes induced by solution treatment of an industrial forged F53 Super Duplex Stainless Steel alloy were studied, in order to emphasize how component phases are influenced by heat treatment temperature and duration. The solution treatment was done at a temperature of 1100°C, with variable holding times: 0.6 ks (10 min), 3.6 ks (60 min) and 10.8 ks (180 min). Scanning electron microscopy-electron backscattered diffraction was used as main characterization technique, to obtain and analyse data referring to microstructural features, such as: nature and morphology of constituent phases, average grain-size and grain misorientation. It was shown that in all studied cases the microstructure consisted of a mixture of about 45% δ-Fe (ferrite) and 55% γ-Fe (austenite). Besides δ-Fe and γ-Fe phases, other phases were also identified, such as τ-phase (chromium-iron carbide), σ-phase (chromium-iron) and δ-(Cr-Fe) (ferrite).

  20. The microstructure of a small scale AISI 316 stainless steel pumped sodium loop following operation for 20,000h

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charnock, W.; Gwyther, J.; Marshall, P.

    1980-08-01

    A small pumped loop constructed of AISI 316 stainless steel has been operated for 20,000 hrs. with a peak temperature of 635 0 C. Marked decarburisation was observed in the preheater and in the adjacent specimen chamber. No regions of significant carburisation were found. The decarburisation of the heat input areas appears to be a consequence of the large temperature difference between the hot and cold legs. In addition the steel temperatures in the hot regions are such as to allow relatively high solid state mobility of carbon. The absence of significant carburisation in other parts is attributed to the lower temperatures which leads to a gradual reduction in carbon activity over a sink area which is large in relation to that of the source. Additionally, the mobility of carbon is reduced at the lower temperatures found in the cooler regions of the loop. Tentatively applying the results to a fast reactor circuit suggests the occurrence of decarburisation in the high heat input regions ie the fuel clad, with corresponding but more widely distributed, and hence less significant, carburisation in other regions. (author)

  1. Strengthening of stainless steel weldment by high temperature precipitation

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Neves Monteiro; Lucio Fabio Cassiano Nascimento; Édio Pereira Lima, Jr.; Fernanda Santos da Luz; Eduardo Sousa Lima; Fábio de Oliveira Braga

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical behavior and the strengthening mechanism of stainless steel welded joints at 600 °C have been investigated. The welds were composed of AISI 304 stainless steel, as base metal, and niobium containing AISI 347 stainless steel, as weld metal. The investigation was conducted by means of creep tests. The welded specimens were subjected to both high temperature (600 °C) and long periods (up to 2000 h) under constant load, and both mechanical properties and microstructural changes in ...

  2. Chemical decontamination of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method for chemical decontamination of radioactive metal waste materials contaminated with radioactive materials on the surface, generated in radioactive materials-handling facilities. The invention is comprised of a method of chemical decontamination of stainless steel, characterized by comprising a first process of immersing a stainless steel-based metal waste material contaminated by radioactive materials on the surface in a sulfuric acid solution and second process of immersing in an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid and oxidizing metal salt, in which a portion of the surface of the stainless steel to be decontaminated is polished mechanically to expose a portion of the base material before the above first and second processes. 1 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Microstructural characterization and model of hardening for the irradiated austenitic stainless steels of the internals of pressurized water reactors; Caracterisation microstructurale et modelisation du durcissement des aciers austenitiques irradies des structures internes des reacteurs a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokor, C

    2003-07-01

    The core internals of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) are composed of SA 304 stainless steel plates and CW 316 stainless steel bolts. These internals undergo a neutron flux at a temperature between 280 deg C and 380 deg C which modifies their mechanical properties. These modifications are due to the changes in the microstructure of these materials under irradiation which depend on flux, dose and irradiation temperature. We have studied, by Transmission Electron Microscopy, the microstructure of stainless steels SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti irradiated in a mixed flux reactor (OSIRIS at 330 deg C between 0,8 dpa et 3,4 dpa) and in a fast breeder reactor at 330 deg C (BOR-60) up to doses of 40 dpa. Moreover, samples have been irradiated at 375 deg C in a fast breeder reactor (EBR-II) up to doses of 10 dpa. The microstructure of the irradiated stainless steels consists in faulted Frank dislocation loops in the [111] planes of austenitic, with a Burgers vector of [111]. It is possible to find some voids in the solution annealed samples irradiated at 375 deg C. The evolution of the dislocations loops and voids has been simulated with a 'cluster dynamic' model. The fit of the model parameters has allowed us to have a quantitative description of our experimental results. This description of the microstructure after irradiation was coupled together with a hardening model by Frank loops that has permitted us to make a quantitative description of the hardening of SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti stainless steels after irradiation at a certain dose, flux and temperature. The irradiation doses studied grow up to 90 dpa, dose of the end of life of PWR internals. (author)

  4. Plating on stainless steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1981-01-01

    Quantitative adhesion data are presented for a variety of electroplated stainless steel type alloys. Results show that excellent adhesion can be obtained by using a Wood's nickel strike or a sulfamate nickel strike prior to final plating. Specimens plated after Wood's nickel striking failed in the deposit rather than at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Flyer plate quantitative tests showed that use of anodic treatment in sulfuric acid prior to Wood's nickel striking even further improved adhesion. In contrast activation of stainless steels by immersion or cathodic treatment in hydrochloric acid resulted in very reduced bond strengths with failure always occurring at the interface between the coating and substrate

  5. Study on the Effect of Laser Welding Parameters on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Ultrafine Grained 304L Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reihane Nafar Dehsorkhi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an ultrafine grained (UFG 304L stainless steel with the average grain size of 300 nm was produced by a combination of cold rolling and annealing. Weldability of the UFG sample was studied by Nd: YAG laser welding under different welding conditions. Taguchi experimental design was used to optimize the effect of frequency, welding time, laser current and laser pulse duration on the resultant microstructure and mechanical properties. X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Optical Microscope (OM, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM, microhardness measurements and tension tests were conducted to characterize the sample after thermomechanical processing and laser welding. The results showed that the ultrafine grained steel had the yield strength of 1000 Mpa and the total elongation of 48%, which were almost three times higher than those of the as-received sample. The microstructure of the weld zone was shown to be a mixture of austenite and delta ferrite. The microhardness of the optimized welded sample (315 HV0.5 was found to be close to the UFG base metal (350 HV. It was also observed that the hardness of the heat affected zone (HAZ was  lower than that of the weld zone, which was related to the HAZ grain growth during laser welding. The results of optimization also showed that the welding time was the most important parameter affecting the weld strength. Overall, the study showed that laser welding could be an appropriate and alternative welding technique for the joining of UFG steels.

  6. DE-NE0000724 - Research Performance Final Report - Investigation of Thermal Aging Effects on the Evolution of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankem, Sreeramamurthy [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Perea, Daniel E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kolli, R. Prakash [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Mburu, Sarah [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Schwarm, Samuel C. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2017-12-11

    This report details the research activities carried out under DOE-NEUP award number DE-NE0000724 concerning the evolution of structural and mechanical properties during thermal aging of CF–3 and CF–8 cast duplex stainless steels (CDSS). The overall objective of this project was to use state-of-the-art characterization techniques to elucidate trends and phenomena in the mechanical and structural evolution of cast duplex stainless steels (CDSS) during thermal aging. These steels are commonly used as structural materials in commercial light water nuclear power plants, undergoing aging for decades in operation as cooling water pipes, pump casings, valve bodies, etc. During extended exposure to these conditions, CDSS are known to undergo a change in mechanical properties resulting in a loss of ductility, i.e. embrittlement. While it is generally accepted that structural changes within the ferrite phase, such as decomposition into iron (Fe)-rich and chromium (Cr)-rich domains, lead to the bulk embrittlement of the steels, many questions remain as to the mechanisms of embrittlement at multiple length scales. This work is intended to shed insight into the atomic level composition changes, associated kinetic mechanisms, and effects of changing phase structure on micro- and nano-scale deformation that lead to loss of impact toughness and tensile ductility in these steels. In general, this project provides a route to answer some of these major questions using techniques such as 3-dimensional (3-D) atom probe tomography (APT) and real-microstructure finite element method (FEM) modeling, which were not readily available when these steels were originally selected for service in light water reactors. Mechanical properties evaluated by Charpy V-notch impact testing (CVN), tensile testing, and microhardness and nanohardness measurements were obtained for each condition and compared with the initial baseline properties to view trends in deformation behavior during aging

  7. Effect of phosphorus and boron additions on helium bubble microstructure in titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jitsukawa, Shiro; Hojou, Kiichi; Hishinuma, Akimichi

    1992-01-01

    Ti-modified austenitic stainless steels (0.06C-0.5Si-15Cr-15Ni-2Mo-0.2Ti) plus P and/or B additions up to 0.06 wt% and 60 wtppm respectively, were irradiated with 10keV He + ions at a dose rate of 1.8 x 10 18 He + /m 2 s at 923K. Irradiation was performed on foil specimens in a transmission electron microscope equipped with an ion-accelerator up to a fluence of 1 x 10 21 He + /m 2 . Small (5 nm >) bubbles were formed in the depth region ranging between 5 and 15 nm from the foil surface of the specimen irradiated up to a fluence of 9 x 10 18 He + /m 2 . These bubbles grew continuously during the following irradiation. They were often observed to grow by coalescence. Bubble growth by coalescence was suppressed by Ti-modification. Both P and B additions enhanced the suppression effect of Ti-modification. (author)

  8. Morphologies, microstructures, and mechanical properties of samples produced using laser metal deposition with 316 L stainless steel wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiang; Mi, Gaoyang; Luo, Yuanqing; Jiang, Ping; Shao, Xinyu; Wang, Chunming

    2017-07-01

    Laser metal deposition (LMD) with a filler has been demonstrated to be an effective method for additive manufacturing because of its high material deposition efficiency, improved surface quality, reduced material wastage, and cleaner process environment without metal dust pollution. In this study, single beads and samples with ten layers were successfully deposited on a 316 L stainless steel surface under optimized conditions using a 4000 W continuous wave fibre laser and an arc welding machine. The results showed that satisfactory layered samples with a large deposition height and smooth side surface could be achieved under appropriate parameters. The uniform structures had fine cellular and network austenite grains with good metallurgical bonding between layers, showing an austenite solidification mode. Precipitated ferrite at the grain boundaries showed a subgrain structure with fine uniform grain size. A higher microhardness (205-226 HV) was detected in the middle of the deposition area, while the tensile strength of the 50 layer sample reached 669 MPa. In addition, ductile fracturing was proven by the emergence of obvious dimples at the fracture surface.

  9. Microstructural Evolution of Secondary Phases in the Cast Duplex Stainless Steels CD3MN and CD3MWCuN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun; Ugurlu, Ozan; Jiang, Chao; Gleeson, Brian; Chumbley, L. Scott

    2007-02-01

    The isothermal formation behavior of secondary phases in two types of duplex stainless steels (DSS), CD3MN and CD3MWCuN, was characterized. Samples were heat treated from 1 minute to 30 days at temperatures from 700°C to 900°C. Small carbide (M23C6) and nitride (Cr2N) precipitates, together with the intermetallic phases sigma and chi, were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. Based on SEM analysis, time-temperature-transformation (TTT) curves for the sigma and chi phases were determined by measuring their volume fractions from backscattered electron micrographs of heat-treated and quenched sample cross sections. Resulting TTT curves showed that the maximum formation temperature for chi is lower than that for sigma, while the time to reach 1 vol pct formation is much less for sigma than it is for chi. The thermodynamic driving forces associated with the sigma and chi formation were assessed using Thermo-Calc.

  10. Corrosion of austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M C.M. [Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1977-01-01

    Types of corrosion observed in a heat exchanger pipe and on a support of still of molasses fermented wort, both in austenitic stainless steel, are focused. Not only are the causes which might have had any kind of influence on them examined, but also the measures adopted in order to avoid and lessen its occurence.

  11. Effect of ageing on the microstructural stability of cold-worked titanium-modified 15Cr-15Ni-2.5Mo austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkadesan, S.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Rodriguez, P.; Padmanabhan, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    A titanium-modified 15Cr-15Ni-2.5Mo austenitic stainless steel conforming to ASTM A 771 (UNS S 38660), commercially called Alloy D9, is being indigenously developed for application as material for the fuel clad and the hexagonal wrapper for fuel subassemblies of the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor. As this material would be used in the cold-worked condition and would be subjected to prolonged exposure to elevated service temperatures, the effect of ageing on the microstructural stability was studied as a function of the amount of cold work. The material was given 2.5-30% prior cold work and then aged at temperatures in the range 923 to 1173 K for times ranging from 0.25 to 1000 h. Hardness measurements made before and after ageing were correlated with the Larson-Miller parameter to determine the highest stable prior cold-work level. Optical microscopy was used to study the microstructural changes. The influence of prolonged exposure for two and three years at the operating temperatures of clad and wrapper, on the elevated temperature tensile properties of a 20% prior cold-worked Alloy D9 was also studied through accelerated ageing treatments based on the present parametric approach. (orig.)

  12. A three dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics modelling of the early cycles of fatigue in an austenitic stainless steel 316L: dislocation microstructure and damage analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depres, Ch.

    2005-01-01

    A numerical code modelling the collective behaviour of dislocations at a mesoscopic scale (Discrete Dislocation Dynamics code) is used to analyse the cyclic plasticity that occurs in surface grains of an AISI 316L stainless steel, in order to understand the plastic mechanism involved in crack initiation in fatigue. Firstly, the analyses of both the formation and the evolution of the dislocation microstructures show the crucial role of cross-slip played in the strain localization in the form of slip bands. As the cycling proceeds, the slip bands exhibit well-organized dislocation arrangements that substitute to dislocation tangles, involving specific interaction mechanisms between primary and deviate systems. Secondly, both the surface displacements generated by plastic slip and the distortion energy induced by the dislocation microstructure have been analysed. We find that an irreversible surface relief in the form of extrusion/intrusion can be induced by cyclic slip of dislocations. The number of cycles for the crack initiation follows a Manson-Coffin type law. The analyses of the concentration of the distortion energy and its repartition in the slip bands show that beneficial energetic zones may be present at the very beginning of the cycling, and that mode-II crack propagation in the surface grains results from a succession of micro-crack initiations along primary slip plane, which is facilitated by various effects (stress concentration due to surface relief, environment effects...). Finally, a dislocation-based model for cyclic plasticity is proposed from Discrete Dislocation Dynamics results. (author)

  13. Effect of annealing temperature on microstructure of ferritic stainless steels with high Mo content; Efeito da temperatura de recozimento na microestrutura em acos inoxidaveis ferriticos com alto teor de Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, H.F.G.; Miranda, H.C. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais; Herculano, L.F.G. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza (Brazil). Lab. de Caracterizacao de Materiais; Tavares, S.S.M. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2006-07-01

    The petroleum refined in Brazilian refining plants is characterized by its high content of sulphur. This fact has increased problems related to naphtenic corrosion. It is known by the experience in refining that steels with high contents of Mo present good naphtenic corrosion resistance. This papers studied aspects referring to mechanical properties and microstructure of high Mo ferritic stainless steels developed in laboratory as a function of annealing temperature. Results showed that temperatures between 1000 and 1050 deg C were more suitable to the steels studied. (author)

  14. Crack propagation during fatigue in cast duplex stainless steels: influence of the microstructure, of the aging and of the test temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calonne, V.

    2001-07-01

    Duplex stainless steels are used as cast components in nuclear power plants. At the service temperature of about 320 C, the ferrite phase is thermally aged and embrittled. This induces a significant decrease in fracture properties of these materials. The aim of this work consists in studying Fatigue Crack Growth Rates (FCGR) and Fatigue Crack Growth Mechanisms (FCGM) as a function of thermal ageing and test temperature (20 C/320 C). Two cast duplex stainless steels (30% ferrite) are tested. In order to better understand the influence of the crystallographic orientation of the phases on the FCGM, the solidification structure of the material is studied by Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) and by Unidirectional Solidification Quenching. Fatigue crack growth tests are also performed in equiaxed and basaltic structures. Microstructure, fatigue crack growth mechanical properties and mechanisms are thus studied in relation to each other. In the studied range of delta K, the crack propagates without any preferential path by successive ruptures of phase laths. The macroscopic crack propagation plane, as determined by EBSD, depends on the crystallographic orientation of the ferrite grain. So, according to the solidification structure, secondary cracks can appear, which in turn influences the FCGR. Fatigue crack closure, which has to be determined to estimate the intrinsic FCGR, decreases with increasing ageing. This can be explained by a decrease in the kinematic cyclic hardening. The Paris exponent as determined from intrinsic FCGR increases with ageing. Intrinsic FCGR can then be separated in two ranges: one with lower FCGR in aged materials than in un-aged and one with the reversed tendency. (author)

  15. Microstructural characterization of stainless steel 17-4 PH used in the control element of PWR-Type reactors submitted to different heat treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Douglas F.A.; Rezende, Renato P.; Turcarelli, Tiago

    2017-01-01

    The Control Element is a set of mechanical components of pressurized water cooled nuclear reactors (PWR), with the function of modifying the reactivity of the nucleus by insertion and withdrawal of neutron absorptive rod, in order to change the flow of neutrons (power) to the necessary and desired levels. The control element also has a safety function when there is a need to have negative reactivity available to shut down the reactor in normal operating or accident situations. In this situation, the control element descends instantly and inserts the rods with absorptive material into the fuel element thus shutting down the reactor. The control element consists of control rods, which carry the neutron absorption material and is supported by the spider, pin, spring and spring retainer assembly. The control element has some components that need to have high resistance to impacts when the safety function is activated, so the material of this component must have high mechanical strength and toughness. One of the materials in which can be specified for this application is martensitic stainless steel 17- 4PH (UNS 17400). This steel, when subjected to the aging heat treatment, has its mechanical properties altered due to the precipitation of dispersed intermetallic compounds in the matrix. In all heat treatments performed the predominant microstructure is lath martensite. The heat treatment of the 620 °C / 4 h presented lower hardness when compared to the other treatments and when increase time and temperature the material presents Nb precipitates that increase the hardness. (author)

  16. Microstructural characterization of stainless steel 17-4 PH used in the control element of PWR-Type reactors submitted to different heat treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Douglas F.A.; Rezende, Renato P.; Turcarelli, Tiago, E-mail: ferreira@marinha.mil.br, E-mail: renato.rezende@marinha.mil.br, E-mail: tiago.turcarelli@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (DDNM/CTMSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Diretoria de Desenvolvimento Nuclear da Marinha

    2017-07-01

    The Control Element is a set of mechanical components of pressurized water cooled nuclear reactors (PWR), with the function of modifying the reactivity of the nucleus by insertion and withdrawal of neutron absorptive rod, in order to change the flow of neutrons (power) to the necessary and desired levels. The control element also has a safety function when there is a need to have negative reactivity available to shut down the reactor in normal operating or accident situations. In this situation, the control element descends instantly and inserts the rods with absorptive material into the fuel element thus shutting down the reactor. The control element consists of control rods, which carry the neutron absorption material and is supported by the spider, pin, spring and spring retainer assembly. The control element has some components that need to have high resistance to impacts when the safety function is activated, so the material of this component must have high mechanical strength and toughness. One of the materials in which can be specified for this application is martensitic stainless steel 17- 4PH (UNS 17400). This steel, when subjected to the aging heat treatment, has its mechanical properties altered due to the precipitation of dispersed intermetallic compounds in the matrix. In all heat treatments performed the predominant microstructure is lath martensite. The heat treatment of the 620 °C / 4 h presented lower hardness when compared to the other treatments and when increase time and temperature the material presents Nb precipitates that increase the hardness. (author)

  17. Corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, J A; Guzman, A; Zuccari, A; Thornburg, D W; Rhodes, B F; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1997-07-01

    The corrosion of 2205 duplex stainless steel was compared with that of AISI type 316L stainless steel. The 2205 stainless steel is a potential orthodontic bracket material with low nickel content (4 to 6 wt%), whereas the 316L stainless steel (nickel content: 10 to 14 wt%) is a currently used bracket material. Both stainless steels were subjected to electrochemical and immersion (crevice) corrosion tests in 37 degrees C, 0.9 wt% sodium chloride solution. Electrochemical testing indicates that 2205 has a longer passivation range than 316L. The corrosion rate of 2205 was 0.416 MPY (milli-inch per year), whereas 316L exhibited 0.647 MPY. When 2205 was coupled to 316L with equal surface area ratio, the corrosion rate of 2205 reduced to 0.260 MPY, indicating that 316L stainless steel behaved like a sacrificial anode. When 316L is coupled with NiTi, TMA, or stainless steel arch wire and was subjected to the immersion corrosion test, it was found that 316L suffered from crevice corrosion. On the other hand, 2205 stainless steel did not show any localized crevice corrosion, although the surface of 2205 was covered with corrosion products, formed when coupled to NiTi and stainless steel wires. This study indicates that considering corrosion resistance, 2205 duplex stainless steel is an improved alternative to 316L for orthodontic bracket fabrication when used in conjunction with titanium, its alloys, or stainless steel arch wires.

  18. Corrosion behaviour of sintered duplex stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utrilla, M. Victoria; Urena, Alejandro; Otero, Enrique; Munez, Claudio Jose [Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/ Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Duplex austenite-ferrite stainless steels were prepared by mixing austenitic (316L) and ferritic (434L) atomized powders. Although different 316L/434L ratios were prepared, present work centred its study on 50% ferrite - 50% austenite sintered steel. The powders were mixed and pressed at 700 MPa and sintered at 1250 deg. C for 30 min in vacuum. The cooling rate was 5 deg. C/min. Solution treatment was carried out to homogenize the microstructure at 1100 deg. C during 20 min. A microstructural study of the material in solution was performed, evaluating the microstructure, proportion and shape of porosity, and ferrite percentage. This last was measured by two methods, quantitative metallography and Fischer ferrito-metry. The materials were heat treated in the range of 700 to 1000 deg. C, for 10, 30 and 60 min and water quenched, to study the microstructural changes and the influence on the intergranular corrosion resistance. The method used to evaluate the sensitization to the intergranular corrosion was the electrochemical potentio-kinetic reactivation procedure (EPR). The test solution was 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0,01 M KSCN at 30 deg. C. The criterion used to evaluate the sensitization was the ratio between the maximum reactivation density (Ir) and the maximum activation density (Ia). The results of the electrochemical tests were discussed in relation with the microstructures observed at the different heat treatments. (authors)

  19. Microstructural study of thermally aged duplex stainless steel deformation and fracture modes; Etude microstructurale des modes de deformation et de rupture d`un acier austenoferritique vieilli thermiquement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhaeghe, B. [Institut national polytechnique, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1996-12-31

    The aim of this work is to study the micro mechanisms of deformation and rupture of an austeno ferritic stainless steel (Z 3 CND 22-10 M) with 33 % of ferrite. It is studied after ageing 1 000 h at 400 deg. C and 8 000 h at 350 deg. C and compared to the `as received` state. During ageing the ferritic phase undergoes microstructural evolutions which affects its properties. The two ageing treatments lead to roughly the same level of embrittlement. Microstructural characterisation shows that both phases percolate and exhibit orientation relationships close to Kurdjumov-Sachs ones. Mechanical properties of the steel were characterised for different ageing treatments at room temperature and at 320 deg. C. The interface is particularly strong and ensures the load transfer to ferrite even if this phase contains cleavage cracks. Moreover the interface does not oppose slip transmission which is instead controlled by localised glide in the ferritic phase. If activated slip systems of austenite are common with ferrite, slip transmission from austenite to ferrite indeed occurs through the=e interface. If they are not common, dislocations cross-slip back into the austenite. At 320 deg. C cross-slip occurs even far from the interface. Damage starts by nucleation in ferrite of cleavage cracks which propagate between austenite islands. Crack propagation is controlled by stretching of austenite ligaments. The material breaks by ductile tearing of austenite islands when the crack eventually percolates in the ferritic phase. The ductility of the material can be correctly describer using a simple model that takes into account the tearing-off the ductile-phase. (author). 153 refs.

  20. Microstructural examination of 12% Cr martensitic stainless steel after irradiation at elevated temperatures in FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Chen-Yih; Gelles, D.S.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1986-06-01

    A remelted 12% Cr martensitic stainless steel (HT-9) has been examined by transmission electron microscopy before and after irradiation in the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA) of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The irradiation temperatures were 365,420, 520, and 600 degree C with the fluences as high as 7.3 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) or 34 dpa. The extracted precipitates from each specimen were identified using x-ray microanalysis and selected area diffraction. The precipitates in the unirradiated condition were primarily M 23 C 6 carbides, which formed at martensite lath and prior austenite grain boundaries. During irradiation at elevated temperatures, small amounts of other phases formed, which were tentatively identified as the chromium-rich α', the nickel-silicon rich G-phase, and the intermetallic Chi phase. Irradiation-induced voids were observed only in specimens irradiated at 420 degree C to a dose of 34 dpa; no voids were found for specimens irradiated at 365, 520, and 600 degree C (∼11, ∼34, and ∼34 dpa). These results are not in agreement with previous experiments in that voids have not been reported in this alloy at relatively high fluence level (∼67 dpa) following irradiation in another fast-spectrum reactor (EBR.II). This is, however, the first observation following FFTF irradiation. The present results indicate that cavities can form in HT-9 at modest fluence levels even without significant generation of helium. Hence, the cavity formation in this class of ferritic alloys is not simply caused by helium generation but rather more complex mechanisms. 12 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Investigation of the Microstructural, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of Grade A Ship Steel-Duplex Stainless Steel Composites Produced via Explosive Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Yakup; Kahraman, Nizamettin; Durgutlu, Ahmet; Gülenç, Behçet

    2017-08-01

    Grade A ship-building steel-AISI 2304 duplex stainless steel composite plates were manufactured via explosive welding. The AISI 2304 plates were used to clad the Grade A plates. Optical microscopy studies were conducted on the joining interface for characterization of the manufactured composite plates. Notch impact, tensile-shear, microhardness, bending and twisting tests were carried out to determine the mechanical properties of the composites. In addition, the surfaces of fractured samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and neutral salt spray (NSS) and potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to examine corrosion behavior. Near the explosion zone, the interface was completely flat, but became wavy as the distance from the explosion zone increased. The notch impact tests indicated that the impact strength of the composites decreased with increasing distance from the explosion zone. The SEM studies detected brittle behavior below the impact transition temperature and ductile behavior above this temperature. Microhardness tests revealed that the hardness values increased with increasing distance from the explosion zone and mechanical tests showed that no visible cracking or separation had occurred on the joining interface. The NSS and potentiodynamic polarization tests determined that the AISI 2304 exhibited higher corrosion resistance than the Grade A steel.

  2. Strengthening of stainless steel weldment by high temperature precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Neves Monteiro

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical behavior and the strengthening mechanism of stainless steel welded joints at 600 °C have been investigated. The welds were composed of AISI 304 stainless steel, as base metal, and niobium containing AISI 347 stainless steel, as weld metal. The investigation was conducted by means of creep tests. The welded specimens were subjected to both high temperature (600 °C and long periods (up to 2000 h under constant load, and both mechanical properties and microstructural changes in the material were monitored. It was found that the exposure of the material at 600 °C under load contributes to a strengthening effect on the weld. The phenomenon might be correlated with an accelerated process of second phase precipitation hardening. Keywords: Stainless steel, Weld, AISI 304, Precipitation hardening

  3. An Investigation of the Microstructure and Fatigue Behavior of Additively Manufactured AISI 316L Stainless Steel with Regard to the Influence of Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian Blinn

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available To exploit the whole potential of Additive Manufacturing, it is essential to investigate the complex relationships between Additive Manufacturing processes, the resulting microstructure, and mechanical properties of the materials and components. In the present work, Selective Laser Melted (SLM (process category: powder bed fusion, Laser Deposition Welded (LDW (process category: direct energy deposition and, for comparison, Continuous Casted and then hot and cold drawn (CC austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L blanks were investigated with regard to their microstructure and mechanical properties. To exclude the influence of surface topography and focus the investigation on the volume microstructure, the blanks were turned into final geometry of specimens. The additively manufactured (AM- blanks were manufactured in both the horizontal and vertical building directions. In the horizontally built specimens, the layer planes are perpendicular and in vertical building direction, they are parallel to the load axis of the specimens. The materials from different manufacturing processes exhibit different chemical composition and hence, austenite stability. Additionally, all types of blanks were heat treated (2 h, 1070 °C, H2O and the influence of the heat treatment on the properties of differently manufactured materials were investigated. From the cyclic deformation curves obtained in the load increase tests, the anisotropic fatigue behavior of the AM-specimens could be detected with only one specimen in each building direction for the different Additive Manufacturing processes, which could be confirmed by constant amplitude tests. The results showed higher fatigue strength for horizontally built specimens compared to the vertical building direction. Furthermore, the constant amplitude tests show that the austenite stability influences the fatigue behavior of differently manufactured 316L. Using load increase tests as an efficient rating method of the

  4. Effect of Dynamic Reheating Controlled by the Weaving Width on the Microstructure of GTA Bead-On-Pipe Weld Metal of 25% Cr Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Joon Sung

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW with three different heat inputs controlled by the weaving width was performed to understand their effects on the microstructural changes during bead-on-pipe welding of super duplex stainless steel. The microstructure of the weld metals was categorized into three different types of zones: non-reheated, reheated type, and reheating-free zone. Even though single-pass welding with different weaving widths was employed, a reheated microstructure was detected, which has been previously observed with multiple pass welding. This phenomenon was called “dynamic reheating”, because it was produced by the weaving operation during welding regardless of the weaving width. The categorized area fraction varied with the weaving width change. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD results at the edge (the area near the fusion line of the low-heat-input condition indicated a higher austenite volume fraction and a lower Cr2N fraction than that of the medium heat input condition. Thus, it described an inverse relationship, because higher heat input provided a lower austenite fraction. In addition, it was observed clearly that the austenite fraction at the medium heat input condition was dramatically increased by reheating, while the Cr2N fraction was reduced. Regardless of the weaving width, reheating contributed to the increase of the austenite fraction, further reducing the Cr2N quantity. The edge areas in the map showed an inverse relationship in the reheated area fraction between low heat input and medium heat input. For this reason, the austenite fraction on the weld metal was determined not only by the heat input, but also by the amount of reheating.

  5. Corrosion behaviour of laser clad stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damborenea, J.J. de; Weerasinghe, V.M.; West, D.R.F.

    1993-01-01

    The present paper is focussed in the study of the properties of a clad layer of stainless steel on a mild steel. By blowing powder of the alloy into a melt pool generated by a laser of 2 KW, an homogeneous layer of 316 stainless steel can be obtained. Structure, composition and corrosion behaviour are similar to those of a stainless steel in as-received condition. (Author)

  6. Mechanical behavior and high-resolution EBSD investigation of the microstructural evolution in AISI 321 stainless steel under dynamic loading condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiamiyu, A.A.; Eskandari, M.; Sanayei, Mohsen; Odeshi, A.G.; Szpunar, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    The impact response of three regions (top, mid and center) across the thickness of AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel plate at high strain rates (>6000 s −1 ) was studied using the split Hopkinson pressure bar system. The result shows that texture and stored energy heterogeneity across plate thickness influenced the mechanical responses of the investigated steel in these regions. Microstructural evaluation using high-resolution electron backscattered diffraction (HR-EBSD) analysis showed that strengthening in AISI 321 steel originates from the evolution of strain-induced martensite and formation of nano-carbides in addition to plastic deformation by mechanical twinning and slip. This resulted in a desirable combination of high strength and good ductility (approx. 2000 MPa at 0.42 true strain). Phase transformation, dynamic recrystallization and formation of nano-carbides were confirmed within the adiabatic shear band (ASB) region. The average dynamic recrystallized (DRX) grain size in the shear band region is 0.28 µm in comparison to grain size of 15 µm outside the shear bands. The nano-sized grain inside the shear bands is proposed to form by rotational dynamic recrystallization. A comparative study of the alloy's behavior under dynamic and quasi-static compression shows that the stability of austenite is higher at high strain rates and lower at a low strain rate. The strength in the dynamically impacted specimen is compromised as a result of the suppressed evolution of strain-induced martensite and mechanical twin. Martensitic transformation under both loading conditions follows the FCC É£-austenite→BCC ά-martensite kinetic path and both phases obey the Kurdjumov-Sachs' {(111)É£||(110)ά and <−101>É£||<1–11>ά} orientation relationship.

  7. Mechanical behavior and high-resolution EBSD investigation of the microstructural evolution in AISI 321 stainless steel under dynamic loading condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiamiyu, A.A., E-mail: ahmed.tiamiyu@usask.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Sask. (Canada); Eskandari, M. [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sanayei, Mohsen; Odeshi, A.G.; Szpunar, J.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Sask. (Canada)

    2016-09-15

    The impact response of three regions (top, mid and center) across the thickness of AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel plate at high strain rates (>6000 s{sup −1}) was studied using the split Hopkinson pressure bar system. The result shows that texture and stored energy heterogeneity across plate thickness influenced the mechanical responses of the investigated steel in these regions. Microstructural evaluation using high-resolution electron backscattered diffraction (HR-EBSD) analysis showed that strengthening in AISI 321 steel originates from the evolution of strain-induced martensite and formation of nano-carbides in addition to plastic deformation by mechanical twinning and slip. This resulted in a desirable combination of high strength and good ductility (approx. 2000 MPa at 0.42 true strain). Phase transformation, dynamic recrystallization and formation of nano-carbides were confirmed within the adiabatic shear band (ASB) region. The average dynamic recrystallized (DRX) grain size in the shear band region is 0.28 µm in comparison to grain size of 15 µm outside the shear bands. The nano-sized grain inside the shear bands is proposed to form by rotational dynamic recrystallization. A comparative study of the alloy's behavior under dynamic and quasi-static compression shows that the stability of austenite is higher at high strain rates and lower at a low strain rate. The strength in the dynamically impacted specimen is compromised as a result of the suppressed evolution of strain-induced martensite and mechanical twin. Martensitic transformation under both loading conditions follows the FCC É£-austenite→BCC ά-martensite kinetic path and both phases obey the Kurdjumov-Sachs' {(111)É£||(110)ά and <−101>É£||<1–11>ά} orientation relationship.

  8. Microstructural Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Simulated Heat-Affected Zones in Cast Precipitation-Hardened Stainless Steels 17-4 and 13-8+Mo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Robert J.; DuPont, John N.

    2017-01-01

    Cast precipitation-hardened (PH) stainless steels 17-4 and 13-8+Mo are used in applications that require a combination of high strength and moderate corrosion resistance. Many such applications require fabrication and/or casting repair by fusion welding. The purpose of this work is to develop an understanding of microstructural evolution and resultant mechanical properties of these materials when subjected to weld thermal cycles. Samples of each material were subjected to heat-affected zone (HAZ) thermal cycles in the solution-treated and aged condition (S-A-W condition) and solution-treated condition with a postweld thermal cycle age (S-W-A condition). Dilatometry was used to establish the onset of various phase transformation temperatures. Light optical microscopy (LOM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) were used to characterize the microstructures, and comparisons were made to gas metal arc welds that were heat treated in the same conditions. Tensile testing was also performed. MatCalc thermodynamic and kinetic modeling software was used to predict the evolution of copper (Cu)-rich body center cubic precipitates in 17-4 and β-NiAl precipitates in 13-8+Mo. The yield strength was lower in the simulated HAZ samples of both materials prepared in the S-A-W condition when compared to their respective base metals. Samples prepared in the S-W-A condition had higher and more uniform yield strengths for both materials. Significant changes were observed in the matrix microstructure of various HAZ regions depending on the peak temperature, and these microstructural changes were interpreted with the aid of dilatometry results, LOM, SEM, and EDS. Despite these significant changes to the matrix microstructure, the changes in mechanical properties appear to be governed primarily by the precipitation behavior. The decrease in strength in the HAZ samples prepared in the S-A-W condition was attributed to the dissolution of precipitates

  9. Nano-composite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Blue, Craig A.; Peter, William H.; Chen, Wei; Aprigliano, Louis F.

    2015-07-14

    A composite stainless steel composition is composed essentially of, in terms of wt. % ranges: 25 to 28 Cr; 11 to 13 Ni; 7 to 8 W; 3.5 to 4 Mo; 3 to 3.5 B; 2 to 2.5 Mn; 1 to 1.5 Si; 0.3 to 1.7 C; up to 2 O; balance Fe. The composition has an austenitic matrix phase and a particulate, crystalline dispersed phase.

  10. Thermophysical properties of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.S.

    1975-09-01

    Recommended values of the thermodynamic and transport properties of stainless steels Type 304L and Type 316L are given for temperatures from 300 to 3000 0 K. The properties in the solid region were obtained by extrapolating available experimental data to the melting range, while appropriate correlations were used to estimate the properties in the liquid region. The properties evaluated include the enthalpy, entropy, specific heat, vapor pressure, density, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and viscosity. (9 fig, 11 tables)

  11. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  12. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Sterling, R.J. Steel, C.-O. Pettersson. “Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded SAF 2507 super duplex stainless steel.” Mater...MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF FRICTION STIR WELDED ALUMINUM-STEEL JOINTS By ERIN ELIZABETH PATTERSON A thesis submitted in...for his work producing the dissimilar weld samples used in this study. Without his work, this project would not have been possible. I would also

  13. Duplex stainless steel surface bay laser cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amigo, V.; Pineda, Y.; Segovia, F.; Vicente, A.

    2004-01-01

    Laser cladding is one of the most promising techniques to restore damaged surfaces and achieve properties similar to those of the base metal. In this work, duplex stainless steels have been cladded by a nickel alloy under different processing conditions. The influence of the beam speed and defocusing variables ha been evaluated in the microstructure both of the cladding and heat affected zone, HAZ. These results have been correlated to mechanical properties by means of microhardness measurements from cladding area to base metal through the interface. This technique has shown to be very appropriate to obtain controlled mechanical properties as they are determined by the solidification microstructure, originated by the transfer of mass and heat in the system. (Author) 21 refs

  14. Micro friction stir lap welding of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel: a study on the mechanical properties, microstructure, texture and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaan, Hossein; Safari, Mehdi; Bakhtiari, Arash

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the effect of friction stir welding of AISI 430 (X6Cr17, material number 1.4016) ferritic stainless steel is examined. Two thin sheets with dimensions of 0.4 × 50 × 200 mm3 are joined in lap configuration. Optical microscopy and field emission electron microscopy were used in order to microstructural evaluations and fracture analysis, respectively. Tensile test and microhardness measurements are employed in order to study the mechanical behaviors of welds. Also, vibrational sample magnetometry (VSM) is employed for characterizing magnetic properties of welded samples. Texture analysis is carried out in order to clarify the change mechanism of magnetic properties in the welded area. The results show that AISI 430 sheets are successfully joined considering both, the appearance of the welding bead and the strength of the welded joint. It is found that by friction stir welding of AISI 430 sheets, texture components with easy axes magnetization have been replaced by texture components with harder magnetization axes. VSM analysis showed that friction stir welding leads to increase in residual induction (Br) and coercivity (Hc). This increase is attributed to the grain refining due the friction stir welding and formation of texture components with harder axes of magnetizations.

  15. Influence of M-TIG and A-TIG Welding Process on Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyarthy, R. S.; Dwivedi, D. K.; Vasudevan, M.

    2017-03-01

    The current study investigates the effects of activating flux tungsten inert gas welding (A-TIG) and multipass tungsten inert gas welding (M-TIG) on the weld morphology, angular distortion, microstructures and mechanical properties when welding 8-mm-thick 409 ferritic stainless steel (FSS). SiO2 was used as activating flux for A-TIG welding, while SUPERTIG ER309L was used as filler for M-TIG welding. Bead-on-plate weld trials were carried out to obtain the full penetration by using different combinations of flux coating density, welding speed and welding current. An optical microscope, field emission scanning microscope (FESEM), and x-ray diffractometer were used for the metallurgical characterizations. Vickers hardness, tensile test, Charpy toughness test, and creep behavior test were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties of the base and weld metals. Experimental results indicate that the A-TIG process can increase the joint penetration and tends to reduce the angular distortion of the 409 FSS weldment. The A-TIG welded joint also exhibited greater mechanical strength. However, a critically low Charpy toughness was measured for the A-TIG weld fusion zone, which was later sufficiently improved after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). It was concluded that PWHT is mandatory for A-TIG welded 409 FSS.

  16. Study on microstructural changes in thermally-aged stainless steel weld-overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels by atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kameda, J.; Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T.; Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K.

    2011-08-01

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes was investigated in stainless steel weld-overlay cladding composed of 90% austenite and 10% δ-ferrite phases using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to cooling process after post-welding heat treatments (PWHT), a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was already observed due to spinodal decomposition in the ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the ferrite phase. The chemical compositions of M 23C 6 type carbides seemed to be formed at the austenite/ferrite interface were analyzed. The analyses of the magnitude of the spinodal decomposition and the hardness implied that the spinodal decomposition was the main cause of the hardening.

  17. Effect of Starting As-cast Structure on the Microstructure-Texture Evolution During Subsequent Processing and Finally Ridging Behavior of Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modak, Pranabananda; Patra, Sudipta; Mitra, Rahul; Chakrabarti, Debalay

    2018-06-01

    Effect of the initial as-cast structure on the microstructure-texture evolution during thermomechanical processing of 409L grade ferritic stainless steel was studied. Samples from the regions of cast slab having `columnar,' `equiaxed,' and a mixture of `columnar' and `equiaxed' grains were subjected to two different processing schedules: one with intermediate hot-band annealing before cold-rolling followed by final annealing, and another without any hot-band annealing. EBSD study reveals that large columnar crystals with cube orientation are very difficult to deform and recrystallize uniformly. Resultant variations in ferrite grain structure and retention of cube-textured band in cold-rolled and annealed sheet contribute to ridging behavior during stretch forming. Initial equiaxed grain structure is certainly beneficial to reduce or even eliminate ridging defect by producing uniform ferrite grain structure, free from any texture banding. Application of hot-band annealing treatment is also advantageous as it can maximize the evolution of beneficial gamma-fiber texture and eliminate the ridging defect in case of completely `equiaxed' starting structure. Such treatment reduces the severity of ridging even if the initial structure contains typically mixed `columnar-equiaxed' grains.

  18. An investigation on microstructure evolution and mechanical properties during transient liquid phase bonding of stainless steel 316L to Ti–6Al–4V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakipour, Shahrokh [Department of Materials Engineering, Tehran Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Halvaee, Ayoub; Amadeh, Ahmad Ali [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Samavatian, Majid, E-mail: m.samavatian@srbiau.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Tehran Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodabandeh, Alireza [Department of Materials Engineering, Tehran Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-25

    Highlights: • Transient liquid phase bonding of SS316L to Ti–6Al–4V was studied. • A vacuum furnace was used to prevent oxidation during the bonding process. • Diffusion of Fe, Cu and Ti at the interface led to formation of eutectic phases. • The maximum shear strength reached to 220 MPa for the bond with 50 μm thick interlayer at 900 °C. - Abstract: Transient liquid phase bonding mechanism of two dissimilar alloys stainless steel 316L and Ti–6Al–4V using pure Cu interlayer with different thicknesses was studied. In order to characterize the microstructure and compositional changes in the joint zone, scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction have been applied. Microhardness and shear strength tests have been performed to investigate mechanical properties of the joints. The results showed that there are various intermetallic compounds at the interface caused by interdiffusion of Ti, Fe and Cu across the joint zone. Furthermore, increasing the interlayer thickness led to incompletion of bonding process in 60 min. The maximum shear strength of 220 MPa has been attained for the bond made at 900 °C. With the rise in bonding temperature to 960 °C, a reduction in bond strength occurs attributed to increase in width of joint zone and formation of more brittle intermetallic compounds at the interface.

  19. Influences of Cr content and PWHT on microstructure and oxidation behavior of stainless steel weld overlay cladding materials in high temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, X.Y.; Ding, X.F. [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Lu, Y.H., E-mail: lu_yonghao@mater.ustb.edu.cn [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Zhu, P. [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute Co. Ltd., 1788 Xihuan Road, 215004 Suzhou (China); Shoji, T. [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, 6-6-01 Aramaki Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai City 980-8579 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Influences of Cr content and post weld heat treatment (PWHT) on microstructure and oxidation behavior of stainless steel cladding materials in high temperature water were investigated. The amounts of metal oxidized and dissolved were estimated to compare the oxidation behaviors of cladding materials with different Cr contents and PWHT. The results indicated that higher Cr content led to formation of more ferrite content, and carbides were found along δ/γ phase interface after PWHT. Higher Cr content enhanced the pitting resistance and compactness of the oxide film to reduce metal amount oxidized and dissolved, which mitigated the weight changes and the formation of Fe-rich oxides. PWHT promoted more and deeper pitting holes along the δ/γ phase interface due to formation of carbides, which resulted in an increase in metal amount oxidized and dissolved, and were also responsible for more Fe-rich oxides and higher weight changes. - Highlights: • The amounts of metal oxidized and metal dissolved were estimated. • Higher Cr content increased ferrite content and PWHT led to formation of carbides. • PWHT promoted more and deeper pitting holes along the δ/γ phase interface. • Lower Cr content and PWHT promoted the metal amounts oxidized and dissolved. • Lower Cr content and PWHT increased weight changes and Fe-rich film formation.

  20. An investigation on microstructure evolution and mechanical properties during transient liquid phase bonding of stainless steel 316L to Ti–6Al–4V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakipour, Shahrokh; Halvaee, Ayoub; Amadeh, Ahmad Ali; Samavatian, Majid; Khodabandeh, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Transient liquid phase bonding of SS316L to Ti–6Al–4V was studied. • A vacuum furnace was used to prevent oxidation during the bonding process. • Diffusion of Fe, Cu and Ti at the interface led to formation of eutectic phases. • The maximum shear strength reached to 220 MPa for the bond with 50 μm thick interlayer at 900 °C. - Abstract: Transient liquid phase bonding mechanism of two dissimilar alloys stainless steel 316L and Ti–6Al–4V using pure Cu interlayer with different thicknesses was studied. In order to characterize the microstructure and compositional changes in the joint zone, scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction have been applied. Microhardness and shear strength tests have been performed to investigate mechanical properties of the joints. The results showed that there are various intermetallic compounds at the interface caused by interdiffusion of Ti, Fe and Cu across the joint zone. Furthermore, increasing the interlayer thickness led to incompletion of bonding process in 60 min. The maximum shear strength of 220 MPa has been attained for the bond made at 900 °C. With the rise in bonding temperature to 960 °C, a reduction in bond strength occurs attributed to increase in width of joint zone and formation of more brittle intermetallic compounds at the interface

  1. Segregation effects in welded stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, J.I.; Shoaid, K.A.; Ahmed, M.; Malik, A.Q.

    1987-01-01

    Welding of steels causes changes in the microstructure and chemical composition which could adversely affect the mechanical and corrosion properties. The report describes the experimental results of an investigation of segregation effects in welded austenitic stainless steels of AISI type 304, 304L, 316 and 316L using the techniques of scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. Considerable enhancement of chromium and carbon has been observed in certain well-defined zones on the parent metal and on composition, particularly in the parent metal, in attributed to the formation of (M 23 C 6 ) precipitates. The formation of geometrically well-defined segregation zones is explained on the basis of the time-temperature-precipitation curve of (M 23 C 6 ). (author)

  2. Deformation induced martensitic transformation in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, E.; Mertinger, V.; Tranta, F.; Solyom, J.

    2003-01-01

    Deformation induced martensitic transformation was investigated in metastable austenitic stainless steel. This steel can present a microstructure of austenite (γ), α' martensite and non magnetic ε martensite. Uni-axial tensile test was used for loading at different temperatures below room temperature (from -120 to 20 deg. C). During the deformation the transformation takes place at certain places in an anisotropic way and texture also develops. Quantitative phase analysis was done by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetic methods while the texture was described by X-ray diffraction using a special inverse pole figure. The quantitative phase analysis has shown that the formation of α' and ε martensite from austenite is the function of deformation rate, and deformation temperature. The transformation of the textured austenite takes place in an anisotropic way and a well defined crystallographic relationship between the parent and α' martensite phase has been measured

  3. Effects of the Cooling Rate After Annealing Treatment on the Microstructure and the Mechanical Properties of Super-Duplex Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Gi-Hyoun; Park, Yong-Ho; Na, Young-Sang; Yoo, Wee-Do; Lee, Jong-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of the cooling rate after heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 2507 duplex stainless steels. Heat treatment was carried out at 1050°C for 1 hr, followed by controlled cooling. The cooling rates were 175.6 × 10 - 3°C/s, 47.8 × 10 - 3°C/s, 33.3 × 10 - 3°C/s, 16.7 × 10 - 3°C/s, 11.7 × 10 - 3°C/s, 5.8 × 10 - 3°C/s and 2.8 × 10 - 3°C/s, which resulted in variations of the microstructure, such as the fractional change of the ferrite phase and sigma phase formation. Fatigue, hardness, impact and tensile tests were performed on the specimens with different cooling rates. The precipitation of the σ phase caused a hardness increase and a sharp decrease of toughness and tensile elongation. The fatigue limit of the sample with a cooling rate of 5.8 × 10 - 3°C/s was 26 MPa higher than that of the sample with a cooling rate of 175.6 × 10 - 3°C/s. Our observations of the fracture surface confirmed that the higher fatigue resistance of the specimen with a cooling rate of 5.8 × 10 - 3°C/s was caused by the delay of the fatigue crack growth, in addition to higher yield strength.

  4. Effects of the Cooling Rate After Annealing Treatment on the Microstructure and the Mechanical Properties of Super-Duplex Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Gi-Hyoun; Park, Yong-Ho [Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Na, Young-Sang; Yoo, Wee-Do; Lee, Jong-Hoon [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of the cooling rate after heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 2507 duplex stainless steels. Heat treatment was carried out at 1050°C for 1 hr, followed by controlled cooling. The cooling rates were 175.6 × 10{sup -}3°C/s, 47.8 × 10{sup -}3°C/s, 33.3 × 10{sup -}3°C/s, 16.7 × 10{sup -}3°C/s, 11.7 × 10{sup -}3°C/s, 5.8 × 10{sup -}3°C/s and 2.8 × 10{sup -}3°C/s, which resulted in variations of the microstructure, such as the fractional change of the ferrite phase and sigma phase formation. Fatigue, hardness, impact and tensile tests were performed on the specimens with different cooling rates. The precipitation of the σ phase caused a hardness increase and a sharp decrease of toughness and tensile elongation. The fatigue limit of the sample with a cooling rate of 5.8 × 10{sup -}3°C/s was 26 MPa higher than that of the sample with a cooling rate of 175.6 × 10{sup -}3°C/s. Our observations of the fracture surface confirmed that the higher fatigue resistance of the specimen with a cooling rate of 5.8 × 10{sup -}3°C/s was caused by the delay of the fatigue crack growth, in addition to higher yield strength.

  5. Mechanical Behavior of Additive Manufactured Layered Materials, Part 2: Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-30

    materials. Elsevier, Oxford; 2007: 416 -420. [19] Deng, D., Chen, R., Sun, Q. and Li, X. Microstructural study of 17-4PH stainless steel after plasma...1 Mechanical Behavior of Additive Manufactured Layered Materials, Part 2: Stainless Steels * Todd M. Mower † and Michael J. Long M.I.T. Lincoln... stainless steel alloys produced with Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) was measured and is compared to that of similar conventional materials

  6. Aspects of plasma cutting in AISI 321 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Barros, I. de; Cardoso, P.E.

    1985-10-01

    The utilization of plasma cutting process in AISI 321 stainless steel heavy plates for fabricating nozzles for nuclear reactors was evaluated. The effect of current, electric potential and cutting speed are studied. The superficial irregularity and the microstructure of the zone affected by the cut were analyzed by measurements of roughness, optical metallography and microhardness. (E.G.) [pt

  7. Microstructural evolution at the overlap zones of 12Cr martensitic stainless steel laser alloyed with TiC

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adebiyi, DI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple track laser alloying is characterised by additional heat treatment and differences in the amount of powder deposited at the overlap regions. These result in different microstructural and phase evolution at these regions, which...

  8. Influence of helium injection schedule and prior thermomechanical treatment on the microstructure of ion-irradiated type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohyama, A.; Ayrault, G.; Loomis, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the evolution of the microstructure in first wall materials during irradiation with special emphasis on the effects of helium production, displacement damage rates and temperature

  9. Liquid Phase Sintering of Highly Alloyed Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Troels

    1996-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering of stainless steel is usually applied to improve corrosion resistance by obtaining a material without an open pore system. The dense structure normally also give a higher strength when compared to conventional sintered steel. Liquid phase sintrering based on addition...... of boride to AISI 316L type steels have previously been studied, but were found to be sensitive to intergranular corrosion due to formation of intermetallic phases rich in chromium and molybdenum. In order to improve this system further, new investigations have focused on the use of higher alloyed stainless...... steel as base material. The stainless base powders were added different amounts and types of boride and sintered in hydrogen at different temperatures and times in a laboratory furnace. During sintering the outlet gas was analyzed and subsequently related to the obtained microstructure. Thermodynamic...

  10. Microstructural characterization of primary coolant pipe steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.K.; Bentley, J.

    1986-01-01

    Atom probe field-ion microscopy, analytical electron microscopy, and optical microscopy have been used to investigate the changes that occur in the microstructure of cast CF 8 primary coolant pipe stainless steel after long term thermal aging. The cast duplex microstructure consisted of austenite with 15% delta-ferrite. Investigation of the aged material revealed that the ferrite spinodally decomposed into a fine scaled network of α and α'. A fine G-phase precipitate was also observed in the ferrite. The observed degradation in mechanical properties is probably a consequence of the spinodal decomposition in the ferrite

  11. Antimicrobial Cu-bearing stainless steel scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qiang; Ren, Ling; Li, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Shuyuan; Sercombe, Timothy B.; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Copper-bearing stainless steel scaffolds with two different structures (Body Centered Cubic and Gyroid labyrinth) at two solid fractions (25% and 40%) were fabricated from both 316L powder and a mixture of 316L and elemental Cu powder using selective laser melting, and relative 316L scaffolds were served as control group. After processing, the antimicrobial testing demonstrated that the 316L-Cu scaffolds presented excellent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and the cell viability assay indicated that there was no cytotoxic effect of 316L-Cu scaffolds on rat marrow mesenchymal stem cells. As such, these have the potential to reduce implant-associated infections. The Cu was also found to homogeneously distribute within the microstructure by scanning electronic microcopy. The addition of Cu would not significantly affect its strength and stiffness compared to 316L scaffold, and the stiffness of all the scaffolds (3-20GPa) is similar to that of bone and much less than that of bulk stainless steel. Consequently, fabrication of such low stiffness porous structures, especially coupled with the addition of antimicrobial Cu, may provide a new direction for medical stainless steels. - Highlights: • 316L-Cu scaffolds were fabricated by using selective laser melting (SLM). • 316L-Cu scaffolds showed satisfied antimicrobial activities. • 316L-Cu scaffolds have no cytotoxic effect on normal cells. • Other properties of 316L-Cu scaffolds were similar to 316L scaffolds. • 316L-Cu scaffolds have the potential to be used in orthopedic applications.

  12. Antimicrobial Cu-bearing stainless steel scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiang, E-mail: mfqwang@163.com [School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110002 (China); Ren, Ling [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Li, Xiaopeng [School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, The University of Western Australia (Australia); Zhang, Shuyuan [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Sercombe, Timothy B., E-mail: tim.sercombe@uwa.edu.au [School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, The University of Western Australia (Australia); Yang, Ke, E-mail: kyang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2016-11-01

    Copper-bearing stainless steel scaffolds with two different structures (Body Centered Cubic and Gyroid labyrinth) at two solid fractions (25% and 40%) were fabricated from both 316L powder and a mixture of 316L and elemental Cu powder using selective laser melting, and relative 316L scaffolds were served as control group. After processing, the antimicrobial testing demonstrated that the 316L-Cu scaffolds presented excellent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and the cell viability assay indicated that there was no cytotoxic effect of 316L-Cu scaffolds on rat marrow mesenchymal stem cells. As such, these have the potential to reduce implant-associated infections. The Cu was also found to homogeneously distribute within the microstructure by scanning electronic microcopy. The addition of Cu would not significantly affect its strength and stiffness compared to 316L scaffold, and the stiffness of all the scaffolds (3-20GPa) is similar to that of bone and much less than that of bulk stainless steel. Consequently, fabrication of such low stiffness porous structures, especially coupled with the addition of antimicrobial Cu, may provide a new direction for medical stainless steels. - Highlights: • 316L-Cu scaffolds were fabricated by using selective laser melting (SLM). • 316L-Cu scaffolds showed satisfied antimicrobial activities. • 316L-Cu scaffolds have no cytotoxic effect on normal cells. • Other properties of 316L-Cu scaffolds were similar to 316L scaffolds. • 316L-Cu scaffolds have the potential to be used in orthopedic applications.

  13. Spectrographic analysis of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabato, S.F.; Lordello, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Two spectrogaphyic solution techniques, 'Porous Cup' and 'Vacuum Cup', were investigated in order to determine the minor constituents (Cr, Ni, Mo, Mn, Cu and V) of stainless steels. Iron and cobalt were experimented as internal standards. The precision varied from 4 to 11% for both spectrographic techniques, in which cobalt was used as international standard. Certified standards from National Bureau of Standards and Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas were analysed to verify the accuracy of both techniques. The best accuracy was obtained with the Vacuum Cup techniques. (Author) [pt

  14. Failures on stainless steel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenninen, H.

    1994-01-01

    Economic losses due to failure mainly by corrosion in process and nuclear industries are considered. In these industries the characteristics of different forms of corrosion and their economic effects are fairly well known and, especially, in nuclear industry the assessment of corrosion related costs has been comprehensive. In both industries the economic losses resulting from environmentally enhanced cracking of stainless steel components and the accompanying failures and outages have been considerable, owing as much to the frequency as the unpredictability of such occurrences. (orig.)

  15. Resistance Element Welding of Magnesium Alloy/austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manladan, S. M.; Yusof, F.; Ramesh, S.; Zhang, Y.; Luo, Z.; Ling, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Multi-material design is increasingly applied in the automotive and aerospace industries to reduce weight, improve crash-worthiness, and reduce environmental pollution. In the present study, a novel variant of resistance spot welding technique, known as resistance element welding was used to join AZ31 Mg alloy to 316 L austenitic stainless steel. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints were evaluated. It was found that the nugget consisted of two zones, including a peripheral fusion zone on the stainless steel side and the main fusion zone. The tensile shear properties of the joints are superior to those obtained by traditional resistance spot welding.

  16. Intergranular stress corrosion in soldered joints of stainless steel 304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamora R, L.

    1994-01-01

    The intergranular stress cracking of welded joints of austenitic stainless steel, AISI 304, is a serious problem in BWR type reactors. It is associated with the simultaneous presence of three factors; stress, a critical media and sensibilization (DOS). EPR technique was used in order to verify the sensibilization degree in the base metal, and the zone affected by heat and welding material. The characterization of material was done. The objective of this work is the study of microstructure and the evaluation of EPR technique used for the determination of DOS in a welded plate of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304. (Author)

  17. Stainless steel fabrications: past and present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, R.

    1986-01-01

    The paper deals with stainless steel fabrications of Fairey Engineering Company for the nuclear industry. The manufacture of stainless steel containers for Magnox and Advanced Gas Cooled Reactors, flexible fabrication facility, and welding development, are all briefly described. (U.K.)

  18. Microstructural evolution at the overlap zones of 12Cr martensitic stainless steel laser alloyed with TiC

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adebiyi, DI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available are not obtainable in the single tracks. X12CrNiMo steel has been laser alloyed with TiC using a 4.4 kW continuous wave (CW) Nd:YAG laser. The process parameters were first optimised after which they were kept constant for overlap ratios of 50% and 75%. The depths...

  19. Microstructure and mechanical properties of a Ti-microalloyed low-carbon stainless steel treated by quenching-partitioning-tempering process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, S.T., E-mail: xst-2007@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Liu, Z.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Wang, Z. [Research Institute, Baoshan Iron & Steel Co. Ltd., Shanghai 201900 (China); Wang, G.D. [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) process was used to treat a Ti-microalloyed low-carbon stainless steel after cold rolling. In addition to martensite, ferrite and retained austenite, TiN, coarse TiC, fine TiC, (Fe,Cr){sub 3}C and ultra-fine TiC precipitates were formed after the Q-P-T treatment. Based on field emission-scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations, thermodynamic, crystallographic and statistical analyses were used to reveal the precipitation behaviors of these particles. The effects of partitioning-tempering (P-T) temperature and time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Q-P-T treated specimens were specially studied. The coarsening and spheroidization of (Fe,Cr){sub 3}C particles during P-T stage were obviously retarded by large Cr addition. The retained austenite was obtained significantly with appropriate P-T parameters. The precipitation of ultra-fine TiC particles in the martensite during the P-T stage at 500 °C induced a secondary hardening. - Highlights: • Some fine TiC with 30–70 nm precipitated in austenite during partial austenization. • A part of fine TiC had K-S OR with martensite after Q-P-T treatment. • A part of fine TiC had a OR specially deviating from K-S OR with martensite. • Coarsening and spheroidization of (Fe,Cr){sub 3}C were retarded during P-T stage. • Ultra-fine TiC with < 10 nm precipitated in martensite during P-T stage at 500 °C.

  20. Microstructure Characterization and Hardness Evaluation of Alloy 52 Welded Stainless Steel 316 Subjected to Ultrasonic Nanocyrtal Surface Modification Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. D.; Amanov, A.; Pyun, Y. S. [Sun Moon Univ., Asan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. S.; Choi, Y. S. [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, an ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM) technique was applied to dissimilar weld point between STS316L and Alloy 52. This UNSM technique is a patented technology, which can be described as a type of ultrasonic cold-forging technology. It has been demonstrated that the UNSM technique is a simple method to produce a nanocrystalline surface layer at the top surface of metallic materials. Microstructure and hardness of STS316L and Alloy 52 are investigated before and after UNSM treatment. It is expected according to the previous study that the UNSM technique is able to release the residual stress which delays PWSCC. In this study, microstructural characterization and hardness evaluation of STS316L and welded Alloy 52 subjected to UNSM technique were investigated.

  1. Niobium stainless steel for implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollo, J.M.D.A.

    1983-01-01

    The materials that have often been used, during the last two or three decades, to carry out materials for implants are made according to the specifications: a)A.S.T.M. (F.55-76, F.56-76, F.138-76, F.139-76) stainless steel b)A.S.T.M. (F.75-76), cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys. c)A.S.T.M. (F.90-76), cobalt-chromium-tungsten-nickel alloys. d)A.S.T.M. (F.67-77), unalloyed titanium. e)A.S.T.M. (F.136-70), titanium alloys. It was the purpose of retaking them, toverify the niobium influence as alloy element in ANSI/ASTM F.55-76 classification stainless steels, usually for these materials elaboration. The problem by substituting molybdenum total or partially for niobium, by comparing the mechanical and corrosion properties, and biocompatibility is presented, by pointing out the variables of these substitutions, when we employ this new material to perform materials for implants. (Author) [pt

  2. Radiation blistering of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Naritsugu; Tanabe, Tetsuo; Imoto, Shosuke

    1980-01-01

    Surface blistering of stainless steels due to 20 keV He + ion bombardment has been investigated by examination of surface topography with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an optical microscope. Blisters of 0.1 to 2 μm in diameter are observed in all samples irradiated with fluence of about 1 x 10 18 He + /cm 2 at any temperature between -80 0 C and 500 0 C. With increasing the fluence blister covers are ruptured and exfoliated and finally the surface becomes rough surface without traces of blister formation. The surface effect is severer at 500 0 C than at 100 0 C irradiation. Also in double-phase stainless steel DP-3, similar surface topography to 316 SS is observed. But by the difference of the erosion rate by sputtering of the surface between α-phase and γ-phase, a striped pattern appears in DP-3 with heavy irradiation of about 2 x 10 19 He + /cm 2 . (author)

  3. Hydrogenation of stainless steels implanted with nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Ramos, L.E. da.

    1989-01-01

    In the present work the effects of both ion implantation and hydrogenation on the fatigue behaviour of an AISI-304 type unstable stainless steel was studied. The material was tested under the following microstructural conditions: annealed; annealed plus hydrogenated; annealed plus ion-implanted; annealed, ion-implanted and hydrogeneted. The hydrogen induced phase transformations were also studied during the outgassing of the samples. The ion implanted was observed to retard the kinetics of the hydrogen induced phase transformations. It was also observed that the nitrogen ion implantation followed by both natural (for about 4 months) and artificial (100 0 C for 6 hours) aging treatments was beneficial to the fatigue life of both non hydrogenated and severely hydrogenated samples. (author) [pt

  4. Effect of Microstructure on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviour of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel Gas Tungsten Arc Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    Present work is aimed to improve stress corrosion cracking resistance of high nitrogen steel and its welds. An attempt to weld high nitrogen steel of 5 mm thick plate using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with three high strength age hardenable fillers i.e., 11-10 PH filler, PH 13- 8Mo and maraging grade of MDN 250 filler is made. Welds were characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Vickers hardness testing of the welds was carried out to study the mechanical behaviour of welds. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were done to determine pitting corrosion resistance in aerated 3.5% NaCl solution. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) testing was carried out using constant load type machine with applied stress of 50% yield strength and in 45% MgCl2 solution boiling at 155°C. The results of the present investigation established that improvement in resistance to stress corrosion cracking was observed for PH 13- 8Mo GTA welds when compared to 11-10 PH and MDN 250 GTA welds. However, All GTA welds failed in the weld interface region. This may be attributed to relatively lower pitting potential in weld interface which acts as active site and the initiation source of pitting.

  5. Phase transformations evaluation on a UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel based on nondestructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo Silva, Edgard de; Costa de Albuquerque, Victor Hugo; Pereira Leite, Josinaldo; Gomes Varela, Antonio Carlos; Pinho de Moura, Elineudo; Tavares, Joao Manuel R.S.

    2009-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel presents special mechanical properties such as, for example, mechanical and corrosion strength, becoming competitive in relation to the other types of stainless steel. One of the great problems of duplex stainless steel microstructural changes study is related to embrittlement above 300 deg. C, with the precipitation of the α' phase occurring over the ferritic microstructure. Aiming to characterise embrittlement of duplex stainless steel, hardening kinetics, from 425 to 475 deg. C, was analysed through the speed of sound, Charpy impact energy, X-ray diffraction, hardness and microscopy parameters. The presence of two hardening stages, detected through the speed of sound, was observed, one being of brittle characteristic and the other ductile. Moreover, the speed of sound showed a direct correlation with the material's hardness. Thus, it is concluded that the speed of sound is a promising nondestructive parameter to follow-up embrittlement in duplex stainless steel.

  6. Phase transformations evaluation on a UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel based on nondestructive testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo Silva, Edgard de, E-mail: edgard@cefetpb.edu.br [Centro federal de Educacao Tecnologica da Paraiba (CEFET PB), Area da Industria, Avenida 1o de Maio, 720 - 58015-430 - Joao Pessoa/PB (Brazil); Costa de Albuquerque, Victor Hugo, E-mail: victor.albuquerque@fe.up.pt [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica (DEM), Cidade Universitaria, S/N - 58059-900 - Joao Pessoa/PB (Brazil); Pereira Leite, Josinaldo, E-mail: josinaldo@ct.ufpb.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica (DEM), Cidade Universitaria, S/N - 58059-900 - Joao Pessoa/PB (Brazil); Gomes Varela, Antonio Carlos, E-mail: varela@cefetpb.edu.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica (DEM), Cidade Universitaria, S/N - 58059-900 - Joao Pessoa/PB (Brazil); Pinho de Moura, Elineudo, E-mail: elineudo@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais, Campus do Pici, Bloco 715, 60455-760 - Fortaleza/CE (Brazil); Tavares, Joao Manuel R.S., E-mail: tavares@fe.up.pt [Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto (FEUP), Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica e Gestao Industrial (DEMEGI)/Instituto de Engenharia Mecanica e Gestao Industrial - INEGI, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2009-08-15

    Duplex stainless steel presents special mechanical properties such as, for example, mechanical and corrosion strength, becoming competitive in relation to the other types of stainless steel. One of the great problems of duplex stainless steel microstructural changes study is related to embrittlement above 300 deg. C, with the precipitation of the {alpha}' phase occurring over the ferritic microstructure. Aiming to characterise embrittlement of duplex stainless steel, hardening kinetics, from 425 to 475 deg. C, was analysed through the speed of sound, Charpy impact energy, X-ray diffraction, hardness and microscopy parameters. The presence of two hardening stages, detected through the speed of sound, was observed, one being of brittle characteristic and the other ductile. Moreover, the speed of sound showed a direct correlation with the material's hardness. Thus, it is concluded that the speed of sound is a promising nondestructive parameter to follow-up embrittlement in duplex stainless steel.

  7. Aging of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1984-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. The existing data are evaluated to determine the expected embrittlement of cast components during the operating lifetime of reactors and to define the objectives and scope of the investigation. This presentation describes the status of the program. Data for the metallurgical characterization of the various cast stainless steels used in the investigation are presented. Charpy impact tests on short-term aged material indicate that CF-3 stainless steels are less susceptible to embrittlement than CF-8 or CF-8M stainless steels. Microstructural characterization of cast stainless steels that were obtained from Georg Fischer Co. and aged for up to 70,000 h at 300, 350, and 400 0 C reveals the formation of four different types of precipitates that are not α'. Embrittlement of the ferrite phase is primarily due to pinning of the dislocations by two of these precipitates, designated as Type M and Type X. The ferrite phase is embrittled after approx. 8 y at 300 0 C and shows cleavage fracture. Examination of the fracture surfaces of the impact-test specimens indicates that the toughness of the long-term aged material is determined by the austenite phase. 8 figures, 3 tables

  8. Development of new high-performance stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Soo

    2002-01-01

    This paper focused on high-performance stainless steels and their development status. Effect of nitrogen addition on super-stainless steel was discussed. Research activities at Yonsei University, on austenitic and martensitic high-performance stainless, steels, and the next-generation duplex stainless steels were introduced

  9. On phase equilibria in duplex stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessman, S. [Swerea KIMAB AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Pettersson, R. [Outokumpu Stainless AB, Avesta Research Centre, Avesta (Sweden); Hertzman, S. [Outokumpu Stainless Research Foundation, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-05-15

    The equilibrium conditions of four duplex stainless steels; Fe-23Cr-4.5Ni-0.1N, Fe-22Cr-5.5Ni-3Mo-0.17N, Fe-25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-0.27N and Fe-25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-1W-1.5Cu-0.27N were studied in the temperature region from 700 to 1000 C. Phase compositions were determined with SEM EDS and the phase fractions using image analysis on backscattered SEM images. The results showed that below 1000 C the steels develop an inverse duplex structure with austenite and sigma phase, of which the former is the matrix phase. With decreasing temperature, the microstructure will be more and more complex and finely dispersed. The ferrite is, for the higher alloyed steels, only stable above 1000 C and at lower temperatures disappears in favour of intermetallic phases. The major intermetallic phase is sigma phase with small amounts of chi phase, the latter primarily in high Mo and W grades. Nitrides, not a focus in this investigation, were present as rounded particles and acicular precipitates at lower temperatures. The results were compared to theoretical predictions using the TCFE5 and TCFE6 databases. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of nitrogen-rich surface layers on AISI 304 stainless steel by rapid nitriding in a hollow cathode discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; He, Yongyong; Zhang, Shangzhou; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yijie

    2018-01-01

    Nitriding treatments have been successfully applied to austenitic stainless steels to improve their hardness and tribological properties. However, at temperatures above 450 °C, conventional plasma nitriding processes decrease the corrosion resistance due to the formation of CrN phases within the modified layer. In this work, AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels were efficiently treated by rapid plasma nitriding at a high temperature of 530 °C in a hollow cathode discharge. The enhanced ionization obtained in the hollow cathode configuration provided a high current density and, consequently, a high temperature could be attained in a short time. The nitrided layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicated that the dual-layer structure of the nitrided layer consists of a high-N face-centered cubic structure with a free CrN precipitate outer (top) layer and a nitrogen-expanded austenite S-phase bottom layer. The rapid nitriding-assisted hollow cathode discharge technique permits the use of high temperatures, as high as 530 °C, without promoting degradation in the corrosion resistance of stainless steel.

  11. Study of Stainless Steel Resistance in Conditions of Tribocorrosion Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Rozing

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Analyzed was the influence of tribocorrosion wear due to effects of fatty acids present in the processed medium. The analysis was conducted on samples made of two austenitic and two martensitic stainless steels. Austenitic steels were tested in their nitrided state and martensitic in their induction hardened state. Conducted were laboratory tests of corrosion resistance of samples, analysis of the microstructure and hardness. To see how the applied processes for modifying the surface of stainless steels behave in realistic conditions, it was conducted the examination of samples/parts of a sunflower cake chain conveyer. Based on the comparison of results obtained in the laboratory and in real conditions, it was estimated that steels AISI 420 and AISI 431 with induction hardened surfaces have a satisfactory resistance to abrasive-adhesive wear in the presence of fatty acids.

  12. Weld bonding of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, I. O.; Zhang, Wenqi; Goncalves, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    . The overall assessment of the weld bonding process is made using several commercial adhesives with varying working times under different surface conditions. The quality of the resulting joints is evaluated by means of macroetching observations, tension-shear tests and peel tests. The theoretical investigation......This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot-welding...... of the process consists of numerical predictions based on the commercial finite element program SORPAS with the purpose of establishing the most favourable parameters that allow spot-welding through the adhesives....

  13. Hydrogen damage in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen damage has been studied in a wide variety of stainless steels. Both internal and external hydrogen damage were evaluated by ductility or J-integral under rising tensile loads and by fractography. Analysis of the data has emphasized the potential effects of strain-induced martensite on hydrogen damage. Strain-induced martensite was neither necessary nor sufficient for hydrogen damage in the alloys studied. Neither ductility loss nor fracture-mode change correlated generally with martensite formation. Alloy composition, particularly nickel and nitrogen contents, was the primary factor in resistance to hydrogen damage. Thermomechanical processing, however, could alter the degree of hydrogen damage in an alloy and was critical for optimizing resistance to hydrogen damage. 10 figures, 10 tables

  14. Tritiated Water Interaction with Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-01-01

    Experiments conducted to study tritium permeation of stainless steel at ambient and elevated temperatures revealed that HT converts relatively quickly to HTO. Further, the HTO partial pressure contributes essentially equally with elemental tritium gas in driving permeation through the stainless steel. Such permeation appears to be due to dissociation of the water molecule on the hot stainless steel surface. There is an equilibrium concentration of HTO vapor above adsorbed gas on the walls of the experimental apparatus evident from freezing transients. The uptake process of tritium from the carrier gas involves both surface adsorption and isotopic exchange with surface bound water

  15. Special stainless steels for sea water service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomaselli, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    Very exacting demands are made on the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of materials which in their service come into contact with seawater, and in many cases simultaneously with corrosive process solutions. The demand for higher alloy stainless steels for seawater application is rising in pace with the increasing requirements for safety and operation economy. The corrosion conditions in seawater and the resistance of stainless steels in this medium will be dealt with in the following. Sanicro 28 will then be compared with stainless steels, types AISI 304, 316 and 317, as well as with Alloy 20, Alloy 825 and SANDVIK 2RK65. (Author) [pt

  16. Correlation of radiation-induced changes in microstructure/microchemistry, density and thermo-electric power of type 304L and 316 stainless steels irradiated in the Phénix reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renault Laborne, Alexandra, E-mail: alexandra.renault@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, SRMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gavoille, Pierre [CEA, DEN, SEMI, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Malaplate, Joël [CEA, DEN, SRMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Pokor, Cédric [EDF R& D, MMC, Site des Renardières, F-77818 Morêt-sur-Loing cedex (France); Tanguy, Benoît [CEA, DEN, SEMI, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-05-15

    Annealed specimens of type 304L and 316 stainless steel and cold-worked 316 specimens were irradiated in the Phénix reactor in the temperature range 381–394 °C and to different damage doses up to 39 dpa. The microstructure and microchemistry of both 304L and 316 have been examined using the combination of the different techniques of TEM to establish the void swelling and precipitation behavior under neutron irradiation. TEM observations are compared with results of measurements of immersion density and thermo-electric power obtained on the same irradiated stainless steels. The similarities and differences in their behavior on different scales are used to understand the factors in terms of the chemical composition and metallurgical state of steels, affecting the precipitation under irradiation and the swelling behavior. Irradiation induces the formation of some precipitate phases (e.g., M{sub 6}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6}-type carbides, and γ’- and G-phases), Frank loops and cavities. According to the metallurgical state and chemical composition of the steel, the amount of each type of radiation-induced defects is not the same, affecting their density and thermo-electric power.

  17. Correlation of radiation-induced changes in microstructure/microchemistry, density and thermo-electric power of type 304L and 316 stainless steels irradiated in the Phénix reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault Laborne, Alexandra; Gavoille, Pierre; Malaplate, Joël; Pokor, Cédric; Tanguy, Benoît

    2015-05-01

    Annealed specimens of type 304L and 316 stainless steel and cold-worked 316 specimens were irradiated in the Phénix reactor in the temperature range 381-394 °C and to different damage doses up to 39 dpa. The microstructure and microchemistry of both 304L and 316 have been examined using the combination of the different techniques of TEM to establish the void swelling and precipitation behavior under neutron irradiation. TEM observations are compared with results of measurements of immersion density and thermo-electric power obtained on the same irradiated stainless steels. The similarities and differences in their behavior on different scales are used to understand the factors in terms of the chemical composition and metallurgical state of steels, affecting the precipitation under irradiation and the swelling behavior. Irradiation induces the formation of some precipitate phases (e.g., M6C and M23C6-type carbides, and γ'- and G-phases), Frank loops and cavities. According to the metallurgical state and chemical composition of the steel, the amount of each type of radiation-induced defects is not the same, affecting their density and thermo-electric power.

  18. Correlation of radiation-induced changes in microstructure/microchemistry, density and thermo-electric power of type 304L and 316 stainless steels irradiated in the Phénix reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renault Laborne, Alexandra; Gavoille, Pierre; Malaplate, Joël; Pokor, Cédric; Tanguy, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Annealed specimens of type 304L and 316 stainless steel and cold-worked 316 specimens were irradiated in the Phénix reactor in the temperature range 381–394 °C and to different damage doses up to 39 dpa. The microstructure and microchemistry of both 304L and 316 have been examined using the combination of the different techniques of TEM to establish the void swelling and precipitation behavior under neutron irradiation. TEM observations are compared with results of measurements of immersion density and thermo-electric power obtained on the same irradiated stainless steels. The similarities and differences in their behavior on different scales are used to understand the factors in terms of the chemical composition and metallurgical state of steels, affecting the precipitation under irradiation and the swelling behavior. Irradiation induces the formation of some precipitate phases (e.g., M 6 C and M 23 C 6 -type carbides, and γ’- and G-phases), Frank loops and cavities. According to the metallurgical state and chemical composition of the steel, the amount of each type of radiation-induced defects is not the same, affecting their density and thermo-electric power

  19. Microstructural evolution of austenitic stainless steels irradiated to 17 dpa in spectrally tailored experiment of the ORR and HFIR at 400{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakai, E.; Hashimoto, N.; Gibson, L.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The microstructural evolution of austenitic JPCA aged and solution annealed JPCA, 316R, C, K, and HP steels irradiated at 400{degrees}C in spectrally tailored experiments of the ORR and HFIR has been investigated. The helium generation rates were about 12-16 appm He/dpa on the average up to 17.3 dpa. The number densities and average diameters of dislocation loops in the steels have ranges of 3.3 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -3} and 15.2-26.3 nm, respectively, except for HP steel for which they are 1.1 x 10{sup 23} m{sup -3} and 8.0 nm. Precipitates are formed in all steels except for HP steel, and the number densities and average diameters have ranges of 5.2 x 10{sup 20} - 7.7 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -3} and 3.4- 19.3 nm, respectively. In the 216R, C, and K steels, the precipitates are also formed at grain boundaries, and the mean sizes of these are about 110, 50, and 50 nm, respectively. The number densities of cavities are about 1 x 10{sup 22} m{sup -3} in all the steels. The swelling is low in the steels which form the precipitates.

  20. Current status of stainless steel industry and development of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Deuk; Lee, Chan Soo; Kim Kwang Tae

    2000-01-01

    Stainless steel is not only clean and smooth in its surface, but also it is superior in quality in terms of corrosion resistance and strength. So that, it is widely in use in the field of construction, chemical installations, and other industries. Growth of stainless steel industry started since the steel technology was developed for mass production in 1960s. Since then stainless steel industry grew rapidly on account of diversified development in this field and growth rate went up to 5.8% per year comparable to 2.3% of steel growth. The rapid growth is attributed to significant industry developments in Europe and Japan in the years of 1970s and 1980s. In addition to these the expansion of stainless steel industry in Korea and Taiwan. Presently Korea produces about 120,000 tons of stainless steel and occupies about 8% of international market. This means Korea become the second largest single country in world in stainless steel production. Moreover Korea is to reinforce its domestic production line by affiliating production companies, increasing of production capability, and specializing in types of stainless steel. This paper is to describe activity of material development, and types of stainless steel for industry use. (Hong, J. S.)

  1. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel: status and program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Ayrault, G.

    1983-10-01

    A program has been initiated to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. The existing data are reviewed to determine the critical parameters that control the aging behavior and to define the objectives and scope of the investigation. The test matrices for microstructural studies and mechanical property measurements are presented. The initial experimental effort is focussed on characterizing the microstructure of long-term, low-temperature aged material. Specimens from three heats of cast CF-8 and CF-8M stainless steel aged for up to 70,000 h at 300, 350, and 400 0 C were obtained from George Fisher Ltd., of Switzerland. Initial analyses reveal the formation of three different types of precipitates which are not α'. An FCC phase, similar to the M 23 C 6 precipitates, was present in all the long-term aged material. 15 references, 10 figures, 2 tables

  2. Material property changes of stainless steels under PWR irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuya, Koji; Nishioka, Hiromasa; Fujii, Katsuhiko; Kamaya, Masayuki; Miura, Terumitsu; Torimaru, Tadahiko

    2009-01-01

    Structural integrity of core structural materials is one of the key issues for long and safe operation of pressurized water reactors. The stainless steel components are exposed to neutron irradiation and high-temperature water, which cause significant property changes and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in some cases. Understanding of irradiation induced material property changes is essential to predict integrity of core components. In the present study, microstructure and microchemistry, mechanical properties, and IASCC behavior were examined in 316 stainless steels irradiated to 1 - 73 dpa in a PWR. Dose-dependent changes of dislocation loops and cavities, grain boundary segregation, tensile properties and fracture mode, deformation behavior, and their interrelation were discussed. Tensile properties and deformation behavior were well coincident with microstructural changes. IASCC susceptibility under slow strain rate tensile tests, IASCC initiation under constant load tests in simulated PWR primary water, and their relationship to material changes were discussed. (author)